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Sample records for saw-scaled vipers viperidae

  1. Differential procoagulant effects of saw-scaled viper (Serpentes: Viperidae: Echis) snake venoms on human plasma and the narrow taxonomic ranges of antivenom efficacies.

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    Rogalski, Aymeric; Soerensen, Christoffer; Op den Brouw, Bianca; Lister, Callum; Dashevsky, Daniel; Arbuckle, Kevin; Gloria, Alexandra; Zdenek, Christina N; Casewell, Nicholas R; Gutiérrez, José María; Wüster, Wolfgang; Ali, Syed A; Masci, Paul; Rowley, Paul; Frank, Nathaniel; Fry, Bryan G

    2017-10-05

    Saw-scaled vipers (genus Echis) are one of the leading causes of snakebite morbidity and mortality in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and vast regions of Asia, constituting a public health burden exceeding that of almost any other snake genus globally. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy, owing to the action of potent procoagulant toxins, is one of the most relevant clinical manifestations of envenomings by Echis spp. Clinical experience and prior studies examining a limited range of venoms and restricted antivenoms have demonstrated for some antivenoms an extreme lack of antivenom cross-reactivity between different species of this genus, sometimes resulting in catastrophic treatment failure. This study undertook the most comprehensive testing of Echis venom effects upon the coagulation of human plasma, and also the broadest examination of antivenom potency and cross-reactivity, to-date. 10 Echis species/populations and four antivenoms (two African, two Asian) were studied. The results indicate that the venoms are, in general, potently procoagulant but that the relative dependence on calcium or phospholipid cofactors is highly variable. Additionally, three out of the four antivenoms tested demonstrated only a very narrow taxonomic range of effectiveness in preventing coagulopathy, with only the SAIMR antivenom displaying significant levels of cross-reactivity. These results were in conflict with previous studies using prolonged preincubation of antivenom with venom to suggest effective cross-reactivity levels for the ICP Echi-Tab antivenom. These findings both inform upon potential clinical effects of envenomation in humans and highlight the extreme limitations of available treatment. It is hoped that this will spur efforts into the development of antivenoms with more comprehensive coverage for bites not only from wild snakes but also from specimens widely kept in zoological collections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A nesting of vipers: Phylogeny and historical biogeography of the Viperidae (Squamata: Serpentes).

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    Wüster, Wolfgang; Peppin, Lindsay; Pook, Catharine E; Walker, Daniel E

    2008-11-01

    Despite their medical interest, the phylogeny of the snake family Viperidae remains inadequately understood. Previous studies have generally focused either on the pitvipers (Crotalinae) or on the Old World vipers (Viperinae), but there has been no comprehensive molecular study of the Viperidae as a whole, leaving the affinities of key taxa unresolved. Here, we infer the phylogenetic relationships among the extant genera of the Viperidae from the sequences of four mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b, NADH subunit 4, 16S and 12S rRNA). The results confirm Azemiops as the sister group of the Crotalinae, whereas Causus is nested within the Viperinae, and thus not a basal viperid or viperine. Relationships among the major clades of Viperinae remain poorly resolved despite increased sequence information compared to previous studies. Bayesian molecular dating in conjunction with dispersal-vicariance analysis suggests an early Tertiary origin in Asia for the crown group Viperidae, and rejects suggestions of a relatively recent, early to mid-Tertiary origin of the Caenophidia.

  3. Cytotoxic activities of [Ser⁴⁹]phospholipase A₂ from the venom of the saw-scaled vipers Echis ocellatus, Echis pyramidum leakeyi, Echis carinatus sochureki, and Echis coloratus.

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    Conlon, J Michael; Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Hama; Mechkarska, Milena; Casewell, Nicholas R; Harrison, Robert A; Calvete, Juan J

    2013-09-01

    Fractionation by reversed-phase HPLC of venom from four species of saw-scaled viper: Echis ocellatus, Echis pyramidum leakeyi, Echis carinatus sochureki, and Echis coloratus led to identification in each sample of an abundant protein with cytotoxic activity against human non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The active component in each case was identified by MALDI-TOF mass fingerprinting of tryptic digests as [Ser⁴⁹]phospholipase A₂ ([Ser⁴⁹]PLA₂). An isoform of [Ser⁴⁹]PLA₂ containing the single Ala¹⁸→ Val substitution and a partially characterized [Asp⁴⁹]PLA₂ were also present in the E. coloratus venom. LC₅₀ values against A549 cells for the purified [Ser⁴⁹]PLA₂ proteins from the four species are in the range 2.9-8.5 μM. This range is not significantly different from the range of LC₅₀ values against human umbilical vein endothelial HUVEC cells (2.5-12.2 μM) indicating that the [Ser⁴⁹]PLA₂ proteins show no differential anti-tumor activity. The LC₅₀ value for [Ser⁴⁹]PLA₂ from E. ocellatus against human erythrocytes is >100 μM and the MIC values against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are >100 μM. It is suggested that the [Ser⁴⁹]PLA₂ proteins play a major role in producing local tissue necrosis and hemorrhage at the site of envenomation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. First observation on courtship behavior of short-tailed viper snake, Gloydius saxatilis (Squamata: Viperidae in Korea

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    Min Seock Do

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most reptile species have their own mating patterns. Therefore, courtship behaviors are important factors in understanding taxonomic features and species-specific breeding habits in the genus. This study explores the mating behaviors of the short-tailed viper snake (Gloydius saxatilis which has never been reported. From September 2012 to August 2013, we observed the courtship behaviors of short-tailed viper snakes in Chunma Mountain County Park, Namyangju City, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. In this study, 10 courtship behaviors from three snake couples were considered and compared. The results showed that, in general, most courtship behaviors of G. saxatilis were similar to those of other species of the family Viperidae. However, the most remarkable behavior of female short-tailed viper snakes was “quivering,” which had not yet been reported in females from the other species of the family Viperidae. These results can provide valuable information for research in systematics of short-tailed viper snakes. Keywords: behavior ecology, first report, Gloydius saxatilis, mating behavior, Viperidae

  5. Randomised controlled double-blind non-inferiority trial of two antivenoms for saw-scaled or carpet viper (Echis ocellatus envenoming in Nigeria.

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    Isa S Abubakar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In West Africa, envenoming by saw-scaled or carpet vipers (Echis ocellatus causes great morbidity and mortality, but there is a crisis in supply of effective and affordable antivenom (ISRCTN01257358. METHODS: In a randomised, double-blind, controlled, non-inferiority trial, "EchiTAb Plus-ICP" (ET-Plus equine antivenom made by Instituto Clodomiro Picado was compared to "EchiTAb G" (ET-G ovine antivenom made by MicroPharm, which is the standard of care in Nigeria and was developed from the original EchiTAb-Fab introduced in 1998. Both are caprylic acid purified whole IgG antivenoms. ET-G is monospecific for Echis ocellatus antivenom (initial dose 1 vial and ET-Plus is polyspecific for E. ocellatus, Naja nigricollis and Bitis arietans (initial dose 3 vials. Both had been screened by pre-clinical and preliminary clinical dose-finding and safety studies. Patients who presented with incoagulable blood, indicative of systemic envenoming by E. ocellatus, were recruited in Kaltungo, north-eastern Nigeria. Those eligible and consenting were randomly allocated with equal probability to receive ET-Plus or ET-G. The primary outcome was permanent restoration of blood coagulability 6 hours after the start of treatment, assessed by a simple whole blood clotting test repeated 6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 hr after treatment. Secondary (safety outcomes were the incidences of anaphylactic, pyrogenic and late serum sickness-type antivenom reactions. FINDINGS: Initial doses permanently restored blood coagulability at 6 hours in 161/194 (83.0% of ET-Plus and 156/206 (75.7% of ET-G treated patients (Relative Risk [RR] 1.10 one-sided 95% CI lower limit 1.01; P = 0.05. ET-Plus caused early reactions on more occasions than did ET-G [50/194 (25.8% and 39/206 (18.9% respectively RR (1.36 one-sided 95% CI 1.86 upper limit; P = 0.06. These reactions were classified as severe in 21 (10.8% and 11 (5.3% of patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: At these doses, ET-Plus was

  6. Comparative venom gland transcriptome surveys of the saw-scaled vipers (Viperidae: Echis) reveal substantial intra-family gene diversity and novel venom transcripts.

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    Casewell, Nicholas R; Harrison, Robert A; Wüster, Wolfgang; Wagstaff, Simon C

    2009-11-30

    Venom variation occurs at all taxonomical levels and can impact significantly upon the clinical manifestations and efficacy of antivenom therapy following snakebite. Variation in snake venom composition is thought to be subject to strong natural selection as a result of adaptation towards specific diets. Members of the medically important genus Echis exhibit considerable variation in venom composition, which has been demonstrated to co-evolve with evolutionary shifts in diet. We adopt a venom gland transcriptome approach in order to investigate the diversity of toxins in the genus and elucidate the mechanisms which result in prey-specific adaptations of venom composition. Venom gland transcriptomes were created for E. pyramidum leakeyi, E. coloratus and E. carinatus sochureki by sequencing approximately 1000 expressed sequence tags from venom gland cDNA libraries. A standardised methodology allowed a comprehensive intra-genus comparison of the venom gland profiles to be undertaken, including the previously described E. ocellatus transcriptome. Blast annotation revealed the presence of snake venom metalloproteinases, C-type lectins, group II phopholipases A2, serine proteases, L-amino oxidases and growth factors in all transcriptomes throughout the genus. Transcripts encoding disintegrins, cysteine-rich secretory proteins and hyaluronidases were obtained from at least one, but not all, species. A representative group of novel venom transcripts exhibiting similarity to lysosomal acid lipase were identified from the E. coloratus transcriptome, whilst novel metallopeptidases exhibiting similarity to neprilysin and dipeptidyl peptidase III were identified from E. p. leakeyi and E. coloratus respectively. The comparison of Echis venom gland transcriptomes revealed substantial intrageneric venom variation in representations and cluster numbers of the most abundant venom toxin families. The expression profiles of established toxin groups exhibit little obvious association with venom-related adaptations to diet described from this genus. We suggest therefore that alterations in isoform diversity or transcript expression levels within the major venom protein families are likely to be responsible for prey specificity, rather than differences in the representation of entire toxin families or the recruitment of novel toxin families, although the recruitment of lysosomal acid lipase as a response to vertebrate feeding cannot be excluded. Evidence of marked intrageneric venom variation within the medically important genus Echis strongly advocates further investigations into the medical significance of venom variation in this genus and its impact upon antivenom therapy.

  7. Individual Growth Rates of Nikolsky’s Viper, Vipera berus nikolskii (Squamata, Viperidae

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    Bondarenko Z. S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Capture-mark-recapture data was used to infer growth rates of the Nikolsky’s viper, Vipera berus nikolskii (Vedmederja, Grubant et Rudaeva, 1986, in the Eastern Ukraine. We have found that growth rate is negatively correlated with age. The difference in growth rates before maturation is not significant between different sexes. Growth rates decrease rapidly after maturation in males and females, however adult males retain significantly higher average growth rates. There is large dispersion of growth rates in the group of adult females, which is caused, probably, by alteration of complete arrest of growth in the years with reproduction and more intensive growth in the years without it. Asymptotic snout-ventral length estimated after Von Bertalanffy model was 680 mm in females and 630 mm in males. Females mature after fifth and males mature after fourth hibernation. The larger females in vipers can not be the result of higher growth rates in females, but are the outcome of a combination of other factors including different maturation time and size (older and being larger, and, perhaps, longer life span due to lower mortality. Growth rates of the Nikolsky’s viper in the nature are higher than in other species in the group of small Eurasian vipers.

  8. Choleoeimeria salaselensis sp. n. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the gall bladder of the horned viper Cerastes gasperettii (Serpentes: Viperidae) in Saudi Arabia.

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    Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Duszynski, Donald W

    2014-06-01

    Oocyst morphology and endogenous developmental stages are described for Choleoeimeria salaselensis sp. n. from the gall bladder of 10 horned vipers, Cerastes gasperettii Leviton and Anderson, in Saudi Arabia. Sporulated oocysts are ellipsoidal, 23 x 15 (22-25 x 14-17) microm, length/width ratio (L/W) 1.5 (1.4-1.6), each with 4 sporocysts (Eimeria-like), but lack a micropyle, polar granules and oocysts residuum. Sporocysts are ellipsoidal, 8 x 5 (7-9 x 5-) microm, L/W 1.5 (1.4-1.6), and Stieda, substieda and parasubstieda bodies are all absent, but a longitudinal suture, which divided the sporocysts into 2 plates, is present. Endogenous development is confined to epithelial cells in the bile duct and gall bladder; mature meronts were 11 x 7 microm, each with 10-16 merozoites, microgamonts were -12 microm wide, and macrogamonts were -16 microm wide with a prominent nucleus and wall-forming bodies. Given these two diagnostic features, sporocysts with a suture and composed of two plates and endogenous development limited to the biliary epithelium, we believe this coccidium is best classified as a member of Choleoeimeria Paperna et Landsberg, 1989. There are 5 known Eimeria species from vipers that have sporocysts somewhat similar in size to those of our new form, but all of them have much larger oocysts and larger sporocysts, some of which differ significantly in shape; there are not yet any Choleoeimeria species known from the Viperidae.

  9. Live-birth in vipers (Viperidae) is a key innovation and adaptation to global cooling during the Cenozoic.

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    Lynch, Vincent J

    2009-09-01

    The identification of adaptations and key innovations has long interested biologists because they confer on organisms the ability to exploit previously unavailable ecological resources and respond to novel selective pressures. Although it can be extremely difficult to test for the effects of a character on the rate of lineage diversification, the convergent evolution of a character in multiple lineages provides an excellent opportunity to test for the effect of that character on lineage diversification. Here, I examine the effect of parity mode on the diversification of vipers, which have independently evolved viviparity in at least 13 lineages. I find strong statistical evidence that viviparous species diversify at a greater rate than oviparous species and correlate major decreases in the diversification rate of oviparous species with periods of global cooling, such as the Oligocene. These results suggest that the evolution of viviparity buffered live-bearing species against the negative effects of global climate change during the Cenozoic, and was a key innovation in the evolution and diversification of live-bearing vipers.

  10. Data on the reproduction of a Caucasian Viper, Vipera kaznakovi Nikolsky, 1909 (Serpentes: Viperidae from Hopa (Northeastern Anatolia, Turkey

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    Bayram Göçmen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we report an observation of a Caucasian Viper, Vipera kaznakovi from Hopa (Artvin, Turkey giving birth. During our field studies, we captured a female Vipera kaznakovi on July 21, 2012 from Esenkıyı village, Hopa (Artvin, Turkey, it was brought to the laboratory and kept in a terrarium for a period until May 28, 2013. The female (SVL= 483 mm, total length, TL = 541 mm gave birth to eight young (mean SVL= 146 mm, mean TL= 161.4 mm, range= 155 – 172 mm; mean weight, W= 3.11 g, range= 2.6 – 3.4 g on August 11, 2012. In six and a half months, the juvenile snakes had reached 163 mm SVL, 187 mm TL and 5.1g W and increased their size by approximately 15%.

  11. Complex longitudinal diversification across South China and Vietnam in Stejneger's pit viper, Viridovipera stejnegeri (Schmidt, 1925) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae).

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    Guo, Peng; Liu, Qin; Zhu, Fei; Zhong, Guang H; Chen, Xin; Myers, Edward A; Che, Jing; Zhang, Liang; Ziegler, Thomas; Nguyen, Truong Q; Burbrink, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Viridovipera stejnegeri is one of the most common pit vipers in Asia, with a wide distribution in southern China and Vietnam. We investigated historical demography and explored how the environment and climatic factors have shaped genetic diversity and the evolutionary history of this venomous snake. A total of 171 samples from 47 localities were sequenced and analysed for two mitochondrial gene fragments and three nuclear genes. Gene trees reveal the existence of two well-supported clades (Southwest China and Southeast China) with seven distinct and strongly supported, geographically structured subclades within V. stejnegeri. Estimation of divergence time and ancestral area suggests that V. stejnegeri originated at ~6.0 Ma in the late Miocene on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau. The estimated date of origin and divergence of the island populations of Taiwan and Hainan closely matches the geological origin of the both islands. The mtDNA gene tree reveals the presence of west-east diversification in V. stejnegeri populations. Complex orogenesis and heterogeneous habitats, as well as climate-mediated habitat differentiation including glacial cycles, all have influenced population structure and the distribution of this taxon. The validity of V. stejnegeri chenbihuii is questionable, and this subspecies most probably represents an invalid taxon. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. When continents collide: phylogeny, historical biogeography and systematics of the medically important viper genus Echis (Squamata: Serpentes: Viperidae).

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    Pook, Catharine E; Joger, Ulrich; Stümpel, Nikolaus; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the phylogeny of the medically important and taxonomically unresolved viper genus Echis using four mitochondrial gene fragments. The results show that the populations of the genus fall into four main clades: the Echis carinatus, E. coloratus, E. ocellatus and E. pyramidum groups. The E. pyramidum and E. coloratus groups are sister taxa but the interrelationships of this clade and the E. ocellatus and E. carinatus groups are unresolved. The initial divergence of the genus appears to coincide with the collision between Afro-Arabia and Eurasia, and that between the E. coloratus and E. pyramidum clades appears to be associated with the opening of the Red Sea. Later land connections between Africa and Arabia may have contributed to shaping the distribution of the E. pyramidum complex. The present distribution of E. carinatus may be the result of range expansion from southern India. Taxonomically, our results provide molecular evidence for the validity of Echis omanensis, E. khosatzkii, E. borkini and E. jogeri, for the presence of unsuspected genetic diversity within the E. pyramidum complex in eastern Africa, and for the conspecificity of E. carinatus and E. multisquamatus. The status of E. leucogaster remains to be confirmed.

  13. Reproductive cycle of free-living male Saharan sand vipers, Cerastes vipera (Viperidae) in the Negev desert, Israel.

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    Sivan, Jaim; Kam, Michael; Hadad, Shlomo; Allan Degen, A; Rozenboim, Israel; Rosenstrauch, Avi

    2012-11-01

    The Saharan sand viper, Cerastes vipera (Linnaeus, 1758), is distributed in all Saharan countries, being confined to sand and dune systems. This relatively small snake, up to 35 cm, is nocturnal, is active from spring to autumn (April to October) and hibernates during the winter (November to March). We predicted that C. vipera would have peak plasma testosterone concentration at mating and that the vas deferens would contain abundant spermatozoa at that time. To test our predictions, we collected information on the time of mating and measured monthly testosterone concentration, testes size and testicular activity in free-living male C. vipera during its active period from April to October. Mating occurred only during spring. The pattern of plasma testosterone concentration, testes volume, seminiferous tubule diameter and spermatogenesis all followed the general pattern of high values in autumn and spring and low values in early summer. Our predictions were partially supported. There was a high plasma testosterone concentration at mating in spring and the vas deferens contained abundant spermatozoa, as predicted, but there was also a high plasma testosterone concentration in autumn without mating. We concluded that: (1) males are both aestival in that they produce spermatozoa in autumn, which they store over the winter hibernation period, and vernal in that they produce spermatozoa in spring prior to mating; (2) matings are associated with spermatogenesis; and (3) the high plasma testosterone concentration is concomitant with both matings and spermatogenesis in spring and with spermatogenesis in autumn. We propose that C. vipera has a single peak of testicular activity and plasma testosterone concentration which start in autumn and end in spring. We also propose that spermatogenesis is prior to spring mating and, consequently, is prenuptial. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative in-vivo toxicity of venoms from South Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Viperidae: Crotalinae: Hypnale).

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    Silva, Anjana; Gunawardena, Panduka; Weilgama, Danister; Maduwage, Kalana; Gawarammana, Indika

    2012-08-29

    Envenoming by south Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Genus: Hypnale) is a significant health issue in Sri Lanka and in peninsular India. Bites by these snakes frequently lead to local envenoming, coagulopathy and acute renal failure even resulting in death. Recently the genus was revised and the existence of three species viz H. hypnale, H. nepa and H. zara were recognized. There is, however, a paucity of information on the toxicity of the venoms of these species. Hence, we compared the toxic effects of the three Hypnale venoms using BALB/c mice. Intraperitoneal median lethal doses (LD50) for H. hypnale, H. zara and H. nepa venoms were 1.6, 6.0 and 9.5 μg protein/g respectively. Minimum haemorrhagic doses for venoms of H. hypnale, H. zara and H. nepa were 3.4, 11.0 and 16.6 μg protein/mouse respectively. The minimum necrotic doses for the same venoms were 15.0, 55.1 and 68.2 μg protein/mouse respectively. Severe congestion and petecheal haemorrhages were observed in lungs, kidneys, liver and the alimentary tract. Histopathogical examination of kidneys revealed proximal tubular cell injury and acute tubular necrosis with intact basement membrane indicating possible direct nephrotoxicity. Hypnale venoms caused pulmonary oedema, hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis, focal neuronal degeneration in brain and extramedullary haemopoiesis in spleen. H. hypnale venom caused all above histopathological alterations at lower doses compared to the other two. Hypnale venoms cause similar pathological changes with marked differences in the severity of the toxic effects in vivo. Therefore, differences in the severity of the clinical manifestations could possibly be seen among bite victims of the three Hypnale species.

  15. Comparative in-vivo toxicity of venoms from South Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Viperidae: Crotalinae: Hypnale

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    Silva Anjana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Envenoming by south Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Genus: Hypnale is a significant health issue in Sri Lanka and in peninsular India. Bites by these snakes frequently lead to local envenoming, coagulopathy and acute renal failure even resulting in death. Recently the genus was revised and the existence of three species viz H. hypnale, H. nepa and H. zara were recognized. There is, however, a paucity of information on the toxicity of the venoms of these species. Hence, we compared the toxic effects of the three Hypnale venoms using BALB/c mice. Findings Intraperitoneal median lethal doses (LD50 for H. hypnale, H. zara and H. nepa venoms were 1.6, 6.0 and 9.5 μg protein/g respectively. Minimum haemorrhagic doses for venoms of H. hypnale, H. zara and H. nepa were 3.4, 11.0 and 16.6 μg protein/mouse respectively. The minimum necrotic doses for the same venoms were 15.0, 55.1 and 68.2 μg protein/mouse respectively. Severe congestion and petecheal haemorrhages were observed in lungs, kidneys, liver and the alimentary tract. Histopathogical examination of kidneys revealed proximal tubular cell injury and acute tubular necrosis with intact basement membrane indicating possible direct nephrotoxicity. Hypnale venoms caused pulmonary oedema, hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis, focal neuronal degeneration in brain and extramedullary haemopoiesis in spleen. H. hypnale venom caused all above histopathological alterations at lower doses compared to the other two. Conclusion Hypnale venoms cause similar pathological changes with marked differences in the severity of the toxic effects in vivo. Therefore, differences in the severity of the clinical manifestations could possibly be seen among bite victims of the three Hypnale species.

  16. Lachesis muta (Viperidae) cDNAs reveal diverging pit viper molecules and scaffolds typical of cobra (Elapidae) venoms: implications for snake toxin repertoire evolution.

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    Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Ching, Ana T C; Carvalho, Eneas; Faria, Fernanda; Nishiyama, Milton Y; Ho, Paulo L; Diniz, Marcelo R V

    2006-06-01

    Efforts to describe toxins from the two major families of venomous snakes (Viperidae and Elapidae) usually reveal proteins belonging to few structural types, particular of each family. Here we carried on an effort to determine uncommon cDNAs that represent possible new toxins from Lachesis muta (Viperidae). In addition to nine classes of typical toxins, atypical molecules never observed in the hundreds of Viperidae snakes studied so far are highly expressed: a diverging C-type lectin that is related to Viperidae toxins but appears to be independently originated; an ohanin-like toxin, which would be the third member of the most recently described class of Elapidae toxins, related to human butyrophilin and B30.2 proteins; and a 3FTx-like toxin, a new member of the widely studied three-finger family of proteins, which includes major Elapidae neurotoxins and CD59 antigen. The presence of these common and uncommon molecules suggests that the repertoire of toxins could be more conserved between families than has been considered, and their features indicate a dynamic process of venom evolution through molecular mechanisms, such as multiple recruitments of important scaffolds and domain exchange between paralogs, always keeping a minimalist nature in most toxin structures in opposition to their nontoxin counterparts.

  17. Habitat suitability, threats and conservation strategies of Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hymnal Merrem (Reptilia: Viperidae) found in Western Ghats, Goa, India

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    N S Sawant; T.D. Jadhav; S.K. Shyama

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that most species are best conserved in their natural community, which results in niche conservation. Depletion of any species is an irreversible change. In the present study the habitat ecology, threats and conservation strategies for the Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hypnale are suggested. The present study was undertaken in some protected areas (PAs) of Goa and the cashew plantations adjoining these PAs. H. hypnale prefers cool and moist places; most of the females o...

  18. Nuclear markers support the mitochondrial phylogeny of Vipera ursinii-renardi complex (Squamata: Viperidae) and species status for the Greek meadow viper.

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    Mizsei, Edvárd; Jablonski, Daniel; Roussos, Stephanos A; Dimaki, Maria; Ioannidis, Yannis; Nilson, Göran; Nagy, Zoltán T

    2017-01-31

    Meadow vipers (Vipera ursinii-renardi complex) are small-bodied snakes that live in either lowland grasslands or montane subalpine-alpine meadows spanning a distribution from France to western China. This complex has previously been the focus of several taxonomic studies which were based mainly on morphological, allozyme or immunological characters and did not clearly resolve the relationships between the various taxa. Recent mitochondrial DNA analyses found unexpected relationships within the complex which had taxonomical consequences for the detected lineages. The most surprising was the basal phylogenetic position of Vipera ursinii graeca, a taxon described almost 30 years ago from the mountains of Greece. We present here new analyses of three nuclear markers (BDNF, NT3, PRLR; a first for studies of meadow and steppe vipers) as well as analyses of newly obtained mitochondrial DNA sequences (CYT B, ND4).Our Bayesian analyses of nuclear sequences are concordant with previous studies of mitochondrial DNA, in that the phylogenetic position of the graeca clade is a clearly distinguished and distinct lineage separated from all other taxa in the complex. These phylogenetic results are also supported by a distinct morphology, ecology and isolated distribution of this unique taxon. Based on several data sets and an integrative species concept we recommend to elevate this taxon to species level: Vipera graeca Nilson & Andrén, 1988 stat. nov.

  19. Comparative study of anticoagulant and procoagulant properties of 28 snake venoms from families Elapidae, Viperidae, and purified Russell's viper venom-factor X activator (RVV-X).

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    Suntravat, Montamas; Nuchprayoon, Issarang; Pérez, John C

    2010-09-15

    Snake venoms consist of numerous molecules with diverse biological functions used for capturing prey. Each component of venom has a specific target, and alters the biological function of its target. Once these molecules are identified, characterized, and cloned; they could have medical applications. The activated clotting time (ACT) and clot rate were used for screening procoagulant and anticoagulant properties of 28 snake venoms. Crude venoms from Daboia russellii siamensis, Bothrops asper, Bothrops moojeni, and one Crotalus oreganus helleri from Wrightwood, CA, had procoagulant activity. These venoms induced a significant shortening of the ACT and showed a significant increase in the clot rate when compared to the negative control. Factor X activator activity was also measured in 28 venoms, and D. r. siamensis venom was 5-6 times higher than those of B. asper, B. moojeni, and C. o. helleri from Wrightwood County. Russell's viper venom-factor X activator (RVV-X) was purified from D. r. siamensis venom, and then procoagulant activity was evaluated by the ACT and clot rate. Other venoms, Crotalus atrox and two Naja pallida, had anticoagulant activity. A significant increase in the ACT and a significant decrease in the clot rate were observed after the addition of these venoms; therefore, the venoms were considered to have anticoagulant activity. Venoms from the same species did not always have the same ACT and clot rate profiles, but the profiles were an excellent way to identify procoagulant and anticoagulant activities in snake venoms.

  20. Habitat suitability, threats and conservation strategies of Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hymnal Merrem (Reptilia: Viperidae found in Western Ghats, Goa, India

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    N.S. Sawant

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that most species are best conserved in their natural community, which results in niche conservation. Depletion of any species is an irreversible change. In the present study the habitat ecology, threats and conservation strategies for the Hump-nosed Pit Viper Hypnale hypnale are suggested. The present study was undertaken in some protected areas (PAs of Goa and the cashew plantations adjoining these PAs. H. hypnale prefers cool and moist places; most of the females of this species are found to spend the period from post monsoon to late summer in the cashew plantations adjoining and within the PAs, making them more susceptible to anthropogenic threats. We conclude that this pattern of seasonal changes in habitat use is mostly a consequence of niche conservation. However, this preference for a particular micro-habitat emphasizes the importance for the conservation of this snake population and although the most suitable habitat in the Western Ghats, for this species is included in the protected areas, specific guidelines are needed to assess conservation needs.

  1. Blood Coagulation Induced by Iranian Saw-Scaled Viper (Echis Carinatus Venom: Identification, Purification and Characterization of a Prothrombin Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Babaie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Echis carinatus is one of the venomous snakes in Iran. The venom of Iranian Echis carinatus is a rich source of protein with various factors affecting the plasma protein and blood coagulation factor. Some of these proteins exhibit types of enzymatic activities. However, other items are proteins with no enzymatic activity.   Materials and Methods: In order to study the mechanism and effect of the venom on human plasma proteins, the present study has evaluated the effect of crude venom and all fractions. A procoagulant factor (prothrombin activator was isolated from the venom of the Iranian snake Echis carinatus with a combination of gel filtration (Sephadex G-75, ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE- Sepharose and reverse phase HPLC. Furthermore, proteolytic activity of the crude venom and all fractions on blood coagulation factors such as prothrombin time (PT was studied. Results: In the present study, the PT test was reduced from 13.4 s to 8.6 s when human plasma was treated with crude venom (concentraion of venom was 1 mg/ml. The purified procoagulant factor revealed a single protein band in SDS polyacrylamide electrophoresis under reducing conditions and its molecular weight was estimated at about 65 kDa. A single-band protein showed fragment patterns similar to those generated by the group A prothrombin activators, which convert prothrombin into meizothrombin independent of the prothrombinase complex. Conclusion: This study showed that the fraction which separated from Iranian snake Echis carinatus venom can be a prothrombin activators. It can be concluded that this fraction is a procoagulant factor.

  2. Bionic research of pit vipers on infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan; Cheng, Teng; Wu, Xiaoping

    2015-07-27

    The members of viperidae crotalinae (pit viper) family have special pit organs to detect infrared radiation in normal room conditions, whereas most artificial uncooled infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) operate only in a vacuum chamber. Dissection shows that the pit membrane is a unique substrate-free structure. The temperature rise advantage of this pit organ was verified in comparison with an assumed substrate pit organ (as an artificial FPA structure). Inspired by the pit viper, we introduced this structure to infrared FPA, replacing the conventional substrate FPA. The substrate-free FPA was fabricated by micro-elctromechanical systems (MEMS) process and placed into an infrared imaging system to obtain thermal images of the human body in atmosphere and vacuum working conditions. We show that the infrared capability of the substrate-free pit organ was achieved.

  3. Diversification in vipers: Phylogenetic relationships, time of divergence and shifts in speciation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Laura R V; Quental, Tiago B; Grazziotin, Felipe G; Alfaro, Michael L; Martins, Marcio; Venzon, Mericien; Zaher, Hussam

    2016-12-01

    Snakes of the cosmopolitan family Viperidae comprise around 329 venomous species showing a striking heterogeneity in species richness among lineages. While the subfamily Azemiopinae comprises only two species, 70% of all viper species are arranged in the subfamily Crotalinae or the "pit vipers". The radiation of the pit vipers was marked by the evolution of the heat-sensing pits, which has been suggested to be a key innovation for the successful diversification of the group. Additionally, only crotalines were able to successfully colonize the New World. Here, we present the most complete molecular phylogeny for the family to date that comprises sequences from nuclear and mitochondrial genes representing 79% of all living vipers. We also investigated the time of divergence between lineages, using six fossils to calibrate the tree, and explored the hypothesis that crotalines have undergone an explosive radiation. Our phylogenetic analyses retrieved high support values for the monophyly of the family Viperidae, subfamilies Viperinae and Crotalinae, and 22 out of 27 genera, as well as well-supported intergeneric relationships throughout the family. We were able to recover a strongly supported sister clade to the New World pit vipers that comprises Gloydius, Ovophis, Protobothrops and Trimeresurus gracilis. Our results agree in many aspects with other studies focusing on the phylogenetics of vipers, but we recover new relationships as well. Despite the addition of new sequences we were not able to resolve some of the poor supported relationships previously suggested. Time of divergence estimates suggested that vipers started to radiate around the late Paleocene to middle Eocene with subfamilies most likely dating back to the Eocene. The invasion of the New World might have taken place sometime close to the Oligocene/Miocene boundary. Diversification analyses suggested a shift in speciation rates during the radiation of a sub-clade of pit vipers where speciation rates

  4. Heat in evolution's kitchen: evolutionary perspectives on the functions and origin of the facial pit of pitvipers (Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krochmal, Aaron R; Bakken, George S; LaDuc, Travis J

    2004-11-01

    Pitvipers (Viperidae: Crotalinae) possess thermal radiation receptors, the facial pits, which allow them to detect modest temperature fluctuations within their environments. It was previously thought that these organs were used solely to aid in prey acquisition, but recent findings demonstrated that western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) use them to direct behavioral thermoregulation, suggesting that facial pits might be general purpose organs used to drive a suite of behaviors. To investigate this further, we conducted a phylogenetic survey of viperine thermoregulatory behavior cued by thermal radiation. We assessed this behavior in 12 pitviper species, representing key nodes in the evolution of pitvipers and a broad range of thermal environments, and a single species of true viper (Viperidae: Viperinae), a closely related subfamily of snakes that lack facial pits but possess a putative thermal radiation receptor. All pitviper species were able to rely on their facial pits to direct thermoregulatory movements, while the true viper was unable to do so. Our results suggest that thermoregulatory behavior cued by thermal radiation is a universal role of facial pits and probably represents an ancestral trait among pitvipers. Further, they establish behavioral thermoregulation as a plausible hypothesis explaining the evolutionary origin of the facial pit.

  5. Snake classification from images

    OpenAIRE

    James, Alex.

    2017-01-01

    Incorrect snake identification from the observable visual traits is a major reason of death resulting from snake bites. So far no automatic classification method has been proposed to distinguish snakes by deciphering the taxonomy features of snake for the two major species of snakes i.e. Elapidae and Viperidae. We present a parallel processed inter-feature product similarity fusion based automatic classification of Spectacled Cobra, Russel's Viper, King Cobra, Common Krait, Saw Scaled Viper, ...

  6. SNAKE BITE WITH TOXIC DEMYELINATION – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Snakebite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in India. India has the highest number of deaths due to snake bite1 Neurotoxicity due to snakebite is well-known with varied presentation.2 Common cases of snakebites are of saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus, Russell’s viper (a viperidae, krait (Bungarus caeruleus, common cobra (Naja naja king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah.3

  7. SNAKE BITE WITH TOXIC DEMYELINATION – A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Justin; Manivannan,; Ramu

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Snakebite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in India. India has the highest number of deaths due to snake bite1 Neurotoxicity due to snakebite is well-known with varied presentation.2 Common cases of snakebites are of saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus), Russell’s viper (a viperidae), krait (Bungarus caeruleus), common cobra (Naja naja) king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).3

  8. Morphological study of Ophidascaris excavata Hsü & Hoeppli, 1931 (Ascaridida: Ascarididae) from Gloydius brevicaudus (Stejneger) (Reptilia: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Zhao, Wen-Ting; Chen, Hui-Xia; Guo, Yan-Ning; Zhang, Lu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Ophidascaris excavata Hsü & Hoeppli, 1931 is a poorly known ascaridid parasite reported from the short-tailed pit viper Gloydius brevicaudus (Stejneger) (Reptilia: Viperidae) in China. In the present paper, the detailed morphology of this nematode was studied using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based on newly collected material. The results revealed several important, but previously unreported, morphological features, including the presence of one pair of small, finger-like prolongations on each lip, narrow cervical alae beginning well posterior to the base of the ventrolateral lips and the second pair of postcloacal ventro-lateral papillae being double; in addition, there is no intestinal caecum. These supplementary morphological and morphometric data, especially the detailed morphological features obtained herein under SEM, would help us to understand the relationships of O. excavata with its congeners and enable us to diagnose this species more accurately.

  9. Wound Myiasis Due to Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae in Persian Horned Viper, Pseudocerastes persicus (Squamata: Viperidae

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    R Dehghani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of myiasis due to Musca domestica describes in Pseudocerastes persicus for the first time. The snake was found in Bari Karafs, Kashan, Iran, with a lesion on its body. Fourteen live larvae of M. domestica removed from its wound. This is the first report of a new larval habitat of M. domestica.

  10. Seasonal, daily activity, and habitat use by three sympatric pit vipers (Serpentes, Viperidae) from southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Marcelo C; Hartmann, Paulo A; Winck, Gisele R; Cechin, Sonia Z

    2014-04-25

    Viperid snakes are widely distributed in the South America and the greater distribution range of the family is found at the Crotalinae subfamily. Despite the abundance of this snakes along their geographic distribution, some ecological aspects remain unknown, principally at subtropical areas. In the present study, we evaluated the activity (daily and seasonal) and the use of the habitat by Bothrops diporus, B. jararaca and B. jararacussu, in an Atlantic Forest area at southern Brazil. We observed higher incidence of viperid snakes during the months with higher temperatures, while no snakes were found during the months with lower temperatures. The data suggest the minimum temperature as environmental variable with the greatest influence on the seasonal activity of this species. Considering the daily activity, we observed a tendency of snakes to avoid the warmest hours. Bothrops jararacussu tend to avoid open areas, being registered only inside and at the edges of the forest. We compared our results with previous studies realized at tropical areas and we suggest the observed seasonal activity as an evolutive response, despite the influence of the different environmental variables, according to the occurence region.

  11. Trichomoniasis in Bothrops jararaca (serpentes, viperidae

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    F. C. Vilela

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of trichomoniasis in a Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae donated to the Center for the Study of Venoms and Venomous Animals - CEVAP/UNESP. The animal had diarrhea with great quantity of flagellated protozoa in the feces. Microscopic examination of fecal smears stained with Giemsa revealed the presence of trichomonads, morphologically similar to Trichomonas acosta. Trichomonads were not detected in fecal exams after treatment with a single dose of 40 mg/kg metronidazole (Flagyl®.

  12. First authenticated cases of life-threatening envenoming by the hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, J K; Simpson, I D; Menon, N C S; Jose, M P; Kulkarni, K J; Raghavendra, G B; Warrell, D A

    2007-01-01

    In Kerala, south-western India, five patients developed systemic envenoming after bites by hump-nosed pit vipers (Hypnale hypnale), proved by identification of the snakes responsible. Two of the dead snakes had been misidentified as saw-scaled vipers (Echis carinatus), while three had remained unidentified. Symptoms of local envenoming were pain, swelling, haemorrhagic blistering, bruising and regional lymphadenopathy. Systemic symptoms included headache, nausea, vomiting and abdominal and chest pain. There was evidence of haemostatic dysfunction (coagulopathy, fibrinolysis, thrombocytopenia or spontaneous systemic haemorrhage) in all cases and of microangiopathic haemolysis in two. Two patients were haemodialysed for acute renal failure, one of whom developed pulmonary oedema requiring mechanical ventilation. In India, H. hypnale has not previously been regarded as a cause of frequent or potentially dangerous envenoming. Its medical importance has been overlooked throughout its geographical range, probably because of confusion with other small species. No specific antivenom exists, yet most patients are treated with non-specific antivenoms, risking reactions without hope of benefit. An effective antivenom is urgently needed in south India and in Sri Lanka, where this species is also a common cause of bites.

  13. Renal sexual segment of the Cottonmouth snake, Agkistrodon piscivorous (Reptilia, Squamata, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, David M; Siegel, Dustin S; Bagwill, April; Eckstut, Mallory E; Alexander, Laura; Camus, Angelle; Morgan, Colby

    2008-06-01

    The seasonal variation of the renal sexual segment (RSS) of males of the Cottonmouth snake, Agkistrodon piscivorous, is described using light and electron microscopy. This study is the first to describe the ultrastructure of the RSS of a viper (Viperidae) and only the fourth on a snake. Renal sexual segments from males collected February to May and from August to November are similar in appearance. The cells are eosinophilic and react with periodic acid/Schiff procedure (PAS) for neutral carbohydrates and bromphenol blue (BB) for proteins. At the ultrastructure level, the cells contain large (2 microm diameter), electron-dense secretory granules and smaller vesicles with a diffuse material, and these structures abut against the luminal border and upon clear vacuoles continuous with intercellular canaliculi. Evidence was found for both apocrine and merocrine processes of product release. In June and July, the RSS are significantly smaller in diameter, largely basophilic, and have only scattered granules that are PAS+ and BB+. Cytologically, the RSS from June to July lack electron-dense secretory granules and the smaller vesicles with diffuse material. Numerous condensing vacuoles and abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, however, indicate that active product synthesis is occurring. This is the first report of significant seasonal variation in the histology and ultrastructure of the RSS of a snake, although such reports exist for lizards. The seasons when the RSS is most highly hypertrophied correspond to the fall and spring mating seasons of A. piscivorous, as determined by other studies. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  14. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom reagent. (a) Identification. Russell viper venom reagent is a device used to determine the cause of an...

  15. [The viper--Finland's only poisonous snake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Arno

    2011-01-01

    The viper (Vipera berus) is the most common poisonous snake in Europe, and the only one in Finland. In viper bites, highly varying amounts of venom end up into the victim, whereby prediction of the progression of symptoms of poisoning is very difficult. A severe clinical picture must always be anticipated. The size of the victim has also an effect on the outcome. Adequate monitoring and when necessary, massive fluid therapy are essential in the treatment. Due to possible kidney damage, anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended. Severe or rapidly progressing symptoms require the use of an antidote.

  16. Predator facilitation or interference: a game of vipers and owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embar, Keren; Raveh, Ashael; Hoffmann, Ishai; Kotler, Burt P

    2014-04-01

    In predator-prey foraging games, the prey's reaction to one type of predator may either facilitate or hinder the success of another predator. We ask, do different predator species affect each other's patch selection? If the predators facilitate each other, they should prefer to hunt in the same patch; if they interfere, they should prefer to hunt alone. We performed an experiment in a large outdoor vivarium where we presented barn owls (Tyto alba) with a choice of hunting greater Egyptian gerbils (Gerbillus pyramidum) in patches with or without Saharan horned vipers (Cerastes cerastes). Gerbils foraged on feeding trays set under bushes or in the open. We monitored owl location, activity, and hunting attempts, viper activity and ambush site location, and the foraging behavior of the gerbils in bush and open microhabitats. Owls directed more attacks towards patches with vipers, and vipers were more active in the presence of owls. Owls and vipers facilitated each other's hunting through their combined effect on gerbil behavior, especially on full moon nights when vipers are more active. Owls forced gerbils into the bushes where vipers preferred to ambush, while viper presence chased gerbils into the open where they were exposed to owls. Owls and vipers took advantage of their indirect positive effect on each other. In the foraging game context, they improve each other's patch quality and hunting success.

  17. Acute Renal Failure Following the Saharan Horned Viper (Cerastes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) is a common snake in the sandy and rocky regions in the south of Morocco. Although nearly all snakes with medical relevance can induce acute renal failure (ARF), it's unusual except with bites by some viper species. ARF has very rarely been reported following ...

  18. An unusual rhinoceros viper, Bitis nasicornis, from Ghana, West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, B.

    1968-01-01

    The characters which serve to distinguish the Gaboon Viper (Bitis gabonica) from the Rhinoceros Viper (B. nasicornis) are examined in relation to a subadult female from Dabocrom, Ghana, which displays characters of both species. It is more like B. nasicornis than B. gabonica but the admixture of B.

  19. A review of neogene and quaternary snakes of Central and Eastern Europe. Part 11: natricinae, elapidae, viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyndlar, Z.

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available Remains of Neogene and Quaternary "natricine" colubrids, elapids and viperids, including snakes previously described and those undescribed yet, coming from Poland, Ukraine, Moldavia, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, and Greece are discussed. The following taxa, including 11 extinct species, were recognized: "Natricinae": Neonatrix nova, Neonatrix sp., Palaeonatrix silesiaca, Palaeonatrix lehmani, Natrix longivertebrata, Natrix cf. N. longivertebrata, Natrix natrix, Natrix tesselata, Natrix cf. N. tesselata, Natrix sp., "Natricinae" indet.; Elapidae: Naja romani, Naja sp., cf. Naja sp.; Viperidae: Vipera platyspondyla, Vipera sarmatica, Vipera burgenlandica, Vipera gedulyi, Vipera kuchurganica, Vipera antiqua, Vipera cf. V. ammodytes, Vipera berus, Vipera sp ('Oriental vipers' group, Vipera sp. ('aspis' group, Vipera sp. ('berus' group, Vipera sp. . (status unknown. Taxonomic status of two other extinct species, Natrix parva and Laophis crotaloides, is uncertain. Modern species appeared fírst in Central and East Europe in the middle Pliocene (MN 15. Older snakes belonged to extinct species of either extinct or extant genera; taxonomic distinction of most extinct genera is, however, not fully demonstrated. Best recognized oldest snakes from the area (Elapidae, Viperidae, and sorne Colubridae are clearly referable to modern genera and intrageneric subdivisions occurring today are observed in oldest (Iower Miocene remains; closest living relatives of these fossils are presently distributed in the Oriental Realm.Se revisan y estudian los restos neógenos y cuaternarios de colúbridos «natricinos», elápidos y vipéridos, incluyendo tanto serpientes previamente descritas como- otras inéditas. Los materiales analizados proceden de Polonia, Ukrania, Moldavia, Checoslovaquia, Austria, Hungría, Rumania, Bulgaria y Grecia. Se reconocen los siguientes taxones, incluyendo 11 especies extinguidas: Natricinae: Neonatrix nova

  20. Genomic and phylogenetic evidence of VIPER retrotransposon domestication in trypanosomatids

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    Adriana Ludwig

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are important residents of eukaryotic genomes and eventually the host can domesticate them to serve cellular functions. We reported here a possible domestication event of the vestigial interposed retroelement (VIPER in trypanosomatids. We found a large gene in a syntenic location in Leishmania braziliensis, L. panamensis, Leptomanas pyrrhocoris, and Crithidia fasciculata whose products share similarity in the C-terminal portion with the third protein of VIPER. No remnants of other VIPER regions surrounding the gene sequence were found. We hypothesise that the domestication event occurred more than 50 mya and the conservation of this gene suggests it might perform some function in the host species.

  1. Pit Viper Envenomation in Military Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Poyrazoglu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites are common in people living or working in rural area. Military personnel are among the risk groups for viper envenomation. In this study, we presented seven cases of vipera snakebites in military personnel and discussed how to minimize functional loss and maximize the outcome. All of the bites were located in extremities and 5 were at hands. All patients were admitted at the day of snake bite which is an indicator of good triage. Hematological complications were the most common systemic complications. Antivenom therapy was performed according to the severity of the envenomation. Local wound care, grafts and flaps were used for wound coverage. Pit viper envenomation can cause serious morbidity in military personnel especially at hot climates. A suspicion of snake bite must be managed properly. Triage is the most important step to reduce the morbidity. Almost all snake bites occur in extremities, thus protective measurement must be taken especially for hands. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 127-130

  2. Wintering the common viper (Vipera berus with embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korosov Andrey Victorovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the Vipers from Karelia phenomenon wintering females with embryos and the annual breeding were found. They were very large and heavy females (L.t. > 62 cm, W > 160 g, for which the mass loss due to pregnancy are not significant. Analysis of the size of 1450 individuals in a Kizhi population of viper showed that the proportion of females that can hibernate from embryos amounts to less than 3%.

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of Sinovipera sichuanensis (Reptilia: Squamata: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Qin; Zhong, Guanghui; Xiao, Rong; Fang, Min; Guo, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Sinovipera sichuanensis is one of the Asian green pit vipers with less concern. It is endemic to China and only known in Hejiang, Sichuan Province and Jiangkou, Guizhou Province. In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome and characterize each partition. The complete mitochondrial genome is 17 225 bp in length containing 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 control regions and 22 tRNAs. We use Bayesian Inference (BI) and Maximum Likelihood (ML) methods to infer the phylogenetic relationship of S. sichuanensis. Both BI and ML analyses strongly support that S. sichuanensis is independent from the other two Asian green pit vipers.

  4. Clinical and Pharmacological Investigation of Myotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Envenoming.

    OpenAIRE

    Anjana Silva; Christopher Johnston; Sanjaya Kuruppu; Daniela Kneisz; Kalana Maduwage; Oded Kleifeld; A Ian Smith; Sisira Siribaddana; Nicholas A Buckley; Wayne C Hodgson; Geoffrey K Isbister

    2016-01-01

    Background Sri Lankan Russell?s viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming is reported to cause myotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are different to the effects of envenoming by most other populations of Russell?s vipers. This study aimed to investigate evidence of myotoxicity in Russell?s viper envenoming, response to antivenom and the toxins responsible for myotoxicity. Methodology and Findings Clinical features of myotoxicity were assessed in authenticated Russell?s viper bite patients admitted t...

  5. Epidemiology of venomous and semi-venomous snakebites (Ophidia: Viperidae, Colubridae) in the Kashan city of the Isfahan province in Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Mehrpour, Omid; Shahi, Morteza Panjeh; Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Karrari, Parissa; Keyler, Dan; Zamani, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Information on the epidemiology of venomous snake species responsible for envenomation to humans in Iran has not been well documented. In the Kashan city, venomous snakebite remains a recurring medical problem. Information providing the correct identification of snake species responsible for envenomation in this geographic region would be useful to regional medical clinics and personnel for the effective and optimal management of the patients. In this cross-sectional study, all patient data was collected from Kashan city and its suburbs. The specific data relating to the taxonomic identification of snakes responsible for envenomation were evaluated. A general approach to the diagnosis and management of patients was also provided. Snakes responsible for bites were transported to a laboratory, where their taxonomic classification was confirmed based on key anatomical features and morphological characteristics. A total of 46 snakes were examined. Of these, 37 (80%) were non-venomous species, and 9 (20%) were identified as venomous. Seven of the nine venomous snake species (78%) were of the family Viperidae, and two specimens (22%) were in the family Colubridae. Specifically, the viperid species were Macrovipera lebetina obtusa, Pseudocerastes persicus, Pseudocerastes fieldi, and Echis carinatus. The two colubrid species were Malpolon monspessulanus insignitus and Psammophis schkari. Five different species of venomous snakes responsible for envenomation in the Kashan city region were confirmed. The viper, P. fieldi, was reported for the first time in the central part of Iran.

  6. Anti-snake venom activities of ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. (Piperaceae) against Russell's viper venom: characterization of piperine as active principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, P A; Nipate, S S; Sonpetkar, J M; Salvi, N C; Waghmare, A B; Chaudhari, P D

    2013-05-20

    Piper longum L. fruits have been traditionally used against snakebites in north-eastern and southern region of India. To examine the ability of ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L., Piperaceae (PLE) and piperine, one of the main active principles of Piper longum, to inhibit the Russell's viper (Doboia russelii, Viperidae) snake venom activities. Anti-snake venom activities of ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. (Piperaceae) and piperine against Russell's viper venom was studied in embryonated fertile chicken eggs, mice and rats by using various models as follows: inhibition of venom lethal action, inhibition of venom haemorrhagic action (in vitro), inhibition of venom haemorrhagic action (in vivo), inhibition of venom necrotizing action, inhibition of venom defibrinogenating action, inhibition of venom induced paw edema, inhibition of venom induced mast cell degranulation, creatine kinase assay and assay for catalase activity. PLE was found to inhibit the venom induced haemorrhage in embryonated fertile chicken eggs. Administration of PLE and piperine significantly (p<0.01) inhibited venom induced lethality, haemorrhage, necrosis, defibrinogenation and inflammatory paw edema in mice in a dose dependent manner. PLE and piperine also significantly (p<0.01) reduced venom induced mast cell degranulation in rats. Venom induced decrease in catalase enzyme levels in mice kidney tissue and increase in creatine kinase enzyme levels in mice serum were significantly (p<0.01) reversed by administration of both PLE and piperine. PLE possesses good anti-snake venom properties and piperine is one of the compounds responsible for the effective venom neutralizing ability of the plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antipredatory function of head shape for vipers and their mimics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne K Valkonen

    Full Text Available Most research into the adaptive significance of warning signals has focused on the colouration and patterns of prey animals. However, behaviour, odour and body shape can also have signal functions and thereby reduce predators' willingness to attack defended prey. European vipers all have a distinctive triangular head shape; and they are all venomous. Several non-venomous snakes, including the subfamily Natricinae, commonly flatten their heads (also known as head triangulation when disturbed. The adaptive significance of this potential behavioural mimicry has never been investigated.We experimentally tested if the triangular head shape typical of vipers offers protection against predation. We compared the predation pressure of free-ranging predators on artificial snakes with triangular-shaped heads against the pressure on replicas with narrow heads. Snakes of both head types had either zigzag patterned bodies, typical of European vipers, or plain (patternless bodies. Plain snakes with narrower Colubrid-like heads suffered significantly higher predation by raptors than snakes with triangular-shaped heads. Head shape did not, however, have an additive effect on survival in zigzag-patterned snakes, suggesting that species which differ from vipers in colouration and pattern would benefit most from behavioural mimicry. Our results demonstrate that the triangular head shape typical of vipers can act as a warning signal to predators. We suggest that head-shape mimicry may be a more common phenomenon among more diverse taxa than is currently recognised.

  8. Debunking the viper's strike: harmless snakes kill a common assumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, David A; Sawvel, Baxter; Moon, Brad R

    2016-03-01

    To survive, organisms must avoid predation and acquire nutrients and energy. Sensory systems must correctly differentiate between potential predators and prey, and elicit behaviours that adjust distances accordingly. For snakes, strikes can serve both purposes. Vipers are thought to have the fastest strikes among snakes. However, strike performance has been measured in very few species, especially non-vipers. We measured defensive strike performance in harmless Texas ratsnakes and two species of vipers, western cottonmouths and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes, using high-speed video recordings. We show that ratsnake strike performance matches or exceeds that of vipers. In contrast with the literature over the past century, vipers do not represent the pinnacle of strike performance in snakes. Both harmless and venomous snakes can strike with very high accelerations that have two key consequences: the accelerations exceed values that can cause loss of consciousness in other animals, such as the accelerations experienced by jet pilots during extreme manoeuvres, and they make the strikes faster than the sensory and motor responses of mammalian prey and predators. Both harmless and venomous snakes can strike faster than the blink of an eye and often reach a target before it can move. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. [The rattlesnake is not more dangerous than the viper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personne, M

    1998-03-11

    The article consists of a comparison of the effects of snakebites inflicted by North American rattlesnakes and those of European vipers, based on a review of series of snake bite victims reported in the literature since 1980. The two groups of snakebites were found to manifest close similarity, even regarding the currently low fatality rates. Whereas local reactions seem to be more extensive after rattlesnake bites, circulatory symptoms including severe hypotension appear to be more common after viper bites. It is concluded that the two groups of snakes may be regarded as equally dangerous.

  10. Effect of Trimeresurus albolabris (green pit viper) venom on mean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... An in vitro study was conducted by mixing small amounts of green pit viper venom with blood and observing changes. At a concentration of 10 µg crude venom, red blood cells (RBC) osmotic fragility slightly increased. RBC morphology changed to spherical shape which was compatible with what was.

  11. Effect of Trimeresurus albolabris (green pit viper) venom on mean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in vitro study was conducted by mixing small amounts of green pit viper venom with blood and observing changes. At a concentration of 10 mg crude venom, red blood cells (RBC) osmotic fragility slightly increased. RBC morphology changed to spherical shape which was compatible with what was observed in scanning ...

  12. Complex regional pain syndrome following viper-bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Skulberg, Per Kristian; Jørum, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) may occur following fractures, surgery or different trauma. Development of CRPS following snake-bite has only been published in three reports (from Turkey, Nepal and Korea), although snake bites occur frequently world-wide. There has been no report from Western Europe. Vipera Berus is a common snake in European countries and the only venomous snake in Norway. We here describe the development of CRPS in a young woman as a consequence of a viper bite (Vipera Berus) in the right arm. We performed a clinical investigation (inspection, measurement of skin temperatures, sensory and motor evaluation) of the patient six months following the viper-bite, measurement of thermal thresholds (quantitative sensory testing, QST), measurement of resting sweat output (RSO) and quantitative sudomotor axon reflex (QSART) from both arms. The patient fulfilled the Budapest criteria for a CRPS-condition, with continuous pain and symptoms and findings of autonomic dysfunction. In addition, we found elevated thresholds of warmth and cold, evidence of an affection of afferent A-delta and C-fibres as well as an affection of the efferent sympathetic sudomotor C-fibres by QSART. An increased RSO-volume was in inverse relationship to the decreased QSART result. It is important to be aware of viper-bite as a possible eliciting event for CRPS for early diagnosis and treatment of a patient. As long-lasting pain and oedema are known complications, it is probable that CRPS after viper-bites previously may have been underdiagnosed. As many patients are unaware of being bit, viper bite should be considered in cases of unexplained sudden pain and swelling of a limb. Copyright © 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Two cases of viper bite: still an important health problem

    OpenAIRE

    Adrija Hajra; Dhrubajyoti Bandyopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Viper venoms act mainly as hemotoxic. Manifestations of snakebites depend on specific toxins that constitute the venom. The local and systemic snake bite related symptoms are directly linked to the toxicity of the venom. Edema, ecchymoses, hematoma, and gangrenous lesions are reported to occur as local symptoms. Systemic symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, delirium, jaundice, circulatory collapse, convulsions, and coma. Death from secondary infections, neurotoxicity, disseminated in...

  14. Formal verification of a microcoded VIPER microprocessor using HOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Karl; Arora, Tejkumar; Leung, Tony; Kalvala, Sara; Schubert, E. Thomas; Windley, Philip; Heckman, Mark; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    The Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE) and members of the Hardware Verification Group at Cambridge University conducted a joint effort to prove the correspondence between the electronic block model and the top level specification of Viper. Unfortunately, the proof became too complex and unmanageable within the given time and funding constraints, and is thus incomplete as of the date of this report. This report describes an independent attempt to use the HOL (Cambridge Higher Order Logic) mechanical verifier to verify Viper. Deriving from recent results in hardware verification research at UC Davis, the approach has been to redesign the electronic block model to make it microcoded and to structure the proof in a series of decreasingly abstract interpreter levels, the lowest being the electronic block level. The highest level is the RSRE Viper instruction set. Owing to the new approach and some results on the proof of generic interpreters as applied to simple microprocessors, this attempt required an effort approximately an order of magnitude less than the previous one.

  15. Viral Association with the Elusive Rickettsia of Viper Plague from Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    quently infected and killed at least 22 snakes, in- cluding Gaboon vipers, rhinoceros vipers (Bitis nasicornis), a Sri Lankan cobra ( Naja naja polycel...lata), a monocellate cobra ( Naja naja kaouthia), a black-necked cobra ( Naja nigricollis), and bull- snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus sayi). The out

  16. Thrombotic microangiopathy due to Viperidae bite: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshkumar, T; Dhanapriya, J; Sakthirajan, R; Thirumalvalavan, K; Kurien, A A; Balasubramaniyan, T; Gopalakrishnan, N

    2017-01-01

    Snake bite is mainly an occupational hazard and causes serious health problems in rural India. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 5-30% cases. Renal pathologic findings include acute tubular necrosis, cortical necrosis, interstitial nephritis, glomerulonephritis, and vasculitis. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurrence after a snake bite is reported rarely. Here, we present two patients who developed TMA after viper bite treated with hemodialysis and plasmapheresis. Renal biopsy showed fibrin thrombi in glomeruli and arterioles with cortical necrosis. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and other was lost to follow-up. TMA should be considered as a possible pathogenesis of AKI after snake bite. The role of plasma exchanges in snake bite TMA is yet to be defined.

  17. Thrombotic microangiopathy due to Viperidae bite: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Dineshkumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bite is mainly an occupational hazard and causes serious health problems in rural India. Acute kidney injury (AKI occurs in 5-30% cases. Renal pathologic findings include acute tubular necrosis, cortical necrosis, interstitial nephritis, glomerulonephritis, and vasculitis. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA occurrence after a snake bite is reported rarely. Here, we present two patients who developed TMA after viper bite treated with hemodialysis and plasmapheresis. Renal biopsy showed fibrin thrombi in glomeruli and arterioles with cortical necrosis. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and other was lost to follow-up. TMA should be considered as a possible pathogenesis of AKI after snake bite. The role of plasma exchanges in snake bite TMA is yet to be defined.

  18. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops mangshanensis (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Yang, Daode; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Baowei

    2014-12-01

    Protobothrops mangshanensis is a venomous pit viper species endemic to Hunan province in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of P. mangshanensis had been determined. The circle genome with the 17,230 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 32.27% A, 24.16% T, 30.34% C and 13.23% G. All the genes in P. mangshanensis were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Gloydius shedaoensis (Squamata: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Zhu, Fei; Wang, Xiaoping; Xiao, Rong; Fang, Min; Sun, Lixin; Li, Pipeng; Guo, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Gloydius shedaoensis is an insular and vulnerable pitviper that is endemic to Snake Island, northeastern China. In this study, we successfully sequenced mitochondrial genomes of two individuals of G. shedaoensis. The complete mitochondrial genomes of G. shedaoensis are circular molecular with 17 222 and 17 221 bp in length respectively, which both contain 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, an origin of light-strand replication (OL) and two non-coding control regions. Compared with previously published mitochondrial genomes of Gloydius species, the base composition and gene arrangement are rather conservative. A Bayesian phylogenetic tree using the complete mitochondrial genomes of all viper species available showed a consistent result with previous studies.

  20. [Envenoming by common viper (Vipera berus)--subject still exists...].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Modła, Arkadiusz

    2004-01-01

    The only venomous reptile that naturally occurs in Poland is the adder or common viper (Vipera berus). Its bites are not of great epidemiological importance, but in some cases serious life-threatening symptoms may appear. The most common symptoms of adder envenomation are: local edema, reddening and pain of the bitten site and also the general symptoms coming from the alimentary tract (vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain), the circulatory system (hypotension, shock, ECG abnormalities), the central nervous system (sleepiness, vertigo, disorientation, loss of consciousness), hematological symptoms (leukocytosis, hemolysis, coagulopathy) and allergic symptoms (fever, urticaria, angio-oedema). In the present study we described the case of a twenty-year-old patient hospitalized at the Toxicology Department of the Collegium Medicum UJ after a viper bite. Except for some above-mentioned symptoms he also developed ocular symptoms like ptosis and blurred vision. Such symptoms after the common viper bite have not been described in the literature till now. The cause of them seems to be an intense allergic reaction in the region of the orbit and eyelids all the more so because the patient had the positive allergy history. However, taking into account the latest reports from the literature, a neurotoxic action of some components of the Vipera berus venom may also play a role. Because of the developing general symptoms a specific equine antivenom was administered to the patient, apart from the supportive care, without any serious side effects that usually are observed after the use of such a kind of sera. It is thought that the sheep antivenom is better than the equine one considering a lack of allergic side effects. As a result of applied treatment the local and general symptoms including ocular symptoms subsided.

  1. Sexual dimorphism in development and venom production of the insular threatened pit viper Bothrops insularism (Serpentes: Viperidae of Queimada Grande Island, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Travaglia-Cardoso

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Bothrops insularis is a threatened snake endemic to Queimada Grande Island, southern coast of São Paulo, Brazil, and the occurrence of sexual abnormalities in females (females with functional ovaries and rudimentary hemipenis has been reported in this population. To date there are few data regarding developmental features of this particular species. The aim of this study was to follow some developmental features in specimens maintained in captivity for seven years in the Herpetology Laboratory at Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, Brazil. We verified a pronounced sexual dimorphism in development and venom production in the specimens analyzed. In this regard, females showed greater length, mass and amount of venom in comparison to males. Our results suggest a possible niche partitioning between the sexes that reduces (or minimizes intraspecific disharmonic interactions (eg. competition on their small living area (Queimada Grande Island. Taken together, our data suggest that males and females probably are divergent in their diets, with females feeding preferentially on endothermic prey (such as migratory birds, while males maintain the juvenile diet (with the major items being ectothermic prey.

  2. Redescription and validation of Bothriechis supraciliaris (Serpentes: Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Solórzano

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The populations of pit vipers from South West CostaRica, have traditionally been identified as Bothriechis schlegelii(Berthold. However, in 1954 E. H. Taylor described one specimen fromthe area as a new subspecies, B. schlegelii supraciliaris. Wermanreturned supraciliaris to synonymy with schlegelii four decadeslater. However, morphometric and color pattern in a SW Costa Ricapopulation (25 specimens differ from those of specimens (N=57 fromother parts of Costa Rica and from descriptions a South Americanspecimens. Here the epithet Bothriechis schlegelii supraciliarisTaylor 1954, is reestablished as a valid taxon and elevated tospecific rank as B. supraciliaris stat.nov. It is closely related toB. schlegelii from which it differs by its color patterns based on auniform ground color with polymorphic dorsal designs and its lowercounts of ventral and caudal scales.Las poblaciones de toboba de pestañas o bocaracá delsuroeste de Costa Rica han sido denominadas tradicionalmente Bothriechis schlegelii supraciliaris Taylor 1954. Sin embargo, lamorfometría y el patrón de coloración sugierenque es una especie aparte, que aquí se propone como Bothriechis supraciliaris stat.nov.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of fresh frozen plasma for coagulopathy in Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming.

