WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite-derived precipitation products

  1. Online Assessment of Satellite-Derived Global Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Teng, W.; Kempler, S.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation is difficult to measure and predict. Each year droughts and floods cause severe property damages and human casualties around the world. Accurate measurement and forecast are important for mitigation and preparedness efforts. Significant progress has been made over the past decade in satellite precipitation product development. In particular, products' spatial and temporal resolutions as well as timely availability have been improved by blended techniques. Their resulting products are widely used in various research and applications. However biases and uncertainties are common among precipitation products and an obstacle exists in quickly gaining knowledge of product quality, biases and behavior at a local or regional scale, namely user defined areas or points of interest. Current online inter-comparison and validation services have not addressed this issue adequately. To address this issue, we have developed a prototype to inter-compare satellite derived daily products in the TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS). Despite its limited functionality and datasets, users can use this tool to generate customized plots within the United States for 2005. In addition, users can download customized data for further analysis, e.g. comparing their gauge data. To meet increasing demands, we plan to increase the temporal coverage and expanded the spatial coverage from the United States to the globe. More products have been added as well. In this poster, we present two new tools: Inter-comparison of 3B42RT and 3B42 Inter-comparison of V6 and V7 TRMM L-3 monthly products The future plans include integrating IPWG (International Precipitation Working Group) Validation Algorithms/statistics, allowing users to generate customized plots and data. In addition, we will expand the current daily products to monthly and their climatology products. Whenever the TRMM science team changes their product version number, users would like to know the differences by

  2. Utilizing Satellite-derived Precipitation Products in Hydrometeorological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Ostrenga, D.; Teng, W. L.; Kempler, S. J.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Each year droughts and floods happen around the world and can cause severe property damages and human casualties. Accurate measurement and forecast are important for preparedness and mitigation efforts. Through multi-satellite blended techniques, significant progress has been made over the past decade in satellite-based precipitation product development, such as, products' spatial and temporal resolutions as well as timely availability. These new products are widely used in various research and applications. In particular, the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products archived and distributed by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) provide 3-hourly, daily and monthly near-global (50° N - 50° S) precipitation datasets for research and applications. Two versions of TMPA products are available, research (3B42, 3B43, rain gauge adjusted) and near-real-time (3B42RT). At GES DISC, we have developed precipitation data services to support hydrometeorological applications in order to maximize the TRMM mission's societal benefits. In this presentation, we will present examples of utilizing TMPA precipitation products in hydrometeorological applications including: 1) monitoring global floods and droughts; 2) providing data services to support the USDA Crop Explorer; 3) support hurricane monitoring activities and research; and 4) retrospective analog year analyses to improve USDA's world agricultural supply and demand estimates. We will also present precipitation data services that can be used to support hydrometeorological applications including: 1) User friendly TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS; URL: http://disc2.nascom.nasa.gov/Giovanni/tovas/); 2) Mirador (http://mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov/), a simplified interface for searching, browsing, and ordering Earth science data at GES DISC; 3) Simple Subset Wizard (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/SSW/ ) for data subsetting and format conversion; 4) Data

  3. Comparison and evaluation of satellite derived precipitation products for hydrological modeling of the Zambezi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Cohen Liechti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the African Dams ProjecT (ADAPT, an integrated water resource management study in the Zambezi Basin is currently under development. In view of the sparse gauging network for rainfall monitoring, the observations from spaceborne instrumentation currently produce the only available rainfall data for a large part of the basin.

    Three operational and acknowledged high resolution satellite derived estimates: the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission product 3B42 (TRMM 3B42, the Famine Early Warning System product 2.0 (FEWS RFE2.0 and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Climate Prediction Centre (NOAA/CPC morphing technique (CMORPH are analyzed in terms of spatial and temporal repartition of the precipitations. They are compared to ground data for the wet seasons of the years 2003 to 2009 on a point to pixel basis at daily, 10-daily and monthly time steps and on a pixel to pixel basis for the wet seasons of the years 2003 to 2007 at monthly time steps.

    The general North-South gradient of precipitation is captured by all the analyzed products. Regarding the spatial heterogeneity, FEWS pixels are much more inter-correlated than TRMM and CMORPH pixels. For a rainfall homogeneity threshold criterion of 0.5 global mean correlation coefficient, the area of each subbasin should not exceed a circle of 2.5° latitude/longitude radius for FEWS and a circle of 0.75° latitude/longitude radius for TRMM and CMORPH considering rectangular mesh.

    In terms of reliability, the correspondence of all estimates with ground data increases with the time step chosen for the analysis. The volume ratio computation indicates that CMORPH is overestimating by nearly 1.5 times the rainfall. The statistics of TRMM and FEWS estimates show quite similar results.

    Due to the its lower inter-correlation and longer data set, the TRMM 3B42 product is chosen as input for the hydraulic-hydrologic model of the basin.

  4. Satellite derived precipitation and freshwater flux variability and its dependence on the North Atlantic Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Axel; Bakan, Stephan; Graßl, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    The variability of satellite retrieved precipitation and freshwater flux from the `Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data' (HOAPS) is assessed with special emphasis on the `North Atlantic Oscillation' (NAO). To cover also land areas, a novel combination of the satellite derived precipitation climatology with the rain gauge based `Full Data Reanalysis Product Version 4', of the `Global Precipitation Climatology Centre' (GPCC) is used. This yields unique high-resolution, quasi-global precipitation fields compiled from two independent data sources. Over the ocean, the response of the freshwater balance and the related parameters to the NAO is investigated for the first time by using a purely satellite based data set. A strong dependence of precipitation patterns to the state of the NAO is found. On synoptic scale this is in accordance with earlier findings by other satellite based and reanalysis products. Furthermore, the consistency of the combined HOAPS-3/GPCC data set allows also detailed regional analyses of precipitation patterns. The response of HOAPS-3 freshwater flux to the NAO is dominated by precipitation at mid and high latitudes, while for the subtropical regions the feedback of the evaporation is stronger.

  5. Evaluating satellite-derived long-term historical precipitation datasets for drought monitoring in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Francisco; Wardlow, Brian; Tadesse, Tsegaye

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation is a key parameter for the study of climate change and variability and the detection and monitoring of natural disaster such as drought. Precipitation datasets that accurately capture the amount and spatial variability of rainfall is critical for drought monitoring and a wide range of other climate applications. This is challenging in many parts of the world, which often have a limited number of weather stations and/or historical data records. Satellite-derived precipitation products offer a viable alternative with several remotely sensed precipitation datasets now available with long historical data records (+30 years), which include the Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station (CHIRPS) and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) datasets. This study presents a comparative analysis of three historical satellite-based precipitation datasets that include Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B43 version 7 (1998-2015), PERSIANN-CDR (1983-2015) and CHIRPS 2.0 (1981-2015) over Chile to assess their performance across the country and evaluate their applicability for agricultural drought evaluation when used in the calculation of commonly used drought indicator as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). In this analysis, 278 weather stations of in-situ rainfall measurements across Chile were initially compared to the satellite-based precipitation estimates. The study area (Chile) was divided into five latitudinal zones: North, North-Central, Central, South-Central and South to determine if there were a regional difference among these satellite-based estimates. Nine statistics were used to evaluate the performance of satellite products to estimate the amount and spatial distribution of historical rainfall across Chile. Hierarchical cluster analysis, k-means and singular value decomposition were used to

  6. Evaluating satellite-derived long-term historical precipitation datasets for drought monitoring in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Francisco; Wardlow, Brian; Tadesse, Tsegaye; Lillo-Saavedra, Mario; Lagos, Octavio

    2017-04-01

    Precipitation is a key parameter for the study of climate change and variability and the detection and monitoring of natural disaster such as drought. Precipitation datasets that accurately capture the amount and spatial variability of rainfall is critical for drought monitoring and a wide range of other climate applications. This is challenging in many parts of the world, which often have a limited number of weather stations and/or historical data records. Satellite-derived precipitation products offer a viable alternative with several remotely sensed precipitation datasets now available with long historical data records (+30years), which include the Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station (CHIRPS) and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) datasets. This study presents a comparative analysis of three historical satellite-based precipitation datasets that include Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B43 version 7 (1998-2015), PERSIANN-CDR (1983-2015) and CHIRPS 2.0 (1981-2015) over Chile to assess their performance across the country and for the case of the two long-term products the applicability for agricultural drought were evaluated when used in the calculation of commonly used drought indicator as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). In this analysis, 278 weather stations of in situ rainfall measurements across Chile were initially compared to the satellite data. The study area (Chile) was divided into five latitudinal zones: North, North-Central, Central, South-Central and South to determine if there were a regional difference among these satellite products, and nine statistics were used to evaluate their performance to estimate the amount and spatial distribution of historical rainfall across Chile. Hierarchical cluster analysis, k-means and singular value decomposition were used to analyze

  7. NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Derived Surface Oil Analysis Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NESDIS Experimental Marine Pollution Surveillance Report (EMPSR) and the Daily Composite product are new products of the NOAA Satellite Analysis Branch and...

  8. A Review of Global Satellite-derived Snow Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Allan; Tedesco, Marco; Lee, Shihyan; Foster, James; Hall, Dorothy K.; Kelly, Richard; Robinson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Snow cover over the Northern Hemisphere plays a crucial role in the Earth's hydrology and surface energy balance, and modulates feedbacks that control variations of global climate. While many of these variations are associated with exchanges of energy and mass between the land surface and the atmosphere, other expected changes are likely to propagate downstream and affect oceanic processes in coastal zones. For example, a large component of the freshwater flux into the Arctic Ocean comes from snow melt. The timing and magnitude of this flux affects biological and thermodynamic processes in the Arctic Ocean, and potentially across the globe through their impact on North Atlantic Deep Water formation. Several recent global remotely sensed products provide information at unprecedented temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions. In this article we review the theoretical underpinnings and characteristics of three key products. We also demonstrate the seasonal and spatial patterns of agreement and disagreement amongst them, and discuss current and future directions in their application and development. Though there is general agreement amongst these products, there can be disagreement over certain geographic regions and under conditions of ephemeral, patchy and melting snow.

  9. Statistical modeling of phenological phases in Poland based on coupling satellite derived products and gridded meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernecki, Bartosz; Jabłońska, Katarzyna; Nowosad, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to create and evaluate different statistical models for reconstructing and predicting selected phenological phases. This issue is of particular importance in Poland where national-wide phenological monitoring was abandoned in the middle of 1990s and the reactivated network was established in 2006. Authors decided to evaluate possibilities of using a wide-range of statistical modeling techniques to create synthetic archive dataset. Additionally, a robust tool for predicting the most distinguishable phenophases using only free of charge data as predictors was created. Study period covers the years 2007-2014 and contains only quality-controlled dataset of 10 species and 14 phenophases. Phenological data used in this study originates from the manual observations network run by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute (IMGW-PIB). Three kind of data sources were used as predictors: (i) satellite derived products, (ii) preprocessed gridded meteorological data, and (iii) spatial properties (longitude, latitude, altitude) of the monitoring site. Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 vegetation products were used for detecting onset dates of particular phenophases. Following indices were used: Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Leaf Area Index (LAI), and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (fPAR). Additionally, Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS) products were chosen to detect occurrence of snow cover. Due to highly noisy data, authors decided to take into account pixel reliability information. Besides satellite derived products (NDVI, EVI, FPAR, LAI, Snow cover), a wide group of observational data and agrometeorological indices derived from the European Climate Assessment & Dataset (ECA&D) were used as a potential predictors: cumulative growing degree days (GDD), cumulative growing precipitation days (GPD

  10. Satellite Derived Volcanic Ash Product Inter-Comparison in Support to SCOPE-Nowcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddans, Richard; Thomas, Gareth; Pavolonis, Mike; Bojinski, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    In support of aeronautical meteorological services, WMO organized a satellite-based volcanic ash retrieval algorithm inter-comparison activity, to improve the consistency of quantitative volcanic ash products from satellites, under the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Nowcasting (SCOPEe Nowcasting) initiative (http:/ jwww.wmo.int/pagesjprogjsatjscopee nowcasting_en.php). The aims of the intercomparison were as follows: 1. Select cases (Sarychev Peak 2009, Eyjafyallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle 2011, Kirishimayama 2011, Kelut 2014), and quantify the differences between satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties derived from different techniques and sensors; 2. Establish a basic validation protocol for satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties; 3. Document the strengths and weaknesses of different remote sensing approaches as a function of satellite sensor; 4. Standardize the units and quality flags associated with volcanic cloud geophysical parameters; 5. Provide recommendations to Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and other users on how to best to utilize quantitative satellite products in operations; 6. Create a "road map" for future volcanic ash related scientific developments and inter-comparison/validation activities that can also be applied to SO2 clouds and emergent volcanic clouds. Volcanic ash satellite remote sensing experts from operational and research organizations were encouraged to participate in the inter-comparison activity, to establish the plans for the inter-comparison and to submit data sets. RAL was contracted by EUMETSAT to perform a systematic inter-comparison of all submitted datasets and results were reported at the WMO International Volcanic Ash Inter-comparison Meeting to held on 29 June - 2 July 2015 in Madison, WI, USA (http:/ /cimss.ssec.wisc.edujmeetings/vol_ash14). 26 different data sets were submitted, from a range of passive imagers and spectrometers and

  11. Spatial and Quantitative Comparison of Satellite-Derived Land Cover Products over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hao; JIA Gen-Suo

    2012-01-01

    Because land cover plays an important role in global climate change studies, assessing the agreement among different land cover products is critical. Significant discrepancies have been reported among satellite-derived land cover products, especially at the regional scale. Dif- ferent classification schemes are a key obstacle to the comparison of products and are considered the main fac- tor behind the disagreement among the different products. Using a feature-based overlap metric, we investigated the degree of spatial agreement and quantified the overall and class-specific agreement among the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS), Global Land Cover 2000 (GLC2000), and the National Land Cover/Use Data- sets (NLCD) products, and the author assessed the prod- ucts by ground reference data at the regional scale over China. The areas with a low degree of agreement mostly occurred in heterogeneous terrain and transition zones, while the areas with a high degree of agreement occurred in major plains and areas with homogeneous vegetation. The overall agreement of the MODIS and GLC2000 products was 50.8% and 52.9%, and the overall accuracy was 50.3% and 41.9%, respectively. Class-specific agree- ment or accuracy varied significantly. The high-agreement classes are water, grassland, cropland, snow and ice, and bare areas, whereas classes with low agreement are shru- bland and wetland in both MODIS and GLC2000. These characteristics of spatial patterns and quantitative agree- ment could be partly explained by the complex landscapes, mixed vegetation, low separability of spectro-temporal- texture signals, and coarse pixels. The differences of class definition among different the classification schemes also affects the agreement. Each product had its advantages and limitations, but neither the overall accuracy nor the class-specific accuracy could meet the requirements of climate modeling.

  12. Exploration of satellite-derived data products for atmospheric turbulence studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Griffith, DJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available layer. This has included all satellite data products that are relevant to the surface energy balance such as surface reflectance, temperature and emissivity. It was also important to identify active archive data services that can provide preprocessed...

  13. Validating long-term satellite-derived disturbance products: the case of burned areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschetti, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The potential research, policy and management applications of satellite products place a high priority on providing statements about their accuracy. A number of NASA, ESA and EU funded global and continental burned area products have been developed using coarse spatial resolution satellite data, and have the potential to become part of a long-term fire Climate Data Record. These products have usually been validated by comparison with reference burned area maps derived by visual interpretation of Landsat or similar spatial resolution data selected on an ad hoc basis. More optimally, a design-based validation method should be adopted that is characterized by the selection of reference data via a probability sampling that can subsequently be used to compute accuracy metrics, taking into account the sampling probability. Design based techniques have been used for annual land cover and land cover change product validation, but have not been widely used for burned area products, or for the validation of global products that are highly variable in time and space (e.g. snow, floods or other non-permanent phenomena). This has been due to the challenge of designing an appropriate sampling strategy, and to the cost of collecting independent reference data. We propose a tri-dimensional sampling grid that allows for probability sampling of Landsat data in time and in space. To sample the globe in the spatial domain with non-overlapping sampling units, the Thiessen Scene Area (TSA) tessellation of the Landsat WRS path/rows is used. The TSA grid is then combined with the 16-day Landsat acquisition calendar to provide tri-dimensonal elements (voxels). This allows the implementation of a sampling design where not only the location but also the time interval of the reference data is explicitly drawn by probability sampling. The proposed sampling design is a stratified random sampling, with two-level stratification of the voxels based on biomes and fire activity (Figure 1). The novel

  14. Validation of Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature Products - Methods and Good Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, P. C.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S. J.; Biard, J.; Ghent, D.

    2014-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable for surface water and energy budget calculations that can be obtained globally and operationally from satellite observations. LST is used for many applications, including weather forecasting, short-term climate prediction, extreme weather monitoring, and irrigation and water resource management. In order to maximize the usefulness of LST for research and studies it is necessary to know the uncertainty in the LST measurement. Multiple validation methods and activities are necessary to assess LST compliance with the quality specifications of operational users. This work presents four different validation methods that have been widely used to determine the uncertainties in LST products derived from satellite measurements. 1) The temperature based validation method involves comparisons with ground-based measurements of LST. The method is strongly limited by the number and quality of available field stations. 2) Scene-based comparisons involve comparing a new satellite LST product with a heritage LST product. This method is not an absolute validation and satellite LST inter-comparisons alone do not provide an independent validation measurement. 3) The radiance-based validation method does not require ground-based measurements and is usually used for large scale validation effort or for LST products with coarser spatial resolution (> 1km). 4) Time series comparisons are used to detect problems that can occur during the instrument's life, e.g. calibration drift, or unrealistic outliers due to cloud coverage. This study enumerates the sources of errors associated with each method. The four different approaches are complementary and provide different levels of information about the quality of the retrieved LST. The challenges in retrieving the LST from satellite measurements are discussed using results obtained for MODIS and VIIRS. This work contributes to the objective of the Land Product Validation (LPV) sub-group of the

  15. Validation of Satellite Derived Primary Production Models in the Northeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, P. V.; Bashmachnikov, I. L.; Brotas, V.

    2016-08-01

    With all the variety of models used for calculation of primary production of phytoplankton (PP) from remote sensing data, a choice of the most realistic one for a particular ocean region remains a non-trivial issue. In this work, we estimate PP in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (200 - 510 N and 100 - 400 W) from 1998 to 2005 using three frequently used models: VGPM (Vertically Generalized Production Model), PSM (Platt and Sathyendranath Model) and Aph-PP model (Absorption Based Model). The modeled results are then compared with in situ observations of PP. The results show a close similarity in PP patterns obtained by different models, but the absolute modeled values differ substantially. In the Northeast Atlantic, PSM is found reproducing better the observed seasonal and spatial variability of PP as compared to the two other models. However, PSM slightly underestimates the PP values.

  16. Estimation efficiency of usage satellite derived and modelled biophysical products for yield forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotii, Andrii; Kussul, Nataliia; Skakun, Sergii; Shelestov, Andrii; Ostapenko, Vadim; Oliinyk, Tamara

    2015-04-01

    Efficient and timely crop monitoring and yield forecasting are important tasks for ensuring of stability and sustainable economic development [1]. As winter crops pay prominent role in agriculture of Ukraine - the main focus of this study is concentrated on winter wheat. In our previous research [2, 3] it was shown that usage of biophysical parameters of crops such as FAPAR (derived from Geoland-2 portal as for SPOT Vegetation data) is far more efficient for crop yield forecasting to NDVI derived from MODIS data - for available data. In our current work efficiency of usage such biophysical parameters as LAI, FAPAR, FCOVER (derived from SPOT Vegetation and PROBA-V data at resolution of 1 km and simulated within WOFOST model) and NDVI product (derived from MODIS) for winter wheat monitoring and yield forecasting is estimated. As the part of crop monitoring workflow (vegetation anomaly detection, vegetation indexes and products analysis) and yield forecasting SPIRITS tool developed by JRC is used. Statistics extraction is done for landcover maps created in SRI within FP-7 SIGMA project. Efficiency of usage satellite based and modelled with WOFOST model biophysical products is estimated. [1] N. Kussul, S. Skakun, A. Shelestov, O. Kussul, "Sensor Web approach to Flood Monitoring and Risk Assessment", in: IGARSS 2013, 21-26 July 2013, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 815-818. [2] F. Kogan, N. Kussul, T. Adamenko, S. Skakun, O. Kravchenko, O. Kryvobok, A. Shelestov, A. Kolotii, O. Kussul, and A. Lavrenyuk, "Winter wheat yield forecasting in Ukraine based on Earth observation, meteorological data and biophysical models," International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, vol. 23, pp. 192-203, 2013. [3] Kussul O., Kussul N., Skakun S., Kravchenko O., Shelestov A., Kolotii A, "Assessment of relative efficiency of using MODIS data to winter wheat yield forecasting in Ukraine", in: IGARSS 2013, 21-26 July 2013, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 3235 - 3238.