    OpenAIRE

    Isbister, G. K.; Jayamanne, S.; Mohamed, F.; Dawson, A.H.; Maduwage, K; I Gawarammana; Lalloo, David; de Silva, H.J.; Scorgie, F E; Lincz, L F; Buckley, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Russell's viper envenoming is a major health issue in South Asia and causes coagulopathy. We studied the effect of fresh frozen plasma and two antivenom doses on correcting coagulopathy. Fresh frozen plasma did not hasten recovery of coagulopathy. Low?dose antivenom did not worsen coagulopathy. Summary Background Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming is a major health issue in South Asia and causes venom?induced consumption coagulopathy (VICC). Objectives To investigate the ...

  4. Emerging Tick-Borne Disease in African Vipers Caused by a Cowdria-like Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    gabonica gabonica), western Gaboon vipers (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros), rhinoceros vipers (Bitis nasicornis), a Sri Lankan cobra ( Naja naja polycellata...a monocellate cobra ( Naja naja kaouthia), a black-necked cobra ( Naja nigricollis), and bullsnakes (Pituophis melanoleucus sayi). The outbreak only...caseous mucoid material, large fat bodies, and the other organs essentially normal. On November 12, 2002, a Sri Lankan cobra ( Naja naja polycellata

  5. [Management of the common European viper's bite--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziray, Agnes; Károlyi, Zsuzsánna

    2011-10-09

    The common European viper is widespread throughout Europe. In Hungary it can be found mainly in the Zemplén Mountains, on the upper course of the Tisza River, and Zala and Somogy counties. Viper's bite is one of the rarest injuries that requires emergency medical care. The venom contains polypeptides and hydrolytic enzymes which have neurotoxic, cytotoxic, hemolytic and hemorrhagic effects. Local symptoms may include double points, pain, swelling, and suffusion at the site of the bite. Very occasionally, particularly in case of small children and elderly people, viper bite can cause life threatening angioedema, as well as shock and, therefore, professional medical help should always be sought preferably in a hospital that has a toxicology and poison control centre. Authors present the history of a 64-year-old nature enthusiast, who, after having been bitten by a viper, lost consciousness and experienced persistent local redness and pain. Soon after the viper bite, the patient suffered another potentially fatal accident, a stroke of lightning that he also survived. In connection with the case, authors provide an overview of the clinical symptoms caused by viper venom, and current issues of professional care.

  6. Características biológicas e inmunológicas del veneno de Bothrops cotiara (Serpentes: Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Rafael de Roodt

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Bothrops cotiara es una serpiente que se encuentra en la provincia de Misiones (Argentina, el Sur de Brasil y Paraguay. La información sobre las características clínicas de los accidentes por esta serpiente es muy escasa y existen pocos datos sobre su veneno y la capacidad neutralizante de las actividades tóxicas del mismo por antivenenos terapéuticos. En este trabajo se estudiaron características bioquímicas, actividades tóxicas y la reactividad inmunoquímica del veneno de B. cotiara. Seis antivenenos anti Viperinos Sudamericanos fueron estudiados frente a este veneno por el método ELISA y se probó la capacidad neutralizante de tres de estos frente a las actividades hemorrágica, necrotizante, procoagulante, trombina-símil, hemolítica indirecta y la potencia letal de veneno de ejemplares de B. cotiara de la provincia de Misiones. Los patrones cromatográficos y electroforéticos mostraron características similares a los de otros venenos de Bothrops. Las actividades tóxicas estuvieron dentro de los ámbitos descritos para los venenos botrópicos. Los seis antivenenos mostraron gran reactividad inmunoquímica por ELISA y las potencias neutralizantes de los tres estudiados fueron muy próximas para las actividades letal, hemorrágica, necrotizante, hemolítica indirecta, coagulante y trombina-símil. Los resultados de los estudios de neutralización indicarían que ante la mordedura de esta poco común especie de Bothrops, pueden usarse los diferentes tipos de antivenenos botrópicos o botrópico-crotálicos para uso terapéutico disponibles en esa región.Biological and immunological characteristics of the poison of Bothrops cotiara (Serpentes: Viperidae. Bothrops cotiara is a venomous snake sporadically found in the province of Misiones in Argentina, South of Brazil and Paraguay. Data on the clinics of the envenomation produced by its bite and on its venom are scarce. There is no information on the neutralizing capacity of the

  7. Viper bites complicate chronic agrochemical nephropathy in rural Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite is a common occupational health hazard among Sri Lankan agricultural workers, particularly in the North Central Province. Viperine snakes, mainly Russell’s viper envenomation, frequently lead to acute renal failure. During the last two decades, an agrochemical nephropathy, a chronic tubulointerstitial disease has rapidly spread over this area leading to high morbidity and mortality. Most of the epidemiological characteristics of these two conditions overlap, increasing the chances of co-occurrence. Herein, we describe four representative cases of viperine snakebites leading to variable clinical presentations, in patients with chronic agrochemical nephropathy, including two patients presented with acute and delayed anuria. These cases suggest the possibility of unusual manifestations of snakebite in patients with Sri Lankan agrochemical nephropathy, of which the clinicians should be aware. It could be postulated that the existing scenario in the Central America could also lead to similar clinical presentations. PMID:25136354

  8. Antivenin remains effective against African Viperidae bites despite a delayed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larréché, Sébastien; Mion, Georges; Mayet, Aurélie; Verret, Catherine; Puidupin, Marc; Benois, Alain; Petitjeans, Fabrice; Libert, Nicolas; Goyffon, Max

    2011-02-01

    Viperidae bites represent a public health issue in Africa and are responsible for a hemorrhagic syndrome with fatal outcome in the short term. A research on Medline database does not reveal any data definitively demonstrating the efficiency of antivenom in case of delayed administration. The aim of this study, based on a 12-year survey of viperine syndromes in Republic of Djibouti, was to compare the normalization of the hemostasis disorders with an early administration of antivenin versus a delayed administration. A retrospective study was conducted from October 1994 to May 2006 in the intensive care unit of the French military Hospital, in Djibouti. Seventy-three Viperidae-envenomed patients were included. Antivenin efficiency in correcting hemostatic disorders was analyzed in relation to time to treatment (before or after the 24th hour after the bite). Forty-two patients (58%) presented with bleeding. A consumptive coagulopathy was found in 68 patients (93%). Antivenin was observed to be effective in improving hemostasis, and the time to normalization of biologic parameters was similar, whether the treatment was started before or after the 24th hour after the bite. Antivenin should ideally be administered as early as possible. However, in Africa, time to treatment generally exceeds 24 hours. The results of the present evidence-based study confirm an empirical concept: a delayed time to treatment should in no way counterindicate the use of antivenin immunotherapy, in the case of African Viperidae bites. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). First Data Release of 57 204 spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present the first Public Data Release (PDR-1) of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). It comprises 57 204 spectroscopic measurements together with all additional information necessary for optimal scientific exploitation of the data, in particular the associated photometric measurements and quantification of the photometric and survey completeness. VIPERS is an ESO Large Programme designed to build a spectroscopic sample of ≃100 000 galaxies with iAB accessing the data through the survey database (http://vipers.inaf.it) where all information can be queried interactively. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://vipers.inaf.it/

  10. Intrauterine death following green tree viper bite presenting as antepartum hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, H P; Poudel, R; Dsovza, V

    2010-01-01

    Few reports exist on venomous snake bites during pregnancy. Envenomation during pregnancy can result in fetal and maternal death. A woman at 33 weeks of gestation presented with green tree viper envenomation and vaginal bleeding. Investigation revealed a grossly deranged coagulation profile, severe anemia and a dead fetus. After correction of the coagulation profile, induction of labor was followed by vaginal delivery. Postpartum care was uneventful, and the patient was discharged five days post partum. Green tree viper bite may cause fetal demise before the onset of maternal symptoms. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of lectin-bound glycoproteins in snake venom from the Elapidae and Viperidae families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarak, Jiraporn; Phutrakul, Suree; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient method of studying the glycoproteins found in snake venom. The glycosylation profiles of the Elapidae and Viperidae snake families were analyzed using FITC-labeled lectin glycoconjugates. The Con A-agarose affinity enrichment technique was used to fractionate glycoproteins from the N. naja kaouthia venom. The results revealed a large number of Con A binding glycoproteins, most of which have moderate to high molecular weights. To identify the proteins, the isolated glycoprotein fractions were subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS. Protein sequences were compared with published protein databases to determine for their biological functions.

  12. The occurrence of Crepidobothrium sp. (Cestoda, Proteocephalidae in Bothrops moojeni (Hoge (Serpentes, Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo José da Silva

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Crepidobothrium sp.(Cestoda, Proteocephalidae in the intestine of Bothrops moojeni (Hoge,1965(Serpentes, Viperidae is reported. The host snake was rescued from the fauna in Porto Primavera dam, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. The snake died in captivity on July 13,1999. At necropsy, 28 tapeworms were found in the snake intestine. The analysis of specimens morphology allowed the conclusion that they belong to the Crepidobothrium (Monticelli, 1900 genus. It was not possible to determine the Crepidobothrium species due to the lack of the gravid proglottids. This is the first report of B. moojeni as a host of cestodes.

  13. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Full spectroscopic data and auxiliary information release (PDR-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marchetti, A.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Moutard, T.; Peacock, J. A.; Zamorani, G.; Burden, A.; Fumana, M.; Jullo, E.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Percival, W. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the full public data release (PDR-2) of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), performed at the ESO VLT. We release redshifts, spectra, CFHTLS magnitudes and ancillary information (as masks and weights) for a complete sample of 86 775 galaxies (plus 4732 other objects, including stars and serendipitous galaxies); we also include their full photometrically-selected parent catalogue. The sample is magnitude limited to iAB ≤ 22.5, with an additional colour-colour pre-selection devised as to exclude galaxies at z http://vipers.inaf.it and on the ESO Archive. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  14. Acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis after anti-venom therapy in Russell's viper bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, S; Routray, P K; Mohapatra, A K; Mohapatra, M; Dash, S C

    2010-09-01

    Russell's viper is a commonly encountered venomous snake in India. Morbidity and mortality following envenomation and the treatment thereof are frequent. We report a rarely seen complication after a treated Russell's viper bite. A 36-year-old male farmer received 30 vials polyvalent anti-snake venom after a viper bite to his right leg. Improvement in initial hematemesis and circulatory shock was followed by acute renal failure managed with regular hemodialysis. He displayed no abnormalities on neurological examination at admission. Fourth day onwards his neurologic status started deteriorating with development of behavioral abnormalities, hemi-spatial neglect of left upper limb, paralysis of left facial nerve, left upper limb, and right lower limb. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain with typical spectroscopic characteristics. High dose methyl prednisolone was administered and a rapid recovery followed. Russell's viper bite followed by treatment with antivenom may be complicated by the development of immune complex mediated demyelination and development of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. MRI spectroscopy helps in early identification of demyelination and in a definite diagnosis. Treatment with corticosteroids was associated with resolution of symptoms in this case.

  15. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beçak, Maria Luiza; Beçak, Willy; Pereira, Alexandre

    2003-09-01

    The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae) was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia) not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine) and cultured tissues (blood) were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  16. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beçak Maria Luiza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine and cultured tissues (blood were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  17. SEROPREVALENCE AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF FERLAVIRUS IN CAPTIVE VIPERS OF COSTA RICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Cristina; Arguedas, Randall; Baldi, Mario; Piche, Martha; Jimenez, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Ferlaviruses (FV, previously referred to as ophidian paramyxoviruses, OPMV), are enveloped viruses with a negative-strand RNA genome, affecting snakes in captivity worldwide. Infection is characterized by respiratory and nervous clinical signs and carries high mortality rates, but no specific treatment or vaccine is currently available. Costa Rica has 16 species of vipers, found in captivity in collections essential for antivenom production, reintroduction, and public education. FV circulation in these populations was previously unknown, and the risk of introducing the viruses into naïve collections or free-ranging populations exists if the virus's presence is confirmed. The objective of this study was to determine seroprevalence and FV shedding in 150 samples from captive vipers in nine collections across Costa Rica. A hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was performed to determine the antibody titer against two Ferlavirus strains, Bush viper virus (BV) and Neotropical virus (NT), and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing to determine virus secretion in cloacal swabs. Ferlavirus strains were replicated in Vero cells, and chicken anti-FV polyclonal antibodies were produced and used as a positive control serum for the HI. Results demonstrate that seroprevalence of anti-FV antibodies in viper serum was 26.6% (n = 40) for the BV strain and 30% (n = 45) for the NT strain in the population tested. Furthermore, molecular characterization of FV group A was possible by sequencing the virus recovered from three cloacal swabs, demonstrating circulation of FV in one collection. This study demonstrates for the first time serological evidence of FV exposure and infection in vipers in captivity in Costa Rica, and suggests cross reactivity between antibodies against both strains. Appropriate biosafety measures could prevent the spread of FV between and within collections of reptiles in the country.

  18. Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia Following Three Different Species of Hump-Nosed Pit Viper (Genus: Hypnale) Envenoming in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namal Rathnayaka, Rathnayaka Mudiyanselage M K; Ranathunga, Anusha Nishanthi; Kularatne, Senanayake A M; Rajapakse, Jayanthe; Ranasinghe, Shirani; Jayathunga, Radha

    2018-01-17

    There are 3 species of hump-nosed pit vipers in Sri Lanka: Hypnale hypnale, Hypnale zara, and Hypnale nepa. The latter 2 are endemic to the country. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) is a known complication of hump-nosed pit viper bites. It was previously documented as a complication of general viper bites and not species specific. We report a series of 3 patients who developed MAHA after being bitten by each species of hump-nosed pit viper. The first patient was bitten by H hypnale and developed a severe form of MAHA associated with acute kidney injury and thrombocytopenia falling into the category of thrombotic microangiopathy. The other 2 developed MAHA that resolved without any complications. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Snakebites of fingers or toes by viperidae family members: an orthopaedic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykissas, Marios G; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Gkiatas, Ioannis; Milionis, Haralampos J; Mavrodontidis, Alexandros N

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review current principles of therapy for affected patients and determine whether an emergent surgical approach or expectant management should be selected in cases of snakebites of fingers or toes by Viperidae family members. Over the past five years (January 2004 to December 2009), 12 patients bitten by Vipera ammodytes were admitted in our department. We retrospectively reviewed their demographic and epidemiological characteristics as well as their symptoms, laboratory findings, and complications. All snake bites occurred at the extremities (fingers and toes). The main complications were oedema, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and decrease in haematocrit. None of the patients developed compartment syndrome or required surgical debridement. The majority of the patients with snakebites of fingers or toes by Vipera ammodytes can be treated conservatively. Surgery is indicated only in case of compartment syndrome, where fasciotomies should be performed without delay after diagnosis.

  20. A taxonomic bibliography of the South American snakes of the Crotalus durissus complex (Serpentes, Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANZOLINI PAULO E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey is made of the taxonomic literature on South American rattlesnakes (genus Crotalus, family Viperidae. Two main areas are emphasized: the attribution of the names proposed in the eighteenth century by Linnaeus and Laurenti, and the current scheme of division in subspecies. The attribution of names is examined based on the original descriptions and on relevant previous and contemporary literature. The presently adopted scheme, proposed by Klauber (1941, 1972 is found not entirely satisfactory, but reasonable enough - besides being hallowed by use. The scheme of geographical differentiation, intrinsically important and with broad practical implications (differentiation of the venom is found to be the culmination of a long series of deficient analyses, and in urgent need of proper investigation.

  1. A rare complication of viper envenomation: cardiac failure. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chara, K; Baccouche, N; Turki, O; Regaig, K; Chaari, A; Bahloul, M; Bouaziz, M

    2017-02-01

    Viper envenomation is common in North Africa. Cardiac complications are not common features of snakebites, the clinical picture of which is usually dominated by toxin-associated neurological, hematological, and vascular damage. There are rare reports of acute myocardial infarction and/or ischemia caused by snakebites, while myocarditis after envenomation has not yet been reported, to our knowledge. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman admitted to our intensive care unit after viper envenomation complicated by acute heart failure with acute pulmonary edema, in a state of cardiogenic shock, accompanied by multi-organ failure, intravascular disseminated coagulation, and neurological damage. Some of the mechanisms that may be involved in this heart failure are discussed, including the possibility of acute myocarditis.

  2. On the issue of taxonomical status of steppe viper (Vipera renardi in Right-bank Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Baybuz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on morphologic variability of the steppe viper in the Kirovograd region (Right-bank Ukraine are given firstly. Tentative estimation of the similaritylevel of the local population and the populations from the Left-bank Ukraine and the Crimea was carried out using methods of the multivariate statistics. Morphological data in line with the results of mitochondrial DNA analysis show that the population in the Kirovograd region belongs to widespread Eurasian species Vipera renardiand morphologically most close to the original populations of the lowland Crimea, Sivash and Forest-Steppe of the Left-bank Ukraine. This could indicate the complicated history of the Right-bank Ukraine colonization by the steppe viper and possible influence of environmental conditions on the vipers’ morphology

  3. VIPER: Chronic Pain after Amputation: Inflammatory Mechanisms, Novel Analgesic Pathways, and Improved Patient Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    agonist reduces the sensitivity in an animal pain model. There is a long road before therapies like this can be used in humans but we are taking the first...subset of 76 patients from the VIPER cohort using multiplexed, high- sensitivity , electrochemiluminescent assays. Pain catastrophizing shows...examined possible links between catastrophizing and inflammatory status[8,9]; this issue has received little study in the chronic pain setting [27] A

  4. A Rare Case Series of Ischemic Stroke Following Russell’s Viper Snake Bite in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Krishna Pothukuchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is an important medical problem in India. Among their various manifestations, cerebral complications are uncommonly found in literature. Moreover, Ischemic stroke following snake bite is quite rare. Here we report a case series of two such cases that developed neurological manifestations following Russell’s viper bite. On computerized tomography (CT scan of brain; cerebral infarcts were revealed. Their likely mechanisms are discussed in present study which include disseminated intravascular coagulation, toxin induced vasculitis and endothelial damage.

  5. Psychosis in Secondary Empty Sella Syndrome following a Russell's Viper Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnakaran, Badr; Punnoose, Varghese P.; Das, Soumitra; Kartha, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Hypopituitarism can present with psychiatric symptoms. We report a unique case of psychosis in clear consciousness in a case of hypopituitarism due to the secondary empty sella syndrome following a Russell's viper bite which was untreated and presented with psychotic symptoms for past 13 years following the snake bite. After the diagnosis of psychosis due to hypopituitarism was made, the patient was treated with levothyroxine and prednisolone supplements and his psychotic symptoms subsided wi...

  6. Renal cortical necrosis, peripheral gangrene, perinephric and retroperitoneal haematoma in a patient with a viper bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Susheel; Sharma, Aman; Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Wanchu, Ajay; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singh, Surjit

    2012-04-01

    Snakebites are estimated to affect more than 2.5 million people annually, of whom more than 100,000 die. Viper bites cause various systemic symptoms such as: coagulopathy; haemolysis; acute renal failure; a generalized increase in capillary permeability; rhabdomyolysis; and neurotoxicity. Wide spectrums of vascular complications are seen. We report the case of a patient developing gangrenous changes in a lower limb along with the development of perinepheric and retroperitoneal haematoma with acute cortical necrosis of the kidneys.

  7. Resembling a viper: implications of mimicry for conservation of the endangered smooth snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, Janne K; Mappes, Johanna

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon of Batesian mimicry, where a palatable animal gains protection against predation by resembling an unpalatable model, has been a core interest of evolutionary biologists for 150 years. An extensive range of studies has focused on revealing mechanistic aspects of mimicry (shared education and generalization of predators) and the evolutionary dynamics of mimicry systems (co-operation vs. conflict) and revealed that protective mimicry is widespread and is important for individual fitness. However, according to our knowledge, there are no case studies where mimicry theories have been applied to conservation of mimetic species. Theoretically, mimicry affects, for example, frequency dependency of predator avoidance learning and human induced mortality. We examined the case of the protected, endangered, nonvenomous smooth snake (Coronella austriaca) that mimics the nonprotected venomous adder (Vipera berus), both of which occur in the Åland archipelago, Finland. To quantify the added predation risk on smooth snakes caused by the rarity of vipers, we calculated risk estimates from experimental data. Resemblance of vipers enhances survival of smooth snakes against bird predation because many predators avoid touching venomous vipers. Mimetic resemblance is however disadvantageous against human predators, who kill venomous vipers and accidentally kill endangered, protected smooth snakes. We found that the effective population size of the adders in Åland is very low relative to its smooth snake mimic (28.93 and 41.35, respectively).Because Batesian mimicry is advantageous for the mimic only if model species exist in sufficiently high numbers, it is likely that the conservation program for smooth snakes will fail if adders continue to be destroyed. Understanding the population consequences of mimetic species may be crucial to the success of endangered species conservation. We suggest that when a Batesian mimic requires protection, conservation planners should

  8. Snake Venom Metalloproteinases and Their Peptide Inhibitors from Myanmar Russell’s Viper Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Than Yee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Russell’s viper bites are potentially fatal from severe bleeding, renal failure and capillary leakage. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs are attributed to these effects. In addition to specific antivenom therapy, endogenous inhibitors from snakes are of interest in studies of new treatment modalities for neutralization of the effect of toxins. Two major snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs: RVV-X and Daborhagin were purified from Myanmar Russell’s viper venom using a new purification strategy. Using the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS approach to explore the Myanmar RV venom gland transcriptome, mRNAs of novel tripeptide SVMP inhibitors (SVMPIs were discovered. Two novel endogenous tripeptides, pERW and pEKW were identified and isolated from the crude venom. Both purified SVMPs showed caseinolytic activity. Additionally, RVV-X displayed specific proteolytic activity towards gelatin and Daborhagin showed potent fibrinogenolytic activity. These activities were inhibited by metal chelators. Notably, the synthetic peptide inhibitors, pERW and pEKW, completely inhibit the gelatinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities of respective SVMPs at 5 mM concentration. These complete inhibitory effects suggest that these tripeptides deserve further study for development of a therapeutic candidate for Russell’s viper envenomation.

  9. Clinical and Pharmacological Investigation of Myotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii) Envenoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anjana; Johnston, Christopher; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Kneisz, Daniela; Maduwage, Kalana; Kleifeld, Oded; Smith, A Ian; Siribaddana, Sisira; Buckley, Nicholas A; Hodgson, Wayne C; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2016-12-01

    Sri Lankan Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming is reported to cause myotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are different to the effects of envenoming by most other populations of Russell's vipers. This study aimed to investigate evidence of myotoxicity in Russell's viper envenoming, response to antivenom and the toxins responsible for myotoxicity. Clinical features of myotoxicity were assessed in authenticated Russell's viper bite patients admitted to a Sri Lankan teaching hospital. Toxins were isolated using high-performance liquid chromatography. In-vitro myotoxicity of the venom and toxins was investigated in chick biventer nerve-muscle preparations. Of 245 enrolled patients, 177 (72.2%) had local myalgia and 173 (70.6%) had local muscle tenderness. Generalized myalgia and muscle tenderness were present in 35 (14.2%) and 29 (11.8%) patients, respectively. Thirty-seven patients had high (>300 U/l) serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations in samples 24h post-bite (median: 666 U/l; maximum: 1066 U/l). Peak venom and 24h CK concentrations were not associated (Spearman's correlation; p = 0.48). The 24h CK concentrations differed in patients without myotoxicity (median 58 U/l), compared to those with local (137 U/l) and generalised signs/symptoms of myotoxicity (107 U/l; p = 0.049). Venom caused concentration-dependent inhibition of direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, without completely abolishing direct twitches after 3 h even at 80 μg/ml. Indian polyvalent antivenom did not prevent in-vitro myotoxicity at recommended concentrations. Two phospholipase A2 toxins with molecular weights of 13kDa, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a (19.2% of venom) and U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b (22.7% of venom), concentration dependently inhibited direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. At 3 μM, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a abolished twitches, while U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b caused 70% inhibition of twitch force after 3h. Removal of both toxins

  10. Clinical and Pharmacological Investigation of Myotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell’s Viper (Daboia russelii) Envenoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Kneisz, Daniela; Maduwage, Kalana; Kleifeld, Oded; Smith, A. Ian; Siribaddana, Sisira; Buckley, Nicholas A.; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sri Lankan Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii) envenoming is reported to cause myotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are different to the effects of envenoming by most other populations of Russell’s vipers. This study aimed to investigate evidence of myotoxicity in Russell’s viper envenoming, response to antivenom and the toxins responsible for myotoxicity. Methodology and Findings Clinical features of myotoxicity were assessed in authenticated Russell’s viper bite patients admitted to a Sri Lankan teaching hospital. Toxins were isolated using high-performance liquid chromatography. In-vitro myotoxicity of the venom and toxins was investigated in chick biventer nerve-muscle preparations. Of 245 enrolled patients, 177 (72.2%) had local myalgia and 173 (70.6%) had local muscle tenderness. Generalized myalgia and muscle tenderness were present in 35 (14.2%) and 29 (11.8%) patients, respectively. Thirty-seven patients had high (>300 U/l) serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations in samples 24h post-bite (median: 666 U/l; maximum: 1066 U/l). Peak venom and 24h CK concentrations were not associated (Spearman’s correlation; p = 0.48). The 24h CK concentrations differed in patients without myotoxicity (median 58 U/l), compared to those with local (137 U/l) and generalised signs/symptoms of myotoxicity (107 U/l; p = 0.049). Venom caused concentration-dependent inhibition of direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, without completely abolishing direct twitches after 3 h even at 80 μg/ml. Indian polyvalent antivenom did not prevent in-vitro myotoxicity at recommended concentrations. Two phospholipase A2 toxins with molecular weights of 13kDa, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a (19.2% of venom) and U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b (22.7% of venom), concentration dependently inhibited direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. At 3 μM, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a abolished twitches, while U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b caused 70% inhibition of

  11. Clinical and Pharmacological Investigation of Myotoxicity in Sri Lankan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii Envenoming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sri Lankan Russell's viper (Daboia russelii envenoming is reported to cause myotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are different to the effects of envenoming by most other populations of Russell's vipers. This study aimed to investigate evidence of myotoxicity in Russell's viper envenoming, response to antivenom and the toxins responsible for myotoxicity.Clinical features of myotoxicity were assessed in authenticated Russell's viper bite patients admitted to a Sri Lankan teaching hospital. Toxins were isolated using high-performance liquid chromatography. In-vitro myotoxicity of the venom and toxins was investigated in chick biventer nerve-muscle preparations. Of 245 enrolled patients, 177 (72.2% had local myalgia and 173 (70.6% had local muscle tenderness. Generalized myalgia and muscle tenderness were present in 35 (14.2% and 29 (11.8% patients, respectively. Thirty-seven patients had high (>300 U/l serum creatine kinase (CK concentrations in samples 24h post-bite (median: 666 U/l; maximum: 1066 U/l. Peak venom and 24h CK concentrations were not associated (Spearman's correlation; p = 0.48. The 24h CK concentrations differed in patients without myotoxicity (median 58 U/l, compared to those with local (137 U/l and generalised signs/symptoms of myotoxicity (107 U/l; p = 0.049. Venom caused concentration-dependent inhibition of direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation, without completely abolishing direct twitches after 3 h even at 80 μg/ml. Indian polyvalent antivenom did not prevent in-vitro myotoxicity at recommended concentrations. Two phospholipase A2 toxins with molecular weights of 13kDa, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a (19.2% of venom and U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b (22.7% of venom, concentration dependently inhibited direct twitches in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. At 3 μM, U1-viperitoxin-Dr1a abolished twitches, while U1-viperitoxin-Dr1b caused 70% inhibition of twitch force after 3h. Removal of both

  12. On a meeting between the Horn Viper and a Centipede in the Peloponnese, southern Greece  or the Biter, bit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Kit; Kretzschmar, Horst

    2009-01-01

    Vipera ammodytes L., (the European Horn-Nosed Viper) is a small venomous snake occurring in southern L., (the European Horn-Nosed Viper) is a small venomous snake occurring in southern Europe. It was documented attacking Scolopendra cingulata Latreille (the venomous Mediterranean Banded Centipede...

  13. Venomics of New World pit vipers: Genus-wide comparisons of venom proteomes across Agkistrodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonte, Bruno; Tsai, Wan-Chih; Ureña-Diaz, Juan Manuel; Sanz, Libia; Mora-Obando, Diana; Sánchez, Elda E.; Fry, Bryan G.; Gutiérrez, José María; Gibbs, H. Lisle; Sovic, Michael G.; Calvete, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a genus-wide comparison of venom proteome variation across New World pit vipers in the genus Agkistrodon. Despite the wide variety of habitats occupied by this genus and that all its taxa feed on diverse species of vertebrates and invertebrate prey, the venom proteomes of copperheads, cottonmouths, and cantils are remarkably similar, both in the type and relative abundance of their different toxin families. The venoms from all the eleven species and subspecies sampled showed relatively similar proteolytic and PLA2 activities. In contrast, quantitative differences were observed in hemorrhagic and myotoxic activities in mice. The highest myotoxic activity was observed with the venoms of A. b. bilineatus, followed by A. p. piscivorus, whereas the venoms of A. c. contortrix and A. p. leucostoma induced the lowest myotoxic activity. The venoms of Agkistrodon bilineatus subspecies showed the highest hemorrhagic activity and A. c. contortrix the lowest. Compositional and toxicological analyses agree with clinical observations of envenomations by Agkistrodon in the USA and Central America. A comparative analysis of Agkistrodon shows that venom divergence tracks phylogeny of this genus to a greater extent than in Sistrurus rattlesnakes, suggesting that the distinct natural histories of Agkistrodon and Sistrurus clades may have played a key role in molding the patterns of evolution of their venom protein genes. Biological significance A deep understanding of the structural and functional profiles of venoms and of the principles governing the evolution of venomous systems is a goal of venomics. Isolated proteomics analyses have been conducted on venoms from many species of vipers and pit vipers. However, making sense of these large inventories of data requires the integration of this information across multiple species to identify evolutionary and ecological trends. Our genus-wide venomics study provides a comprehensive overview of the toxic arsenal across

  14. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Star formation history of passive red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudek, M.; Małek, K.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Pollo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Fritz, A.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Marchetti, A.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Ilbert, O.; Gargiulo, A.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We trace the evolution and the star formation history of passive red galaxies, using a subset of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The detailed spectral analysis of stellar populations of intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies allows the build up of their stellar content to be followed over the last 8 billion years. Methods: We extracted a sample of passive red galaxies in the redshift range 0.4 history of passive red galaxies. We compare the results with a grid of synthetic spectra to constrain the star formation epochs of these galaxies. We characterize the formation redshift-stellar mass relation for intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies. Results: We find that at z 1 stellar populations in low-mass passive red galaxies are younger than in high-mass passive red galaxies, similar to what is observed at the present epoch. Over the full analyzed redshift range 0.4 time passes, I.e., what has become known as the downsizing picture. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  15. Comparative analyses of putative toxin gene homologs from an Old World viper, Daboia russelii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraja M. Krishnan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Availability of snake genome sequences has opened up exciting areas of research on comparative genomics and gene diversity. One of the challenges in studying snake genomes is the acquisition of biological material from live animals, especially from the venomous ones, making the process cumbersome and time-consuming. Here, we report comparative sequence analyses of putative toxin gene homologs from Russell’s viper (Daboia russelii using whole-genome sequencing data obtained from shed skin. When compared with the major venom proteins in Russell’s viper studied previously, we found 45–100% sequence similarity between the venom proteins and their putative homologs in the skin. Additionally, comparative analyses of 20 putative toxin gene family homologs provided evidence of unique sequence motifs in nerve growth factor (NGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, Kunitz/Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz BPTI, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, andpathogenesis-related1 proteins (CAP and cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP. In those derived proteins, we identified V11 and T35 in the NGF domain; F23 and A29 in the PDGF domain; N69, K2 and A5 in the CAP domain; and Q17 in the CRISP domain to be responsible for differences in the largest pockets across the protein domain structures in crotalines, viperines and elapids from the in silico structure-based analysis. Similarly, residues F10, Y11 and E20 appear to play an important role in the protein structures across the kunitz protein domain of viperids and elapids. Our study highlights the usefulness of shed skin in obtaining good quality high-molecular weight DNA for comparative genomic studies, and provides evidence towards the unique features and evolution of putative venom gene homologs in vipers.

  16. Psychosis in Secondary Empty Sella Syndrome following a Russell's Viper Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnakaran, Badr; Punnoose, Varghese P; Das, Soumitra; Kartha, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Hypopituitarism can present with psychiatric symptoms. We report a unique case of psychosis in clear consciousness in a case of hypopituitarism due to the secondary empty sella syndrome following a Russell's viper bite which was untreated and presented with psychotic symptoms for past 13 years following the snake bite. After the diagnosis of psychosis due to hypopituitarism was made, the patient was treated with levothyroxine and prednisolone supplements and his psychotic symptoms subsided without any psychotropic drugs. Vasculotoxic snake bites can cause hypopituitarism and can present with psychosis. Further research will be needed into the prevalence of this phenomenon.

  17. Clinical picture of envenoming with the Meadow Viper (Vipera (Acridophaga) ursinii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecsák, László; Zacher, Gábor; Malina, Tamás

    2011-01-01

    The vipers in the Vipera (Acridophaga) ursinii complex are small-sized insectivorous snakes found in parts of central and southern Europe. Subspecies include Vipera ursinii ursinii, Vipera ursinii moldavica, Vipera ursinii macrops, Vipera ursinii rakosiensis, and Vipera ursinii graeca and are commonly known as the meadow vipers. These are the least known European Vipera from a clinical point of view. We identified cases of V. ursinii envenomations through three methods, including literature search in PubMed, ISI web of Knowldge, JSTOR, Biological Abstracts, Zoological Record, using the various combination of the following terms: snakebite, envenoming, bite, venom, ursinii, meadow viper, steppe viper (in English, French, Italian, Hungarian, Croatian, Serbian, Romanian), review of paper-based medical case records of hospitals in Hungary (four) and Romania (one) covering the 1970-July 2010 period, and personal communications of professional and amateur herpetologists studying V. ursinii and snake-handlers bitten by these snakes. We identified 64 cases from subspecies: V. u. ursinii (14), V. u. moldavica (8), V. u. macrops (5), and V. u. rakosiensis (37). Forty-five bites were collected from the literature, 5 from hospitals, 10 cases were communicated by seven herpetologists and four cases by two snake keepers. Bites were mostly asymptomatic. Forty-five envenomings (70%) resulted in mild and moderate local symptoms, involving pain with low-intensity, pruritus, numbness, swelling with or without erythema and/or local hematoma. Bullae (n = 3, 5%), mild superficial necrosis (n = 4, 6%), cellulitis (n = 1, 2%), and moderately extended edema (n = 8, 13%) of the bitten extremity rarely develop. Massive limb edema was recorded in eight (13%) cases. The most common systemic symptoms were dizziness caused by transient hypotension and tachycardia. Gastrointestinal disorders (i.e. nausea, vomiting) were rare (n = 2, 3%) compared to other Vipera, and probably triggered only by

  18. Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch, 1844) (Acari: Ixodidae) two-host life-cycle on Viperidae snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniel Sobreira; Maciel, Ricardo; Cunha, Lucas Maciel; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Amblyomma rotundatum is an ixodid tick that infests ectothermic animals and reproduces exclusively by parthenogenesis. This tick has been frequently reported to infest reptiles and amphibians, under natural conditions and sometimes in captivity. It was described in Brazil and several other countries of South, Central and North America. Although many studies have reported aspects of its biology, none of them has used regularly either ophidian as hosts, or controlled temperature, humidity and luminosity for parasitic stages. The objective of this experiment was to study the life cycle of A. rotundatum feeding on Viperidae snakes under room controlled conditions at 27 ± 1 °C temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and 12:12 hours photoperiod for parasitic stages, and under B.O.D incubator conditions at 27 ± 1 °C temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and scotophase for non-parasitic stages. The total duration of the life cycle ranged from 56 to 163 days (mean of 105 days). Two-host life cycle was observed for most of the ixodid population studied.

  19. Ultrastructure of spermiogenesis in the Cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Rheubert, Justin L; Anzalone, Marla L; Siegel, Dustin S; Sever, David M

    2010-03-01

    To date multiple studies exist that examine the morphology of spermatozoa. However, there are limited numbers of data detailing the ontogenic characters of spermiogenesis within squamates. Testicular tissues were collected from Cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus) and tissues from spermiogenically active months were analyzed ultrastructurally to detail the cellular changes that occur during spermiogenesis. The major events of spermiogenesis (acrosome formation, nuclear elongation/DNA condensation, and flagellar development) resemble that of other squamates; however, specific ultrastructural differences can be observed between Cottonmouths and other squamates studied to date. During acrosome formation vesicles from the Golgi apparatus fuse at the apical surface of the nuclear membrane prior to making nuclear contact. At this stage, the acrosome granule can be observed in a centralized location within the vesicle. As elongation commences the acrosome complex becomes highly compartmentalized and migrates laterally along the nucleus. Parallel and circum-cylindrical microtubules (components of the manchette) are observed with parallel microtubules outnumbering the circum-cylindrical microtubules. Flagella, displaying the conserved 9 + 2 microtubule arrangement, sit in nuclear fossae that have electron lucent shoulders juxtaposed on either side of the spermatids basal plates. This study aims to provide developmental characters for squamates in the subfamily Crotalinae, family Viperidae, which may be useful for histopathological studies on spermatogenesis in semi-aquatic species exposed to pesticides. Furthermore, these data in the near future may provide morphological characters for spermiogenesis that can be added to morphological data matrices that may be used in phylogenetic analyses.

  20. Comparative morphology of the skin of Natrix tessellata (family: Colubridae) and Cerastes vipera (family: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Eleneen, Rasha E; Allam, Ahmed A

    2011-10-01

    We studied beneficial difference of the skin of two snakes. Two snakes were chosen from two different habitats and two families: Colubridae (Natrix tessellata) and Viperidae (Cerastes vipera). The investigations were performed by light and electron microscopy. Histologically, the skin of the studied species show pronounced modifications that correlated with functional demands. The scales in Natrix tessellata overlapped slightly, while in Cerastes vipera they were highly overlapped. SEM shows that scales of Natrix tessellata had bidentate tips while the scales of Cerastes vipera were keeled. Histochemically, in both studied species, melanocytes and collagenous fibres were distributed throughout the dermis. Polysaccharides were highly concentrated in the epidermis and dermis of both species while proteins were highly concentrated only in the epidermis. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the skin of both snakes consisted of keratins located in the epidermis. Some lipids and mucus were incorporated into the outer scale surfaces such that lipids were part of the fully keratinised hard layer of the snakes' skins. Lipids are probably responsible for limiting water loss and ion movements across the skin. Melanosomes from epidermal melanocytes were present only in Cerastes vipera. In aggregate, these results indicate that snakeskin may provide an ecological indicator whereby epidermal and integumentary specializations may be ecologically correlated.

  1. Antibacterial activity of different types of snake venom from the Viperidae family against Staphylococcus aureus

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    Isabela Nascimento Canhas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxins and venoms produced by living organisms have exhibited a variety of biological activities against microorganisms. In this study, we tested seven snake venoms from the family Viperidae for antibacterial activity and the activities of reversal of antibiotic resistance and inhibition of biofilm formation against 22 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Bothrops moojeni venom exhibited anti staphylococcal activity with the lowest mean value of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Moreover, reversal of antibiotic resistance was observed for combinations of B. moojeni venom (½ x MIC and norfloxacin or ampicillin (both ½ x MIC for 86.4% and 50% of the isolates, respectively. B. moojeni venom alone at ½ MIC inhibited 90% of biofilm formation, whereas in combination with ciprofloxacin, both at ½ MIC, a reduction on the NorA efflux pump activity was observed. The detection of in vitro mutants colonies of S. aureus resistant to B. moojeni venom was low and they did not survive. A phospholipase A2 was purified from the venom of B. moojeni and displayed anti-staphylococcal activity when tested alone or in combination with ciprofloxacin. The results presented here will contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents against resistant S. aureus.

  2. Biochemical and biological characterization of the venoms of Bothriopsis bilineata and Bothriopsis taeniata (Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Bárbara N; Telli, Caliandra A; Dutra, Tatiana P; Alves, Letícia S; Bozza, Marcelo T; Fin, Cyntia A; Thiesen, Flavia V; Renner, Márcia F

    2007-08-01

    Snake venom is a complex mixture containing diverse protein components with different structures and functions that are used for prey immobilization and death. Snake venoms from the family Viperidae cause pronounced local and systemic effects, such as pain, edema, hemorrhage and necrosis. Here, we investigated the enzymatic and biological activities of venoms from two Amazonian snakes, Bothriopsis bilineata and Bothriopsis taeniata. Both venoms presented high enzymatic activities for proteases kallikrein, thrombin and plasmin, low levels of trypsin, cathepsin C and leucine aminopeptidase activities, while lacked acetylcholinesterase activity. B. taeniata and B. bilineata crude venoms caused inflammation inducing neutrophil recruitment into peritoneal cavity of mice 4h after injection. Neutrophil recruitment induced by B. taeniata venom was accompanied by hemorrhage. EDTA treatment profoundly impaired neutrophil recruitment, suggesting the involvement of a metalloproteinase on venoms-induced neutrophil recruitment. Pretreatment with dexamethasone and zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, significantly reduced neutrophil migration, but indomethacin and montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, had no effect, suggesting the involvement of lipoxygenase-derived metabolites, probably LTB(4). Together, these results show that B. bilineata and B. taeniata venoms induce a marked inflammatory reaction, with leukocyte recruitment, and hemorrhage, which parallels to a high proteolytic activity found in these venoms.

  3. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium (Apicomplexa, Cryptosporidiidae in Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes, Viperidae in Brazil

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    Karasawa Andréa Satie Matsubara

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium (Apicomplexa, Cryptosporidiidae in the snake Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes, Viperidae. Fifty animals were evaluated for the presence of oocysts of Cryptosporidium sp. at the time of arrival and 30 and 60 days later. Intestinal washings with saline solution (1% body weight, fecal samples, and organ scrapings were collected during the study. Oocysts were concentrated by an ether-phosphate-buffered saline sedimentation technique and then separated by a density gradient centrifugation technique. Smears were made with the sediment and submitted to modified acid-fast and auramine-rhodamine staining. Cryptosporidium-positive smears were used as controls for the experimental findings. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts was 14%. Among the positive snakes, oocysts were detected only in the intestinal washing in two specimens, only in the feces in four specimens, and in both materials at least once in one specimen. The positive snakes were predominantly from Santa Maria da Serra city State of São Paulo (57.1%. We also observed that all of the examinations that presented positive results were obtained at least 27 days after the capture of the animals.

  4. Elucidation of trends within venom components from the snake families Elapidae and Viperidae using gel filtration chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Robert Leslie James; Graham, Ciaren; Theakston, David; McMullan, Geoff; Shaw, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Research into snake venom components has intensified over the last number of decades, particularly that work directed towards the discovery of novel agents with potential applications in clinical therapy. In the present study we report, for the first time, defined patterns observed in the G-50 chromatographic elution profiles from 30 snake venoms taken from Elapidae and Viperidae families, as well as previously unreported patterns within subfamilies of these snake species. Development of this chromatographic technique thus offers a rapid method for the general classification of snakes within these families as well as providing insights into hitherto uncharacterised trends within the venoms of snake subfamilies that have opened new avenues for further investigation.

  5. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The decline of cosmic star formation: quenching, mass, and environment connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Bolzonella, M.; Granett, B. R.; De Lucia, G.; Branchini, E.; Zamorani, G.; Iovino, A.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Blaizot, J.; Coupon, J.; Hawken, A.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Gargiulo, A.

    2017-06-01

    We use the final data of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) to investigate the effect of the environment on the evolution of galaxies between z = 0.5 and z = 0.9. We characterise local environment in terms of the density contrast smoothed over a cylindrical kernel, the scale of which is defined by the distance to the fifth nearest neighbour. This is performed by using a volume-limited sub-sample of galaxies complete up to z = 0.9, but allows us to attach a value of local density to all galaxies in the full VIPERS magnitude-limited sample to I Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  6. Viper's bugloss (Echium spp. honey typing and establishing the pollen threshold for monofloral honey.

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    Tomás Martín Arroyo

    Full Text Available Honey samples (n = 126 from Castilla-La Mancha (Central Spain were characterized based on their physicochemical properties and a melissopalynological analysis. The latter showed that Echium pollen type was the dominant palynomorph in most samples, representing at least 30% of the pollen in each sample. As anticipated, a relationship was observed between the proportion of this pollen and the properties of the honey. One goal of this study was to set a threshold that defines the percentage of pollen necessary for Viper's bugloss honey to be considered monofloral or multifloral. This is a mandatory requirement in light of the publication of the European Directive 2014/63/EU establishing the regulations governing the labelling and control of honey to eradicate fraud (BOE n° 147, June 2015. By analyzing how the proportions of Echium pollen type affected the physicochemical and sensory parameters of the honey, the honeys analyzed could be segregated into multifloral and monofloral honeys. The data indicates that the proportion of pollen necessary to discriminate monofloral Viper's bugloss honey lies at 70%.

  7. Antitoxin use and pediatric intensive care for viper bites in Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, M; Pisani, M; Stoppa, F; Di Nardo, M; Pirozzi, N; Luca, E; Pulitanò, S; Conti, G; Marzano, L; De Luca, D; Valentini, P; Pietrini, D; Piastra, M

    2014-01-01

    In Italy viper bites represent an uncommon event, though envenomation can cause severe complications, more in children than adults, because of dose/body size ratio. We present a case series within a selected population: 10 Italian cases (from Rome surroundings) of viperbites requiring PICU admission, over a 5-year interval. Five children showed a systemic involvement, whereas the remaining patients showed a damage. All were managed and closely monitored in an ICU setting. Relevant clinical findings and therapeutic approach, ICU course and complications have been recorded. Age range was 3-15 years with mean age of 6,9 (SD±4,58) years; 2 patients needed respiratory support beyond oxygen supplementation. Most patients underwent fluid loading, while hemodynamic support was given to4/10. Median PICU stay was 60 hours (IQR=24.0-75.5). No mortality was reported. Indications and precautions for administration of antivenom in the last years have been reviewed: early treatment seems to reduce mortality/morbidity, though representing a threat for children. Current recommendations for the treatment of viper envenomation have been described, based on a literature's review and the application of these knowledges to clinical reality of our PICUs. Therefore, paediatric patients with systemic or rapidly evolving symptoms should be monitored carefully for the development of bite-related complications in an ICU setting mostly in younger children.

  8. Diversifying selection and color-biased dispersal in the asp viper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Sylvain; Zwahlen, Valérie; Mebert, Konrad; Monney, Jean-Claude; Golay, Philippe; Ott, Thomas; Durand, Thierry; Thiery, Gilles; Kaiser, Laura; Geser, Sylvia N; Ursenbacher, Sylvain

    2015-05-31

    The presence of intraspecific color polymorphism can have multiple impacts on the ecology of a species; as a consequence, particular color morphs may be strongly selected for in a given habitat type. For example, the asp viper (Vipera aspis) shows a high level of color polymorphism. A blotched morph (cryptic) is common throughout its range (central and western Europe), while a melanistic morph is frequently found in montane populations, presumably for thermoregulatory reasons. Besides, rare atypical uniformly colored individuals are known here and there. Nevertheless, we found in a restricted treeless area of the French Alps, a population containing a high proportion (>50%) of such specimens. The aim of the study is to bring insight into the presence and function of this color morph by (i) studying the genetic structure of these populations using nine microsatellite markers, and testing for (ii) a potential local diversifying selection and (iii) differences in dispersal capacity between blotched and non-blotched vipers. Our genetic analyses support the occurrence of local diversifying selection for the non-blotched phenotype. In addition, we found significant color-biased dispersal, blotched individuals dispersing more than atypical individuals. We hypothesize that, in this population, the non-blotched phenotype possess an advantage over the typical one, a phenomenon possibly due to a better background matching ability in a more open habitat. In addition, color-biased dispersal might be partly associated with the observed local diversifying selection, as it can affect the genetic structure of populations, and hence the distribution of color morphs.

  9. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). PCA-based automatic cleaning and reconstruction of survey spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, A.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Identifying spurious reduction artefacts in galaxy spectra is a challenge for large surveys. Aims: We present an algorithm for identifying and repairing spurious residual features in sky-subtracted galaxy spectra by using data from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) as a test case. Methods: The algorithm uses principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the galaxy spectra in the observed frame to identify sky line residuals imprinted at characteristic wavelengths. We further model the galaxy spectra in the rest-frame using PCA to estimate the most probable continuum in the corrupted spectral regions, which are then repaired. Results: We apply the method to 90 000 spectra from the VIPERS survey and compare the results with a subset for which careful editing was performed by hand. We find that the automatic technique reproduces the time-consuming manual cleaning in a uniform and objective manner across a large data sample. The mask data products produced in this work are released together with the VIPERS second public data release (PDR-2). based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), that is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, which is a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/.

  10. Optimising management of hypertension in primary care: the Valsartan Intensified Primary Care Reduction of Blood Pressure (Viper-Bp) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Simon; Carrington, Melinda J; Swemmer, Carla; Kurstjens, Nicol; Jennings, Garry L

    2011-12-15

    The Valstartan Intensified Primary CarE Reduction of Blood Pressure Study (VIPER-BP) Study is an open-label, randomised controlled trial comparing usual primary care management with an intensive BP management strategy using three forms of valsartan-based therapy (mono-therapy, thiazide diuretic or calcium channel blocker combinations) to achieve individualised BP control. To identify the features of General Practitioner (GP) management of hypertension in Australia, we analyse the response to a case scenario-based survey of 500 GPs. We subsequently recruited a national cohort of GP Investigators to enrol up to 2500 patients into the VIPER-BP Study. GP responses clearly demonstrated that, compared to the VIPER-BP intervention, a heterogeneous approach to the primary care management of hypertension persists in Australia. By November 2010, 2157 hypertensive patients from 272 actively recruiting GP Investigators were enrolled into the study. Of these, 1965 (91%) patients were entered into a standardised "run-in" phase of 28 days of valsartan 80 mg/day. Subsequently, 1285 patients were randomised to usual care (n=435) or the VIPER-BP intervention (n=850). There was a predominance of males (62%), whilst 55% had pre-existing diabetes or cardiovascular disease and 63% had been previously treated for hypertension. Mean systolic and diastolic BP on randomisation for men and women, respectively, was 148 ± 15/88 ± 11 and 148 ± 18/87 ± 10 mm Hg. In contrast to typical primary care management of hypertension, VIPER-BP combines more intensive and aggressive therapies with structured management to more rapidly attain and sustain individualised BP targets in hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Within-clutch variation in venoms from hatchlings of Deinagkistrodon acutus (Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian-Fang; Qu, Yan-Fu; Zhang, Xiu-Qin; Ji, Xiang

    2011-06-01

    We used 17 hatchling five-paced pit-vipers snakes (Deinagkistrodon acutus) to study within-clutch variation in snake venoms. We measured venom yield and total protein content, and examined the correlations between venom yield and hatchling size [snout-vent length (SVL) and body mass]. We also analyzed the electrophoretic profiles and enzymatic activities of venoms from hatchlings. Lyophilized venom mass was not correlated with SVL, nor with body mass. Liquid venom mass and total protein content were not correlated with body mass, but were positively correlated with SVL. Venom composition, as shown in SDS-PAGE chromatograms did vary among individuals but there were biochemical differences in activity which had to be due to subtle venom composition differences between the sexes. Female hatchlings showed higher esterolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities but lower proteolytic, collagenolytic, phosphomonoesterase and fibrinolytic activities than male hatchlings. We did not find sexual differences in 5' nucleotidase, phospholipase A(2) and hyaluronidase activities, and l-amino acid oxidase activities in either female or male hatchlings. Within-clutch variation in venoms from D. acutus hatchlings should be attributed to the individual-based differences in presence or absence, and the relative amount of the protein components, and might have a genetic basis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. VIPER: a general-purpose digital image-processing system applied to video microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, M; Ittner, W

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes VIPER, the video image-processing system Erlangen. It consists of a general purpose microcomputer, commercially available image-processing hardware modules connected directly to the computer, video input/output-modules such as a TV camera, video recorders and monitors, and a software package. The modular structure and the capabilities of this system are explained. The software is user-friendly, menu-driven and performs image acquisition, transfers, greyscale processing, arithmetics, logical operations, filtering display, colour assignment, graphics, and a couple of management functions. More than 100 image-processing functions are implemented. They are available either by typing a key or by a simple call to the function-subroutine library in application programs. Examples are supplied in the area of biomedical research, e.g. in in-vivo microscopy.

  13. Transient distal renal tubular acidosis following hump nosed viper bite: Two cases from Sri Lanka

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    Ranga M Weerakkody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hump-nosed viper (Hypnale hypnale; HNV is one of the six major snake species in Sri Lanka that cause envenomation. Nephrotoxicity, coagulopathy, and neurotoxicity are wellrecognized features of its envenomation. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis (RTA4 has only once been described previously in this condition, and we report two further cases. Two patients aged 53 and 51 presented following HNV bites with acute kidney injury and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Both underwent multiple cycles of hemodialysis until the polyuric phase was reached. Despite polyuria, both patients developed resistant hyperkalemia that needed further hemodialysis. The urinary pH, arterial pH, delta ratio, and transtubular potassium gradient confirmed RTA4. HNV venom has been shown to damage the proximal convoluted tubules in animal studies, but not the distal convoluted tubule, and hence the mechanism of our observation in these two patients is unclear. Unexplained hyperkalemia in recovery phase of HNV bite should raise suspicions of RTA4.

  14. Risk factors for high-grade envenomations after French viper bites in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, Isabelle; Maréchal, Céline; Gurrera, Emmanuel; Cordier, Laurie; Honorat, Raphaele; Grouteau, Erick

    2012-07-01

    Viper bites and subsequent evolution to severe envenomations are more frequent in children. The aims of this study were to describe the clinical, biological, and therapeutic characteristics of children bitten by vipers in France and to identify risk factors associated with severe envenomations. A retrospective study was conducted between 2001 and 2009 in the pediatric emergency department of a tertiary-level children hospital. Collected data were age and sex of children; day and time of admission; day, time, and circumstances of the accident; snake identification; bite location; envenomation severity; presence of fang marks; prehospital care; use of specific immunotherapy and associated treatments; length of stay; and hospital course. Fifty-eight children were included (43 boys, 15 girls). The mean age was 7.8 ± 4.1 years. Bites were most often located on the lower extremities (77%). The classification of envenomation was: 83% low grade (absence or minor envenomation) and 17% high-grade (moderate to severe envenomations). All high-grade envenomations received specific immunotherapy (Viperfav). Being bitten on an upper extremity (P level (P = 0.016) were associated with a significant risk of high-grade envenomation. In the multivariate analysis, 3 factors remained significant: upper-extremity location (relative risk [RR], 60.5 [3.5-1040]; P = 0.005), immediate violent pain (RR, 21.5 [1.3-364.5]; P = 0.03), and female sex (RR, 17.5 [0.9-320.3]; P = 0.053). A certain number of criteria seem related to more significant risk of progression to high-grade envenomation. Bites to the upper extremities should be carefully observed because of the risk of evolution to a high-grade envenomation.

  15. Epidemiology and clinical effects of hump-nosed pit viper (Genus: Hypnale) envenoming in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduwage, Kalana; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Silva, Anjana; Bowatta, Sunil; Mendis, Suresh; Gawarammana, Indika

    2013-01-01

    Hump-nosed pit vipers of Genus Hypnale are the commonest cause of snake bite in Sri Lanka. Although there are many reports of local effects, coagulopathy and acute kidney injury, it remains unclear how frequent these clinical effects are and therefore the medical importance of this snake genus. The genus has been recently revised to include Hypnale hypnale from Sri Lanka and Western Ghats of Southern India, and the two endemic species to Sri Lanka, Hypnale zara and Hypnale nepa. This was a prospective hospital-based clinical study of definite Hypnale spp. bites from July 2008 to July 2010 in six Sri Lankan hospitals. There were 114 patients included and all snakes were correctly identified by hospital staff as Hypnale spp. Of these, 93 snakes were identified as H. hypnale by an expert, 16 as H. zara and five as H. nepa. Most bites occurred on the lower limbs in the daytime. There was no difference in the clinical effects between the three species. Pain and fang marks were present in all patients, 101 had local swelling and only 16 (14%) developed extensive local swelling that spread proximally and involved more than half of the bitten limb. Systemic symptoms occurred in 18 patients; four patients had an abnormal 20 min whole blood clotting test and one patient developed an acute kidney injury that required haemodialysis. All patients were discharged alive with a median length of stay of 2 days. This study confirms that hump-nosed viper bites cause only minor effects in most cases. Future studies need to undertake formal coagulation studies and identify important early indicators of renal impairment. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. THE USE OF THE ANTI-VENOM SPECIFIC ANTIBODIES ISOLATED FROM DUCK EGGS FOR INACTIVATION OF THE VIPER VENOM

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    ADRIANA CRISTE

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The activity of specific anti-venom can be demonstrated using protection test in laboratory mice. Our study aimed to emphasize the possibility of viper venom inactivation by the antibodies produced and isolated from duck eggs and also to the activation concentration of these antibodies. The venom used for inoculation was harvested from two viper species (Vipera ammodytes and Vipera berus. The immunoglobulin extract had a better activity on the venom from Vipera berus compared to the venom from Vipera ammodytes. This could be the result of a better immunological response, as consequence of the immunization with this type of venom, compared to the response recorded when the Vipera ammodytes venom was used. Besides the advantages of low cost, high productivity and reduced risk of anaphylactic shock, the duck eggs also have high activity up to dilutions of 1/16, 1/32, respectively, with specific activity and 100 surviving in individuals which received 3 x DL50.

  17. Venomics of Tropidolaemus wagleri, the sexually dimorphic temple pit viper: Unveiling a deeply conserved atypical toxin arsenal

    OpenAIRE

    Choo Hock Tan; Kae Yi Tan; Michelle Khai Khun Yap; Nget Hong Tan

    2017-01-01

    Tropidolaemus wagleri (temple pit viper) is a medically important snake in Southeast Asia. It displays distinct sexual dimorphism and prey specificity, however its venomics and inter-sex venom variation have not been thoroughly investigated. Applying reverse-phase HPLC, we demonstrated that the venom profiles were not significantly affected by sex and geographical locality (Peninsular Malaya, insular Penang, insular Sumatra) of the snakes. Essentially, venoms of both sexes share comparable in...

  18. Type specimens of Crotalus scutulatus (Chordata: Reptilia: Squamata: Viperidae) re-examined, with new evidence after more than a century of confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Michael D.; Gotte, Steve W.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Gilmore, Ned; Poindexter, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The original description of Crotalus scutulatus (Chordata: Reptilia: Squamata: Viperidae) was published in 1861 by Robert Kennicott, who did not identify a type specimen or a type locality. We review the history of specimens purported to be the type(s) and various designations of type locality. We provide evidence that ANSP 7069 (formerly one of two specimens of USNM 5027) is the holotype and that the appropriate type locality is Fort Buchanan, near present-day Sonoita, in Santa Cruz County, Arizona.

  19. Prospection, structural analysis and phylogenetic relationships of endogenous gamma-phospholipase A(2) inhibitors in Brazilian Bothrops snakes (Viperidae, Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevão-Costa, Maria Inácia; Rocha, Bruno Coelho; de Alvarenga Mudado, Maurício; Redondo, Rodrigo; Franco, Glória Regina; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre

    2008-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there have been an increasing number of reports on endogenous phospholipase A(2) inhibitors (PLIs) in the sera of snakes. These studies have demonstrated the existence of three different structural classes of PLIs (alpha, beta and gamma). The gamma class members are potent inhibitors of phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)) from the venom of Viperidae snakes. These enzymes, together with the mammalian pro-inflammatory PLA(2), belong to the IIA class of the PLA(2)-superfamily. Although coming from distinct sources, these phospholipases A(2) share main structural features. For this reason, gammaPLIs have been considered as potential models for the development of selective inhibitors of pro-inflammatory PLA(2) in humans. In spite of the rich diversity of the ophidian fauna in Brazil, only two gammaPLI representatives, from Crotalus durissus terrificus and Lachesis muta, have been described in Brazilian snakes so far. Here we investigated the presence of transcripts of novel gammaPLIs in six Bothrops species (Viperidae, Crotalinae) commonly found in our country: Bothrops alternatus, Bothrops erythromelas, Bothrops jararaca, Bothrops jararacussu, Bothrops moojeni and Bothrops neuwiedi. gammaPLI transcripts were present in every species analysed. The deduced mature proteins possessed 181 amino acid residues following a 19-residue signal peptide, similar to the gammaPLIs from C. d. terrificus taken as our model, with the exception of the deduced proteins from B. erythromelas and B. neuwiedi snakes. In these particular cases, an insertion of 4-amino acid residues was consistently present. A Bayesian tree was obtained for the Brazilian Bothrops gammaPLIs, showing four clusters: (1) L. muta and B. jararacussu, (2) B. alternatus, (3) B. erythromelas and B. neuwiedi, (4) B. jararaca and B. moojeni. Detailed structural analysis and further comparisons of these novel Bothrops inhibitors with gammaPLIs from New and Old World snakes are provided.

  20. Common Viper Bites in the Czech Republic - Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects during 15 Year Period (1999–2013

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    Jiří Valenta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse most important epidemiological and clinical aspects of registered snakebites caused by a native common European viper Vipera berus in the Czech Republic over a period of 15 years (1999–2013. Data have been collected retrospectively from a database of the Toxinology Centre belonging to the General University Hospital in Prague. In total, 191 cases of snakebites caused by common viper were registered during the study period. Systemic envenoming occurred in 49 (25.7% patients, local envenoming without systemic symptoms was recorded in 91 (47.6% and asymptomatic dry bites were seen in 51 (26.7% cases, respectively. Twenty-four patients (12.6% of all bites were treated with administration of antivenom. None of the victims died as a result of snakebite during the observation period. Native viper snakes usually did not cause serious harm to the patients, with the exception of children. Antivenom should be administered in all cases with systemic manifestations, in children even with serious local affection and administered as soon as possible. Envenomed patients should be admitted to the hospital and treated at least under supervision of specialists with experience in snakebite treatment, who can indicate and provide administration of the antivenom.

  1. Oral bacterial flora of the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) and bamboo pit viper (Trimeresurus albolabris) in Hong Kong SAR, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, K C; Tsui, K L; Lam, K K; Crow, P; Ng, Kenneth H L; Ades, G; Yip, K T; Grioni, Alessandro; Tan, K S; Lung, David C; Lam, Tommy S K; Fung, H T; Que, T L; Kam, C W

    2009-06-01

    To determine the oral bacterial flora associated with two common local venomous snakes in Hong Kong, namely the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) and the bamboo pit viper (Trimeresurus albolabris). Cross-sectional study. A non-government organisation and a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Thirty-two Chinese cobras and seven bamboo pit vipers. Species identification of bacteria in the oral cavity of both snakes and their antibiotic susceptibilities. The oral cavity of Chinese cobra harbour a wide range of pathogenic bacteria, including: Gram-negative bacterial species like Morganella morganii, Aeromonas hydrophila and Proteus, and Gram-positive bacteria like Enterococcus faecalis, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus as well as anaerobic species (clostridia). The oral cavity of the Chinese cobra is more likely than that of the bamboo pit viper to harbour pathogenic bacteria associated with snakebite infection (Pcobra (Pcobra bites may be beneficial, owing to the multiple pathogenic bacteria in its oral cavity and the higher risk of ensuing necrosis. The regimen of levofloxacin plus amoxicillin/clavulanate appears promising for this purpose, but further study is required to confirm its clinical utility in patients.

  2. Common viper bites in the Czech Republic - epidemiological and clinical aspects during 15 year period (1999-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Jiří; Stach, Zdeněk; Stříteský, Martin; Michálek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse most important epidemiological and clinical aspects of registered snakebites caused by a native common European viper Vipera berus in the Czech Republic over a period of 15 years (1999–2013). Data have been collected retrospectively from a database of the Toxinology Centre belonging to the General University Hospital in Prague. In total, 191 cases of snakebites caused by common viper were registered during the study period. Systemic envenoming occurred in 49 (25.7%) patients, local envenoming without systemic symptoms was recorded in 91 (47.6%) and asymptomatic dry bites were seen in 51 (26.7%) cases, respectively. Twenty-four patients (12.6% of all bites) were treated with administration of antivenom. None of the victims died as a result of snakebite during the observation period. Native viper snakes usually did not cause serious harm to the patients, with the exception of children. Antivenom should be administered in all cases with systemic manifestations, in children even with serious local affection and administered as soon as possible. Envenomed patients should be admitted to the hospital and treated at least under supervision of specialists with experience in snakebite treatment, who can indicate and provide administration of the antivenom.

  3. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The distinct build-up of dense and normal massive passive galaxies

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    Gargiulo, A.; Bolzonella, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Krywult, J.; De Lucia, G.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Haines, C.; Hawken, A. J.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We have used the final data from the VIPERS redshift survey to extract an unparalleled sample of more than 2000 massive ℳ≥1011 M⊙ passive galaxies (MPGs) at redshift 0.5≤z≤1.0, based on their NUVrK colours. This has enabled us to investigate how the population of these objects was built up over cosmic time. We find that the evolution of the number density depends on the galaxy mean surface stellar mass density, Σ. In particular, dense (Σ≥2000 M⊙ pc-2) MPGs show a constant comoving number density over this redshift range, whilst this increases by a factor of approximately four for the least dense objects, defined as having Σ programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  4. Cross reactivity and lethality neutralization of venoms of Indonesian Trimeresurus complex species by Thai Green Pit Viper Antivenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choo Hock; Liew, Jia Lee; Tan, Nget Hong; Khaldun, Ismail Ahmad; Maharani, Tri; Khomvilai, Sumana; Sitprija, Visith

    2017-10-16

    Arboreal pit vipers of the Trimeresurus complex group are medically important species in Indonesia (west of Wallace's line), but there is no specific antivenom produced in the country for treating related envenomation. Instead, the exiting trivalent Indonesian antivenom, Biosave(®) Serum Anti Bisa Ular (SABU, indicated for envenoming by Malayan pit viper, Javan spitting cobra and banded krait) is often misused to treat Trimeresus envenoming resulting in poor therapeutic outcome. Here, we investigated the cross-reactivity and neutralization capability of Thai Green Pit Viper Antivenom (GPVAV) against the venoms of four Indonesian Trimeresurus species. Consistently, the venoms of Trimeresurus (Trimeresurus) insularis, Trimeresurus (Trimeresurus) purpureomaculatus, Trimeresurus (Parias) hageni and Trimeresurus (Craspedocephalus) puniceus of Indonesia showed stronger immunoreactivity on ELISA to GPVAV than to Biosave(®). The findings correlated with in vivo neutralization results, whereby GPVAV was far more effective than Biosave(®) in cross-neutralizing the lethality of the venoms by a potency of at least 15 to 80 times higher. The efficacy of GPVAV is partly attributable to its cross-neutralization of the procoagulant effect of the venoms, thereby mitigating the progression of venom-induced consumptive coagulopathy. The paraspecific effectiveness of GPVAV against Trimeresurus species envenoming in Indonesia await further clinical investigation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Immunological Cross-Reactivity and Neutralisation of European Viper Venoms with the Monospecific Vipera berus Antivenom ViperaTAb

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    Nicholas R. Casewell

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Medically important cases of snakebite in Europe are predominately caused by European vipers of the genus Vipera. The mainstay of snakebite therapy is polyclonal antibody therapy, referred to as antivenom. Here we investigate the capability of the monospecific V. berus antivenom, ViperaTAb®, to cross-react with, and neutralise lethality induced by, a variety of European vipers. Using ELISA and immunoblotting, we find that ViperaTAb® antibodies recognise and bind to the majority of toxic components found in the venoms of the Vipera species tested at comparably high levels to those observed with V. berus. Using in vivo pre-clinical efficacy studies, we demonstrate that ViperaTAb® effectively neutralises lethality induced by V. berus, V. aspis, V. ammodytes and V. latastei venoms and at much higher levels than those outlined by regulatory pharmacopoeial guidelines. Notably, venom neutralisation was found to be superior to (V. berus, V. aspis and V. latastei, or as equally effective as (V. ammodytes, the monospecific V. ammodytes “Zagreb antivenom”, which has long been successfully used for treating European snake envenomings. This study suggests that ViperaTAb® may be a valuable therapeutic product for treating snakebite by a variety of European vipers found throughout the continent.

  6. Immunological Cross-Reactivity and Neutralisation of European Viper Venoms with the Monospecific Vipera berus Antivenom ViperaTAb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casewell, Nicholas R.; Al-Abdulla, Ibrahim; Smith, David; Coxon, Ruth; Landon, John

    2014-01-01

    Medically important cases of snakebite in Europe are predominately caused by European vipers of the genus Vipera. The mainstay of snakebite therapy is polyclonal antibody therapy, referred to as antivenom. Here we investigate the capability of the monospecific V. berus antivenom, ViperaTAb®, to cross-react with, and neutralise lethality induced by, a variety of European vipers. Using ELISA and immunoblotting, we find that ViperaTAb® antibodies recognise and bind to the majority of toxic components found in the venoms of the Vipera species tested at comparably high levels to those observed with V. berus. Using in vivo pre-clinical efficacy studies, we demonstrate that ViperaTAb® effectively neutralises lethality induced by V. berus, V. aspis, V. ammodytes and V. latastei venoms and at much higher levels than those outlined by regulatory pharmacopoeial guidelines. Notably, venom neutralisation was found to be superior to (V. berus, V. aspis and V. latastei), or as equally effective as (V. ammodytes), the monospecific V. ammodytes “Zagreb antivenom”, which has long been successfully used for treating European snake envenomings. This study suggests that ViperaTAb® may be a valuable therapeutic product for treating snakebite by a variety of European vipers found throughout the continent. PMID:25153254

  7. Detection of venom after antivenom is not associated with persistent coagulopathy in a prospective cohort of Russell's viper (Daboia russelii envenomings.

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    Kalana Maduwage

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Venom recurrence or persistence in the circulation after antivenom treatment has been documented many times in viper envenoming. However, it has not been associated with clinical recurrence for many snakes, including Russell's viper (Daboia spp.. We compare the recovery of coagulopathy to the recurrence or persistence of venom in patients with Russell's viper envenoming.The study included patients with Russell's viper (D. russelii envenoming presenting over a 30 month period who had Russell's viper venom detected by enzyme immunoassay. Demographics, information on the snake bite, and clinical effects were collected for all patients. All patients had serum collected for venom specific enzyme immunoassay and citrate plasma to measure fibrinogen levels and prothrombin time (international normalised ratio; INR. Patients with venom recurrence/persistence were compared to those with no detectable recurrence of venom. There were 55 patients with confirmed Russell's viper envenoming and coagulopathy with low fibrinogen concentrations: 31 with venom recurrence/persistence, and 24 with no venom detected post-antivenom. Fibrinogen concentrations increased and INR decreased after antivenom in both the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, antivenom dose and length of hospital were similar for both groups. Pre-antivenom venom concentrations were higher in patients with venom recurrence/persistence with a median venom concentration of 385 ng/mL (16-1521 ng/mL compared to 128 ng/mL (14-1492 ng/mL; p = 0.008.Recurrence of Russell's viper venom was not associated with a recurrence of coagulopathy and length of hospital stay. Further work is required to determine if the detection of venom recurrence is due to the venom specific enzyme immunoassay detecting both venom-antivenom complexes as well as free venom.

  8. Climate change and peripheral populations: predictions for a relict Mediterranean viper

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    José C. Brito

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecological niche-based models were developed in peripheral populations of Vipera latastei North Africa to: 1 identify environmental factors related to species occurrence; 2 identify present suitable areas; 3 estimate future areas according to forecasted scenarios of climate change; and 4 quantify habitat suitability changes between present and future climatic scenarios. Field observations were combined with environmental factors to derive an ensemble of predictions of species occurrence. The resulting models were projected to the future North African environmental scenarios. Species occurrence was most related to precipitation variation. Present suitable habitats were fragmented and ranged from coastal to mountain habitats, and the overall fragmented range suggests a relict distribution from wider past ranges. Future projections suggest a progressive decrease in suitable areas. The relationship with precipitation supports the current unsuitability of most North Africa for the species and predicts future increased extinction risk. Monitoring of population trends and full protection of mountain forests are key-targets for long-term conservation of African populations of this viper. Predicted trends may give indications about other peripheral populations of Palearctic vertebrates in North Africa which should be assessed in detail.

  9. The life and viper of Dr Patrick Russell MD FRS (1727-1805): physician and naturalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, B J

    1994-11-01

    It is nearly two hundred years since the publication in 1796 of An Account of Indian Serpents collected on the Coast of Coromandel by Patrick Russell. Within the folio is a drawing and description of the venomous snake called Katuka Rekula Poda in the local Telugu language, whose venom was shown experimentally by Dr Russell to be nearly as lethal as that of Cobra de Capello. The snake is now known as Vipera russelli or Russell's viper. Dr Russell was representative of the naturalistic tendency of British medicine in the late 18th century. He was a keen observer and skilled doctor in clinical practice, particularly in Aleppo, Syria, during an outbreak of the plague, and indefatigable in his study of plant and animal life both in Aleppo and later in the Madras Province of India. As a physician as well as Naturalist to the East India Company in the Carnatic he was concerned with the problem of snakebite. His first aim was to find a means whereby the non-specialist could distinguish between poisonous and harmless snakes and so combat the terrible notion that all bites were mortal. His writing, encompassing social and natural histories and climaxed by a study of snakes, has left a rich legacy. Dr Patrick Russell was a man of the highest integrity and ability, a physician and naturalist par excellence.

  10. Venoms of South Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Genus: Hypnale cause muscarinic effects in BALB/c mice

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    A Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical, in-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest the necrotic, haemorrhagic, pro-coagulant and nephrotoxic effects of South Asian Hump nosed pit vipers, reports on neurotoxic properties are limited to a single in-vitro study. Using BALB/c mice, for the first time, here we demonstrate the signs of envenoming suggestive of possible muscarinic effects of the venoms of all three Hypnale species. Further, we demonstrate that the muscarinic effects are occurred at lower venom doses by H. hypnale venom, compared to H. nepa and H. zara.

  11. Novel role of antiplatelet agents (aspirin plus clopidogrel in an incoagulable blood of a victim of russell's viper snakebite

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    H. S. Bawaskar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake antivenom is a specific antidote to the venom action, neutralizing the circulating venom. However, it fails to neutralize the venom fixed to target organs such as platelets, renal tubules, etc. Russell's viper venom initiates rapid coagulation in a victim by activating blood platelets, factors V, X, and anticoagulant cofactors. Activation of thrombin, resulting in formation of micro-thrombi, fibrinolysis, and a vicious cascade, sets in. Inhibition of activated platelets by aspirin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor and clopidogrel (ADP receptor inhibitor helps to break this vicious circle induced by Russell's venom and may initiate the natural physiological clotting mechanism. They can be utilized as an adjuvant treatment.

  12. Dilute Russell's viper venom time reagents in lupus anticoagulant testing: a well-considered choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreter, Barbara; Devreese, Katrien M J

    2017-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulant (LAC) detection represents diagnostic challenges among which the multitude of available reagents and interference by anticoagulant treatment. One of the two advised tests is the dilute Russell's viper venom time (dRVVT). However, it is currently not clear whether all dRVVT reagents may be considered equivalent. The objective of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of two dRVVT reagents, with special attention to the influence of anticoagulant therapy. STA®-Staclot® dRVV Screen/Confirm (Stago, Asnières-sur-Seine, France) and dRVT-LS/dRVTL-LR (Haematex, Hornsby, Australia) were evaluated on 443 patient samples [358 consecutive patients with LAC request including six antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) patients, 18 non-consecutively selected APS patients and 37 vitamin K antagonists (VKA)-treated and 30 direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC)-treated non-APS patients]. Additionally, pooled normal plasma (PNP) was spiked with factor deficient plasma (n=33) and DOAC calibrators (n=21) to evaluate sensitivity for factor deficiencies and false-positivity rates, respectively. A higher number of samples were defined as LAC positive by Stago vs. Haematex [11.5% (41/358) vs. 3.63% (13/358)]. Most discordances were in the VKA and DOAC group. Haematex was less prone to VKA-related factor deficiencies, explaining the absence of false-positive LAC results in VKA-treated non-APS patients compared to 10.8% with Stago. We observed no false-positive LAC ratios with Haematex in DOAC-spiked PNP and a lower number in DOAC-treated non-APS patients. However, increased specificity seemed to be at cost of a reduced sensitivity as Haematex showed less positive APS patient samples (45.8% vs. 87.5%). dRVVT reagents differ in LAC sensitivity and for VKA and DOAC interference.

  13. Phospholipases a2 from Viperidae snakes: Differences in membranotropic activity between enzymatically active toxin and its inactive isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaryan, Narine A; Ghulikyan, Lusine; Kishmiryan, Arsen; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Utkin, Yuri N; Tsetlin, Victor I; Lomonte, Bruno; Ayvazyan, Naira M

    2015-02-01

    We describe the interaction of various phospholipases A2 (PLA2) from snake venoms of the family Viperidae (Macrovipera lebetina obtusa, Vipera ursinii renardi, Bothrops asper) with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of natural brain phospholipids mixture, visualized through fluorescence microscopy. The membrane fluorescent probes 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonicacid (ANS), LAUDRAN and PRODAN were used to assess the state of the membrane and specifically mark the lipid packing and membrane fluidity. Our results have shown that the three PLA2s which contain either of aspartic acid, serine, or lysine residues at position 49 in the catalytic center, have different effects on the vesicles. The PLA2 with aspartic acid at this position causes the oval deformation of the vesicles, while serine and lysine-containing enzymes lead to an appreciable increase of fluorescence intensity in the vesicles membrane, wherein the shape and dimensions of GUVs have not changed, but in this case GUV aggregation occurs. LAURDAN and PRODAN detect the extent of water penetration into the bilayer surface. We calculated generalized polarization function (GP), showing that for all cases (D49 PLA2, S49 PLA2 and K49 PLA2) both LAUDRAN and PRODAN GP values decrease. A higher LAURDAN GP is indicative of low water penetration in the lipid bilayer in case of K49 PLA2 compared with D49 PLA2, whereas the PRODAN mainly gives information when lipid is in liquid crystalline phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PROVENANCE SNAKES OF GENUS Bothrops AND Crotalus (VIPERIDAE CATALOGED IN SERPENTARIUM ZOO UNIVERSITY OF CAXIAS DO SUL (UCS

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    Ezequiel Capeletti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Snakes are reptiles that have large environmental adaptations, which favored it's distribution among the various ecosystems. In Brazil, there are found 392 species of snakes, while in Rio Grande do Sul (RS, this research field, 79 species have been described, of which there is the Viperidae family. The objective of this work is to verify the origin of snakes of genus Bothrops and Crotalus, according to the records of the last 15 years of the serpentarium the University of Caxias do Sul, representing the first survey in captivity of the northeastern region of RS. By extension, we seek to investigate whether there is a relationship between the amount of snakes records and abiotic factors: precipitation, temperature and humidity during the period. The research was developed at UCS's serpentarium, by documental analysis of notebook records describing serpents entries between the years 2000 and 2014, in addition to literature review that helped to understand the distribution of the species and gather of the environmental parameters at the Instituto Nacional de Metereologia for further analysis. It was found that the received species are distributed in 26 cities in the RS state, of which the highlights are the municities of Nova Petrópolis and Caxias do Sul, with 148 and 42 individuals respectively. Further, it was found that there was no relationship between the amount of animals and registered temperature, precipitation and humidity. Keywords: Geographic distribution; Bothrops; Crotalus; abiotic factors; northeastern RS.

  15. Comparison of cobas 4800, m2000, Viper XTR, and Infinity 80 Automated Instruments When Processing Urine Specimens for the Diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernesky, Max A; Jang, Dan; Gilchrist, Jodi; Smieja, Marek; Arias, Manuel; Hatchette, Todd; Poirier, Andre; Mayne, Donna; Ratnam, Sam

    2017-03-01

    North American and European advisory groups recommend testing for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) with nucleic acid amplification tests. Testing is often performed on automated instruments. The objectives of this study were to process urines for the diagnosis of CT and NG and to examine workflow procedures and outcomes. While processing 1, 24, 48, 96, and 192 urine specimens on 3 batch-mode systems which use 96-well plates: cobas 4800, m2000, and Viper XTR and the random access cartridge testing GeneXpert Infinity 80, we measured assay performance, hands-on time for processing and maintenance, reagents and plastics consumption, time required to obtain results, and testing accuracy. The Infinity 80 required the least hands-on time for single specimens and smaller batches, whereas the Viper XTR and m2000 required the most hands-on time for all batch sizes. Cumulative daily, weekly, and monthly maintenance was highest for the Viper XTR and lowest for Infinity 80. All batch-mode instruments consumed large amounts of disposables. Time to results was shortest for the Infinity 80, and the Viper XTR provided the shortest time for the batch-mode instruments. All systems showed similar diagnostic accuracy. Because detection performances were similar, issues of hands-on time, maintenance, time to results, and consumables are important operational factors for the diagnosis and treatment of CT/NG infections.

  16. Production of high titre antibody response against Russell's viper venom in mice immunized with ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. (Piperaceae) and piperine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, P A; Nipate, S S; Sonpetkar, J M; Salvi, N C; Waghmare, A B; Chaudhari, P D

    2014-01-15

    Piper longum L. fruits have been traditionally used against snakebites in north-eastern and southern region of India. The aim of the study was to assess the production of antibody response against Russell's viper venom in mice after prophylactic immunization with ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. and piperine. The mice sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against Russell's viper venom by in vitro lethality neutralization assay and in vivo lethality neutralization assay. Polyvalent anti-snake venom serum (antivenom) manufactured by Haffkine Bio-Pharmaceutical Corporation Ltd. was used as standard. Further confirmation of presence of antibodies against the venom in sera of mice immunized with PLE and piperine was done using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double immunodiffusion test. Treatment with PLE-treated mice serum and piperine-treated mice serum was found to inhibit the lethal action of venom both in the in vitro lethality neutralization assay and in vivo lethality neutralization assay. ELISA testing indicated that there were significantly high (pPiper longum and piperine produced a high titre antibody response against Russell's viper venom in mice. The antibodies against PLE and piperine could be useful in antivenom therapy of Russell's viper bites. PLE and piperine may also have a potential interest in view of the development of antivenom formulations used as antidote against snake bites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Venoms from Russian Vipers of Pelias Group: Phospholipases A₂ are the Main Venom Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Starkov, Vladislav G; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2016-04-12

    Venoms of most Russian viper species are poorly characterized. Here, by quantitative chromato-mass-spectrometry, we analyzed protein and peptide compositions of venoms from four Vipera species (V. kaznakovi, V. renardi, V. orlovi and V. nikolskii) inhabiting different regions of Russia. In all these species, the main components were phospholipases A₂, their content ranging from 24% in V. orlovi to 65% in V. nikolskii. Altogether, enzyme content in venom of V. nikolskii reached ~85%. Among the non-enzymatic proteins, the most abundant were disintegrins (14%) in the V. renardi venom, C-type lectin like (12.5%) in V. kaznakovi, cysteine-rich venom proteins (12%) in V. orlovi and venom endothelial growth factors (8%) in V. nikolskii. In total, 210 proteins and 512 endogenous peptides were identified in the four viper venoms. They represented 14 snake venom protein families, most of which were found in the venoms of Vipera snakes previously. However, phospholipase B and nucleotide degrading enzymes were reported here for the first time. Compositions of V. kaznakovi and V. orlovi venoms were described for the first time and showed the greatest similarity among the four venoms studied, which probably reflected close relationship between these species within the "kaznakovi" complex.

  18. One strategy for arthroscopic suture fixation of tibial intercondylar eminence fractures using the Meniscal Viper Repair System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochiai Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Principles for the treatment of tibial intercondylar eminence fracture are early reduction and stable fixation. Numerous ways to treatment of this fracture have been invented. We designed a simple, low-invasive, and arthroscopic surgical strategy for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture utilizing the Meniscal Viper Repair System used for arthroscopic meniscal suture. Methods We studied 5 patients, who underwent arthroscopic suture fixation that we modified. The present technique utilized the Meniscal Viper Repair System for arthroscopic suture of the meniscus. With one handling, a high-strength ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene(UHMWPE suture can be passed through the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and the loops for suture retrieval placed at both sides of ACL. Surgical results were evaluated by the presence or absence of bone union on plain radiographs, postoperative range of motion of the knee joint, the side-to-side differences measured by Telos SE, and Lysholm scores. Results The reduced position achieved after surgery was maintained and good function was obtained in all cases. The mean distance of tibia anterior displacement and assessment by Lysholm score showed good surgical results. Conclusion This method simplified the conventional arthroscopic suture fixation and increased its precision, and was applicable to Type II fractures that could be reduced, as well as surgically indicated Types III and IV. The present series suggested that our surgical approach was a useful surgical intervention for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture.

  19. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS): galaxy segregation inside filaments at z ≃ 0.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, N.; Arnouts, S.; Vibert, D.; de la Torre, S.; Moutard, T.; Pichon, C.; Davidzon, I.; Kraljic, K.; Bolzonella, M.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Granett, B. R.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Dubois, Y.; Hawken, A.; Ilbert, O.; Laigle, C.; Moscardini, L.; Sousbie, T.; Treyer, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first quantitative detection of large-scale filamentary structure at z ≃ 0.7 in the large cosmological volume probed by the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We use simulations to show the capability of VIPERS to recover robust topological features in the galaxy distribution, in particular the filamentary network. We then investigate how galaxies with different stellar masses and stellar activities are distributed around the filaments, and find a significant segregation, with the most massive or quiescent galaxies being closer to the filament axis than less massive or active galaxies. The signal persists even after downweighting the contribution of peak regions. Our results suggest that massive and quiescent galaxies assemble their stellar mass through successive mergers during their migration along filaments towards the nodes of the cosmic web. On the other hand, low-mass star-forming galaxies prefer the outer edge of filaments, a vorticity-rich region dominated by smooth accretion, as predicted by the recent spin alignment theory. This emphasizes the role of large-scale cosmic flows in shaping galaxy properties.

  20. Venomics of Tropidolaemus wagleri, the sexually dimorphic temple pit viper: Unveiling a deeply conserved atypical toxin arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choo Hock; Tan, Kae Yi; Yap, Michelle Khai Khun; Tan, Nget Hong

    2017-01-01

    Tropidolaemus wagleri (temple pit viper) is a medically important snake in Southeast Asia. It displays distinct sexual dimorphism and prey specificity, however its venomics and inter-sex venom variation have not been thoroughly investigated. Applying reverse-phase HPLC, we demonstrated that the venom profiles were not significantly affected by sex and geographical locality (Peninsular Malaya, insular Penang, insular Sumatra) of the snakes. Essentially, venoms of both sexes share comparable intravenous median lethal dose (LD50) (0.56–0.63 μg/g) and cause neurotoxic envenomation in mice. LCMS/MS identified six waglerin forms as the predominant lethal principles, comprising 38.2% of total venom proteins. Fourteen other toxin-protein families identified include phospholipase A2, serine proteinase, snaclec and metalloproteinase. In mice, HPLC fractions containing these proteins showed insignificant contribution to the overall venom lethality. Besides, the unique elution pattern of approximately 34.5% of non-lethal, low molecular mass proteins (3–5 kDa) on HPLC could be potential biomarker for this primitive crotalid species. Together, the study unveiled the venom proteome of T. wagleri that is atypical among many pit vipers as it comprises abundant neurotoxic peptides (waglerins) but little hemotoxic proteinases. The findings also revealed that the venom is relatively well conserved intraspecifically despite the drastic morphological differences between sexes. PMID:28240232

  1. Comparison of green pit viper and Agkistrodon halys antivenom in inhibition of coagulopathy due to Trimeresurus albolabris venom: an in-vitro study using human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S K; Yip, S F; Crow, P; Fung, H T; Cheng, J Mh; Tan, K S; Wong, O F; Yeung, D Yt; Wong, Y K; Poon, K M; Ades, G

    2017-02-01

    There are two antivenoms that may be administered in Hong Kong following a bite by Trimeresurus albolabris: the green pit viper antivenom from the Thai Red Cross Society in Thailand and the Agkistrodon halys antivenom from the Shanghai Institute of Biological Products in China. Both are recommended by the Central Coordinating Committee of Accident and Emergency Services of the Hospital Authority for treating patients with a bite by Trimeresurus albolabris. The choice of which antivenom to use is based on physician preference. This study aimed to compare the relative efficacy of the two antivenoms. This in-vitro experimental study was carried out by a wildlife conservation organisation and a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Human plasma from 40 adult health care worker volunteers was collected. The Trimeresurus albolabris venom was added to human plasma and the mixture was assayed after incubation with each antivenom (green pit viper and Agkistrodon halys) using saline as a control. Fibrinogen level and clotting time in both antivenom groups were studied. The mean fibrinogen level was elevated from 0 g/L to 2.86 g/L and 1.11 g/L after the addition of green pit viper antivenom and Agkistrodon halys antivenom, respectively. When mean clotting time was measured, the value was 6.70 minutes in the control, prolonged to more than 360 minutes by green pit viper antivenom and to 19.06 minutes by Agkistrodon halys antivenom. Green pit viper antivenom was superior to Agkistrodon halys antivenom in neutralisation of the thrombin-like and hypofibrinogenaemic activities of Trimeresurus albolabris venom.

  2. Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae two-host life-cycle on Viperidae snakes Ciclo dioxênico em Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidaeparasitando serpentes da família Viperidae

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    Daniel Sobreira Rodrigues

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Amblyomma rotundatum is an ixodid tick that infests ectothermic animals and reproduces exclusively by parthenogenesis. This tick has been frequently reported to infest reptiles and amphibians, under natural conditions and sometimes in captivity. It was described in Brazil and several other countries of South, Central and North America. Although many studies have reported aspects of its biology, none of them has used regularly either ophidian as hosts, or controlled temperature, humidity and luminosity for parasitic stages. The objective of this experiment was to study the life cycle of A. rotundatum feeding on Viperidae snakes under room controlled conditions at 27 ± 1 ºC temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and 12:12 hours photoperiod for parasitic stages, and under B.O.D incubator conditions at 27 ± 1 ºC temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and scotophase for non-parasitic stages. The total duration of the life cycle ranged from 56 to 163 days (mean of 105 days. Two-host life cycle was observed for most of the ixodid population studied.Amblyomma rotundatum é um carrapato da família Ixodidae, parasito de animais pecilotérmicos, e que se reproduz exclusivamente por partenogênese. Este carrapato é frequentemente relatado infestando répteis e anfíbios em condições naturais e, às vezes, em animais de cativeiro. Ele já foi relatado no Brasil e em vários outros países das Américas do Sul, Central e do Norte. Embora muitos estudos sobre sua biologia tenham sido publicados, nunca foram utilizados ofídios como hospedeiros e, tão pouco, foram realizados ensaios com os estádios parasitários sob condições controladas de temperatura, umidade e iluminação. O objetivo deste experimento foi estudar o ciclo biológico de A. rotundatum se alimentando em serpentes da família Viperidae sob condições ambientais controladas a 27 ± 1 ºC de temperatura, 85 ± 10% de umidade relativa do ar e 12:12 horas de fotoperíodo para est

  3. Venom peptide analysis of Vipera ammodytes meridionalis (Viperinae) and Bothrops jararacussu (Crotalinae) demonstrates subfamily-specificity of the peptidome in the family Viperidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawar, Aisha; Trusch, Maria; Georgieva, Dessislava; Spencer, Patrick; Frochaux, Violette; Harder, Sönke; Arni, Raghuvir K; Duhalov, Deyan; Genov, Nicolay; Schlüter, Hartmut; Betzel, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Snake venom peptidomes are valuable sources of pharmacologically active compounds. We analyzed the peptidic fractions (peptides with molecular masses Viperidae family: BPPs are the major peptide component of the Crotalinae venom peptidome lacking Kunitz-type inhibitors (with one exception) while the Viperinae venom, in addition to BPPs, can contain peptides of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor family. We found indications for a post-translational phosphorylation of serine residues in Bothrops jararacussu venom BPP (S[combining low line]QGLPPGPPIP), which could be a regulatory mechanism in their interactions with ACE, and might influence the hypotensive effect. Homology between venom BPPs from Viperidae snakes and venom natriuretic peptide precursors from Elapidae snakes suggests a structural similarity between the respective peptides from the peptidomes of both snake families. The results demonstrate that the venoms of both snakes are rich sources of peptides influencing important physiological systems such as blood pressure regulation and hemostasis. The data can be used for pharmacological and medical applications.

  4. Population Pharmacokinetics of an Indian F(ab'2 Snake Antivenom in Patients with Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii Bites.

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    Geoffrey K Isbister

    Full Text Available There is limited information on antivenom pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of an Indian snake antivenom in humans with Russell's viper bites.Patient data and serial blood samples were collected from patients with Russell's viper (Daboia russelii envenoming in Sri Lanka. All patients received Indian F(ab'2 snake antivenom manufactured by VINS Bioproducts Ltd. Antivenom concentrations were measured with sandwich enzyme immunoassays. Timed antivenom concentrations were analysed using MONOLIXvs4.2. One, two and three compartment models with zero order input and first order elimination kinetics were assessed. Models were parameterized with clearance (CL, intercompartmental clearance (Q, central compartment volume (V and peripheral compartment volume (VP. Between-subject-variability (BSV on relative bioavailability (F was included to account for dose variations. Covariates effects (age, sex, weight, antivenom batch, pre-antivenom concentrations were explored by visual inspection and in model building. There were 75 patients, median age 57 years (40-70 y and 64 (85% were male. 411 antivenom concentration data points were analysed. A two compartment model with zero order input, linear elimination kinetics and a combined error model best described the data. Inclusion of BSV on F and weight as a covariate on V improved the model. Inclusion of pre-antivenom concentrations or different batches on BSV of F did not. Final model parameter estimates were CL,0.078 L h(-1, V,2.2L, Q,0.178 L h(-1 and VP,8.33L. The median half-life of distribution was 4.6 h (10-90%iles:2.6-7.1 h and half-life of elimination, 140 h (10th-90th percentilesx:95-223h.Indian F(ab'2 snake antivenom displayed biexponential disposition pharmacokinetics, with a rapid distribution half-life and more prolonged elimination half-life.

  5. Immunological properties of Hypnale hypnale (hump-nosed pit viper) venom: antibody production with diagnostic and therapeutic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choo Hock; Tan, Nget Hong; Sim, Si Mui; Fung, Shin Yee; Gnanathasan, Christeine Ariaranee

    2012-06-01

    Envenomation by hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale, Hh) in Sri Lanka has caused significant morbidity and mortality, attributed to 35% of total venomous snakebites. In Southwestern India (Kerala), H. hypnale was increasingly identified as a dangerous and common source of envenomation, second to the Russell's viper but ahead of the cobra bites. Unfortunately, there is still no specific antivenom to date. This study aims to investigate the immunological properties of the venom and to assess the feasibility of specific Hh antivenom production as well as the development of a diagnostic assay. Hh venom elicited satisfactory titers of anti-Hh IgG in rabbits after 3rd immunization. The anti-Hh IgG, isolated with caprylic acid precipitation method, was effective in neutralizing the venom lethality (potency=48 LD(50) per ml IgG) as well as its procoagulant, hemorrhagic and necrotic effects, indicating the possibility to produce the specific antivenom using the common immunization regime. Cross-reactivity studies using indirect ELISA showed that anti-Hh IgG cross-reacted extensively with several Asiatic crotalid venoms, particularly that of Calloselasma rhodostoma (73.6%), presumably due to the presence of venom antigens common to both snakes. Levels of immunological cross-reactivity were vastly reduced with double-sandwich ELISA. Further work demonstrated that the assay was able to distinguish and quantify venoms of H. hypnale, Daboia russelii and Echis carinatus sinhaleyus (three common local viperid) used to spike human sera at various concentrations. The assay hence may be a useful investigating tool for diagnosing biting species and studying the time course profile of venom concentrations in blood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bitis gabonica (Gaboon viper) snake venom gland: toward a catalog for the full- length transcripts (cDNA) and proteins

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    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; My-Pham, Van; Harrison, Jim; Garfield, Mark K.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2010-01-01

    The venom gland of the snake Bitis gabonica (Gaboon viper) was used for the first time to construct a unidirectional cDNA phage library followed by high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Hundreds of cDNAs were obtained and clustered into contigs. We found mostly novel full-length cDNA coding for metalloproteases (P-II and P-III classes), Lys49-phospholipase A2, serine proteases with essential mutations in the active site, Kunitz protease inhibitors, several C-type lectins, bradykinin-potentiating peptide, vascular endothelial growth factor, nucleotidases and nucleases, nerve growth factor, and L-amino acid oxidases. Two new members of the recently described short coding region family of disintegrin, displaying RGD and MLD motifs are reported. In addition, we have identified for the first time a cytokine-like molecule and a multi-Kunitz protease inhibitor in snake venoms. The CLUSTAL alignment and the unrooted cladograms for selected families of B. gabonica venom proteins are also presented. A significant number of sequences were devoid of database matches, suggesting that their biologic function remains to be identified. This paper also reports the N-terminus of the 15 most abundant venom proteins and the sequences matching their corresponding transcripts. The electronic version of this manuscript, available on request, contains spreadsheets with hyperlinks to FASTA-formatted files for each contig and the best match to the GenBank and Conserved Domain Databases, in addition to CLUSTAL alignments of each contig. We have thus generated a comprehensive catalog of the B. gabonica venom gland, containing for each secreted protein: i) the predicted molecular weight, ii) the predicted isoelectric point, iii) the accession number, and iv) the putative function. The role of these molecules is discussed in the context of the envenomation caused by the Gaboon viper. PMID:15276202

  7. Evaluation of Mango Seed Kernel Methanolic Extract on Metalloproteases in Carpet Viper (Echisocellatus Venom: An in Vitro Experiment

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    Peculiar Nwanyibunwa Okoro*

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global incidence of snakebite has become a major concern to the community. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mango seed kernel methanol extract on metalloproteases in Carpet Viper (Echis ocellatus venom. Methods: Mango seed kernel methanolic extract was evaluated in vitro for its anti-venom activity and inhibition of metalloproteases of Carpet Viper's (Echis ocellatus venom. Metalloprotease portion was partially purified from the venom of E. ocellatus with a yield of 71%, a purification fold of 2.63 and a specific activity of 19.00 µmol/min/mg protein. Results: The enzyme appeared as a band on SDS-PAGE with a molecular weight of 23 kDa. The kinetic properties of the enzyme showed a Km of 0.31 mg mL-1 and a Vmax of 9.09 µmol min-1. When the enzyme was incubated with the extract, kinetic studies revealed a mixed non-competitive pattern of inhibition with Km values of 0.56 and 1.11 mg mL-1 and Vmaxvalues of 6.67 and 4.17-µmol min-1 for 5% and 20% inhibitor concentrations, respectively. An estimated Ki value of 0.168 mg mL-1 was obtained from a secondary plot demonstrating that the extract had a high affinity for the partially purified enzyme; thus, could serve as an effective inhibitor. Conclusion: Methanol extract of mango seed kernel has a high affinity for the partially purified enzyme, and it might provide an inexpensive and readily available alternative to sheep serum in the management of snakebite envenomation. Therefore, further in vivo studies are necessary to assess its effectiveness and safety.

  8. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  9. Type IV renal tubular acidosis following resolution of acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to hump-nosed viper bite

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    S Karunarathne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hump-nosed viper bite can cause acute kidney injury (AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In some patients, it can cause chronic kidney disease necessitating life-long renal replacement therapy. Lack of effective antivenom makes the management of these patients difficult. A 51-year-old Sri Lankan male was admitted with AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation following a hump-nosed viper bite. He made a complete recovery with blood product support and hemodialysis. Renal biopsy was performed as his renal recovery was prolonged which revealed patchy tubular atrophy and interstitial inflammation suggestive of subacute interstitial nephritis. Later, he presented with hyperkalemic paralysis and acidosis. A diagnosis of late onset type 4 renal tubular acidosis was made and he responded well to a course of fludrocortisone.

  10. [Genetic divergence of Vipera berus and Vipera nikolskii (Reptilia: Viperidae, Vipera) populations in lower Volga and adjacent territories assessed according to the sequences of cytochrome oxidase III 12S ribosome RNA genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, R V; Zav'ialov, E V; Velikov, V A; Tabachishin, V G

    2008-02-01

    The nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial genome fragments containing the genes coding for cytochrome oxidase subunit III (COIII) and 12S ribosomal RNA of common European viper and Nikolsky's viper from various habitats (Saratov, Samara, and Penza oblasts; Chuvash Republic; and the Republic of Mordovia) were determined. According to the sequencing data, all samples clustered into two groups except for a number of individuals carrying single mutations in the genes in question. One group comprised V. nikolskii from Saratov oblast and the other, V. berus from the Chuvash Republic, Republic of Mordovia, and Samara and Penza oblasts. These results comply with the available data on the karyotypes of the studied vipers of this region. Further genetic studies of V. nikolskii and V. berus from various parts of this area are necessary.

  11. Heterodimeric neurotoxic phospholipases A2--the first proteins from venom of recently established species Vipera nikolskii: implication of venom composition in viper systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, Anna S; Zavada, Larisa L; Starkov, Vladislav G; Kovyazina, Irina V; Subbotina, Tatyana F; Kostyukhina, Ekaterina E; Dementieva, Irina N; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V; Utkin, Yuri N

    2008-03-15

    For the first time the venom of recently established viper species Vipera nikolskii was fractionated and two heterodimeric phospholipases A(2) (HDP-1 and HDP-2) were isolated. Isolation of HDP-1 and HDP-2 is the first indication of the presence of two heterodimeric phospholipases A(2) in the venom of one viper species. When tested on the frog neuromuscular junction, isolated proteins affected neuromuscular transmission acting presynaptically. Using RP-HPLC, each heterodimer was separated into two monomeric subunits: basic phospholipase A(2) (HDP-1P and HDP-2P) and acidic component without enzymatic activity (HDP-In). The complete primary structures of subunits were deduced from corresponding sequences of cDNAs. The determined amino acid sequences were homologous to those of vipoxin from Vipera ammodytes and vaspin from Vipera aspis. Similar proteins were not found earlier in the well-studied venom of Vipera berus, the species from which V. nikolskii was recently separated. Our finding supports at the biochemical level the correctness of the establishment of V. nikolskii as an independent species. The finding of similar proteins (HDPs and vipoxin) in geographically remote species (V. nikolskii and V. ammodytes) corroborates the hypothesis about the pre-existence of genes encoding these proteins in all true viper species and their expression under certain conditions.

  12. Inhibition of hemorrhagic and edematogenic activities of snake venoms by a broad-spectrum protease inhibitor, murinoglobulin; the effect on venoms from five different genera in Viperidae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Filho, Wilker; Sugiki, Masahiko; Yoshida, Etsuo; Maruyama, Masugi

    2003-08-01

    In order to obtain basic data on the effect of broad-spectrum protease inhibitor against local symptoms of Viperidae snake envenomation, inhibitory capacity of rat murinoglobulin on local hemorrhagic and edematogenic activities of venoms from Crotalus atrox, Bothrops jararaca, Lachesis muta muta, Trimeresurus flavoviridis and Echis carinatus sochureki were examined. Murinoglobulin, pre-incubated with the crude venoms at 37 degrees C for 15 min, inhibited hemorrhagic activity of all five venoms to various extents. The activity of C. atrox was almost completely inhibited at the murinoglobulin/venom ratio (w/w) of 20. The activity of B. jararaca, Lachesis muta muta and T. flavoviridis venoms was considerably inhibited at the ratio of 20 (77.2, 80.0 and 86.2% inhibition, respectively), however some of the activity still remained even at the ratio of 40 (84.2, 79.8 and 86.2% inhibition, respectively). Among the five venoms, E. c. sochureki venom is quite resistant to murinoglobulin treatment and statistically significant inhibition was only found at the ratio of 40 (64.1% inhibition). Fibrinolytic and gelatinase activities were more susceptible to murinoglobulin inhibition. The treatment at the ratios of 10 and 20 almost completely inhibited respectively the fibrinolytic and the gelatinase activities of all the venoms. Murinoglobulin treatment also significantly inhibited the edematogenic activity of L. muta muta, T. flavoviridis and Echis carinatus sochureki. The treatment of murinoglobulin at the ratio of 40 considerably suppressed the swelling up to 60 min after subcutaneous injection of L. muta muta and E. c. sochureki venoms, and up to 30 min after T. flavoviridis venom injection. Murinoglobulin is a potent inhibitor against local effects of multiple snake venoms in Viperidae family.

  13. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

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    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  14. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Grazyna; Gowda, Veerabasappa T; Maroun, Rachid C

    2007-12-06

    The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2), present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL) at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i) presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii) natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii) coagulation factors present in human blood. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa) via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-beta-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS). The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  15. [Mortality from snake bites, wild and domestic animal bites and arthropod stings in the savannah zone of eastern Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trape, J F; Pison, G; Guyavarch, E; Mane, Y

    2002-08-01

    From 1976 to 1999, we conducted a prospective study of overall and cause-specific mortality among the population of 42 villages of south-eastern Senegal. Of 4,228 deaths registered during this period, 26 were brought on by snakebites, 4 by invertebrate stings and 8 by other wild or domestic animals. The average annual mortality rate from snakebite was 14 deaths per 100,000 population. Among persons aged 1 year or more, 0.9% (26/2,880) of deaths were caused by snakebite and this cause represented 28% (26/94) of the total number of deaths by accident. We also investigated the snake fauna of the area. Of 1,280 snakes belonging to 34 species that were collected, one-third were dangerous and the proportion of Viperidae, Elapidae and Atractaspididae was 23%, 11% and 0.6%, respectively. The saw-scaled viper Echis ocellatus was the most abundant species (13.6%). Other venomous species were Causus maculatus (6.5%), Naja katiensis (5.5%), Bitis arietans (2.7%), Elapsoidea trapei (2.4%), Naja nigricollis (1.2%), Naja melanoleuca (1.1%), Atractaspis aterrima (0.4%), Dendroaspis polylepis (0.3%) and Naja haje (0.1%).

  16. High mortality from snakebite in south-eastern Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trape, J F; Pison, G; Guyavarch, E; Mane, Y

    2001-01-01

    Over 24 years, from 1976 to 1999, we conducted a prospective study of overall and cause-specific mortality among the population of 42 villages of south-eastern Senegal. Of 4228 deaths registered during this period, 26 were caused by snakebite, 4 by invertebrate stings and 8 by other wild or domestic animals. The average annual mortality rate from snakebite was 14 deaths per 100,000 population. Among persons aged > or = 1 year, 0.9% (26/2880) of deaths were caused by snakebite and this cause represented 28% (26/94) of total deaths by accidents. We also investigated the snake fauna of the area. Of 1280 snakes belonging to 34 species that were collected, one-third were dangerous and the proportion of Viperidae, Elapidae and Atractaspidae was 23%, 11% and 0.6%, respectively. The saw-scaled viper Echis ocellatus was the most abundant species (13.6%). Other venomous species were Causus maculatus (6.5%), Naja katiensis (5.5%), Bitis arietans (2.7%), Elapsoidea trapei (2.4%), Naja nigricollis (1.2%), Naja melanoleuca (1.1%), Atractaspis aterrima (0.4%), Dendroaspis polylepis (0.3%) and Naja haje (0.1%).

  17. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The coevolution of galaxy morphology and colour to z 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krywult, J.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Pollo, A.; Vergani, D.; Bolzonella, M.; Davidzon, I.; Iovino, A.; Gargiulo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Zamorani, G.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tojeiro, R.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The study of the separation of galaxy types into different classes that share the same characteristics, and of the evolution of the specific parameters used in the classification are fundamental for understanding galaxy evolution. Aims: We explore the evolution of the statistical distribution of galaxy morphological properties and colours combining high-quality imaging data from the CFHT Legacy Survey with the large number of redshifts and extended photometry from the VIPERS survey. Methods: Galaxy structural parameters were combined with absolute magnitudes, colours and redshifts in order to trace evolution in a multi-parameter space. Using a new method we analysed the combination of colours and structural parameters of early- and late-type galaxies in luminosity-redshift space. Results: We find that both the rest-frame colour distributions in the (U-B) vs. (B-V) plane and the Sérsic index distributions are well fitted by a sum of two Gaussians, with a remarkable consistency of red-spheroidal and blue-disky galaxy populations, over the explored redshift (0.5 < z < 1) and luminosity (-1.5 < B-B∗ < 1.0) ranges. The combination of the rest-frame colour and Sérsic index as a function of redshift and luminosity allows us to present the structure of both galaxy types and their evolution. We find that early-type galaxies display only a slow change in their concentrations after z = 1. Their high concentrations were already established at z 1 and depend much more strongly on their luminosity than redshift. In contrast, late-type galaxies clearly become more concentrated with cosmic time with only little evolution in colour, which remains dependent mainly on their luminosity. Conclusions: The combination of rest-frame colours and Sérsic index as a function of redshift and luminosity leads to a precise statistical description of the structure of galaxies and their evolution. Additionally, the proposed method provides a robust way to split galaxies into early

  18. Lance-headed viper (Bothrops moojeni bite wounding the eye Acidente botrópico (Bothrops moojeni com ferimento ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Otaviano Brandão

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old girl was bitten in her left eye by a lance-headed viper identified as Bothrops moojeni, measuring 115 cm of length. There was severe facial swelling and left exophthalmus, and enucleation of the eye was necessary. The patient apparently had mild systemic envenoming, but local inflammatory signs and histological evidence of necrosis suggest that both the mechanical trauma and the local action of the venom had a role in the genesis of the eye lesion. It is arguable if the loss of the eye could be prevented even if the antivenom was administered earlier.Uma menina de 5 anos de idade foi picada no olho esquerdo por uma serpente da espécie Bothrops moojeni, que media 115 cm de comprimento. Houve intenso edema facial e ex-oftalmia; enucleação do olho foi necessária. A paciente aparentemente apresentou um envenenamento sistêmico leve, mas os sinais inflamatórios locais e a evidência histológica de necrose sugerem que tanto o traumatismo mecânico como a ação local do veneno tiveram um papel na gênese da lesão ocular. É questionável se o prognóstico da lesão ocular teria sido diferente se o antiveneno tivesse sido administrado em dose adequada mais precocemente.

  19. Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine) antivenom is effective in the neutralization of South American viperidae venoms in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, William H; Tanen, David A; Tong, Tri C; Betten, David P; Carstairs, Shaun D; Williams, Saralyn R; Cantrell, Frank L; Clark, Richard F

    2005-06-01

    <.001). All animals in the FabAV+normal saline solution group survived to the conclusion of the study. FabAV, when premixed with venom, decreases lethality in a murine model of intraperitoneal venom injection of the South American pit vipers, C durissus terrificus and B atrox .

  20. Preliminary evaluation of total protein concentration and electrophoretic protein fractions in fresh and frozen serum from wild Horned Vipers (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Daniela; de Giorgi, Giada Bagnagatti; Della Pepa, Alessandra; Baggiani, Luciana; Spada, Eva; Perego, Roberta; Comazzi, Carlo; Belloli, Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Determination of the health status of reptiles is based on physical examination and evaluation of hematologic and biochemical values. Evaluation of serum total protein (TP) concentration and protein fractions plays an important role in health assessment; however, little is known about references value for these analytes in wild viperoid snakes. In addition, studies evaluating the stability of proteins in frozen viperoid serum are lacking. The aims of this study were to establish preliminary reference values for concentrations of TP and protein fractions in serum from wild vipers and to evaluate the stability of serum proteins in frozen serum samples from viperoid snakes. Blood samples were collected from wild Horned Vipers (Vipera ammodytes ammodytes). Using fresh serum, TP concentrations were determined using the biuret method and protein fractions were analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE); albumin/globulin ratios were calculated. Analyses were also performed on serum frozen at -20°C for 70 days and then thawed. Pre- and post-storage results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Five adult wild Horned Vipers were sampled and comprised 4 males and 1 female. The female snake had higher TP concentrations than the male snakes. The electrophoretic patterns demonstrated 6 protein fractions that were similar for all 5 snakes. There were no significant changes in the concentrations of the 6 protein fractions post-storage; the percentage of the alpha-1 fraction was increased in frozen/thawed serum. Total protein concentrations in serum from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes were in agreement with published reference intervals for healthy reptiles and viperoid snakes. Serum protein fractions were easy to identify using AGE electrophoresis. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  1. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The matter density and baryon fraction from the galaxy power spectrum at redshift 0.6 < z < 1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, S.; Granett, B. R.; Bel, J.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Wilson, M. J.; Pezzotta, A.; de la Torre, S.; Garilli, B.; Bolzonella, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Percival, W. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Moutard, T.

    2017-05-01

    We use the final catalogue of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) to measure the power spectrum of the galaxy distribution at high redshift, presenting results that extend beyond z = 1 for the first time. We apply a fast Fourier transform technique to four independent subvolumes comprising a total of 51 728 galaxies at 0.6 fashion. We then use covariance matrices derived from a large ensemble of mock datasets in order to fit the spectral data. The results are well matched by a standard ΛCDM model, with density parameter ΩM h = 0.227+0.063-0.050 and baryon fraction fB=ΩB/ΩM=0.220+0.058-0.072. These inferences from the high-z galaxy distribution are consistent with results from local galaxy surveys, and also with the cosmic microwave background. Thus the ΛCDM model gives a good match to cosmic structure at all redshifts currently accessible to observational study. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly under programme 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  2. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). An unprecedented view of galaxies and large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Fritz, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Hudelot, P.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-06-01

    We describe the construction and general features of VIPERS, the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. This ESO Large Programme is using the Very Large Telescope with the aim of building a spectroscopic sample of ~ 100 000 galaxies with iABquality of the spectroscopic data. The stellar contamination is found to be only 3.2%, endorsing the quality of the star-galaxy separation process and fully confirming the original estimates based on the VVDS data, which also indicate a galaxy incompleteness from this process of only 1.4%. Using a set of 1215 repeated observations, we estimate an rms redshift error σz/ (1 + z) = 4.7 × 10-4 and calibrate the internal spectral quality grading. Benefiting from the combination of size and detailed sampling of this dataset, we conclude by presenting a map showing in unprecedented detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies between 5 and 8 billion years ago. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS website is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  3. Analysis of the gut contents of Vipera aspis (Reptilia, Viperidae from an area of Central Italy (Tolfa Mountains, Latium: a new method to study the terrestrial small mammals / Contributo allo studio della microteriofauna di un'area dell'Italia centrale (Monti della Tolfa, Lazio mediante analisi del contenuto stomacale di Vipera aspis (Reptilia, Viperidae

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    Massimo Capula

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A preliminary study of the trophic system between terrestrial small mammals and their specialized predator, the Asp Viper (Vipera aspis, was carried out through analysis of gut contents of 62 Vipera aspis specimens from 6 localities of Tolfa Mountains (Latium, Central Italy. Two different techniques were used in order to obtain the gut contents from a living viper: (i gently pressing its belly; (ii exposing the animal at a low temperature (<8 °C. Twelve out of 18 small mammal species occurring in this area were preyed by the vipers. The number of preyed species is very similar to that observed in the pellets of Tyto alba (Aves, Strigiformes from the same area. The only apparent exception is represented by Microtus savii: this mammal was never preyed by Vipera aspis, although being one of the principal preys of Tyto alba. These data indicate that the analysis of Vipera aspis gut contents could be utilized as a method to integrate faunistic observations on terrestrial micromammals obtained with both traditional and Barn Owl pellets data. Riassunto Nel presente contributo sono stati presi in esame i dati desunti dall'analisi dei contenuti stomacali di 62 esemplari di Vipera aspis catturati in 6 diverse stazioni dei Monti della Tolfa (Lazio, Italia centrale. Tali dati sono stati confrontati con quelli esistenti sui micromammiferi della medesima area ottenuti con l'analisi dei rigetti dei rapaci notturni e con i metodi tradizionali. Le vipere esaminate hanno predato 12 delle 18 specie di micromammiferi terrestri presenti nei Monti della Tolfa. Un numero simile di specie predate è stato osservato nella stessa area con il metodo dell'analisi dei rigetti del Barbagianni (Tyto alba. Tali dati indicano che la metodologia descritta può essere utilizzata efficacemente al fine di integrare i dati faunistici sui micromammiferi

  4. Understanding Russell's viper venom factor V activator's substrate specificity by surface plasmon resonance and in-silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pradeep K; Antonyraj, Christian B; Basheer Ahamed, Syed Ibrahim; Srinivas, Sistla

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation factor V (FV) is activated either by Factor X or thrombin, cleaving at three different sites viz., Site I (Arg709-Ser710), site II (Arg1018-Thr1019), and site III (Arg1545-Ser1546). Russell's viper venom factor V activator (RVV-V) is a thrombin-like serine proteinase that activates FV with selective, single cleavage at site III. A long lasting effort is being pending in understanding the 'selective' binding specificity of the RVV-V towards site III. Here, we present the binding kinetic study of RVV-V with two designed peptides corresponding to the regions from site I (Gln699-Asn713) and site II (1008Lys-Pro1022), respectively, that include 15 amino acids. Our investigation for justifying the binding efficacy and kinetics of peptides includes SPR method, protein-peptide docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and principal component analysis (PCA). Surprisingly, the SPR experiment disclosed that the Peptide II showed a lower binding affinity with KD of 2.775 mM while the Peptide I showed none. Docking and simulation of both the peptides with RVV-V engaged either rooted or shallow binding for Peptide II and Peptide I respectively. The peptide binding resulted in global conformational changes in the native fold of RVV-V, whereas the similar studies for thrombin failed to make major changes in the native fold. In support, the PCA analysis for RVV-V showed the dislocation of catalytic triad upon binding both the peptides. Hence, RVV-V, a serine protease, is incompetent in cleaving these two sites. This study suggests a transition in RVV-V from the native rigid to the distorted flexible structure and paves a way to design a new peptide substrate/inhibitor.

  5. Structural and evolutionary insights into endogenous alpha-phospholipase A2 inhibitors of Latin American pit vipers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevão-Costa, Maria Inácia; Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre H; Mudadu, Maurício de Alvarenga; Franco, Glória Regina; Fontes, Marcos Roberto M; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre

    2016-03-15

    Phospholipases A2 are major components of snake venoms (svPLA2s) and are able to induce multiple local and systemic deleterious effects upon envenomation. Several snake species are provided with svPLA2 inhibitors (sbPLIs) in their circulating blood, which confer a natural resistance against the toxic components of homologous and heterologous venoms. The sbPLIs belong to any of three structural classes named α, β and γ. In the present study, we identified, characterized and performed structural and evolutionary analyses of sbαPLIs transcripts and the encoded proteins, in the most common Latin American pit vipers belonging to Crotalus, Bothrops and Lachesis genera. Mutation data indicated that sbαPLIs from Latin American snakes might have evolved in an accelerated manner, similarly to that reported for sbαPLIs from Asian snakes, and possibly co-evoluted with svPLA2s in response to the diversity of target enzymes. The importance of sbαPLI trimerization for the effective binding and inhibition of acidic svPLA2s is discussed and conserved cationic residues located at the central pore of the inhibitor trimer are suggested to be a significant part of the binding site of sbαPLIs to acidic svPLA2s. Our data contribute to the current body of knowledge on the structural and evolutionary characteristics of sbPLIs, in general, and may assist in the future development of selective inhibitors for secretory PLA2 from several sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The genus Atheris (Serpentes: Viperidae) in East Africa: phylogeny and the role of rifting and climate in shaping the current pattern of species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegon, M; Loader, S P; Marsden, S J; Branch, W R; Davenport, T R B; Ursenbacher, S

    2014-10-01

    Past climatic and tectonic events are believed to have strongly influenced species diversity in the Eastern Afromontane Biodiversity Hotspot. We investigated the phylogenetic relationships and historical biogeography of the East African genus Atheris (Serpentes: Viperidae), and explored temporal and spatial relationships between Atheris species across Africa, and the impact of palaeoclimatic fluctuations and tectonic movements on cladogenesis of the genus. Using mitochondrial sequence data, the phylogeny of East African species of Atheris shows congruent temporal patterns that link diversification to major tectonic and aridification events within East Africa over the last 15million years (my). Our results are consistent with a scenario of a delayed direct west-east colonisation of the Eastern Arc Mountains of Atheris by the formation of the western rift. Based on the phylogenetic patterns, this terrestrial, forest-associated genus has dispersed into East Africa across a divided route, on both west-southeasterly and west-northeasterly directions (a C-shaped route). Cladogenesis in the Eastern Arc Mountains and Southern Highlands of Tanzania corresponds to late Miocene and Plio-Pleistocene climatic shifts. Taxonomically, our data confirmed the monophyly of Atheris as currently defined, and reveal four major East African clades, three of which occur in discrete mountain ranges. Possible cryptic taxa are identified in the Atheris rungweensis and A. ceratophora clades. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Life-threatening envenoming by the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) causing micro-angiopathic haemolysis, coagulopathy and acute renal failure: clinical cases and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneemann, M; Cathomas, R; Laidlaw, S T; El Nahas, A M; Theakston, R D G; Warrell, D A

    2004-11-01

    The desert horned vipers (Cerastes cerastes and C. gasperettii) are the most familiar snakes of the great deserts of North Africa and the Middle East, including the plains of Iraq. They are responsible for many human snake bites. In Western countries, they are popular among exotic-snake keepers. To investigate mechanisms of life-threatening envenoming and treatment. Clinical investigation. Clinical and laboratory studies with measurement of serum venom antigen concentrations by enzyme immunoassay. Two men bitten while handling captive Saharan horned vipers (Cerastes cerastes) in Europe developed extensive local swelling and life-threatening systemic envenoming, characterized by coagulopathy, increased fibrinolysis, thrombocytopenia, micro-angiopathic haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure. The clinical picture is explicable by the presence in C. cerastes venom of several thrombin-like, Factor-X-activating, platelet-aggregating, haemorrhagic and nephrotoxic components. In one case, prophylactic use of subcutaneous epinephrine may have contributed to intracranial haemorrhage. The roles in treatment of heparin (rejected) and specific antivenom (recommended) are discussed. Cerastes cerastes is capable of life-threatening envenoming in humans. Optimal treatment of envenoming is by early administration of specific antivenom, and avoidance of ineffective and potentially-dangerous ancillary methods.

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Polyherbal Formulation against Russell’s Viper and Cobra Venom and Screening of Bioactive Components by Docking Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sakthivel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study emphasizes to reveal the antivenom activity of Aristolochia bracteolata Lam., Tylophora indica (Burm.f. Merrill, and Leucas aspera S. which were evaluated against venoms of Daboia russelli russelli (Russell’s viper and Naja naja (Indian cobra. The aqueous extracts of leaves and roots of the above-mentioned plants and their polyherbal (1 : 1 : 1 formulation at a dose of 200 mg/kg showed protection against envenomed mice with LD50 doses of 0.44 mg/kg and 0.28 mg/kg against Russell’s viper and cobra venom, respectively. In in vitro antioxidant activities sample extracts showed free radical scavenging effects in dose dependent manner. Computational drug design and docking studies were carried out to predict the neutralizing principles of type I phospholipase A2 (PLA2 from Indian common krait venom. This confirmed that aristolochic acid and leucasin can neutralize type I PLA2 enzyme. Results suggest that these plants could serve as a source of natural antioxidants and common antidote for snake bite. However, further studies are needed to identify the lead molecule responsible for antidote activity.

  9. Crotaline Fab antivenom appears to be effective in cases of severe North American pit viper envenomation: An integrative review

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    Mlynarchek Sara L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2000, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine (hereafter, FabAV, "for the management of patients with minimal to moderate North American Crotalid envenomation." Because whole-IgG pit viper antivenom is no longer available in the United States, FabAV is currently the only specific treatment option available to United States clinicians treating snakebite victims of any severity. No clinical trial data are available concerning the effectiveness of FabAV for treatment of severe snakebite, but several published articles describe its use in this setting. Methods We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language medical literature to identify all publications (1996 to July, 2008 containing data about the administration of FabAV. Two trained reviewers separately extracted case-level data concerning the administration of FabAV to patients with severe envenomation by North American crotaline snakes to a standardized form. Descriptive statistics were used. In addition, we hand-searched the US National Poison Data System reports for the years 2000–2006 to identify and describe any reports of death that occurred after FabAV administration. Results The literature review found 147 unique publications regarding FabAV. Twenty-four evaluable cases of severe human envenomation treated with FabAV were identified in 19 publications. Seven cases were described in five cohort studies, and 17 cases were described in 14 single patient case reports or non-cohort case series. Sixty-five specific severe venom effects were reported in these 24 patients, of which 50 effects (77% improved or resolved after FabAV therapy. Initial control of all severe venom effects was achieved in 12 patients (50%. The rate at which initial control was achieved was significantly higher among patients reported in the cohort series than in the case series and non-cohort reports (100% vs. 29%, P = 0

  10. Crotaline Fab antivenom appears to be effective in cases of severe North American pit viper envenomation: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonas, Eric J; Schaeffer, Tammi H; Kokko, Jamie; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Bogdan, Gregory M

    2009-06-22

    In 2000, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) (hereafter, FabAV), "for the management of patients with minimal to moderate North American Crotalid envenomation." Because whole-IgG pit viper antivenom is no longer available in the United States, FabAV is currently the only specific treatment option available to United States clinicians treating snakebite victims of any severity. No clinical trial data are available concerning the effectiveness of FabAV for treatment of severe snakebite, but several published articles describe its use in this setting. We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language medical literature to identify all publications (1996 to July, 2008) containing data about the administration of FabAV. Two trained reviewers separately extracted case-level data concerning the administration of FabAV to patients with severe envenomation by North American crotaline snakes to a standardized form. Descriptive statistics were used. In addition, we hand-searched the US National Poison Data System reports for the years 2000-2006 to identify and describe any reports of death that occurred after FabAV administration. The literature review found 147 unique publications regarding FabAV. Twenty-four evaluable cases of severe human envenomation treated with FabAV were identified in 19 publications. Seven cases were described in five cohort studies, and 17 cases were described in 14 single patient case reports or non-cohort case series. Sixty-five specific severe venom effects were reported in these 24 patients, of which 50 effects (77%) improved or resolved after FabAV therapy. Initial control of all severe venom effects was achieved in 12 patients (50%). The rate at which initial control was achieved was significantly higher among patients reported in the cohort series than in the case series and non-cohort reports (100% vs. 29%, P = 0.005). The median dose of FabAV used to obtain initial

  11. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Downsizing of the blue cloud and the influence of galaxy size on mass quenching over the last eight billion years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, C. P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Guzzo, L.; Davidzon, I.; Bolzonella, M.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; De Lucia, G.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Gargiulo, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Siudek, M.

    2017-08-01

    We use the full VIPERS redshift survey in combination with SDSS-DR7 to explore the relationships between star-formation history (using d4000), stellar mass and galaxy structure, and how these relationships have evolved since z 1. We trace the extents and evolutions of both the blue cloud and red sequence by fitting double Gaussians to the d4000 distribution of galaxies in narrow stellar mass bins, for four redshift intervals over 0 limit of the blue cloud has retreated steadily with time from ℳ 1011.2 M⊙at z 0.9 to ℳ 1010.7 M⊙by the present day. The number density of massive blue-cloud galaxies (ℳ > 1011M⊙, d4000 limit, entering a narrow diagonal region within the size-mass plane termed the "quenching zone", they start to be quenched, their d4000 values increasing to push them towards the green valley. In parallel, their structures change, showing higher Sérsic indices and central stellar mass densities. For these galaxies, bulge growth is required for them to reach the high-mass limit of the blue cloud and be quenched by internal mechanisms. The blue-cloud galaxies that are being quenched at z 0.8 lie along the same size-mass relation as present day quiescent galaxies and seem the likely progenitors of today's S0s. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of satellite DNA sequences from constitutive heterochromatin of the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Viperidae) and the Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Seki, Risako; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-12-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences of the centromeric heterochromatin provide valuable molecular cytogenetic markers for the investigation of genomic compartmentalization in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of sauropsids. Here, the relationship between centromeric heterochromatin and karyotype evolution was examined using cloned repetitive DNA sequences from two snake species, the habu snake (Protobothrops flavoviridis, Crotalinae, Viperidae) and Burmese python (Python bivittatus, Pythonidae). Three satellite DNA (stDNA) families were isolated from the heterochromatin of these snakes: 168-bp PFL-MspI from P. flavoviridis and 196-bp PBI-DdeI and 174-bp PBI-MspI from P. bivittatus. The PFL-MspI and PBI-DdeI sequences were localized to the centromeric regions of most chromosomes in the respective species, suggesting that the two sequences were the major components of the centromeric heterochromatin in these organisms. The PBI-MspI sequence was localized to the pericentromeric region of four chromosome pairs. The PFL-MspI and the PBI-DdeI sequences were conserved only in the genome of closely related species, Gloydius blomhoffii (Crotalinae) and Python molurus, respectively, although their locations on the chromosomes were slightly different. In contrast, the PBI-MspI sequence was also in the genomes of P. molurus and Boa constrictor (Boidae), and additionally localized to the centromeric regions of eight chromosome pairs in B. constrictor, suggesting that this sequence originated in the genome of a common ancestor of Pythonidae and Boidae, approximately 86 million years ago. The three stDNA sequences showed no genomic compartmentalization between the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes, suggesting that homogenization of the centromeric and/or pericentromeric stDNA sequences occurred in the macrochromosomes and microchromosomes of these snakes.