  17. Aerus-GEO: newly available satellite-derived aerosol optical depth product over Europe and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, D.; Roujean, J. L.; Ceamanos, X.; Six, B.; Suman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The major difficulty in detecting the aerosol signal from visible and near-infrared remote sensing observations is to reach the proper separation of the components related to the atmosphere and the surface. A method is proposed to circumvent this issue by exploiting the directional and temporal dimensions of the satellite signal through the use of a semi-empirical kernel-driven model for the surface/atmosphere coupled system. This algorithm was implemented by the ICARE Data Center (http://www.icare.univ-lille1.fr), which operationally disseminates a daily AOD product at 670 nm over the MSG disk since 2014. The proposed method referred to as AERUS-GEO (Aerosol and surface albEdo Retrieval Using a directional Splitting method - application to GEO data) is applied to three spectral bands (0.6 mm, 0.8 mm, and 1.6 mm) of MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) observations, which scan Europe, Africa, and the Eastern part of South America every 15 minutes. The daily AOD estimates at 0.63μm has been extensively validated. In contrast, the Angstrom coefficient is still going through validation and we will show the differences between the MSG derived Angstrom exponent with that of CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) near-real time aerosol product. The impact of aerosol type on the aerosol radiative forcing will be presented as a part of future development plan.

  18. Varying applicability of four different satellite-derived soil moisture products to global gridded crop model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toru; Iizumi, Toshichika; Okada, Masashi; Nishimori, Motoki; Grünwald, Thomas; Prueger, John; Cescatti, Alessandro; Korres, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Marius; Carrara, Arnaud; Loubet, Benjamin; Ceschia, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-derived daily surface soil moisture products have been increasingly available, but their applicability to global gridded crop model (GGCM) evaluation is unclear. This study compares four different soil moisture products with the flux tower site observation at 18 cropland sites across the world where either of maize, soybean, rice and wheat is grown. These products include the first and second versions of Climate Change Initiative Soil Moisture (CCISM-1 and CCISM-2) datasets distributed by the European Space Agency and two different AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System)-derived soil moisture datasets, separately provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (AMSRE-J) and U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (AMSRE-N). The comparison demonstrates varying reliability of these products in representing major characteristics of temporal pattern of cropland soil moisture by product and crop. Possible reasons for the varying reliability include the differences in sensors, algorithms, bands and criteria used when estimating soil moisture. Both the CCISM-1 and CCISM-2 products appear the most reliable for soybean- and wheat-growing area. However, the percentage of valid data of these products is always lower than other products due to relatively strict criteria when merging data derived from multiple sources, although the CCISM-2 product has much more data with valid retrievals than the CCISM-1 product. The reliability of the AMSRE-J product is the highest for maize- and rice-growing areas and comparable to or slightly lower than the CCISM products for soybean- and wheat-growing areas. The AMSRE-N is the least reliable in most location-crop combinations. The reliability of the products for rice-growing area is far lower than that of other upland crops likely due to the extensive use of irrigation and patch distribution of rice paddy in the area examined here. We conclude that the CCISM-1, CCISM-2 and AMSRE

  19. Assessing Disagreement and Tolerance of Misclassification of Satellite-derived Land Cover Products Used in WRF Model Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hao; JIA Gensuo

    2013-01-01

    As more satellite-derived land cover products used in the study of global change,especially climate modeling,assessing their quality has become vitally important.In this study,we developed a distance metric based on the parameters used in weather research and forecasting (WRF) to characterize the degree of disagreement among land cover products and to identify the tolerance for misclassification within the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP) classification scheme.We determined the spatial degree of disagreement and then created maps of misclassification of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer (MODIS) products,and we calculated overall and class-specific accuracy and fuzzy agreement in a WRF model.Our results show a high level of agreement and high tolerance of misclassification in the WRF model between large-scale homogeneous landscapes,while a low level of agreement and tolerance of misclassification appeared in heterogeneous landscapes.The degree of disagreement varied significantly among seven regions of China.The class-specific accuracy and fuzzy agreement in MODIS Collection 4 and 5 products varied significantly.High accuracy and fuzzy agreement occurred in the following classes:water,grassland,cropland,and barren or sparsely vegetated.Misclassification mainly occurred among specific classes with similar plant functional types and low discriminative spectro-temporal signals.Some classes need to be improved further; the quality of MODIS land cover products across China still does not meet the common requirements of climate modeling.Our findings may have important implications for improving land surface parameterization for simulating climate and for better understanding the influence of the land cover change on climate.

  20. Evaluating a satellite-based seasonal evapotranspiration product and identifying its relationship with other satellite-derived products and crop yield: A case study for Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Tsegaye; Senay, Gabriel B.; Berhan, Getachew; Regassa, Teshome; Beyene, Shimelis

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-derived evapotranspiration anomalies and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are currently used for African agricultural drought monitoring and food security status assessment. In this study, a process to evaluate satellite-derived evapotranspiration (ETa) products with a geospatial statistical exploratory technique that uses NDVI, satellite-derived rainfall estimate (RFE), and crop yield data has been developed. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the ETa using the NDVI and RFE, and identify a relationship between the ETa and Ethiopia’s cereal crop (i.e., teff, sorghum, corn/maize, barley, and wheat) yields during the main rainy season. Since crop production is one of the main factors affecting food security, the evaluation of remote sensing-based seasonal ETa was done to identify the appropriateness of this tool as a proxy for monitoring vegetation condition in drought vulnerable and food insecure areas to support decision makers. The results of this study showed that the comparison between seasonal ETa and RFE produced strong correlation (R2 > 0.99) for all 41 crop growing zones in Ethiopia. The results of the spatial regression analyses of seasonal ETa and NDVI using Ordinary Least Squares and Geographically Weighted Regression showed relatively weak yearly spatial relationships (R2 cropping zones. However, for each individual crop zones, the correlation between NDVI and ETa ranged between 0.3 and 0.84 for about 44% of the cropping zones. Similarly, for each individual crop zones, the correlation (R2) between the seasonal ETa anomaly and de-trended cereal crop yield was between 0.4 and 0.82 for 76% (31 out of 41) of the crop growing zones. The preliminary results indicated that the ETa products have a good predictive potential for these 31 identified zones in Ethiopia. Decision makers may potentially use ETa products for monitoring cereal crop yields and

  1. Oceanic Weather Decision Support for Unmanned Global Hawk Science Missions into Hurricanes with Tailored Satellite Derived Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, Wayne; Griffin, Sarah; Velden, Christopher; Zipser, Ed; Cecil, Daniel; Braun, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to identify in-flight hazards to high-altitude aircraft, namely the Global Hawk. The Global Hawk was used during Septembers 2012-2016 as part of two NASA funded Hurricane Sentinel-3 field campaigns to over-fly hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean. This talk identifies the cause of severe turbulence experienced over Hurricane Emily (2005) and how a combination of NOAA funded GOES-R algorithm derived cloud top heights/tropical overshooting tops using GOES-13/SEVIRI imager radiances, and lightning information are used to identify areas of potential turbulence for near real-time navigation decision support. Several examples will demonstrate how the Global Hawk pilots remotely received and used real-time satellite derived cloud and lightning detection information to keep the aircraft safely above clouds and avoid regions of potential turbulence.

  2. Temporal disaggregation of satellite-derived monthly precipitation estimates and the resulting propagation of error in partitioning of water at the land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Margulis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Global estimates of precipitation can now be made using data from a combination of geosynchronous and low earth-orbit satellites. However, revisit patterns of polar-orbiting satellites and the need to sample mixed-clouds scenes from geosynchronous satellites leads to the coarsening of the temporal resolution to the monthly scale. There are prohibitive limitations to the applicability of monthly-scale aggregated precipitation estimates in many hydrological applications. The nonlinear and threshold dependencies of surface hydrological processes on precipitation may cause the hydrological response of the surface to vary considerably based on the intermittent temporal structure of the forcing. Therefore, to make the monthly satellite data useful for hydrological applications (i.e. water balance studies, rainfall-runoff modelling, etc., it is necessary to disaggregate the monthly precipitation estimates into shorter time intervals so that they may be used in surface hydrology models. In this study, two simple statistical disaggregation schemes are developed for use with monthly precipitation estimates provided by satellites. The two techniques are shown to perform relatively well in introducing a reasonable temporal structure into the disaggregated time series. An ensemble of disaggregated realisations was routed through two land surface models of varying complexity so that the error propagation that takes place over the course of the month could be characterised. Results suggest that one of the proposed disaggregation schemes can be used in hydrological applications without introducing significant error. Keywords: precipitation, temporal disaggregation, hydrological modelling, error propagation

  3. Investigating the usefulness of satellite derived fluorescence data in inferring gross primary productivity within the carbon cycle data assimilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Koffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the utility of satellite measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs in constraining gross primary productivity (GPP. We ingest Fs measurements into the Carbon-Cycle Data Assimilation System (CCDAS which has been augmented by the fluorescence component of the Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes (SCOPE model. CCDAS simulates well the patterns of Fs suggesting the combined model is capable of ingesting these measurements. However simulated Fs is insensitive to the key parameter controlling GPP, the carboxylation capacity (Vcmax. Simulated Fs is sensitive to both the incoming absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (aPAR and leaf chlorophyll concentration both of which are treated as perfectly known in previous CCDAS versions. Proper use of Fs measurements therefore requires enhancement of CCDAS to include and expose these variables.

  4. Production of satellite-derived aerosol climate data records: current status of the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    and the Aerosol_cci team Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (Phase 1: 2010 -2014; Phase 2: 2014-2017) intensive work has been conducted to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors ATSR (3 algorithms), PARASOL, MERIS (3 algorithms), synergetic AATSR/SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOMOS. Whereas OMI and GOMOS were used to derive absorbing aerosol index and stratospheric extinction profiles, respectively, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Ångström coefficient were retrieved from the other sensors. The cooperation between the project partners, including both the retrieval teams and independent validation teams, has resulted in a strong improvement of most algorithms. In particular the AATSR retrieved AOD is qualitatively similar to that from MODIS, usually taken as the standard, MISR and SeaWiFS. This conclusion has been reached form several different ways of validation of the L2 and L3 products, using AERONET sun photometer data as the common ground-truth for the application of both 'traditional' statistical techniques and a 'scoring' technique using spatial and temporal correlations. Quantitatively, the limited AATSR swath width of 500km results in a smaller amount of data. Nevertheless, the assimilation of AATSR-retrieved AOD, together with MODIS data, contributes to improving the in the ECMWF climate model results. In addition to the multi-spectral AOD, and thus the Ångström Exponent, also a per-pixel uncertainty is provided and validated. By the end of Aerosol_cci Phase 1 the ATSR algorithms have been applied to both ATSR-2 and AATSR resulting in an AOD time series of 17 years. In phase 2 this work is continued with a focus on the further improvement of the ATSR algorithms as well as those for the other instruments and algorithms, mentioned above, which in phase 1 were considered less mature. The first efforts are on the further characterization of the uncertainties and on better understanding of the

  5. Hydrological Utility and Uncertainty of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Products in the Mountainous Region of South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Pil Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-derived precipitation can be a potential source of forcing data for assessing water availability and managing water supply in mountainous regions of East Asia. This study investigates the hydrological utility of satellite-derived precipitation and uncertainties attributed to error propagation of satellite products in hydrological modeling. To this end, four satellite precipitation products (tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA version 6 (TMPAv6 and version 7 (TMPAv7, the global satellite mapping of precipitation (GSMaP, and the climate prediction center (CPC morphing technique (CMORPH were integrated into a physically-based hydrologic model for the mountainous region of South Korea. The satellite precipitation products displayed different levels of accuracy when compared to the intra- and inter-annual variations of ground-gauged precipitation. As compared to the GSMaP and CMORPH products, superior performances were seen when the TMPA products were used within streamflow simulations. Significant dry (negative biases in the GSMaP and CMORPH products led to large underestimates of streamflow during wet-summer seasons. Although the TMPA products displayed a good level of performance for hydrologic modeling, there were some over/underestimates of precipitation by satellites during the winter season that were induced by snow accumulation and snowmelt processes. These differences resulted in streamflow simulation uncertainties during the winter and spring seasons. This study highlights the crucial need to understand hydrological uncertainties from satellite-derived precipitation for improved water resource management and planning in mountainous basins. Furthermore, it is suggested that a reliable snowfall detection algorithm is necessary for the new global precipitation measurement (GPM mission.

  6. Evaluation of Satellite and Ground Based Precipitation Products for Flood Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, S.; Sharif, H.; Yeggina, S.

    2012-04-01

    The development in satellite-derived rainfall estimates encouraged the hydrological modeling in sparse gauged basins or ungauged basins. Especially, physically-based distributed hydrological models can benefit from the good spatial and temporal coverage of satellite precipitation products. In this study, three satellite derived precipitation datasets (TRMM, CMORPH, and PERSIANN), NEXRAD, and rain gauge precipitation datasets were used to drive the hydrological model. The physically-based, distributed hydrological model Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrological Analysis (GSSHA) was used in this study. Focus will be on the results from the Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort, Texas. The Guadalupe River Basin above Canyon Lake and below Comfort Texas drains an area of 1232 km2. Different storm events will be used in these simulations. August 2007 event was used as calibration and June 2007 event was used as validation. Results are discussed interms of accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates with the ground based precipitation estimates, predicting peak discharges, runoff volumes, time lag, and spatial distribution. The initial results showed that, model was able to predict the peak discharges and runoff volumes when using NEXRAD MPE data, and TRMM 3B42 precipitation product. The results also showed that there was time lag in hydrographs driven by both PERSIANN and CMORPH data sets.

  7. Satellite-derived primary productivity and its spatial and temporal variability in the China seas%中国近海初级生产力的遥感研究及其时空演化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    檀赛春; 石广玉

    2006-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of primary productivity in the China seas from 2003 to 2005 was estimated using a size-fractionated primary productivity model. Primary productivity estimated from satellite-derived data showed spatial and temporal variability. Annual averaged primary productivity levels were 564.39, 363.08, 536.47, 413.88, 195.77, and 100.09 gCm-2a-1 in the Bohai Sea, northern Yellow Sea (YS), southern YS, northern East China Sea (ECS), southern ECS, and South China Sea (SCS), respectively. Peaks of primary productivity appeared in spring (April-June) and fall (October and November) in the northern YS, southern YS, and southern ECS, while a single peak (June) appeared in the Bohai Sea and northern ECS. The SCS had two peaks in primary productivity, but these peaks occurred in winter (January) and summer (August), with the winter peak far higher than the summer peak. Monthly averaged primary productivity values from 2003 to 2005 in the Bohai Sea and southern YS were higher than those in the other four seas during most months, while those in the southern ECS and SCS were the lowest. Primary productivity in spring (March-June in the southern ECS and April-July in the other five areas) contributed approximately 41% on average to the annual primary productivity in all the study seas except the SCS. The largest interannual variability also occurred in spring (average standard deviation = 6.68), according to the satellite-derived estimates. The contribution during fall (October-January in the southern ECS and August-November in the other five areas) was approximately 33% on average; the primary productivity during this period also showed interannual variability. However, in the SCS, the winter (December-March) contribution was the highest (about 42%), while the spring (April-July) contribution was the lowest (28%). The SCS did share a feature with the other five areas: the larger the contribution, the larger the interannual variability. Spatial and

  8. Application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard Using Satellite-Derived and Modeled Data Products for Pelagic Habitats in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    measurements may have been taken following a large rain or flood event. A review of precipitation records for this period may further support this...Assistance Agreement MX -97408100). Florida Marine Research Institute, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, St. Petersburg, FL

  9. Asphaltene precipitates in oil production wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinitz, W,; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    1998-01-01

    At the beginning of production in a southern German oil field, flow blockage was observed during file initial stage of production from the oil wells. The hindrance was caused by the precipitation of asphaltenes in the proximity of the borehole and in the tubings. The precipitates were of solid...

  10. NESDIS Blended Total Precipitable Water (TPW) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The blended Total Precipitable Water (TPW) product is derived from multiple sensors/satellites. The Percentage of TPW normal (PCT), or TPW anomaly, shows the...

  11. Modeling gross primary production of agro-forestry ecosystems by assimilation of satellite-derived information in a process-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliavacca, Mirco; Meroni, Michele; Busetto, Lorenzo; Colombo, Roberto; Zenone, Terenzio; Matteucci, Giorgio; Manca, Giovanni; Seufert, Guenther

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present results obtained in the framework of a regional-scale analysis of the carbon budget of poplar plantations in Northern Italy. We explored the ability of the process-based model BIOME-BGC to estimate the gross primary production (GPP) using an inverse modeling approach exploiting eddy covariance and satellite data. We firstly present a version of BIOME-BGC coupled with the radiative transfer models PROSPECT and SAILH (named PROSAILH-BGC) with the aims of i) improving the BIOME-BGC description of the radiative transfer regime within the canopy and ii) allowing the assimilation of remotely-sensed vegetation index time series, such as MODIS NDVI, into the model. Secondly, we present a two-step model inversion for optimization of model parameters. In the first step, some key ecophysiological parameters were optimized against data collected by an eddy covariance flux tower. In the second step, important information about phenological dates and about standing biomass were optimized against MODIS NDVI. Results obtained showed that the PROSAILH-BGC allowed simulation of MODIS NDVI with good accuracy and that we described better the canopy radiation regime. The inverse modeling approach was demonstrated to be useful for the optimization of ecophysiological model parameters, phenological dates and parameters related to the standing biomass, allowing good accuracy of daily and annual GPP predictions. In summary, this study showed that assimilation of eddy covariance and remote sensing data in a process model may provide important information for modeling gross primary production at regional scale.