  13. Hypopituitarism following envenoming by Russell's vipers (Daboia siamensis and D. russelii) resembling Sheehan's syndrome: first case report from Sri Lanka, a review of the literature and recommendations for endocrine management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonypillai, C N; Wass, J A H; Warrell, D A; Rajaratnam, H N

    2011-02-01

    Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii and D. siamensis) inhabit 10 South and South East Asian countries. People envenomed by these snakes suffer coagulopathy, bleeding, shock, neurotoxicity, acute kidney injury and local tissue damage leading to severe morbidity and mortality. An unusual complication of Russell's viper bite envenoming in Burma (D. siamensis) and southern India (D. russelii) is hypopituitarism but until now it has not been reported elsewhere. Here, we describe the first case of hypopituitarism following Russell's viper bite in Sri Lanka, review the literature on this subject and make recommendations for endocrine investigation and management. A 49-year-old man was bitten and seriously envenomed by D. russelii in 2005. He was treated with antivenom but although he recovered from the acute effects he remained feeling unwell. Hypopituitarism, with deficiencies of gonadal, steroid and thyroid axes, was diagnosed 3 years later. He showed marked improvement after replacement of anterior pituitary hormones. We attribute his hypopituitarism to D. russelii envenoming. Russell's viper bite is known to cause acute and chronic hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus, perhaps through deposition of fibrin microthrombi and haemorrhage in the pituitary gland resulting from the action of venom procoagulant enzymes and haemorrhagins. Forty nine cases of hypopituitarism following Russell's viper bite have been described in the English language literature. Patients with acute hypopituitarism may present with hypoglycaemia and hypotension during the acute phase of envenoming. Those with chronic hypopituitarism seem to have recovered from envenoming but present later with features of hypopituitarism. Over 85% of these patients had suffered acute kidney injury immediately after the bite. Steroid replacement in acute hypopituitarism is life saving. All 11 patients with chronic hypopituitarism in whom the outcome of treatment was reported, showed marked improvement with hormone

  14. Visual PEF Reader - VIPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Victor; Khanampornpan, Teerapat; Boehmer, Rudy A.; Kim, Rachel Y.

    2011-01-01

    This software graphically displays all pertinent information from a Predicted Events File (PEF) using the Java Swing framework, which allows for multi-platform support. The PEF is hard to weed through when looking for specific information and it is a desire for the MRO (Mars Reconn aissance Orbiter) Mission Planning & Sequencing Team (MPST) to have a different way to visualize the data. This tool will provide the team with a visual way of reviewing and error-checking the sequence product. The front end of the tool contains much of the aesthetically appealing material for viewing. The time stamp is displayed in the top left corner, and highlighted details are displayed in the bottom left corner. The time bar stretches along the top of the window, and the rest of the space is allotted for blocks and step functions. A preferences window is used to control the layout of the sections along with the ability to choose color and size of the blocks. Double-clicking on a block will show information contained within the block. Zooming into a certain level will graphically display that information as an overlay on the block itself. Other functions include using hotkeys to navigate, an option to jump to a specific time, enabling a vertical line, and double-clicking to zoom in/out. The back end involves a configuration file that allows a more experienced user to pre-define the structure of a block, a single event, or a step function. The individual will have to determine what information is important within each block and what actually defines the beginning and end of a block. This gives the user much more flexibility in terms of what the tool is searching for. In addition to the configurability, all the settings in the preferences window are saved in the configuration file as well

  15. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) . Exploring the dependence of the three-point correlation function on stellar mass and luminosity at 0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moresco, M.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Davidzon, I.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Carbone, C.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: The three-point correlation function (3PCF) is a powerful probe to investigate the clustering of matter in the Universe in a complementary way with respect to lower-order statistics, providing additional information with respect to the two-point correlation function and allowing us to shed light on biasing, non-linear processes, and deviations from Gaussian statistics. In this paper, we analyse the first data release of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), determining the dependence of the three-point correlation function on luminosity and stellar mass at z = [ 0.5,1.1 ]. Methods: We exploit the VIPERS Public Data Release 1, consisting of more than 50 000 galaxies with B-band magnitudes in the range - 21.6 ≲ MB - 5log (h) ≲ - 19.9 and stellar masses in the range 9.8 ≲ log (M⋆ [ h-2M⊙ ] ) ≲ 10.7. We measure both the connected 3PCF and the reduced 3PCF in redshift space, probing different configurations and scales, in the range 2.5 Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://vipers.inaf.it/

  16. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The growth of structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2 from redshift-space distortions in the clustering of the PDR-2 final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotta, A.; de la Torre, S.; Bel, J.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Koda, J.; Ilbert, O.; Mohammad, F.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present measurements of the growth rate of cosmological structure from the modelling of the anisotropic galaxy clustering measured in the final data release of the VIPERS survey. The analysis is carried out in configuration space and based on measurements of the first two even multipole moments of the anisotropic galaxy auto-correlation function, in two redshift bins spanning the range 0.5 programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  17. Characterization of a novel pro-coagulant metalloprotease (RVBCMP) possessing alpha-fibrinogenase and tissue haemorrhagic activity from venom of Daboia russelli russelli (Russell's viper): evidence of distinct coagulant and haemorrhagic sites in RVBCMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2008-04-01

    A novel, basic pro-coagulation metalloprotease (Russell's viper basic coagulant metalloprotease, RVBCMP) with an approximate molecular weight of 15kDa was purified from the venom of Daboia russelli russelli (Russell's viper) from eastern India. RVBCMP exerted dose-dependent coagulation of platelet-poor human plasma; however, RVBCMP possessed less coagulant activity as compared with the coagulant activity of crude Russell's viper venom (RVV). RVBCMP did not show oedema induction, direct haemolysis of washed erythrocytes, hydrolysis of human plasma albumin or globulin, and thrombin-like activity, but exhibited caseinolytic, alpha-fibrinogenolytic, and liver tissue haemorrhagic activities. Inhibition of coagulant and protease activities of RVBCMP by EDTA suggested a metalloprotease nature of this protein. RVBCMP showed antigenicity as was evident from the immunoblotting experiment. None of the tested plant extracts, except Leucus lavandulaefolia, inhibited the coagulant or haemorrhagic activity of RVBCMP. Interestingly, aqueous extracts of the tested plants as well as the commercial polyvalent antivenom raised against crude RVV differentially inhibited the coagulant and tissue haemorrhagic activity of RVBCMP. The current investigation provides a fairly good indication that RVBCMP possesses a distinct, perhaps overlapping, site for coagulant and tissue haemorrhagic activity.

  18. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-10-20

    Oct 20, 2011 ... man; cobra, common krait, Russell viper and Saw Scaled Viper [1]. In India each year approximately 200,000 number of cases of snake bite are reported, out of which 45,000 to 50,000 succumb to death [2]. The problem is so under-rated that it was only added to WHO´s list of neglected tropical diseases in ...

  19. Endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms in the substantia nigra pars reticulata modulate GABAergic nigrotectal pathways in mice threatened by urutu-cruzeiro venomous pit viper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, R C; Roncon, C M; Elias-Filho, D H; Coimbra, N C

    2015-09-10

    The substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) is rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons and connected to the mesencephalic tectum (MT) structures, such as the superior colliculus and dorsal periaqueductal gray matter. The SNpr presents a high density of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs), suggesting a possible regulatory role that is played by endocannabinoids (eCBs) in the ventral mesencephalon. The present study investigated the involvement of SNpr eCB mechanisms in nigrotectal pathways in the expression of defensive behavior associated with instinctive fear and panic reactions in mice that are confronted with the venomous Viperidae snake Bothrops alternatus. The localization of CB1 receptors (CB1RS) and synaptophysin glycoprotein in the SNpr was also evaluated. Administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline in the MT increased defensive responses to the snake that are related to panic, such as freezing and non-oriented escape reactions, sometimes toward the snake itself. Mice that were pretreated with anandamide (5 or 50pmol) in the SNpr, followed by an injection of physiological saline or bicuculline in the MT, exhibited significant decreases in the expression of alertness, freezing, and escape responses. Immunofluorescence showed the presence of fibers that were rich in CB1RS and synaptophysin in the SNpr, indicating that these receptors appear to be located mainly in presynaptic terminals in the striatonigral pathway. These findings suggest that eCB mechanisms in the SNpr facilitate the activity of nigrotectal GABAergic pathways, modulating the activity of striatonigral links during the elaboration and organization of innate fear and panic-like responses in threatening situations. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo evaluation of homeostatic effects of Echis carinatus snake venom in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmanizadeh Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The venom of the family Viperidae, including the saw-scaled viper, is rich in serine proteinases and metalloproteinases, which affect the nervous system, complementary system, blood coagulation, platelet aggregation and blood pressure. One of the most prominent effects of the snake venom of Echis carinatus (Ec is its coagulation activity, used for killing prey. Materials and methods Subfractions F1A and F1B were isolated from Ec crude venom by a combination of gel chromatography (Sephadex G-75 and ion exchange chromatography on a DEAE-Sepharose (DE-52. These subfractions were then intravenously (IV injected into NIH male mice. Blood samples were taken before and after the administration of these subfractions. Times for prothrombin, partial thromboplastin and fibrinogen were recorded. Results and conclusions Comparison of the prothrombin time before and after F1A and F1B administrations showed that time for blood coagulation after injection is shorter than that of normal blood coagulation and also reduced coagulation time after Ec crude venom injection. This difference in coagulation time shows the intense coagulation activity of these subfractions that significantly increase the coagulation cascade rate and Causes to quick blood coagulation. The LD50 of the Ec crude venom was also determined to be 11.1 μg/mouse. Different crude venom doses were prepared with physiological serum and injected into four mice. Comparison of the prothrombin times after injection of subfractions F1A and F1B showed that the rate of mouse blood coagulation increases considerably. Comparing the partial thromboplastin times after injecting these subfractions with this normal test time showed that the activity rate of intrinsic blood coagulation system rose sharply in mice. Finally, by comparing the fibrinogen time after subfraction injections and normal test time, we can infer intense activation of coagulation cascade and fibrin production.

  1. Comparison of Russell viper venom-based and activated partial thromboplastin time-based screening assays for resistance to activated protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Adrianna Z; Lemire, Susan J; Longtine, Janina; Dorfman, David M

    2008-11-01

    Thrombotic disease is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity, with an estimated lifetime risk of greater than 10% in Western populations. One of the most common hereditary thrombophilias is the factor V Leiden mutation, which is identified with a screening assay for activated protein C (APC) resistance and confirmed by DNA analysis. In this study, we compared the commercially available Pefakit (Pentapharm, Basel, Switzerland) and Cryocheck (Precision BioLogic, Dartmouth, Canada) assays, 2 recently developed Russell viper venom (RVV)-based screening tests, with the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT)-based screening test currently used in our hospital's clinical laboratory. We found that the aPTT-based assay for resistance to APC had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 70%, and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 70%, whereas both of the RVV-based assays exhibited high sensitivity, specificity, and PPV at 100%. In addition, we found that these new functional assays are more cost-effective relative to the screening algorithm previously used in our clinical laboratory and could potentially eliminate the need for DNA analysis, although further study is required.

  2. Molecular diversity in venom proteins of the Russell's viper (Daboia russellii russellii) and the Indian cobra (Naja naja) in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mieko; Itoh, Takeshi; Anuruddhe, B M; Bandaranayake, I K; Shirani Ranasinghe, J G; Athauda, Seranath B P; Moriyama, Akihiko

    2010-02-01

    To examine the molecular diversity of the venom proteins of the Russell's viper (Daboia russellii russellii) and the Indian cobra (Naja naja) in Sri Lanka, we isolated 38 venom proteins through a combination of anion exchange chromatography followed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. From the venom of D. r. russellii we isolated 15 proteins: 5 isozymes of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), 4 serine proteases, 2 C-type lectin-like proteins, 2 L-amino acid oxidases, 1 cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), and 1 metalloproteinase. From the venom of N. naja we isolated 23 proteins: 10 isoforms of cytotoxins (CTX), 7 PLA(2) isozymes, 2 muscarinic toxinlike proteins, 2 CRISPs, 1 nerve growth factor, and 1 new thrombin-like serine protease. Most of these proteins contained new amino acid sequences for each species, indicating molecular diversity in venom proteins. The entire amino acid sequences of PLA(2)3 from D. r. russellii and CTX7 from N. naja were determined. Additionally, the polymorphic amino acid residues of PLA(2)3 were preferentially localized on the potential antigenic sites. While 2 types of PLA(2) (N and S types) were found in D. r. russellii (India) and D. r. siamensis (Java), all the PLA(2)s from D. r. siamensis (Burma) were N type, and those from D. r. russellii (Sri Lanka) were primarily S type.

  3. Proteomic and biochemical analyses of short-tailed pit viper (Gloydius brevicaudus) venom: age-related variation and composition-activity correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian-Fang; Wang, Jin; He, Ying; Qu, Yan-Fu; Lin, Long-Hui; Ma, Xiao-Mei; Ji, Xiang

    2014-06-13

    We conducted an in-depth analysis of the proteomic and biochemical profiles of the venom of neonate and adult short-tailed pit vipers (Gloydius brevicaudus). Identified proteins were assigned to a few main toxin families. Disintegrin, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), serine proteinase, cysteine-rich secretory protein, C-type lectin-like protein, l-amino acid oxidase and snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) were detected in both venoms, while 5'-nucleotidase was detected only in the adult venom. SVMP was the predominant protein family in both venoms (neonate: 65.7%; adult: 64.4%), followed by PLA2 (neonate: 13.4%; adult: 25.0%). Antivenomic analysis revealed that commercial G. brevicaudus antivenom almost neutralized the chromatographic peaks with medium and high molecular masses in both venoms, but did not completely recognize peaks with low molecular mass. Toxicological and enzymatic activities show remarkable age-related variation in G. brevicaudus venom, probably resulting from variation in venom composition. Our data demonstrate age-related variation across venomics, antivenomics and biochemical profiles of G. brevicaudus venom, and have implications for the management of G. brevicaudus bites, including improving antivenom preparation by combining both venoms. This study investigates the composition and biochemical activity of neonate and adult Gloydius brevicaudus venoms. We found remarkable age-related variation in venom biological activity, likely the result of variation in venom composition. Antivenomics analysis was used to explore difference in neonate and adult G. brevicaudus venoms. Our findings have implications for the diagnosis and clinical management of G. brevicaudus bites, and the design of venom mixtures that will increase the efficacy of commercial antivenom. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics of non-model organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of secretary PLA₂--VRV-PL-VIIIa of Russell's viper venom by standard aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhananjaya, B L; Sudarshan, S

    2015-03-01

    The aqueous extract of Mangifera indica is known to possess anti-snake venom activities. However, its inhibitory potency and mechanism of action on multi-toxic phospholipases A2s, which are the most toxic and lethal component of snake venom is still unknown. Therefore, this study was carried out to evaluate the modulatory effect of standard aqueous bark extract of M. indica on VRV-PL-VIIIa of Indian Russells viper venom. Mangifera indica extract dose dependently inhibited the GIIB sPLA2 (VRV-PL-VIIIa) activity with an IC50 value of 6.8±0.3 μg/ml. M. indica extract effectively inhibited the indirect hemolytic activity up to 96% at ~40 μg/ml concentration. Further, M. indica extract at different concentrations (0-50 μg/ml) inhibited the edema formed in a dose dependent manner. It was found that there was no relieve of inhibitory effect of the extract when examined as a function of increased substrate and calcium concentration. The inhibition was irreversible as evident from binding studies. The in vitro inhibition is well correlated with in situ and in vivo edema inducing activities. As the inhibition is independent of substrate, calcium concentration and was irreversible, it can be concluded that M. indica extracts mode of inhibition could be due to direct interaction of components present in the extract with PLA2 enzyme. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of M. indica effectively inhibits svPLA2 (Snake venom phospholipase A2) enzymatic and its associated toxic activities, which substantiate its anti-snake venom properties. Further in-depth studies are interesting to known on the role and mechanism of the principal inhibitory constituents present in the extract, so as to develop them into potent anti-snake venom and as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of a 7.2 kDa cytotoxin isolated from the venom of Daboia russelli russelli of the Viperidae family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Choudhury, Subhasree; Gomes, Aparna; Gomes, Antony; Dattagupta, Jiban K.; Sen, Udayaditya

    2006-01-01

    A cytotoxin (MW 7.2 kDa) from Indian Russell’s viper (Daboia russelli russelli) venom possessing antiproliferative activity, cardiotoxicity, neurotoxicity and myotoxicity has been purified, characterized and crystallized. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P41, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 47.94, c = 50.2 Å. Larger crystals, which diffracted to 1.5 Å, were found to be twinned; diffraction data were therefore collected to 2.93 Å resolution using a smaller crystal. Molecular-replacement calculations identified two molecules of the protein in the asymmetric unit, which is in accordance with the calculated V M value. PMID:16511326

  6. Phylogeny and diversification of mountain vipers (Montivipera, Nilson et al., 2001) triggered by multiple Plio-Pleistocene refugia and high-mountain topography in the Near and Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stümpel, Nikolaus; Rajabizadeh, Mehdi; Avcı, Aziz; Wüster, Wolfgang; Joger, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    The Near and Middle East is a hotspot of biodiversity, but the region remains underexplored at the level of genetic biodiversity. Here, we present an extensive molecular phylogeny of the viperid snake genus Montivipera, including all known taxa. Based on nuclear and mitochondrial data, we present novel insights into the phylogeny of the genus and review the status of its constituent species. Maximum likelihood methods revealed a montane origin of Montivipera at 12.3Mya. We then analyzed factors of mountain viper diversity. Our data support substantial changes in effective population size through Plio-Pleistocene periods. We conclude that climatic oscillations were drivers of allopatric speciation, and that mountain systems of the Near and Middle East have strongly influenced the evolution and survival of taxa, because climatic and topographical heterogeneities induced by mountains have played a crucial role as filters for dispersal and as multiple refugia. The wide diversity of montane microhabitats enabled mountain vipers to retain their ecological niche during climatic pessima. In consequence the varied geological and topographical conditions between refugia favoured genetic isolation and created patterns of species richness resulting in the formation of neoendemic taxa. Our data support high concordance between geographic distributions of Montivipera haplotypes with putative plant refugia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Vitrectomy with or without encircling band for pseudophakic retinal detachment: a multi-centre, three-arm, randomised clinical trial. VIPER Study Report No. 1--design and enrolment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazinani, B; Baumgarten, S; Schiller, P; Agostini, H; Helbig, H; Limburg, E; Hellmich, M; Walter, P

    2016-03-01

    Scleral buckling is currently used in addition to vitrectomy for the treatment of pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) to better support the vitreous base and better visualisation of the periphery. The aims of this study are to evaluate (1) whether the combination of 20 G vitrectomy and scleral buckling is superior to 20 G vitrectomy alone (control) (confirmatory), and (2) whether transconjunctival 23/25 G vitrectomy is non-inferior to 20 G vitrectomy (both without scleral buckling) regarding operation success (exploratory). The VIPER (Vitrectomy Plus Encircling Band Vs. Vitrectomy Alone For The Treatment Of Pseudophakic Retinal Detachment) study is an unmasked, multi-centre, three-arm randomised trial. Patients with PRD were eligible, excluding complicated retinal detachment or otherwise severe ophthalmologic impairment. Patients were randomised to one of three interventions: 20 G vitrectomy alone (control C), combination of 20 G vitrectomy and circumferential scleral buckling (experimental treatment E1) or 23/25 G vitrectomy alone (experimental treatment E2). The primary endpoint is the absence of any indication for a retina re-attaching procedure during 6 months of follow-up. Secondary endpoints include best corrected visual acuity, retina re-attaching procedures, complications and adverse events. From June 2011 to August 2013, 257 patients were enrolled in the study. The internet randomisation service assigned 100 patients each to the treatment arms C and E1, and 57 patients to treatment E2. The imbalance is due to the fact that several retinal surgeons did not qualify for performing E2. The random assignment was stratified and balanced (ie, 1:1 or 1:1:1 ratio) by surgeon. The described study represents a methodologically rigorous protocol evaluating the benefits of three different vitrectomy approaches to PRD. The projected results will help to establish their overall efficacy and will permit conclusions regarding their relative value. DRKS

  8. Viper NHEXS Program: A Viper Pilot Neck Health & Conditioning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    6 Halo Neck Strengthening Workout ...requires the pilot to place the neck at an even more extreme angle while in the check-six position to maintain visual contact with an adversary. Some...neck warm-up may ameliorate some of the neck strain incurred during high-G maneuvers. Any type of physical training regimen/ workout should be preceded

  9. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Gravity test from the combination of redshift-space distortions and galaxy-galaxy lensing at 0.5 < z < 1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, S.; Jullo, E.; Giocoli, C.; Pezzotta, A.; Bel, J.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Metcalf, R. B.; Prada, F.; Yepes, G.

    2017-12-01

    We carry out a joint analysis of redshift-space distortions and galaxy-galaxy lensing, with the aim of measuring the growth rate of structure; this is a key quantity for understanding the nature of gravity on cosmological scales and late-time cosmic acceleration. We make use of the final VIPERS redshift survey dataset, which maps a portion of the Universe at a redshift of z ≃ 0.8, and the lensing data from the CFHTLenS survey over the same area of the sky. We build a consistent theoretical model that combines non-linear galaxy biasing and redshift-space distortion models, and confront it with observations. The two probes are combined in a Bayesian maximum likelihood analysis to determine the growth rate of structure at two redshifts z = 0.6 and z = 0.86. We obtain measurements of fσ8(0.6) = 0.48 ± 0.12 and fσ8(0.86) = 0.48 ± 0.10. The additional galaxy-galaxy lensing constraint alleviates galaxy bias and σ8 degeneracies, providing direct measurements of f and σ8: [f(0.6),σ8(0.6)] = [0.93 ± 0.22,0.52 ± 0.06] and [f(0.86),σ8(0.86)] = [0.99 ± 0.19,0.48 ± 0.04]. These measurements are statistically consistent with a Universe where the gravitational interactions can be described by General Relativity, although they are not yet accurate enough to rule out some commonly considered alternatives. Finally, as a complementary test we measure the gravitational slip parameter, EG, for the first time at z > 0.6. We find values of E̅G(0.6) = 0.16±0.09 and E̅G(0.86) = 0.09±0.07, when EG is averaged over scales above 3 h-1 Mpc. We find that our EG measurements exhibit slightly lower values than expected for standard relativistic gravity in a ΛCDM background, although the results are consistent within 1-2σ. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT

  10. Snakes of medical importance in India: is the concept of the "Big 4" still relevant and useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ian D; Norris, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    Snakebites continue to be a major medical concern in India. However, there is very little hard evidence of a numerical nature to enable us to understand which species are responsible for mortality and morbidity. For many decades, the concept of the "Big 4" Snakes of Medical Importance has reflected the view that 4 species are responsible for Indian snakebite mortality--the Indian cobra (Naja naja), the common krait (Bungarus caeruleus), the Russell's viper (Daboia russelii) and the saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus). However, a recent discovery that another species, the hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale), is capable of causing lethal envenomation, and that this problem was being concealed by systematic misidentification of this species as the saw-scaled viper, has necessitated a review of the concept of the "Big 4." The concept of the "Big 4" snakes is reviewed to demonstrate its failure to include all currently known snakes of medical significance in India, and its negative effects related to clinical management of snakebite. The emergence of the hump-nosed pit viper (Hypnale hypnale) as a snake of medical significance has rendered the "Big 4" obsolete in terms of completeness. The concept of the "Big 4" is restricting sound epidemiological work and the development of effective snake antivenoms. It should be replaced by the model introduced in the 1980s by the World Health Organization, which has not received adequate circulation and implementation.

  11. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators

    OpenAIRE

    L?vgren, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need ...

  12. Unraveling the Proteome Composition and Immuno-profiling of Western India Russell's Viper Venom for In-Depth Understanding of Its Pharmacological Properties, Clinical Manifestations, and Effective Antivenom Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Bhargab; Patra, Aparup; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2017-02-03

    The proteome composition of western India (WI) Russell's viper venom (RVV) was correlated with pharmacological properties and pathological manifestations of RV envenomation. Proteins in the 5-19 and 100-110 kDa mass ranges were the most predominate (∼35.1%) and least abundant (∼3.4%) components, respectively, of WI RVV. Non-reduced SDS-PAGE indicated the occurrence of multiple subunits, non-covalent oligomers, self-aggregation, and/or interactions among the RVV proteins. A total of 55 proteins belonging to 13 distinct snake venom families were unambiguously identified by ESI-LC-MS/MS analysis. Phospholipase A2 (32.5%) and Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors (12.5%) represented the most abundant enzymatic and non-enzymatic proteins, respectively. However, ATPase, ADPase, and hyaluronidase, detected by enzyme assays, were not identified by proteomic analysis owing to limitations in protein database deposition. Several biochemical and pharmacological properties of WI RVV were also investigated. Neurological symptoms exhibited by some RV-bite patients in WI may be correlated to the presence of neurotoxic phospholipase A2 enzymes and Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor complex in this venom. Monovalent antivenom was found to be better than polyvalent antivenom in immuno-recognition and neutralization of the tested pharmacological properties and enzyme activities of WI RVV; nevertheless, both antivenoms demonstrated poor cross-reactivity and neutralization of pharmacological activities shown by low-molecular-mass proteins (<18 kDa) of this venom.

  13. Serine Protease Variants Encoded by Echis ocellatus Venom Gland cDNA: Cloning and Sequencing Analysis

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    S. S. Hasson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Envenoming by Echis saw-scaled viper is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite its medical importance, there have been few investigations into the toxin composition of the venom of this viper. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding four groups or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive Serine protease proteins (SPs from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus. All these SP sequences encoded the cysteine residues scaffold that form the 6-disulphide bonds responsible for the characteristic tertiary structure of venom serine proteases. All the Echis ocellatus EoSP groups showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom SPs. However, these groups also showed marked intercluster sequence conservation across them which were significantly different from that of previously published viper SPs. Because viper venom SPs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis ocellatus EoSPs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of interspecific and intergeneric sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis ocellatus EoSPs and analogous serine proteases from other viper species leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise (that we will exploit, by epidermal DNA immunization the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent.

  14. C. U. Fen Fakültesi

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    Yüksel Coşkun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A blunt-nosed viper specimen, Macrovipera lebetina obtusa is recorded from Hıdırlık village, Divriği, Sivas province in Central Anatolia. Previously Erzincan- Kemaliye was the westernmost locality known for this species in central Anatolia. Information on new locality and morphological features of this endangered subspecies is given. Keywords. Reptilia, Viperidae, Macrovipera lebetina obtusa, Turkey, distribution.

  15. The North-South divide in snake bite envenomation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vivek; Thakur, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Snake bite envenomations are common in rural areas and the incidence peaks during monsoons in India. Prominent venomous species have been traditionally labeled as the 'big four' that includes Cobra, Krait, Russel's viper and Saw scaled viper. Systematic attempts for identification and classification of prevalent snakes in various states of India are missing till now and there is no concrete data on this aspect. The published literature however shows that some species of snakes are more prevalent in a particular region than the other parts of India e.g. Saw scaled vipers in Rajasthan. We reviewed the published literature from various parts of India and found that there is a North-South divide in the snake bite profile from India. Neurotoxic envenomations are significantly higher in North India compared to South India where Hematotoxic envenomations are prevalent. Russel's viper causes local necrosis, gangrene and compartment syndrome. These manifestations have never been reported in North Indian snake bite profile in the published literature. Early morning neuroparalysis caused by Krait is a common problem in North India leading to high mortality after snake bite. This review presents supporting evidence for the North-South divide and proposes a way forward in formulation and revision of guidelines for snake bite in India.

  16. The North-South divide in snake bite envenomation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bite envenomations are common in rural areas and the incidence peaks during monsoons in India. Prominent venomous species have been traditionally labeled as the ′big four′ that includes Cobra, Krait, Russel′s viper and Saw scaled viper. Systematic attempts for identification and classification of prevalent snakes in various states of India are missing till now and there is no concrete data on this aspect. The published literature however shows that some species of snakes are more prevalent in a particular region than the other parts of India e.g. Saw scaled vipers in Rajasthan. We reviewed the published literature from various parts of India and found that there is a North-South divide in the snake bite profile from India. Neurotoxic envenomations are significantly higher in North India compared to South India where Hematotoxic envenomations are prevalent. Russel′s viper causes local necrosis, gangrene and compartment syndrome. These manifestations have never been reported in North Indian snake bite profile in the published literature. Early morning neuroparalysis caused by Krait is a common problem in North India leading to high mortality after snake bite. This review presents supporting evidence for the North-South divide and proposes a way forward in formulation and revision of guidelines for snake bite in India.

  17. Bothrops sanctaecrucis Hoge 1966 (Squamata: Viperidae

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    Miranda Calle, Alejandro Bruno

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Seis ejemplares de la especie Bothrops sanctaecrucis presentes en la Colección Boliviana de Fauna (CBF, La Paz- Bolivia fueron examinados y comparados con sus congéneres (Tabla 1. Departamento de Cochabamba, Provincia Carrasco, Sección Quinta, Municipio Puerto Villarroel, Localidad Yuquis, 16º47’00.0"S, 64º56’50.0"O; 216 msnm. (CBF 673 Fecha de colecta: 11 mayo 1988. Colector: K.H. Redford. (200 mm LHC, 31.4 mm LCC. (CBF 776 Fecha de colecta: abril 1991. Colector: Allyn Maclean Sterman. (481.8 mm LHC, 85.8 mm LCC. Ambos individuos fueron colectados en la ecoregión Bosque Amazónico Preandino (Ibisch et al., 2003, y evaluados por Harvey et al. (2005. Departamento del Beni, Provincia General José Ballivián, Sección Segunda, Municipio San Borja, Localidad Quiquibey, 15º22’30.8"S, 67º06’17.4"O; 300 msnm. Fecha de colecta: 28 noviembre 1989. Colector: Efraín Peñaranda. Colectado en la ecoregión Bosque Amazónico Subandino (Ibisch et al., 2003. (CBF 814. Individuo con 921.8 mm LHC, 159.8 mm LCC. Departamento del Beni, Provincia Moxos, Sección Primera, Municipio San Ignacio, Localidad Oromomo, 16º01’58.7"S, 66º11’12.5"O; 250 msnm. (CBF 1009 Fecha de colecta: 17 mayo 1992. Colectores: Sergio Otazú y Fernando Guerra. (552.2 mm LHC, 119.0 mm LCC. (CBF 1023 Fecha de colecta: 18 mayo 1992. Colectores: Sergio Otazú y Fernando Guerra. (997.0 mm LHC, 151.4 mm LCC. Ambos individuos fueron colectados en la ecoregión Bosque Amazónico Subandino (Ibisch et al., 2003, y evaluados por Harvey et al. (2005. Ambos ejemplares corresponden a la localidad tipo de la especie descrita por Hoge (1966. Departamento de La Paz, Provincia Nor Yungas, Sección Primera, Municipio Coroico, Lo calidad Bajo Hornuni (Parque Nacional y Área Natural de Manejo Integrado Cotapata, 16º12’54.4"S, 67º53’09.8"O; 1935 msnm. Sin fecha de colecta. Colector: Amira Apaza. Colectado en la ecoregión Yungas (Ibisch et al., 2003. (CBF 3359. Individuo con 843.4 mm LHC, 92.6 mm LCC.

  18. Postprandial thermogenesis in Bothrops moojeni (Serpentes: Viperidae

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    DR Stuginski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakes that can ingest prey that are proportionally large have high metabolic rates during digestion. This great increase in metabolic rate (specific dynamic action - SDA may create a significant augment in the animal's body temperature. The present study investigated postprandial thermogenesis in Bothrops moojeni. Briefly, two groups of snakes were fed meals equivalent to 17 ± 3% and 32 ± 5% of their body weight and were observed for 72 hours, in which thermal images of each snake were taken with an infrared camera in a thermostable environment with a constant air temperature of 30°C. The results showed a significant increase in snake surface temperature, with a thermal peak between 33 and 36 hours after feeding. The meal size had a great impact on the intensity and duration of the thermogenic response. Such increase in temperature appears to be connected with the huge increase in metabolic rates during digestion of relatively large prey by snakes that feed infrequently. The ecologic implication of the thermogenic response is still not well understood; however, it is possible that its presence could affect behaviors associated with the snake digestion, such as postprandial thermophily.

  19. Venomous snakebite in Thailand. I: Medically important snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanhome, L; Cox, M J; Wilde, H; Jintakoon, P; Chaiyabutr, N; Sitprija, V

    1998-05-01

    Thailand has an abundance of venomous snakes. Among the neurotoxic family Elapidae, there are three species of the genus Naja (cobras), three of the genus Bungarus (kraits), and the king cobra of the genus Ophiophagus. Other Elapidae snakes in Thailand include sea snakes and Asian coral snakes of the genus Calliophis. They have potent venoms but rarely bite humans. Tissue and hemotoxic snakes are represented by family Viperidae, subfamilies Viperinae and Crotalinae. They remain an occupational hazard for farmers and rubber tappers, causing serious morbidity but only rare deaths, since competent treatment is now widely available throughout Thailand. Purified equine antivenin is manufactured locally for the monocled and Siamese spitting cobras (Naja kaouthia and N. siamensis), king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), banded krait (Bungarus fasciatus), most green pit vipers (Trimeresurus sp.), Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma), and the Siamese Russell's viper (Daboia russelli siamensis).

  20. Capacidade reprodutiva de Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae Reproductive capacity of Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae

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    Thélia Rosana Forte Janeiro-Cinquini

    Full Text Available The relationship between female body size and egg number was examined in the snake Bothrops jararaca (Wied, 1924. Some authors have demonstrated that the estimated clutch size may be affected by the inclusion or exclusion of dead neonates or non-developed eggs. The reproductive system of 254 mature females newly arrived from nature was examined and 29.55% (n=75 had eggs in the oviducts in different stages of embryonic development. The presence of atresic eggs was observed in 34.5% of those females. A significant difference was observed in the number of eggs in the right and left oviducts (t=9.48, P<0.001, but not in the number of atresic eggs (t=1.110, P=0.278. The correlation of female body size and egg number was greater when all, the normal and atresic eggs were considered (r=0.63, P<0.001. The exclusion of atresic eggs from the clutch size decreased slightly this correlation (r=0.54, P<0.001.

  1. Padrões espaciais da riqueza de espécies de viperídeos na América do Sul: temperatura ambiental vs. cinética-bioquímica = Spatial patterns of viperid species richness in South America: environmental temperature vs. biochemical kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Souza Lima-Ribeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem por objetivo testar a influência da temperatura na taxa metabólica de viperídeos como um mecanismo básico de origem dos padrões espaciais de riqueza desse grupo na América do Sul, como proposto por Allen et al. (2002 dentro da Teoria Metabólica em Ecologia. Para isso, testamos a relação entre o logaritmo natural dariqueza de espécies de viperídeos e o inverso da temperatura (em Kelvin, 1000*K-1, após corrigir os efeitos da autocorrelação espacial, e verificamos se a reta estimada apresenta inclinação de -9,0*T. As variáveis apresentaram baixo índice de correlação (r2 = 0,216; p The aim of this study was to test the influence of temperature on metabolic rates of viperid species as the underlying mechanism to explain the richness pattern of this group in South America, following the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE proposed by Allen et al. (2002. We tested MTE predictions by considering the relationship between the natural logarithm of viperid species richness and the inverse of temperature (in Kelvin, 1000*K-1 after to correct for spatial autocorrelation effects and to check whether the linear function presents a slope of -9.0*T. The relationship between variables presented low correlation coefficient (r2 = 0.216; P < 0.0001 and a slope of -3.737*T (C.I. (95% ± 0.379.These results showed that viperids respond in a different way to the temperature gradient in comparison with other taxa and the prediction of Allen et al. (2002, since the confidence interval of slope in this case doesnot include the value of -9.0*T. This study demonstrates that temperature is not the sole driver of broad-scale spatial pattern of viperid species richness in South America.

  2. Morphology of the snake spectacle reflects its evolutionary adaptation and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, Mari-Ann Otkjaer; Heegaard, Steffen; Wang, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Background Covering the eye of all snakes is a transparent integumental structure known as the spectacle. In order to determine variations in spectacle thickness among species, the spectacles of 217 alcohol-preserved museum specimens of 44 species belonging to 14 different families underwent...... found in the Usambara bush viper (Viperidae) with a thickness of 74 ± 9 μm and the absolute thickest spectacle was found in the red-tailed pipe snake (Cylindrophiidae) which had a spectacle thickness of 244 ± 57 μm. Fossorial and aquatic snakes had significantly thicker spectacles than arboreal...... and terrestrial snakes. When spectacle thickness was correlated to eye size (horizontal spectacle diameter), Gray’s earth snake (Uropeltidae) had the lowest ratio (1:7) and the cottonmouth (Viperidae) had the highest ratio (1:65). Multivariable and phylogenetic analyses showed that spectacular thickness could...

  3. Frequency and effort of reproduction in female Vipera aspis from a southern population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffi, Marco A. L.; Giudici, Federico; Ioalè, Paolo

    1999-11-01

    The frequency of reproduction of the asp viper ( Vipera aspis, Viperidae) was studied in a population living along the coasts of central Italy. An annual reproductive cycle seemed to be the rule during the 5-year study period. Annual reproduction, high average mass of reproductive females, and large size of neonates, compared with other northern or continental populations, are presumably due to the particularly suitable climatic conditions of the area, as in most coastal habitats of the Mediterranean region. Such a scenario should influence the extent of the feeding period, which allows females, within a few months after parturition, to regain their previous body condition and reproduce again the following year.

  4. Production and preclinical assessment of camelid immunoglobulins against Echis sochureki venom from desert of Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, P D; Ghorui, S K; Kochar, S K; Singh, Raghvendar; Patil, N V

    2017-08-01

    Snakebite is a significant cause of death and disability in subsistent farming populations of rural India. Antivenom is the most effective treatment of envenoming and is manufactured from IgG of venom-immunised horses. Because of complex fiscal reasons, the production, testing and delivery of antivenoms designed to treat envenoming by the most medically-important snakes in the region has been questioned time to time. In this study, we report successful immunisation of dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) against the venom of Indian saw-scaled Viper- Echis carinatus sochureki. This study assessed the specificity and potential of camels immunised with venom of medically most important snake of Western India, the saw-scaled viper (Echis c. sochureki). Using WHO standard pre-clinical in vivo tests the neutralisation of the venom responsible for the lethal, haemorrhagic, coagulant and local necrotizing activities were measured, since these are the most significant effects that characterize envenoming by this species. The anti-venom was found significantly effective in the neutralisation of all these effects tested and thus, revealed further an immunological perspective, that camel IgG anti-venom (monospecific) would be as efficacious as specific equine anti-venoms or even of better choice in treating snake specific envenoming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Body Size Evolution in Insular Speckled Rattlesnakes (Viperidae: Crotalus mitchellii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meik, Jesse M.; Lawing, A. Michelle; Pires-daSilva, André

    2010-01-01

    Background Speckled rattlesnakes (Crotalus mitchellii) inhabit multiple islands off the coast of Baja California, Mexico. Two of the 14 known insular populations have been recognized as subspecies based primarily on body size divergence from putative mainland ancestral populations; however, a survey of body size variation from other islands occupied by these snakes has not been previously reported. We examined body size variation between island and mainland speckled rattlesnakes, and the relationship between body size and various island physical variables among 12 island populations. We also examined relative head size among giant, dwarfed, and mainland speckled rattlesnakes to determine whether allometric differences conformed to predictions of gape size (and indirectly body size) evolving in response to shifts in prey size. Methodology/Principal Findings Insular speckled rattlesnakes show considerable variation in body size when compared to mainland source subspecies. In addition to previously known instances of gigantism on Ángel de la Guarda and dwarfism on El Muerto, various degrees of body size decrease have occurred frequently in this taxon, with dwarfed rattlesnakes occurring mostly on small, recently isolated, land-bridge islands. Regression models using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) showed that mean SVL of insular populations was most strongly correlated with island area, suggesting the influence of selection for different body size optima for islands of different size. Allometric differences in head size of giant and dwarf rattlesnakes revealed patterns consistent with shifts to larger and smaller prey, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide the first example of a clear relationship between body size and island area in a squamate reptile species; among vertebrates this pattern has been previously documented in few insular mammals. This finding suggests that selection for body size is influenced by changes in community dynamics that are related to graded differences in area over what are otherwise similar bioclimatic conditions. We hypothesize that in this system shifts to larger prey, episodic saturation and depression of primary prey density, and predator release may have led to insular gigantism, and that shifts to smaller prey and increased reproductive efficiency in the presence of intense intraspecific competition may have led to insular dwarfism. PMID:20209105

  6. Body size evolution in insular speckled rattlesnakes (Viperidae: Crotalus mitchellii.

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    Jesse M Meik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Speckled rattlesnakes (Crotalus mitchellii inhabit multiple islands off the coast of Baja California, Mexico. Two of the 14 known insular populations have been recognized as subspecies based primarily on body size divergence from putative mainland ancestral populations; however, a survey of body size variation from other islands occupied by these snakes has not been previously reported. We examined body size variation between island and mainland speckled rattlesnakes, and the relationship between body size and various island physical variables among 12 island populations. We also examined relative head size among giant, dwarfed, and mainland speckled rattlesnakes to determine whether allometric differences conformed to predictions of gape size (and indirectly body size evolving in response to shifts in prey size. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insular speckled rattlesnakes show considerable variation in body size when compared to mainland source subspecies. In addition to previously known instances of gigantism on Angel de la Guarda and dwarfism on El Muerto, various degrees of body size decrease have occurred frequently in this taxon, with dwarfed rattlesnakes occurring mostly on small, recently isolated, land-bridge islands. Regression models using the Akaike information criterion (AIC showed that mean SVL of insular populations was most strongly correlated with island area, suggesting the influence of selection for different body size optima for islands of different size. Allometric differences in head size of giant and dwarf rattlesnakes revealed patterns consistent with shifts to larger and smaller prey, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide the first example of a clear relationship between body size and island area in a squamate reptile species; among vertebrates this pattern has been previously documented in few insular mammals. This finding suggests that selection for body size is influenced by changes in community dynamics that are related to graded differences in area over what are otherwise similar bioclimatic conditions. We hypothesize that in this system shifts to larger prey, episodic saturation and depression of primary prey density, and predator release may have led to insular gigantism, and that shifts to smaller prey and increased reproductive efficiency in the presence of intense intraspecific competition may have led to insular dwarfism.

  7. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops mucrosquamatus (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Huang, Xin; Li, Zhenyu; Hu, Huijian; Zhang, Baowei

    2013-10-01

    Protobothrops mucrosquamatus is the endangered snake that is distributed in southwestern China and other adjacent countries of Asia. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of P. mucrosquamatus. The circle genome with the total length of 17,233 bp contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 32.98% A, 25.17% T, 29.19% C and 12.67% G. All the genes in P. mucrosquamatus were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes that were encoded on the L-strand.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of Trimeresurus albolabris (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Chenling; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Xin; Hu, Chaochao; Xue, Chun; Zhang, Baowei

    2015-04-01

    Trimeresurus albolabris is the most widely distributed species in the genus Trimeresurus and mainly in East and South-East Asia. In this study, we first sequenced and characterized the whole mitochondrial genome of T. albolabris. The total length of the complete mitochondrial genome was 17,220 bp with 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 2 control regions. The overall base composition of T. albolabris was 33.40% A, 27.04% T, 27.28% C, and 12.28% G. Except for ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-stand, all the genes in T. albolabris were distributed on the H-strand.

  9. A new adder ( Bitis ; Viperidae) from the Western Cape Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new species of small, terrestrial Bitis is described from the Western Cape Province, South Africa. It occurs in sympatry with Bitis comuta and Bifis atropos on the upper slopes and summit of the Cedarberg, and with the latter on the Swartberg. Features of scalation, colour and body form distinguish the new species from all ...

  10. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops jerdonii (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Xiaoxue; Pan, Tao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Baowei

    2013-06-01

    Protobothrops jerdonii is a common venomous snake that is widely distributed in southwestern China and other adjacent countries of Asia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of P. jerdonii was determined. The circle genome with the 17,239 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 33.13% A, 25.07% T, 29.31% C, and 12.50% G. All the genes in P. jerdonii were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  11. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops dabieshanensis (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Zhang, Liang; Pan, Tao; Zhang, Baowei

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Protobothrops dabieshanensis is new species snake which is only distributed in Dabie Mountain of Anhui China at present. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of P. dabieshanensis (AHU 2013-EE-Hp01) had been determined. The circle genome with the 17,193 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 33.20% A, 25.13% T, 29.22% C and 12.45% G. All the genes in P. dabieshanensis were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  12. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops xiangchengsis (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baowei; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Liang; Han, Demin

    2015-08-01

    Protobothrops xiangchengsis is the endangered snake which is only distributed in China. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of P. xiangchengsis (HB-px20100722). The circle genome with the 17,240 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 33.16% A, 25.16% T, 29.17% C and 12.51% G. All the genes in P. xiangchengsis were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  13. Bayesian mixed models and the phylogeny of pitvipers (Viperidae: Serpentes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A; Parkinson, Christopher L

    2006-04-01

    The subfamily Crotalinae (pitvipers) contains over 190 species of venomous snakes distributed in both the Old and New World. We incorporated an extensive sampling of taxa (including 28 of 29 genera), and sequences of four mitochondrial gene fragments (2.3kb) per individual, to estimate the phylogeny of pitvipers based on maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic methods. Our Bayesian analyses incorporated complex mixed models of nucleotide evolution that allocated independent models to various partitions of the dataset within combined analyses. We compared results of unpartitioned versus partitioned Bayesian analyses to investigate how much unpartitioned (versus partitioned) models were forced to compromise estimates of model parameters, and whether complex models substantially alter phylogenetic conclusions to the extent that they appear to extract more phylogenetic signal than simple models. Our results indicate that complex models do extract more phylogenetic signal from the data. We also address how differences in phylogenetic results (e.g., bipartition posterior probabilities) obtained from simple versus complex models may be interpreted in terms of relative credibility. Our estimates of pitviper phylogeny suggest that nearly all recently proposed generic reallocations appear valid, although certain Old and New World genera (Ovophis, Trimeresurus, and Bothrops) remain poly- or paraphyletic and require further taxonomic revision. While a majority of nodes were resolved, we could not confidently estimate the basal relationships among New World genera and which lineage of Old World species is most closely related to this New World group.

  14. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops cornutus (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Huang, Xin; Han, Demin; Xue, Chun; Zhang, Baowei

    2015-04-01

    Protobothrops cornutus is the endangered snake which is distributed narrowly in southern China and other adjacent countries of Asia. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of P. cornutus (HB-pc20090810). The circle genome with the 17,219 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 control regions. Overall base composition of the complete mtDNA was 33.18% A, 24.80% T, 29.43% C and 12.58% G. All the genes in P. cornutus were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  15. Mitochondrial genome of Protobothrops maolanensis (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Baowei

    2014-12-01

    Protobothrops maolanensis was recently described from Guizhou, southwestern China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of P. maolanensis had been determined. The circle genome with the 17,231 bp total length contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 control regions. Overall, base composition of the complete mtDNA was 32.96% A, 24.92% T, 29.41% C and 12.72% G. All the genes in P. maolanensis were distributed on the H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes which were encoded on the L-strand.

  16. Phylogeography of the Central American lancehead Bothrops asper (SERPENTES: VIPERIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica; Parkinson, Christopher L; Daza, Juan M; Wüster, Wolfgang; Sasa, Mahmood

    2017-01-01

    The uplift and final connection of the Central American land bridge is considered the major event that allowed biotic exchange between vertebrate lineages of northern and southern origin in the New World. However, given the complex tectonics that shaped Middle America, there is still substantial controversy over details of this geographical reconnection, and its role in determining biogeographic patterns in the region. Here, we examine the phylogeography of Bothrops asper, a widely distributed pitviper in Middle America and northwestern South America, in an attempt to evaluate how the final Isthmian uplift and other biogeographical boundaries in the region influenced genealogical lineage divergence in this species. We examined sequence data from two mitochondrial genes (MT-CYB and MT-ND4) from 111 specimens of B. asper, representing 70 localities throughout the species' distribution. We reconstructed phylogeographic patterns using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods and estimated divergence time using the Bayesian relaxed clock method. Within the nominal species, an early split led to two divergent lineages of B. asper: one includes five phylogroups distributed in Caribbean Middle America and southwestern Ecuador, and the other comprises five other groups scattered in the Pacific slope of Isthmian Central America and northwestern South America. Our results provide evidence of a complex transition that involves at least two dispersal events into Middle America during the final closure of the Isthmus.

  17. Microvesicles in the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sylvia Mendes; Fernandes, Wilson; Sant'Anna, Sávio Stefanini; Yamanouye, Norma

    2007-01-01

    Microvesicles with electron-dense content are consistently observed by transmission electron microscopy on the luminal face of secretory cells of venom glands of viperid snakes. In this work, we evaluated their presence in Crotalus durissus terrificus venom glands and also in freshly collected venom. Microvesicles were found in the venom glands mainly in regions of exocytosis. They ranged from 40 to 80 nm in diameter. Freeze-fracture replicas of the glands revealed particles on the cytoplasmic leaflet (P-face) of these vesicles, suggesting that they carry transmembrane proteins. Vesicles separated by ultracentrifugation from cell-free venom were similar in size and structure to the microvesicles observed in the glands. A fine fuzzy coat surrounded each microvesicle. The function of these venom vesicles is still unknown, but they may contribute to inactivation of stored venom components, or their activation after the venom is released.

  18. Body size evolution in insular speckled rattlesnakes (Viperidae: Crotalus mitchellii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meik, Jesse M; Lawing, A Michelle; Pires-daSilva, André

    2010-03-04

    Speckled rattlesnakes (Crotalus mitchellii) inhabit multiple islands off the coast of Baja California, Mexico. Two of the 14 known insular populations have been recognized as subspecies based primarily on body size divergence from putative mainland ancestral populations; however, a survey of body size variation from other islands occupied by these snakes has not been previously reported. We examined body size variation between island and mainland speckled rattlesnakes, and the relationship between body size and various island physical variables among 12 island populations. We also examined relative head size among giant, dwarfed, and mainland speckled rattlesnakes to determine whether allometric differences conformed to predictions of gape size (and indirectly body size) evolving in response to shifts in prey size. Insular speckled rattlesnakes show considerable variation in body size when compared to mainland source subspecies. In addition to previously known instances of gigantism on Angel de la Guarda and dwarfism on El Muerto, various degrees of body size decrease have occurred frequently in this taxon, with dwarfed rattlesnakes occurring mostly on small, recently isolated, land-bridge islands. Regression models using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) showed that mean SVL of insular populations was most strongly correlated with island area, suggesting the influence of selection for different body size optima for islands of different size. Allometric differences in head size of giant and dwarf rattlesnakes revealed patterns consistent with shifts to larger and smaller prey, respectively. Our data provide the first example of a clear relationship between body size and island area in a squamate reptile species; among vertebrates this pattern has been previously documented in few insular mammals. This finding suggests that selection for body size is influenced by changes in community dynamics that are related to graded differences in area over what are otherwise similar bioclimatic conditions. We hypothesize that in this system shifts to larger prey, episodic saturation and depression of primary prey density, and predator release may have led to insular gigantism, and that shifts to smaller prey and increased reproductive efficiency in the presence of intense intraspecific competition may have led to insular dwarfism.

  19. Sexual dimorphism in venom of Bothrops jararaca(Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, M F D; Travaglia-Cardoso, S R; Rocha, M M T

    2006-09-15

    Bothrops jararaca is an abundant snake in Brazil, and its venom has been studied exhaustively. The species exhibits adult size dimorphism in which female are larger. We registered the growth in Snout-Vent Length and weight of one litter (with 11 females and 12 males). We compared growth curves and venom profile between male and female of B. jararaca in order to establish the relationship of those characters and sex. Their venoms were analyzed when they were 36 months old, concerning SDS PAGE, protein content, proteolytic, hyaluronidasic, phospholipasic, blood-clotting, edematogenic, hemorrhagic, myotoxic activities, and lethality. Differences in the growth curves of the females and the males were significantly different after the 12th month of age, with the females growing faster. Females produced five times more venom than males. The electrophoretic patterns were variable: the venom from males had more protein bands than females. Venom composition varied significantly between males and females. Venom from females is more potent for hyaluronidasic, hemorrhagic, and lethality activities, whereas venom from males is more potent for coagulant, phospholipasic, and myotoxic activities. The variability of proteolytic and edematogenic activities were not significant. The important sexual dimorphism in body size and mass, amount of venom produced, and venom composition in B. jararaca may reflect a divergence in niche partitioning.

  20. (Bitis; Viperidae) from the Western Cape Province, South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-02-25

    Feb 25, 1997 ... Leiden 43(9): 107-115. SPAWLS, S. & BRANCH, W.R. 1995. Dangerous snakes of. Africa, Southern Books Pub!.. Johannesburg, 192p. VISSER, 1. 1979. New and reconfirmed records for the Cape. Province with notes on some 'rare' species (Sauria, Serpentes and. Anura). J Herpetol. Assoc. Afr. 21: 40-50.

  1. Cysteine-rich venom proteins from the snakes of Viperinae subfamily - molecular cloning and phylogenetic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, Anna S; Starkov, Vladislav G; Osipov, Alexey V; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Filkin, Sergey Yu; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine-rich proteins found in animal venoms (CRISP-Vs) are members of a large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs). CRISP-Vs acting on different ion channels were found in venoms or mRNA (cDNA) encoding CRISP-Vs were cloned from snakes of three main families (Elapidae, Colubridae and Viperidae). About thirty snake CRISP-Vs were sequenced so far, however no complete sequence for CRISP-V from Viperinae subfamily was reported. We have cloned and sequenced for the first time cDNAs encoding CRISP-Vs from Vipera nikolskii and Vipera berus vipers (Viperinae). The deduced mature CRISP-V amino acid sequences consist of 220 amino acid residues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that viper proteins are closely related to those of Crotalinae snakes. The presence of CRISP-V in the V. berus venom was revealed using a combination of gel-filtration chromatography, electrophoresis and MALDI mass spectrometry. The finding of the putative channel blocker in viper venom may indicate its action on prey nervous system.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Three Novel Phospholipase A₂ Proteins from the Venom of Atheris chlorechis, Atheris nitschei and Atheris squamigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Chen, Xiaole; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Secretory phospholipase A₂ (sPLA₂) is known as a major component of snake venoms and displays higher-order catalytic hydrolysis functions as well as a wide range of pathological effects. Atheris is not a notoriously dangerous genus of snakes although there are some reports of fatal cases after envenomation due to the effects of coagulation disturbances and hemorrhaging. Molecular characterization of Atheris venom enzymes is incomplete and there are only a few reports in the literature. Here, we report, for the first time, the cloning and characterization of three novel cDNAs encoding phospholipase A₂ precursors (one each) from the venoms of the Western bush viper (Atheris chlorechis), the Great Lakes bush viper (Atheris nitschei) and the Variable bush viper (Atheris squamigera), using a "shotgun cloning" strategy. Open-reading frames of respective cloned cDNAs contained putative 16 residue signal peptides and mature proteins composed of 121 to 123 amino acid residues. Alignment of mature protein sequences revealed high degrees of structural conservation and identity with Group II venom PLA₂ proteins from other taxa within the Viperidae. Reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) profiles of these three snake venoms were obtained separately and chromatographic fractions were assessed for phospholipase activity using an egg yolk suspension assay. The molecular masses of mature proteins were all identified as approximately 14 kDa. Mass spectrometric analyses of the fractionated oligopeptides arising from tryptic digestion of intact venom proteins, was performed for further structural characterization.

  3. An Acoustic Sensor for the Viper Infrared Sniper Detection System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ertem, M

    1999-01-01

    .... However, a single camera IR method can not reliably give a range to target. An acoustic sensor and associated signal processing algorithm have been developed to act as a simple filter to detect the acoustic signature of a rifle shot...

  4. Antitumoral Potential of Tunisian Snake Venoms Secreted Phospholipases A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoudha Zouari-Kessentini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipases type A2 (PLA2s are the most abundant proteins found in Viperidae snake venom. They are quite fascinating from both a biological and structural point of view. Despite similarity in their structures and common catalytic properties, they exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities. Besides being hydrolases, secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 are an important group of toxins, whose action at the molecular level is still a matter of debate. These proteins can display toxic effects by different mechanisms. In addition to neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, hemolytic activity, antibacterial, anticoagulant, and antiplatelet effects, some venom PLA2s show antitumor and antiangiogenic activities by mechanisms independent of their enzymatic activity. This paper aims to discuss original finding against anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activities of sPLA2 isolated from Tunisian vipers: Cerastes cerastes and Macrovipera lebetina, representing new tools to target specific integrins, mainly, and integrins.

  5. Antitumoral Potential of Tunisian Snake Venoms Secreted Phospholipases A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari-Kessentini, Raoudha; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Bazaa, Amine; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Luis, Jose; Marrakchi, Naziha

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipases type A2 (PLA2s) are the most abundant proteins found in Viperidae snake venom. They are quite fascinating from both a biological and structural point of view. Despite similarity in their structures and common catalytic properties, they exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities. Besides being hydrolases, secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) are an important group of toxins, whose action at the molecular level is still a matter of debate. These proteins can display toxic effects by different mechanisms. In addition to neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, hemolytic activity, antibacterial, anticoagulant, and antiplatelet effects, some venom PLA2s show antitumor and antiangiogenic activities by mechanisms independent of their enzymatic activity. This paper aims to discuss original finding against anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activities of sPLA2 isolated from Tunisian vipers: Cerastes cerastes and Macrovipera lebetina, representing new tools to target specific integrins, mainly, α5β1 and αv integrins. PMID:23509718

  6. Morphology of the snake spectacle reflects its evolutionary adaptation and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, Mari-Ann Otkjaer; Heegaard, Steffen; Wang, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure spectacular thickness. Multivariable analyses were made to determine whether family, activity period (diurnal/nocturnal) and habitat (arboreal/terrestrial/fossorial/aquatic) influenced spectacle thickness. Results The thinnest spectacles in absolute terms were...... found in the Usambara bush viper (Viperidae) with a thickness of 74 ± 9 μm and the absolute thickest spectacle was found in the red-tailed pipe snake (Cylindrophiidae) which had a spectacle thickness of 244 ± 57 μm. Fossorial and aquatic snakes had significantly thicker spectacles than arboreal...... be predicted by taxonomic family and habitat, but not activity period. Conclusion This phylogenetically broad systematic study of the thickness of the snake spectacle showed that spectacular thickness varies greatly across snake species and may reflect evolutionary adaptation and development....

  7. Morphology of the snake spectacle reflects its evolutionary adaptation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Mari-Ann Otkjaer; Heegaard, Steffen; Wang, Tobias; Gade, Jacob Thorup; Damsgaard, Christian; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2017-08-18

    Covering the eye of all snakes is a transparent integumental structure known as the spectacle. In order to determine variations in spectacle thickness among species, the spectacles of 217 alcohol-preserved museum specimens of 44 species belonging to 14 different families underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure spectacular thickness. Multivariable analyses were made to determine whether family, activity period (diurnal/nocturnal) and habitat (arboreal/terrestrial/fossorial/aquatic) influenced spectacle thickness. The thinnest spectacles in absolute terms were found in the Usambara bush viper (Viperidae) with a thickness of 74 ± 9 μm and the absolute thickest spectacle was found in the red-tailed pipe snake (Cylindrophiidae) which had a spectacle thickness of 244 ± 57 μm. Fossorial and aquatic snakes had significantly thicker spectacles than arboreal and terrestrial snakes. When spectacle thickness was correlated to eye size (horizontal spectacle diameter), Gray's earth snake (Uropeltidae) had the lowest ratio (1:7) and the cottonmouth (Viperidae) had the highest ratio (1:65). Multivariable and phylogenetic analyses showed that spectacular thickness could be predicted by taxonomic family and habitat, but not activity period. This phylogenetically broad systematic study of the thickness of the snake spectacle showed that spectacular thickness varies greatly across snake species and may reflect evolutionary adaptation and development.

  8. Venomous snakebite in Thailand. II: Clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochanugool, C; Wildde, H; Bhanganada, K; Chanhome, L; Cox, M J; Chaiyabutr, N; Sitprija, V

    1998-05-01

    We reviewed a total of 2,525 snakebite patients in Bangkok. Of these, 1,415 were bitten by venomous snakes, 91 by neurotoxic snakes of genus Naja or Bungarus and 1,324 by snakes of family Viperidae or Crotalidae. Seventy-one percent of bites were on the lower extremity. There were two fatal cobra bites; both patients were dead on arrival at the hospital. Bites from vipers caused morbidity but no deaths. Species-specific antivenins are effective in reversing respiratory failure from cobra bites and coagulopathies from bites by Viperidae and Crotalidae snakes. However, early respiratory and wound care will save lives even in the absence of specific cobra and krait antivenin. Care of a snakebite victim should consist of immobilization and bandaging of the bitten limb with elastic bandages during transport to the hospital, early surgical debridement of necrotic tissue, appropriate infusion of antivenin, aggressive respiratory support, management of shock and infection, and peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis. Incision of bite wounds, suctioning, application of ice, and tourniquets are of no proven value and may be dangerous. All snakebite victims in southeast Asia should survive if they receive early competent care.

  9. Aspectos da biologia reprodutiva de Bothrops jararaca em cativeiro (Serpentes, Viperidae Reproductive biological aspects of Bothrops jararaca in captivity (Serpentes, Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Machado Alves

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The reproduction of Bothrops jararaca (Wied, 1824 in captivity in ordened to determine the intercourse period, births, number of neonates, proportion of males and females per litter were performed between 1989 and 1999. Fifty eight females were observed, 16 intercourses in captivity, 45 females arrived already fertilized from nature and 53 litters, resulting on the birth of 426 live neonates, 67 infertile egg masses, 18 stillborn neonates and 4 abnormal neonates. The intercourse period was from february to december and the births happened between february and may. From the two gestacional periods observed, the shortest one was 152 days and the longest 239. The average amount of live neonates per litter was 8,04. Among 323 neonates, 47,68% were males and 52,32% were females. During the first year of life, 75,71% of the females and 71,54% of the males died, and 2,31% of the females and 0,81% of the males reached the fifth year of life.

  10. Efficacy of Indian polyvalent snake antivenoms against Sri Lankan snake venoms: lethality studies or clinically focussed in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduwage, Kalana; Silva, Anjana; O’Leary, Margaret A.; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro antivenom efficacy studies were compared to rodent lethality studies to test two Indian snake antivenoms (VINS and BHARAT) against four Sri Lankan snakes. In vitro efficacy was tested at venom concentrations consistent with human envenoming. Efficacy was compared statistically for one batch from each manufacturer where multiple vials were available. In binding studies EC50 for all VINS antivenoms were less than BHARAT for D. russelii [553 μg/mL vs. 1371 μg/mL;p = 0.016), but were greater for VINS antivenoms compared to BHARAT for N. naja [336 μg/mL vs. 70 μg/mL;p < 0.0001]. EC50 of both antivenoms was only slighty different for E. carinatus and B. caeruleus. For procoagulant activity neutralisation, the EC50 was lower for VINS compared to BHARAT - 60 μg/mL vs. 176 μg/mL (p < 0.0001) for Russell’s viper and 357 μg/mL vs. 6906μg/mL (p < 0.0001) for Saw-scaled viper. Only VINS antivenom neutralized in vitro neurotoxicity of krait venom. Both antivenoms partially neutralized cobra and didn’t neutralize Russell’s viper neurotoxicity. Lethality studies found no statistically significant difference in ED50 values between VINS and BHARAT antivenoms. VINS antivenoms appeared superior to BHARAT at concentrations equivalent to administering 10 vials antivenom, based on binding and neutralisation studies. Lethality studies were inconsistent suggesting rodent death may not measure relevant efficacy outcomes in humans. PMID:27231196

  11. Snake bite in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, A G; Gebi, U I; Onyemelukwe, G C

    2001-09-01

    Four families of venomous snakes are found in Nigeria--Viperidae, Elapidae, Colubridae and Actraspididae but three species carpet viper (Echis ocellatus), black-necked spitting cobra (Naja nigricollis) and puff adder (Bitis arietans), belonging to the first two families, are the most important snakes associated with envenoming in Nigeria. The incidence of bites has been reported as 497 per 100,000 population per year with a 12 percent natural mortality, with Echis ocellatus accounting for at least 66 percent in certain foci. Bites occur more often while victims were farming, herding or walking although the spitting cobra may bite victims who roll upon it in their sleep. Carpet viper venom contains a prothrombin activating procoagulant, haemorrhagin and cytolytic fractions which cause haemorrhage, incoagulable blood, shock and local reactions/ necrosis. The spitting cobra bite manifests with local tissue reaction and occassionally with bleeding from the site of bite, but no classic neurotoxic feature has been observed except following Egyptian cobra (N. haje) bites. Cardiotoxicity and renal failure may occassionally occur following bites by the carpet viper and the puff adder. In the laboratory, haematological and other features are noted and immunodiagnosis has a role in species identification. Immobilisation of the bitten limb is probably the single most important first aid measure. Antivenom should be used cautiously when indicated. As only 8.5 percent of snake bite victims attend hospitals in Nigeria, health education should be the main preventive measure, mean-while, the study of immunisation of occupationally predisposed individuals in endemic areas should be intensified. A new Fab fragment antivenom specific to Nigerian Echis ocellatus was investigated clinically, just as the local herbs-Aristolochia spp, Guiera spp and Schummaniophyton spp are investigated experimentally.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Three Novel Phospholipase A2 Proteins from the Venom of Atheris chlorechis, Atheris nitschei and Atheris squamigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is known as a major component of snake venoms and displays higher-order catalytic hydrolysis functions as well as a wide range of pathological effects. Atheris is not a notoriously dangerous genus of snakes although there are some reports of fatal cases after envenomation due to the effects of coagulation disturbances and hemorrhaging. Molecular characterization of Atheris venom enzymes is incomplete and there are only a few reports in the literature. Here, we report, for the first time, the cloning and characterization of three novel cDNAs encoding phospholipase A2 precursors (one each from the venoms of the Western bush viper (Atheris chlorechis, the Great Lakes bush viper (Atheris nitschei and the Variable bush viper (Atheris squamigera, using a “shotgun cloning” strategy. Open-reading frames of respective cloned cDNAs contained putative 16 residue signal peptides and mature proteins composed of 121 to 123 amino acid residues. Alignment of mature protein sequences revealed high degrees of structural conservation and identity with Group II venom PLA2 proteins from other taxa within the Viperidae. Reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC profiles of these three snake venoms were obtained separately and chromatographic fractions were assessed for phospholipase activity using an egg yolk suspension assay. The molecular masses of mature proteins were all identified as approximately 14 kDa. Mass spectrometric analyses of the fractionated oligopeptides arising from tryptic digestion of intact venom proteins, was performed for further structural characterization.