  12. Atmospheric COS measurements and satellite-derived vegetation fluorescence data to evaluate the terrestrial gross primary productivity of CMIP5 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peylin, Philippe; MacBean, Natasha; Launois, Thomas; Belviso, Sauveur; Cadule, Patricia; Maignan, Fabienne

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the fate of the ecosystem carbon stocks and their sensitivity to climate change strongly relies on our ability to accurately model the gross carbon fluxes, i.e. photosynthesis and respiration. The Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) simulated by the different terrestrial models used in CMIP5 show large differences however, not only in terms of mean value but also in terms of phase and amplitude, thus hampering accurate investigations into carbon-climate feedbacks. While the net C flux of an ecosystem (NEE) can be measured in situ with the eddy covariance technique, the GPP is not directly accessible at larger scales and usually estimates are based on indirect measurements combining different tracers. Recent measurements of a new atmospheric tracer, the Carbonyl sulphide (COS), as well as the global measurement of Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF) from satellite instruments (GOSAT, GOME2) open a new window for evaluating the GPP of earth system models. The use of COS relies on the fact that it is absorbed by the leaves in a similar manner to CO2, while there seems to be nothing equivalent to respiration for COS. Following recent work by Launois et al. (ACP, 2015), there is a potential to evaluate model GPP from atmospheric COS and CO2 measurements, using a transport model and recent parameterizations for the non-photosynthetic sinks (oxic soils, atmospheric oxidation) and biogenic sources (oceans and anoxic soils) of COS. Vegetation uptake of COS is modeled as a linear function of GPP and the ratio of COS to CO2 rate of uptake by plants. For the fluorescence, recent measurements of SIF from space appear to be highly correlated with monthly variations of data-driven GPP estimates (Guanter et al., 2012), following a strong dependence of vegetation SIF on photosynthetic activity. These global measurements thus provide new indications on the timing of canopy carbon uptake. In this work, we propose a dual approach that combines the strength of both COS and SIF

  13. Estimating Ground-Level Particulate Matter (PM) Concentration using Satellite-derived Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seohui; Im, Jungho

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are strongly associated with adverse human health effects. In particular, particulate matter less than 10 micrometers and 2.5 micrometers (i.e., PM10 and PM2.5, respectively) can cause cardiovascular and lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Air quality including PM has typically been monitored using station-based in-situ measurements over the world. However, in situ measurements do not provide spatial continuity over large areas. An alternative approach is to use satellite remote sensing as it provides data over vast areas at high temporal resolution. The literature shows that PM concentrations are related with Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) that is derived from satellite observations, but it is still difficult to identify PM concentrations directly from AOD. Some studies used statistical approaches for estimating PM concentrations from AOD while some others combined numerical models and satellite-derived AOD. In this study, satellite-derived products were used to estimate ground PM concentrations based on machine learning over South Korea. Satellite-derived products include AOD from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), soil moisture from AMSR-2, elevation from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and land cover, land surface temperature and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). PM concentrations data were collected from 318 stations. A statistical ordinary least squares (OLS) approach was also tested and compared with the machine learning approach (i.e., random forest). PM concentration was estimated during spring season (from March to May) in 2015 that typically shows high concentration of PM. The randomly selected 80% of data were used for model calibration and the remaining 20% were used for validation. The developed models were further tested for prediction of PM

  14. Capabilities and uncertainties of aircraft measurements for the validation of satellite precipitation products – a virtual case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lammert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing sensors on board of research aircraft provide detailed measurements of clouds and precipitation which can be used as reference data to validate satellite products. Such satellite derived precipitation data using passive microwave radiometers with a resolution of typically 50×50km2$50\\times50\\,\\text{km}^2$ stands against high spatial and temporal resolved airborne measurements, but only along a chosen line. This paper focuses on analysis on the uncertainty arising from the different spatial resolution and coverage. Therefore we use a perfect model approach, with a high resolved forecast model yielding perfect virtual aircraft and satellite observations. The mean precipitation and standard deviation per satellite box were estimated with a Gaussian approach. The comparison of the mean values shows a high correlation of 0.92, but a very wide spread. As criterion to define good agreement between satellite mean and reference, we choose a deviation of one standard deviation of the virtual aircraft as threshold. Considering flight tracks in the range of 50 km (one overflight, the perfect agreement of satellite and aircraft observations is only detected in 65 % of the cases. To increase this low reliability the precipitation distributions of the virtual aircraft were fitted by a gamma density function. Using the same quality criterion, the usage of gamma density fit yields an improvement of the Aircraft reliability up to 80 %.

  15. Performance of TMPA satellite precipitation product over the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharel, G.; Kirilenko, A.; Zhang, X.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite derived precipitation can be used as supplement and/or replacement to ground data in various applications including modeling and weather forecasting based on its accuracy, reliability and validity. We analyzed Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B42 v.6 Level 3 product (0.25° × 0.25°, 3-hour resolution) against the United States Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) ground data from 98 stations in the Northern Great Plains (NGP) over the period of seven years (2003 to 2009). NGP, comprised of Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, South Dakota and Nebraska states of the US, is located between the latitudes 41° - 49° N and longitudes 94° - 113.5° E within the TMPA product latitude band (50° NS).The goal of this research was to investigate the performance of TMPA over the NGP region. Results showed that the TMPA daily data has poor rainfall detection ability (POD ~ 0.3), weak correlation with the meteorological data (ρ=0.46) and high root mean square deviation (RMSD = 4.9 mm/day). We also found noticeable seasonal differences in the daily TMPA product performance. It underperformed during cold season (November to March) with weaker correlation (0.25) and worse POD (~ 0.15), as compared to relatively modest correlation (0.47) and POD (~0.30) during warm season (April to October). Our analysis at monthly scale revealed significantly better performance of TMPA with higher correlation (0.82) and lower RMSD (0.72 mm/day). Based on our findings, the TMPA daily data might be a poor replacement to ground data, however, at a monthly scale, TMPA can be used to estimate spatial rainfall distribution in NGP and/or as an input to a stochastic daily weather generator.

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Precipitation Processing System (PPS) GPM Mission Gridded Text Products Provide Surface Precipitation Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Kelley, O.; Kummerow, C.; Huffman, G.; Olson, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite will complete its first year in space. The core satellite carries a conically scanning microwave imager called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which also has 166 GHz and 183 GHz frequency channels. The GPM core satellite also carries a dual frequency radar (DPR) which operates at Ku frequency, similar to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, and a new Ka frequency. The precipitation processing system (PPS) is producing swath-based instantaneous precipitation retrievals from GMI, both radars including a dual-frequency product, and a combined GMIDPR precipitation retrieval. These level 2 products are written in the HDF5 format and have many additional parameters beyond surface precipitation that are organized into appropriate groups. While these retrieval algorithms were developed prior to launch and are not optimal, these algorithms are producing very creditable retrievals. It is appropriate for a wide group of users to have access to the GPM retrievals. However, for researchers requiring only surface precipitation, these L2 swath products can appear to be very intimidating and they certainly do contain many more variables than the average researcher needs. Some researchers desire only surface retrievals stored in a simple easily accessible format. In response, PPS has begun to produce gridded text based products that contain just the most widely used variables for each instrument (surface rainfall rate, fraction liquid, fraction convective) in a single line for each grid box that contains one or more observations.This paper will describe the gridded data products that are being produced and provide an overview of their content. Currently two types of gridded products are being produced: (1) surface precipitation retrievals from the core satellite instruments GMI, DPR, and combined GMIDPR (2) surface precipitation retrievals for the partner constellation

  17. Trends in a satellite-derived vegetation index and environmental variables in a restored brackish lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yoon Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated relative influence of climatic variables on the plant productivity after lagoon restoration. Chilika Lagoon, the largest brackish lake ecosystem in East Asia, experienced severe problems such as excessive dominance of freshwater exotic plants and rapid debasement of biodiversity associated with decreased hydrologic connectivity between the lagoon and the ocean. To halt the degradation of the lagoon ecosystem, the Chilika Development Authority implemented a restoration project, creating a new channel to penetrate the barrier beach of the lagoon. Using a satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI dataset, we compared the trend of vegetation changes after the lagoon restoration, from April 1998 to May 2014. The time series of NDVI data were decomposed into trend, seasonal, and random components using a local regression method. The results were visualized to understand the traits of spatial distribution in the lagoon. The NDVI trend, indicative of primary productivity, decreased rapidly during the restoration period, and gradually increased (slope coefficient: 2.1×10−4, p<0.05 after two years of restoration. Level of seawater exchange had more influences on plant productivity than local precipitation in the restored lagoon. Higher El Niño/Southern Oscillation increased sea level pressure, and caused intrusion of seawater into the lagoon, and the subsequently elevated salinity decreased the annual mean NDVI. Our findings suggest that lagoon restoration plans for enhancing interconnectivity with the ocean should consider oceanographic effects due to meteorological forcing, and long-term NDVI results can be used as a valuable index for adaptive management of the restoration site.

  18. An optimal merging technique for high-resolution precipitation products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Shrestha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation products are currently available from various sources at higher spatial and temporal resolution than any time in the past. Each of the precipitation products has its strengths and weaknesses in availability, accuracy, resolution, retrieval techniques and quality control. By merging the precipitation data obtained from multiple sources, one can improve its information content by minimizing these issues. However, precipitation data merging poses challenges of scale-mismatch, and accurate error and bias assessment. In this paper we present Optimal Merging of Precipitation (OMP, a new method to merge precipitation data from multiple sources that are of different spatial and temporal resolutions and accuracies. This method is a combination of scale conversion and merging weight optimization, involving performance-tracing based on Bayesian statistics and trend-analysis, which yields merging weights for each precipitation data source. The weights are optimized at multiple scales to facilitate multiscale merging and better precipitation downscaling. Precipitation data used in the experiment include products from the 12-km resolution North American Land Data Assimilation (NLDAS system, the 8-km resolution CMORPH and the 4-km resolution National Stage-IV QPE. The test cases demonstrate that the OMP method is capable of identifying a better data source and allocating a higher priority for them in the merging procedure, dynamically over the region and time period. This method is also effective in filtering out poor quality data introduced into the merging process.

  19. Extreme precipitation patterns reduced terrestrial ecosystem production across biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Moran, S. M.; Nearing, M.; Ponce Campos, G. E.; Huete, A. R.; Buda, A. R.; Bosch, D. D.; Gunter, S. A.; Kitchen, S. G.; McNab, W.; Morgan, J. A.; McClaran, M. P.; Montoya, D. S.; Peters, D. P.; Starks, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation regimes are predicted to shift to more extreme patterns that are characterized by more intense rainfall events and longer dry intervals, yet their ecological impacts on vegetation production remain uncertain across biomes in natural climatic conditions. This in situ study investigated the effects of novel climatic conditions on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by combining a greenness index from satellite measurements and climatic records during 2000 to 2009 from 11 long-term experimental sites in multiple biomes and climates. Results showed that extreme precipitation patterns decreased the sensitivity of ANPP to total annual precipitation (PT), at the regional and decadal scales, leading to a mean 20% decrease in rain-use efficiency across biomes. Relative decreases in ANPP were greatest for arid grassland (16%) and Mediterranean forest (20%), and less for mesic grassland and temperate forest (3%). The co-occurrence of more heavy rainfall events and longer dry intervals caused greater water stress that resulted in reduced vegetation production. A new generalized model was developed to improve predictions of the ANPP response to changes in extreme precipitation patterns by using a function of both PT and an index of precipitation extremes. These findings suggest that extreme precipitation patterns have more substantial and complex effects on vegetation production across biomes, and are as important as total annual precipitation in understanding vegetation processes. With predictions of more extreme weather events, forecasts of ecosystem production should consider these non-linear responses to altered precipitation patterns associated with climate change. Figure. Relation of production across precipitation gradients for 11 sites for two groups (Low: R95p% definitions. The relations were significantly different for the two groups (F2, 106 = 18.51, P < 0.0001).

  20. Assessment of the Consistency among Precipitation Products over Arid Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebreyesus, Dawit; Temimi, Marouane

    2016-04-01

    This study addresses the analysis of the consistency among global precipitation products over arid regions. First, precipitation products were examined against in situ observations from the UAE network. Then, the consistency among the different products was assessed regionally over the Arabian Peninsula and the Sahara Desert. Four distinct independently-derived precipitation products, namely, Global Precipitation Climate Center (GPCC), Willmott-Matsuura 2001 (WM), Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), and CPC Morphing (CMORPH) were examined. Over the UAE, in situ monthly observations from 6 stations over a time period of 11 years, from 2000 to 2010 inclusive, were used. The correlation with in situ observations, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and Relative Bias (rBIAS) were calculated to evaluate the precipitation products. The lowest areal averaged RMSE over all stations, ranging from 3.82mm to 9.98mm, was obtained with the GPCC indicating a higher agreement with in situ observations. The average RMSE of GPCC over the country was 6.18mm. However, the highest areal averaged RMSE, ranging from 9.44 to 19.52mm, was obtained with the WM product with average of 13.57mm. The results showed an overestimation of the observed rainfall values across all products with overall average of 42%. CMORPH product was found to be the most inconsistent products spatially across the UAE with rBIAS ranging from -47% in Al Ain to 372% in Dubai. The correlation with in situ observations was found to be higher with GPCC product ranging from 0.8450 to 0.9494. TRMM was second with an average of 0.8413, ranging from 0.7098 to 0.9248. Furthermore, Mean Relative Difference (MRD) was calculated to investigate the precision among the precipitation products. CMORPH was found to be inconsistent spatially being the lowest estimator for four stations (Adu Dhabi, Al Ain, Sharjah, Ras Al Khaimah) whereas being the highest estimator for the rest two stations (Dubai and Fujairah). Generally, the

  1. Utilization of Precipitation and Moisture Products Derived from Satellites to Support NOAA Operational Precipitation Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, R.; Zhao, L.; Kuligowski, R. J.; Kusselson, S.; Ma, L.; Kidder, S. Q.; Forsythe, J. M.; Jones, A. S.; Ebert, E. E.; Valenti, E.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA/NESDIS operates a constellation of polar and geostationary orbiting satellites to support weather forecasts and to monitor the climate. Additionally, NOAA utilizes satellite assets from other U.S. agencies like NASA and the Department of Defense, as well as those from other nations with similar weather and climate responsibilities (i.e., EUMETSAT and JMA). Over the past two decades, through joint efforts between U.S. and international government researchers, academic partners, and private sector corporations, a series of "value added" products have been developed to better serve the needs of weather forecasters and to exploit the full potential of precipitation and moisture products generated from these satellites. In this presentation, we will focus on two of these products - Ensemble Tropical Rainfall Potential (eTRaP) and Blended Total Precipitable Water (bTPW) - and provide examples on how they contribute to hydrometeorological forecasts. In terms of passive microwave satellite products, TPW perhaps is most widely used to support real-time forecasting applications, as it accurately depicts tropospheric water vapor and its movement. In particular, it has proven to be extremely useful in determining the location, timing, and duration of "atmospheric rivers" which contribute to and sustain flooding events. A multi-sensor approach has been developed and implemented at NESDIS in which passive microwave estimates from multiple satellites and sensors are merged to create a seamless, bTPW product that is more efficient for forecasters to use. Additionally, this product is being enhanced for utilization for television weather forecasters. Examples will be shown to illustrate the roll of atmospheric rivers and contribution to flooding events, and how the bTPW product was used to improve the forecast of these events. Heavy rains associated with land falling tropical cyclones (TC) frequently trigger floods that cause millions of dollars of damage and tremendous loss

  2. A hybrid framework for verification of satellite precipitation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Hsu, K.; AghaKouchak, A.; Sorooshian, S.

    2011-12-01

    Advances in satellite technology have led to the development of many remote-sensing algorithms to estimate precipitation at quasi-global scales. A number of satellite precipitation products are provided at high spatial and temporal resolutions that are suitable for short-term hydrologic applications. Several coordinated validation activities have been established to evaluate the accuracy of satellite precipitation. Traditional verification measures summarize pixel-to-pixel differences between observation and estimates. Object-based verification methods, however, extend pixel based validation to address errors related to spatial patterns and storm structure, such as the shape, volume, and distribution of precipitation rain-objects. In this investigation, a 2D watershed segmentation technique is used to identify rain storm objects and is further adopted in a hybrid verification framework to diagnose the storm-scale rainfall objects from both satellite-based precipitation estimates and ground observations (radar estimates). Five key scores are identified in the objective-based verification framework, including false alarm ratio, missing ratio, maximum of total interest, equal weight and weighted summation of total interest. These scores indicate the performance of satellite estimates with features extracted from the segmented storm objects. The proposed object-based verification framework was used to evaluate PERSIANN, PERSIANN-CCS, CMORPH, 3B42RT against NOAA stage IV MPE multi-sensor composite rain analysis. All estimates are evaluated at 0.25°x0.25° daily-scale in summer 2008 over the continental United States (CONUS). The five final scores for each precipitation product are compared with the median of maximum interest (MMI) of the Method for Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation (MODE). The results show PERSIANN and CMORPH outperform 3B42RT and PERSIANN-CCS. Different satellite products presented distinct features of precipitation. For example, the sizes of

  3. Migratory herbivorous waterfowl track satellite-derived green wave index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatinajafabadi, Mitra; Wang, Tiejun; Skidmore, Andrew K; Toxopeus, Albertus G; Kölzsch, Andrea; Nolet, Bart A; Exo, Klaus-Michael; Griffin, Larry; Stahl, Julia; Cabot, David

    2014-01-01

    Many migrating herbivores rely on plant biomass to fuel their life cycles and have adapted to following changes in plant quality through time. The green wave hypothesis predicts that herbivorous waterfowl will follow the wave of food availability and quality during their spring migration. However, testing this hypothesis is hampered by the large geographical range these birds cover. The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series is an ideal proxy indicator for the development of plant biomass and quality across a broad spatial area. A derived index, the green wave index (GWI), has been successfully used to link altitudinal and latitudinal migration of mammals to spatio-temporal variations in food quality and quantity. To date, this index has not been used to test the green wave hypothesis for individual avian herbivores. Here, we use the satellite-derived GWI to examine the green wave hypothesis with respect to GPS-tracked individual barnacle geese from three flyway populations (Russian n = 12, Svalbard n = 8, and Greenland n = 7). Data were collected over three years (2008-2010). Our results showed that the Russian and Svalbard barnacle geese followed the middle stage of the green wave (GWI 40-60%), while the Greenland geese followed an earlier stage (GWI 20-40%). Despite these differences among geese populations, the phase of vegetation greenness encountered by the GPS-tracked geese was close to the 50% GWI (i.e. the assumed date of peak nitrogen concentration), thereby implying that barnacle geese track high quality food during their spring migration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the migration of individual avian herbivores has been successfully studied with respect to vegetation phenology using the satellite-derived GWI. Our results offer further support for the green wave hypothesis applying to long-distance migrants on a larger scale.

  4. Migratory herbivorous waterfowl track satellite-derived green wave index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Shariatinajafabadi

    Full Text Available Many migrating herbivores rely on plant biomass to fuel their life cycles and have adapted to following changes in plant quality through time. The green wave hypothesis predicts that herbivorous waterfowl will follow the wave of food availability and quality during their spring migration. However, testing this hypothesis is hampered by the large geographical range these birds cover. The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI time series is an ideal proxy indicator for the development of plant biomass and quality across a broad spatial area. A derived index, the green wave index (GWI, has been successfully used to link altitudinal and latitudinal migration of mammals to spatio-temporal variations in food quality and quantity. To date, this index has not been used to test the green wave hypothesis for individual avian herbivores. Here, we use the satellite-derived GWI to examine the green wave hypothesis with respect to GPS-tracked individual barnacle geese from three flyway populations (Russian n = 12, Svalbard n = 8, and Greenland n = 7. Data were collected over three years (2008-2010. Our results showed that the Russian and Svalbard barnacle geese followed the middle stage of the green wave (GWI 40-60%, while the Greenland geese followed an earlier stage (GWI 20-40%. Despite these differences among geese populations, the phase of vegetation greenness encountered by the GPS-tracked geese was close to the 50% GWI (i.e. the assumed date of peak nitrogen concentration, thereby implying that barnacle geese track high quality food during their spring migration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the migration of individual avian herbivores has been successfully studied with respect to vegetation phenology using the satellite-derived GWI. Our results offer further support for the green wave hypothesis applying to long-distance migrants on a larger scale.

  5. Improving High-resolution Spatial Estimates of Precipitation in the Equatorial Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, A.; Rajagopalan, B.; Funk, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    satellite-derived precipitation to be unbiased estimates of gauge precipitation, which is far from being the case. Thus a third method, Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling, is offered. In this, first, the gauge observations are modeled as a function of satellite-derived estimates and other variables such as elevation. The residual from this first hierarchical model is then subjected to a spatial Kriging model. The posterior distributions of all the model parameters are estimated simultaneously in Markov Chain Monte Carlo framework - consequently, the posterior distributions and uncertainties of the blended precipitation estimates are attained. This approach provides a robust treatment of uncertainties and the hierarchy enables incorporating all relevant covariates. These blended products provide more accurate and representative initial conditions for hydrologic modeling applications that are crucial for modeling and mitigating impacts from climate hazards such as floods and landslides which are of major concern in this region.

  6. Few multiyear precipitation-reduction experiments find a shift in the productivity-precipitation relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estiarte, Marc; Vicca, Sara; Peñuelas, Josep; Bahn, Michael; Beier, Claus; Emmett, Bridget A; Fay, Philip A; Hanson, Paul J; Hasibeder, Roland; Kigel, Jaime; Kröel-Dulay, Gyorgy; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Lellei-Kovács, Eszter; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Ogaya, Romà; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Reinsch, Sabine; Sala, Osvaldo E; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Sternberg, Marcelo; Tielbörger, Katja; Tietema, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A

    2016-07-01

    Well-defined productivity-precipitation relationships of ecosystems are needed as benchmarks for the validation of land models used for future projections. The productivity-precipitation relationship may be studied in two ways: the spatial approach relates differences in productivity to those in precipitation among sites along a precipitation gradient (the spatial fit, with a steeper slope); the temporal approach relates interannual productivity changes to variation in precipitation within sites (the temporal fits, with flatter slopes). Precipitation-reduction experiments in natural ecosystems represent a complement to the fits, because they can reduce precipitation below the natural range and are thus well suited to study potential effects of climate drying. Here, we analyse the effects of dry treatments in eleven multiyear precipitation-manipulation experiments, focusing on changes in the temporal fit. We expected that structural changes in the dry treatments would occur in some experiments, thereby reducing the intercept of the temporal fit and displacing the productivity-precipitation relationship downward the spatial fit. The majority of experiments (72%) showed that dry treatments did not alter the temporal fit. This implies that current temporal fits are to be preferred over the spatial fit to benchmark land-model projections of productivity under future climate within the precipitation ranges covered by the experiments. Moreover, in two experiments, the intercept of the temporal fit unexpectedly increased due to mechanisms that reduced either water loss or nutrient loss. The expected decrease of the intercept was observed in only one experiment, and only when distinguishing between the late and the early phases of the experiment. This implies that we currently do not know at which precipitation-reduction level or at which experimental duration structural changes will start to alter ecosystem productivity. Our study highlights the need for experiments with

  7. Physically-based, Hydrologic Simulations Driven by Three Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, S.; Sharif, H. O.; Yeggina, S.; El Hassan, A.

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the model-simulated stream discharge over the Guadalupe River basin in central Texas driven by three precipitation products: the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority (GBRA) rain gauge network, the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) Stage ΙΙΙ precipitation product, and the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 product. Focus will be on results from the Upper Guadalupe River sub-basin. This sub-basin is more prone to flooding due to its geological properties (thin soils, exposed bedrock, and sparse vegetation) and the impact of Balcones Escarpment on the moisture coming from the Gulf of Mexico. The physically based, distributed-parameter Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) hydrologic model was used to simulate the June-2002 flooding event. Simulations driven by NEXRAD Stage ΙΙΙ 15 - min precipitation yielded better results with low RMSE (88.3%), high NSE (0.6), high R2 (0.73), low RSR (0.63) and low PBIAS (-17.3%) compared to simulations driven by the other products.

  8. Satellite-derived methane emissions from inundation in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C. N.; Bennartz, R.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The uncertainty in methane (CH4) source strength of rice fields and wetlands is particularly high in South Asia CH4 budgets. We used satellite observations of CH4 column mixing ratios from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY), and Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) to estimate the contribution of Bangladesh emissions to atmospheric CH4 concentrations. Using satellite-derived inundation area as a proxy for source area, we developed a simple inverse advection model that estimates average annual CH4 surface fluxes to be 4, 9, and 19 mg CH4 m-2 h-1 in AIRS, SCIAMACHY, and GOSAT, respectively. Despite this variability, our flux estimates varied over a significantly narrower range than reported values for CH4 surface fluxes from a survey of 32 studies reporting ground-based observations between 0 and 260 mg CH4 m-2 h-1. Upscaling our satellite-derived surface flux estimates, we estimated total annual CH4 emissions for Bangladesh to be 1.3 ± 3.2, 1.8 ± 2.0, 3.1 ± 1.6 Tg yr-1, depending on the satellite. Our estimates of total emissions are in line with the median of total emission values for Bangladesh reported in earlier studies.

  9. Enhanced interannual precipitation variability increases plant functional diversity that in turn ameliorates negative impact on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-12-01

    Although precipitation interannual variability is projected to increase due to climate change, effects of changes in precipitation variance have received considerable less attention than effects of changes in the mean state of climate. Interannual precipitation variability effects on functional diversity and its consequences for ecosystem functioning are assessed here using a 6-year rainfall manipulation experiment. Five precipitation treatments were switched annually resulting in increased levels of precipitation variability while maintaining average precipitation constant. Functional diversity showed a positive response to increased variability due to increased evenness. Dominant grasses decreased and rare plant functional types increased in abundance because grasses showed a hump-shaped response to precipitation with a maximum around modal precipitation, whereas rare species peaked at high precipitation values. Increased functional diversity ameliorated negative effects of precipitation variability on primary production. Rare species buffered the effect of precipitation variability on the variability in total productivity because their variance decreases with increasing precipitation variance.

  10. Temporal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Precipitation Products for Hydrological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, K. J.; Bennett, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    No study has systematically evaluated streamflow modeling between monthly and daily timescales. This study examines streamflow from eight watersheds across the United States where five different precipitation products were used as primary input into the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to generate simulated streamflow. Timescales examined include monthly, dekad (10 day), pentad (5 day), triad (3 day), and daily. The eight basins studied are the San Pedro (Arizona); Cimarron (north-central Oklahoma); mid-Nueces (south Texas); mid-Rio Grande (south Texas and northern Mexico), Yocano (northern Mississippi); Alapaha (south Georgia); Upper Tar (North Carolina) and mid-St. Francis (eastern Arkansas). The precipitation products used to drive simulations include rain gauge, NWS Multisensor Precipitation Estimator, Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission, Multi-Satellite (TRMM) Precipitation Analysis, TRMM 3B42-V6, and Climate Prediction Center Morphing Method (CMORPH). Understanding how streamflow varies at sub-monthly timescales is important because there are a host of hydrological applications such a flood forecast guidance and reservoir inflow forecasts that reside in a temporal domain between monthly and daily timescales. The major finding of this study is the quantification of a strong positive correlation between performance metrics and time step at which model performance deteriorates. Basically, better performing simulations, with higher Nash-Sutcliffe values of 0.80 and above can support modeling at finer timescales to at least daily and perhaps beyond into the sub-daily realm. These findings are significant in that they clearly document the ability of SWAT to support modeling at sub-monthly time steps, which is beyond the capability for which SWAT was initially designed.

  11. Improving high-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation via fusion of multiple radar-based precipitation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieeinasab, Arezoo; Norouzi, Amir; Seo, Dong-Jun; Nelson, Brian

    2015-12-01

    For monitoring and prediction of water-related hazards in urban areas such as flash flooding, high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic modeling is necessary. Because of large sensitivity and scale dependence of rainfall-runoff models to errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), it is very important that the accuracy of QPE be improved in high-resolution hydrologic modeling to the greatest extent possible. With the availability of multiple radar-based precipitation products in many areas, one may now consider fusing them to produce more accurate high-resolution QPE for a wide spectrum of applications. In this work, we formulate and comparatively evaluate four relatively simple procedures for such fusion based on Fisher estimation and its conditional bias-penalized variant: Direct Estimation (DE), Bias Correction (BC), Reduced-Dimension Bias Correction (RBC) and Simple Estimation (SE). They are applied to fuse the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and radar-only Next Generation QPE (Q2) products at the 15-min 1-km resolution (Experiment 1), and the MPE and Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) QPE products at the 15-min 500-m resolution (Experiment 2). The resulting fused estimates are evaluated using the 15-min rain gauge observations from the City of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW) in north Texas. The main criterion used for evaluation is that the fused QPE improves over the ingredient QPEs at their native spatial resolutions, and that, at the higher resolution, the fused QPE improves not only over the ingredient higher-resolution QPE but also over the ingredient lower-resolution QPE trivially disaggregated using the ingredient high-resolution QPE. All four procedures assume that the ingredient QPEs are unbiased, which is not likely to hold true in reality even if real-time bias correction is in operation. To test robustness under more realistic conditions, the fusion procedures were evaluated with and

  12. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of

  13. An application programming interface for extreme precipitation and hazard products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Stanley, T.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Reed, J.; Lammers, M.

    2016-12-01

    Remote sensing data provides situational awareness of extreme events and hazards over large areas in a way that is impossible to achieve with in situ data. However, more valuable than raw data is actionable information based on user needs. This information can take the form of derived products, extraction of a subset of variables in a larger data matrix, or data processing for a specific goal. These products can then stream to the end users, who can use these data to improve local to global decision making. This presentation will outline both the science and methodology of two new data products and tools that can provide relevant climate and hazard data for response and support. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission provides near real-time information on rain and snow around the world every thirty minutes. Through a new applications programing interface (API), this data can be freely accessed by consumers to visualize, analyze, and communicate where, when and how much rain is falling worldwide. The second tool is a global landslide model that provides situational awareness of potential landslide activity in near real-time, utilizing several remotely sensed data products. This hazard information is also provided through an API and is being ingested by the emergency response community, international aid organizations, and others around the world. This presentation will highlight lessons learned through the development, implementation, and communication of these products and tools with the goal of enabling better and more effective decision making.

  14. Evaluating Satellite Products for Precipitation Estimation in Mountain Regions: A Case Study for Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarendra Lakhankar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation in mountain regions is often highly variable and poorly observed, limiting abilities to manage water resource challenges. Here, we evaluate remote sensing and ground station-based gridded precipitation products over Nepal against weather station precipitation observations on a monthly timescale. We find that the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM 3B-43 precipitation product exhibits little mean bias and reasonable skill in giving precipitation over Nepal. Compared to station observations, the TRMM precipitation product showed an overall Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.49, which is similar to the skill of the gridded station-based product Asian Precipitation-Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE. The other satellite precipitation products considered (Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP, the Climate Prediction Center Morphing technique (CMORPH, Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information Using Artificial Neural Networks-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS were less skillful, as judged by Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, and, on average, substantially underestimated precipitation compared to station observations, despite their, in some cases, higher nominal spatial resolution compared to TRMM. None of the products fully captured the dependence of mean precipitation on elevation seen in the station observations. Overall, the TRMM product is promising for use in water resources applications.

  15. Comparison of Satellite-Derived and In-Situ Observations of Ice and Snow Surface Temperatures over Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Box, Jason E.; Casey, Kimberly A.; Hook, Simon J.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Steffen, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    The most practical way to get a spatially broad and continuous measurements of the surface temperature in the data-sparse cryosphere is by satellite remote sensing. The uncertainties in satellite-derived LSTs must be understood to develop internally-consistent decade-scale land-surface temperature (LST) records needed for climate studies. In this work we assess satellite-derived "clear-sky" LST products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and LSTs derived from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) over snow and ice on Greenland. When possible, we compare satellite-derived LSTs with in-situ air-temperature observations from Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) automatic-weather stations (AWS). We find that MODIS, ASTER and ETM+ provide reliable and consistent LSTs under clear-sky conditions and relatively-flat terrain over snow and ice targets over a range of temperatures from -40 to 0 C. The satellite-derived LSTs agree within a relative RMS uncertainty of approx.0.5 C. The good agreement among the LSTs derived from the various satellite instruments is especially notable since different spectral channels and different retrieval algorithms are used to calculate LST from the raw satellite data. The AWS record in-situ data at a "point" while the satellite instruments record data over an area varying in size from: 57 X 57 m (ETM+), 90 X 90 m (ASTER), or to 1 X 1 km (MODIS). Surface topography and other factors contribute to variability of LST within a pixel, thus the AWS measurements may not be representative of the LST of the pixel. Without more information on the local spatial patterns of LST, the AWS LST cannot be considered valid ground truth for the satellite measurements, with RMS uncertainty approx.2 C. Despite the relatively large AWS-derived uncertainty, we find LST data are characterized by high accuracy but have uncertain absolute precision.

  16. Initialization with diabatic heating from satellite-derived rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Leiming; Chan, Johnny; Davidson, Noel E.; Turk, Joe

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, a new technique is proposed to improve initialization of a tropical cyclone (TC) prediction model using diabatic heating profiles estimated from a combination of both infrared satellite cloud imagery and satellite-derived rainfall. The method is termed Rainfall-defined Diabatic Heating, RDH. To examine the RDH performance, initialization and forecast experiments are made with the Australia Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) Tropical Cyclone — Limited Area Prediction System (TC-LAPS) for the case of TC Chris, which made landfall on the west coast of Australia during 3-6 Feb 2002. RDH is performed in three steps: 1) based on previous observational and numerical studies, reference diabatic heating profiles are firstly classified into three kinds: convective, stratiform or composite types; 2) NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) 3-hourly gridded satellite rainfall estimates are categorized as one of the three types according to the rain rate; 3) within a nudging phase of 24 h, the model-generated heating at each grid point during the integration is replaced by the reference heating profiles on the basis of the satellite-observed cloud top temperature and rainfall type. The results of sensitivity experiments show that RDH has a positive impact on the model initialization of TC Chris. The heating profiles generated by the model within the observed rainfall area show agreement with that of reference heating. That is, maximum heating is located in the lower troposphere for convective rainfall, and in the upper troposphere for stratiform rainfall. In response to the replaced heating and its impact on the TC structure, the model initial condition and forecasts of the track and intensity are improved.

  17. Linking Satellite-Derived Fire Counts to Satellite-Derived Weather Data in Fire Prediction Models to Forecast Extreme Fires in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, D. J.; Soja, A. J.; Stackhouse, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    Fire is the dominant disturbance that precipitates ecosystem change in boreal regions, and fire is largely under the control of weather and climate. Fire frequency, fire severity, area burned and fire season length are predicted to increase in boreal regions under climate change scenarios. Therefore to predict fire weather and ecosystem change, we must understand the factors that influence fire regimes and at what scale these are viable. The Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI), developed by the Canadian Forestry Service, is used for this comparison, and it is calculated using local noon surface-level air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and daily (noon-noon) rainfall. The FWI assesses daily forest fire burning potential. Large-scale FWI are calculated at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) using NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 (GEOS-4) large-scale reanalysis and NASA Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data. The GEOS-4 reanalysis weather data are 3-hourly interpolated to 1-hourly data at a 1ox1o resolution and the GPCP precipitation data are also at 1ox1o resolution. In previous work focusing on the fire season in Siberia in 1999 and 2002, we have shown the combination of GEOS-4 weather data and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data compares well to ground-based weather data when used as inputs for FWI calculation. The density and accuracy of Siberian surface station data can be limited, which leads to results that are not representative of the spatial reality. GEOS-4/GPCP-dervied FWI can serve to spatially enhance current and historic FWI, because these data are spatially and temporally consistency. The surface station and model reanalysis derived fire weather indices compared well spatially, temporally and quantitatively, and increased fire activity compares well with increasing FWI ratings. To continue our previous work, we statistically compare satellite-derived fire counts to FWI categories at

  18. Evaluation of global fine-resolution precipitation products and their uncertainty quantification in ensemble discharge simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W.; Zhang, C.; Fu, G.; Sweetapple, C.; Zhou, H.

    2016-02-01

    The applicability of six fine-resolution precipitation products, including precipitation radar, infrared, microwave and gauge-based products, using different precipitation computation recipes, is evaluated using statistical and hydrological methods in northeastern China. In addition, a framework quantifying uncertainty contributions of precipitation products, hydrological models, and their interactions to uncertainties in ensemble discharges is proposed. The investigated precipitation products are Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products (TRMM3B42 and TRMM3B42RT), Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)/Noah, Asian Precipitation - Highly-Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE), Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN), and a Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMAP-MVK+) product. Two hydrological models of different complexities, i.e. a water and energy budget-based distributed hydrological model and a physically based semi-distributed hydrological model, are employed to investigate the influence of hydrological models on simulated discharges. Results show APHRODITE has high accuracy at a monthly scale compared with other products, and GSMAP-MVK+ shows huge advantage and is better than TRMM3B42 in relative bias (RB), Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (NSE), root mean square error (RMSE), correlation coefficient (CC), false alarm ratio, and critical success index. These findings could be very useful for validation, refinement, and future development of satellite-based products (e.g. NASA Global Precipitation Measurement). Although large uncertainty exists in heavy precipitation, hydrological models contribute most of the uncertainty in extreme discharges. Interactions between precipitation products and hydrological models can have the similar magnitude of contribution to discharge uncertainty as the hydrological models. A

  19. The production of precipitated calcium carbonate from industrial gypsum wastes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Precipitated calcium carbonate is a material of great interest due to its large range of applications. Although there are extensive reserves of limestone worldwide, very few deposits are of sufficient quality to provide raw materials for specialised...

  20. Surface radiation at sea validation of satellite-derived data with shipboard measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Dieter Behr

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality-controlled and validated radiation products are the basis for their ability to serve the climate and solar energy community. Satellite-derived radiation fluxes are well preferred for this task as they cover the whole research area in time and space. In order to monitor the accuracy of these data, validation with well maintained and calibrated ground based measurements is necessary. Over sea, however, long-term accurate reference data sets from calibrated instruments recording radiation are scarce. Therefore data from research vessels operating at sea are used to perform a reasonable validation. A prerequisite is that the instruments on board are maintained as well as land borne stations. This paper focuses on the comparison of radiation data recorded on board of the German Research Vessel "Meteor" during her 13 months cruise across the Mediterranean and the Black Sea with CM-SAF products using NOAA- and MSG-data (August 2006-August 2007: surface incoming short-wave radiation (SIS and surface downward long-wave radiation (SDL. Measuring radiation fluxes at sea causes inevitable errors, e.g.shadowing of fields of view of the radiometers by parts of the ship. These ship-inherent difficulties are discussed at first. A comparison of pairs of ship-recorded and satellite-derived mean fluxes for the complete measuring period delivers a good agreement: the mean bias deviation (MBD for SIS daily means is −7.6 W/m2 with a median bias of −4 W/m2 and consistently the MBD for monthly means is −7.3 W/m2, for SDL daily means the MBD is 8.1 and 6 W/m2 median bias respectively. The MBD for monthly means is 8.2 W/m2. The variances of the daily means (ship and satellite have the same annual courses for both fluxes. No significant dependence of the bias on the total cloud cover recorded according to WMO (1969 has been found. The results of the comparison between ship-based observations and satellite retrieved surface radiation reveal the good accuracy

  1. Model-simulated and Satellite-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) Comparisons Across Multiple Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiames, J. S., Jr.; Cooter, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is an important parameter in assessing vegetation structure for characterizing forest canopies over large areas at broad spatial scales using satellite remote sensing data. However, satellite-derived LAI products can be limited by obstructed atmospheric conditions yielding sub-optimal values, or complete non-returns. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Exposure Methods and Measurements and Computational Exposure Divisions are investigating the viability of supplemental modelled LAI inputs into satellite-derived data streams to support various regional and local scale air quality models for retrospective and future climate assessments. In this present study, one-year (2002) of plot level stand characteristics at four study sites located in Virginia and North Carolina (USA) are used to calibrate species-specific plant parameters in a semi-empirical biogeochemical model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model was designed primarily for managed agricultural field crop ecosystems, but also includes managed woody species that span both xeric and mesic sites (e.g., mesquite, pine, oak, etc.). LAI was simulated using EPIC at a 4 km2 and 12 km2 grid coincident with the regional Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) grid. LAI comparisons were made between model-simulated and MODIS-derived LAI. Field/satellite-upscaled LAI was also compared to the corresponding MODIS LAI value. Preliminary results show field/satellite-upscaled LAI (1 km2) was 1.5 to 3 times smaller than that with the corresponding 1 km2 MODIS LAI for all four sites across all dates, with the largest discrepancies occurring at leaf-out and leaf senescence periods. Simulated LAI/MODIS LAI comparison results will be presented at the conference. Disclaimer: This work is done in support of EPA's Sustainable Healthy Communities Research Program. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded and conducted the research described in this paper. Although

  2. A Generalized Statistical Uncertainty Model for Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachi, S.

    2013-12-01

    A mixture model of Generalized Normal Distribution and Gamma distribution (GND-G) is used to model the joint probability distribution of satellite-based and stage IV radar rainfall under a given spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. 1°x1° and daily rainfall). The distribution parameters of GND-G are extended across various rainfall rates and spatial and temporal resolutions. In the study, GND-G is used to describe the uncertainty of the estimates from Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensing Information using Artificial Neural Network algorithm (PERSIANN). The stage IV-based multi-sensor precipitation estimates (MPE) are used as reference measurements .The study area for constructing the uncertainty model covers a 15°×15°box of 0.25°×0.25° cells over the eastern United States for summer 2004 to 2009. Cells are aggregated in space and time to obtain data with different resolutions for the construction of the model's parameter space. Result shows that comparing to the other statistical uncertainty models, GND-G fits better than the other models, such as Gaussian and Gamma distributions, to the reference precipitation data. The impact of precipitation uncertainty to the stream flow is further demonstrated by Monte Carlo simulation of precipitation forcing in the hydrologic model. The NWS DMIP2 basins over Illinois River basin south of Siloam is selected in this case study. The data covers the time period of 2006 to 2008.The uncertainty range of stream flow from precipitation of GND-G distributions calculated and will be discussed.

  3. New Global Precipitation Products and Data Service Updates at the NASA GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Ostrenga, D.; Savtchenko, A.; DeShong, B.; Greene, M.; Vollmer, B.; Kempler, S.