  13. Alexander Mikhailovich Zakharov and his works on the venom apparatus and venoms of some poisonous snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherlin Vladimir Alexandrovich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article gives brief biographical information about a very talented herpetologist Alexander M. Zakharov, and describes the general results of his works on the structure and function of venom glands of some poisonous snakes and their venoms. In his studies, he got the results, which are fundamentally different from the conventional concept of 30s - 70s of the XX century. Unfortunately, among physicians this concept has not changed up today. At that time it was thought that the poisons of Viperidae snakes are almost completely hemotoxic, and poisons of Elapidae (cobra are almost neurotoxic. But A.M.Zaharov found out, that poisons of both types of snakes (Viperidae and Elapidae include three groups of substances: hemotoxins, neurotoxins and non-toxic component – hyaluronidase. Each of these groups of substances is produced by independent part of venom glands and has its own special effect. Neurotoxins act on the central nervous system (mainly the respiratory center, but are greatly destroyed by means of the blood antigen properties and cannot pass through the hematoencephalic barrier. Hyaluronidase , connecting with neurotoxins, has an important property – to "smuggle" neurotoxins through the hematoencephalic barrier exactly into the target organ – the respiratory center in the central nervous system. In this case, neurotoxin enters the respiratory center not through the blood and lymph vessels, but directly through the nerve channel, through synapsis. The main function of hemotoxins is not to kill the victim, but to protect neurotoxins and hyaluronidase from the destructive activity of the victim's blood. Therefore, the target of the poisons of Viperidae and Elapidae snakes is the central nervous system of victims, but Elapidae has almost no hemotoxins. That’s why their striking effect can be achieved only by a strong increase in the amount of neurotoxins and hyaluronidase. Hemotoxins of Viperidae venoms permits to reduce the amount of

  14. The Evolutionary Implications of Hemipenial Morphology of Rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus (Laurent, 1768 (Serpentes: Viperidae: Crotalinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcovan Porto

    Full Text Available Most amniotes vertebrates have an intromittent organ to deliver semen. The reptile Sphenodon and most birds lost the ancestral penis and developed a cloaca-cloaca mating. Known as hemipenises, the copulatory organ of Squamata shows unique features between the amniotes intromittent organ. They are the only paired intromittent organs across amniotes and are fully inverted and encapsulated in the tail when not in use. The histology and ultrastructure of the hemipenes of Crotalus durissus rattlesnake is described as the evolutionary implications of the main features discussed. The organization of hemipenis of Crotalus durissus terrificus in two concentric corpora cavernosa is similar to other Squamata but differ markedly from the organization of the penis found in crocodilians, testudinata, birds and mammals. Based on the available data, the penis of the ancestral amniotes was made of connective tissue and the incorporation of smooth muscle in the framework of the sinusoids occurred independently in mammals and Crotalus durissus. The propulsor action of the muscle retractor penis basalis was confirmed and therefore the named should be changed to musculus hemipenis propulsor.The retractor penis magnus found in Squamata has no homology to the retractor penis of mammals, although both are responsible for the retraction of the copulatory organ.

  15. Ophidascaris durissus sp. nov. (Nematoda Ascarididae parasitizing Crotalus durissus Linnaeus (Ophidia, Viperidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Helena Martins Panizzutti

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The species Ophidascaris durissus sp. nov. is proposed with basis on specimens recovered from the rattlesnake Crotalus durissus L., 1758 (type host captured in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil (type locality. By the lack of interlabia, the new species can be compared only to O. natricis Yamaguti, 1935 from Japan and O. freitasi Hoa & Lien, 1970, from Vietnam. However, O. durissus sp. nov. differs from O. natricis mainly by the absence of internal lip papillae, location of the vulvar aperture and length of the spicules; from O. freitasi mostly by the greater number of pre-cloacal and distribution of post-cloacal papillae.

  16. The Evolutionary Implications of Hemipenial Morphology of Rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus (Laurent, 1768) (Serpentes: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Marcovan; de Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Pissinatti, Lorenzo; Rodrigues, Renata Lopes; Rojas-Moscoso, Julio Alejandro; Cogo, José Carlos; Metze, Konradin; Antunes, Edson; Nahoum, César; Mónica, Fabíola Z; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Most amniotes vertebrates have an intromittent organ to deliver semen. The reptile Sphenodon and most birds lost the ancestral penis and developed a cloaca-cloaca mating. Known as hemipenises, the copulatory organ of Squamata shows unique features between the amniotes intromittent organ. They are the only paired intromittent organs across amniotes and are fully inverted and encapsulated in the tail when not in use. The histology and ultrastructure of the hemipenes of Crotalus durissus rattlesnake is described as the evolutionary implications of the main features discussed. The organization of hemipenis of Crotalus durissus terrificus in two concentric corpora cavernosa is similar to other Squamata but differ markedly from the organization of the penis found in crocodilians, testudinata, birds and mammals. Based on the available data, the penis of the ancestral amniotes was made of connective tissue and the incorporation of smooth muscle in the framework of the sinusoids occurred independently in mammals and Crotalus durissus. The propulsor action of the muscle retractor penis basalis was confirmed and therefore the named should be changed to musculus hemipenis propulsor.The retractor penis magnus found in Squamata has no homology to the retractor penis of mammals, although both are responsible for the retraction of the copulatory organ.

  17. Diversity-dependent cladogenesis throughout western Mexico: Evolutionary biogeography of rattlesnakes (Viperidae: Crotalinae: Crotalus and Sistrurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Christopher; Sánchez-Ramírez, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    Rattlesnakes (Crotalus and Sistrurus) represent a radiation of approximately 42 species distributed throughout the New World from southern Canada to Argentina. Interest in this enigmatic group of snakes continues to accrue due, in part, to their ecomorphological diversity, contributions to global envenomations, and potential medicinal importance. Although the group has garnered substantial attention from systematists and evolutionary biologists for decades, little is still known regarding patterns of lineage diversification. In addition, few studies have statistically quantified broad-scale biogeographic patterns in rattlesnakes to ascertain how dispersal occurred throughout the New World, particularly among the different major biomes of the Americas. To examine diversification and biogeographic patterns in this group of snakes we assemble a multilocus data set consisting of over 6700bp encompassing three nuclear loci (NT-3, RAG-1, C-mos) and seven mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, ATPase6, ATPase8, ND4, ND5, cytb). Fossil-calibrated phylogenetic and subsequent diversification rate analyses are implemented using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference, to examine their evolutionary history and temporal dynamics of diversity. Based on ancestral area reconstructions we explore dispersal patterns throughout the New World. Cladogenesis occurred predominantly during the Miocene and Pliocene with only two divergences during the Pleistocene. Two different diversification rate models, advocating diversity-dependence, are strongly supported. These models indicate an early rapid radiation followed by a recent speciation rate decline. Biogeographic analyses suggest that the high elevation pine-oak forests of western Mexico served as a major speciation pump for the majority of lineages, with the desert biome of western North America colonized independently at least twice. All together, these results provide evidence for rapid diversification of rattlesnakes throughout the Mexican highlands during the Neogene, likely in response to continual orogenesis of Mexico's major mountain systems, followed by more recent dispersal into desert and tropical biomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Toxicity and neutralization of venoms from Peruvian snakes of the genera Bothrops and Lachesis (Serpentes: Viperidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incio Ruiz, R; Incio Ruiz, L; Martínez-Vargas, A Z; Salas Arruz, M; Gutiérrez, J M

    1993-12-01

    The lethal potencies (Median Lethal Dose) of the venoms of Peruvian snakes (Bothrops atrox, Bothrops barnetti, Bothrops pictus and Lachesis muta muta) were determined in mice by using intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection. In addition, the neutralizing ability of three antivenoms (bothropic polyvalent, bothropic bivalent and lachetic) was studied by preincubation-type experiments. B. pictus venom had the highest lethality by the intraperitoneal route whereas B. atrox venom had the highest lethality when tested by the intravenous route. The three antivenoms were effective in neutralizing lethality of the homologous venoms. Bivalent antivenom was more effective than polyvalent antivenom in the neutralization of B. pictus venom. On the basis of these findings, the use of bivalent bothropic antivenom is recommended in the Pacific coastal regions of Perú, whereas polyvalent bothropic antivenom is recommended in the oriental jungle regions of the country.

  19. The defensive strike of five species of lanceheads of the genus Bothrops (Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, M S; Martins, M

    2007-05-01

    We studied the defensive strike of one species of each of five recognized lineages within the genus Bothrops, namely, B. alternatus, B. jararaca, B. jararacussu, B. moojeni and B. pauloensis. The defensive strike of the studied species was in general similar to that of Crotalus viridis and C. atrox, but some important differences were observed. Bothrops alternatus and B. pauloensis struck preferentially from a tight body posture, whereas B. jararaca and B. moojeni from a loose body posture. Defensive strikes were either true or false (during the latter, the mouth remains closed or partially open). Almost all strikes were successful; only on a few occasions snakes missed their target (flawed strikes). Strike variables were very conservative among the five species, especially strike distance and height, and one possible explanation may be related to constraints imposed on strike variables as a way of increasing strike accuracy.

  20. Variação entre filhotes de representantes do complexo Bothrops newied (Serpentes, Viperidae, Crotalinae

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    Vinícius Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available External morphological characters of 141 young specimens (69 males and 72 femalesof the Bothrops newied complex were analyzed. Regression analysis was used in the study of morphometric characters and principal components analysis was used in the study of meristic and qualitative characters. Sexual dimorphism was confirmed in the meristic and morphometric characters. Males showed higher counts of subcaudals and longer tails. Females showed eventually higher number of ventrals and dorsal rows, and larger heads. Six different drawing patterns were diagnosed and can indicate the existence of different species. Ontogenetic variation was described.

  1. [Neutralization of the hemorrhagic effect induced by Bothrops asper (Serpentes: Viperidae) venom with tropical plant extracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, O; Gutiérrez, J M; Barrios, M; Castro, I; Romero, M; Umaña, E

    1999-09-01

    Organic extracts representing 48 species included in 30 families of Costa Rican tropical plants were evaluated for their ability to neutralize hemorrhagic activity induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper. A bioassay in mice was used, based on intradermal injection of either venom or venom-extract mixtures followed by the measurement of hemorrhagic areas. Total inhibition of hemorrhage was observed with the ethanolic, ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts of Bursera simaruba, Clusia torresii, C. palmana, Croton draco, Persea americana, Phoebe brenesii, Pimenta dioica, Sapindus saponaria, Smilax cuculmeca and Virola koschnyi. Chemical analysis of these extracts identified catequines, flavones, anthocyanines and condensated tannins, which may be responsible for the inhibitory effect observed, probably owing to the chelation of the zinc required for the catalytic activity of venom's hemorrhagic metalloproteinases.

  2. Discovery of a novel accessory structure of the pitviper infrared receptor organ (serpentes: viperidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Bolívar-G

    Full Text Available The facial pits of rattlesnakes, copperheads, lanceheads, bushmasters and other American and Asian pitvipers (Crotalinae are highly innervated and densely vascularized infrared (IR receptor organs. For over a century, studies have focused on a small sample of model species from North America and Asia. Based on an expanded survey of Central and South American crotalines, we report a conspicuous accessory structure composed of well-defined papillae that project from the anterior orbital adnexa. The papillae are continuous with the inner chamber of the IR receptor organ and our histological and ultrastructural data suggest that they possess a well-developed nervous network and extensive vascularization; however, they lack the characteristic IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses found in the IR-receptive pit membrane. The function of the IR receptor organ papillae is unknown.

  3. Ecological divergence and sexual selection drive sexual size dimorphism in New World pitvipers (Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, C R; Guiher, T J; Pyron, R A

    2014-04-01

    Hypotheses for the origin and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) fall into three primary categories: (i) sexual selection on male size, (ii) fecundity selection on female size and (iii) ecological selection for gender-specific niche divergence. We investigate the impact of these forces on SSD evolution in New World pitvipers (Crotalinae). We constructed a phylogeny from up to eight genes (seven mitochondrial, one nuclear) for 104 species of NW crotalines. We gathered morphological and ecological data for 82 species for comparative analyses. There is a strong signal of sexual selection on male size driving SSD, but less evidence for fecundity selection on female size across lineages. No support was found for allometric scaling of SSD (Rensch's rule), nor for directional selection for increasing male size (the Fairbairn-Preziosi hypothesis) in NW crotalines. Interestingly, arboreal lineages experience higher rates of SSD evolution and a pronounced shift to female-biased dimorphism. This suggests that fecundity selection on arboreal females exaggerates ecologically mediated dimorphism, whereas sexual selection drives male size in terrestrial lineages. We find that increasing SSD in both directions (male- and female-biased) decreases speciation rates. In NW crotalines, it appears that increasing magnitudes of ecologically mediated SSD reduce rates of speciation, as divergence accumulates within species among sexes, reducing adaptive divergence between populations leading to speciation. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gloydius intermedius (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunzhu; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Cheng; Dou, Huashan

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of Gloydius intermedius is analyzed and presented for the first time. The genome was 17, 226 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 control region. The overall base composition was A (32.4%), C (28.8%), T (25.9%), and G (12.9%). The base compositions clearly presented the A-C skew, which was most obvious in the protein-coding genes. The extended termination-associated sequence domain, the central conserved domain and the conserved sequence block domain are defined in the mitochondrial genome control region of G. intermedius. Mitochondrial genome analyses based on MP, ML, NJ and Bayesian analyses yielded identical phylogenetic trees, indicating a close phylogenetic affinity of the 13 Crotalinae species. It appeared that no less than two major phyletic lineages were present in Crotalinae. The main clades within the Crotalinae supported are: A clade including the Protobothrops. A clade (G. brevicaudus, G. ussuriensis, G. intermedius, G. saxatilis) with the Ovophis appeared as the sister taxon to Protobothrops and was supported by bootstrap values of 88%. The four Gloydius species formed a paraphyletic group with the high bootstrap value (100 %) in all examinations.

  5. Late embryos and bony skull development in Bothropoides jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polachowski, Katja M; Werneburg, Ingmar

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, developmental anatomy received increasing interest as a potential new source for phylogenetic research. For skeletal development, studies mainly rely on the first appearance of ossification centers. However, informative events occur during the whole course of skeletogenesis; interactions between external and internal development occur and morphometric changes take place - all of which present potential sources for phylogenetic analyses. Therefore, the Standard Event System (SES) was used to traceably describe the external development of the snake species Bothropoides jararaca and external measurements were analyzed. We then applied micro-computed tomography (μCT), clearing and double-staining, and 2D and 3D morphometric methods to describe, illustrate, and analyze the development of the head in great detail. We found a 3D flattening of the skull during ontogeny, a pattern that is not reflected in external development. This may be explained by a different relationship of skeletogenesis and external characters to the developing jaw musculature or simply by the different type of data. Clearing and double-staining and μCT-scanning revealed a broadly similar sequence in the onset of ossification. Minute differences may be due to the treatment of embryos. Bones of the dermatocranium are among the first to ossify and the development of the calcified endolymph may reflect its function as a calcium source during development. The value of phylogenetic observations using the sequence of first ossifications is critically discussed. The related heterochronic changes are interpreted to contribute at least to the very first phase of divagating skull formation among taxa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Multilocus phylogeny of the Asian Lance-headed pitvipers (Squamata, Viperidae, Protobothrops).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Liu, Qin; Wen, Tao; Xiao, Rong; Fang, Ming; Zhong, Guanghui; Truong, Nguyen Q; Zhu, Fei; Jadin, Robert C; Li, Cao

    2016-03-22

    Despite the public health significance and potential applications to medical research, the evolutionary history of the Asian Lance-headed pitvipers (genus Protobothrops) remains inadequately studied. Previous research generally focused on a few selected species with no comprehensive molecular study of Protobothrops. Here, we conduct the first study to infer the phylogenetic relationships of all currently recognized species in this genus based on four mitochondrial DNA fragments and four nuclear genes. Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood analyses show that within Protobothrops there are four strongly supported clades forming distinct subgroups. The first subgroup, which is sister to the other three, consists of three species, P. himalayanus, P. kaulbacki, and P. sieversorum. The second subgroup contains only P. mangshanensis. The final two subgroups, which are sister groups, include the other four and six Protobothrops species. Although our findings provide additional information on the phylogenetic relationships of the genus Protobothrops, the placement of P. dabieshanensis and P. elegans remains problematic. In addition, our molecular results indicate that P. trungkhanhensis, currently considered endemic to Vietnam, should be added to the species known from China. Our ancestral area estimation indicated that Protobothrops likely originated in southwestern China. This study improves our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among species of Asian Lance-headed pitvipers, providing a greater framework for future studies.

  7. Phylogenetic structure and species boundaries in the mountain pitviper Ovophis monticola (Serpentes: Viperidae: Crotalinae) in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Anita; Dawson, Karen; Guo, Peng; Thorpe, Roger S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated phylogenetic structure and morphological variation in Asian mountain pitvipers of the genus Ovophis (comprising 3-4 species some of which are considered polytypic) by sequencing four mitochondrial markers (cytochrome b, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4, 12S and 16S rRNA) from 72 specimens, and analysed them in a Bayesian framework together with another 26 sequences from closely related genera. We reconstructed the region of origin and direction of dispersal of the major clades, and of Ovophis as a whole, using likelihood framework analysis. We also defined morphogroups from 280 specimens from across the range of Ovophis to allow the geographic extent of the major clades to be determined, as well as to allow inclusion of specimens lacking sequence data. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the monophyly of Ovophis as currently defined, and revealed that it contains two major lineages, eastern (mainly Chinese) and western, with both occurring in southwestern China, central and northern Viet Nam. The most likely origin of the genus, and of individual lineages, coincides with the northeastern boundary of the Indomalayan hotspot. Major diversification in this species group likely corresponded to major climatic changes arising from the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau in the early to mid Miocene. With reference to the defined morphogroups, we suggest that at least five species are present and provide appropriate names. With a few exceptions, the newly defined species boundaries do not correspond to the existing taxonomy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Viperidae Venoms Antibacterial Profile: a Short Communication for Proteomics

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    Bruno L. Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections involving multidrug-resistant strains are one of the ten leading causes of death and an important health problem in need for new antibacterial sources and agents. Herein, we tested and compared four snake venoms (Agkistrodon rhodostoma, Bothrops jararaca, B. atrox and Lachesis muta against 10 Gram-positive and Gram-negative drug-resistant clinical bacteria strains to identify them as new sources of potential antibacterial molecules. Our data revealed that, as efficient as some antibiotics currently on the market (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC = 1–32 μg mL−1, A. rhodostoma and B. atrox venoms were active against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis (MIC = 4.5 μg mL−1, while B. jararaca inhibited S. aureus growth (MIC = 13 μg ml−1. As genomic and proteomic technologies are improving and developing rapidly, our results suggested that A. rhodostoma, B. atrox and B. jararaca venoms and glands are feasible sources for searching antimicrobial prototypes for future design new antibiotics against drug-resistant clinical bacteria. They also point to an additional perspective to fully identify the pharmacological potential of these venoms by using different techniques.

  9. Utilisation of Crotalidae polyvalent immune fab (ovine) for Viperidae envenomations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P N; McGoodwin, L; Banner, W

    2008-12-01

    Snakebite envenomations occur in 45,000 patients in the USA annually and are associated with morbidity especially in children and the elderly. Crotalidae polyvalent immune fab (ovine; FabAV) is a polyvalent antivenom derived from sheep for crotalid envenomations. Limited clinical trials are available in paediatric patients. A literature search using MEDLINE (1950-February 2008), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-February 2008), EMBASE (1988-February 2008) and Cochrane Library (1996-June 2008) was conducted using key words including: antivenom OR snakebites OR children OR Crotalid OR envenomations. All English-language articles were identified from data sources. Pertinent studies pertaining to FabAV in children and adolescents with crotalid envenomations were included for analysis. Ten papers were included for review, representing 47 children. Initial doses ranging from 2 to 18 g were administered and initial control was achieved in most children. Maintenance dosing was continued in 63.8% (30/47) of patients; 4.3% (2/47) of patients had episodes of venom recurrence. Adverse events were noted in 8.5% of children (4/47) when pooled for data analysis. FabAV appears to be a safe and effective agent for children with crotalid envenomations. Clinicians should adapt dosing recommendations used for adults until future large, well-designed trials can confirm the efficacy and safety from observation studies and case reports.

  10. Meal size effects on the postprandial metabolic response of Bothrops alternatus (Serpentes: Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo S. B. Gavira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of meal size on the postprandial metabolic response of the lancehead Bothrops alternatus (Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1894, fed mice equaling to 5, 10, 20, and 40% of the snake's body mass. The maximum O2 consumption rates measured during digestion increased with meal size, reaching levels up to 2.8-7.8-fold higher than the metabolic rate measured during fasting. Specific Dynamic Action (SDA duration also increased with meal size, lasting from 54 to 212 hours to complete. Under our experimental conditions, 30ºC, the majority of our snakes failed to completely digest prey with a relative size of 40%. The SDA coefficient ranged from 17 to 27% of the energy content of the meal and was not affected by meal size.

  11. Discovery of a novel accessory structure of the pitviper infrared receptor organ (serpentes: viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-G, Wilmar; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Grant, Taran; Jared, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The facial pits of rattlesnakes, copperheads, lanceheads, bushmasters and other American and Asian pitvipers (Crotalinae) are highly innervated and densely vascularized infrared (IR) receptor organs. For over a century, studies have focused on a small sample of model species from North America and Asia. Based on an expanded survey of Central and South American crotalines, we report a conspicuous accessory structure composed of well-defined papillae that project from the anterior orbital adnexa. The papillae are continuous with the inner chamber of the IR receptor organ and our histological and ultrastructural data suggest that they possess a well-developed nervous network and extensive vascularization; however, they lack the characteristic IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses found in the IR-receptive pit membrane. The function of the IR receptor organ papillae is unknown.

  12. Descriptions of six new species of Caryospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Guatemalan snakes (Serpentes: Colubridae and Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seville, Robert S; Asmundsson, Ingrid M; Campbell, Jonathan A

    2005-12-01

    One hundred and seventy snakes were collected in Guatemala and examined for coccidia. Of these, 8 individuals representing 6 host species were positive for Caryospora spp., 6 of which are described as new species. Sporulated oocysts of Caryospora bothriechis n. sp. from Bothriechis aurifer are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 12.7 x 12.5 (12-14 x 12-13) microm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.0; they lack a micropyle (M) or oocyst residuum (OR), but 1 large polar granule (PG) is usually present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 9.0-7.5 (8-10 x 7-8) microm, and have a L/W ratio of 1.2, and a Stieda body (SB) and sporocyst residuum (SR). Oocysts of Caryospora coniophanis n. sp. from Coniophanes imperialis are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 18.8 x 18.1 (17-20.5 x 16-20) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.0; they lack a M and OR, but 1 large PG is usually present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 13.2 x 9.4 (12-15 x 8-10) microm with a L/W ratio of 1.4, and a SB, substieda body (SSB), and SR. Oocysts of Caryospora conophae n. sp. from Conophis lineatus are spheroid to subspheroidal, 20.4 x 19.5 (17-26 x 17-25) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.0; they lack a M and OR, but 1 large PG is usually present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 13.1 x 9.8 (11-15 x 8-11) microm with a L/W ratio of 1.3 and a SB, SSB, and SR. Oocysts of Caryospora guatemalensis n. sp. from Lampropeltis triangulum are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 23.9 x 23.2 (20-27 x 20-26) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.0; they lack a M and OR, but 1 large PG is usually present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 14.4 x 10.6 (13-18 x 9-13) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.4 and a SB, SSB, and SR. Oocysts of Caryospora mayorum n. sp. from Conophis lineatus are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 25.6 x 24.4 (24-27 x 24-25) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.0; they lack a M and OR, but 1 large PG is usually present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 16.3 x 11.9 (16-18 x 11-13) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.4 and a SB, SSB, and SR. Oocysts of Caryospora zacapensis n. sp. from Masticophis mentovarius are spheroidal to subspheroidal, 22.5 x 21.8 (19-25 x 18-25) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.0; they lack a M and OR, but 1 large PG is usually present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 14.6 x 11.4 (11-16 x 10-13) microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.3 and a SB, SSB, and SR.

  13. Crystallographic characterization of functional sites of crotoxin and ammodytoxin, potent β-neurotoxins from Viperidae venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Grazyna; Saul, Frederick

    2012-09-15

    This review will focus on a description of the three-dimensional structures of two β-neurotoxins, the monomeric PLA(2) ammodytoxin from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes, and heterodimeric crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus, and a detailed structural analysis of their multiple functional sites. We have recently determined at high resolution the crystal structures of two natural isoforms of ammodytoxin (AtxA and AtxC) (Saul et al., 2010) which exhibit different toxicity profiles and different anticoagulant properties. Comparative structural analysis of these two PLA(2) isoforms, which differ only by two amino acid residues, allowed us to detect local conformational changes and delineate the role of critical residues in the anticoagulant and neurotoxic functions of these PLA(2) (Saul et al., 2010). We have also determined, at 1.35Å resolution, the crystal structure of heterodimeric crotoxin (Faure et al., 2011). The three-dimensional structure of crotoxin revealed details of the binding interface between its acidic (CA) and basic (CB) subunits and allowed us to identify key residues involved in the stability and toxicity of this potent heterodimeric β-neurotoxin (Faure et al., 2011). The precise spatial orientation of the three covalently linked polypeptide chains in the mature CA subunit complexed with CB helps us to understand the role played by critical residues of the CA subunit in the increased toxicity of the crotoxin complex. Since the CA subunit is a natural inhibitor of the catalytic and anticoagulant activities of CB, identification of the CA-CB binding interface describes residues involved in this inhibition. We propose future research directions based on knowledge of the recently reported 3D structures of crotoxin and ammodytoxin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Age-dependent variations in the venom proteins of Vipera xanthina (Gray, 1849) (Ophidia: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Hüseyin; Alpagut Keskin, Nurşen; Cevik, I Ethem; Ilgaz, Cetin

    2006-01-01

    In this study, polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and densitometry analysis methods were used to analyze venom extracts of Vipera xanthina specimens of different lengths (35, 47 and 88 cm) collected from the same locality. The electropherograms of the venom protein samples showed age-dependent qualitative and quantitative variations.

  15. Occurrence of European Adder (Vipera berus, Viperidae, Ophidia on Vlasina Plateau (Southeastern Serbia

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    Crnobrnja-Isailović, J.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The European adder (Vipera berus is among the most widespread reptile species in Europe, but it’s distribution at the Balkan Peninsula seems to be scarce and fragmented. As going toward the south, specimens were more frequently found in the vegetational zone of boreal forests and high alpine pastures. In the South-eastern Serbia, recent occurrence of European adder was confirmed on the Vlasina Plateau, in June 2010, in a mosaic-complex of peat bogs and marsh vegetation. Recent engagement of ecology students from University of Niš in mapping actual local distribution of adder will help locating key spots for its conservation in this area.

  16. Geographic distribution and apparent decline of Crotalus durissus terrificus (Laurenti 1768; Serpentes, Viperidae) in Uruguay

    OpenAIRE

    Prigioni, Carlos M.; Borteiro, Claudio; Kolenc, Francisco; González, Enrique M.; Colina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we make a comprehensive account of rattlesnake records in this country obtained from herpetological literature and other bibliographic sources, specimens accessioned in herpetological and non-specialized local collections, and new information gathered during field surveys. Asociación Herpetológica Argentina

  17. A new large species of Bitis Gray, 1842 (Serpentes: Viperidae) from the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, David J; Wade, Edward O Z; Spawls, Stephen; Böhme, Wolfgang; Buechley, Evan R; Sykes, Daniel; Colston, Timothy J

    2016-03-20

    A new species of viperine viperid snake is described, Bitis harenna sp. nov. The new species is a member of the subgenus Macrocerastes based on it having three scales separating the nasal and rostral shields, and on the combination of 'divisions' of dorsal scale rows on the upper flanks and 'fusions' of rows on the lower flanks. Bitis harenna sp. nov. is distinguished from other members of the subgenus by its unique colour pattern, posterior parietal flange on the lateral wall of the braincase, and possibly by differences in scalation and head proportions. Only a single museum specimen is known, a female collected from 'Dodola' in Ethiopia probably in the late 1960s and previously identified as a possibly unusually coloured and patterned B. parviocula. A live, presumably male, specimen very closely resembling the holotype of Bitis harenna sp. nov. was photographed on the Harenna escarpment of the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia in 2013, providing secure occurrence data and evidence that the holotype is not a uniquely aberrant specimen. A revised key to the species of Bitis in Ethiopia is presented. Aspects of body scalation are compared among species of the subgenus Macrocerastes and between species of Macrocerastes and Bitis, and several systematic characters are highlighted and clarified.

  18. On the main branches of the pulmonary artery in some Viperidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brongersma, L.D.

    1949-01-01

    In all snakes, the Boidae and Xenopeltidae excepted, only the right lung is well developed, while the left lung is rudimentary or absent (BUTLER, 1895). The right lung consists of an anterior alveolar part that is strongly vascularized, and of a posterior smooth-walled air-sac that is anangious.

  19. Molecular phylogeography of endangered sharp-snouted pitviper (Deinagkistrodon acutus; Reptilia, Viperidae) in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; He, Shunping; Peng, Zuogang; Zhao, Kai; Zhao, Ermi

    2007-09-01

    Using phylogenetic and population genetic approaches, the present study reports the phylogeographic structure of the sharp-snouted pitviper (Deinagkistrodon acutus), a threatened snake species with commercial and medicinal importance in China. The entire mitochondrial ND2 gene (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2) sequences of 86 individuals of D. acutus from 14 localities across its range in China were determined. Based on the results of phylogenetic analyses, distribution of diagnostic sites, haplotype network, and AMOVA hierarchical analysis, an east-west division of the whole D. acutus population could be observed. Geographically, a line formed by a lake, river, and mountain chain (the Poyang Lake, Gan River to the southern end of the Wuyi Mountains), results in vicariance and approximately vertically splits the range into two and the whole population into two main lineages (western and eastern). The bifurcating tree suggested generally west to east dispersal trend. The data fit the isolation by distance (IBD) model well. Star-like clusters in haplotype network, significantly negative values of Fs statistics, and unimodal mismatch distributions all suggest recent demographic expansions in four areas. The results show that isolation, dispersal, bottleneck, and expansion jointly constitute the history of D. acutus. In a haplotype network, the excessive predominance of central haplotypes, few medium-frequency haplotypes, predominance (73.1%) of the singletons among the derived haplotypes, most of which are connected to the central haplotype by only one mutational step, unsymmetrical campanulate unimodal curve of mismatch distributions and leftwards shift of the peaks, all suggest that the whole D. acutus population is a young population with low genetic diversity. Based on the data, the first priority for conservation action should be given to the Huangshan unit.

  20. Intraspecific variation of Bothrops pubescens (cope, 1869 venom in Uruguay (serpentes: viperidae

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    V. Morais

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Uruguay, there was no information about the variations degree in Bothrops pubescens venoms until the present work, in which we investigated intraspecific venom variation using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. We found some differences in the venom protein profile; however, they were not related to the parameters studied (geographic distribution, weight, sex, and captivity time. Moreover, we distinguished two different groups in relation to band densities at 49 and 57 kDa. Specimens with predominant density in the 49kDa band tend to be predominantly females. Weight distribution in this group extended for all the range (150-1500 g with an average weight of 720 g. The other group (57kDa predominant band showed restricted weight range (150-400 g with an average weight of 280 g. Cluster analysis was also performed. The variability observed in the venom profile probably corresponds to genetic variations.

  1. Echis carinatus (Serpentes: Viperidae) as a new host for Caryospora maxima (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyousif, Mohamed S; Al-Anazi, Abdullah D; Al-Shawa, Yaser R

    2004-08-01

    Caryospora maxima is redescribed from the intestinal contents of the viperid snake, Echis carinatus collected from Gazan area in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. This report represents a new host and geographic location for the parasite. Sporulated oocysts of this coccidian are spherical to subspherical, 42.8 x 41.2 (40.3-45.9 x 39.6-43.8) microm, with smooth brownish-yellow bilayered wall, 1.9 (1.5-2.3) microm. thick. Micropyle and oocyst residuum are absent. Some oocysts had a small polar granule. Sporocysts are broadly ellipsoid, 22.1 x 16.8 (21.0-23.3 x 15.5-17.4) microm., with a prominent stieda and substieda bodies. Sporocyst residuum is present consisting of many granules in compact mass. Sporozoites are banana-shaped, each with two refractile globules. Oocyst measurements were similar to those reported from Psammophis schokari in Jordan. Except for the presence of a spherical polar granule, the oocyst morphology was identical to the original description of C. maxima.

  2. The defensive strike of five species of lanceheads of the genus Bothrops (Viperidae

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    MS. Araújo

    Full Text Available We studied the defensive strike of one species of each of five recognized lineages within the genus Bothrops, namely, B. alternatus, B. jararaca, B. jararacussu, B. moojeni and B. pauloensis. The defensive strike of the studied species was in general similar to that of Crotalus viridis and C. atrox, but some important differences were observed. Bothrops alternatus and B. pauloensis struck preferentially from a tight body posture, whereas B. jararaca and B. moojeni from a loose body posture. Defensive strikes were either true or false (during the latter, the mouth remains closed or partially open. Almost all strikes were successful; only on a few occasions snakes missed their target (flawed strikes. Strike variables were very conservative among the five species, especially strike distance and height, and one possible explanation may be related to constraints imposed on strike variables as a way of increasing strike accuracy.

  3. Sequencing and analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of Gloydius saxatilis (Squamata: Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunzhu; Xie, Fei; Liu, Yichen; Zhao, Shuai; Wang, Yongsheng; Ma, Teng; Zhao, Tianqing

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of Gloydius saxatilis is analyzed and presented for the public for the first time. The genome was 17,218 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 control regions. The overall base composition was A (32.3%), C (28.9%), T (25.8%), and G (13.0%). The base compositions presented clearly the A-C skew, which was most obviously in the protein-coding genes. The extended termination-associated sequence domain, the central conserved domain and the conserved sequence block domain are defined in the mitochondrial genome control region of G. saxatilis. Mitochondrial genomes analyses based on MP, ML, NJ and Bayesian analyses yielded identical phylogenetic trees, indicating a close phylogenetic affinity of the thirteen Crotalinae species. It appeared that no less than two major phyletic lineages were present in Crotalinae. The main clades within the Crotalinae supported are: A clade including the Protobothrops. A clade (G. brevicaudus, G. ussuriensis, G. intermedius, G. saxatilis) with the Ovophis as the sister taxon to Protobothrops and was supported by bootstrap values of 88%. The four Gloydius species formed a paraphyletic group with the high bootstrap value (100%) in all examinations.

  4. Porocephalus species (Pentastomida infecting Boa constrictor (Boidae and Lachesis muta (Viperidae in northeastern Brazil

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    Miriam Camargo Guarnieri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has a great diversity of snakes, but there are few published works concerning parasitism in these animals. The present paper examined pulmonary infection by pentastomids in large snakes from northeastern Brazil, including six specimens of Boa constrictor and two examples of Lachesis muta from the Serpentarium of the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE, Brazil, all of which were collected in the Atlantic Coastal Forest. One specimen of B. constrictor was infected by Porocephalus sp. (intensity of infection 5.0 and one specimen of L. muta was infected by P. stilesi (intensity of infection 15.0.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Viperidae Venoms Antibacterial Profile: a Short Communication for Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Bruno L.; Santos, Dilvani O.; dos Santos, André Luis; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; de Freitas, Cícero C.; Cabral, Lúcio M.; Castro, Helena C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections involving multidrug-resistant strains are one of the ten leading causes of death and an important health problem in need for new antibacterial sources and agents. Herein, we tested and compared four snake venoms (Agkistrodon rhodostoma, Bothrops jararaca, B. atrox and Lachesis muta) against 10 Gram-positive and Gram-negative drug-resistant clinical bacteria strains to identify them as new sources of potential antibacterial molecules. Our data revealed that, as efficient as some antibiotics currently on the market (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 1–32 μg mL−1), A. rhodostoma and B. atrox venoms were active against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis (MIC = 4.5 μg mL−1), while B. jararaca inhibited S. aureus growth (MIC = 13 μg ml−1). As genomic and proteomic technologies are improving and developing rapidly, our results suggested that A. rhodostoma, B. atrox and B. jararaca venoms and glands are feasible sources for searching antimicrobial prototypes for future design new antibiotics against drug-resistant clinical bacteria. They also point to an additional perspective to fully identify the pharmacological potential of these venoms by using different techniques. PMID:18955360

  6. Postura de folículos vitelogênicos em cativeiro por serpentes Bothrops (Serpentes, Viperidae

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    Fátima Queiroz Alves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2014v27n2p213 As Serpentes do gênero Bothrops são amplamente distribuídas nas Américas Central e Sul e dados reprodutivos são disponíveis para várias das suas espécies. Mas B. leucurus é pouco estudada em vários aspectos. Neste trabalho, relatamos episódios de expulsão folicular por uma fêmea de B. leucurus e duas fêmeas de B. neuwiedi mantidas em cativeiro. As posturas dos folículos de B. leucurus e B. neuwiedi podem sugerir que serpentes Bothrops incluem o mecanismo fisiológico de expulsão folicular em sua fisiologia reprodutiva como meio para desbloquear os ovidutos.

  7. Shallow phylogeographic structure in the declining Mexican Lance-headed Rattlesnake, Crotalus polystictus (Serpentes: Viperidae

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    Jesse M. Meik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated matrilineal relationships among populations of the Mexican lance-headed rattlesnake (Crotalus polystictus, a pitviper inhabiting high-elevation valleys of the densely populated southernMexican Plateau. A fragment of the mitochondrial ATPase 8 and 6 genes (589 base pairs revealed comparatively low levels of genetic diversity, with few nucleotide polymorphisms across the portion of the geographic distribution sampled. The shallow intraspecificsequence divergence (1.0% in C. polystictus ATPase 8 and 6 genes contrasts with deep divergences (~1.0–14.1% observed within other montane rattlesnake lineages from the Mexican highlands, and is more typical of intraspecific variation observed in lowland rattlesnake species with similar distributional extents (e.g., C. tigris. We posit that the low genetic diversity in C. polystictus relative to that of other highland rattlesnakes may reflect ecological differences resulting in a different evolutionary response to Pleistocene climatic events. Our finding of apparently low genetic diversity in C. polystictus highlights the importance of conservation initiatives to protect high elevation grasslands in central Mexico.

  8. Is the population of Crotalus durissus (Serpentes, Viperidae) expanding in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Marcelo Ribeiro; Menezes, Frederico Alcântara

    2013-12-05

    Crotalus durissus are found from Mexico to northern Argentina in a highly disjunct distribution. According to some studies, this species is prone to occupy areas disturbed by human activities and floods comprise a plausible method of dispersal as inferred for some North American rattlesnakes. Based on the literature, it seems plausible that Crotalus durissus expanded their natural distribution in Brazil due to floods, but only in a few municipalities in Rio de Janeiro State. Data entries of Butantan Institute, in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1998 to 2012 show a declining tendency of snakes brought by donors. In addition, research shows no evidence of Crotalus durissus being an expanding species in the Brazilian territory.

  9. Natural history of the terciopelo Bothrops asper (Serpentes: Viperidae) in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasa, Mahmood; Wasko, Dennis K; Lamar, William W

    2009-12-01

    The terciopelo Bothrops asper is the only lancehead species widely distributed in the humid lowlands of Middle America and northwestern South America. Its large body size, relative abundance and cryptic habits contribute to the high incidence of snakebites induced by this species throughout its distribution. The terciopelo plays an important role in ecosystems, both as prey and as a generalist predator. Diet comprises a great variety of prey items, including some species that are considered nuisances. B. asper, as other lancehead species, exhibits a notable ontogenetic shift in diet, consuming ectotherms (mainly frogs and lizards) when young, and increasingly incorporating birds, rodents, and other small mammals with maturity. Adult terciopelos also consume large anurans, especially when endothermic prey availability is low. Using radiotelemetry we determined home range and movement patterns from 28 individual B. asper at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Overall home range estimates are relatively small compared with other pitvipers, averaging between 3.71ha and 5.95ha; home range size did not differ between males and females. Movement patterns are largely aseasonal and consist of short (50 m) movements to new foraging areas. Habitat use is related to prey availability and therefore to foraging strategy. Our data support a strong preference for areas near swamps by both sexes. Reproduction in B. asper is highly seasonal, and--apparently--biannual. Reproductive cycles in Costa Rica are tightly related to rainfall patterns. Therefore, the timing of breeding differs between populations in the Caribbean and Pacific lowlands. Bothrops asper is adapted to areas with low levels of disturbance along the agricultural frontier, and consequently it is not rare to find it in or near human dwellings. However, despite popular belief, no evidence supports a purported increase in population density of this species in Costa Rica. Despite human persecution and substantial modification of habitat, B. asper is a species with a conservation status of least concern, and probably will likely persist well into the future. Thus, it is important to learn how to coexist with this species, and to improve mechanisms for the prevention and treatment of accidental snakebite and its consequences.

  10. Acción de la miotoxina del veneno de Bothrops brazili Hoge, 1953 (Ophidia: Viperidae

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    Carmen Pantigoso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Se ha estudiado el modo de acción de la miotoxina aislada del veneno de la serpiente Bothrops brazili. La inoculación de la miotoxina en el músculo gastrocnemius de ratones albinos produce durante la primera hora de acción la liberación de creatina kinasa y lactato deshidrogenasa, mientras que por PAGE-SDS, se revela que la incubación de la miotoxina con músculo gastrocnemius aislado, produce además la liberación de otras proteínas musculares. Asimismo, la miotoxina produce hipercontracción, lesiones delta e incrementa los niveles de calcio intramuscular, tanto in vivo como in vitro, lo cual no depende del ingreso de calcio extracelular vía receptores de dihidropiridina. Este incremento de calcio explicaría la hipercontracción observada y podría generar la activación de proteasas y lipasas endógenas dependientes de calcio, que conducirían a la necrosis muscular.

  11. Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae) causing myiasis in Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes: Viperidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R J; do Prado, A P; Rodrigues, R R; Lopes, C A; Godoy, W A

    1999-09-01

    We describe a case of myiasis in Crotalus durissus terrificus (Laurenti) caused by Megaselia scalaris (Loew). The snake was found in Anhembi, Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a lesion measuring 25 mm in diameter where the larvae of M. scalaris had penetrated the ribs. The opportunistic behavior of the larvae of M. scalaris is discussed.

  12. Is the population of Crotalus durissus (Serpentes, Viperidae) expanding in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Crotalus durissus are found from Mexico to northern Argentina in a highly disjunct distribution. According to some studies, this species is prone to occupy areas disturbed by human activities and floods comprise a plausible method of dispersal as inferred for some North American rattlesnakes. Based on the literature, it seems plausible that Crotalus durissus expanded their natural distribution in Brazil due to floods, but only in a few municipalities in Rio de Janeiro State. Data entries of Butantan Institute, in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1998 to 2012 show a declining tendency of snakes brought by donors. In addition, research shows no evidence of Crotalus durissus being an expanding species in the Brazilian territory. PMID:24314146

  13. Evaluation of the lethal potency of scorpion and snake venoms and comparison between intraperitoneal and intravenous injection routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukkache, Naoual; El Jaoudi, Rachid; Ghalim, Noreddine; Chgoury, Fatima; Bouhaouala, Balkiss; Mdaghri, Naima El; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2014-06-12

    Scorpion stings and snake bites are major health hazards that lead to suffering of victims and high mortality. Thousands of injuries associated with such stings and bites of venomous animals occur every year worldwide. In North Africa, more than 100,000 scorpion stings and snake bites are reported annually. An appropriate determination of the 50% lethal doses (LD₅₀) of scorpion and snake venoms appears to be an important step to assess (and compare) venom toxic activity. Such LD₅₀ values are also commonly used to evaluate the neutralizing capacity of specific anti-venom batches. In the present work, we determined experimentally the LD₅₀ values of reference scorpion and snake venoms in Swiss mice, and evaluated the influence of two main venom injection routes (i.e., intraperitoneal (IP) versus intravenous (IV)). The analysis of experimental LD₅₀ values obtained with three collected scorpion venoms indicates that Androctonus mauretanicus (Am) is intrinsically more toxic than Androctonus australis hector (Aah) species, whereas the latter is more toxic than Buthus occitanus (Bo). Similar analysis of three representative snake venoms of the Viperidae family shows that Cerastes cerastes (Cc) is more toxic than either Bitis arietans (Ba) or Macrovipera lebetina (Ml) species. Interestingly, the venom of Elapidae cobra snake Naja haje (Nh) is far more toxic than viper venoms Cc, Ml and Ba, in agreement with the known severity of cobra-related envenomation. Also, our data showed that viper venoms are about three-times less toxic when injected IP as compared to IV, distinct from cobra venom Nh which exhibited a similar toxicity when injected IP or IV. Overall, this study clearly highlights the usefulness of procedure standardization, especially regarding the administration route, for evaluating the relative toxicity of individual animal venoms. It also evidenced a marked difference in lethal activity between venoms of cobra and vipers, which, apart from the

  14. Evaluation of the Lethal Potency of Scorpion and Snake Venoms and Comparison between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Injection Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoual Oukkache

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion stings and snake bites are major health hazards that lead to suffering of victims and high mortality. Thousands of injuries associated with such stings and bites of venomous animals occur every year worldwide. In North Africa, more than 100,000 scorpion stings and snake bites are reported annually. An appropriate determination of the 50% lethal doses (LD50 of scorpion and snake venoms appears to be an important step to assess (and compare venom toxic activity. Such LD50 values are also commonly used to evaluate the neutralizing capacity of specific anti-venom batches. In the present work, we determined experimentally the LD50 values of reference scorpion and snake venoms in Swiss mice, and evaluated the influence of two main venom injection routes (i.e., intraperitoneal (IP versus intravenous (IV. The analysis of experimental LD50 values obtained with three collected scorpion venoms indicates that Androctonus mauretanicus (Am is intrinsically more toxic than Androctonus australis hector (Aah species, whereas the latter is more toxic than Buthus occitanus (Bo. Similar analysis of three representative snake venoms of the Viperidae family shows that Cerastes cerastes (Cc is more toxic than either Bitis arietans (Ba or Macrovipera lebetina (Ml species. Interestingly, the venom of Elapidae cobra snake Naja haje (Nh is far more toxic than viper venoms Cc, Ml and Ba, in agreement with the known severity of cobra-related envenomation. Also, our data showed that viper venoms are about three-times less toxic when injected IP as compared to IV, distinct from cobra venom Nh which exhibited a similar toxicity when injected IP or IV. Overall, this study clearly highlights the usefulness of procedure standardization, especially regarding the administration route, for evaluating the relative toxicity of individual animal venoms. It also evidenced a marked difference in lethal activity between venoms of cobra and vipers, which, apart from the nature of

  15. Evaluation of the Lethal Potency of Scorpion and Snake Venoms and Comparison between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Injection Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukkache, Naoual; Jaoudi, Rachid El; Ghalim, Noreddine; Chgoury, Fatima; Bouhaouala, Balkiss; Mdaghri, Naima El; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion stings and snake bites are major health hazards that lead to suffering of victims and high mortality. Thousands of injuries associated with such stings and bites of venomous animals occur every year worldwide. In North Africa, more than 100,000 scorpion stings and snake bites are reported annually. An appropriate determination of the 50% lethal doses (LD50) of scorpion and snake venoms appears to be an important step to assess (and compare) venom toxic activity. Such LD50 values are also commonly used to evaluate the neutralizing capacity of specific anti-venom batches. In the present work, we determined experimentally the LD50 values of reference scorpion and snake venoms in Swiss mice, and evaluated the influence of two main venom injection routes (i.e., intraperitoneal (IP) versus intravenous (IV)). The analysis of experimental LD50 values obtained with three collected scorpion venoms indicates that Androctonus mauretanicus (Am) is intrinsically more toxic than Androctonus australis hector (Aah) species, whereas the latter is more toxic than Buthus occitanus (Bo). Similar analysis of three representative snake venoms of the Viperidae family shows that Cerastes cerastes (Cc) is more toxic than either Bitis arietans (Ba) or Macrovipera lebetina (Ml) species. Interestingly, the venom of Elapidae cobra snake Naja haje (Nh) is far more toxic than viper venoms Cc, Ml and Ba, in agreement with the known severity of cobra-related envenomation. Also, our data showed that viper venoms are about three-times less toxic when injected IP as compared to IV, distinct from cobra venom Nh which exhibited a similar toxicity when injected IP or IV. Overall, this study clearly highlights the usefulness of procedure standardization, especially regarding the administration route, for evaluating the relative toxicity of individual animal venoms. It also evidenced a marked difference in lethal activity between venoms of cobra and vipers, which, apart from the nature of toxins

  16. Venomous snakebites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adukauskienė, Dalia; Varanauskienė, Eglė; Adukauskaitė, Agnė

    2011-01-01

    More than 5 million people are bitten by venomous snakes annually and more than 100,000 of them die. In Europe, one person dies due to envenomation every 3 years. There is only one venomous snake species in Lithuania--the common adder (Vipera berus)--which belongs to the Viperidae family; however, there are some exotic poisonous snakes in the zoos and private collections, such as those belonging to the Elapidae family (cobras, mambas, coral snakes, etc.) and the Crotalidae subfamily of the Viperidae family (pit vipers, such as rattlesnakes). Snake venom can be classified into hemotoxic, neurotoxic, necrotoxic, cardiotoxic, and nephrotoxic according to the different predominant effects depending on the family (i.e., venom of Crotalidae and Viperidae snakes is more hemotoxic and necrotoxic, whereas venom of Elapidae family is mainly neurotoxic). The intoxication degree is estimated according to the appearance of these symptoms: 1) no intoxication ("dry" bite); 2) mild intoxication (local edema and pain); 3) moderate intoxication (pain, edema spreading out of the bite zone, and systemic signs); 4) severe intoxication (shock, severe coagulopathy, and massive edemas). This topic is relevant because people tend to make major mistakes providing first aid (e.g., mouth suction, wound incision, and application of ice or heat). Therefore, this article presents the essential tips on how first aid should be performed properly according to the "Guidelines for the Management of Snake-Bites" by the World Health Organization (2010). Firstly, the victim should be reassured. Rings or other things must be removed preventing constriction of the swelling limb. Airway/breathing must be maintained. The bitten limb should be immobilized and kept below heart level to prevent venom absorption and systemic spread. Usage of pressure bandage is controversial since people usually apply it improperly. Incision, mouth suction, or excision should not be performed; neither a tourniquet nor ice or

  17. Canopy Venom: Proteomic Comparison among New World Arboreal Pit-Viper Venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Jordan; Cochran, Chip; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Nouwens, Amanda; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Kawasaki, Minami; Wood, Kelly; Dobson, James; Baumann, Kate; Jouiaei, Mahdokht; Jackson, Timothy N W; Koludarov, Ivan; Low, Dolyce; Ali, Syed A; Smith, A Ian; Barnes, Andrew; Fry, Bryan G

    2016-07-08

    Central and South American pitvipers, belonging to the genera Bothrops and Bothriechis, have independently evolved arboreal tendencies. Little is known regarding the composition and activity of their venoms. In order to close this knowledge gap, venom proteomics and toxin activity of species of Bothriechis, and Bothrops (including Bothriopsis) were investigated through established analytical methods. A combination of proteomics and bioactivity techniques was used to demonstrate a similar diversification of venom composition between large and small species within Bothriechis and Bothriopsis. Increasing our understanding of the evolution of complex venom cocktails may facilitate future biodiscoveries.

  18. The viper fangs: clinical anatomy, principles of physical examination and therapy (a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Oliveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of fangs is a fundamental part of clinical examination of viperid snakes. The long curved venom fang is carried by short, highly mobile maxilla. Short anaesthesia is advised for safe physical examination and radiography of the mouth cavity. The fangs are gently forced outside the fang pocket by passing the bar or forceps on the palato-maxillary arch, and rotating them rostrally shifting the mucosal fold. Functional fangs are periodically shed and several generations of replacement teeth lie behind and beneath each fang. In case of fang fracture, therapy should be limited to flushing with a solution of chlorhexidine or povidone iodine, and topical application of pro-coagulant and antibacterial cream. Therapy of chronic fang inflammation is based on removal of necrotized fang and repeated abundant irrigation of the fang pocket. Treatment of chronic stomatitis consists of flushing with chlorhexidine or povidone iodine, physical removal of the plaques, administration of analgesics and antibiotics (marbofloxacin, enrofloxacin or ceftazidime. Extra-oral surgical approach is the best method for odontogenic abscess removal. A vigorous flushing with sterile saline solution, chlorhexidine and povidone iodine and topical application of antibiotics (antibiotic embedded surgical sponge is advised. Force feeding of the anorectic patient suffering from fang inflammation is a mandatory part of the standard treatment protocol.

  19. Purification and characterization of a phospholipase A2 from Cerastes cerastes (horn viper) snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebari, F L; Martin-Eauclaire, M F

    1990-01-01

    A single phospholipase A2 has been found in Cerastes cerastes venom, purified to homogeneity by a combination of chromatographic steps involving gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. Its mol. wt, its amino acid composition and its partial amino acid sequence have been determined. High homologies between its sequence and those of other Viperid phospholipides A2 have been noticed. The phospholipase was non-lethal to mice up to a dose as high as 25 mg/kg by i.p. and i.v. injection. This non-toxic enzyme exhibited an acidic isoelectric point and hydrolyzed monolayers of different short chain phospholipids. Some kinetic parameters have been studied potentiometric titration (with or without Triton X-100) and the rate of catalysis seemed not to be affected by changes in the physical state of the substrate.

  20. Responses of infrared-sensitive tectal units of the pit viper Crotalus atrox to moving objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldenbach, Felix; Bleckmann, Horst; Kohl, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Rattlesnakes perceive IR radiation with their pit organs. This enables them to detect and strike towards warm-blooded prey even in the dark. In addition, the IR sense allows rattlesnakes to find places for thermoregulation. Animate objects (e.g., prey) tend to move and thus cause moving IR images across the pit membrane. Even when an object is stationary, scanning head movements of rattlesnakes will result in moving IR images across the pit membrane. We recorded the neuronal activity of IR-sensitive tectal neurons of the rattlesnake Crotalus atrox while stimulating the snakes with an IR source that moved horizontally at various velocities. As long as object velocity was low (angular velocity of ~5°/s) IR-sensitive tectal neurons hardly showed any responses. With increasing object velocity though, neuronal activity reached a maximum at ~50°/s. A further increase in object velocity up to ~120°/s resulted in a slight decrease of neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate the importance of moving stimuli for the snake's IR detection abilities: in contrast to fast moving objects, stationary or slowly moving objects will not be detected when the snake is motionless, but might be detected by scanning head movements.

  1. AMCO Air Monitoring Viper Data Feed Points, Oakland CA, Live 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains points depicting locations and all air monitor sensor readings for the AMCO Chemical Superfund Site. Data are live sensor readings from...

  2. Canopy Venom: Proteomic Comparison among New World Arboreal Pit-Viper Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Debono

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Central and South American pitvipers, belonging to the genera Bothrops and Bothriechis, have independently evolved arboreal tendencies. Little is known regarding the composition and activity of their venoms. In order to close this knowledge gap, venom proteomics and toxin activity of species of Bothriechis, and Bothrops (including Bothriopsis were investigated through established analytical methods. A combination of proteomics and bioactivity techniques was used to demonstrate a similar diversification of venom composition between large and small species within Bothriechis and Bothriopsis. Increasing our understanding of the evolution of complex venom cocktails may facilitate future biodiscoveries.

  3. SeaVipers- Computer Vision and Inertial Position/Reference Sensor System (CVIPRSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    sensor for use as a Position Reference System (PRS) in Dynamic Positioning (DP). Using a combination of robotics and CV techniques, the sensor...based sensor for use as a Position Reference System (PRS) in Dynamic Positioning (DP). Using a combination of robotics and CV techniques, the sensor...Faculty of the Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor

  4. VIPER: Chronic Pain after Amputation: Inflammatory Mechanisms, Novel Analgesic Pathways, and Improved Patient Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    and DNA methylation changes in humans before and after amputation and determine the role of cytokine ratio measurement in prediction of pain...covering over 2,000,000 genetic markers ) on over 40,000 patients. The perioperative data we have obtained will be merged with these genetic data, and this...containing antibodies to CD14 (a macrophage marker ) and then qPCR was performed to confirm that stimulation produced the phenotype of interest. For PCR we

  5. Cold climate specialization: adaptive covariation between metabolic rate and thermoregulation in pregnant vipers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourdais, Olivier; Guillon, Michaël; Denardo, Dale; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    2013-07-02

    We compared thermoregulatory strategies during pregnancy in two congeneric viperid snakes (Vipera berus and Vipera aspis) with parapatric geographic ranges. V. berus is a boreal specialist with the largest known distribution among terrestrial snakes while V. aspis is a south-European species. Despite contrasted climatic affinities, the two species displayed identical thermal preferences (Tset) in a laboratory thermal gradient. Under identical natural conditions, however, V. berus was capable of maintaining Tset for longer periods, especially when the weather was constraining. Consistent with the metabolic cold adaptation hypothesis, V. berus displayed higher standard metabolic rate at all temperatures considered. We used the thermal dependence of metabolic rate to calculate daily metabolic profiles from body temperature under natural conditions. The boreal specialist experienced higher daily metabolic rate and minimized gestation duration chiefly because of differences in the metabolic reaction norms, but also superior thermoregulatory efficiency. Under cold climates, thermal constraints should make precise thermoregulation costly. However, a shift in the metabolic reaction norm may compensate for thermal constraints and modify the cost-benefit balance of thermoregulation. Covariation between metabolic rate and thermoregulation efficiency is likely an important adaptation to cold climates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Study of Clinical Profile of Snake Bite at a Tertiary Care Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Gaurav; Mhaskar, Dhanesh; Agarwal, Anubhav

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snake bite is an important occupational and rural hazard because India has always been a land of Exotic snakes. In Maharashtra, common poisonous snakes are Cobra, Russell's Viper, Saw Scaled Viper, and Krait. It is a fact that inspite of heavy morbidity and mortality, very little attention is paid by the clinicians to this occupational hazard. Aims: To study the prevalence of poisonous and non-poisonous snake bites in part of Western Maharashtra with reference to age, sex, occupation, part of body bitten, time of bite and seasonal variation, and the types of poisonous snakes common in this locality and their clinical manifestations along with the systemic envenomation from various types of poisonous snakes and their effective management in reducing the mortality rate. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted between May 2010 to May 2012 at a tertiary health care center in Maharashtra. Result: A total of 150 patients were studied in our hospital. Out of 150, 76 patients were of poisonous snake bite and 74 patients were of non-poisonous snake bite. Out of these 76 poisonous snake bites, 42 were viperine snake bites, 21 were neuroparalytic snake bites and 13 were locally toxic (LT) snake bites. Conclusion: Snake bite is a common life-threatening emergency in the study area. Delay in hospitalization is associated with poor prognosis and increased mortality rate due to consumptive coagulopathy, renal failure, and respiratory failure. Unusual complications like pulmonary edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were observed in present study. PMID:25253932

  7. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing

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    Adam D. Hargreaves

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0–2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5′ and 3′ UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29. We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species.

  8. A prospective cohort study of the effectiveness of the primary hospital management of all snakebites in Kurunegala district of Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmy, Seyed; Kularatne, Senanayake A M; Rathnayake, Shantha S; Dawson, Andrew H

    2017-08-01

    -nosed viper (Hypnalespp), 61 Russell's viper, 14 cobra, 13 common krait, 03 saw scaled viper. Primary hospitals received a significant number of snakebites that would be missed in surveys conducted in tertiary hospitals. Adherence to guidelines was good for the use of antivenom but not for hospital transfer or treatment of anaphylaxis. The large difference in snakebite incidence between community and hospital studies could possibly be due to non-envenomed patients not presenting. As the majority of snakebite management occurs in primary hospitals education and clinical support should be focused on that part of the health system.

  9. Antigenic cross-reactivity and species-specific identification of Pseudocerastes persicus fieldi snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nihal M; El-Kady, Ebtsam M

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we recognized progressively high immunological cross-reactivity between Pseudocerastes persicus fieldi (Pf) venom and six other medically important Egyptian snake venoms belonging to families Viperidae and Elapidae. Antibodies with a range of bonding strengths were shown to be involved in such cross-reactivity. Two strategies have been tried to access specificity; (i) using affinity purified species-specific anti-Pf antivenom antibodies, (ii) conducting the assay in the presence of ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN). The discrimination power of the prepared species-specific antivenom was demonstrated by its ability to detect Pf venom over a range of Pf concentrations (2.5 ng-2.5 μg) in a variety of body fluids. The assay could distinguish circulating Pf antigens from other viper antigens in the whole blood of experimentally envenomed mice. What seems promising in our work is the use of the chaotrope, NH4SCN, which renders the reaction medium more favorable for the specific homologous antigen-antibody interactions, primarily via preventing lower avid antibodies to share and, to a bit lesser extent, by decreasing non-specific absorbance signals frequently encountered with ELISA assays. The ELISA described herein may be useful for clinicians for identification of snake bites inflicted by Pf snake species. Balancing between specificity and sensitivity has to be considered for best results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Current challenges for confronting the public health problem of snakebite envenoming in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a serious public health problem in Central America, where approximately 5,500 cases occur every year. Panama has the highest incidence and El Salvador the lowest. The majority, and most severe, cases are inflicted by the pit viper Bothrops asper (family Viperidae), locally known as ‘terciopelo’, ‘barba amarilla’ or ‘equis’. About 1% of the bites are caused by coral snakes of the genus Micrurus (family Elapidae). Despite significant and successful efforts in Central America regarding snakebite envenomings in the areas of research, antivenom manufacture and quality control, training of health professionals in the diagnosis and clinical management of bites, and prevention of snakebites, much remains to be done in order to further reduce the impact of this medical condition. This essay presents seven challenges for improving the confrontation of snakebite envenoming in Central America. Overcoming these challenges demands a coordinated partnership of highly diverse stakeholders though inter-sectorial and inter-programmatic interventions. PMID:24602234

  11. Immunogenicity of Bothrops atrox (Ophidia: Viperidae venom and its evaluation by immunoenzymatic methods Inmunogenicidad del veneno de Bothrops atrox (Ophidia: Viperidae y su evaluación por métodos inmunoenzimáticos

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    Gustavo A. Sandoval

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of Bothrops atrox, “jergón”, venom was studied using ELISA and Western Blot methods, as well as cross-reactivity patterns against venoms of Bothrops brazili, Lachesis muta and Crotalus durissus. For this purpose, New Zealand white rabbits (2 kg aprox were immunized with four 500 μg doses of B. atrox venom in a period of 90 days. Antibody production was followed using ELISA technique, and title of hiper-immune serum was determined at the end of immunization protocol. Additionally, electrophoretic patterns of venoms were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and venom reactivity against obtained serum by ELISA and Western Blot. Immunization schedule allowed a pronounced antibody production since day 20 of protocol. At the end of process, serum title was 256000, which demonstrated both efficacy and usefulness of the developed procedure. On the other hand, studied venoms showed a heterogenic protein composition according to their electrophoretic patterns, whereas cross-reactivity values of 23,7%, 4,0% and 1,8% were obtained between B. atrox venom and B. brazili, L. muta and C. durissus venoms, respectively, using immunoenzymatic methods. According to our results, this procedure constitutes an initial step for further assays directed to optimization in immunoserum production for envenoming treatment and development of kits for diagnosis and species identification of snakes.Se estudió la inmunogenicidad del veneno de la serpiente Bothrops atrox, “jergón”, utilizando los métodos inmunoenzimáticos de ELISA y Western Blot, así como los patrones de reactividad cruzada empleando los venenos de las serpientes Bothrops brazili, Lachesis muta y Crotalus durissus. Para este fin se inmunizaron conejos albinos Nueva Zelanda (2 kg aprox con cuatro dosis de 500 μg del veneno de B. atrox en un periodo de 90 días. La producción de anticuerpos fue monitoreada mediante la técnica de ELISA, determinándose el título del suero hiperinmune obtenido al final del protocolo de inmunización. Adicionalmente se analizaron los patrones electroforéticos de los venenos en estudio mediante PAGE-SDS y su reactividad frente al suero obtenido mediante ELISA y Western Blot. El esquema de inmunización utilizado permitió una producción sostenida de anticuerpos a partir del día 20 del protocolo. Finalizado este proceso, el título del suero fue calculado en 256000, lo cual mostró la eficacia y practicidad del procedimiento desarrollado. Por otro lado, los venenos estudiados mostraron una heterogeneidad en su composición proteica a partir del análisis de sus patrones electroforéticos, mientras que a partir de los estudios inmunoenzimáticos, se pudo obtener valores de reactividad cruzada entre el veneno de B. atrox y los venenos de B. brazili, L. muta y C. durissus, de 23,7%, 4,0% y 1,8%, respectivamente. Los resultados obtenidos constituyen el paso inicial para posteriores ensayos dirigidos a la optimización en la producción de inmunosueros para el tratamiento del envenenamiento, así como para el desarrollo de kits de diagnóstico e identificación de especies de serpiente.

  12. Variação anual do sistema reprodutor de fêmeas de Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae) Annual variation of the reproductive system in females of Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Thélia R. F. Janeiro-Cinquini

    2004-01-01

    The morphological changes of the ovary and oviduct of 238 tropical snakes Bothrops jararaca (Wied, 1824) were determined. The ovarian mass presented a remarkable decrease in October, after ovulation, staying in low levels from November to March, during the gestational period. From April to September, it increased because of the ovarian follicles maturation. A gradual increase in oviduct weight was observed from October to March due to stages of embryonic development. A significant difference ...

  13. Variação anual do sistema reprodutor de fêmeas de Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae Annual variation of the reproductive system in females of Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae

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    Thélia R. F. Janeiro-Cinquini

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes of the ovary and oviduct of 238 tropical snakes Bothrops jararaca (Wied, 1824 were determined. The ovarian mass presented a remarkable decrease in October, after ovulation, staying in low levels from November to March, during the gestational period. From April to September, it increased because of the ovarian follicles maturation. A gradual increase in oviduct weight was observed from October to March due to stages of embryonic development. A significant difference was observed between right and left ovary weight, and oviduct length, independently of the months considered.

  14. Ocorrência de híbridos não naturais entre Bothrops jararaca e B. neuwiedi (Serpentes, Viperidae Occurrence of non natural hybridism between Bothrops jararaca and B. neuwiedi (Serpentes, Viperidae

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    Rafael Lucchesi Balestrin

    Full Text Available In May 1987, a female of Bothrops jararaca (Wied, 1824, from Carazinho, Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Brazil, was placed in the same vivarium with a male of Bothrops neuwiedi Wagler, 1824 coming from Guaíba, RS. There, they stayed for aproximately ten months. In March 1988, it was observed a delivery of five live and two still born, among them six presented morphologic characteristics of B. neuwiedi and one of B. jararaca. After the female died, in April 1988, through necropsy, two fetusus were found, one near the cloaca and, both identified as B. neuwiedi. The morphologic analysis and the origin of the progenitors suggest the hypothesis that the litter was resulted of cross-breeding.

  15. Multilocus species delimitation in the Crotalus triseriatus species group (Serpentes: Viperidae: Crotalinae), with the description of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Robert W; Linkem, Charles W; Dorcas, Michael E; Lathrop, Amy; Jones, Jason M; Alvarado-Díaz, Javier; Grünwald, Christoph I; Murphy, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    Members of the Crotalus triseriatus species group of montane rattlesnakes are widely distributed across the highlands of Mexico and southwestern USA. Although five species are currently recognized within the group, species limits remain to be tested. Genetic studies suggest that species may be paraphyletic and that at least one cryptic species may be present. We generate 3,346 base pairs of DNA sequence data from seven nuclear loci to test competing models of species delimitation in the C. triseriatus group using Bayes factor delimitation. We also examine museum specimens from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt for evidence of cryptic species. We find strong support for a nine-species model and genetic and morphological evidence for recognizing two new species within the group, which we formally describe here. Our results suggest that the current taxonomy of the C. triseriatus species group does not reflect evolutionary history. We suggest several conservative taxonomic changes to the group, but future studies are needed to better clarify relationships among species and examine genetic patterns and structure within wide-ranging lineages.

  16. First record of Porocephalus cf. clavatus (Pentastomida: Porocephalida) as a parasite on Bothrops asper (Squamata: Viperidae) in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, G; Sánchez-Monge, A

    2015-11-01

    Pentastomids are parasites that infect respiratory cavities of vertebrates, they are pretty common but poorly known in wildlife veterinary. A Bothrops asper snake (Garman, 1884) was captured in the Caribbean region of Costa Rica and had its lung infested with pentastomids, identified as ca Porocephalus clavatus (Wyman, 1845). This represents the first record of Porocephalus (Humboldt, 1812) on B. asper as well as P. cf. clavatus in Costa Rica. Further studies are needed to clarify their taxonomic position, images and scanning electron microscopy photographs (SEM) of the specimens are given.

  17. Phylogeny, Taxonomy, and Biogeography of the Oriental Pitvipers of the Genus Trimeresurus (Reptilia: Viperidae: Crotalinae): A Molecular Perspective : Phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Chung, Tu; Hurng-Yi, Wang; Mung-Pei, Tsai; Mamoru, Toda; Wen-Jen, Lee; Fu-Ji, Zhang; Hidetoshi, OTA; Institute of Zoology, Academia Sinica; Department of Zoology, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University; Department of Biology, National Taiwan Normal University; Chengdu Institute of Biology, The chinese Academy of Science; Tropical Biosphere Researcg Center, University of the Ryukyus

    2000-01-01

    Based on sequence variation in 806 bp of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, phylogenetic relationships were inferred for 14 species of Trimeresurus (sensu lato) including all East Asian members. Samples analyzed also included representatives of all assemblages of species that are frequently treated as separate genera except for T.mangshanensis, a type species of the recently described monotypic genus Ermia. Results support some previous accounts chiefly from morphological studies, such as disti...

  18. Modeling nucleotide evolution at the mesoscale: the phylogeny of the neotropical pitvipers of the Porthidium group (viperidae: crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A; Sasa, Mahmood M; Parkinson, Christopher L

    2005-12-01

    We analyzed the phylogeny of the Neotropical pitvipers within the Porthidium group (including intra-specific through inter-generic relationships) using 1.4 kb of DNA sequences from two mitochondrial protein-coding genes (ND4 and cyt-b). We investigated how Bayesian Markov chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) phylogenetic hypotheses based on this 'mesoscale' dataset were affected by analysis under various complex models of nucleotide evolution that partition models across the dataset. We develop an approach, employing three statistics (Akaike weights, Bayes factors, and relative Bayes factors), for examining the performance of complex models in order to identify the best-fit model for data analysis. Our results suggest that: (1) model choice may have important practical effects on phylogenetic conclusions even for mesoscale datasets, (2) the use of a complex partitioned model did not produce widespread increases or decreases in nodal posterior probability support, and (3) most differences in resolution resulting from model choice were concentrated at deeper nodes. Our phylogenetic estimates of relationships among members of the Porthidium group (genera: Atropoides, Cerrophidion, and Porthidium) resolve the monophyly of the three genera. Bayesian MCMC results suggest that Cerrophidion and Porthidium form a clade that is the sister taxon to Atropoides. In addition to resolving the intra-specific relationships among a majority of Porthidium group taxa, our results highlight phylogeographic patterns across Middle and South America and suggest that each of the three genera may harbor undescribed species diversity.

  19. Phenotypic differences in a cryptic predator: factors influencing morphological variation in the terciopelo Bothrops asper (Garman, 1884; Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica María; Sasa, Mahmood; Pardo, Rodrigo; Méndez, Marco Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The terciopelo Bothrops asper, is a cryptic lancehead pitviper widely distributed in humid environments of Middle America and the north-western portion of South America. Throughout its extensive distribution range, the terciopelo exhibits great morphological variation in external characters, a situation that has complicated its proper separation from other related species. In this paper, we analyzed the phenotypic variation of B. asper based in a sample of 514 specimens from nine distinct physiographic regions. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated great phenotypic differentiation among most pre-established groups, and the pattern is fairly congruent between sexes. However, no correspondence was observed between morphological variation and molecular divergence, inferred from mDNA sequences, between individuals representing the physiographical regions under study. Geographic variation in the number of interrictals, ventral scales, subcaudal scales and dorsal blotches was positively correlated with latitude and number of dry months, but inversely related with precipitation. However, other variables do not exhibit such an effect. The observed relationships between scale counts and environmental variables are explained in terms of selective pressures to improve water balance along the distributional range of the species.

  20. Another new and threatened species of lancehead genus Bothrops (Serpentes, Viperidae) from Ilha dos Franceses, Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbo, Fausto E; Gasparini, João Luiz; Almeida, Antonio P; Zaher, Hussam; Grazziotin, Felipe G; Gusmão, Rodrigo B; Ferrarini, José Mário G; Sawaya, Ricardo J

    2016-04-04

    A new insular species of the genus Bothrops is described from Ilha dos Franceses, a small island off the coast of Espírito Santo State, in southeastern Brazil. The new species differs from mainland populations of B. jararaca mainly by its small size, relative longer tail, relative smaller head length, and relative larger eyes. The new species is distinguished from B. alcatraz, B. insularis and B. otavioi by the higher number of ventral and subcaudal scales, relative longer tail and smaller head. The new species is highly abundant on the island, being nocturnal, semiarboreal, and feeding on small lizards and centipeds. Due its unique and restricted area of occurrence, declining quality of habitat, and constant use of the island for tourism, the new species may be considered as critically endangered.

  1. Systématique et répartition de Vipera ursinii (Bonaparte, 1835) (Reptilia, Viperidae), en Roumanie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancea, St.; Saint Girons, H.; Fuhn, I.E.; Stugren, B.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of geographical distribution and comparative morphology in Vipera ursinii from Romania leads to the following results: 1. The population from Fînaţele Clujului, which does not exist anymore, belonged to the subspecies V. ursinii rakosiensis. 2. Populations from Moldavia show a mixture of

  2. Histological characterization of Sticholecitha serpentis Prudhoe, 1949 (digenea, bieriidae, sticholecithinae, parasite of Bothrops moojeni Hoge, 1966 (serpentes, viperidae

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    TB. Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphology of the species Sticholecitha serpentis Prudhoe, 1949 by means of histological procedures. Helminths were previously fixed in Railliet & Henry solution, uncompressed and were included in 2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate. Longitudinal and transverse serial sections with a 4-mum thickness were performed in a microtome (Leica RM 2165, stained with haematoxylin-eosin and then analyzed in a computerized image analysis system (Qwin Lite 2.5, Leica. Structures of systematic value, such as oral sucker, acetabulum, prepharynx, pharynx, esophagus, intestinal caeca, vitelline glands, ovary, uterus, cirrus pouch and testicles were described. Structures that were poorly visible in total preparations were also observed and described, such as efferent ducts, ejaculatory duct, prostate, seminal vesicle, seminal receptacle, Laurer’s channel, Mehlis’ gland, vitelline ducts, metraterm, genital atrium, digestive glands and excretory vesicle. We demonstrated that histological analysis can supply important data regarding the morphological characterization of S. serpentis and will be able to contribute to systematic studies of trematodes.

  3. Does gestation or feeding affect the body temperature of the golden lancehead, Bothrops insularis (Squamata: Viperidae under field conditions?

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    Rafael P. Bovo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature affects physiological performance in reptiles and, therefore, body temperature (Tb control is argued to have an important adaptive value. Alterations in Tb due to transient changes in physiological state, as during digestion or gestation, are often linked to the potential benefits of a more precise Tb regulation. However, such thermoregulatory responses in nature remain controversial, particularly for tropical snakes. Herein, we measured Tb of the golden lanceheads, Bothrops insularis (Amaral, 1921, at Queimada Grande Island, southeastern Brazil, to test for alteration in selected body temperatures associated with feeding or gestation. We found no evidence that postprandial or gravid snakes selected for higher Tb indicating that, under natural conditions, body temperature regulation in B. insularis apparently encompasses other ecological factors beyond physiological state per se.

  4. Communautés antigéniques des venins et systématique des Viperidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detrait, J.; Girons, Saint H.

    1979-01-01

    A study, by immunoelectrophoresis and immunodiffusion of the shared antigens in venom from 21 species of Viperinae and Crotalinae, representing 10 different genera, has produced a number of results of taxonomie significance which are summarized schematically in the dendrogram shown in fig. 1. For

  5. A new species of hognose pitviper, genus Porthidium, from the southwestern Pacific of Costa Rica (Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, William W; Sasa, Mahmood

    2003-01-01

    A new species of terrestrial pitviper, Porthidium porrasi, is described from mesophytic forests of the Península de Osa and surrounding area of the Pacific versant of southwestern Costa Rica. It is most similar to P. nasutum and is characterized by a pattern of bands, persistence of the juvenile tail color in adults, and a high number of dorsal scales. Analysis of mtDNA sequences confirms its distinction from P. nasutum. The existence of this species reinforces the notion of elevated herpetofaunal endemism in southwestern Costa Rica.

  6. Description of gamontogonic and sporogonic stages of Hepatozoon spp. (Apicomplexa, Hepatozoidae) from Caudisoma durissa terrifica (Serpentes, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena; da Silva, Reinaldo José; Madeira, Newton Goulart

    2011-04-01

    Three specimens of Caudisoma durissa terrifica infected with Hepatozoon spp. were studied. One was parasitized by one type of gamont and the other two were each infected by two morphologically different gamonts. Utilizing morphology and morphometry analysis, we concluded that three types of gamonts were very similar and may represent the same Hepatozoon species, but at least three different Hepatozoon species were infecting the C. durissa terrifica snakes in this study. Some of this species caused erythrocyte modifications. The sporogonic development of Hepatozoon sp. was observed from 12 h to the 20th day after female Culex quinquefasciatus blood meals.

  7. Differences in endothelin receptor types in the vasculature of Bothrops jararaca (Viperidae) and Oxyrhopus guibei (Colubridae) snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Lívia S M; Frias, Flávia T; Carmona, Eurídice; Borgheresi, Rosa A M B

    2008-07-01

    Endothelins (ETs) are vasoactive peptides evolutionary well conserved that exert their effects through two specific receptors (ET(A) and ET(B)) widely distributed in all vertebrates. In snakes, the presence and function of endothelins and their receptors are still scarcely described. We have recently demonstrated the presence of ET(A) and ET(B2) receptors in the snake Bothrops jararaca (Bj). In the present work we showed that distinctively from Bj, the vascular contraction induced by endothelin in Oxyrhopus guibei (Og) snake is mediated only by ET(A) receptors. Selective ET(B) agonists (SRTX-c and IRL(1620)) and antagonists (IRL(1038) and BQ(788)) were ineffective in Og preparations of isolated aorta. We also showed that ET-1 response on Og arterial blood pressure was monophasic hypertensive as opposed to biphasic (hypotension followed by hypertension) in Bj. Furthermore, we characterized the relaxing properties of endothelin receptor ET(B1) in pre-contracted aorta preparations. We showed that IRL(1620) induced relaxation of pre-contracted Bj aorta but was ineffective in relaxing Og preparations. IRL(1620) relaxing effect on Bj aorta was abolished by l-NAME, indicating involvement of NO release, and was reduced by selective ET(B) antagonists. Our findings suggest that Og snake has a more primitive spectrum of ET receptors (only ET(A) receptor) than Bj (presence of ET(A), ET(B1) and ET(B2) receptors).

  8. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors (βPLIs) are encoded in the venom glands of Lachesis muta (Crotalinae, Viperidae) snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rebeca Mascarenhas; Estevão-Costa, Maria Inácia; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Ho, Paulo Lee; Diniz, Marcelo Ribeiro Vasconcelos; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipase A(2) inhibitors (PLIs) are glycoproteins secreted by snake liver into the circulating blood aiming the self-protection against toxic venom phospholipases A(2). In the present study, we describe the first complete nucleotide sequence of a βPLI from venom glands of a New World snake, Lachesis muta. The deduced primary structure was compared to other known βPLIs and recent literature findings of other possible roles of PLIs in snakes are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxicity of Bothrops neuwiedi complex ("yarará chica") venom from different regions of Argentina (Serpentes, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Vanessa Costa; Lanari, Laura Cecilia; Hajos, Silvia Elvira; de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael

    2011-04-01

    We report a study of toxic and enzymatic activities of Bothrops neuwiedi complex venoms collected from specimens of different regions of Argentina and a pool of these same venoms. Were determined lethal, hemorrhagic and pro-coagulant (plasma and fibrinogen) doses and the neutralization of these activities by a bivalent antivenom. The electrophoretic pattern of different regions venom was studied by SDS-PAGE. All samples exhibited lethal potencies, hemorrhagic and coagulant (plasma and fibrinogen) activities with potencies concordant with previous studies. The only conspicuous difference in the toxicological pattern of Bothrops diporus venoms was the low-thrombin-like activity found in one sample. The antivenom used in this study could neutralize all the toxic activities tested and the neutralizing potency of the antivenom was comparable for all samples. Despite the wide distribution of B. neuwiedi complex throughout Argentina and the evident morphological variation between B. diporus (B. neuwiedi complex), this study establishes a remarkably similar toxicity profile throughout its range. This is the first systematic study on the regional variation of enzymatic and toxic activities of venom from species belonging to the B. neuwiedi complex, one of the snakes of highest sanitary importance in South America and their neutralization by the type of antivenom most commonly used in the South of South America. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. First record of Porocephalus cf. clavatus (Pentastomida: Porocephalida as a parasite on Bothrops asper (Squamata: Viperidae in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alvarado

    Full Text Available Abstract Pentastomids are parasites that infect respiratory cavities of vertebrates, they are pretty common but poorly known in wildlife veterinary. A Bothrops asper snake (Garman, 1884 was captured in the Caribbean region of Costa Rica and had its lung infested with pentastomids, identified as ca Porocephalus clavatus (Wyman, 1845. This represents the first record of Porocephalus (Humboldt, 1812 on B. asper as well as P. cf. clavatus in Costa Rica. Further studies are needed to clarify their taxonomic position, images and scanning electron microscopy photographs (SEM of the specimens are given.

  11. Aislamiento y caracterización parcial de una miotoxina del veneno de la serpiente Bothrops atrox (Ophidia: Viperidae

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    Sergio Huatuco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Se ha purificado una miotoxina del veneno de la serpiente Bothrops atrox, empleando una columna de intercambio catiónico de CM-Sephadex C-50 equilibrada con buffer acetato de amonio 0,05M a pH 7. La miotoxina es una proteína básica, y por cromatografía de filtración y PAGE-SDS se ha determinado que tiene un peso molecular de 27 kDa, estando formada por dos cadenas polipeptídicas de 14 kDa cada una. La inoculación de la miotoxina en el músculo gastrocnemius de ratones albinos produce la liberación de creatina kinasa así como la necrosis del tejido. La miotoxina tiene actividad de fosfolipasa, anticoagulante y edemática, pero no hemolítica.

  12. Edema induced by Bothrops asper (Squamata: Viperidae snake venom and its inhibition by Costa Rican plant extracts

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    Beatriz Badilla

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We tested the capacity of leaf (Urera baccifera, Loasa speciosa, Urtica leptuphylla, Chaptalia nutans, and Satureja viminea and root (Uncaria tomentosa extracts to inhibit edema induced by Bothrops asper snake venom. Edema-forming activity was studied plethysmographically in the rat hind paw model. Groups of rats were injected intraperitoneally with various doses of each extract and, one hour later, venom was injected subcutaneously in the right hind paw. Edema was assessed at various time intervals. The edematogenic activity was inhibited in those animals that received an injection U. tomentosa, C. nutans or L. speciosa extract. The extract of U. baccifera showed a slight inhibition of the venom effect. Extract from S. viminea and, to a lesser extent that of U. leptuphylla, induced a pro-inflammatory effect, increasing the edema at doses of 250 mg/kg at one and two hours. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 245-252. Epub 2006 Jun 01.Se investigó la capacidad de los extractos de las hojas de Urera baccifera, Loasa speciosa, Urtica leptuphylla, Chaptalia nutans, Satureja viminea y de la raíz de Uncaria tomentosa para inhibir el edema inducido por el veneno de Bothrops asper por métodos pletismométricos. Los grupos de ratas fueron inyectados intraperitonealmente con varias dosis de cada extracto y una hora mas tarde se inyectó veneno por vía subcutánea en la pata trasera derecha de la rata. Se evaluó el edema en distintos intervalos de tiempo. Los resultados muestran que la actividad edematogénica fue inhibida en los animales que recibieron los extractos de raíz de U. tomentosa, hojas de C. nutans y L. speciosa. Los extractos de hojas de U. baccifera mostraron leve inhibición del efecto del veneno. El extracto de hojas de S. viminea y en menor grado el de U. leptuphylla indujeron un efecto pro inflamatorio.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a myotoxin from Bothrops brazili Hoge, 1953 Hoge, 1953 snake venom (Ophidia: Viperidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pantigoso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A myotoxin from the venom of the snake Bothrops brazili has been purified by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50 with 0,05 M ammonium acetate buffer pH 7. The homogeneity was evaluated by PAGE with and without SDS, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. The myotoxin is a basic protein with 15,6% of Lys+Arg; it is not a glicoprotein, has not enzymatic activity, and corresponds to 25% of the whole venom protein. The molecular weight of the myotoxin was determined by PAGE-SDS and gel filtration chromatography. The myotoxin has 30 KDa of molecular weight and two polypeptide chains of 15 KDa each. Myotoxin produces a severe necrosis on the gastrocnemius muscle of white mice. The myotoxin does not have hemolytic nor anticoagulant activity. However, produces edema with a DEM of 32,6 mg of protein.

  14. Morphological, morphometric, and molecular characterization of Hepatozoon spp. (Apicomplexa, Hepatozoidae) from naturally infected Caudisona durissa terrifica (Serpentes, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moço, Tatiana Cristina; da Silva, Reinaldo José; Madeira, Newton Goulart; Dos Santos Paduan, Karina; Rubini, Adriano Stefani; Leal, Denise Dutra Menezes; O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena

    2012-04-01

    Hepatozoon spp. are the most frequent intracellular protozoa in snakes. Considering the variety of parasites infecting specimens of Caudisona durissa terrifica and the divergent data in literature where only two species, Hepatozoon romani and Hepatozoon capsulata, are described, the aim of this study was to morphologically, morphometrically, and molecularly characterize Hepatozoon spp. from some naturally infected specimens of C. durissa terrifica, and observe changes caused by these protozoa in parasitized erythrocytes. Four snakes were examined. Two of them had two morphological distinct gamonts, while the other two had only one type of gamont. The six distinct gamonts were provisionally named gamonts A, B, C, D, E, and F. Statistical analysis, however, confirmed the existence of only four parasite populations, those which were capable of inducing significant alterations in determined red blood cells variables. Attempts to infect Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were done for each snake specimen. Some mosquitoes became infected and oocysts were recovered and measured. The detection of Hepatozoon DNA was obtained with success but the molecular characterization was unable to differentiate species of the samples, with respect to the fragment studied.

  15. Description of Serpentirhabdias atroxi n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae), a parasite of Bothrops atrox (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae) in Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; da Costa, Paulo André Ferreira Borges; Maschio, Gleomar Fabiano; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    A new lung-dwelling nematode species is described from the common lancehead Bothrops atrox (Linnaeus) in the Brazilian Amazon Region. The species is assigned to the genus Serpentirhabdias Tkach, Kuzmin & Snyder, 2014 based on the presence of six lips arranged in two lateral groups, the absence of prominent cuticular inflations, and lung parasitism in snakes. Serpentirhabdias atroxi n. sp. differs from other species of the genus mainly by details of the morphology of the anterior end: cuticularised ring surrounding the anterior part of the buccal cavity and six minute onchia present in the oesophastome. Serpentirhabdias atroxi n. sp. is the seventh species of the genus known from the Neotropical Realm and the second species described from viperid snakes.

  16. Acerca de la localidad tipo de Bothrops ammodytoides Leybold (Serpentes: viperidae) y Pseudotomodon trigonatus (Leybold) (Serpentes: colubridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Scrocchi, Gustavo

    1997-01-01

    De las especies del género Bothrops, Bothrops ammodytoides es una de las más típicas, ya que su característica "nariz" la hace inconfundible. Probablemente sea debido a esto que la sinonimia de esta especie sea bastante corta, ya que parece haber sido conocida claramente desde el momento de su descripción original.

  17. Biology and conservation status of Piraja’s Lancehead Snake Bothrops piraña Amaral, 1923 (Serpentes: Viperidae, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.D. Freitas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The venomous snake Bothrops pirajai (Amaral, 1923 is endemic to Brazil. Despite being described almost a century ago, very little is known about this species, which has never been studied in situ. Here, we present new data on the biology and natural history of B. pirajai based on a review of existing museum specimens and a field study (1504 man hours carried out throughout the species range. The distribution of B. pirajai was found to be restricted to the eastern Atlantic forest of the state of Bahia, Brazil, between Todosos Santos Bay, Itabuna and Ilhéus (12050’S-14050’S, 88-835 m. We recommend the species be uplisted to Endangered in the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s global Red List of Threatened Species as its estimated extent of occurrence is under 5000km2. The effective conservation of B. pirajai will rely on addressing two key issues: improving our knowledge of the species and successfully mitigating habitat loss and fragmentation.

  18. Environmental and Cultural Impact. Proposed Tennessee Colony Reservoir, Trinity River, Texas. Volume III. Appendices D and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Viperidae Agkistrodon contortrix southern copperhead contor tr ix Agkistrodon contortrix Broad-banded copperhead laticinctus Agkistrodon piscivorus...massasauga tergeminus D -42 Table 3-D Continued Viperidae continued Sistrurus miliarius Western pigmy rattle- streckeri snake Crocodylidae Alligator

  19. Proteomic and functional analyses of the venom of Porthidium lansbergii lansbergii (Lansberg's hognose viper) from the Atlantic Department of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Charris, Eliécer; Montealegre-Sanchez, Leonel; Solano-Redondo, Luis; Mora-Obando, Diana; Camacho, Erika; Castro-Herrera, Fernando; Fierro-Pérez, Leonardo; Lomonte, Bruno

    2015-01-30

    The venom of the Lansberg's hognose pitviper, Porthidium lansbergii lansbergii, a species found in the northern region of Colombia, is poorly known. Aiming to increase knowledge on Porthidium species venoms, its proteomic analysis and functional evaluation of in vitro and in vivo activities relevant to its toxicity were undertaken. Out of 51 protein components resolved by a combination of RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE, 47 were assigned to 12 known protein families. In similarity with two previously characterized venoms from species within this genus, Porthidium nasutum and Porthidium ophryomegas, that of P. lansbergii lansbergii was dominated by metalloproteinases, although in lower proportion. A common feature of the three Porthidium venoms appears to be a high content of disintegrins. Proteins not previously observed in Porthidium venoms belong to the vascular endothelium growth factor, phosphodiesterase, and phospholipase B families. P. lansbergii lansbergii venom showed relatively weak lethal activity to mice, and induced a moderate local myotoxicity, but considerable hemorrhage. Its isolated VEGF component showed potent edema-inducing activity in the mouse footpad assay. Significant thrombocytopenia, but no other major hematological changes, were observed in envenomed mice. In vitro, this venom lacked coagulant effect on human plasma, and induced a potent inhibition of platelet aggregation which was reproduced by its purified disintegrin components. Phospholipase A2 and proteolytic activities were also demonstrated. Overall, the compositional and functional data herein described for the venom of P. lansbergii lansbergii may contribute to a better understanding of envenomings by this pitviper species, for which specific clinical information is lacking. Porthidium lansbergii lansbergii is estimated to be responsible for nearly 20% of snakebite envenoming cases at the Atlantic Department of Colombia, but the identity and functional properties of its venom components are largely unknown. This study provides the first combined proteomic and functional analyses of the venom of this pitviper, which may contribute to a better understanding of the features of envenomings by this species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunological cross-reactivity and neutralisation of European viper venoms with the monospecific Vipera berus antivenom ViperaTAb

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casewell, Nicholas R; Al-Abdulla, Ibrahim; Smith, David; Coxon, Ruth; Landon, John

    2014-01-01

    .... Using ELISA and immunoblotting, we find that ViperaTAb® antibodies recognise and bind to the majority of toxic components found in the venoms of the Vipera species tested at comparably high levels to those observed with V. berus...

  1. Cross-recognition of a pit viper (Crotalinae) polyspecific antivenom explored through high-density peptide microarray epitope mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2017-01-01

    Snakebite antivenom is a 120 years old invention based on polyclonal mixtures of antibodies purified from the blood of hyper-immunized animals. Knowledge on antibody recognition sites (epitopes) on snake venom proteins is limited, but may be used to provide molecular level explanations for antive...

  2. Seasonal biotic and abiotic factors affecting hunting strategy in free-living Saharan sand vipers, Cerastes vipera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horesh, Sefi J A; Sivan, Jaim; Rosenstrauch, Avi; Tesler, Itay; Degen, A Allan; Kam, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Sit-and-wait ambushing and active hunting are two strategies used by predators to capture prey. In snakes, hunting strategy is conserved phylogenetically; most species employ only one strategy. Active hunters encounter and capture more prey but invest more energy in hunting and have higher risks of being predated. This trade-off is important to small predators. The small Cerastes vipera employs both modes of hunting, which is unlike most viperids which use only sit-and wait ambushing. This species hibernates in October and emerges in April. Energy intake should be high prior to hibernation to overcome the non-feeding hibernation period and for reproduction on their emergence. We predicted that more individuals would hunt actively towards hibernation and an abiotic factor would trigger this response. Furthermore, since more energy is required for active hunting, we predicted that snakes in good body condition would use active hunting to a greater extent than snakes in poor body condition. To test our predictions, we tracked free-living snakes year round and determined their hunting strategy, estimated their body condition index (BCI), and calculated circannual parameters of day length as environmental cues known to affect animal behaviour. Two novel findings emerged in this study, namely, hunting strategy was affected significantly by 1) the circannual change in day length and 2) by BCI. The proportion of active hunters increased from 5% in April to over 30% in October and BCI of active foragers was higher than that of sit-and-wait foragers and, therefore, our predictions were supported. The entrainment between the proportion of active hunting and the abiotic factor is indicative of an adaptive function for choosing a hunting strategy. A trend was evident among life stages. When all life stages were present (September-October), the proportion of active foragers increased with age: 0.0% among neonates, 18.2% among juveniles and 31.4% among adults. We concluded that vulnerable small neonates used sit-and-wait ambush not only as a hunting strategy but also as a hiding technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The VIPER project (Visualization Integration Platform for Exploration Research): a biologically inspired autonomous reconfigurable robotic platform for diverse unstructured environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Oliver J.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-09-01

    Over the last decade the world has seen numerous autonomous vehicle programs. Wheels and track designs are the basis for many of these vehicles. This is primarily due to four main reasons: a vast preexisting knowledge base for these designs, energy efficiency of power sources, scalability of actuators, and the lack of control systems technologies for handling alternate highly complex distributed systems. Though large efforts seek to improve the mobility of these vehicles, many limitations still exist for these systems within unstructured environments, e.g. limited mobility within industrial and nuclear accident sites where existing plant configurations have been extensively changed. These unstructured operational environments include missions for exploration, reconnaissance, and emergency recovery of objects within reconfigured or collapsed structures, e.g. bombed buildings. More importantly, these environments present a clear and present danger for direct human interactions during the initial phases of recovery operations. Clearly, the current classes of autonomous vehicles are incapable of performing in these environments. Thus the next generation of designs must include highly reconfigurable and flexible autonomous robotic platforms. This new breed of autonomous vehicles will be both highly flexible and environmentally adaptable. Presented in this paper is one of the most successful designs from nature, the snake-eel-worm (SEW). This design implements shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators which allow for scaling of the robotic SEW designs from sub-micron scale to heavy industrial implementations without major conceptual redesigns as required in traditional hydraulic, pneumatic, or motor driven systems. Autonomous vehicles based on the SEW design posses the ability to easily move between air based environments and fluid based environments with limited or no reconfiguration. Under a SEW designed vehicle, one not only achieves vastly improved maneuverability within a highly unstructured environment, but also gains robotic manipulation abilities, normally relegated as secondary add-ons within existing vehicles, all within one small condensed package. The prototype design presented includes a Beowulf style computing system for advanced guidance calculations and visualization computations. All of the design and implementation pertaining to the SEW robot discussed in this paper is the product of a student team under the summer fellowship program at the DOEs INEEL.

  4. Snakes of Medical Significance in India: The First Reported Case of Envenoming by the Levantine Viper (Macrovipera lebetina)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Col. Lekh R. Sharma; Lt. Col. Vivek Lal; Ian D. Simpson

    2008-01-01

    ... (Macrovipera lebetina) in India. This snake is found in India in the mountainous regions of Jammu and Kashmir and is capable of causing necrosis and hemostatic manifestations, as seen in the case reported here...

  5. Venomous snakes of Costa Rica: biological and medical implications of their venom proteomic profiles analyzed through the strategy of snake venomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonte, Bruno; Fernández, Julián; Sanz, Libia; Angulo, Yamileth; Sasa, Mahmood; Gutiérrez, José María; Calvete, Juan J

    2014-06-13

    In spite of its small territory of ~50,000km(2), Costa Rica harbors a remarkably rich biodiversity. Its herpetofauna includes 138 species of snakes, of which sixteen pit vipers (family Viperidae, subfamily Crotalinae), five coral snakes (family Elapidae, subfamily Elapinae), and one sea snake (Family Elapidae, subfamily Hydrophiinae) pose potential hazards to human and animal health. In recent years, knowledge on the composition of snake venoms has expanded dramatically thanks to the development of increasingly fast and sensitive analytical techniques in mass spectrometry and separation science applied to protein characterization. Among several analytical strategies to determine the overall protein/peptide composition of snake venoms, the methodology known as 'snake venomics' has proven particularly well suited and informative, by providing not only a catalog of protein types/families present in a venom, but also a semi-quantitative estimation of their relative abundances. Through a collaborative research initiative between Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia (IBV) and Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP), this strategy has been applied to the study of venoms of Costa Rican snakes, aiming to obtain a deeper knowledge on their composition, geographic and ontogenic variations, relationships to taxonomy, correlation with toxic activities, and discovery of novel components. The proteomic profiles of venoms from sixteen out of the 22 species within the Viperidae and Elapidae families found in Costa Rica have been reported so far, and an integrative view of these studies is hereby presented. In line with other venomic projects by research groups focusing on a wide variety of snakes around the world, these studies contribute to a deeper understanding of the biochemical basis for the diverse toxic profiles evolved by venomous snakes. In addition, these studies provide opportunities to identify novel molecules of potential pharmacological interest. Furthermore, the

  6. Structures of Azemiops feae venom phospholipases and cys-rich-secretory protein and implications for taxonomy and toxinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Inn-Ho; Wang, Ying-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa

    2016-05-01

    The Azemiops snakes are pit-less and phylogenetically located at the Crotalinae and Viperinae divergence. cDNAs encoding five Azemiops venom phospholipase (sPLA2) molecules were cloned and sequenced; their signal-peptides were similar to those of crotalid sPLA2s. Based on their calculated pI-values and residue-49 substitutions, they were designated as Af-E6, Af-N49a, Af-N49a1, Af-N49a2, and Af-N49b, respectively. The first three isoforms, comprising 3-4% of the venom proteins, were purified by reversed-phase HPLC. Af-E6 is catalytically active and has >80% sequence-similarity to other Glu(6)-PLA2 (a pitviper venom-marker). Results of phylogenetic analyses reveal that acidic Af-N49a and Af-N49a1 are rather unique and loosely linked with crotalid PLA2s, while Af-N49b is related to the viperid PLA2s with Ser(1) substitution. Notably, the Asn(49)-substitutions in these molecules imply catalytic-independent mechanisms. The 3D-models of Af-E6 and Af-N49a have surface electropotential maps similar to each other and to those of antiplatelet PLA2s, while the Af-N49b model is similar to basic and myotoxic sPLA2 molecules. From Azemiops feae and four other Viperidae, we cloned five novel Cys-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs). Azemiops CRISP and natriuretic-peptide precursors share more sequence similarities with those of crotalid venoms than with viperid venoms, further supporting the theory that Azemiops are sister taxons to pit vipers, especially Tropedolaemus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae leaf extract combined with anti-venom serum on experimental Crotalus durissus (Squamata: Viperidae envenomation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Stuani Floriano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Crotalic envenomation represents the highest number of deaths when compared to other snakebite envenomations of medical interest. Crotalic venom has important characteristics such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and clotting and hemolytic action. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory aspects of Crotalus durissus terrificus experimental envenomation in Wistar rats treated with antivenom and the aqueous extract of the plant Mikania glomerata. The animals were divided into three groups: Group C (control; Group VS-venom and antivenom; Group VSM-venom, antivenom and aqueous extract of M. glomerata. Crotalic poison caused clinical and laboratory alterations in Wistar mice. Significant linical alterations were: temperature decrease, edema in the venom inoculated member, sedation and a locomotion decrease in groups VS and VSM when compared with group C. A faster recovery from sedation was observed only for animals of group VSM when compared to VS. There was an increase in the number of leukocytes, neutrophils and creatine kinase in the VS and VSM groups, compared to group C. Wistar rats showed a high resistance to crotalic venom. Additional studies with different doses, time of treatment, different administration methods and histopathological and immunological studies are necessary to understand the action of M. glomerata in crotalic accidents. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (4: 929-937. Epub 2009 December 01.El envenamiento crotálico representa el número más alto de muertes cuando es comparado con envenenamientos por mordeduras de otras serpientes de interés médico. El veneno crotálico tiene importantes características de acción neurotóxica, miotoxicidad, nefrotoxicidad, coagulación y acción hemolítica. Este trabajo evaluó los aspectos clínicos y de laboratorio del envenenamiento experimental con el veneno de la serpiente Crotalus durissus terrificus en las ratas Wistar tratadas con suero antiofídico y extracto acuoso de M. glomerata. Los animales fueron separados en tres diferentes grupos: grupo control (C; grupo veneno+suero (VS, grupo veneno+suero+extracto acuoso de M. glomerata (VSM. El veneno crotálico causó alteraciones clínicas y diferencias en los análisis sanguíneos practicados a los ratones Wistar evaluados. Las alteraciones clínicas más importantes fueron una disminución de la temperatura, edema en el miembro inoculado de veneno, la sedación y una disminución de la locomoción en los grupos VS y VSM comparado con el grupo C. Una rápida recuperación de la sedación estadísticamente significativa fue observada en los animales del grupo VSM al compararse con los del grupo VS. Los análisis sanguíneos mostraron un aumento en el número de leucocitos, neutrofilos y creatina quinasa en los grupos VS y VSM comparados con el grupo C. Los ratones Wistar mostraron una alta resistencia al veneno del crótalo. Estudios adicionales con variación en las dosis, tiempo de tratamiento, y métodos de administración, así como la realización de estudios histopatológicos e inmunológicos son importantes para comprender la acción de M. glomerata en accidentes crotálicos.

  8. Uso do habitat e alimentação em juvenis de Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae na Mata Atlântica do sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso Hartmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereins we describe habitat use, diet and subjugation behavior of prey in juveniles of Bothrops jararaca that occur in steams in the Atlantic Forest, north coast of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Adittional information on juveniles of B. jararacussu found in similar situations to those of B. jararaca are also discussed. Individuals of B. jararaca were observed mainly on the ground during the day, and on the ground and also on vegetation at night. The majority of prey were diurnal anurans that inhabit the marginal rocks of streams. Juveniles of B. jararaca hold the prey after the bite, and use parts of the body to subjugate it. The frequent use of streams seems to be related to prey availability, and the use of vegetation at night may protect juveniles from terrestrial predators. Considering that some individuals were resting on the vegetation at night we can infer that juveniles of B. jararaca forage mainly on the ground during the day at the study site. Juveniles of B. jararacussu also use stream margins during the day to search for prey and apparently, similar to juveniles of B. jararaca, forage at times and places where frogs are active.

  9. The mechanics of sound production in the puff adder bitis arietans (Serpentes: viperidae) and the information content of the snake hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young; Nejman; Meltzer; Marvin

    1999-09-01

    Puff adders (Bitis arietans), like many other snakes, hiss as part of their defensive repertoire. In B. arietans, the hisses have a clear quadraphasic pattern consisting of an initial exhalatory hiss, a brief transitional pause, an inhalatory hiss and a rest or breath-holding phase. Simultaneous recordings of body diameter, electrical activity in the intrinsic laryngeal musculature, airflow through the nasal passageway and sound production revealed that the anterior respiratory tract plays a passive role in hissing and that the costal pump is responsible for generating the quadraphasic pattern. During hissing, B. arietans uses the same mechanics previously described for normal respiratory ventilation in snakes. Analyses of artificial hisses reveal that the anterior respiratory tract of B. arietans has little ability to modify an exhalant airstream acoustically. The combination of the simple ventilatory mechanics used during hissing and the lack of acoustic modification of the exhalant airstream results in the production of an acoustically simple hiss. Cross-correlation matrix analyses of a variety of snake hisses showed a high degree of acoustic similarity between the sounds, almost approaching the levels determined for white noise. This high level of acoustic similarity reflects the low level of acoustic specialization within the sounds produced by snakes and the low potential for encoded information content.

  10. A relict lineage and new species of green palm-pitviper (Squamata, Viperidae, Bothriechis) from the Chortís Highlands of Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Josiah H; Medina-Flores, Melissa; Wilson, Larry David; Jadin, Robert C; Austin, James D

    2013-01-01

    A new species of palm-pitviper of the genus Bothriechis is described from Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat in northern Honduras. The new species differs from congeners by having 19 dorsal scale rows at midbody, a bright green dorsal coloration in adults, the prelacunal scale fused to the second supralabial, and in representing a northern lineage that is sister to Bothriechis lateralis, which is distributed in Costa Rica and western Panama and is isolated from the new taxon by the Nicaraguan Depression. This represents the 15th endemic species occurring in Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat, one of the richest herpetofaunal sites in Honduras, itself being the country with the highest degree of herpetofaunal endemism in Central America. We name this new species in honor of a Honduran conservationist slain in fighting against illegal logging, highlighting the sacrifices of rural activists in battling these issues and the critical importance of conservation in these areas.

  11. On the systematics of Trimeresurus labialis Fitzinger in Steindachner, 1867, a pitviper from the Nicobar Islands (India), with revalidation of Trimeresurus mutabilis Stoliczka, 1870 (Squamata, Viperidae, Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Gernot; David, Patrick; Chandramouli, S R

    2014-04-14

    The Asian pitviper currently identified as Trimeresurus labialis Fitzinger in Steindachner, 1867 is revised on the basis of morphological data obtained from 37 preserved specimens originating from seven islands of the Nicobar Islands. Multivariate analyses shows that these specimens can be divided into two clusters of populations which differ by a series of constant taxonomically informative morphological characters. The first cluster, which includes the name-bearing types of Trimeresurus labialis Fitzinger in Steindachner, 1867, is present only on Car Nicobar Island. The second cluster, which includes the name-bearing types of Trimeresurus mutabilis Stoliczka, 1870, is distributed on the Central Nicobar Islands. We regard these clusters as distinct species, which are morphologically diagnosable and isolated from each other. As a consequence, Trimeresurus mutabilis, long considered a synonym of T. labialis, is here resurrected to specific level. A lectotype is designated for Trimeresurus mutabilis.

  12. Synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal region of Lys49 phospholipase A2 homologues from viperidae snake venoms: biomimetic activities and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonte, Bruno; Angulo, Yamileth; Moreno, Edgardo

    2010-01-01

    Lys49-phospholipase A(2) homologues constitute a large family of toxins present in the venoms of viperid snake species, which despite lacking catalytic activity, cause significant skeletal muscle necrosis. The main structural determinants of this toxic effect have been experimentally mapped to a region near their C-terminus (115-129), which combines cationic and hydrophobic/aromatic amino acid residues. Short (13-mer) synthetic peptides representing this C-terminal region can mimick several of the effects of Lys49 PLA(2) homologues. In addition to their ability to damage muscle cells, these peptides display antibacterial, antiendotoxic, antifungal, antiparasite, and antitumor activities, as well as VEGF-receptor 2 (KDR)-binding and heparin-binding properties. Modifications of their sequences have shown possibilities to enhance their effects upon prokaryotic cells, while decreasing toxicity for eukaryotic cells. This review presents an updated summary on the biomimetic actions exerted by such peptides, and highlights their potential value as molecular tools or as drug leads in diverse biomedical areas.

  13. Examination of biochemical and biological activities of Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes: Viperidae; Wied-Neuwied 1824) snake venom after up to 54 years of storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Daniela M; de Morais-Zani, Karen; Serino-Silva, Caroline; Grego, Kathleen F; Sant'Anna, Savio S; Fernandes, Wilson; Aniz, Patrícia A E A; Torquato, Ricardo J S; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Sanz, Libia; Calvete, Juan J; Tanaka-Azevedo, Anita M

    2018-01-01

    The number of snakes donated to the Brazilian Instituto Butantan has been decreasing in the past 10 years. This circumstance motivated us to compare the properties of five venom pools of Bothrops jararaca snake stored for up to 54 years. Results showed differences among venom pools regarding enzymatic and other biological activities, such as caseinolytic, phospholipase A2, hemorrhagic and coagulant activities, as well as antigenicity. Protein content, reverse-phase chromatographic profile, and immunorecognition by commercial Bothrops antivenom were comparable for all venom pools, although lethality of the most recent preparations was higher. Since the lowest functional activities did not always correspond to older venoms, differences among venom pools used for antivenom production during the period 1963-2008 may correlate with the different proportions of venoms from different localities used in their generation, rather than to long-term storage. We conclude that B. jararaca venoms properly stored for long periods of time retain their structural and pharmacological activities, thus representing useful materials for scientific research and antivenom production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae) leaf extract combined with anti-venom serum on experimental Crotalus durissus (Squamata: Viperidae) envenomation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floriano, Rafael Stuani; Nogueira, Rosa Maria Barilli; Sakate, Michiko; Laposy, Cecília Braga; da Motta, Yudney Pereira; Sangiorgio, Fabíola; David, Heloísa Costa; Nabas, João Marcelo

    2009-12-01

    Crotalic envenomation represents the highest number of deaths when compared to other snakebite envenomations of medical interest. Crotalic venom has important characteristics such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and clotting and hemolytic action. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory aspects of Crotalus durissus terrificus experimental envenomation in Wistar rats treated with antivenom and the aqueous extract of the plant Mikania glomerata. The animals were divided into three groups: Group C (control); Group VS-venom and antivenom; Group VSM-venom, antivenom and aqueous extract of M. glomerata. Crotalic poison caused clinical and laboratory alterations in Wistar mice. Significant clinical alterations were: temperature decrease, edema in the venom inoculated member, sedation and a locomotion decrease in groups VS and VSM when compared with group C. A faster recovery from sedation was observed only for animals of group VSM when compared to VS. There was an increase in the number of leukocytes, neutrophils and creatine kinase in the VS and VSM groups, compared to group C. Wistar rats showed a high resistance to crotalic venom. Additional studies with different doses, time of treatment, different administration methods and histopathological and immunological studies are necessary to understand the action of M. glomerata in crotalic accidents.

  15. A cryptic palm-pitviper species (Squamata: Viperidae: Bothriechis) from the Costa Rican highlands, with notes on the variation within B. nigroviridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Tiffany M; Mason, Andrew J; Castoe, Todd A; Sasa, Mahmood; Parkinson, Christopher L

    2016-07-15

    Middle America is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world, harboring an exceptional number of rare and endemic species. This is especially true of Middle American cloud forests, where montane specialists occupy restricted, high-elevation ranges making them attractive candidates for investigating historical biogeography and speciation. One such highland-restricted species, the black speckled palm-pitviper (Bothriechis nigroviridis), occupies the Central, Tilarán, and Talamanca Cordilleras in Costa Rica and Panama. In this study, we investigate the genetic and morphological variation among populations of B. nigroviridis by inferring a multilocus phylogeny (21 individuals) and analyzing meristic scale characters with a principal component analysis (64 individuals). We find B. nigroviridis sensu stricto to be composed of two deeply divergent lineages, one with a restricted range in the northern and central Cordillera Talamanca and the other ranging throughout the Central, Tilarán, and Talamanca Cordilleras. Furthermore, these two lineages are morphologically distinct, with previously unrecognized differences in several characters allowing us to name and diagnose a new species B. nubestris sp. nov. We also examine the genetic and morphological variation within B. nigroviridis and discuss biogeographic hypotheses that may have led to the diversification of Bothriechis lineages.

  16. Daily patterns of the locomotor activity of Bothrops jararacussu (Serpentes: Viperidae: A response to environmental lighting conditions or an endogenous rhythm?

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    Júlia Niehues da Cruz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available While most circadian biologists would probably assume that circadian clocks drive activity patterns, it is also well known that environmental stimuli may mask endogenous rhythms by either increasing or suppressing activity. The hypothesis that circadian rhythms are generally entrained by exogenous cycles was experimentally tested in Bothrops jararacussu. In this study, we investigated the locomotor activity under constant light and constant dark conditions for 24 days and compared it to that of control snakes living under a light/dark cycle. Under the light/dark cycle, one peak of activity was observed during the night phase, which is typical of the circadian rhythms of nocturnal species. Constant light on Bothrops jararacussu promoted a significant fragmentation and an overall increase in the amount of locomotor activity, while constant darkness provoked a significant suppression of activity. This circadian rhythm is probably endogenous, primarily synchronized by alternating light and darkness. Constant light induces desynchronization, and constant darkness leads to the blockage of circadian clocks. The functional significance of these circadian changes suggests a small flexibility in circadian organization in response to environmental conditions.

  17. Food resources influence spatial ecology, habitat selection, and foraging behavior in an ambush-hunting snake (Viperidae: Bothrops asper): an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Dennis K; Sasa, Mahmood

    2012-06-01

    Prey availability affects many aspects of predators' life history and is considered a primary factor influencing individuals' decisions regarding spatial ecology and behavior, but few experimental data are currently available. Snakes may represent ideal model organisms relative to other animal groups for addressing such resource dependency, due to a presumably more direct link between food resources and many aspects of behavior and natural history. We experimentally investigated the relationship between food intake and spatial behavior in a population of the snake Bothrops asper in a Costa Rican lowland rainforest. Six adult snakes were allowed to forage naturally while six were offered supplemental food in the field, with both groups monitored using radiotelemetry. Mean home range size did not differ between groups presumably due to small sample size, but supplementally fed snakes demonstrated altered patterns of macro- and microhabitat selection, shorter and less frequent movements, and increased mass acquisition. Fed snakes also devoted less time to foraging efforts, instead more frequently remaining inactive and utilizing shelter. Because snakes were always fed in situ and not at designated feeding stations, observed shifts in habitat selection are not explained by animals simply moving to areas of higher food availability. Rather, B. asper may have moved to swamps in order to feed on amphibians when necessary, but remained in preferred forest habitat when food was otherwise abundant. The strong behavioral and spatiotemporal responses of snakes in this population may have been influenced by an overall scarcity of mammalian prey during the study period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A relict lineage and new species of green palm-pitviper (Squamata, Viperidae, Bothriechis from the Chortís Highlands of Mesoamerica

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    Josiah Townsend

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A new species of palm-pitviper of the genus Bothriechis is described from Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat in northern Honduras. The new species differs from congeners by19 dorsal scale rows at midbody, a bright green dorsal coloration in adults, the prelacunal scale fused to the second supralabial, and in representing a northern lineage that is sister to B. lateralis, which is distributed in Costa Rica and western Panama and is isolated from the new taxon by the Nicaraguan Depression. This represents the 15th endemic species occurring in Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat, one of the richest herpetofaunal sites in Honduras, itself being the country with the highest degree of herpetofaunal endemism in Central America. We name this new species in honor of a Honduran conservationist slain in fighting against illegal logging, highlighting the sacrifices of rural activists in battling these issues and the critical importance of conservation in these areas.

  19. A relict lineage and new species of green palm-pitviper (Squamata, Viperidae, Bothriechis) from the Chortís Highlands of Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Josiah H.; Medina-Flores, Melissa; Wilson, Larry David; Jadin, Robert C.; Austin, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of palm-pitviper of the genus Bothriechis is described from Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat in northern Honduras. The new species differs from congeners by having 19 dorsal scale rows at midbody, a bright green dorsal coloration in adults, the prelacunal scale fused to the second supralabial, and in representing a northern lineage that is sister to Bothriechis lateralis, which is distributed in Costa Rica and western Panama and is isolated from the new taxon by the Nicaraguan Depression. This represents the 15th endemic species occurring in Refugio de Vida Silvestre Texíguat, one of the richest herpetofaunal sites in Honduras, itself being the country with the highest degree of herpetofaunal endemism in Central America. We name this new species in honor of a Honduran conservationist slain in fighting against illegal logging, highlighting the sacrifices of rural activists in battling these issues and the critical importance of conservation in these areas. PMID:23794885

  20. Digenetic trematodes infection in a Bothrops moojeni (Viperidae population from a fauna rescue in Porto Primavera, São Paulo State

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    Barrella T.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo é descrita a infecção por trematódeos digenéticos parasitas da cavidade oral e esôfago em uma população de serpentes Bothrops moojeni provenientes de resgate de fauna em Porto Primavera, Estado de São Paulo. Foi observada prevalência de infecção de 68%. O grau de infecção (número de trematódeos por serpente variou de 2 a 51 helmintos. Os trematódeos encontrados foram Ophisthogonimus spp. e Sticholecitha serpentis. A alta prevalência de infecção foi associada com a drástica alteração ambiental e o estresse multi-fatorial aos quais os animais foram submetidos, que poderiam ter favorecido o ciclo dos parasitas.

  1. Hepatozoon spp. (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae) infection and selected hematological values of the neotropical rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Serpentes: Viperidae), from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Rafael Otávio Cançado; Cunha, Lucas Maciel; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; da Silva, Israel José; Pinto, Ana Cristina Araújo; Braga, Erika Martins; da Cunha, Arildo Pinto; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to establish the hematological values of Crotalus durissus collilineatus snakes captured in Brazil as well as to verify the effects of hematozoan infection on these snakes. Eighty-three blood samples were drawn from C. d. collilineatus specimens for analysis. The sample set was composed of 30 males and 30 females, recently caught from the wild, and 11 males and 12 females bred in captivity. Blood samples were used to determine red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, thrombocyte counts, hematocrit values, hemoglobin concentration, and total plasma protein. Blood smears were used to diagnose Hepatozoon spp. infection and to calculate the parasitic load in the sample as well as the percentage of immature red cells. Results obtained for the wild-caught animals, with and without parasites, were compared among themselves and with the values obtained for the captive-bred animals. Hematological values for C. durissus were established. Wild-caught snakes had an infection rate of 38.3%, while no Hepatozoon sp. infection was detected in the captive-bred animals. The snakes which were not infected by the Hepatozoon sp. exhibited average weight, length, and weight-length ratios higher than those of the infected animals. An increase in immature red cells was noted in the Hepatozoon-infected snakes.

  2. Morphometric and phylogenetic analyses of Serpentirhabdias viperidicus n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from the lancehead snake Bothrops moojeni Hoge, 1966 (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, D H; Aguiar, A; Müller, M I; Narciso, R B; da Silva, L A F; da Silva, R J

    2017-05-01

    Serpentirhabdias viperidicus n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) is described from the lungs of the 'Brazilian lancehead' Bothrops moojeni (Hoge, 1966) from the savannah in São Paulo State, Brazil. The new species is the eighth species of Serpentirhabdias described in the Neotropical region, and differs from other species mainly by a combination of characters: lips slightly notable, presence of fine striations at posterior ends, presence of two parallel lines with intercalated pores, a pore-shaped phasmid situated at the level of the anal aperture and another two in the posterior half of the tail. It is the first species of Serpentirhabdias reported in this snake host and the second species of this genus found parasitizing South American viperidian snakes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis using ribosomal (ITS and 28S partial) genes confirms Serpentirhabdias viperidicus n. sp. as a new species that clustered in the Serpentirhabdias clade, sister taxon to Serpentirhabdias fuscovenosa and Serpentirhabdias elaphe. This is the first description of Serpentirhabdias species from Brazil using molecular approaches and morphological characters to confirm the monophyly of this recent genus.

  3. Neutralización del efecto hemorrágico inducido por veneno de Bothrops asper (Serpentes: Viperidae por extractos de plantas tropicales

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    Oscar Castro

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la capacidad de extractos orgánicos de 48 especies de plantas costarricenses para neutralizar la actividad hemorrágica del veneno de la serpiente Bothrops asper (terciopelo. Los extractos se evaluaron mediante un bioensayo basado en inyecciones intradérmicas de veneno en ratones, o de mezclas veneno-extracto, seguidas de la cuantificación macroscópica de la hemorragia. Se observó una inhibición total de la hemorragia con los extractos etanólico, de acetato de etilo y acuoso de Bursera simaruba, Clusia torresii, C. palmana, Croton draco, Persea americana, Phoebe brenesii, Pimenta dioica, Sapindus saponaria, Smilax cuculmeca y Virola koschnyi. El análisis químico de estos extractos permitió identificar catequinas, flavonas, antocianinas y taninos condensados, los cuales podrían jugar un papel en la inhibición del efecto hemorrágico debido a la capacidad de quelar el ion zinc requerido por las metaloproteinasas hemorrágicas para su acción.Organic extracts representing 48 species included in 30 families of Costa Rican tropical plants were evaluated for their ability to neutralize hemorrhagic activity induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper. A bioassay in mice was used, based on intradermal injection of either venom or venom-extract mixtures followed by the measurement of hemorrhagic areas. Total inhibition of hemorrhage was observed with the ethanolic, ethyl acetate and aquous extracts of Bursera simaruba, Clusia torresii, C. palmana, Croton draco, Persea americana, Phoebe brenesii, Pimenta dioica, Sapindus saponaria, Smilax cuculmeca and Virola koschnyi. Chemical analysis of these extracts identified catequines, flavones, anthocyanines and condensated tannins, which may be responsible for the inhibitory effect observed, probably owing to the chelation of the zinc required for the catalytic activity of venom’s hemorrhagic metalloproteinases.

  4. Variation in yield and lethality of venoms from Iranian snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, M

    1984-01-01

    The dangerous venomous terrestrial snakes of Iran belong to three groups: the Elapidae (cobras); the Viperinae (true vipers); the Crotalinae (pit vipers). Geographical distribution of each species was determined. Studies on the venoms extracted from the following Iranian snakes, Oxus cobra, Naja naja oxiana, Levantine viper (Afyi), Vipera lebetina, Carpet viper, Echis carinatus, Persian horned viper, Pseudocerastes persicus, Latifii viper, Vipera latifii, Mountain viper, Vipera xanthina and Caucasus pit viper (Agkistrodon halys), indicated that the yield of venom varies in each species. Venoms were compared for their lethality (i.v. LD50 in mice) and their rate of production. The antigenic components of the venoms were compared with their antisera by gel diffusion tests. To obtain the best results from antivenom treatment, the serum should be made against the venom of the local population of snakes or, at least, the commercial antivenom should be controlled for potency by testing with local reference venom.

  5. Kinetic studies on the activation of human factor X. The role of metal ions on the reaction catalyzed by the venom coagulant protein of Viper russelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S; Robey, F A; Kosow, D P

    1978-07-10

    The effect of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2+ on the initial rate of activation of human Factor X by the venom coagulant protein of Vipera russelli has been investigated. Neither Mg2+ nor Mn2+ alone support the reaction. Ca2+ is an essential activator and exhibits cooperative kinetics. Both Mg2+ and Mn2+ enhance the reaction cooperatively when Ca2+ is present at suboptimal concentrations. Similarly, Ca2+ quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of human Factor X in a cooperative manner. While neither Mg2+ nor Mn2+ by themselves affect the fluorescence of human Factor X, they decrease the cooperativity of the Ca2+ binding to the protein as judged by Hill plots of the Ca2+ -induced fluoresence quenching. EPR measurements indicate that there are three high affinity Mn2+ binding sites on human Factor X which can also bind Ca2+. Positive cooperativity was not observed for Mn2+ binding. These data indicate that Ca2+ can cause a conformational change of the Factor X molecule which allows the activation reaction to proceed. We propose that Mn2+ does not support the activation of human Factor X because it cannot induce a necessary conformational change in the absence of Ca2+.

  6. Viper venom induced inflammation with Montivipera xanthina (Gray, 1849) and the anti-snake venom activities of Artemisia absinthium L. in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantsoy, Ayse; Erel, Sura Baykan; Köksal, Cinel; Göçmen, Bayram; Yıldız, Mehmet Zülfü; Karabay Yavaşoğlu, Nefise Ülkü

    2013-04-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the characterization of Montivipera xanthina crude venom partially by in vitro and in vivo and the anti-snake venom activities of Artemisia absinthium L. in comparison with carrageenan-induced acute inflammation model in rats. The LD50 value was estimated as 8.78 mg/kg within 24 h by different venom doses administrated intraperitoneally in mice. The IC50 value was 0.43 ± 0.18 μg/ml after 48 h treatment while the calculated value was 0.73 ± 0.10 μg/ml for the culture media totally refreshed after 2 h treatment with venom. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally with A. absinthium extract, 30 min before venom or carrageenan was injected subplantarly into the left hind paw. Intraperitoneal administration of 25 and 50 mg/kg extract was inhibited venom induced paw swelling at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h (p absinthium was described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of emulsions with different physicochemical properties on the antibody response towards the venom of West African carpet viper (Echis ocellatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez, Karina; Herrera, María; Segura, Álvaro; Vargas, Mariángela; Villalta, Mauren; Montero, Mavis; Gutiérrez, Jose María; León, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Adjuvant emulsions are widely used to enhance the antibody response of the animals used as immunoglobulin source for producing antivenoms. Usually, the adjuvant activity of emulsions is attributed both to their ability to trigger "danger" signals from cells in which they induce death, and to form depots from which immunogens are slowly released. However, there is contradictory evidence suggesting that adjuvant activity of emulsions is independent of the dispersion type and the rate of immunogen release. In order to test how physical properties of emulsions, composed of mineral oil and water, affect their ability to enhance the antibody response towards snake venoms, we compared water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions prepared at volume ratios of 70/30, 50/50 or 30/70, a 50/50 oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion, and a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion. Comparison included their droplet-size, viscosity, rate of immunogen release and ability to enhance the antibody response of mice immunized with the venom of the African viperid snake Echis ocellatus. It was found that all emulsions released a low amount of venom, and that the 50/50 (W/O) and the multiple emulsion (W/O/W) were those that induced the higher anti-venom antibody response. Our results suggest that the ability of emulsions to enhance the anti-venom response is not associated to their ability to form depots from which the venom is slowly released. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulmonary, microbiological and hematological changes in Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes, Viperidae parasitized by nematodes of the genus Rhabdias (Nematoda, Rhabdiasidae Alterações Pulmonares, microbiológicas e hematológicas em Crotalus durissus terrificus (Serpentes, Viperidae parasitadas pelos nematódeos do gênero Rhabdias (Nematoda, Rhabdiasidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reported the pulmonary, microbiological, and hematological alterations in Crotalus durissus terrificus parasitized by nematodes of the genus Rhabdias. Histological, microbiological, and hematological analysis were performed on parasitized (n=6 and non-parasitized (n=6 snakes. Granulocytic and mononuclear cell infiltrates in the pulmonary parenchyma and epithelium were also observed during the histological analysis of parasitized snakes. Microbiological analysis of parasitized animals revealed the following Gram-negative bacteria: Citrobacter divergens, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Proteus vulgaris, Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter ammnigenus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pantoea sp. and Providencia rettgeri. In non-parasitized snakes, the following species were identified: B. cepacia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Acinetobacter baumanii. Increased levels of plasmatic protein, decreased lymphocyte counts, and normal red blood cell values were observed in parasitized animals.Este trabalho relata as alterações pulmonares, microbiológicas e hematológicas em Crotalus durissus terrificus parasitadas pelo nematódeo do gênero Rhabdias. As análises histológicas, microbiológicas e hematológicas foram realizadas em serpentes parasitadas (n=6 e não parasitadas (n=6. Foram observados infiltrados de células granulocíticas e mononucleares no parênquima pulmonar durante a análise histopatológica das serpentes parasitadas. A análise microbiológica revelou as seguintes bactérias Gram-negativas; Citrobacter divergens, Burkholderia cepacia, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Proteus vulgaris, Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter ammnigenus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pantoea sp. e Providencia rettgeri. Nas serpentes não parasitadas foram identificadas: B. cepacia, Pseudomonas fluorescens e Acinetobacter baumanii. Nos animais parasitados observaram-se: aumento da concentração de proteína plasmática, diminuição da contagem de linfócitos, e valores normais de hematimetria.