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes recent updates of the ongoing GPM data service activities at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center(DISC) to facilitate access and exploration of GPM, TRMM and other NASA precipitation datasets for the global community. The poster contains -Updates on GPM products and data services -New features in Giovanni for precipitation data visualization -Precipitation data and service outreach activities.

  4. Adequacy of satellite derived rainfall data for stream flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, G.; Gadain, Hussein; Smith, Jody L.; Asante, Kwasi; Bandaragoda, C.J.; Verdin, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Floods are the most common and widespread climate-related hazard on Earth. Flood forecasting can reduce the death toll associated with floods. Satellites offer effective and economical means for calculating areal rainfall estimates in sparsely gauged regions. However, satellite-based rainfall estimates have had limited use in flood forecasting and hydrologic stream flow modeling because the rainfall estimates were considered to be unreliable. In this study we present the calibration and validation results from a spatially distributed hydrologic model driven by daily satellite-based estimates of rainfall for sub-basins of the Nile and Mekong Rivers. The results demonstrate the usefulness of remotely sensed precipitation data for hydrologic modeling when the hydrologic model is calibrated with such data. However, the remotely sensed rainfall estimates cannot be used confidently with hydrologic models that are calibrated with rain gauge measured rainfall, unless the model is recalibrated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007.

  5. Modelling dengue fever risk in the State of Yucatan, Mexico using regional-scale satellite-derived sea surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureano-Rosario, Abdiel E; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Gomez-Carro, Salvador; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Muller-Karger, Frank E

    2017-08-01

    Accurately predicting vector-borne diseases, such as dengue fever, is essential for communities worldwide. Changes in environmental parameters such as precipitation, air temperature, and humidity are known to influence dengue fever dynamics. Furthermore, previous studies have shown how oceanographic variables, such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related sea surface temperature from the Pacific Ocean, influences dengue fever in the Americas. However, literature is lacking on the use of regional-scale satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) to assess its relationship with dengue fever in coastal areas. Data on confirmed dengue cases, demographics, precipitation, and air temperature were collected. Incidence of weekly dengue cases was examined. Stepwise multiple regression analyses (AIC model selection) were used to assess which environmental variables best explained increased dengue incidence rates. SST, minimum air temperature, precipitation, and humidity substantially explained 42% of the observed variation (r(2)=0.42). Infectious diseases are characterized by the influence of past cases on current cases and results show that previous dengue cases alone explained 89% of the variation. Ordinary least-squares analyses showed a positive trend of 0.20±0.03°C in SST from 2006 to 2015. An important element of this study is to help develop strategic recommendations for public health officials in Mexico by providing a simple early warning capability for dengue incidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Explore GPM IMERG and Other Global Precipitation Products with GES DISC GIOVANNI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana M.; Vollmer, Bruce; MacRitchie, Kyle; Kempler, Steven

    2015-01-01

    New features and capabilities in the newly released GIOVANNI allow exploring GPM IMERG (Integrated Multi-satelliE Retrievals for GPM) Early, Late and Final Run global half-hourly and monthly precipitation products as well as other precipitation products distributed by the GES DISC such as TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), NLDAS (North American Land Data Assimilation Systems), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation Systems), etc. GIOVANNI is a web-based tool developed by the GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences and Data Information Services Center) to visualize and analyze Earth science data without having to download data and software. The new interface in GIOVANNI allows searching and filtering precipitation products from different NASA missions and projects and expands the capabilities to inter-compare different precipitation products in one interface. Knowing differences in precipitation products is important to identify issues in retrieval algorithms, biases, uncertainties, etc. Due to different formats, data structures, units and so on, it is not easy to inter-compare precipitation products. Newly added features and capabilities (unit conversion, regridding, etc.) in GIOVANNI make inter-comparisons possible. In this presentation, we will describe these new features and capabilities along with examples.

  7. Using GIS data and satellite derived irradiance to optimize siting of PV installations in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Annelen; Nguyen, Viet-Anh; Bartlett, Stuart; Sossan, Fabrizio; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For a successful distribution strategy of PV installations, it does not suffice to choose the locations with highest annual total irradiance. Attention needs to be given to spatial correlation patterns of insolation to avoid large system-wide variations, which can cause extended deficits in supply or might even damage the electrical network. One alternative goal instead is to seek configurations that provide the smoothest energy production, with the most reliable and predictable supply. Our work investigates several scenarios, each pursuing a different strategy for a future renewable Switzerland without nuclear power. Based on an estimate for necessary installed capacity for solar power [Bartlett, 2015] we first use heuristics to pre-select realistic placements for PV installations. Then we apply optimization methods to find a subset of locations that provides the best possible combined electricity production. For the first part of the selection process, we use a DEM to exclude high elevation zones which would be difficult to access and which are prone to natural hazards. Then we use land surface cover information to find all zones with potential roof area, deemed suitable for installation of solar panels. The optimization employs Principal Component Analysis of satellite derived irradiance data (Surface Incoming Shortwave Radiation (SIS), based on Meteosat Second Generation sensors) to incorporate a spatial aspect into the selection process that does not simply maximize annual total production but rather provides the most robust supply, by combining regions with anti-correlated cloud cover patterns. Depending on the initial assumptions and constraints, the resulting distribution schemes for PV installations vary with respect to required surface area, annual total and lowest short-term production, and illustrate how important it is to clearly define priorities and policies for a future renewable Switzerland.

  8. Error Analysis and Evaluation of the Latest GSMap and IMERG Precipitation Products over Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Ning

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study comprehensively analyzes error characteristics and performance of the two latest GPM-era satellite precipitation products over eastern China from April 2014 to March 2016. Analysis results indicate that the two products have totally different spatial distributions of total bias. Many of the underestimations for the GSMap-gauged could be traced to significant hit bias, with a secondary contribution from missed precipitation. For IMERG, total bias illustrates significant overestimation over most of the eastern part of China, except upper reaches of Yangtze and Yellow River basins. GSMap-gauged tends to overestimate light precipitation (<16 mm/day and underestimate precipitation with rain rate larger than 16 mm/day; however, IMERG underestimates precipitation at rain rate between 8 and 64 mm/day and overestimates precipitation at rain rate more than 64 mm/day. IMERG overestimates extreme precipitation indices (RR99P and R20TOT, with relative bias values of 17.9% and 11.5%, respectively. But GSMap-gauged shows significant underestimation of these indices. In addition, both products performed well in the Huaihe, Liaohe, and Yangtze River basins for extreme precipitation detection. At basin scale comparisons, the GSMap-gauged data has a relatively higher accuracy than IMERG, especially at the Haihe, Huaihe, Liaohe, and Yellow River basins.

  9. Germanium recovery from gasification fly ash: evaluation of end-products obtained by precipitation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Fátima; Font, Oriol; Fernández-Pereira, Constantino; Querol, Xavier; Juan, Roberto; Ruiz, Carmen; Coca, Pilar

    2009-08-15

    In this study the purity of the germanium end-products obtained by two different precipitation methods carried out on germanium-bearing solutions was evaluated as a last step of a hydrometallurgy process for the recovery of this valuable element from the Puertollano Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) fly ash. Since H(2)S is produced as a by-product in the gas cleaning system of the Puertollano IGCC plant, precipitation of germanium as GeS(2) was tested by sulfiding the Ge-bearing solutions. The technological and hazardous issues that surround H(2)S handling conducted to investigate a novel precipitation procedure: precipitation as an organic complex by adding 1,2-dihydroxy benzene pyrocatechol (CAT) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to the Ge-bearing solutions. Relatively high purity Ge end-products (90 and 93% hexagonal-GeO(2) purity, respectively) were obtained by precipitating Ge from enriched solutions, as GeS(2) sulfiding the solutions with H(2)S, or as organic complex with CAT/CTAB mixtures and subsequent roasting of the precipitates. Both methods showed high efficiency (>99%) to precipitate selectively Ge using a single precipitation stage from germanium-bearing solutions.

  10. NESDIS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) ATMS Precipitation and Surface Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains two-dimensional precipitation and surface products from the NESDIS Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) using sensor data from the...

  11. Kinetics of sorption of oil products by hydroxide precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, N.A.; Dubrovskaya, G.E.; Berezyuk, V.G.; Pushkarev, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    Study of the kinetics of sorption of oils (palm and coriander oils, Genrex-26, Emulsol E-2(B)) under static conditions by aluminum and iron hydroxide precipitates (with FeSO/sub 4/, FeCl/sub 3/, and AlCl/sub 3/ as coagulants) showed that an increase of temperature to 40 to 50/sup 0/C raises the sorption rate substantially. The kinetic relations can be represented by equations for first-order reactions. The calculated rate constants and the values of the empirical activation energies are evidence of physical sorption with diffusion as the controlling step.

  12. Assessment of the consistency among global precipitation products over the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Wehbe

    2017-08-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: The UAE, similar to other dryland environments lacking adequate hydrologic monitoring networks, presents a unique area to evaluate satellite remote sensing products and the erratic spatiotemporal nature of precipitation in diverse environments. Statistical analyses indicate that the TMPA V7 precipitation products record the highest overall agreement with the observational network. Within the UAE, areas that receive high rainfall and fall within the vegetated highlands (e.g., >250 m, provide the most promise for incorporating satellite precipitation into hydrologic monitoring, modeling, or water resource management.

  13. Assessing the performance of satellite-based precipitation products over the Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaver, Angelika; Dorigo, Wouter; Brocca, Luca; Ciabatta, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Detailed knowledge about the spatial and temporal patterns and quantities of precipitation is of high importance. This applies especially in the Mediterranean region, where water demand for agricultural, industrial and touristic needs is growing and climate projections foresee a decrease of precipitation amounts and an increase in variability. In this region, ground-based rain gauges are available only limited in number, particularly in northern Africa and the Middle East and lack to capture the high spatio-temporal character of precipitation over large areas. This has motivated the development of a large number of remote sensing products for monitoring rainfall. Satellite-based precipitation products are based on various observation principles and retrieval approaches, i.e. from thermal infra-red and microwaves. Although, many individual validation studies on the performance of these precipitation datasets exist, they mostly examine only one or a few of these rainfall products at the same time and are not targeted at the Mediterranean basin as a whole. Here, we present an extensive comparative study of seven different satellite-based precipitation products, namely CMORPH 30-minutes, CMORPH 3-hourly, GPCP, PERSIANN, SM2Rain CCI, TRMM TMPA 3B42, and TRMM TMPA 3B42RT, focusing on the whole Mediterranean region and on individual Mediterranean catchments. The time frame of investigation is restricted by the common availability of all precipitation products and covers the period 2000-2013. We assess the skill of the satellite products against gridded gauge-based data provided by GPCC and E-OBS. Apart from common characteristics like biases and temporal correlations we evaluate several sophisticated dataset properties that are of particular interest for Mediterranean hydrology, including the capability of the remotely sensed products to capture extreme events and trends. A clear seasonal dependency of the correlation results can be observed for the whole Mediterranean

  14. Incorporating Uncertainties in Satellite-Derived Chlorophyll into Model Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    radiances in the seven visible MODIS channels used in the estimation of the bio-optical products, such as chlorophyll, absorption and backscattering...grazers, nitrate, silicate, ammonium, and two detritus pools. Phytoplankton photosynthesis in the biochemical model is driven by Photosynthetically

  15. Identifying individual fires from satellite-derived burned area data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archibald, S

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for identifying individual fires from the Modis burned area data product is introduced for southern Africa. This algorithm gives the date of burning, size of fire, and location of the centroid for all fires identified over 8 years...

  16. Assessment and Comparison of TMPA Satellite Precipitation Products in Varying Climatic and Topographic Regimes in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Milewski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA satellite precipitation products have been utilized to quantify, forecast, or understand precipitation patterns, climate change, hydrologic models, and drought in numerous scientific investigations. The TMPA products recently went through a series of algorithm developments to enhance the accuracy and reliability of high-quality precipitation measurements, particularly in low rainfall environments and complex terrain. In this study, we evaluated four TMPA products (3B42: V6, V7temp, V7, RTV7 against 125 rain gauges in Northern Morocco to assess the accuracy of TMPA products in various regimes, examine the performance metrics of new algorithm developments, and assess the impact of the processing error in 2012. Results show that the research products outperform the real-time products in all environments within Morocco, and the newest algorithm development (3B42 V7 outperforms the previous version (V6, particularly in low rainfall and high-elevation environments. TMPA products continue to overestimate precipitation in arid environments and underestimate it in high-elevation areas. Lastly, the temporary processing error resulted in little bias except in arid environments. These results corroborate findings from previous studies, provide scientific data for the Middle East, highlight the difficulty of using TMPA products in varying conditions, and present preliminary research for future algorithm development for the GPM mission.

  17. Next-Generation Satellite Precipitation Products for Understanding Global and Regional Water Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in understanding the space-time variability of continental water fluxes is the lack of accurate precipitation estimates over complex terrains. While satellite precipitation observations can be used to complement ground-based data to obtain improved estimates, space-based and ground-based estimates come with their own sets of uncertainties, which must be understood and characterized. Quantitative estimation of uncertainties in these products also provides a necessary foundation for merging satellite and ground-based precipitation measurements within a rigorous statistical framework. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission that will provide next-generation global precipitation data products for research and applications. It consists of a constellation of microwave sensors provided by NASA, JAXA, CNES, ISRO, EUMETSAT, DOD, NOAA, NPP, and JPSS. At the heart of the mission is the GPM Core Observatory provided by NASA and JAXA to be launched in 2013. The GPM Core, which will carry the first space-borne dual-frequency radar and a state-of-the-art multi-frequency radiometer, is designed to set new reference standards for precipitation measurements from space, which can then be used to unify and refine precipitation retrievals from all constellation sensors. The next-generation constellation-based satellite precipitation estimates will be characterized by intercalibrated radiometric measurements and physical-based retrievals using a common observation-derived hydrometeor database. For pre-launch algorithm development and post-launch product evaluation, NASA supports an extensive ground validation (GV) program in cooperation with domestic and international partners to improve (1) physics of remote-sensing algorithms through a series of focused field campaigns, (2) characterization of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based precipitation products over selected GV testbeds, and (3) modeling of atmospheric processes and

  18. Supporting Hydrometeorological Research and Applications with Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Products and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Deshong, B.; MacRitchie, K.; Greene, M.; Kempler, S.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is an important dataset in hydrometeorological research and applications such as flood modeling, drought monitoring, etc. On February 27, 2014, the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched to provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow (http:pmm.nasa.govGPM). The GPM mission consists of an international network of satellites in which a GPM Core Observatory satellite carries both active and passive microwave instruments to measure precipitation and serve as a reference standard, to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of other research and operational satellites. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data. The GES DISC is home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). GPM products currently available include the following:1. Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products2. Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products (Level-2 and Level-3)3. GPM dual-frequency precipitation radar and their combined products (Level-2 and Level-3)4. Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products (early, late, and final run)GPM data can be accessed through a number of data services (e.g., Simple Subset Wizard, OPeNDAP, WMS, WCS, ftp, etc.). A newly released Unified User Interface or UUI is a single interface to provide users seamless access to data, information and services. For example, a search for precipitation products will not only return TRMM and GPM products, but also other global precipitation products such as MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation Systems), etc.New features and capabilities have been recently added in GIOVANNI to allow exploring and inter-comparing GPM IMERG (Integrated Multi-satelliE Retrievals for GPM) half-hourly and monthly precipitation

  19. Relating watershed nutrient loads to satellite derived estuarine water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrter, J. C.; Le, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient enhanced phytoplankton production is a cause of degraded estuarine water quality. Yet, relationships between watershed nutrient loads and the spatial and temporal scales of phytoplankton blooms and subsequent water quality impairments remain unquantified for most systems. This is partially due to a lack of observations. In many systems, satellite remote sensing of water quality variables may be used to supplement limited field observations and improve understanding of linkages to nutrients. Here, we present the results from a field and satellite ocean color study that quantitatively links nutrients to variations in estuarine water quality endpoints. The study was conducted in Pensacola Bay, Florida, an estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico that is impacted by watershed nutrients. We developed new empirical band ratio algorithms to retrieve phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll a (chla), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS). MERIS had suitable spatial resolution (300-m) for the scale of Pensacola Bay (area = 370 km2, mean depth = 3.4 m) and a spectral band centered at wavelength 709 nm that was used to minimize the effect of organic matter on chla retrieval. The algorithms were applied to daily MERIS remote sensing reflectance (level 2) data acquired from 2003 to 2011 to calculate nine-year time-series of mean monthly chla, CDOM, and SPM concentrations. The MERIS derived time-series were then analyzed for statistical relations with time-series of mean monthly river discharge and river loads of nitrogen, phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon, and SPM. Regression analyses revealed significant relationships between river loads and MERIS water quality variables. The simple regression models provide quantitative predictions about how much chla, CDOM, and SPM concentrations in Pensacola Bay will increase with increased river loading, which is necessary information

  20. Evaluation of Six High-Resolution Satellite and Ground-Based Precipitation Products over Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou Leong Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite precipitation products (SPPs potentially constitute an alternative to sparse rain gauge networks for assessing the spatial distribution of precipitation. However, applications of these products are still limited due to the lack of robust quality assessment. This study compares daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual rainfall amount at 342 rain gauges over Malaysia to estimations using five SPPs (3B42RT, 3B42V7, GPCP-1DD, PERSIANN-CDR, and CMORPH and a ground-based precipitation product (APHRODITE. The performance of the precipitation products was evaluated from 2003 to 2007 using continuous (RMSE, R2, ME, MAE, and RB and categorical (ACC, POD, FAR, CSI, and HSS statistical approaches. Overall, 3B42V7 and APHRODITE performed the best, while the worst performance was shown by GPCP-1DD. 3B42RT, 3B42V7, and PERSIANN-CDR slightly overestimated observed precipitation by 2%, 4.7%, and 2.1%, respectively. By contrast, APHRODITE and CMORPH significantly underestimated precipitations by 19.7% and 13.2%, respectively, whereas GPCP-1DD only slightly underestimated by 2.8%. All six precipitation products performed better in the northeast monsoon than in the southwest monsoon. The better performances occurred in eastern and southern Peninsular Malaysia and in the north of East Malaysia, which receives higher rainfall during the northeast monsoon, whereas poor performances occurred in the western and dryer Peninsular Malaysia. All precipitation products underestimated the no/tiny (<1 mm/day and extreme (≥20 mm/day rainfall events, while they overestimated low (1–20 mm/day rainfall events. 3B42RT and 3B42V7 showed the best ability to detect precipitation amounts with the highest HSS value (0.36. Precipitations during flood events such as those which occurred in late 2006 and early 2007 were estimated the best by 3B42RT and 3B42V7, as shown by an R2 value ranging from 0.49 to 0.88 and 0.52 to 0.86, respectively. These results on SPPs’ uncertainties

  1. Comparison of Remotely Sensed Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Products for a Statewide Water Assessment of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Fernald, A.; Peterson, K.; Walker, S.; Hewitt, I. C.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET) are the major components of the water balance in New Mexico. Therefore, it is critical to acquire accurate precipitation and ET data as input into a statewide water balance. Since existing meteorological stations in New Mexico don't cover the entire state and leave many areas without accurate information, we propose to evaluate the accuracy of existing nationwide remotely sensed databases for precipitation and ET to quantify the spatial and temporal distributions of those components in a statewide water balance. In this study we compare five precipitation products and three ET products: the CHIRPS (Climate Hazard Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station data) model, the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service product, the PERSIANN-GCCS (Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Network - Global Cloud Classification System) model, the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes) model the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, the ALExI (Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse) model, the MOD 16 ( MODIS Global Evapotranspiration Product) model of NASA, and the SSEB (Simplified Surface Energy Balance) model produced by the USGS. Early results show a strong relationship between all precipitation products across the state of New Mexico from 2000 to 2013 with an average depth of 315 mm, except for the PERSIANN model which has a rainfall depth approximately 53% higher (673mm) than the average of the other models. Additionally there is a strong relationship between the ALExI and SSEB ET models yet these models exceed the precipitation in the state by approximately 35%. The MOD 16 ET model has an average ET depth approximately 42% less than the average of the precipitation models and about 60% less than the ALExI and SSEB ET models. Future work includes validation of precipitation and ET models using high density rain gauge networks, as well as METRIC