  9. A low-cost method to test cytotoxic effects of Crotalus vegrandis (Serpentes: Viperidae venom on kidney cell cultures Un método de bajo costo para probar los efectos citotóxicos del veneno de Crotalus vegrandis (Serpentes: Viperidae en cultivos de células renales

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    María E. Girón

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the renal lesion upon envenomation by snakebite has been related to myolysis, hemolysis, hypotension and/or direct venom nephrotoxicity caused by the venom. Both primary and continuous cell culture systems provide an in vitro alternative for quantitative evaluation of the toxicity of snake venoms. Crude Crotalus vegrandis venom was fractionated by molecular exclusion chromatography. The toxicity of C. vegrandis crude venom, hemorrhagic, and neurotoxic fractions were evaluated on mouse primary renal cells and a continuous cell line of Vero cells maintained in vitro. Cells were isolated from murine renal cortex and were grown in 96 well plates with Dulbecco's Modified Essential Medium (DMEM and challenged with crude and venom fractions. The murine renal cortex cells exhibited epithelial morphology and the majority showed smooth muscle actin determined by immune-staining. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the tetrazolium colorimetric method. Cell viability was less for crude venom, followed by the hemorrhagic and neurotoxic fractions with a CT50 of 4.93, 18.41 and 50.22 µg/mL, respectively. The Vero cell cultures seemed to be more sensitive with a CT50 of 2.9 and 1.4 µg/mL for crude venom and the hemorrhagic peak, respectively. The results of this study show the potential of using cell culture system to evaluate venom toxicity.La patogénesis de la lesion renal ha sido relacionada a la miolisis, hemólisis, hipotensión y/o el efecto directo del veneno. Tanto el cultivo primario o el cultivo celular continuo proveen una alternativa in vitro para la evaluación cuantitativa de la toxicidad de venenos de serpiente. El veneno crudo de Crotalus vegrandis fue fraccionado por una cromatografía de exclusión molecular. La toxicidad del veneno crudo de C. vegrandis, sus fracciones hemorrágicas y neurotóxicas fueron evaluadas en células renales primarias de ratón y una línea continua de células Vero mantenidas in vitro. Las células fueron aisladas de la corteza renal murina y se cultivaron en placas de 96 pozos con medio Dulbecco (DMEM. Allí fueron tratadas con el veneno crudo y sus fracciones. Las células de la corteza renal murina tuvieron una morfología de células epiteliales y la mayoría se tiñeron con un anticuerpo anti-músculo actina. La citotoxicidad fue evaluada por el método colorimétrico del tetrazolium. La viabilidad de las células fue menor en las células tratadas con el veneno crudo, seguida por la fracción hemorrágica y neurotóxica, con un CT50 de 4.93, 18.41 y 50.22 µg/mL, respectivamente. Los cultivos de células Vero parecieron ser más sensibles con un CT50 de 2.9 y 1.4 µg/mL para el veneno crudo y el pico hemorrágico, respectivamente. Los resultados de este estudio muestran la potencialidad de usar sistemas de cultivo celular para evaluar la toxicidad de los venenos.

  10. A influência dos ritmos circadianos no metabolismo da serpente Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5030 The influence of circadian rhythms on the metabolism of the snake Bothrops jararaca (Serpentes, Viperidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.5030

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    José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A atividade termorreguladora conduziu a uma busca extensiva para o entendimento das correlações entre as variáveis fisiológicas, incluindo as funções metabólicas e a temperatura corporal. Frequentes observações mostram que algumas serpentes podem se aquecer, sendo este aumento de temperatura independente da temperatura ambiente, indicando a termorregulação bem sucedida. Bothrops jararaca foram expostas a dois ambientes com diferentes temperaturas (20 e 30oC durante três semanas, sendo mensuradas a temperatura corporal e o consumo de oxigênio. O aumento da temperatura corporal e consumo de oxigênio de Bothrops jararaca ocorreram na fase de escuro do fotoperíodo, consistente para espécies noturnas. Entretanto, antecedendo a fase de escuro, as serpentes em 20oC apresentaram os níveis mais elevados durante o dia para temperatura corporal e consumo de oxigênio. Estes resultados indicam pela primeira vez que animais termodependentes podem controlar a temperatura corporal por meio de ritmos fisiológicos circadianos, semelhante aos observados em termoindependentes. Os ritmos circadianos permitem que os animais antecipem as mudanças no ambiente: parâmetros fisiológicos como a temperatura corporal e as reservas de energia ou sua mobilização podem ser ajustadas antes que as mudanças ambientais previstas ocorram realmente.The thermoregulatory activity has led to an extensive search for correlations between physiological variables, including metabolic functions, and the ideal level of body temperature. Snakes were also often seen basking, when their body temperatures were relatively independent of ambient temperature, indicating successful thermoregulation. Bothrops jararaca were exposed to two different ambient temperatures (20 and 30ºC over a time course of three weeks and oxygen consumption and body temperature were measured. The snakes exhibited a freerunning rhythm of body temperature. Metabolic rate was increased at the same circadian phase as the increase in body temperature in the 30ºC. The increase of body temperature and oxygen consumption of B. jararaca occurs in the scotophase of the photoperiod, consistent with that of nocturnal species. However, prior to a scotophase period the snakes under 20ºC maintain body temperature and oxygen consumption at higher levels during the day. These results demonstrate for the first time that ectothermic animals may display physiologically generated circadian rhythms of body temperature similar to those recorded in endotherms. Circadian rhythms allow animals to anticipate environmental changes: physiological parameters such as body temperature and mobilization of energy reserves have to be adjusted before the expected environmental changes actually take place.

  11. Immunological cross-reactivity of venoms from some Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The immunological cross-reactivity among the Elapidae, Viperidae and Buthidae venoms was detected in dot blot and western blot assays and quantified in ELISA as percentage of absorbance of heterologous versus homologous reaction. Mutual cross-reactivity between the Elapidae and Viperidae venoms was ...

  12. Padrões de atividade locomotora diária de Bothrops jararacussu (Serpentes: Viperidae: Uma resposta relacionada às condições ambientais de luminosidade ou a ritmos endógenos?

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    José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz

    2008-01-01

    pelos ciclos exógenos, foi testada experimentalmente em Bothrops jararacussu. Neste estudo, investigamos a atividade locomotora sobre condições de luminosidade e escuro constantes durante 24 dias e comparamos com os controles, submetidos ao um ciclo de claro/escuro. Sob um ciclo claro/escuro foi observado um pico de atividade durante a fase noturna do ciclo, ritmo circadiano típico de espécies noturnas. Em condições constantes de luminosidade, espécimes de Bothrops jararacussu exibiram significativa fragmentação com aumento global na atividade locomotora e, em escuro constante, signifi cativa supressão da atividade. Provavelmente, o ritmo circadiano é endógeno, primariamente sincronizado pela alternância de claro e escuro. Luminosidade constante induz desincronização e escuro constante bloqueio dos relógios circadianos. O significado funcional destas alterações circadianas sugere pequena flexibilidade na organização circadiana em resposta às condições do ambiente.

  13. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of AnMIP, a new alpha-type phospholipase A2 myotoxin inhibitor from the plasma of the snake Atropoides nummifer (Viperidae: Crotalinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Steve; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Angulo, Yamileth; Lomonte, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    A new phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))-inhibitory protein was isolated from the plasma of Atropoides nummifer, a crotaline snake from Central America. This inhibitor was named AnMIP, given its ability to neutralize the activity of basic PLA(2) myotoxins of its own and related venoms. The cDNA of AnMIP was cloned and sequenced, showing that it belongs to the alpha group of phospholipase A(2) inhibitors (PLIs). AnMIP appears as a homotrimer in the native state, held together by non-covalent forces, with a subunit molecular mass of 22,247-22,301 and an isoelectric point of 4.1-4.7. This trimeric structure is the first observed in a PLIalpha from American crotaline snakes, previously reported only in Asian species. Sequencing, mass spectrometry, and analytical isoelectrofocusing indicated the existence of isoforms, as reported for other PLIalphas isolated from snake plasma. The inhibitory profile of AnMIP showed specificity towards group II PLA(2)s, either belonging to the catalytically-active (D49) or -inactive (K49) subtypes, exemplified in this study by Bothrops asper myotoxin I and A. nummifer myotoxin II, respectively. By phylogenetic analysis it was shown that AnMIP is closely related to CgMIP-II, previously isolated from the plasma of Cerrophidion godmani, showing 93% amino acid sequence identity.

  14. Recruitment of striatonigral disinhibitory and nigrotectal inhibitory GABAergic pathways during the organization of defensive behavior by mice in a dangerous environment with the venomous snake Bothrops alternatus (Reptilia, Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Rafael Carvalho; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-06-01

    The neuropsychopharmacological basis of fear- or panic-related behavior has been the focus of several studies. Some mesencephalic tectum (MT) structures, such as the superior colliculus (SC) and dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG), are considered to be responsible for the control of defensive responses evoked during threatening situations. Furthermore, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra (SNpr) sends inputs to the SC that can work as a sensory channel to MT neurons fundamental for the elaboration of defensive responses. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of striato-nigral GABAergic inputs in the activity of nigro-tectal outputs during the elaboration of defensive behavior using a GABA(A) receptor selective blockade in the MT of mice confronted pre-treated with Bothrops alternatus. Mice with injections of physiological saline into the SNpr and treated with a GABA(A) receptor selective antagonist in the MT displayed an increase in panic-related behavior, expressed by an increase in the duration of freezing, frequency of nonoriented escape and frequency of total escape responses during the confrontation with the snake. However, intra-SNpr injections of cobalt chloride followed by MT injections of bicuculline caused a significant decrease in the duration of freezing and total escape responses. In addition, intra-SNpr injections of lidocaine followed by MT injections of bicuculline caused an increase in panic-related behavior. The results highlight the involvement of SNpr and MT structures in the organization of defensive behaviors and suggest an inhibitory control of striatonigral-nigrotectal pathways during the elaboration of fear- and panic-related behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Caracterização individual do veneno de Bothrops alternatus Duméril, Bibron & Duméril em função da distribuição geográfica no Brasil (Serpentes,Viperidae Individual characterization of Bothrops alternatus Duméril, Bibron & Duméril venoms, according to their geographic distribution in Brazil (Serpentes, Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa M. T. da Rocha

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Bothrops alternatus Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1854 é uma serpente de importância em saúde pública, com ampla distribuição geográfica, desde o Mato Grosso do Sul até o sudeste do Brasil, chegando até a Argentina e Uruguai, ocupando vários domínios morfoclimáticos. Neste trabalho investigou-se a variação do veneno de adultos de Bothrops alternatus, em função de sua distribuição geográfica no Brasil, comparativamente ao veneno elaborado sob a forma de "pool" desta espécie (veneno referência, que inclui serpentes, em sua maioria, da região do estado de São Paulo. Foram analisadas as atividades letal, coagulante sobre o plasma, proteolítica sobre a caseína e miotóxica, bem como os padrões eletroforéticos de 61 amostras individuais de veneno contrapostas ao "pool". Os resultados mostraram que o veneno de B. alternatus é pouco ativo, comparativamente ao de outros Bothrops Wagler, 1824. A variação individual prevaleceu, não apresentando correlação com as áreas de distribuição geográfica e domínios morfoclimáticos, porém a atividade coagulante das amostras de veneno provenientes do nordeste da distribuição geográfica apresentaram-se menos ativas comparativamente às da porção central da distribuição. Os venenos provenientes das bordas da distribuição apresentaram ações proteolíticas e miotóxicas mais intensas, que estatisticamente não foram significativamente diferentes. As variações individuais prevaleceram.Bothrops alternatus Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1854 snakebites are an important public health problem in Brazil. Such snakes are found from Mato Grosso do Sul (central Brazil to southeastern Brazil, reaching even Argentina and Uruguay and thereby occupying different morphoclimatic domains. This work investigated venom variation occurring in adult specimens of B. alternatus specimens, according to their geographic distribution in Brazil. The standard venom pool (reference venom produced by Instituto Butantan, which includes mostly venoms from B. alternatus specimens captured in São Paulo State, was also used for comparison. Lethal, myotoxic, proteolytic (on casein, and coagulant (on human plasma activities, as well as the electrophoretic patterns of 61 individual venom samples, were evaluated and compared to those of the reference venom pool. Results showed that B. alternatus venom activities are less potent than those of other Bothrops Wagler, 1824 species. A great individual variation was noticed, which could not be correlated with either geographic distribution or morphoclimatic domains. Coagulant activity of venom samples obtained from specimens captured in the northeastern area of B. alternatus distribution was less intense if compared to those obtained from the central zone. Venoms from the peripheric area of B. alternatus distribution presented higher proteolytic and myotoxic activities, but no statistically significant difference was observed. In summary, individual variation predominated over geographic distribution.

  16. Environ: E00516 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00516 Agkistrodon acutus Crude drug Agkistrodon acutus [TAX:36307] Viperidae Agkistrodon acut...us extirpated organ (charbroiled, dried) Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Animals Reptiles E00516 Agkistrodon acutus ...

  17. Observations on the vertebral hypapophyses and associated Musculature in some snakes, with special reference to the Colubridae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malnate, E.V.

    1972-01-01

    Hypapophyses are reported to be present on the anterior precaudal vertebrae of representatives of all snake families, except the Typhlopidae, Leptotyphlopidae, and Uropeltidae. The processes occur on all precaudal vertebrae in the Acrochordidae, Colubridae (auct.), Elapidae, Viperidae, and two

  18. CLINICAL AND INVESTIGATIVE PROFILE OF PATIENTS HAVING SNAKEBITE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikin Raj

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND On the Indian subcontinent, almost all snakebite deaths have traditionally been attributed to the big four consisting of the Russell's viper, Indian cobra, saw-scaled viper and the common krait. In India, the incidence of acute kidney injury following Russell’s viper( E. carinatus bite is 13 to 32%. As many of the cases are not reported and many cases are falsely believed due to some other underlying factors, the actual figure may actually be upto 40%. 1 Tubular necrosis and cortical necrosis are the main causes of AKI. The aim of the study is to- 1. Evaluate all patients with snakebite both clinically and by investigations. 2. Assess the risk factors and the prognostic factors in snakebite-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI. 3. Determine the in-hospital outcome of snakebite patients with AKI. MATERIALS AND METHODS Observational Study (A Descriptive and Prospective Type of Study- Period of Data Collection- December 2013 to November 2014 (total duration of 1 year. Inclusion Criteria- All patients coming to emergency department with a definitive history of snakebite. A clinical history taking and a complete physical examination was done in each case. It was followed by laboratory investigations. RESULTS Out of 113 patients, 35 patients developed acute kidney injury. Primarily, symptoms complained by the patients were pain at local bite site (74.3%, local bite site swelling (38.1%, vomiting (37.2%, decreased urine output (30.1%, bleeding from any site (24.8%, black or brown urine (20.4%, giddiness (16.8%, limb weakness (15.0%, ptosis (12.4%, altered sensorium (6.2% and abdominal pain (6.2%. Neurotoxicity was present in 36 (31.9% patients. Haemotoxicity was present in 36 (31.9% patients. Local toxicity was present in 42 (37.2% patients. Primary renal toxicity was present in only 1 (0.8% patient. IV haemolysis was observed in 12 patients in AKI group, which was seen in only 11 out of 78 patients in non-AKI group, which was statistically

  19. Neutralisation of venom-induced haemorrhage by IgG from camels and llamas immunised with viper venom and also by endogenous, non-IgG components in camelid sera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, R.A.; Hasson, S.S.; Harmsen, M.M.; Laing, G.D.; Theakston, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Envenoming by snakes results in severe systemic and local pathology. Intravenous administration of antivenom, prepared from IgG of venom immunised horses or sheep, is the only effective treatment of systemic envenoming. Conventional antivenoms, formulated as intact IgG, papain-cleaved (Fab) or

  20. Document-Based and Message-Centric Security Using XML Authentication and Encryption for Coalition and Interagency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    151 VIPER FLAMINGO CTG 151.01 GRANT KUMATE CTG 151.02 JACKAL JADE CTG 151.04 FANNIE SNAKE...ORDER: CTX CALL SIGN COLLECTIVE CTF 151 VIPER FLAMINGO CTG 151.01 GRANT KUMATE CTG...Staff, Canadian Navy Canada X ADM Rodolfo Codina Diaz Commander-in-Chief, Chilean Navy Chile X X X X ADM Almirante Guillermo Barrera

  1. Common adder bite to the tongue causing life threatening toxicity from airway compromise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Jessen, Casper L; Lambertsen, Karin

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate the acute phase and development of symptoms in a 24-year-old man following a European Common Viper bite to the tongue.......We illustrate the acute phase and development of symptoms in a 24-year-old man following a European Common Viper bite to the tongue....

  2. Kiire aeg ja mittepõgenemistsoon / Raivo Kelomees

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kelomees, Raivo, 1960-

    2000-01-01

    Baseli 20. video, filmi ja uue meedia festivalist "Viper - http://www.viper.ch". Sümpoosionist "Quick Times". Festivali serveris oli Eestist Lauri Tiidemanni video "Käed". Osalemistingimustest. Jaan Tinguely muuseumist (arhitekt Mario Botta). Ilmunud ka kogumikus "Ekraan kui membraan". Tartu, 2007, lk. 81-83

  3. Snake (Vipera berus) bite: The cause of severe anaphylactic shock and hepatocellular injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pałgan, K; Kuźmiński, A; Janik, A; Gotz-Żbikowska, M; Bartuzi, Z

    2015-01-01

    Vipera berus bites lead to a variety of clinical manifestations. Local swelling, coagulopathy, nephrotoxicity, cardiac effects and myotoxicity are known to be associated with envenoming by a viper bite...

  4. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... such as rattlesnakes and other vipers), frostbite, and burns. The two types of DIC are acute and ...

  5. Living with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... such as rattlesnakes and other vipers), frostbite, and burns. The two types of DIC are acute and ...

  6. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... such as rattlesnakes and other vipers), frostbite, and burns. The two types of DIC are acute and ...

  7. What Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... such as rattlesnakes and other vipers), frostbite, and burns. The two types of DIC are acute and ...

  8. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... such as rattlesnakes and other vipers), frostbite, and burns. The two types of DIC are acute and ...

  9. Book 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ELI-TECH Diagnostics, France). LDL-C was calculated according to. Friedewald's equation.27. Lupus anticoagulant was detected by dilute russell's viper venom time. (DRVVT) based lupus anticoagulant detection system (LADS) kit (Tulip.

  10. Kelomehele preemia Baseli festivalil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Baselis festivalil "VIPER - International Festival for Film Video and New Media" tunnistati parimaks CD-ROMiks Gustav Deutschi/Anna Schimeki "Odysee today", netiprojektiks itaallaste "01.ORG", äramärkimispreemia - Raivo Kelomehe "Videoweaver"

  11. Neuronal Mechanisms and Bloodflow Control of Infrared Reception in Snakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goris, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The infrared pit organs of pit vipers and pythons were studied with emphasis on bloodflow in the capillary bed and its possible role as a cooling mechanism for the pit receptors stimulated by infrared (= heat...

  12. Observable N–N oscillation, high-scale see-saw and origin of matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since the expected see-saw scale is high and the N − N ¯ amplitude goes like M R − 5 , one might think that this process is not observable in realistic see-saw models for neutrino masses. In this talk I show that in supersymmetric models, the above conclusion is circumvented leading to an enhanced and observable rate for ...

  13. Army Sustainment. Volume 43, Issue 2. March-April 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    at Hohenfels , Germany, built a facility where deploying units can gain hands-on experience with tactical recovery operations. At this facility...at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center at Hohenfels , Germany. (Photo by SPC Ricky Lowes, VIPERS Visual Information Personnel Team, JMRC) 28... HoHenfels , GerMany. Soldiers use a “replicate” vehi­ cle to practice securing chains for recovering a vehicle. (Photo by SPC Ricky Lowes, VIPERS

  14. awareness and'pati'ern of needlestick among health workers at

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in snakebite patients bitten by viperidae species that are prone to development of haemorrhagic systemic envenomation symptoms (5) In this situation, it was found very useful in initiating antisnake venom therapy once a value beyond. 20minutes is obtained. This was found to reduce mortality significantly. The high mortality ...

  15. Ophidian Spectaculitis and Spectacular Dysecdysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, M. O.; Bertelsen, M. F.; Heegaard, S.

    2015-01-01

    The histologic features of abnormal spectacles in 60 snakes from the 5 families of Boidae, Colubridae, Elapidae, Pythonidae, and Viperidae are described in a retrospective study conducted on specimens submitted to a private diagnostic service during a period of 15 years. Fifty-two snakes had...

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in snakebite patients bitten by viperidae species that are prone to development of haemorrhagic systemic envenomation symptoms (5) In this situation, it was found very useful in initiating antisnake venom therapy once a value beyond. 20minutes is obtained. This was found to reduce mortality significantly. The high mortality ...

  17. Binding of tryptophan and iron by reptilion plasnna proteins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adder. Bi/is arie/ans (Ophidia: Viperidae). Herpelol. 32: 245-247. LANE. E. 1957. Methods in Enzymology, Vol. 3. Academic Press: New York. p. 450-451. McMENAMY, R.H. & WATSON. F. 1968. Indole-albumin association: a comparative study.

  18. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intravascular coagulation“. The Elapidae whose effect is neurotoxic resulting in motor paralysis involving cranial and spinal nerves.4 The Viperidae whose effect is cytotoxic ... The wound was irrigated with hydrogen peroxide, and normal saline. Dressing was done with eusol. The scrotum was elevated with crepe bandage.

  19. Armillifer-Infected Snakes Sold at Congolese Bushmeat Markets Represent an Emerging Zoonotic Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardi, Richard; Babocsay, Gergely; Tappe, Dennis; Sulyok, Mihály; Bodó, Imre; Rózsa, Lajos

    2017-12-01

    African pythons (Pythonidae) and large vipers (Bitis spp.) act as definitive hosts for Armillifer armillatus and Armillifer grandis parasites (Crustacea: Pentastomida) in the Congo Basin. Since the proportion of snakes in bushmeat gradually increases, human pentastomiasis is an emerging zoonotic disease. To substantiate the significance of this threat, we surveyed snakes offered for human consumption at bushmeat markets in the Kole district, Democratic Republic of the Congo, for the presence of adult pentastomids. In Bitis vipers (n = 40), Armillifer spp. infestations exhibited an 87.5% prevalence and 6.0 median intensity. Parasite abundance covaried positively with viper length, but not with body mass. In pythons (n = 13), Armillifer spp. exhibited a 92.3% prevalence and 3.5 median intensity. The positive correlations between parasite abundance and python length or mass were statistically nonsignificant. Ninety-one percent of A. grandis were discovered in vipers and 97% of infected vipers hosted A. grandis, whereas 81% of A. armillatus specimens were found in pythons and 63% of infected pythons hosted A. armillatus. Thus, challenging the widespread notion of strict host specificity, we found 'reversed' infections and even a case of coinfection. In this study, we also gathered information about the snake consumption habits of different tribal cultures in the area. Infective parasite ova likely transmit to humans directly by consumption of uncooked meat, or indirectly through contaminated hands, kitchen tools or washing water.

  20. Bioquímica plasmática de cascavéis (Caudisona durissa LINNAEUS, 1758 em cativeiro Blood biochemical parameters from captivity rattlesnake (Caudisona durissa LINNAEUS, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Bandeira da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Acidentes com seres humanos envolvendo a espécie Caudisona durissa possuem a mais alta taxa de letalidade dentre os viperídeos brasileiros. Ressalta-se então a importância para a saúde pública da criação dessa espécie em cativeiro para produção de soro antiofídico. No entanto, essa atividade ainda hoje encontra alguns desafios como a instalação de doenças no plantel, evidenciando a importância de estudos sobre a fisiologia de serpentes. Dessa forma, foram realizadas análises de bioquímica plasmática em 53 serpentes da espécie Caudisona durissa, mantidas em cativeiro. Foram utilizadas amostras de plasma com heparina e as dosagens bioquímicas realizadas em aparelho automatizado (Ciba Corning - Express Plus®. Os resultados e seus respectivos desvios-padrões foram: uréia -1,32mg dL-1 (±1,1; ácido úrico - 2,08mg dL-1 (±1,4; creatinina - 0,52mg dL-1 (±0,2; proteína total - 3,7g dL-1 (±0,7; albumina - 1,62g dL-1 (±0,4; globulinas - 2,08g dL-1 (±0,5; cálcio - 15,25mg dL-1 (±2,8; fósforo - 4,61mg dL-1 (±1,9; colesterol - 171,58mg dL-1 (±52,7; triglicerídeos - 19,29mg dL-1 (±14,3; fosfatase alcalina - 31,04U L-1 (±12,4; aspartato aminotransferase (AST - 22,25U L-1 (±11,4; alanina aminotransferase (ALT - 7,11U L-1 (±5,4 e Amilase - 1385,23U L-1 (±568,7. Foram calculados os seguintes índices: relação uréia/creatinina - 2,5 e relação cálcio/fósforo - 3,3. O conjunto de resultados das análises bioquímicas do sangue das cascavéis em cativeiro pode servir como referência para apoio diagnóstico na espécie estudada e para outros trabalhos com o mesmo caráter de observação.Human accidents involving rattlesnake Caudisona durissa have the highest fatality rate among the Brazilian Viperidae family. Breeding this specie in captivity in order to produce antivenoms is very important to public health. Nevertheless, there are some challenges that this activity must face, like the onset of diseases on the

  1. Development of osteomyelitis secondary to a snakebite: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilsev Ince

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Viperidae family is responsible for most of the venomous snakebites in Anatolia. Toxicity symptoms may be local such as edema, hyperemia, blisters, necrosis, lymphadenopathy, and ecchymosis or hematological, including high white blood cell (WBC, neutrophilia, decrease in hemoglobin, thrombocytopenia, international normalized ratio (INR elongation, and increase in creatine kinase (CK, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF and #945;, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Antivenom thera- py should be provided if hyperemia continues and/or edema does not regress. Complications are very low in envenomation cases related to Viperidae bites with proper treatment and follow-up. Otherwise, complications can progress to necrosis, acute renal failure, compartment syndrome, amputation, and death may be seen. However, no report in the literature has described osteomyelitis as a late complication of snakebite. In this study, we present an osteomyelitis case caused by snakebite culminating in amputation because of the inadequate treatment. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(3.000: 180-183

  2. Effective equine immunization protocol for production of potent poly-specific antisera against Calloselasma rhodostoma, Cryptelytrops albolabris and Daboia siamensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Sapsutthipas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Snake envenomation has been estimated to affect 1.8 million people annually with about 94,000 deaths mostly in poor tropical countries. Specific antivenoms are the only rational and effective therapy for these cases. Efforts are being made to produce effective, affordable and sufficient antivenoms for these victims. The immunization process, which has rarely been described in detail, is one step that needs to be rigorously studied and improved especially with regard to the production of polyspecific antisera. The polyspecific nature of therapeutic antivenom could obviate the need to identify the culprit snake species. The aim of this study was to produce potent polyspecific antisera against 3 medically important vipers of Thailand and its neighboring countries, namely Cryptelytrops albolabris "White lipped pit viper" (CA, Calleoselasma rhodostoma "Malayan pit viper" (CR, and Daboia siamensis "Russell's viper" (DS. Four horses were immunized with a mixture of the 3 viper venoms using the 'low dose, low volume multi-site' immunization protocol. The antisera showed rapid rise in ELISA titers against the 3 venoms and reached plateau at about the 8th week post-immunization. The in vivo neutralization potency (P of the antisera against CA, CR and DS venoms was 10.40, 2.42 and 0.76 mg/ml, respectively and was much higher than the minimal potency limits set by Queen Soavabha Memorial Institute (QSMI. The corresponding potency values for the QSMI monospecific antisera against CA, CR and DS venoms were 7.28, 3.12 and 1.50 mg/ml, respectively. The polyspecific antisera also effectively neutralized the procoagulant, hemorrhagic, necrotic and nephrotoxic activities of the viper venoms. This effective immunization protocol should be useful in the production of potent polyspecific antisera against snake venoms, and equine antisera against tetanus, diphtheria or rabies.

  3. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of Crotalus horridus (timber rattlesnake).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jacob B; Cobb, Vincent A; Cahoon, A Bruce

    2013-04-01

    The complete mitogenome of the timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) was completed using Sanger sequencing. It is 17,260 bp with 13 protein-coding genes, 21 tRNAs, two rRNAs and two control regions. Gene synteny is consistent with other snakes with the exception of a missing redundant tRNA (Ser) . This mitogenome should prove to be a useful addition of a well-known member of the Viperidae snake family.

  4. The Global Burden of Snakebite: A Literature Analysis and Modelling Based on Regional Estimates of Envenoming and Deaths

    OpenAIRE

    Kasturiratne, A; Wickremasinghe, A.R.; Silva, N; Gunawardena, N. K.; Pathmeswaran, A.; Premaratna, R.; Savioli, L.; Lalloo, David; de Silva, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Of the 3,000 or so snake species that exist in the world, about 600 are venomous. Venomous snakes?which exist on every continent except Antarctica?immobilize their prey by injecting modified saliva (venom) that contains toxins into their prey's tissues through their fangs?specialized, hollow teeth. Snakes also use their venoms for self defense and will bite people who threaten, startle or provoke them. Snakebites caused by the families Viperidae (for example, pit ...

  5. Ugrizi strupenih kač: Bites by venomous snakes:

    OpenAIRE

    Grenc, Damjan

    2009-01-01

    Eight different species of non-venomous snakes of the Colubridae family, and three different species of poisonous snakes of the Viperidae family are native in Slovenia. In the period between 1999 and October of 2008, 39 snake bites were reported to the Poison Control Centre. The most common clinical findings in snake bite victims are discernible fang marks, rapidly progressive swelling, pain, ecchymosis, lymphangitis, and regional lymphadenitis. Systemic signs of envenomation can be delayed a...

  6. STUDY OF CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND COMPLICATIONS OF HAEMOTOXIC SNAKE ENVENOMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Narasimham; Srinivasa Rao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Snake bites are of major public health importance in many communities as causes of haemorrhage, other morbidity and mortality. 1 Of the 3000 species of snakes, about 500 belong to the 3 families of venomous snakes, Atr actaspididae, Elapidae and Viperidae. Estimated 15000 – 20000 people die each year from snake bite in India. 2 In tropical countries snake bite is occupational disease of farmers, plantation workers and hunters. In ...

  7. Road mortality of amphibians and reptiles in the Anatolian part of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    TOK, CEMAL VAROL; Ayaz, Dinçer; Kerim ÇİÇEK

    2014-01-01

    The amphibian and reptile specimens, crushed due to vehicle traffic, were recorded during herpetological trips to various regions of Anatolia between 2005 and 2009. In total, 183 individuals were detected, representing 28 species from 4 amphibian [Salamandridae (1), Ranidae (3), Bufonidae (2), and Hylidae (2)], 3 turtle [Testudinidae (1), Emydidae (1), and Geoemydidae (2)], 3 lizard [Agamidae (1), Anguidae (2), and Lacertidae (5)] and 2 snake [Colubridae (6) and Viperidae (2)] families. The m...

  8. Development of Equine IgG Antivenoms against Major Snake Groups in Mozambique.

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Raimondi Guidolin; Celso Pereira Caricati; José Roberto Marcelino; Wilmar Dias da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Background Snake envenoming is a significant public health problem in underdeveloped and developing countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, it is estimated that 90,000?400,000 envenomations occur each year, resulting in 3,500?32,000 deaths. Envenomings are caused by snakes from the Viperidae (Bitis spp. and Echis spp.) and Elapidae (Naja spp. and Dendroaspis spp.) families. The African continent has been suffering from a severe antivenom crisis and current antivenom production is only sufficient to...

  9. Correlation between annual activity patterns of venomous snakes and rural people in the Niger Delta, southern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Akani, Godfrey C; Ebere, Nwabueze; Franco, Daniel; Eniang, Edem A; Petrozzi, Fabio; Politano, Edoardo; Luiselli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Venomous snakes are among the most serious health hazards for rural people in tropical regions of the world. Herein we compare the monthly activity patterns of eight venomous snake species (Elapidae and Viperidae) with those of rural people in the Niger Delta area of southern Nigeria, in order to identify the periods of highest potential risk for persons, and the human group actually at greater risk of snakebite. Results We documented that above-ground activity of all veno...

  10. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Joydip; Chatterjee, Apratim; Sarkar, Anup; Roy, Koushik; Agarwal, Rakhesh; Lahiri, Durjoy; Biswas, Amrito; Mondal, Anupam; Maity, Pranab; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2015-01-01

    Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS) along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review.

  11. Snakes from the Atlantic Rainforest area of Serra do Mendanha, in Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil: a first approximation to the taxocenosis composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, J A L; Figueiredo, J P; Pontes, R C; Rocha, C F D

    2008-08-01

    We studied the species composition of the snake community of Serra do Mendanha, in Rio de Janeiro state, Southeastern Brazil, with an effort of 800 hours/man in different habitats, including undisturbed forest, secondary forest, areas under regeneration, and banana plantation. We sampled snakes monthly in the area using a combination of methods including intensive visual searching and pitfall traps with drift-fences. We found a total of 191 individuals of 27 snake species, belonging to four families: Boidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Viperidae. In terms of species richness, the most speciose snake family in the area was Colubridae (85.2%; n = 23), followed by Viperidae (7.4%; n = 2), Boidae (3.7%; n = 1) and Elapidae (3.7%; n = 1) (Table 1). Quantitatively, the family Colubridae represented 81.7% (n = 156) of the total of individuals captured throughout the study, followed by Elapidae (13.1% of the individuals; n = 25), Viperidae (4.7%; n = 9) and Boidae (0.5%; n = 1). The data obtained in the study allowed a first approximation of the richness and composition of the snake fauna from Serra do Mendanha, including the records obtained during fieldwork in the present study and those of specimens deposited in Institutional Collections and detailed field data for each voucher specimen. All records are novel data for the area.

  12. Snakes from the Atlantic Rainforest area of Serra do Mendanha, in Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil: a first approximation to the taxocenosis composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAL. Pontes

    Full Text Available We studied the species composition of the snake community of Serra do Mendanha, in Rio de Janeiro state, Southeastern Brazil, with an effort of 800 hours/man in different habitats, including undisturbed forest, secondary forest, areas under regeneration, and banana plantation. We sampled snakes monthly in the area using a combination of methods including intensive visual searching and pitfall traps with drift-fences. We found a total of 191 individuals of 27 snake species, belonging to four families: Boidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Viperidae. In terms of species richness, the most speciose snake family in the area was Colubridae (85.2%; n = 23, followed by Viperidae (7.4%; n = 2, Boidae (3.7%; n = 1 and Elapidae (3.7%; n = 1 (Table 1. Quantitatively, the family Colubridae represented 81.7% (n = 156 of the total of individuals captured throughout the study, followed by Elapidae (13.1% of the individuals; n = 25, Viperidae (4.7%; n = 9 and Boidae (0.5%; n = 1. The data obtained in the study allowed a first approximation of the richness and composition of the snake fauna from Serra do Mendanha, including the records obtained during fieldwork in the present study and those of specimens deposited in Institutional Collections and detailed field data for each voucher specimen. All records are novel data for the area.

  13. The use of ecological niche modeling to infer potential risk areas of snakebite in the Mexican state of Veracruz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Yañez-Arenas

    Full Text Available Many authors have claimed that snakebite risk is associated with human population density, human activities, and snake behavior. Here we analyzed whether environmental suitability of vipers can be used as an indicator of snakebite risk. We tested several hypotheses to explain snakebite incidence, through the construction of models incorporating both environmental suitability and socioeconomic variables in Veracruz, Mexico.Ecological niche modeling (ENM was used to estimate potential geographic and ecological distributions of nine viper species' in Veracruz. We calculated the distance to the species' niche centroid (DNC; this distance may be associated with a prediction of abundance. We found significant inverse relationships between snakebites and DNCs of common vipers (Crotalus simus and Bothrops asper, explaining respectively 15% and almost 35% of variation in snakebite incidence. Additionally, DNCs for these two vipers, in combination with marginalization of human populations, accounted for 76% of variation in incidence.Our results suggest that niche modeling and niche-centroid distance approaches can be used to mapping distributions of environmental suitability for venomous snakes; combining this ecological information with socioeconomic factors may help with inferring potential risk areas for snakebites, since hospital data are often biased (especially when incidences are low.

  14. Mathematical modelling in blood coagulation : simulation and parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.H. Stortelder (Walter); P.W. Hemker (Piet); H.C. Hemker

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes the mathematical modelling of a part of the blood coagulation mechanism. The model includes the activation of factor X by a purified enzyme from Russel's Viper Venom (RVV), factor V and prothrombin, and also comprises the inactivation of the products formed. In this

  15. IRAQ - An Insurgency Collage: Does Center Of Gravity Still Apply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-13

    Gravity Iraqi Rejectionists Isla COG: Sunni Arab Popular Support COG: The Ideology & Appeal to Muslims Strategic and Operational Objectives...most realistic model of urban, desert and cultural training the military has seen, namely, Mojave Viper in Twenty-Nine Palms .45 The third

  16. The Necessity for the Military Assistance Command--Vietnam Studies and Observations Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    to his anti-colonialist views, chose to remain on the sidelines as the French suffered a sound defeat. In a meeting with General Taylor on May 24...of three U.S. personnel and nine Montagnards. Teams were named for either a state or snake as in RT Idaho or RT Viper. Salem House. SOG code name

  17. Management of snakebites at a rural South African hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    definite reduction in the number of patients with systemic envenomation, complications and mortality from Russell's viper envenomation.11. Although the best results from antivenom are observed within four hours of the bite,5 antivenom has been noted to be effective in symptomatic patients even when administered more ...

  18. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    symptoms are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, which may be followed by loss of hair, radio countermeasures--See electronic warfare. hemorrhage...of International Narcotics Matters BIO Bureau of International Organizations BIO biological BIT built-in test BITE built in test equipment BIU beach...communications system VIP very important person; visual information processor VIPER vertical takeoff and landing integrated platform for extended

  19. Effectiveness and resolution of tests for evaluating the performance of cutting fluids in machining aerospace alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Axinte, Dragos A.

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses effectiveness and resolution of five cutting tests (turning, milling, drilling, tapping, VIPER grinding) and their quality output measures used in a multi-task procedure for evaluating the performance of cutting fluids when machining aerospace materials. The evaluation takes...

  20. 78 FR 34550 - Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc Turbojet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ...-44-AD; Amendment 39-17473; AD 2013-11-13] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Rolls-Royce plc... adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Rolls-Royce plc (RR) Viper Mk. 601-22 turbojet engines...-Royce plc, P.O. Box 3, Gypsy Patch Lane, Filton, Bristol, BS347QE, United Kingdom; phone: 011-44- 117...

  1. Tokyo grand prix Laur Tiidemannile ja pronks Tiia Johannsonile

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Laur Tiidemanni töö "Klaver" netikunstifestivalil "Art on the Net 2001" teemal "Cage-järgsed interaktiivsed helid". Tiia Johannsoni töö "get.real gets real". "Viper" online videofestivali võitis T. Johannsoni töö "Pilvelõhkujad". Lisatud internetiaadressid

  2. The death of Cleopatra | Retief | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatal viper bites are characteristically associated with prominent, swollen and haemorrhagic wounds. Cobras may cause rapid death in spite of minor bite wounds, but in order to kill three adults, the snake would have to be large. Legend has it that the reptile was smuggled to Cleopatra in a small basket of figs, which would ...

  3. Fatty Acids, α-Tocopherol, β-Carotene and Lutein Contents in Forage Legumes, Forbs and a Grass-Clover Mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgersma, A.; Søegaard, Karen; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2013-01-01

    2009 and 2010. The experimental design was a randomized complete block, and analyses of variance were performed. In addition, three other forbs were grown: borage ( Borago officinalis ), viper's bugloss ( Echium vulgare ), and chervil ( Anthriscus cerefolium ). Lucerne and yellow sweet clover had...

  4. Unusual visual loss after snakebite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Tungpakorn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites are endemic in some parts of Thailand, being associated with several complications. Ocular disturbances are uncommon, except in cases of corneal or conjunctival injury, when the eye is directly exposed to the snake venom. The present study presents a case of combined ophthalmic artery occlusion and transient central retinal artery occlusion with macular ischemia after a Russell's viper bite.

  5. the xylophonist and the poetry of the xylophone text with emphasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prince Acheampong

    which is also operated as a medium of communication and made to express itself in a poetic language. It is the major .... This positive response is however based on the knowledge of the language of the xylophone, which has its .... The venomous nature of these reptiles, the viper and the cobra, is well known. A bite from ...

  6. The Journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. Volume 6. Issue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    challenges in our environment. With over a billion people facing chronic nutrition shortages,4 and a host of old and emerging diseases that threaten to... snakes (which cannot hear), and will additionally heat their tails only when encountered by particular snakes (pit vipers) that can sense infrared

  7. The use of ecological niche modeling to infer potential risk areas of snakebite in the Mexican state of Veracruz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yañez-Arenas, Carlos; Peterson, A Townsend; Mokondoko, Pierre; Rojas-Soto, Octavio; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Many authors have claimed that snakebite risk is associated with human population density, human activities, and snake behavior. Here we analyzed whether environmental suitability of vipers can be used as an indicator of snakebite risk. We tested several hypotheses to explain snakebite incidence, through the construction of models incorporating both environmental suitability and socioeconomic variables in Veracruz, Mexico. Ecological niche modeling (ENM) was used to estimate potential geographic and ecological distributions of nine viper species' in Veracruz. We calculated the distance to the species' niche centroid (DNC); this distance may be associated with a prediction of abundance. We found significant inverse relationships between snakebites and DNCs of common vipers (Crotalus simus and Bothrops asper), explaining respectively 15% and almost 35% of variation in snakebite incidence. Additionally, DNCs for these two vipers, in combination with marginalization of human populations, accounted for 76% of variation in incidence. Our results suggest that niche modeling and niche-centroid distance approaches can be used to mapping distributions of environmental suitability for venomous snakes; combining this ecological information with socioeconomic factors may help with inferring potential risk areas for snakebites, since hospital data are often biased (especially when incidences are low).

  8. Purification and Functional Characterisation of Rhinocerase, a Novel Serine Protease from the Venom of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Harrison, Robert A.; Bicknell, Andrew B.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Hutchinson, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are a major component of viper venoms and are thought to disrupt several distinct elements of the blood coagulation system of envenomed victims. A detailed understanding of the functions of these enzymes is important both for acquiring a fuller understanding of the pathology of envenoming and because these venom proteins have shown potential in treating blood coagulation disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study a novel, highly abundant serine protease, which we have named rhinocerase, has been isolated and characterised from the venom of Bitis gabonica rhinoceros using liquid phase isoelectric focusing and gel filtration. Like many viper venom serine proteases, this enzyme is glycosylated; the estimated molecular mass of the native enzyme is approximately 36kDa, which reduces to 31kDa after deglycosylation. The partial amino acid sequence shows similarity to other viper venom serine proteases, but is clearly distinct from the sequence of the only other sequenced serine protease from Bitis gabonica. Other viper venom serine proteases have been shown to exert distinct biological effects, and our preliminary functional characterization of rhinocerase suggest it to be multifunctional. It is capable of degrading α and β chains of fibrinogen, dissolving plasma clots and of hydrolysing a kallikrein substrate. Conclusions/Significance A novel multifunctional viper venom serine protease has been isolated and characterised. The activities of the enzyme are consistent with the known in vivo effects of Bitis gabonica envenoming, including bleeding disorders, clotting disorders and hypotension. This study will form the basis for future research to understand the mechanisms of serine protease action, and examine the potential for rhinocerase to be used clinically to reduce the risk of human haemostatic disorders such as heart attacks and strokes. PMID:20300193

  9. Anti-snake venom activities of extracts and fractions from callus cultures of Sapindus saponaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcos L; Marcussi, Silvana; Fernandes, Renata S; Pereira, Paulo S; Januário, Ana Helena; França, Suzelei C; Da Silva, Saulo L; Soares, Andreimar M; Lourenço, Miriam V

    2012-03-01

    Sapindus saponaria L. (Sapindaceae) bark, root, and fruits are used as sedatives and to treat gastric ulcer and also demonstrate diuretic and expectorant effects. The anti-snake venom properties of callus of S. saponaria are investigated here for the first time. In vitro cultivated callus of Sapindus saponaria were lyophilized, and the extracts were prepared with different solvents, before submitting to phytochemical studies and evaluation of the anti-ophidian activity. Crude extracts were fractionated by liquid-liquid partition and the fractions were monitored by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Subsequently, anti-ophidian activities were analyzed toward Bothrops jararacussu Lacerda (Viperidae), B. moojeni Hoge (Viperidae), B. alternates Duméril (Viperidea) and Crotalus durissus terrificus Lineu (Viperidae) venoms and isolated myotoxins and phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)). Fractions A1, A2 and the extract in MeOH:H(2)O (9:1) significantly inhibited the toxic and pharmacological activities induced by snake venoms and toxins, when compared to other extracts and fractions. The lethal, clotting, phospholipase, edema-inducing, hemorrhagic and myotoxic activities were partially inhibited by the different extracts and fractions. TLC profiles of the crude extracts (B and C) and fractions (A1 and A2) showed β-sitosterol and stigmasterol as their main compounds. Stigmasterol exhibited inhibitory effects on enzymatic and myotoxic activities of PLA(2). Sapindus saponaria extracts and fractions presented anti-ophidian activity and could be used as an adjuvant to serum therapy or for its supplementation, and in addition, as a rich source of potential inhibitors of enzymes involved in several pathophysiological human and animal diseases.

  10. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. Measuring the growth rate of structure around cosmic voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, A. J.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; de la Torre, S.; Garilli, B.; Bolzonella, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Percival, W. J.

    2017-11-01

    We aim to develop a novel methodology for measuring thegrowth rate of structure around cosmic voids. We identified voids in the completed VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), using an algorithm based on searching for empty spheres. We measured the cross-correlation between the centres of voids and the complete galaxy catalogue. The cross-correlation function exhibits a clear anisotropy in both VIPERS fields (W1 and W4), which is characteristic of linear redshift space distortions. By measuring the projected cross-correlation and then de-projecting it we are able to estimate the un-distorted cross-correlation function. We propose that given a sufficiently well-measured cross-correlation function one should be able to measure the linear growth rate of structure by applying a simple linear Gaussian streaming model for the redshift space distortions (RSD). Our study of voids in 306 mock galaxy catalogues mimicking the VIPERS fields suggests that VIPERS is capable of measuring β, the ratio of the linear growth rate to the bias, with an error of around 25%. Applying our method to the VIPERS data, we find a value for the redshift space distortion parameter, β = 0.423-0.108+0.104 which, given the bias of the galaxy population we use, gives a linear growth rate of f σ8 = 0.296-0.078+0.075 at z = 0.727. These results are consistent with values observed in parallel VIPERS analyses that use standard techniques. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in

  11. A Single Residue in Ebola Virus Receptor NPC1 Influences Cellular Host Range in Reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndungo, Esther; Herbert, Andrew S; Raaben, Matthijs; Obernosterer, Gregor; Biswas, Rohan; Miller, Emily Happy; Wirchnianski, Ariel S; Carette, Jan E; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Whelan, Sean P; Dye, John M; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Filoviruses are the causative agents of an increasing number of disease outbreaks in human populations, including the current unprecedented Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in western Africa. One obstacle to controlling these epidemics is our poor understanding of the host range of filoviruses and their natural reservoirs. Here, we investigated the role of the intracellular filovirus receptor, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as a molecular determinant of Ebola virus (EBOV) host range at the cellular level. Whereas human cells can be infected by EBOV, a cell line derived from a Russell's viper (Daboia russellii) (VH-2) is resistant to infection in an NPC1-dependent manner. We found that VH-2 cells are resistant to EBOV infection because the Russell's viper NPC1 ortholog bound poorly to the EBOV spike glycoprotein (GP). Analysis of panels of viper-human NPC1 chimeras and point mutants allowed us to identify a single amino acid residue in NPC1, at position 503, that bidirectionally influenced both its binding to EBOV GP and its viral receptor activity in cells. Significantly, this single residue change perturbed neither NPC1's endosomal localization nor its housekeeping role in cellular cholesterol trafficking. Together with other recent work, these findings identify sequences in NPC1 that are important for viral receptor activity by virtue of their direct interaction with EBOV GP and suggest that they may influence filovirus host range in nature. Broader surveys of NPC1 orthologs from vertebrates may delineate additional sequence polymorphisms in this gene that control susceptibility to filovirus infection. IMPORTANCE Identifying cellular factors that determine susceptibility to infection can help us understand how Ebola virus is transmitted. We asked if the EBOV receptor Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) could explain why reptiles are resistant to EBOV infection. We demonstrate that cells derived from the Russell's viper are not susceptible to infection because EBOV cannot bind to

  12. ENVENENAMIENTO OFIDICO POR EL GENERO Bothrops COMPLICADO CON MIOCARDIOPATIA TÓXICA: A PROPOSITO DE UN CASO.

    OpenAIRE

    Sajar Abusaid Palomo; Carlos Muñoz Medina; Milagros Mota Carvajal; Marisol Sandoval

    2014-01-01

    El envenenamiento ofídico en Venezuela es un problema de salud pública, afectando a agricultores y mineros, implicada con mayor frecuencia la familia Viperidae, genero Bothrops. Presenta clínica variable, desde manifestaciones locales hasta sistémicas. Paciente femenina de 40 años, agricultora, consulta por dolor y aumento de volumen en cara lateral de pie izquierdo por envenenamiento ofídico. Acude a ambulatorio de su localidad, 24 horas después es trasladada al Hospital Universitario Ruiz y...

  13. Ofidizam i liječenje – povodom nazočnosti novih vrsta otrovnih zmija u Zoološkom vrtu grada Zagreba i privatnim herpetarijima

    OpenAIRE

    Maretić, Tomislav; Cizelj, Ivan; Čivljak, Rok

    2013-01-01

    Među 15 vrsta zmija koje žive u Hrvatskoj tri su vrste otrovne: poskok (Vipera ammodytes), riđovka (Vipera berus) i planinski žutokrug (Vipera ursinii), a sve pripadaju porodici ljutica (Viperidae). Njihov je otrov pretežno hemotoksičan, iako su ustanovljeni elementi neurotoksičnosti i kardiotoksičnosti. Premda njihov ugriz predstavlja veliki zdravstveni problem smrtni slučajevi su razmjerno rijetki. Nedavno uvođenje novih vrsta otrovnica u Zooološki vrt grada Zagreba, kao i izložbe svjetskih...

  14. Survey of the reptilian fauna of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. VI. The snake fauna of Turaif region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadoon, Mohammed K; Paray, Bilal Ahmad; Al-Otaibi, Hamad

    2017-05-01

    A collection of snakes in Turaif region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, an area that has been poorly documented for reptiles, consists of 28 specimens representing 11 species belonging to 4 families (Colubridae, Elapidae, Viperidae and Atractaspididae). This study presents the first comprehensive inventory of the herpetofauna of the Turaif province of Saudi Arabia. Co-ordinates: Latitude, longitude and altitude, of the collected specimens were mapped using GPS. Three of the snake species Lytorhynchus diadema, Pseudocerastes fieldi and Walterinnesia morgani reported by the authors in the present survey proved to be new records for Turaif region of Saudi Arabia.

  15. Survey of the reptilian fauna of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. VI. The snake fauna of Turaif region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K. Al-Sadoon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A collection of snakes in Turaif region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, an area that has been poorly documented for reptiles, consists of 28 specimens representing 11 species belonging to 4 families (Colubridae, Elapidae, Viperidae and Atractaspididae. This study presents the first comprehensive inventory of the herpetofauna of the Turaif province of Saudi Arabia. Co-ordinates: Latitude, longitude and altitude, of the collected specimens were mapped using GPS. Three of the snake species Lytorhynchus diadema, Pseudocerastes fieldi and Walterinnesia morgani reported by the authors in the present survey proved to be new records for Turaif region of Saudi Arabia.

  16. Ecological studies on the diversity of terrestrial poisonous snakes "Proteroglyphous” of Jazan region Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Reptilia: Ophidia)

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa F. Masood

    2012-01-01

    The present work was carried out in Jazan region. The region of Jazan in being in the South-Western part of Saudi Arabia between longitudes 420 and 43.80 and latitudes 5, 16o and 17o, and is bounded on the south and east of the Republic of Yemen, Asir area in the north and the Red Sea in the west. The results showed that there are four families of poisonous snakes "Proteroglyphous" living in Jazan region. They are: Family Atractaspididae, Elapidae, Viperidae and Hydrophiidae . This work aim...

  17. Clinically Significant Envenomation From Postmortem Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emswiler, Michael P; Griffith, F Phillip; Cumpston, Kirk L

    2017-03-01

    Over 14,000 copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) bites were reported to United States poison centers between 1983 and 2008, and 1809 cases were reported to poison centers in 2014. The copperhead is primarily found in the southeastern United States and belongs to the pit viper subfamily Crotalinae, which also includes the water moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorus) and rattlesnakes (Crotalus and Sistrurus genera). Postmortem rattlesnakes have been reported to cause clinically significant envenomation; we report a case of a postmortem copperhead causing clinically significant envenomation after inadvertent puncture with the deceased copperhead fang. The copperhead was transected twice, leaving the snake in 3 separate pieces. While handling the snake head, an inadvertent puncture occurred on the right index finger followed by pain and swelling in the affected extremity necessitating antivenom administration. Care should be taken when handling deceased pit vipers due to the continued risk of envenomation. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relaxation incisions of venomous snake "Japanese mamushi" bites to the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugamata A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Akira Sugamata, Naoki Yoshizawa, Takahiro OkadaDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Gloydius blomhoffii, commonly known as Japanese mamushi, is a venomous viper species found widely in Japan. The most frequently bitten regions are the fingers and toes, and severe swelling causes compression of peripheral arteries and/or compartment syndrome of the extremities. We experienced four cases of mamushi bites to the hand, and undertook relaxation incision in the hands of three of these patients. As a result, the patients who underwent relaxation incision did not show any skin necrosis or permanent sensory disturbance in the affected fingers. Relaxation incision can be useful to not only decompress subcutaneous and compartment pressure of the hand, but also to wash out the venom from the bitten region by improving venous and lymphatic drainage.Keywords: mamushi, snakebite, viper, relaxation incision

  19. The Study on the Snake by TOXICON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-wook Kim

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to investigate the researches of Snake which was published papers in the TOXICON(1990-2.000, one of the most famous Journal of toxicology. And the results were as follows: 1. The number related with Snake is 195papers. 2. There were great papers related wih Cobra, and next is Tigris, Viper, etc. 3. There were great papers related wih protein in the composition of snake venom. 4. There were great papers related wih neurotoxin in the research of poisonous character. 5. There were great papers related wih Viper according to the anticoagulation. 6. Eight papers were published to study the immune response of snake venom. 7. The papers of molecular study of snake venom were seven. 8. The papers of anti-snake venom study were three.

  20. Abundance and diversity of anemonefishes and their host sea anemones at two mesophotic sites on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, T.; Scott, A.; Steinberg, D.

    2012-12-01

    Anemonefishes and their host sea anemones are iconic inhabitants of coral reef ecosystems. While studies have documented their abundance in shallow-water reef habitats in parts of the Indo-Pacific, none have examined these species on mesophotic reefs. In this study, we used autonomous underwater vehicle imagery to examine the abundance and diversity of anemones and anemonefishes at Viper Reef and Hydrographers Passage in the central Great Barrier Reef at depths between 50 and 65 m. A total of 37 host sea anemones (31 Entacmaea quadricolor and 6 Heteractis crispa) and 24 anemonefishes (23 Amphiprion akindynos and 1 A. perideraion) were observed. Densities were highest at Viper Reef, with 8.48 E. quadricolor and A. akindynos per 100 m2 of reef substratum. These results support the hypothesis that mesophotic reefs have many species common to shallow-water coral reefs and that many taxa may occur at depths greater than currently recognised.

  1. Comparison of optics and performance of single channel and a novel dual-channel fiberoptic ureteroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusch, Achim; Okhunov, Zhamshid; del Junco, Michael; Yoon, Renai; Khanipour, Ramtin; Menhadji, Ashleigh; Landman, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate performance characteristics and optics of a novel dual-working channel fiberoptic ureteroscope (Wolf Cobra) with 2 single-channel fiberoptic ureteroscopes and to a single-channel distal sensor standard definition digital ureteroscope URF-V (SD-DS). Four new ureteroscopes (Cobra, Viper, X(2), and SD-DS) were compared for active deflection, irrigation flow, and optical characteristics. We performed a porcine ureteroscopy and measured the time for cleaning the middle calyx after injection of 10 cc of a standardized bloody solution. The SD-DS showed a higher resolution (7.42 lines/mm; P = .0001) compared with the fiberoptic ureteroscopes; among the fiberoptic ureteroscopes, the Cobra had the highest resolution than the Viper and X(2) (P = .0001). Grayscale distribution and color representation were identical for the fiberoptic ureteroscopes, whereas the SD-DS provided a superior color representation and a significant higher depth of field. The Cobra provided superior flow with empty working channel (86 cc/min vs 68 cc/min [Viper] vs 62.5 cc/min [X(2)] vs 62 cc/min [SD-DS]; P = .0001) and with various accessories (P superior deflection up and down (P standardized bloody field, the Cobra provided significant shorter evacuation times compared with those of the Viper, X(2), and SD-DS (36.6 vs 72 vs 65.6 vs 72.6 seconds, respectively; P = .0001). The additional working channel of the Wolf Cobra may improve vision and performance during challenging ureteroscopic cases by providing an increased flow. The enhanced irrigation capabilities of the Cobra have to be balanced with a larger diameter of this ureteroscope. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FabAV antivenin use after copperhead snakebite: clinically indicated or knee-jerk reaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Stephen C.; Peters, Jo Ann; Allen, LaDonna; Creath, Robert; Dombrovskiy, Viktor Y

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) (FabAV) antivenin is commonly recommended after pit viper snakebites. Because copperhead envenomations are usually self-limited, some physicians are reluctant to use this costly treatment routinely, while others follow a more liberal approach. We hypothesized that, in practice, only patients with evidence of significant (moderate or severe) copperhead envenomation [those with snakebite severity score (SSS) > 3] receive FabAV and e...

  3. AJNT volume 5 issue 3 [Sep 2012].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was also given intravenous saline according to his volume status and urine output. He was started on amoxicillin/ clavulonic acid, morphine ... 12 g/dL. Total leukocyte count. 13000/mm³. D-dimer. 600 µg/ml. Urinalysis. Color. Dark. pH. 5.0. Protein. +. RBC. 15-30 /HPF. Figure-1: The Saharan horned viper, Cerastes Cerastes ...

  4. Freshwater Cyanobacteria (Blue-Green Algae) Toxins: Isolation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    comes from ingestion of the toxic cells and extracellular toxin from a water bloom. Given the LD5 0 for intraperitoneal, bioassay in mouse for purified...testes, seminal vesicles , and prostate were taken from the 90-minute rat and the control rat; only lungs and liver were taken from the others. The organs...toxicity. Admini- stration of the anticoagulants heparin, acetylsalicylic acid, Malayan pit viper venom , streptokinase, and warfarin in a previous study by

  5. Biogeography and conservation of viperids from North-West Africa : an application of ecological niche-based models and GIS

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, J. C.; Fahd, S.; Geniez, P.; Martinez-Freiria, F.; Pleguezuelos, J. M.; Trape, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    North-West Africa is an outstanding region to study biogeographic patterns in biodiversity distribution. This study identifies biogeographic affinities and areas of probable occurrence for seven viperid snakes through the combination of high resolution presence data and environmental factors. Vipers exhibited distinct biogeographical affinities: Bitis arietans was mostly found along savannahs, Echis leucogaster along the Sahel/savannahs, Cerastes cerastes and C vipera throughout most desertic...

  6. Focused Feasibility Study Final Health and Safety Plan. Beach Point Test Site, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood Area, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    bite thoroughly with an antiseptic and seek medical attention as soon as possible. The various stages and symptoms of both diseases are well recognized...the bite . The extremely painful characteristics of a pit viper bite (e.g., rattlesnake, copperhead) 4 include rapid swelling that can be identified...Recognition of Symptoms and Signs ........................... 3-7 0 3.1.2 Hazard Communication Program Procedures .......................... 3-7 3.1.3

  7. Inorganic chemistry and IONiC: an online community bringing cutting-edge research into the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Elizabeth R; Eppley, Hilary J; Geselbracht, Margret J; Johnson, Adam R; Reisner, Barbara A; Smith, Sheila R; Stewart, Joanne L; Watson, Lori A; Williams, B Scott

    2011-07-04

    This Viewpoint highlights creative ways that members of the Interactive Online Network of Inorganic Chemists (IONiC) are using journal articles from Inorganic Chemistry to engage undergraduate students in the classroom. We provide information about specific educational materials and networking features available free of charge to the inorganic community on IONiC's web home, the Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Electronic Resource (VIPEr, www.ionicviper.org ) and describe the benefits of joining this community. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. F-22A Beddown Environmental Assessment Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    ERP site ST-34 is a former Army-Air Force Exchange Services gas station that had a fuel release in 1991 from one of the feed lines. The...tshawytscha AK SSC No Leatherback sea turtle Dermochelys coriacea FE No Short-tailed albatross Phoebastria albatrus FE, AKE No Kittlitz’s murrelet...Viper, Buffalo, Eielson, and Birch MOAs, in the interior region of Alaska, include a large system of streams and small rivers that feed into the

  9. A Methodology for Formal Hardware Verification, with Application to Microprocessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-29

    Sekar and Srivas verified a simplified version of Wirth’s Lilith . Tamarack Mike Gordon illustrated his early ideas on hardware verification using a...include FM8501 [137, 86] and related designs [136, 239], simplified versions of Cayuga [227] and Lilith [2131, Tamarack [150], Viper [77], SECD [119, 120...techniques in a different proof system, called SBL, to verify a simplified version of Wirth’s LILITH processor. Their model included a simplified form

  10. Clinical Effects and Antivenom Use for Snake Bite Victims Treated at Three US Hospitals in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    viper, Echis carinatus) and the Oxus cobra ( Naja oxiana).1–3 Although nearby countries such as Pakistan and India are reported by the World Health...410b 4 Favirept 31.3b 332 1.6b 15 69 Naja oxiana 2.5 40.4 183 410 4 Favirept 39.7 159 1.7b 16 7 Pseudocerastes 12.5 32.1b 78b 1.0 1 Favirept 30.3b

  11. Molecular Docking Studies and Anti−Snake Venom Metalloproteinase Activity of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Pimolpan Pithayanukul; Jiraporn Leanpolchareanchai; Patchreenart Saparpakorn

    2009-01-01

    Snakebite envenomations cause severe local tissue necrosis and the venom metalloproteinases are thought to be the key toxins involved. In this study, the ethanolic extract from seed kernels of Thai mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. ‘Fahlun’) (Anacardiaceae) and its major phenolic principle (pentagalloylglucopyranose) exhibited potent and dose−dependent inhibitory effects on the caseinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities of Malayan pit viper and Thai cobra venoms in in vitro tests. molecular do...

  12. The Use of Ecological Niche Modeling to Infer Potential Risk Areas of Snakebite in the Mexican State of Veracruz

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Yañez-Arenas; A. Townsend Peterson; Pierre Mokondoko; Octavio Rojas-Soto; Enrique Martínez-Meyer

    2014-01-01

    Background Many authors have claimed that snakebite risk is associated with human population density, human activities, and snake behavior. Here we analyzed whether environmental suitability of vipers can be used as an indicator of snakebite risk. We tested several hypotheses to explain snakebite incidence, through the construction of models incorporating both environmental suitability and socioeconomic variables in Veracruz, Mexico. Methodology/Principal Findings Ecological niche modeling (E...

  13. A Review and Database of Snake Venom Proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoulis, Theo

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the last decade combining transcriptomics with established proteomics methods have made possible rapid identification and quantification of protein families in snake venoms. Although over 100 studies have been published, the value of this information is increased when it is collated, allowing rapid assimilation and evaluation of evolutionary trends, geographical variation, and possible medical implications. This review brings together all compositional studies of snake venom proteomes published in the last decade. Compositional studies were identified for 132 snake species: 42 from 360 (12%) Elapidae (elapids), 20 from 101 (20%) Viperinae (true vipers), 65 from 239 (27%) Crotalinae (pit vipers), and five species of non-front-fanged snakes. Approximately 90% of their total venom composition consisted of eight protein families for elapids, 11 protein families for viperines and ten protein families for crotalines. There were four dominant protein families: phospholipase A2s (the most common across all front-fanged snakes), metalloproteases, serine proteases and three-finger toxins. There were six secondary protein families: cysteine-rich secretory proteins, l-amino acid oxidases, kunitz peptides, C-type lectins/snaclecs, disintegrins and natriuretic peptides. Elapid venoms contained mostly three-finger toxins and phospholipase A2s and viper venoms metalloproteases, phospholipase A2s and serine proteases. Although 63 protein families were identified, more than half were present in snake species studied and always in low abundance. The importance of these minor component proteins remains unknown. PMID:28927001

  14. Commissioned article: management of exotic snakebites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, D A

    2009-09-01

    Exotic (foreign or non-native) snakes, including venomous species, are becoming increasingly popular pets in Western countries. Some of them are kept illegally (as defined by the UK Dangerous Wild Animals Act of 1976). There is a large international market for such animals, with contraventions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). In the UK, several other European countries and the USA the reported numbers of bites by venomous exotic snakes, although small, are increasing but still underestimate the occurrence of these occasionally fatal events because of the victims' reluctance to seek medical care. Victims are predominantly young men who have been drinking alcohol. Bites may be intentionally provoked. In Europe, the species most often involved are cobras, green mambas, American pit vipers particularly rattlesnakes, African adders, vipers and Asian green pit vipers. To illustrate the special problems involved, case histories are presented of bites by exotic species in the UK and of bites abroad, where patients were repatriated for treatment. In view of the relative rarity and diversity of these cases, expert advice must usually be sought. These requests should include information about the species thought to have been responsible and the history and timing of the evolution of envenoming. Sources of advice and antivenom are discussed together with recommendations for appropriate first aid and emergency treatment while this is being awaited. Respiratory and cardiovascular resuscitation may be required and when systemic or severe local envenoming develops, specific (equine or ovine) antivenom is indicated.