  2. Performance Assessment of Multi-Source Weighted-Ensemble Precipitation (MSWEP Product over India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh S. Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Error characterization is vital for the advancement of precipitation algorithms, the evaluation of numerical model outputs, and their integration in various hydro-meteorological applications. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA has been a benchmark for successive Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM based products. This has given way to the evolution of many multi-satellite precipitation products. This study evaluates the performance of the newly released multi-satellite Multi-Source Weighted-Ensemble Precipitation (MSWEP product, whose temporal variability was determined based on several data products including TMPA 3B42 RT. The evaluation was conducted over India with respect to the IMD-gauge-based rainfall for pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post monsoon seasons at daily scale for a 35-year (1979–2013 period. The rainfall climatology is examined over India and over four geographical extents within India known to be subject to uniform rainfall. The performance evaluation of rainfall time series was carried out. In addition to this, the performance of the product over different rainfall classes was evaluated along with the contribution of each class to the total rainfall. Further, seasonal evaluation of the MSWEP products was based on the categorical and volumetric indices from the contingency table. Upon evaluation it was observed that the MSWEP products show large errors in detecting the higher quantiles of rainfall (>75th and > 95th quantiles. The MSWEP precipitation product available at a 0.25° × 0.25° spatial resolution and daily temporal resolution matched well with the daily IMD rainfall over India. Overall results suggest that a suitable region and season-dependent bias correction is essential before its integration in hydrological applications. While the MSWEP was observed to perform well for daily rainfall, it suffered from poor detection capabilities for higher quantiles, making

  3. Comparison of five gridded precipitation products at climatological scales over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsanola, A. A.; Ogunjobi, K. O.; Ajayi, V. O.; Adefisan, E. A.; Omotosho, J. A.; Sanogo, S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper aimed at assessing the capabilities and limitations of five different precipitation products to describe rainfall over West Africa. Five gridded precipitation datasets of the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multi-Platform Analysis (TMPA 3B43v7); University of Delaware (UDEL version 3.01); Climatic Research Unit (CRU version 3.1); Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC version 7) and African Rainfall Climatology (ARC version 2) were compared and validated with reference ground observation data from 81 stations spanning a 19-year period, from January 1990 to December 2008. Spatial investigation of the precipitation datasets was performed, and their capability to replicate the inter-annual and intra-seasonal variability was also assessed. The ability of the products to capture the El Nino and La Nina events were also assessed. Results show that all the five datasets depicted similar spatial distribution of mean rainfall climatology, although differences exist in the total rainfall amount for each precipitation dataset. Further analysis shows that the three distinct phases of the mean annual cycle of the West Africa Monsoon precipitation were well captured by the datasets. However, CRU, GPCC and UDEL failed to capture the little dry season in the month of August while UDEL and GPCC underestimated rainfall amount in the Sahel region. Results of the inter-annual precipitation anomalies shows that ARC2 fail to capture about 46% of the observed variability while the other four datasets exhibits a greater performance (r > 0.9). All the precipitation dataset except ARC2 were consistent with the ground observation in capturing the dry and wet conditions associated with El Nino and La Nina events, respectively. ARC2 tends to overestimate the El Nino event and failed to capture the La Nina event in all the years considered. In general GPCC, CRU and TRMM were found to be the most outstanding datasets and can, therefore, be used for precipitation

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of aboveground primary productivity along a precipitation gradient in Chinese temperate grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Investigating the spatial and temporal variance in productivity along natural precipitation gradients is one of the most efficient approaches to improve understanding of how ecosystems respond to climate change. In this paper, by using the natural precipitation gradient of the Inner Mongolian Plateau from east to west determined by relatively long-term observations, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) of the temperate grasslands covering this region. Across this grassland transect, ANPP increased exponentially with the increase of mean annual precipitation (MAP) (ANPP=24.47e0.005MAP, R2=0.48). Values for the three vegetation types desert steppe, typical steppe, and meadow steppe were: 60.86 gm-2a-1, 167.14 gm-2a-1 and 288.73 gm-2a-1 respectively. By contrast, temperature had negative effects on ANPP. The moisture index (K ), which takes into ac- count both precipitation and temperature could explain the spatial variance of ANPP better than MAP alone (ANPP=2020.34K1.24, R2=0.57). Temporally, we found that the inter-annual variation in ANPP (cal- culated as the coefficient of variation, CV) got greater with the increase of aridity. However, this trend was not correlated with the inter-annual variation of precipitation. For all of the three vegetation types, ANPP had greater inter-annual variation than annual precipitation (PPT). Their difference (ANPP CV/PPT CV) was greatest in desert steppe and least in meadow steppe. Our results suggest that in more arid regions, grasslands not only have lower productivity, but also higher inter-annual variation of production. Climate change may have significant effects on the productivity through changes in precipitation pattern, vegetation growth potential, and species diversity.

  5. Spatiotemporal dynamics of aboveground primary productivity along a precipitation gradient in Chinese temperate grassland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU ZhongMin; FAN JiangWen; ZHONG HuaPing; YU GuiRui

    2007-01-01

    Investigating the spatial and temporal variance in productivity along natural precipitation gradients is one of the most efficient approaches to improve understanding of how ecosystems respond to climate change. In this paper, by using the natural precipitation gradient of the Inner Mongolian Plateau from east to west determined by relatively long-term observations, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) of the temperate grasslands covering this region. Across this grassland transect, ANPP increased exponentially with the increase of mean annual precipitation (MAP) (ANPP=24.47e0.005MAP,R2=0.48). Values for the three vegetation types desert steppe,typical steppe, and meadow steppe were: 60.86 gm-2a-1, 167.14 gm-2a-1 and 288.73 gm-2a-1 respectively.By contrast, temperature had negative effects on ANPP. The moisture index (K), which takes into account both precipitation and temperature could explain the spatial variance of ANPP better than MAP alone (ANPP=2020.34K1.24,R2=0.57). Temporally, we found that the inter-annual variation in ANPP (calculated as the coefficient of variation, CV) got greater with the increase of aridity. However, this trend was not correlated with the inter-annual variation of precipitation. For all of the three vegetation types,ANPP had greater inter-annual variation than annual precipitation (PPT). Their difference (ANPP CV/PPT CV) was greatest in desert steppe and least in meadow steppe. Our results suggest that in more arid regions, grasslands not only have lower productivity, but also higher inter-annual variation of production. Climate change may have significant effects on the productivity through changes in precipitation pattern, vegetation growth potential, and species diversity.

  6. Productivity responses of desert vegetation to precipitation patterns across a rainfall gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Zhao, Wenzhi; Liu, Hu

    2015-03-01

    The influences of previous-year precipitation and episodic rainfall events on dryland plants and communities are poorly quantified in the temperate desert region of Northwest China. To evaluate the thresholds and lags in the response of aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) to variability in rainfall pulses and seasonal precipitation along the precipitation-productivity gradient in three desert ecosystems with different precipitation regimes, we collected precipitation data from 2000 to 2012 in Shandan (SD), Linze (LZ) and Jiuquan (JQ) in northwestern China. Further, we extracted the corresponding MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, a proxy for ANPP) datasets at 250 m spatial resolution. We then evaluated different desert ecosystems responses using statistical analysis, and a threshold-delay model (TDM). TDM is an integrative framework for analysis of plant growth, precipitation thresholds, and plant functional type strategies that capture the nonlinear nature of plant responses to rainfall pulses. Our results showed that: (1) the growing season NDVIINT (INT stands for time-integrated) was largely correlated with the warm season (spring/summer) at our mildly-arid desert ecosystem (SD). The arid ecosystem (LZ) exhibited a different response, and the growing season NDVIINT depended highly on the previous year's fall/winter precipitation and ANPP. At the extremely arid site (JQ), the variability of growing season NDVIINT was equally correlated with the cool- and warm-season precipitation; (2) some parameters of threshold-delay differed among the three sites: while the response of NDVI to rainfall pulses began at about 5 mm for all the sites, the maximum thresholds in SD, LZ, and JQ were about 55, 35 and 30 mm respectively, increasing with an increase in mean annual precipitation. By and large, more previous year's fall/winter precipitation, and large rainfall events, significantly enhanced the growth of desert vegetation, and desert ecosystems

  7. Precipitation legacies in desert grassland primary production occur through previous-year tiller density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Lara G; Sala, Osvaldo E; Peters, Debra P C

    2013-02-01

    In arid ecosystems, current-year precipitation often explains only a small proportion of annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP). We hypothesized that lags in the response of ecosystems to changes in water availability explain this low explanatory power, and that lags result from legacies from transitions from dry to wet years or the reverse. We explored five hypotheses regarding the magnitude of legacies, two possible mechanisms, and the differential effect of previous dry or wet years on the legacy magnitude. We used a three-year manipulative experiment with five levels of rainfall in the first two years (-80% and -50% reduced annual precipitation (PPT), ambient, +50% and +80% increased PPT), and reversed treatments in year 3. Legacies of previous two years, which were dry or wet, accounted for a large fraction (20%) of interannual variability in production on year 3. Legacies in ANPP were similar in absolute value for both types of precipitation transitions, and their magnitude was a function of the difference between previous and current-year precipitation. Tiller density accounted for 40% of legacy variability, while nitrogen and carryover water availability showed no effect. Understanding responses to changes in interannual precipitation will assist in assessing ecosystem responses to climate change-induced increases in precipitation variability.

  8. Depiction of global drought by reanalysis and real-time satellite precipitation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric; Zhan, Wang

    2017-04-01

    Reanalysis precipitation is routinely used as a surrogate of observations due to its high spatial and temporal resolution and global coverage, and thus widely used in hydrologic and agricultural applications. The resultant product is largely dependent on the accuracy of reanalysis precipitation datasets. With advances in satellite remote sensing technology, the latest generation of reanalysis systems starts to include real time satellite precipitation estimates as inputs to their assimilation system. In this presentation, reanalysis precipitations datasets and real-time satellite rainfall products are used for the depiction of global drought events by comparing them against an observational reference dataset, namely the Princeton Global Forcing (PGF) dataset, during the period of March 2000 to December 2012. The selected reanalyses are the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), ERA-Interim, and the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, version 1 (MERRA) and 2 (MERRA-2). Three real-time satellite precipitation estimates; namely the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B42RT, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) morphing algorithm (CMORPH) and the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN) are included in the study. Our results show that all datasets depict Sub-Saharan African drought events with limited skill, as opposed to mid latitude regions. Reanalyses and satellite real-time precipitation datasets have comparative skill in the low latitudes. Specific drought events are analyzed that demonstrate the drought depiction from the various datasets. In North America, Asia and Europe, drought events are better replicated and inter-dataset variability is significantly smaller. Overall, temporal characteristics of identified drought events are better estimated than their spatial extent.

  9. New Products for Near Real-Time Enhanced Landslide Identification and Precipitation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Pierel, J.; Ahamed, A.; Fayne, J.; Rumsey, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nepal and the Himalayan region are hotspots for landslide activity due to mountainous topography, complex terrain, and monsoon rains. Current research in landslide modeling and detection generally requires high resolution imagery with software aided classification or manual digitization by analysts. These methods are plagued by low spatial and temporal accuracy. Addressing issues in conventional measurement, this study combined optical data from Landsat 8, a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generated from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) to create two products. The Sudden Landslide Identification Product (SLIP) uses Landsat 8 and the ASTER DEM to identify landslides in near real-time, and provides damage assessments by mapping landslides triggered by precipitation. Detecting Real-time Increased Precipitation (DRIP) monitors precipitation levels extracted from the GPM-IMERG 30-minute product to create alerts in near real-time when current rainfall levels exceed regional threshold values. After a landslide detection is made by SLIP, historical rainfall data from DRIP is analyzed to estimate a date for the detected landslide. Together, DRIP and SLIP will be used by local and regional organizations in Nepal such as the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), as well as the international scientific community to protect lives, preserve infrastructure, and manage local ecosystems.

  10. Inter-Comparison of High-Resolution Satellite Precipitation Products over Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Guo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the spatial error structures of eight precipitation estimates derived from four different satellite retrieval algorithms including TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA, Climate Prediction Center morphing technique (CMORPH, Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN. All the original satellite and bias-corrected products of each algorithm (3B42RTV7 and 3B42V7, CMORPH_RAW and CMORPH_CRT, GSMaP_MVK and GSMaP_Gauge, PERSIANN_RAW and PERSIANN_CDR are evaluated against ground-based Asian Precipitation-Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE over Central Asia for the period of 2004 to 2006. The analyses show that all products except PERSIANN exhibit overestimation over Aral Sea and its surrounding areas. The bias-correction improves the quality of the original satellite TMPA products and GSMaP significantly but slightly in CMORPH and PERSIANN over Central Asia. 3B42RTV7 overestimates precipitation significantly with large Relative Bias (RB (128.17% while GSMaP_Gauge shows consistent high correlation coefficient (CC (>0.8 but RB fluctuates between −57.95% and 112.63%. The PERSIANN_CDR outperforms other products in winter with the highest CC (0.67. Both the satellite-only and gauge adjusted products have particularly poor performance in detecting rainfall events in terms of lower POD (less than 65%, CSI (less than 45% and relatively high FAR (more than 35%.

  11. Thermodynamic Research on Precipitates in Low Carbon Nb-Microalloyed Steels Produced by Compact Strip Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song XIANG; Guoquan LIU; Yang LI; Changrong LI; Andong WANG

    2007-01-01

    Microalloying element Nb in low carbon steels produced by compact strip production (CSP) process plays an important role in inhibiting recrystallization, decreasing the transformation temperature and grain refinement.With decreasing the rolling temperature, dislocations can be pinned by carbonitrides and the strength is increased. Based on the two sublattice model, with metal atom sublattice and interstitial atom sublattice,a thermodynamic model for carbonitride was established to calculate the equilibrium between matrix and carbonitride. In the steel produced by CSP, the calculation results showed that the starting temperature of precipitation of Ti and Nb are 1340℃ and 1040℃, respectively. In the range of 890-950℃, Nb rapidly precipitated. And the maximum of the atomic fraction of Nb in carbonitride was about 0.68. The morphologies and energy spectrum of the precipitates showed that (NbTi) (CN) precipitated near the dislocations. The experiment results show that Nb rapidly precipitated when the temperature was lower than 970℃, and the atomic fraction of Nb in carbonitride was about 60%-80%. The calculation results are in agreement with the experiment data. Therefore the thermodynamic model can be a useful assistant tool in the research on the precipitates in the low carbon steels produced by CSP.

  12. Global Precipitation Products at NASA GES DISC for Supporting Agriculture Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Teng, W.; Ostrenga, D.; Albayrak, R.; Savtchenko, A.; Yang, W.; Vollmer, B.; Meyer, D.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation describes precipitation products available at the NASA GES DISC that support agricultural research. XXXX Key environmental variables for agriculture: precipitation, temperature, water (soil moisture), solar radiation, NDVI, etc. Rainfed agriculture - major farming practices that rely on rainfall for water. Rainfed agriculture: >95% of farmed land (sub- Saharan Africa); 90% (Latin America); 75% (Near East and North Africa); 65% (East Asia); 60% (South Asia). Precipitation is very important for rainfed agriculture. Droughts can cause severe damage. Precipitation information can be used to monitor the growing season. The Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC), one of 12 NASA data centers, located in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA. The GES DISC is a major data archive center for global precipitation, water & energy cycles, atmospheric composition, and climate variability Global and regional precipitation datasets (satellite-based and data assimilation Data services (subsetting, format conversion, online visualization, etc.) User services are available FAQs, How to (recipes), Glossary, etc. Social media (Twitter, YouTube, User forum) Help desk (phone, email, online feedback) Training materials (ARSET => Applied Remote Sensing Training) Liu,

  13. Validation and Development of the GPCP Experimental One-Degree Daily (1DD) Global Precipitation Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The One-Degree Daily (1DD) precipitation dataset has been developed for the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and is currently in beta test preparatory to release as an official GPCP product. The 1DD provides a globally-complete, observation-only estimate of precipitation on a daily 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid for the period 1997 through early 2000 (by the time of the conference). In the latitude band 40N-40S the 1DD uses the Threshold-Matched Precipitation Index (TMPI), a GPI-like IR product with the pixel-level T(sub b) threshold and (single) conditional rain rate determined locally for each month by the frequency of precipitation in the GPROF SSM/I product and by, the precipitation amount in the GPCP monthly satellite-gauge (SG) combination. Outside 40N-40S the 1DD uses a scaled TOVS precipitation estimate that has month-by-month adjustments based on the TMPI and the SG. Early validation results are encouraging. The 1DD shows relatively large scatter about the daily validation values in individual grid boxes, as expected for a technique that depends on cloud-sensing schemes such as the TMPI and TOVS. On the other hand, the time series of 1DD shows good correlation with validation in individual boxes. For example, the 1997-1998 time series of 1DD and Oklahoma Mesonet values in a grid box in northeastern Oklahoma have the correlation coefficient = 0.73. Looking more carefully at these two time series, the number of raining days for the 1DD is within 7% of the Mesonet value, while the distribution of daily rain values is very similar. Other tests indicate that area- or time-averaging improve the error characteristics, making the data set highly attractive to users interested in stream flow, short-term regional climatology, and model comparisons. The second generation of the 1DD product is currently under development; it is designed to directly incorporate TRMM and other high-quality precipitation estimates. These data are generally sparse because they are

  14. Developing GIOVANNI-based Online Prototypes to Intercompare TRMM-Related Global Gridded-Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Teng, William; Kempler, Steven; Milich, Lenard

    2014-01-01

    New online prototypes have been developed to extend and enhance the previous effort by facilitating investigation of product characteristics and intercomparison of precipitation products in different algorithms as well as in different versions at different spatial scales ranging from local to global without downloading data and software. Several popular Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products and the TRMM Composite Climatology are included. In addition, users can download customized data in several popular formats for further analysis. Examples show product quality problems and differences in several monthly precipitation products. It is seen that differences in daily and monthly precipitation products are distributed unevenly in space and it is necessary to have tools such as those presented here for customized and detailed investigations. A simple time series and two area maps allow the discovery of abnormal values of 3A25 in one of the months. An example shows a V-shaped valley issue in the Version 6 3B43 time series and another example shows a sudden drop in 3A25 monthly rain rate, all of which provide important information when the products are used for long-term trend studies. Future plans include adding more products and statistical functionality in the prototypes.

  15. Calibration of the Distributed Hydrological Model mHM using Satellite derived Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M.; Samaniego, L. E.; Cuntz, M.

    2012-12-01

    A combined investigation of the water and energy balance in hydrologic models can lead to a more accurate estimation of hydrological fluxes and state variables, such as evapotranspiration and soil moisture. Hydrologic models are usually calibrated against discharge measurements, and thus are only trained on information of few points within a catchment. This procedure does not take into account any spatio-temporal variability of fluxes or state variables. Satellite data are a useful source of information to account for this spatial distributions. The objective of this study is to calibrate the distributed hydrological model mHM with satellite derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) fields provided by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). LST is preferred to other satellite products such as soil moisture or evapotranspiration due to its higher precision. LST is obtained by solving the energy balance by assuming that the soil heat flux and the storage term are negligible on a daily time step. The evapotranspiration is determined by closing the water balance in mHM. The net radiation is calculated by using the incoming short- and longwave radiation, albedo and emissivity data provided by LSA-SAF. The Multiscale Parameter Regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) is used to determine the aerodynamic resistance among other parameters. The optimization is performed within the time period 2008-2010 using three objective functions that consider 1) only discharge, 2) only LST, and 3) a combination of both. The proposed method is applied to seven major German river basins: Danube, Ems, Main, Mulde, Neckar, Saale, and Weser. The annual coefficient of correlation between LSA-SAF incoming shortwave radiation and 28 meteorological stations operated by the German Weather Service (DWD) is 0.94 (RMSE = 29 W m-2) in 2009. LSA-SAF incoming longwave radiation could be further evaluated at two eddy covariance stations with a very similar

  16. Influence of satellite-derived photolysis rates and NOx emissions on Texas ozone modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncertain photolysis rates and emission inventory impair the accuracy of state-level ozone (O3 regulatory modeling. Past studies have separately used satellite-observed clouds to correct the model-predicted photolysis rates, or satellite-constrained top-down NOx emissions to identify and reduce uncertainties in bottom-up NOx emissions. However, the joint application of multiple satellite-derived model inputs to improve O3 State Implementation Plan (SIP modeling has rarely been explored. In this study, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES observations of clouds are applied to derive the photolysis rates, replacing those used in Texas SIP modeling. This changes modeled O3 concentrations by up to 80 ppb and improves O3 simulations by reducing modeled normalized mean bias (NMB and normalized mean error (NME by up to 0.1. A sector-based discrete Kalman filter (DKF inversion approach is incorporated with the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx-Decoupled Direct Method (DDM model to adjust Texas NOx emissions using a high resolution Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI NO2 product. The discrepancy between OMI and CAMx NO2 vertical column densities (VCD is further reduced by increasing modeled NOx lifetime and adding an artificial amount of NO2 in the upper troposphere. The sector-based DKF inversion tends to scale down area and non-road NOx emissions by 50%, leading to a 2–5 ppb decrease in ground 8 h O3 predictions. Model performance in simulating ground NO2 and O3 are improved using inverted NOx emissions, with 0.25 and 0.04 reductions in NMBs and 0.13 and 0.04 reductions in NMEs, respectively. Using both GOES-derived photolysis rates and OMI-constrained NOx emissions together reduces modeled NMB and NME by 0.05 and increases the model correlation with ground measurement in O3 simulations and makes O3 more sensitive to NOx emissions in the O3 non-attainment areas.