  15. Oral microbiota of Brazilian captive snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MG Fonseca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to determine the oral microbiotic composition of snakes from São José do Rio Preto city, São Paulo State, Brazil. Ten snake species, comprising the families Boidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Viperidae, were submitted to microbiological examination of their oral cavity, which indicated positivity for all buccal samples. Gram-negative bacilli, gram-negative cocci bacilli, gram-positive bacilli and gram-positive cocci were isolated from the snakes. Among isolated bacterium species, the occurrence of coagulase-negative staphylococci in the buccal cavity of Crotalus durissus (Viperiade, Eunectes murinus (Boidae, Mastigodryas bifossatus (Colubridae and Bacillus subtilis, common to oral cavity of Bothrops alternatus (Viperidae and Phalotris mertensi (Colubridae, was detected. It was observed higher diversity of isolated bacteria from the oral cavity of Micrurus frontalis (Elapidae and Philodryas nattereri (Colubridae, as well as the prevalence of gram-positive baccillus and gram-positive cocci. The composition of the oral microbiota of the studied snakes, with or without inoculating fangs, is diverse and also related to the formation of abscesses at the bite site in the victims of the ophidian accidents, and to pathogenic processes in the snakes that host these microorganisms.

  16. Lista y distribución de los ofidios (Reptilia: Serpentes de Santa Fe, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzamendia, Vanesa

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la composición y distribución de las serpientes en la provincia de Santa Fe, Argentina, sobre la base de 1.292 registros obtenidos en muestreos de campo, revisión de las colecciones herpetológicas de Argentina y registros bibliográficos. Se registraron 51 especies y subespecies (43 Colubridae, 3 Viperidae, 2 Boidae, 1 Elapidae, 1 Leptotyphlopidae y 1 Typhlopidae, representando un 39% de los taxones registrados para Argentina. Se realizaron mapas con localidades precisas para determinar la distribución de las serpientes. Una especie y 4 subespecies son registros novedosos para la provincia. Los patrones de distribución son brevemente discutidos en relación con las formaciones fitogeográficas. We studied the composition and distribution of the Santa Fe snakes based on 1,292 examined specimens obtained in field survey, revision of the Argentine herpetological collections and reliable literature records. Maps were built for determinate the distribution of snakes. Fifty one species and subspecies were recorded (43 Colubridae, 3 Viperidae, 2 Boidae, 1 Elapidae, 1 Leptotyphlopidae and 1 Typhlopidae, a 39% of the survey taxa in Argentina. One species and three subspecies were new records in Santa Fe province. The distributional patterns are briefly discussed in relation with phytogeographical subdivisions.

  17. Notas sobre predação em uma taxocenose de anfíbios anuros no sudeste do Brasil Predation notes in an anuran amphibians assemblage from southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José P. Pombal Jr

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anfíbios anuros são predados por todos os grupos de vertebrados e muitos invertebrados. Todavia os estudos sobre predação em anfíbios anuros ainda são esparsos e anedóticos. Neste estudo são fornecidas informações sobre predação de anuros de uma assembléia no sudeste do Brasil. Invertebrados (aranhas e barata d’agua, a rã Leptodactylus cf. ocellatus e cinco espécies serpentes (quatro Colubridae e um Viperidae predaram espécies ou indivíduos de pequeno porte.Anuran amphibians are preyer by all vertebrate groups and several invertebrates. However, predation studies on amphibians are still occasional and anecdotic. Herein, informations on predation of an anuran assemblage of southeastern Brazil are provided. Invertebrates (spiders and water bugs, the frog Leptodactylus cf. ocellatus, and five snake species (four Colubridae and one Viperidae preyer on small individuals or small anuran species.

  18. Proteomic Analyses of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix Venom Using 2D Electrophoresis and MS Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Urbanik, Małgorzata; Hus, Konrad; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Petrilla, Vladimír; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Petrillová, Monika; Legáth, Jaroslav

    2016-12-13

    Snake venom is a complex mixture of proteins and peptides which in the Viperidae is mainly hemotoxic. The diversity of these components causes the venom to be an extremely interesting object of study. Discovered components can be used in search for new pharmaceuticals used primarily in the treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system. In order to determine the protein composition of the southern copperhead venom, we have used high resolution two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI ToF/ToF MS-based identification. We have identified 10 groups of proteins present in the venom, of which phospholipase A₂ and metalloprotease and serine proteases constitute the largest groups. For the first time presence of 5'-nucleotidase in venom was found in this group of snakes. Three peptides present in the venom were also identified. Two of them as bradykinin-potentiating agents and one as an inhibitor.

  19. Inhibition of Lung Tumor Colonization and Cell Migration with the Disintegrin Crotatroxin 2 Isolated from the Venom of Crotalus atrox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Jacob A.; Sánchez, Elda E.; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Soto, Julio G.; Bashir, Sajid; McLane, Mary Ann; Paquette-Straub, Carrie; Pérez, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Disintegrins are low molecular weight proteins (4-15 kDa) with an RGD binding region at their binding loop. Disintegrin and disintegrin-like proteins are found in the venom of four families of snakes: Atractaspididae, Elapidae, Viperidae and Colubridae. This report describes the biological activity of a disintegrin, crotatroxin 2, isolated by a three-step chromatography procedure from the venom of the Western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). The intact molecular mass for crotatroxin 2 was 7.384 kDa and 71 amino acids. Crotatroxin 2 inhibited human whole blood platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 17.5 nM, inhibited cell (66.3p) migration by 63%, and inhibited experimental lung tumor colonization in BALB/c mice at 1000 μg/kg. Our data suggest that while crotatroxin 2 inhibits platelet aggregation, cancer cell migration, and lung tumor colonization it is done via different integrins. PMID:18387648

  20. Biosynthesis, secretion and in vivo isotopic labelling of venom of the Egyptian cobra, Naja haje annulifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochva, E; Tönsing, L; Louw, A I; Liebenberg, N V; Visser, L

    1982-01-01

    The venom glands of Elapidae differ from those of the Viperidae by lacking an expanded central lumen; the venom is stored in the tubular lumina as well as inside the cells in densely packed secretion granules. Using isotope tracer techniques, it was found that in the Egyptian cobra (Naja haje annulifera) venom is secreted both from pre-existing and from newly-formed granules. The rate of protein biosynthesis peaks at 4-9 days after venom was extracted (milked) from the glands. Highly labelled toxins (1-10 mCi/mmole protein) were isolated in good yield from the venom of snakes chronically intubated and infused i.p. with (3H)-amino acids. Repeated Fluothane (Halothane) anaesthesias and venom collections had no ill effect on venom yield. The radioactive venom and its component toxins retained full biological potency.

  1. Estado actual del registro de escamados extinguidos de América del Sur y sus implicancias paleoambientales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino, Adriana María

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The record of the South American fossil Squamata extends from the Late Cretaceous to the Holocene. The recorded families are Iguanidae s.l., Teiidae, Gekkonidae, ?Scincidae, Amphisbaenidae, Boidae, Aniliidae, Colubridae and Viperidae Dinilysiidae from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia and Palaeopheidae from the Late Eocene of Ecuador are the only known extinct recorded families. The families distribution during the Cretaceous and most of the Tertiary apparently was more extensive than at present, due to more generalized subtropical climatic conditions. The geological events during the Cenozoic would have caused climatic and environmental changes that would have favoured the appeareance of new adaptative types and the restriction in the distribution of many forms.

  2. [Snake envenomation in French Guiana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippaux, J P

    2002-01-01

    French Guiana is a French Overseas Department in South America. Ninety-five percent of the territory is a tropical rainforest. Its rich fauna includes seven families of snakes but only 3 are potentially venomous. Less than 12% of species and, depending on biotope, 10 to 30% of specimens collected are dangerous for humans. The annual incidence of snakebite is less than 50 bites per 100,000 inhabitants overall but increases to 600 per 100,000 for persons active in the rainforest where the risk is highest. The most common envenomation by Viperidae such as Bothrops, which is abundant throughout French Guiana, induces inflammation, necrosis and hemorrhage. Crotalus durissus, a rattlesnake living in coastal savannah, or Micrurus sp cause neuromuscular poisoning. Coral snakes are encountered throughout French Guiana, but envenomation is very rare. Antivenom therapy must be administered by the intravenous route in association with symptomatic treatment and, if necessary, resuscitation in a specialized care unit.

  3. Herpetofauna, Ponte de Pedra Hydroelectric Power Plant, states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Jr., N. J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a check list of amphibians and reptiles of the area under influence of Ponte de Pedra hydroelectricpower plant on Correntes River (municipality of Sonora, between the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso do Sul and MatoGrosso. The list was the result of collecting efforts of a Faunal Program (inventory, rescue, and monitoring carried outbetween November 2003 and April 2005. The list comprises 2 orders (Gymnophiona and Anura, 7 families(Caeciliidae, Bufonidae, Cycloramphidae, Hylidae, Leiuperidae, and Leptodactylidae 14 genera, and 33 species ofamphibians and 3 orders (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamata, 20 families (Chelidae, Testudinidae, Alligatoridae,Amphisbaenidae, Anguidae, Gekkonidae, Phyllodactylidae, Gymnophtalmidae, Hoplocercidae, Polychrotidae,Scincidae, Teiidae, Tropiduridae, Anomalepididae, Leptotyphlopidae, Typhlopidae, Boidae, Colubridae, Elapidae, andViperidae, 51 genera, and 72 species of reptiles.

  4. Reptiles, Squamata, Parque Natural Municipal da Taquara, municipality of Duque de Caxias, state of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salles, R. O. L.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report a list of the reptiles from Parque Natural Municipal da Taquara, municipality of Duque deCaxias, state of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil, an area situated in the Atlantic Rainforest Domain. The study wascarried out from September 2006 to October 2008. We recorded 31 species of Squamate reptiles: one species of thefamily Amphisbaenidae; eight species of lizards of the families Anguidae (n = 1, Gekkonidae (1, Phyllodactylidae (1,Polychrotidae (1, Scincidae (1, Teiidae (2, and Tropiduridae (1; and 22 species of snakes of the families Boidae (2,Colubridae (6, Dipsadidae (11, Elapidae (1, and Viperidae (2. Our study indicates that the PNMT is an important area forthe conservation of the Squamate reptile assemblages that inhabit lowlands of Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil.

  5. Snake Venom PLA2, a Promising Target for Broad-Spectrum Antivenom Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Keren; Yang, Mengxue

    2017-01-01

    Snakebite envenomation is a neglected global health problem, causing substantial mortality, disability, and psychological morbidity, especially in rural tropical and subtropical zones. Antivenin is currently the only specific medicine for envenomation. However, it is restricted by cold storage, snakebite diagnosis, and high price. Snake venom phospholipase A2s (svPLA2s) are found in all kinds of venomous snake families (e.g., Viperidae, Elapidae, and Colubridae). Along with their catalytic activity, svPLA2s elicit a wide variety of pharmacological effects that play a pivotal role in envenomation damage. Hence, neutralization of the svPLA2s could weaken or inhibit toxic damage. Here we overviewed the latest knowledge on the distribution, pathophysiological effects, and inhibitors of svPLA2s to elucidate the potential for a novel, wide spectrum antivenom drug targeting svPLA2s. PMID:29318152

  6. Herpetofauna, Parc National des Volcans, North Province, Republic of Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roelke, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein is presented a list of the reptiles and anurans from the Parc National des Volcans (PNV(01°43’ S, 29°52’ W, an area in the west and north provinces of the Republic of Rwanda in the Albertine Riftregion of Africa. Fieldwork was conducted between two and six days per week from June through August2007 and 2008. We also conducted literature searches of all historical expeditions within the park for speciesrecords. Seventeen species of reptiles and anurans are recorded from the PNV. Nine of the species were anurans,distributed in five families: Arthroleptidae (3, Bufonidae (1, Hyperoliidae (3, Phrynobatrachidae (1, andPipidae (1. Eight species of reptiles were recorded from five families: Chamaeleonidae (1, Lacertidae (2,Scincidae (2, Colubridae (2, and Viperidae (1. Eight of the seventeen species found in the PNV are endemicto the Albertine Rift.

  7. Herpetofauna, Santa Edwiges I and II hydroelectric power plants, state of Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintra, C. E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a check list of amphibians and reptiles of the area under the influence of Santa Edwiges I and IIsmall hydroelectric power plants on Rio Buritis, state of Goiás, Brazil. The list was the result of faunal rescueoperations carried out between 31 August and 29 September 2005 (Santa Edwiges II and between 30 July and 12September 2006 (Santa Edwiges I. The list comprises 30 species of amphibians belonging to 16 genera and 8 families(Caeciliidae, Bufonidae, Cycloramphidae, Hylidae, Brachycephalidae, Leiuperidae, Leptodactylidae, andMicrohylidae, and 45 species of reptiles belonging to 38 genera and 16 families (Amphisbaenidae, Anguidae,Gekkonidae, Gymnophtalmidae, Polychrotidae, Scincidae, Teiidae, Tropiduridae, Anomalepididae, Leptotyphlopidae,Typhlopidae, Boidae, Colubridae, Dipsadidae, Elapidae, and Viperidae.

  8. Biochemical Characterization, Action on Macrophages, and Superoxide Anion Production of Four Basic Phospholipases A2 from Panamanian Bothrops asper Snake Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Aristides Quintero; Rodríguez, Isela González; Arantes, Eliane C.; Setúbal, Sulamita S.; Calderon, Leonardo de A.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.; Soares, Andreimar M.

    2013-01-01

    Bothrops asper (Squamata: Viperidae) is the most important venomous snake in Central America, being responsible for the majority of snakebite accidents. Four basic PLA2s (pMTX-I to -IV) were purified from crude venom by a single-step chromatography using a CM-Sepharose ion-exchange column (1.5 × 15 cm). Analysis of the N-terminal sequence demonstrated that pMTX-I and III belong to the catalytically active Asp49 phospholipase A2 subclass, whereas pMTX-II and IV belong to the enzymatically inactive Lys49 PLA2s-like subclass. The PLA2s isolated from Panama Bothrops asper venom (pMTX-I, II, III, and IV) are able to induce myotoxic activity, inflammatory reaction mainly leukocyte migration to the muscle, and induce J774A.1 macrophages activation to start phagocytic activity and superoxide production. PMID:23509779

  9. Proteomic Analyses of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix Venom Using 2D Electrophoresis and MS Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Aleksandra; Urbanik, Małgorzata; Hus, Konrad; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Petrilla, Vladimír; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Petrillová, Monika; Legáth, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom is a complex mixture of proteins and peptides which in the Viperidae is mainly hemotoxic. The diversity of these components causes the venom to be an extremely interesting object of study. Discovered components can be used in search for new pharmaceuticals used primarily in the treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system. In order to determine the protein composition of the southern copperhead venom, we have used high resolution two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI ToF/ToF MS-based identification. We have identified 10 groups of proteins present in the venom, of which phospholipase A2 and metalloprotease and serine proteases constitute the largest groups. For the first time presence of 5′-nucleotidase in venom was found in this group of snakes. Three peptides present in the venom were also identified. Two of them as bradykinin-potentiating agents and one as an inhibitor. PMID:27983581

  10. Snake Venom PLA2, a Promising Target for Broad-Spectrum Antivenom Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixiang Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite envenomation is a neglected global health problem, causing substantial mortality, disability, and psychological morbidity, especially in rural tropical and subtropical zones. Antivenin is currently the only specific medicine for envenomation. However, it is restricted by cold storage, snakebite diagnosis, and high price. Snake venom phospholipase A2s (svPLA2s are found in all kinds of venomous snake families (e.g., Viperidae, Elapidae, and Colubridae. Along with their catalytic activity, svPLA2s elicit a wide variety of pharmacological effects that play a pivotal role in envenomation damage. Hence, neutralization of the svPLA2s could weaken or inhibit toxic damage. Here we overviewed the latest knowledge on the distribution, pathophysiological effects, and inhibitors of svPLA2s to elucidate the potential for a novel, wide spectrum antivenom drug targeting svPLA2s.

  11. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer- dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking...... for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying - and -type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2......) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis...

  12. Proteomic Analyses of Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix Venom Using 2D Electrophoresis and MS Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Bocian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom is a complex mixture of proteins and peptides which in the Viperidae is mainly hemotoxic. The diversity of these components causes the venom to be an extremely interesting object of study. Discovered components can be used in search for new pharmaceuticals used primarily in the treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system. In order to determine the protein composition of the southern copperhead venom, we have used high resolution two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI ToF/ToF MS-based identification. We have identified 10 groups of proteins present in the venom, of which phospholipase A2 and metalloprotease and serine proteases constitute the largest groups. For the first time presence of 5′-nucleotidase in venom was found in this group of snakes. Three peptides present in the venom were also identified. Two of them as bradykinin-potentiating agents and one as an inhibitor.

  13. Thrombelastographic characterization of the thrombin-like activity of Crotalus simus and Bothrops asper venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G; Boyer, Leslie V; Redford, Daniel T; Ford, Paul

    2017-04-01

    : Annually, thousands suffer venomous snake-bite from Crotalus simus and Bothrops asper vipers in central and South America. The goals of the present study were to generally characterize the thrombin-like effects of venom from these snakes in human plasma with viscoelastic methods. Human plasma was exposed to the venom of three different C. simus subspecies and venoms obtained from B. asper vipers located in three different locations in Mexico. To characterize the factor X-activating and thrombin-like activity of these venoms, plasma (normal or factor XIII deficient) was pretreated with a variety of additives (e.g., heparin) in the absence or presence of calcium prior to exposure to 2.0 μg/ml of each viper's venom. These profiles were compared with plasma without venom that had contact activation of coagulation. Coagulation kinetics were determined with thrombelastography. All venoms had thrombin-like activity, with C. s. simus creating a slow growing, weak clot that was likely mediated by metalloproteinases. In contrast, B. asper venoms had rapid onset of coagulation and a high velocity of thrombus growth. Further, B. asper venom activity was calcium-independent, activated prothrombin, activated factor XIII, and independently polymerized fibrinogen. The viscoelastic methods used were able to differentiate subspecies of C. simus and specimens of B. asper, and provide insight into the mechanisms by which the venoms acted on plasma. These methods may be useful in the profiling of similar venoms and perhaps can assist in the assessment of interventions designed to treat envenomation (e.g., antivenom).

  14. Impact of different study populations on reader behavior and performance metrics: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Brandon D.; Pisano, Etta; Cole, Elodia; Myers, Kyle

    2017-03-01

    The FDA recently completed a study on design methodologies surrounding the Validation of Imaging Premarket Evaluation and Regulation called VIPER. VIPER consisted of five large reader sub-studies to compare the impact of different study populations on reader behavior as seen by sensitivity, specificity, and AUC, the area under the ROC curve (receiver operating characteristic curve). The study investigated different prevalence levels and two kinds of sampling of non-cancer patients: a screening population and a challenge population. The VIPER study compared full-field digital mammography (FFDM) to screenfilm mammography (SFM) for women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts. All cases and corresponding images were sampled from Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) archives. There were 20 readers (American Board Certified radiologists) for each sub-study, and instead of every reader reading every case (fully-crossed study), readers and cases were split into groups to reduce reader workload and the total number of observations (split-plot study). For data collection, readers first decided whether or not they would recall a patient. Following that decision, they provided an ROC score for how close or far that patient was from the recall decision threshold. Performance results for FFDM show that as prevalence increases to 50%, there is a moderate increase in sensitivity and decrease in specificity, whereas AUC is mainly flat. Regarding precision, the statistical efficiency (ratio of variances) of sensitivity and specificity relative to AUC are 0.66 at best and decrease with prevalence. Analyses comparing modalities and the study populations (screening vs. challenge) are still ongoing.

  15. Chronic Musculoskeletal Disabilities following Snake Envenoming in Sri Lanka: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subashini Jayawardana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is a major public health problem in agricultural communities in the tropics leading to acute local and systemic impairments with resultant disabilities. Snakebite related long-term musculoskeletal disabilities have been a neglected area of research. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study in an agricultural community to describe the chronic musculoskeletal disabilities of snake envenoming.A sample representative of residents of a single district in a region of high incidence of snake envenoming was recruited to identify ever snakebite victims. They were evaluated for chronic musculoskeletal disabilities that had developed immediately or within four weeks after the snakebite and persisted over three months. In-depth interviews, validated musculoskeletal functional assessment criteria and specialists' examinations were utilised. Among the 816 victims, 26 (3.2%, 95% confidence interval: 2.2-4.6% had musculoskeletal disabilities, persisting on average for 13.4 years (SD = 14.4. The disabilities were mostly in lower limbs (61.5% and ranged from swelling (34.6%, muscle wasting (46.1%, reduced motion (61.5%, reduced muscle power (50%, impaired balance (26.9%, chronic non-healing ulcers (3.85%, abnormal gait (3.85%, fixed deformities (19.2% to amputations (15.4%. Based on disability patterns, six snakebite-related musculoskeletal syndromes were recognised. The offending snakes causing disabilities were cobra (30.8%, Russell's viper (26.9% and hump-nosed viper (7.7%. Cobra bites manifested muscle wasting (87.5%, reduced muscle power (87.5%, joint stiffness (62.5% and deformities (37.5% while viper bites manifested impaired balance (42.8%, pain (71.4% and swelling (71.4%.Snakebite envenoming is associated with considerable long-term musculoskeletal disabilities. Facilities for specialized care and rehabilitation need to be established in high risk areas.

  16. Comparative sex chromosome genomics in snakes: differentiation, evolutionary strata, and lack of global dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Emerson, J J; Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  17. Comparative sex chromosome genomics in snakes: differentiation, evolutionary strata, and lack of global dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vicoso

    Full Text Available Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females. Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae, but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae. Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases. This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution, but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex

  18. Comparative Sex Chromosome Genomics in Snakes: Differentiation, Evolutionary Strata, and Lack of Global Dosage Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of five putative toxins from the venom gland of the snake Philodryas chamissonis (Serpentes: Dipsadidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urra, Félix A; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Hodar, Christian; Cambiazo, Verónica; Labra, Antonieta

    2015-12-15

    Philodryas chamissonis is a rear-fanged snake endemic to Chile. Its bite produces mild to moderate symptoms with proteolytic and anti-coagulant effects. Presently, the composition of the venom, as well as, the biochemical and structural characteristics of its toxins, remains unknown. In this study, we cloned and reported the first full-length sequences of five toxin-encoding genes from the venom gland of this species: Type III snake venom metalloprotease (SVMP), snake venom serine protease (SVSP), Cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), α and β subunits of C-type lectin-like protein (CLP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (NP). These genes are highly expressed in the venom gland and their sequences exhibited a putative signal peptide, suggesting that these are components of the venom. These putative toxins had different evolutionary relationships with those reported for some front-fanged snakes, being SVMP, SVSP and CRISP of P. chamissonis closely related to the toxins present in Elapidae species, while NP was more related to those of Viperidae species. In addition, analyses suggest that the α and β subunits of CLP of P. chamissonis might have a α-subunit scaffold in common with Viperidae species, whose highly variable C-terminal region might have allowed the diversification in α and β subunits. Our results provide the first molecular description of the toxins possibly implicated in the envenomation of prey and humans by the bite of P. chamissonis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Snake venom antibodies in Ecuadorian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, R D; Reid, H A; Larrick, J W; Kaplan, J; Yost, J A

    1981-10-01

    Serum samples from 223 Waorani Indians, a tribe in eastern Ecuador, were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to snake venom. Seventy-eight per cent were positive, confirming the highest incidence and mortality from snake bite poisoning yet recorded in the world. Most samples were positive for more than one venom antibody. Antibodies were found to venoms of Bothrops viper in 60% of positive cases, of Micrurus coral snake in 21%, and of the bushmaster, Lachesis muta, in 18%. Further studies are needed to determine whether high venom-antibody levels afford protection against further snake envenoming.

  1. Low-dose adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute adverse reactions to antivenom following snakebite: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Asita de Silva, H.; Pathmeswaran, Arunasalam; Ranasinha, Channa; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Samarakoon, Senarath; Hittharage, Ariyasena; Kalupahana, Ranjith; Ratnatilaka, Asoka; Uluwatthage, Wimalasiri; Aronson, Jeffrey; Armitage, Jane; Lalloo, David; Janaka de Silva, H

    2011-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Of the 3,000 or so snake species in the world, about 600 are venomous. Venomous snakes, which are particularly common in equatorial and tropical regions, immobilize their prey by injecting modified saliva (venom) into their prey's tissues through their fangs—specialized hollow teeth. Snakes also use their venoms for self-defense and will bite people who threaten, startle, or provoke them. A bite from a highly venomous snake such as a pit viper or cobra can cause wi...

  2. Heterogeneity in the properties of mutant secreted lymphocyte antigen 6/urokinase receptor-related protein 1 (SLURP1) in Mal de Meleda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyo, Oludotun; Oberer, Monika; Ploug, M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects in SLURP1, a "lymphocyte antigen 6" (Ly6)-like protein, cause mal de Meleda, a palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). The hallmark of Ly6 proteins is an 80-amino acid domain containing 10 cysteines, all arranged in a characteristic spacing pattern and all disulfide-bonded, creating a thr......-fingered structural motif (Fig. 1). This sequence motif was initially found in cobra and viper toxins, but was later identified in ~25 mammalian proteins. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  3. Comparing the performance of two CBIRS indexing schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Wolfgang; Robbert, Guenter; Henrich, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Content based image retrieval (CBIR) as it is known today has to deal with a number of challenges. Quickly summarized, the main challenges are firstly, to bridge the semantic gap between high-level concepts and low-level features using feedback, secondly to provide performance under adverse conditions. High-dimensional spaces, as well as a demanding machine learning task make the right way of indexing an important issue. When indexing multimedia data, most groups opt for extraction of high-dimensional feature vectors from the data, followed by dimensionality reduction like PCA (Principal Components Analysis) or LSI (Latent Semantic Indexing). The resulting vectors are indexed using spatial indexing structures such as kd-trees or R-trees, for example. Other projects, such as MARS and Viper propose the adaptation of text indexing techniques, notably the inverted file. Here, the Viper system is the most direct adaptation of text retrieval techniques to quantized vectors. However, while the Viper query engine provides decent performance together with impressive user-feedback behavior, as well as the possibility for easy integration of long-term learning algorithms, and support for potentially infinite feature vectors, there has been no comparison of vector-based methods and inverted-file-based methods under similar conditions. In this publication, we compare a CBIR query engine that uses inverted files (Bothrops, a rewrite of the Viper query engine based on a relational database), and a CBIR query engine based on LSD (Local Split Decision) trees for spatial indexing using the same feature sets. The Benchathlon initiative works on providing a set of images and ground truth for simulating image queries by example and corresponding user feedback. When performing the Benchathlon benchmark on a CBIR system (the System Under Test, SUT), a benchmarking harness connects over internet to the SUT, performing a number of queries using an agreed-upon protocol, the multimedia

  4. Bilateral Acute Anterior Uveitis and Optic Disc Edema Following a Snake Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Praveen K; Ahuja, Shashi; Kumar, Praveen S

    2014-01-01

    The authors wish to report a case of bilateral acute anterior uveitis and optic disc edema following a hemotoxic snake bite, in order to highlight the concomitant occurrence of these conditions and the potential adverse effects of anti-snake venom (ASV). A 35-year-old male was bitten by a viper at seventeen thirty hours, and was started on ASV. Two days following treatment he experienced sudden onset redness and painful diminution of vision in both eyes (OU). On examination, the patient's vis...

  5. [Vipera berus bite--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajkowska, Joanna; Garkowski, Adam; Pancewicz, Sławomir

    2010-11-01

    Cases of bite by common viper (Vipera berus) are rare on the territory of Poland, and the mortality after bites is less than 1%. This paper describes a case of 81-year-old patient with massive swelling, redness and soreness of the right hand, which occurred shortly after the adder bite. In this paper we present composition and mechanisms of the venom's action, clinical symptoms and treatment of poisoning after a snake bite. Based on the reported case authors draw attention to hospital treatment and indications for administration of antivenom as the only causative method of treatment.

  6. High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools discusses the fundamentals and advances in high performance grinding processes, and provides a complete overview of newly-developing areas in the field. Topics covered are grinding tool formulation and structure, grinding wheel design and conditioning and applications using high performance grinding wheels. Also included are heat treatment strategies for grinding tools, using grinding tools for high speed applications, laser-based and diamond dressing techniques, high-efficiency deep grinding, VIPER grinding, and new grinding wheels.

  7. An Unusual Etiology for Elevation of Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT in SLE: Acquired Hemophilia and Lupus Anticoagulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Seethala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female who has a history significant for diabetes, depression, and rheumatoid arthritis presented with a progressively enlarging hematoma of the left upper extremity. She was found to have an enlarging hematoma and an isolated elevation of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT. Lab work-up revealed low factor VIII activity levels and inhibitor titers at 13.38 Bethesda units (BU. Dilute Russell’s viper venom time (dRVVT revealed a lupus anticoagulant. Hemostasis was achieved with factor VIII inhibitor bypassing activity (FEIBA and inhibitor eradication with-rituxan after the failure of first-line treatment with cyclophosphamide and prednisone.

  8. High-throughput epitope identification for snakebite antivenom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; De Masi, Federico; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    Insight into the epitopic recognition pattern for polyclonal antivenoms is a strong tool for accurate prediction of antivenom cross-reactivity and provides a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a high-throughput approach was applied to characterize linear epitopes in 966 individual...... toxins from pit vipers (Crotalidae) using the ICP Crotalidae antivenom. Due to an abundance of snake venom metalloproteinases and phospholipase A2s in the venoms used for production of the investigated antivenom, this study focuses on these toxin families....

  9. Microstructure-mediated Optical Effects in Southern African Snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ishan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scales of the African Viper Bitis arietans were tested for optical effects. Spectral intensity was recorded at incident angles over the visible spectrum for dark, pale, and ventral scale regions. The lowest spectral intensity recordings were associated with scales which have the greatest level of micro-structuring. Our results indicate that scale appearance in B. arietans is a product of microstructure-mediated optical effects. The optical effect may play a role in improving the ecological performance of the snake in its natural environment.

  10. Microstructure-mediated Optical Effects in Southern African Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ishan; Alexander, Graham

    2017-03-01

    The scales of the African Viper Bitis arietans were tested for optical effects. Spectral intensity was recorded at incident angles over the visible spectrum for dark, pale, and ventral scale regions. The lowest spectral intensity recordings were associated with scales which have the greatest level of micro-structuring. Our results indicate that scale appearance in B. arietans is a product of microstructure-mediated optical effects. The optical effect may play a role in improving the ecological performance of the snake in its natural environment.

  11. Rhabdomyolysis due to Multiple Wasp Stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wasp sting is a relatively common arthropod assault, but is sometimes fatal because of anaphylaxis. Rhabdomyolysis is a serious condition, with destruction of striated muscles, and can be induced by various causes such as drugs, heart attacks, CRASH syndrome, and viper bites. Mass envenomation by multiple wasp stings can also cause rhabdomyolysis followed by acute renal failure, although it is extremely rare. We herein report a case who had an anaphylaxis-like reaction and rhabdomyolysis due to multiple wasp stings.

  12. Current management of copperhead snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J Patrick; Morrison, Ray L

    2011-04-01

    Several thousand snakebites occur annually in the US, but fewer than 10 deaths occur. Most deaths are from envenomations by rattlesnakes (Crotalus species), but deaths from copperhead and water moccasin (Agkistrodon species) are rare. All snakebites presented to East Texas Medical Center, Crockett, a level III trauma center, from 1995 to 2010 were reviewed. A total of 142 snakebites were treated. Ninety-four were of the Agkistrodon species-contortrix contortrix (copperhead) or piscivorus leukostoma (water moccasin). Three were rattlesnakes, and 3 were from the Texas coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tener). Forty-two were unidentified pit vipers. The following results are of the 88 copperhead bites. The most common presenting symptoms were pain and swelling. Eighty-five percent were of grade 1 envenomations. Ten patients had laboratory abnormalities secondary to the snakebite. Forty-four were admitted for observation. The average length of stay for patients admitted was 2 days. No patients received antivenom, and no patients required surgical intervention. There were no deaths. One patient had edema and ecchymosis that persisted for more than 1 month. Accurate identification of the pit viper species involved in snakebites is essential. Although envenomation by a rattlesnake (Crotalus species) may require antivenom and uncommonly surgery, a bite by a copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) rarely requires any intervention other than observation. The unnecessary use of antivenom should be discouraged. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Directional sensitivity in the thermal response of the facial pit in western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Tobias; Colayori, Samantha E; Westhoff, Guido; Bakken, George S; Young, Bruce A

    2012-08-01

    Recent work published in the accompanying paper used a combination of 3D morphological reconstruction to define optical spread functions and heat transfer physics to study how external heat energy would reach the sensory membrane within the facial pit of pitvipers. The results from all of the species examined indicated asymmetric directional sensitivity, e.g. the pit would preferentially respond to stimuli located below and behind the snake. The present study was intended as a test of these findings through a quantitative neurophysiological analysis of directional sensitivity in the facial pit of the western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox. An infrared emitter was positioned through a coordinate system (with varying angular orientations and distances) and the response it evoked measured through neurophysiological recordings of a trigeminal nerve branch composed of the afferents from the sensory membrane of the facial pit. Significant differences were found in the strength of the membrane's neural response to a constant stimulus presented at different orientations (relative to the facial pit opening) and over different distances. The peak sensitivity (at 12 deg above and 20 deg in front of the facial pit opening) was in good agreement with the predicted directional sensitivities based on optical spread functions and 3D topography. These findings support the hypothesis that the topography, and functional performance, of the facial pit has undergone an adaptive radiation within the pit vipers, and that differences in the behavioral ecology of the pit vipers (i.e. terrestrial versus arboreal) are reflected within the facial pits.

  14. Person Re-Identification by Iterative Re-Weighted Sparse Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Giuseppe; Masi, Iacopo; Bagdanov, Andrew D; Del Bimbo, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a method for person re-identification based on discriminative, sparse basis expansions of targets in terms of a labeled gallery of known individuals. We propose an iterative extension to sparse discriminative classifiers capable of ranking many candidate targets. The approach makes use of soft- and hard- re-weighting to redistribute energy among the most relevant contributing elements and to ensure that the best candidates are ranked at each iteration. Our approach also leverages a novel visual descriptor which we show to be discriminative while remaining robust to pose and illumination variations. An extensive comparative evaluation is given demonstrating that our approach achieves state-of-the-art performance on single- and multi-shot person re-identification scenarios on the VIPeR, i-LIDS, ETHZ, and CAVIAR4REID datasets. The combination of our descriptor and iterative sparse basis expansion improves state-of-the-art rank-1 performance by six percentage points on VIPeR and by 20 on CAVIAR4REID compared to other methods with a single gallery image per person. With multiple gallery and probe images per person our approach improves by 17 percentage points the state-of-the-art on i-LIDS and by 72 on CAVIAR4REID at rank-1. The approach is also quite efficient, capable of single-shot person re-identification over galleries containing hundreds of individuals at about 30 re-identifications per second.

  15. Cytotoxicity of Southeast Asian snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jamunaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity of venoms from eleven medically important snakes found in Southeast Asia (Naja kaouthia, Naja siamensis, Naja sumatrana, Ophiophagus hannah, Bungarus candidus, Bungarus fasciatus, Enhydrina schistosa, Calloselasma rhodostoma, Trimeresurus purpureomaculatus and Tropidolaemus sumatranus was determined, based on the MTS cytotoxicity assay, which determines the survival of viable cells in monolayer MDCK and Vero cell cultures upon exposure to the snake venoms. Snake venom toxicity was expressed as the venom dose that killed 50% of the cells (CTC50 under the assay conditions. Venoms of C. rhodostoma (2.6 µg/mL, 1.4 µg/mL and O. hannah were the most cytotoxic (3.8 µg/mL, 1.7 µg/mL whereas N. siamensis venom showed the least cytotoxicity (51.9 µg/mL, 45.7 µg/mL against Vero and MDCK cells, respectively. All the viper venoms showed higher cytotoxic potency towards both Vero and MDCK cell lines, in comparison to krait and cobra venoms. E. schistosa did not cause cytotoxicity towards MDCK or Vero cells at the tested concentrations. The cytotoxicity correlates well with the known differences in the composition of venoms from cobras, kraits, vipers and sea snakes.

  16. Interaction of toxic venoms with the complement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, Vanessa; Lindorfer, Jean; Gewurz, H.

    1971-01-01

    Thirty-nine venoms from various vertebrate and invertebrate species were tested for their ability to consume haemolytic complement (C) activity upon incubation in fresh guinea-pig serum. Nineteen had `anti-complementary' activity, and these were provisionally sorted into the following groups: Pattern I—exemplified by the Naja haje (Egyptian cobra) and six other Elapidae species (all cobras), which induced selective consumption of C3—C9, and led to formation of a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; Pattern II—exemplified by the Agkistrodon rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper), Bitis arietans (puff adder), Bothrops jararaca (South American pit viper), Bothrops atrox (Fer de Lance) and three other species, which induced marked consumption of C4 and C2, as well as C3—C9, but did not form a stable C3—C9-consuming intermediate; and individual animals, e.g. the Lachesis muta (bushmaster), which induced other patterns (III—VI) of complement component consumption. Active fractions of representative venoms were partially purified by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography and their interactions with the complement system characterized further. It is anticipated that these enzymes, with a capacity to activate the complement system in unique ways, will prove to be of further experimental usefulness. PMID:4398349

  17. Syndromic approach to treatment of snake bite in Sri Lanka based on results of a prospective national hospital-based survey of patients envenomed by identified snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariaratnam, Christeine A; Sheriff, Mohamed H Rezvi; Arambepola, Carukshi; Theakston, R David G; Warrell, David A

    2009-10-01

    Of 860 snakes brought to 10 hospitals in Sri Lanka with the patients they had bitten, 762 (89%) were venomous. Russell's vipers (Daboia russelii) and hump-nosed pit vipers (Hypnale hypnale) were the most numerous and H. hypnale was the most widely distributed. Fifty-one (6%) were misidentified by hospital staff, causing inappropriate antivenom treatment of 13 patients. Distinctive clinical syndromes were identified to aid species diagnosis in most cases of snake bite in Sri Lanka where the biting species is unknown. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of these syndromes for envenoming were 78% and 96% by Naja naja, 66% and 100% by Bungarus caeruleus, 14% and 100% by Daboia russelii, and 10% and 97% by Hypnale hypnale, respectively. Although only polyspecific antivenoms are used in Sri Lanka, species diagnosis remains important to anticipate life-threatening complications such as local necrosis, hemorrhage and renal and respiratory failure and to identify likely victims of envenoming by H. hypnale who will not benefit from existing antivenoms. The technique of hospital-based collection, labeling and preservation of dead snakes brought by bitten patients is recommended for rapid assessment of a country's medically-important herpetofauna.

  18. Coral snake bites and envenomation in children: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Khalil, Paul A; Chegondi, Madhuradhar; Raszynski, Andre; Meyer, Keith G; Totapally, Balagangadhar R

    2014-04-01

    North America is home to 2 families of venomous snakes, Crotalinae (pit viper family) and Elapidae (coral snake family). Although there are several published reports describing and reviewing the management of pit viper snakebites in children, there are no recent similar publications detailing the clinical course and management of coral snake envenomation. Our case series describes the hospital course of children with coral snake bites admitted to our regional pediatric intensive care. We also reviewed prior published case reports of coral snake bites in the United States. We identified 4 patients with either confirmed or suspected coral snake envenomation from our hospital's records. In 2 cases, the snakebite occurred after apparent provocation. Antivenom was administered to 3 patients. The regional venom response team was consulted for management advice and supplied the antivenom. One patient had a prolonged hospital course, which was complicated by respiratory failure, bulbar palsy, and ataxia. All survived to discharge. Admission to pediatric intensive care is warranted after all Eastern coral snake bites. A specialized regional or national venom response team can be a useful resource for management advice and as a source of antivenom.

  19. Recognizing dangerous snakes in the United States and Canada: a novel 3-step identification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    The rapid and accurate recognition of dangerously venomous snakes following bites is crucial to making appropriate decisions regarding first aid, evacuation, and treatment. Past recommendations for identification of dangerous North American pit vipers have often required subjective determinations of head shape or relied on traits shared with some nondangerous species (elliptical pupils and undivided subcaudal scales). Heat-sensitive facial pits are diagnostic but require close examination of the dangerous head, and cephalic traits are useless when working with a decapitated carcass. Exclusive of cephalic traits, pit vipers north of Mexico can be recognized by the combination of keeled middorsal scales and undivided subcaudal scales. The order of colored rings is usually suggested to identify coral snakes in the United States, yet extension of the colored rings across the ventral scales must be added as an essential identifying factor to ensure elimination of all harmless look-alikes. A novel 3-step flow chart is presented that allows dangerous snakes in the United States and Canada to be recognized quickly and dependably without relying on cephalic traits. This process cannot be used in other countries, however, due to greater variability of these characteristics in snakes from other parts of the world. Finally, close examination of potentially venomous snakes is extraordinarily dangerous and steps to safeguard those making such observations are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Which antivenom for Cerastes envenoming?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, G; Larréché, S

    2014-01-01

    During Echis viper envenoming, the administration of a single FAV-Afrique(®) antivenin vial generally corrects hemostasis disorders in less than twelve hours. The correction of hemostasis after 36 hours by 4 vials of FAV-Afrique(®) is thus not in favor of the usefulness of this antivenin for Cerastes envenoming . Mortality due to viper envenoming in Africa is high, but more than 90 % of poisoned patients survive despite the absence of appropriate antivenom. The severity of poisoning depends on several factors: age and condition of the patient, location of the bite, composition and amount of injected venom, management delay, and therefore, survival is not necessarily synonymous of effectiveness of antivenom treatment. Cerastes venoms contain many enzymes that disrupt various stages of hemostasis. It remains to prove that FAV-Afrique(®), a polyvalent antivenom adapted to venom of the main species responsible for envenoming in sub-Saharan Africa, (Bitis, Echis, Naja and Dendroaspis), is able to neutralize these specific proteins. The most logical approach of Cerastes envenoming is the administration of an antivenin adapted to species found in North Africa: Favirept(®) (Sanofi Pasteur) is a polyvalent antivenom adapted to the venoms of C. cerastes, Bitis arietans, Echis leucogaster, Macrovipera deserti, Naja haje and Naja nigricollis.

  1. Transient signaling of Erk1/2, Akt and PLCgamma induced by nerve growth factor in brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecht, Shimon; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Wagenstein, Yoav; Inoue, Seiji; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lelkes, Peter I; Lazarovici, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative evidences suggest that nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes angiogenic effects such as proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (ECs) from different vascular beds, induces capillary sprouting in chorioallantoic membrane and improves in vivo vascularization in a hind-limb ischemic model. In the present study, we sought to investigate the signaling properties of NGF in a microcapillary ECs model compared to those of a neuronal model. NGF-induced phosphorylation of signaling molecules Erk1/2, Akt and PLCgamma were measured using Western blotting and compared between mouse NGF (mNGF) and snake venom NGF analogues. NGFs-induced signaling was TrkA mediated as evident by inhibition with the TrkA antagonist K252a. NGF and its analogues-induced signaling in ECs were characterized by a transient effect in contrast to a prolonged stimulation in neuronal cells. The potency of mouse, cobra and viper NGFs to induce Erk1/2 phosphorylation in ECs was higher than in neurons. In ECs, mNGF exhibited the highest efficacy of stimulation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation, followed by viper and cobra NGFs. The efficacy of stimulation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation measured with neurons was opposite from that in ECs. NGF-induced temporal signaling differences between ECs and neurons may explain the dual vascular and neurotrophic effects of this growth factor. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and coagulopathy in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following administration of the rodenticie diphacinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Day, Daniel D.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Voler, Steven F.; Eisemann, John D.; Johnston, John J.

    2011-01-01

    The acute oral toxicity of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was found to be over 20 times greater in American kestrels (Falco sparverius; median lethal dose 96.8 mg/kg body weight) compared with Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Modest evidence of internal bleeding was observed at necropsy, although histological examination of heart, liver, kidney, lung, intestine, and skeletal muscle revealed hemorrhage over a wide range of doses (35.1-675 mg/kg). Residue analysis suggests that the half-life of diphacinone in the liver of kestrels that survived was relatively short, with the majority of the dose cleared within 7 d of exposure. Several precise and sensitive clotting assays (prothrombin time, Russell's viper venom time, thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in this species, and oral administration of diphacinone at 50 mg/kg increased prothrombin time and Russell?s viper venom time at 48 and 96 h postdose compared with controls. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and generally corresponded with the onset of overt signs of toxicity and lethality. In view of the toxicity and risk evaluation data derived from American kestrels, the involvement of diphacinone in some raptor mortality events, and the paucity of threshold effects data following short-term dietary exposure for birds of prey, additional feeding trials with captive raptors are warranted to characterize more fully the risk of secondary poisoning.

  3. Multi Dark Lens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Jullo, Eric; Metcalf, R. Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Göttlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, Huan Yuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a large data base of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple plane has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our data base and new ones can be run upon request. Our data base also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realizations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshift according to the CFHTLS source redshift distribution both using stacking and cross-correlation techniques, finding very good agreement.

  4. Unusual neurotoxic envenomations by Vipera aspis aspis snakes in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, L; Robbe-Vincent, A; Saliou, B; Valli, M; Bon, C; Choumet, V

    2002-03-01

    Vipera aspis aspis (V.a.a.) is the most dangerous poisonous snake in South-Eastern France. The clinical symptoms observed after V.a.a. envenomations involve mostly local signs (pain, edema) associated in the more severe cases with systemic symptoms (gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular manifestations). Since 1992, several unusual cases of moderate and severe 'neurotoxic' envenomations by V.a.a. snakes have been reported in a very localized area in South-Eastern France. Most of the human patients mainly suffered neurological signs owing to cephalic muscle paralysis. Drowsiness and dyspnea were observed for the most severe cases. Envenomed animals suffered respiratory distress and paralysis. The local signs were never as severe as observed after envenomations by vipers in other French regions. Human patients with moderate or severe clinical features received two intravenous injections of Viperfav antivenom, the first dose inducing the decrease of the neurological signs and the second reducing significantly the edema. Neurotoxic components immunologically cross-reacting with toxins from V. ammodytes ammodytes venom from Eastern Europe were detected in the blood of all patients suffering neurological symptoms after a V.a.a. bite. The protective efficacy of various antivenoms was evaluated in mice. The existence of geographical variations in the composition of V.a.a. venom emphasizes on the use of polyvalent antivenom in the treatment of viper envenomations in France.

  5. +Ophitoxaemia and myocardial infarction—the issues during primary angioplasty: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Thomas, Jinesh; Francis, Preetham Kumar; Shylaja, Sajith Vamadevan

    2014-01-01

    ‘The Big four’ are the most poisonous snakes in India, and especially in Kerala. These include the cobra, the viper, the krait and the sea snake. Most of the poisonous snakebites in India occur in Kerala. We believe there are only a few reports of myocardial infarction after snakebites and most of these are viper bites. We believe this is the second case of primary angioplasty for a snakebite. There are at least a few potential issues in performing a primary angioplasty in a snakebite case, namely (1) Is it a thrombus or a spasm? (2) Are the bleeding parameters deranged? Will the patient tolerate tirofiban and other glycoprotein (GB) 2b3a inhibitors? Will he develop dangerous bleeding due to the high dose of heparin needed? Further, would we save the patient from myocardial infarction only to lose him to renal failure, both due to the nephrotoxicity of the venom, the kidney being further damaged by the contrast media used for the angioplasty? We discuss all these issues as they crossed our mind, and hope it will help further treatment in others. We would like to review the available literature on these points and describe a recent case of ours. PMID:25342187

  6. +Ophitoxaemia and myocardial infarction--the issues during primary angioplasty: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Thomas, Jinesh; Francis, Preetham Kumar; Shylaja, Sajith Vamadevan

    2014-10-23

    'The Big four' are the most poisonous snakes in India, and especially in Kerala. These include the cobra, the viper, the krait and the sea snake. Most of the poisonous snakebites in India occur in Kerala. We believe there are only a few reports of myocardial infarction after snakebites and most of these are viper bites. We believe this is the second case of primary angioplasty for a snakebite. There are at least a few potential issues in performing a primary angioplasty in a snakebite case, namely (1) Is it a thrombus or a spasm? (2) Are the bleeding parameters deranged? Will the patient tolerate tirofiban and other glycoprotein (GB) 2b3a inhibitors? Will he develop dangerous bleeding due to the high dose of heparin needed? Further, would we save the patient from myocardial infarction only to lose him to renal failure, both due to the nephrotoxicity of the venom, the kidney being further damaged by the contrast media used for the angioplasty? We discuss all these issues as they crossed our mind, and hope it will help further treatment in others. We would like to review the available literature on these points and describe a recent case of ours. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Final Technical Report for DE-SC0002014- July 29, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, NC

    2011-07-29

    The project titled “National Biorepository for Children’s and Women’s Cancer”. The funding received by the Biopathology Center (BPC) at the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital was utilized to procure equipment and add resources to establish a national digital archive of tissues of children and women’s cancers to advance treatment and research. As planned in the proposal, the project allowed the BPC to procure two high-speed imaging robots and hire imaging technicians to scan a large collection of Children’s and Women’s cancer tissues. The BPC team focused on completed clinical trials, with some dating back nearly 30 years, conducted by the Children’s Oncology Group (and its precursor groups) as well as the Gynecologic Oncology Group. A total of 139 clinical trials were imaged as part of the archive project allowing the team to generate 29, 488 images that are currently stored at the Ohio Supercomputer Center located in Columbus Ohio. The images are now integrated with the Virtual Imaging for Pathology, Education and Research (VIPER) application. The VIPER application allows the BPC to make the digital archive available via the Internet to approved researchers remotely eliminating the use of glass slides for this collection. The elimination of glass slides reduces costs associated with shipping, reduces breakage of glass slides and allows for the review of these cases quickly by experts on a standard desktop computer.

  8. Isolation of a Novel Fusogenic Orthoreovirus from Eucampsipoda africana Bat Flies in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Jansen van Vuren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the isolation of a novel fusogenic orthoreovirus from bat flies (Eucampsipoda africana associated with Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus collected in South Africa. Complete sequences of the ten dsRNA genome segments of the virus, tentatively named Mahlapitsi virus (MAHLV, were determined. Phylogenetic analysis places this virus into a distinct clade with Baboon orthoreovirus, Bush viper reovirus and the bat-associated Broome virus. All genome segments of MAHLV contain a 5' terminal sequence (5'-GGUCA that is unique to all currently described viruses of the genus. The smallest genome segment is bicistronic encoding for a 14 kDa protein similar to p14 membrane fusion protein of Bush viper reovirus and an 18 kDa protein similar to p16 non-structural protein of Baboon orthoreovirus. This is the first report on isolation of an orthoreovirus from an arthropod host associated with bats, and phylogenetic and sequence data suggests that MAHLV constitutes a new species within the Orthoreovirus genus.

  9. Development of a polymerase chain reaction to distinguish monocellate cobra (Naja khouthia) bites from other common Thai snake species, using both venom extracts and bite-site swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntrarachun, S; Pakmanee, N; Tirawatnapong, T; Chanhome, L; Sitprija, V

    2001-07-01

    A PCR technique was used in this study to identify and distinguish monocellate cobra snake bites using snake venoms and swab specimens from snake bite-sites in mice from bites by other common Thai snakes. The sequences of nucleotide primers were selected for the cobrotoxin-encoding gene from the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) since the sequences of monocellate cobra (Naja kaouthia) venom are still unknown. However, the 113-bp fragment of cDNA of the cobrotoxin-encoding gene was detected in the monocellate cobra venom using RT-PCR. This gene was not found in the venoms of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra), Bungarus fasciatus (banded krait), Daboia russelii siamensis (Siamese Russell's Viper, and Calloselasma rhodostoma (Malayan pit viper). Moreover, direct PCR could detect a 665-bp fragment of the cobrotoxin-encoding gene in the monocellate cobra venom but not the other snake venoms. Likewise, this gene was only observed in swab specimens from cobra snake bite-sites in mice. This is the first report demonstrating the ability of PCR to detect the cobrotoxin-encoding gene from snake venoms and swab specimens. Further studies are required for identification of this and other snakes from the bite-sites on human skin.

  10. Molecular basis for prey relocation in viperid snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviola, Anthony J; Chiszar, David; Busch, Chardelle; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2013-03-01

    Vertebrate predators use a broad arsenal of behaviors and weaponry for overcoming fractious and potentially dangerous prey. A unique array of predatory strategies occur among snakes, ranging from mechanical modes of constriction and jaw-holding in non-venomous snakes, to a chemical means, venom, for quickly dispatching prey. However, even among venomous snakes, different prey handling strategies are utilized, varying from the strike-and-hold behaviors exhibited by highly toxic elapid snakes to the rapid strike-and-release envenomation seen in viperid snakes. For vipers, this mode of envenomation represents a minimal risk predatory strategy by permitting little contact with or retaliation from prey, but it adds the additional task of relocating envenomated prey which has wandered from the attack site. This task is further confounded by trails of other unstruck conspecific or heterospecific prey. Despite decades of behavioral study, researchers still do not know the molecular mechanism which allows for prey relocation. During behavioral discrimination trials (vomeronasal responsiveness) to euthanized mice injected with size-fractionated venom, Crotalus atrox responded significantly to only one protein peak. Assays for enzymes common in rattlesnake venoms, such as exonuclease, L-amino acid oxidase, metalloproteinase, thrombin-like and kallikrein-like serine proteases and phospholipase A(2), showed that vomeronasal responsiveness was not dependent on enzymatic activity. Using mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing, we identified the proteins responsible for envenomated prey discrimination as the non-enzymatic disintegrins crotatroxin 1 and 2. Our results demonstrate a novel and critical biological role for venom disintegrins far beyond their well-established role in disruption of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. These findings reveal the evolutionary significance of free disintegrins in venoms as the molecular mechanism in vipers allowing for

  11. Snakebites notified to the poison control center of Morocco between 2009 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafiq, Fouad; El Hattimy, Faiçal; Rhalem, Naima; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; Mokhtari, Abdelrhani; Soulaymani-Bencheikh, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Snakebites cause considerable death and injury throughout the globe, particularly in tropical regions, and pose an important yet neglected threat to public health. In 2008, the Centre Anti Poison et de Parmacovigilance du Maroc (CAPM) started to set up a specific strategy for the control of snakebites that was formalized in 2012. The aim of the present study is to describe and update the epidemiological characteristics of snakebites notified to CAPM between 2009 and 2013. This retrospective five-year study included all cases of snakebites notified to CAPM by mail or phone. During the study period, 873 snakebite cases were reported to CAPM, an average incidence of 2.65 cases per 100,000 inhabitants with 218 cases each year. The highest incidence was found in Tangier-Tetouan region with 357 cases (40.9 %) followed by Souss Massa Draa region with 128 cases (14.6 %). The average age of patients was 26.8 ± 17.2 years. The male to female sex ratio was 1.67:1 and 77 % of cases occurred in rural areas. The bites occurred mainly in spring (44 %) followed by summer (42 %). Snake species was identified in 54 cases (6.2 %): colubrids represented 31 % (n = 18) and vipers 67 % (n = 36), mainly Daboia mauritanica, Bitis arietans and Cerastes cerastes. In 311 cases (35.6 %), the patients showed viper syndrome. Thrombocytopenia was observed in 23.5 % of viper syndrome cases, whereas, compartment syndrome was observed in 7.6 % patients. FAV-Afrique® was administered in 41 patients (5 %). In patients treated with antivenom, 38 patients recovered and three died. Twenty-seven deaths were reported (3.9 %). Despite specific efforts to better understand the epidemiology of snakebites in Morocco (incidence, severity, snake species involved), it remains underestimated. Therefore, further work is still necessary to ensure accessibility of appropriate antivenom against venomous species and to improve the management of envenomation in Morocco.

  12. Stabilising the Integrity of Snake Venom mRNA Stored under Tropical Field Conditions Expands Research Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Gareth; Logan, Rhiannon A E; Leung, Kam-Yin D; Newberry, Fiona J; Rowley, Paul D; Dunbar, John P; Wagstaff, Simon C; Casewell, Nicholas R; Harrison, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    Snake venoms contain many proteinaceous toxins that can cause severe pathology and mortality in snakebite victims. Interestingly, mRNA encoding such toxins can be recovered directly from venom, although yields are low and quality is unknown. It also remains unclear whether such RNA contains information about toxin isoforms and whether it is representative of mRNA recovered from conventional sources, such as the venom gland. Answering these questions will address the feasibility of using venom-derived RNA for future research relevant to biomedical and antivenom applications. Venom was extracted from several species of snake, including both members of the Viperidae and Elapidae, and either lyophilized or immediately added to TRIzol reagent. TRIzol-treated venom was incubated at a range of temperatures (4-37°C) for a range of durations (0-48 hours), followed by subsequent RNA isolation and assessments of RNA quantity and quality. Subsequently, full-length toxin transcripts were targeted for PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. TRIzol-treated venom yielded total RNA of greater quantity and quality than lyophilized venom, and with quality comparable to venom gland-derived RNA. Full-length sequences from multiple Viperidae and Elapidae toxin families were successfully PCR amplified from TRIzol-treated venom RNA. We demonstrated that venom can be stored in TRIzol for 48 hours at 4-19°C, and 8 hours at 37°C, at minimal cost to RNA quality, and found that venom RNA encoded multiple toxin isoforms that seemed homologous (98-99% identity) to those found in the venom gland. The non-invasive experimental modifications we propose will facilitate the future investigation of venom composition by using venom as an alternative source to venom gland tissue for RNA-based studies, thus obviating the undesirable need to sacrifice snakes for such research purposes. In addition, they expand research horizons to rare, endangered or protected snake species and provide more

  13. Commented distributional list of the Reptiles of Mauritania (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padial, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first comprehensive review of the reptiles of Mauritania. It includes distributional information and comments. Mauritania harbors 86 species of reptiles belonging to 21 families. Among these families, Colubridae and Lacertidae are the most diverse, with 14 and 13 species respectively. Other families, such as Agamidae, Gekkonidae, Scincidae or Viperidae are also well represented. Among the 80 continental species, 47.5% are Saharan, 33.8% Afrotropical, 16.2% Sahelian and 2.5% Mediterranean. The marine turtles form another important group, with six species. Eight species are excluded from the country list because of old identification errors, there is not enough evidence of their presence or due to changes in political borders. Among the species expected to occur in Mauritania, at least nine may occur in Saharan environments, 13 in the Sahel savannah and two may have been introduced.

    Esta es la primera lista de reptiles comentada con datos de distribución para la República Islámica de Mauritania. La fauna de reptiles de Mauritania se compone de 86 especies pertenecientes a 21 familias. Entres ellas, Colubridae y Lacertidae son las más diversas, con 14 y 13 especies respectivamente. Otras familias como Agamidae, Gekkonidae, Scincidae y Viperidae también son representativas. Entre las 80 especies continentales el 47.5% son de distribución sahariana, el 33.8% afrotropical, el 16.2% sahelianas y el 2.5% mediterráneas. Las tortugas marinas, con seis especies, es otro grupo importante. Ocho especies no han sido incluidas en la lista debido a que se trataba de viejos errores de identificación, por carecer de suficiente evidencia o debido a la redistribución de las viejas fronteras políticas. Entre las especies potencialmente presentes, al menos nueve de ellas se esperan para las zonas saharianas, trece para las sabanas del Sahel, y dos podrían haber sido introducidas.

  14. Testing the 'toxin hypothesis of allergy': mast cells, IgE, and innate and acquired immune responses to venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    Work in mice indicates that innate functions of mast cells, particularly degradation of venom toxins by mast cell-derived proteases, can enhance resistance to certain arthropod or reptile venoms. Recent reports indicate that acquired Th2 immune responses associated with the production of IgE antibodies, induced by Russell's viper venom or honeybee venom, or by a component of honeybee venom, bee venom phospholipase 2 (bvPLA2), can increase the resistance of mice to challenge with potentially lethal doses of either of the venoms or bvPLA2. These findings support the conclusion that, in contrast to the detrimental effects associated with allergic type 2 (Th2) immune responses, mast cells and IgE-dependent immune responses to venoms can contribute to innate and adaptive resistance to venom-induced pathology and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrastructural organization of skin: classification on the basis of mechanical role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, A S; Eikenberry, E F; Parry, D A

    1987-01-01

    In our previous developmental study on skin we reported that correlations existed between the collagen fibril diameter distribution, glycosaminoglycan content and composition, and mechanical role. In this work we present new but related electron microscope data on the ultrastructure of skins from flounder, marlin, cod, frog, toad, caiman, viper, pigeon, whale and opossum. It is shown that mammalian and avian body skins generally contain relatively sharp unimodal distributions of fibril diameter consistent with a "passive" mechanical role. In contrast most reptilian and fish skins have broad, right-skewed (or bimodal) distributions of fibril diameters compatible with the exotendinous attributes required of an "active" skin. A study of the changing form of the collagen fibril diameter distribution with depth in the dermis is also reported.

  16. Morphometric differences between extant and extinct Italian populations of the adder, Vipera berus (Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Gentilli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vipera berus (Linnaeus, 1758 is the terrestrial snake showing the widest distribution in the world, occuring from Great Britain, France and Northern Italy to the Sakhalin Island and North Korea (Nilson, 1980; Saint Girons, 1980; Nilson et al., 1994; Nilson & Andrén, 1997a. However, adders do not occur uniformly over their distribution area, but are scattered in several isolated populations (Nilson & Andrén, 1997a. Frequently, ecological traits of borderline and isolated populations differ from those living in the core area of the distribution range of the species, and might be subjected to higher risks of stochastic extinction and higher differentiation rates (Mayr, 1970. For example, meadow vipers (Vipera ursinii show a highly fragmented distribution, many of isolated groups being different subspecies (Nilson & Andrén, 1997b, 2001.

  17. Isolation and characterisation of insulin-releasing compounds from Crotalus adamanteus, Crotalus vegrandis and Bitis nasicornis venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sara W M; Bhat, Vikas K; Flatt, Peter R; Gault, Victor A; McClean, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Crude venom from three venomous snakes, Crotalus adamanteus, Crotalus vegrandis and Bitis nasicornis was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography, and selected fractions screened for in-vitro insulinotropic activity using clonal pancreatic BRIN-BD11 cells. Nineteen fractions stimulated insulin secretion and the structural identity of bioactive compounds responsible was probed using MALDI-ToF MS and N-terminal Edman degradation sequencing. Partial N-terminal sequences were determined and their homology to existing sequences identified using BLAST searching. The main insulinotropic peptide families identified were made up of snake venom serine proteinases, phospholipases A2 (PLA2) and disintegrins. Snake venom constituents may have therapeutic potential for diabetes, with each of the three viper venoms tested providing insulinotropic compounds from a range of different toxin families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Deep Learning for Person Reidentification Using Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyu Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the variations of viewpoint, pose, and illumination, a given individual may appear considerably different across different camera views. Tracking individuals across camera networks with no overlapping fields is still a challenging problem. Previous works mainly focus on feature representation and metric learning individually which tend to have a suboptimal solution. To address this issue, in this work, we propose a novel framework to do the feature representation learning and metric learning jointly. Different from previous works, we represent the pairs of pedestrian images as new resized input and use linear Support Vector Machine to replace softmax activation function for similarity learning. Particularly, dropout and data augmentation techniques are also employed in this model to prevent the network from overfitting. Extensive experiments on two publically available datasets VIPeR and CUHK01 demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed approach.

  19. Molecular Docking Studies and Anti−Snake Venom Metalloproteinase Activity of Thai Mango Seed Kernel Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimolpan Pithayanukul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite envenomations cause severe local tissue necrosis and the venom metalloproteinases are thought to be the key toxins involved. In this study, the ethanolic extract from seed kernels of Thai mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. ‘Fahlun’ (Anacardiaceae and its major phenolic principle (pentagalloylglucopyranose exhibited potent and dose−dependent inhibitory effects on the caseinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities of Malayan pit viper and Thai cobra venoms in in vitro tests. molecular docking studies revealed that the binding orientations of the phenolic principles were in the binding pockets of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs. The phenolic principles could form hydrogen bonds with the three histidine residues in the conserved zinc−binding motif and could chelate the Zn2+ atom of the SVMPs, which could potentially result in inhibition of the venom enzymatic activities and thereby inhibit tissue necrosis.

  20. Immunological properties of antivenins. II. Univalent Naja haje antivenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, F; El-Hawary, M F

    1976-03-01

    A purified Naja haje antivenin was tested against Egyptian N. haje and N. nigricollis venoms, Indian N. naja venom, Iranian N. naja oxiana, Vipera lebetina, and V. persica venoms, and Echis carinatus venom from both Iran and Egypt. The different elapid venoms, with the exception of that of N. naja oxiana, showed a considerable number of identical and similar precipitin components by immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. On the other hand, only a few identical and partially identical lines were detected when this antiserum was tested against the viper venoms. Cross neutralization tests in mice showed variable degrees of protection by the antiserum against the different venoms studied; there was no direct correlation with the immunodiffusion results.