  17. Effects of precipitation changes on aboveground net primary production and soil respiration in a switchgrass field

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study attempted to test whether switchgrass aboveground net primary production (ANPP) responds to precipitation (PPT) changes in a double asymmetry pattern as framed by Knapp et al. (2016), and whether it is held true for other ecosystem processes such as soil respiration (SR). Data were colle...

  18. Potential Utility of the Real-Time TMPA-RT Precipitation Estimates in Streamflow Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fengge; Gao, Huilin; Huffman, George J.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the potential utility of the real-time Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA-RT) data for streamflow prediction, both through direct comparisons of TMPA-RT estimates with a gridded gauge product, and through evaluation of streamflow simulations over four tributaries of La Plata Basin (LPB) in South America using the two precipitation products. Our assessments indicate that the relative accuracy and the hydrologic performance of TMPA-RT-based streamflow simulations generally improved after February 2005. The improvements in TMPA-RT since 2005 are closely related to upgrades in the TMPA-RT algorithm in early February, 2005 which include use of additional microwave sensors (AMSR-E and AMSU-B) and implementation of different calibration schemes. Our work suggests considerable potential for hydrologic prediction using purely satellite-derived precipitation estimates (no adjustments by in situ gauges) in parts of the globe where in situ observations are sparse.

  19. Economics of recombinant antibody production processes at various scales: Industry-standard compared to continuous precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Tscheliessnig, Anne; Sommer, Ralf; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-06-01

    Standard industry processes for recombinant antibody production employ protein A affinity chromatography in combination with other chromatography steps and ultra-/diafiltration. This study compares a generic antibody production process with a recently developed purification process based on a series of selective precipitation steps. The new process makes two of the usual three chromatographic steps obsolete and can be performed in a continuous fashion. Cost of Goods (CoGs) analyses were done for: (i) a generic chromatography-based antibody standard purification; (ii) the continuous precipitation-based purification process coupled to a continuous perfusion production system; and (iii) a hybrid process, coupling the continuous purification process to an upstream batch process. The results of this economic analysis show that the precipitation-based process offers cost reductions at all stages of the life cycle of a therapeutic antibody, (i.e. clinical phase I, II and III, as well as full commercial production). The savings in clinical phase production are largely attributed to the fact that expensive chromatographic resins are omitted. These economic analyses will help to determine the strategies that are best suited for small-scale production in parallel fashion, which is of importance for antibody production in non-privileged countries and for personalized medicine.

  20. Trend shifts in satellite-derived vegetation growth in Central Eurasia, 1982-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Xin-Ping; Yang, Tai-Bao

    2017-02-01

    Central Eurasian vegetation is critical for the regional ecological security and the global carbon cycle. However, climatic impacts on vegetation growth in Central Eurasia are uncertain. The reason for this uncertainty lies in the fact that the response of vegetation to climate change showed nonlinearity, seasonality and differences among plant functional types. Based on remotely sensed vegetation index and in-situ meteorological data for the years 1982-2013, in conjunction with the latest land cover type product, we analyzed how vegetation growth trend varied across different seasons and evaluated vegetation response to climate variables at regional, biome and pixel scales. We found a persistent increase in the growing season NDVI over Central Eurasia during 1982-1994, whereas this greening trend has stalled since the mid-1990s in response to increased water deficit. The stalled trend in the growing season NDVI was largely attributed by summer and autumn NDVI changes. Enhanced spring vegetation growth after 2002 was caused by rapid spring warming. The response of vegetation to climatic factors varied in different seasons. Precipitation was the main climate driver for the growing season and summer vegetation growth. Changes in temperature and precipitation during winter and spring controlled the spring vegetation growth. Autumn vegetation growth was mainly dependent on the vegetation growth in summer. We found diverse responses of different vegetation types to climate drivers in Central Eurasia. Forests were more responsive to temperature than to precipitation. Grassland and desert vegetation responded more strongly to precipitation than to temperature in summer but more strongly to temperature than to precipitation in spring. In addition, the growth of desert vegetation was more dependent on winter precipitation than that of grasslands. This study has important implications for improving the performance of terrestrial ecosystem models to predict future vegetation

  1. Precipitation of organic arsenic compounds and their degradation products during struvite formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jin-Biao; Yuan, Shoujun [School of Civil Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Institute of Water Treatment and Wastes Reutilization, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Wang, Wei, E-mail: dwhit@126.com [School of Civil Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Institute of Water Treatment and Wastes Reutilization, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Hu, Zhen-Hu, E-mail: zhhu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Institute of Water Treatment and Wastes Reutilization, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Yu, Han-Qing [Department of Chemistry, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Organic and inorganic arsenic compounds precipitated during struvite formation. • Precipitation of organic arsenic compounds in struvite decreased with increasing pH. • Arsenate easily precipitate in struvite as compared to organic arsenic compounds. • Arsenic compounds in solution affected the shape of struvite crystallization products. - Abstract: Roxarsone (ROX) and arsanilic acid (ASA) have been extensively used as organoarsenic animal feed additives. Organic arsenic compounds and their degradation products, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), exist in the effluent from anaerobic reactors treating animal manure contaminated by ROX or ASA with ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N) and phosphate (PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}-P) together. Therefore, arsenic species in the effluent might be involved in the struvite formation process. In this study, the involvement of organic arsenic compounds and their degradation products As(V) and As(III) in the struvite crystallization was investigated. The results demonstrated that arsenic compounds did not substantially affect the PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}-P recovery, but confirmed the precipitation of arsenic during struvite formation. The precipitation of arsenic compounds in struvite was considerably affected by a solution pH from 9.0 to 11.0. With an increase in pH, the content of ASA and ROX in the precipitation decreased, but the contents of As(III) and As(V) increased. In addition, the arsenic content of As(V) in the struvite was higher than that of As(III), ASA and ROX. The results indicated that the struvite could be contaminated when the solution contains arsenic species, but that could be minimized by controlling the solution pH and maintaining anaerobic conditions during struvite formation.

  2. Newly Released TRMM Version 7 Products, Other Precipitation Datasets and Data Services at NASA GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Teng, W. L.; Trivedi, Bhagirath; Kempler, S.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is home of global precipitation product archives, in particular, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products. TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japan satellite mission to monitor tropical and subtropical (40 S - 40 N) precipitation and to estimate its associated latent heating. The TRMM satellite provides the first detailed and comprehensive dataset on the four dimensional distribution of rainfall and latent heating over vastly undersampled tropical and subtropical oceans and continents. The TRMM satellite was launched on November 27, 1997. TRMM data products are archived at and distributed by GES DISC. The newly released TRMM Version 7 consists of several changes including new parameters, new products, meta data, data structures, etc. For example, hydrometeor profiles in 2A12 now have 28 layers (14 in V6). New parameters have been added to several popular Level-3 products, such as, 3B42, 3B43. Version 2.2 of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) dataset has been added to the TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS; URL: http://disc2.nascom.nasa.gov/Giovanni/tovas/), allowing online analysis and visualization without downloading data and software. The GPCP dataset extends back to 1979. Version 3 of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) monitoring product has been updated in TOVAS as well. The product provides global gauge-based monthly rainfall along with number of gauges per grid. The dataset begins in January 1986. To facilitate data and information access and support precipitation research and applications, we have developed a Precipitation Data and Information Services Center (PDISC; URL: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/precipitation). In addition to TRMM, PDISC provides current and past observational precipitation data. Users can access precipitation data archives consisting of both remote sensing and in-situ observations. Users can use these data

  3. Merging bottom-up and top-down precipitation products using a stochastic error model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Viviana; Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Ciabatta, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation is of great importance for water resources management, agricultural planning, and forecasting and monitoring of natural hazards such as flash floods and landslides. In situ observations are limited around the Earth, especially in remote areas (e.g., complex terrain, dense vegetation), but currently available satellite precipitation products are able to provide global precipitation estimates with an accuracy that depends upon many factors (e.g., type of storms, temporal sampling, season etc…). Recently, Brocca et al. (2014) have proposed an alternative approach (i.e., SM2RAIN) that allows to estimate rainfall from space by using satellite soil moisture observations. In contrast with classical satellite precipitation products which sense the cloud properties to retrieve the instantaneous precipitation, this new bottom-up approach makes use of two consecutive soil moisture measurements for obtaining an estimate of the fallen precipitation within the interval between two satellite passes. As a result, the nature of the measurement is different and complementary to the one of classical precipitation products and could provide a different valid perspective to improve current satellite rainfall estimates via appropriate integration between the products (i.e., SM2RAIN plus a classical satellite rainfall product). However, whether SM2RAIN is able or not to improve the performance of any state-of-the-art satellite rainfall product is much dependent upon an adequate quantification and characterization of the relative errors of the products. In this study, the stochastic rainfall error model SREM2D (Hossain et al. 2006) is used for characterizing the retrieval error of both SM2RAIN and a state-of-the-art satellite precipitation product (i.e., 3B42RT). The error characterization serves for an optimal integration between SM2RAIN and 3B42RT for enhancing the capability of the resulting integrated product (i.e. SM2RAIN+3B42RT) in

  4. Ecosystem net primary production responses to changes in precipitation using an annual integrated MODIS EVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce Campos, Guillermo Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the relationship of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) with precipitation using the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from satellite data as surrogate for ANPP was assessed. To use EVI as a proxy for ANPP we extracted the satellite data from areas with uniform vegetation in a 2x2 km area for the multi-site approach. In the multi-site analysis in the United States our results showed a strong exponential relationship between iEVI and annual precipitation across the sites and climate regimes studied. We found convergence of all sites toward common and maximum rain use efficiency under the water-limited conditions represented by the driest year at each site. Measures of inter-annual variability in iEVI with rainfall variation across biomes were similar to that reported by Knapp and Smith (2001) in which the more herbaceous dominant sites were found to be most sensitive to inter-annual variations in precipitation with no relationships found in woodland sites. The relationship was also evaluated in the southern hemisphere using a multi-site analysis with information from satellite TRMM for precipitation and MOD13Q1 from MODIS for EVI values at calendar and hydrologic year periods. The tested sites were located across the 6 major land cover types in Australia, obtained from MODIS MCD12Q1 product and used to compare the relationship across different biomes. The results showed significant agreement between the annual iEVI and annual precipitation across the biomes involved in this study showing non-significant differences between the calendar and hydrologic years for the 24 sites across different climatic conditions. At the regional scale we also assessed the ANPP-precipitation relationship across all of Australia. Precipitation data from TRMM was obtained at 0.25°x0.2°5 degrees spatial resolution and monthly temporal resolution and EVI values were obtained from the CGM (Climate Grid Modeling) MOD13C1-16-days and 5.6km temporal and spatial

  5. The new portfolio of global precipitation data products of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre suitable to assess and quantify the global water cycle and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Udo; Ziese, Markus; Meyer-Christoffer, Anja; Finger, Peter; Rustemeier, Elke; Becker, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation plays an important role in the global energy and water cycle. Accurate knowledge of precipitation amounts reaching the land surface is of special importance for fresh water assessment and management related to land use, agriculture and hydrology, incl. risk reduction of flood and drought. High interest in long-term precipitation analyses arises from the needs to assess climate change and its impacts on all spatial scales. In this framework, the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) has been established in 1989 on request of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). It is operated by Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, National Meteorological Service of Germany) as a German contribution to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). This paper provides information on the most recent update of GPCC's gridded data product portfolio including example use cases.

  6. The new portfolio of global precipitation data products of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre suitable to assess and quantify the global water cycle and resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schneider

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation plays an important role in the global energy and water cycle. Accurate knowledge of precipitation amounts reaching the land surface is of special importance for fresh water assessment and management related to land use, agriculture and hydrology, incl. risk reduction of flood and drought. High interest in long-term precipitation analyses arises from the needs to assess climate change and its impacts on all spatial scales. In this framework, the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC has been established in 1989 on request of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO. It is operated by Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, National Meteorological Service of Germany as a German contribution to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP. This paper provides information on the most recent update of GPCC's gridded data product portfolio including example use cases.

  7. Modelling LAI at a regional scale with ISBA-A-gs: comparison with satellite-derived LAI over southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brut

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A CO2-responsive land surface model (the ISBA-A-gs model of Météo-France is used to simulate photosynthesis and Leaf Area Index (LAI in southwestern France for a 3-year period (2001–2003. A domain of about 170 000 km2 is covered at a spatial resolution of 8 km. The capability of ISBA-A-gs to reproduce the seasonal and the interannual variability of LAI at a regional scale, is assessed with satellite-derived LAI products. One originates from the CYCLOPES programme using SPOT/VEGETATION data, and two products are based on MODIS data. The comparison reveals discrepancies between the satellite LAI estimates and between satellite and simulated LAI values, both in their intensity and in the timing of the leaf onset. The model simulates higher LAI values for the C3 crops than the satellite observations, which may be due to a saturation effect within the satellite signal or to uncertainties in model parameters. The simulated leaf onset presents a significant delay for C3 crops and mountainous grasslands. In-situ observations at a mid-altitude grassland site show that the generic temperature response of photosynthesis used in the model is not appropriate for plants adapted to the cold climatic conditions of the mountainous areas. This study demonstrates the potential of LAI remote sensing products for identifying and locating models' shortcomings at a regional scale.

  8. a Diagnostic Approach to Obtaining Planetary Boundary Layer Winds Using Satellite-Derived Thermal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt, Carol Lynn

    The feasibility of using satellite-derived thermal data to generate realistic synoptic-scale winds within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is examined. Diagnostic "modified Ekman" wind equations from the Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) Boundary Layer Model are used to compute winds at seven levels within the PBL transition layer (50 m to 1600 m AGL). Satellite-derived winds based on 62 predawn (0921 GMT 19 April 1979) TIROS-N soundings are compared to similarly-derived wind fields based on 39 AVE-SESAME II rawinsonde (RAOB) soundings taken 2 h later. Actual wind fields are also used as a basis for comparison. Qualitative and statistical comparisons show that the Ekman winds from both sources are in very close agreement, with an average vector correlation coefficient of 0.815. Best results are obtained at 300 m AGL. Satellite winds tend to be slightly weaker than their RAOB counterparts and exhibit a greater degree of cross-isobaric flow. The modified Ekman winds show a significant improvement over geostrophic values at levels nearest the surface. Horizontal moisture divergence, moisture advection, velocity divergence and relative vorticity are computed at 300 m AGL using satellite-derived winds and moisture data. Results show excellent agreement with corresponding RAOB-derived values. Areas of horizontal moisture convergence, velocity convergence, and positive vorticity are nearly coincident and align in regions which later develop intense convection. Vertical motion at 1600 m AGL is computed using stepwise integration of the satellite winds through the PBL. Values and patterns are similar to those obtained using the RAOB-derived winds. Regions of maximum upward motion correspond with areas of greatest moisture convergence and the convection that later develops.

  9. The validation service of the hydrological SAF geostationary and polar satellite precipitation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puca, S.; Porcu, F.; Rinollo, A.; Vulpiani, G.; Baguis, P.; Balabanova, S.; Campione, E.; Ertürk, A.; Gabellani, S.; Iwanski, R.; Jurašek, M.; Kaňák, J.; Kerényi, J.; Koshinchanov, G.; Kozinarova, G.; Krahe, P.; Lapeta, B.; Lábó, E.; Milani, L.; Okon, L'.; Öztopal, A.; Pagliara, P.; Pignone, F.; Rachimow, C.; Rebora, N.; Roulin, E.; Sönmez, I.; Toniazzo, A.; Biron, D.; Casella, D.; Cattani, E.; Dietrich, S.; Di Paola, F.; Laviola, S.; Levizzani, V.; Melfi, D.; Mugnai, A.; Panegrossi, G.; Petracca, M.; Sanò, P.; Zauli, F.; Rosci, P.; De Leonibus, L.; Agosta, E.; Gattari, F.

    2014-04-01

    The development phase (DP) of the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility for Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) led to the design and implementation of several precipitation products, after 5 yr (2005-2010) of activity. Presently, five precipitation estimation algorithms based on data from passive microwave and infrared sensors, on board geostationary and sun-synchronous platforms, function in operational mode at the H-SAF hosting institute to provide near real-time precipitation products at different spatial and temporal resolutions. In order to evaluate the precipitation product accuracy, a validation activity has been established since the beginning of the project. A Precipitation Product Validation Group (PPVG) works in parallel with the development of the estimation algorithms with two aims: to provide the algorithm developers with indications to refine algorithms and products, and to evaluate the error structure to be associated with the operational products. In this paper, the framework of the PPVG is presented: (a) the characteristics of the ground reference data available to H-SAF (i.e. radar and rain gauge networks), (b) the agreed upon validation strategy settled among the eight European countries participating in the PPVG, and (c) the steps of the validation procedures. The quality of the reference data is discussed, and the efforts for its improvement are outlined, with special emphasis on the definition of a ground radar quality map and on the implementation of a suitable rain gauge interpolation algorithm. The work done during the H-SAF development phase has led the PPVG to converge into a common validation procedure among the members, taking advantage of the experience acquired by each one of them in the validation of H-SAF products. The methodology is presented here, indicating the main steps of the validation procedure (ground data quality control, spatial interpolation, up-scaling of radar data vs. satellite grid

  10. Hydrologic evaluation of a Generalized Statistical Uncertainty Model for Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachi, S.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.

    2014-12-01

    Development of satellite based precipitation retrieval algorithms and using them in hydroclimatic studies have been of great interest to hydrologists. It is important to understand the uncertainty associated with precipitation products and how they further contribute to the variability in stream flow simulation. In this study a mixture model of Generalized Normal Distribution and Gamma distribution (GND-G) is used to model the joint probability distribution of satellite-based (PERSIANN) and stage IV radar rainfall. The study area for constructing the uncertainty model covers a 15°×15°box of 0.25°×0.25° cells over the eastern United States for summer 2004 to 2009. Cells are aggregated in space and time to obtain data with different resolutions for the construction of the model's parameter space. This uncertainty model is evaluated using data from National Weather Service (NWS) Distributed Hydrologic Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 2 (DMIP 2) basin over Illinois River basin south of Siloam, OK. This data covers the time period of 2006 to 2008.The uncertainty range of precipitation is estimated. The impact of precipitation uncertainty to the stream flow estimation is demonstrated by Monte Carlo simulation of precipitation forcing in the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model. The results show that using precipitation along with its uncertainty distribution as forcing to SAC-SMA make it possible to have an estimation of the uncertainty associated with the stream flow simulation ( in this case study %90 confidence interval is used). The mean of this stream flow confidence interval is compared to the reference stream flow for evaluation of the model and the results show that this method helps to better estimate the variability of the stream flow simulation along with its statistics e.g. percent bias and root mean squared error.

  11. New and Updated Gridded Analysis Products provided by the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziese, Markus; Schneider, Udo; Meyer-Christoffer, Anja; Finger, Peter; Schamm, Kirstin; Rustemeier, Elke; Becker, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Since its start in 1989 the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) performs global analyses of monthly precipitation for the earth's land-surface on the basis of in-situ measurements. Meanwhile, the data set has continuously grown both in temporal coverage (original start of the evaluation period was 1986), as well as extent and quality of the underlying data base. The high spatio-temporal variability of precipitation requires an accordingly high density of measurement data. Data collected from national meteorological and hydrological services are the core of the GPCC data base, supported by global and regional data collections. Also the GPCC receives SYNOP and CLIMAT reports via WMO-GTS, which are mainly applied for near-real-time products. A high quality control effort is undertaken to remove miscoded and temporal or spatial dislocated data before entry into the GPCC archive, serving the basis for further interpolation and product generation. The GPCC archive holds records from almost 100 000 stations, among those three quarters with records long enough to serve the data basis of the GPCC suite of global precipitation products, comprising near-real-time as well as non-real-time products. Near-real-time products are the 'First Guess Monthly', 'First Guess Daily', 'Monitoring Product' and 'GPCC Drought Index'. These products are based on WMO-GTS data, e.g., SYNOP and CLIMAT reports and monthly totals calculated at CPC. Non-real-time products are the 'Full Data Monthly', 'Full Data Daily', 'Climatology', and 'HOMPRA-Europe'. Data from national meteorological and hydrological services and regional and global data collections are mainly used to calculate these products. Also WMO-GTS data are used if no other data are available. The majority of the products were released in an updated version, but 'Full Data Daily' and HOMPRA-Europe' are new products provided the first time. 'Full Data Daily' is a global analysis of daily precipitation totals from 1988 to 2013

  12. Current status of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft and the new version of GPM standard products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K.; Nio, T.; Konishi, T.; Masaki, T.; Kubota, T.; Oki, R.; Iguchi, T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The objective of the GPM mission is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. The inclination of the GPM core satellite is 65 degrees, and the nominal flight altitude is 407 km. The non-sunsynchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band precipitation radar (KaPR). GPM core observatory was successfully launched by H2A launch vehicle on Feb. 28, 2014. DPR keeps its performances on orbit after launch. DPR products were released to the public on Sep. 2, 2014. JAXA is continuing DPR trend monitoring, calibration and validation operations to confirm that DPR keeps its function and performance on orbit. JAXA have started to provide new version (Version 4) of GPM standard products on March 3, 2016. Various improvements of the DPR algorithm were implemented in the Version 4 product. Moreover, the latent heat product based on the Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm is available since Version 4 product. Current orbital operation status of the GPM/DPR and highlights of the Version 4 product are reported.

  13. Utilizing Satellite Precipitation Products to Understand the Link Between Climate Variability and Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, V.; Mousam, A.; Delamater, P. L.; Cash, B. A.; Quispe, A.

    2015-12-01

    Malaria is a public health threat to people globally leading to 198 million cases and 584,000 deaths annually. Outbreaks of vector borne diseases such as malaria can be significantly impacted by climate variables such as precipitation. For example, an increase in rainfall has the potential to create pools of water that can serve as breeding locations for mosquitos. Peru is a country that is currently controlling malaria, but has not been able to completely eliminate the disease. Despite the various initiatives in order to control malaria - including regional efforts to improve surveillance, early detection, prompt treatment, and vector management - malaria cases in Peru have risen between 2011 and 2014. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that climate variability plays a fundamental role in malaria occurrence over a 12-year period (2003-2014) in Peru. When analyzing climate variability, it is important to obtain high-quality, high-resolution data for a time series long enough to draw conclusion about how climate variables have been and are changing. Remote sensing is a powerful tool for measuring and monitoring climate variables continuously in time and space. A widely used satellite-based precipitation product, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), available globally since 1998, was used to obtain 3-hourly data with a spatial resolution of 0.25° x 0.25°. The precipitation data was linked to weekly (2003-2014) malaria cases collected by health centers and available at a district level all over Peru to investigate the relationship between precipitation and the seasonal and annual variations in malaria incidence. Further studies will incorporate additional climate variables such as temperature, humidity, soil moisture, and surface pressure from remote sensing data products and climate models. Ultimately, this research will help us to understand if climate variability impacts malaria incidence

  14. Modelling LAI at a regional scale with ISBA-A-gs: comparison with satellite-derived LAI over southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brut

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A CO2-responsive land surface model (the ISBA-A-gs model of Météo-France is used to simulate photosynthesis and Leaf Area Index (LAI in southwestern France for a 3-year period (2001–2003. A domain of about 170 000 km2 is covered at a spatial resolution of 8 km. The capability of ISBA-A-gs to reproduce the seasonal and the inter-annual variability of LAI at a regional scale, is assessed with two satellite-derived LAI products. One originates from the CYCLOPES programme using SPOT/VEGETATION data, and the second is based on MODIS data. The comparison reveals discrepancies between the two satellite LAI estimates and between satellite and simulated LAI values, both in their intensity and in the timing of the leaf onset. The model simulates higher LAI values for the C3 crops and coniferous trees than the satellite observations, which may be due to a saturation effect within the satellite signal. The simulated leaf onset presents a significant delay for mountainous grasslands. In-situ observations at a mid-altitude grassland site show that the generic temperature response of photosynthesis used in the model is not appropriate for plants adapted to the cold climatic conditions of the mountainous areas. This study demonstrates the potential of LAI remote sensing products for identifying and locating models' shortcomings at a regional scale.

  15. Modelling LAI at a regional scale with ISBA-A-gs: comparison with satellite-derived LAI over southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brut, A.; Rüdiger, C.; Lafont, S.; Roujean, J.-L.; Calvet, J.-C.; Jarlan, L.; Gibelin, A.-L.; Albergel, C.; Le Moigne, P.; Soussana, J.-F.; Klumpp, K.

    2009-04-01

    A CO2-responsive land surface model (the ISBA-A-gs model of Météo-France) is used to simulate photosynthesis and Leaf Area Index (LAI) in southwestern France for a 3-year period (2001-2003). A domain of about 170 000 km2 is covered at a spatial resolution of 8 km. The capability of ISBA-A-gs to reproduce the seasonal and the inter-annual variability of LAI at a regional scale, is assessed with two satellite-derived LAI products. One originates from the CYCLOPES programme using SPOT/VEGETATION data, and the second is based on MODIS data. The comparison reveals discrepancies between the two satellite LAI estimates and between satellite and simulated LAI values, both in their intensity and in the timing of the leaf onset. The model simulates higher LAI values for the C3 crops and coniferous trees than the satellite observations, which may be due to a saturation effect within the satellite signal. The simulated leaf onset presents a significant delay for mountainous grasslands. In-situ observations at a mid-altitude grassland site show that the generic temperature response of photosynthesis used in the model is not appropriate for plants adapted to the cold climatic conditions of the mountainous areas. This study demonstrates the potential of LAI remote sensing products for identifying and locating models' shortcomings at a regional scale.

  16. Effect of structural characteristics of corncob hemicelluloses fractionated by graded ethanol precipitation on furfural production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiling; Dai, Qingqing; Ren, Junli; Jian, Longfei; Peng, Feng; Sun, Runcang; Liu, Guoliang

    2016-01-20

    In the present study, a graded ethanol precipitation technique was employed to obtain hemicelluloses from the alkali-extracted corncob liquid. The relationship between the structural characteristics of alkali-soluble corncob hemicelluloses and the production of furfural was investigated by a heterogeneous process in a biphasic system. Results showed that alkali-soluble corncob hemicelluloses mainly consisted of glucuronoarabinoxylans and L-arabino-(4-O-methylglucurono)-D-xylans, and the drying way had less influence on the sugar composition, molecular weights and the functional groups of hemicelluloses obtained by the different ethanol concentration precipitation except for the thermal property, the amorphous structure and the ability for the furfural production. Furthermore, alkali-soluble corncob hemicelluloses with higher xylose content, lower branch degree, higher polydispersity and crystallinity contributed to the furfural production. A highest furfural yield of 45.41% with the xylose conversion efficiency of 99.06% and the furfural selectivity of 45.84% was obtained from the oven-dried hemicelluloses precipitated at the 30% (v/v) ethanol concentration.

  17. Assessment of Satellite-Derived Essential Climate Variables in the Terrestrial Domain: Overview and Status of the CEOS LPV Subgroup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    The validation of satellite-derived terrestrial observations has perennially faced the challenge of finding a consistent set of in-situ measurements that can both cover a wide range of surface conditions and provide timely and traceable product accuracy and uncertainty information. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), the space arm of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), plays a key role in coordinating the land product validation process. The Land Product Validation (LPV) sub-group of the CEOS Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV) aims to address the challenges associated with the validation of global land products. This paper will provide a status of LPV subgroup focus area activities, which cover seven Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) terrestrial Essential Climate Variables (ECVs): (1) Snow Cover, (2) Surface Albedo, (3) Land Cover, (4) Leaf Area Index, (5) Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR), (6) Active Fires, and (7) Soil Moisture; as well as two additional variables (Land Surface Phenology and Land Surface Temperature), which are deemed of high priority of the LPV community. A primary focus of LPV is the implementation of a global validation framework for product intercomparison and validation (fig. 1). This framework is based on a citable protocol, fiducial reference data, and automated subsetting. Ideally, each of these parts will be integrated into an online platform where quantitative tests are run, and standardized intercomparison and validation results reported for all products used in the validation exercise. The establishment of consensus guidelines for in situ measurements as well as inter-comparison of trends derived from independently-obtained reference data and derived products will enhance coordination of the scientific needs of the Earth system communities with global LPV activities (http://lpvs.gsfc.nasa.gov/).

  18. Application of satellite derived information for disaster risk reduction: vulnerability assessment for southwest coast of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Lubna; Blaschke, Thomas; Zeil, Peter

    2010-10-01

    The SW-coast of Pakistan is vulnerable to natural disasters, such as cyclones and tsunamis. Lack of spatially referenced information is a major hinder for proper disaster risk management programs in Pakistan, but satellite remote sensing being reliable, fast and spatially referenced information can be used as an important component in various natural disaster risk reduction activities. This study aimed to investigate vulnerability of coastal communities to cyclone and tsunamis based on satellite derived information. It is observed that SPOT-5 is relevant source on threatened features with respect to certain vulnerabilities like road, settlements, infrastructure and used in preparation of hazard zonation and vulnerability maps. Landsat ETM found very useful in demarcation of flood inundated areas. The GIS integrated evaluation of LANDSAT and ASTER GDEM helps identify low lying areas most susceptible to flooding and inundation by cyclone surges and tsunamis. The GIS integrated evaluation of SPOT, LANDSAT and ASTER GDEM data helps identify areas and infrastructure most vulnerable to cyclone surges and tsunami. Additionally, analysis of the vulnerability of critical infrastructures (schools, hospitals) within hazard zones provides indicators for the degree of spatial exposure to disaster. Satellite derived information in conjunction with detailed surveys of hazard prone areas can provide comprehensive vulnerability and risk analysis.

  19. A Combined Satellite-Derived Drought Indicator to Support Humanitarian Aid Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Enenkel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Governments, aid organizations and researchers are struggling with the complexity of detecting and monitoring drought events, which leads to weaknesses regarding the translation of early warnings into action. Embedded in an advanced decision-support framework for Doctors without Borders (Médecins sans Frontières, this study focuses on identifying the added-value of combining different satellite-derived datasets for drought monitoring and forecasting in Ethiopia. The core of the study is the improvement of an existing drought index via methodical adaptations and the integration of various satellite-derived datasets. The resulting Enhanced Combined Drought Index (ECDI links four input datasets (rainfall, soil moisture, land surface temperature and vegetation status. The respective weight of each input dataset is calculated for every grid point at a spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees (roughly 28 kilometers. In the case of data gaps in one input dataset, the weights are automatically redistributed to other available variables. Ranking the years 1992 to 2014 according to the ECDI-based warning levels allows for the identification of all large-scale drought events in Ethiopia. Our results also indicate a good match between the ECDI-based drought warning levels and reported drought impacts for both the start and the end of the season.

  20. Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, J.; Wilbert, S.; Ruiz-Arias, J. A.; Meyer, R.; Gueymard, C.; Súri, M.; Martín, L.; Mieslinger, T.; Blanc, P.; Grant, I.; Boland, J.; Ineichen, P.; Remund, J.; Escobar, R.; Troccoli, A.; Sengupta, M.; Nielsen, K. P.; Renne, D.; Geuder, N.; Cebecauer, T.

    2016-07-01

    At any site, the bankability of a projected solar power plant largely depends on the accuracy and general quality of the solar radiation data generated during the solar resource assessment phase. The term 'site adaptation' has recently started to be used in the framework of solar energy projects to refer to the improvement that can be achieved in satellite-derived solar irradiance and model data when short-term local ground measurements are used to correct systematic errors and bias in the original dataset. This contribution presents a preliminary survey of different possible techniques that can improve long-term satellite-derived and model-derived solar radiation data through the use of short-term on-site ground measurements. The possible approaches that are reported here may be applied in different ways, depending on the origin and characteristics of the uncertainties in the modeled data. This work, which is the first step of a forthcoming in-depth assessment of methodologies for site adaptation, has been done within the framework of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 46 'Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting.'

  1. A Satellite-Derived Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor Transport Index for Climate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gray J.; Lerner, Jeffrey A.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A new approach is presented to quantify upper-level moisture transport from geostationary satellite data. Daily time sequences of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GOES-7 water vapor imagery were used to produce estimates of winds and water vapor mixing ratio in the cloud-free region of the upper troposphere sensed by the 6.7- microns water vapor channel. The winds and mixing ratio values were gridded and then combined to produce a parameter called the water vapor transport index (WVTI), which represents the magnitude of the two-dimensional transport of water vapor in the upper troposphere. Daily grids of WVTI, meridional moisture transport, mixing ratio, pressure, and other associated parameters were averaged to produce monthly fields for June, July, and August (JJA) of 1987 and 1988 over the Americas and surrounding oceanic regions, The WVTI was used to compare upper-tropospheric moisture transport between the summers of 1987 and 1988, contrasting the latter part of the 1986/87 El Nino event and the La Nina period of 1988. A similar product derived from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) 40-Year Reanalysis Project was used to help to validate the index. Although the goal of this research was to describe the formulation and utility of the WVTI, considerable insight was obtained into the interannual variability of upper-level water vapor transport. Both datasets showed large upper-level water vapor transport associated with synoptic features over the Americas and with outflow from tropical convective systems. Minimal transport occurred over tropical and subtropical high pressure regions where winds were light. Index values from NCEP-NCAR were 2-3 times larger than that determined from GOES. This difference resulted from large zonal wind differences and an apparent overestimate of upper-tropospheric moisture in the reanalysis model. A comparison of the satellite-derived monthly

  2. Bias correction of satellite precipitation products for flood forecasting application at the Upper Mahanadi River Basin in Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beria, H.; Nanda, T., Sr.; Chatterjee, C.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution satellite precipitation products such as Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), etc., offer a promising alternative to flood forecasting in data scarce regions. At the current state-of-art, these products cannot be used in the raw form for flood forecasting, even at smaller lead times. In the current study, these precipitation products are bias corrected using statistical techniques, such as additive and multiplicative bias corrections, and wavelet multi-resolution analysis (MRA) with India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded precipitation product,obtained from gauge-based rainfall estimates. Neural network based rainfall-runoff modeling using these bias corrected products provide encouraging results for flood forecasting upto 48 hours lead time. We will present various statistical and graphical interpretations of catchment response to high rainfall events using both the raw and bias corrected precipitation products at different lead times.

  3. A Stochastic Technique for Error Correction and Spatial Downscaling of Global Gridded Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedi, H.; Kaheil, Y.; Anagnostou, E. N.; McCollum, J.; Beighley, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deriving flood maps requires an accurate characterization of precipitation variability at high spatio-temporal resolution. Most of the available global-scale gridded precipitation products are available at resolutions (e.g., 25 km) not directly applicable to flood modeling. An error correction and spatial downscaling method based on a two-dimensional satellite rainfall error model (SREM2D) is tested in this study based on a long-term (2001-2010) dataset. Specifically, the model is applied on two rainfall datasets: a satellite precipitation product (TRMM-3B42.V7 at 0.25 degree) and a global land-atmosphere re-analysis product (GLDAS-CLM at 1 degree), to produce error corrected rainfall ensembles at 0.05 degree spatial resolution. The NCEP hourly, 4-km resolution multi-sensor precipitation product (WSR-88D stage IV gauge-adjusted radar-rainfall product) is used as the reference rainfall dataset. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model is forced with the downscaled ensemble rainfall data to produce an ensemble of runoff values. The Susquehanna River basin is the study area, consisting of 1000 sub-basins ranging from 39 to 67,000 square kilometers including complex terrain and high latitude locations. There are 437 significant storm events selected over the study area based on the 10-year database. The analysis performed is based on 60 percent of events in each season kept for model calibration and 40 percent for validation. The statistical analysis consists of two parts: (1) evaluation of error metrics (relative standard deviation and efficiency coefficient) to quantify improvements in rainfall and runoff simulations as function of basin size and storm severity, and (2) ensemble verification (exceedance probability and mean uncertainty ratio) of the rainfall and runoff ensembles to assess the accuracy of the ensemble-based uncertainty characterization. The study investigates how well the ensemble of downscaled and error-corrected rainfall data performs

  4. Nordic Seas Precipitation Ground Validation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Christian; Bumke, Karl; Bakan, Stephan; Andersson, Axel

    2010-05-01

    A thorough knowledge of global ocean precipitation is an indispensable prerequisite for the understanding of the water cycle in the global climate system. However, reliable detection of precipitation over the global oceans, especially of solid precipitation, remains a challenging task. This is true for both, passive microwave remote sensing and reanalysis based model estimates. The satellite based HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data) climatology contains fields of precipitation, evaporation and the resulting freshwater flux along with 12 additional atmospheric parameters over the global ice-free ocean between 1987 and 2005. Except for the NOAA Pathfinder SST, all basic state variables are calculated from SSM/I passive microwave radiometer measurements. HOAPS contains three main data subsets that originate from one common pixel-level data source. Gridded 0.5 degree monthly, pentad and twice daily data products are freely available from www.hoaps.org. The optical disdrometer ODM 470 is a ground validation instrument capable of measuring rain and snowfall on ships even under high wind speeds. It was used for the first time over the Nordic Seas during the LOFZY 2005 campaign. A dichotomous verification for these snowfall events resulted in a perfect score between the disdrometer, a precipitation detector and a shipboard observer's log. The disdrometer data is further point-to-area collocated against precipitation from three satellite derived climatologies, HOAPS-3, the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) one degree daily (1DD) data set, and the Goddard Profiling algorithm, version 2004 (GPROF 2004). Only the HOAPS precipitation turns out to be overall consistent with the disdrometer data resulting in an accuracy of 0.96. The collocated data comprises light precipitation events below 1 mm/h. Therefore two LOFZY case studies with high precipitation rates are presented that still indicate plausible results. Overall, this

  5. Crystallisation kinetics of ZnS precipitation; an experimental study using the mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Azzam, Mohammed O.J.; Yahya, Salah Abu; Versteeg, Geert

    2004-01-01

    The precipitation kinetics of zinc sulfide were studied using a lab scale mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) precipitation reactor. The vessel was operated at different feed concentrations, molar ratios, stirrer speeds, pH-values, feed injection positions and residence times. Primary

  6. Crystallization kinetics of ZnS precipitation; an experimental study using the mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarazi, Mousa Al-; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Azzam, Mohammed O.J.; Yahya, Salah Abu; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2004-01-01

    The precipitation kinetics of zinc sulfide were studied using a lab scale mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) precipitation reactor. The vessel was operated at different feed concentrations, molar ratios, stirrer speeds, pH-values, feed injection positions and residence times. Primary

  7. Crystallization kinetics of ZnS precipitation; an experimental study using the mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Tarazi, Mousa; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Azzam, Mohammed O.J.; Yahya, Salah Abu; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2004-01-01

    The precipitation kinetics of zinc sulfide were studied using a lab scale mixed-suspension-mixed-product-removal (MSMPR) precipitation reactor. The vessel was operated at different feed concentrations, molar ratios, stirrer speeds, pH-values, feed injection positions and residence times. Primary nuc

  8. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide.

  9. Reconciling high-altitude precipitation in the upper Indus basin with glacier mass balances and runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerzeel, Walter; Wanders, Niko; Lutz, Arthur; Shea, Joseph; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Mountain ranges in Asia are important water suppliers, especially if downstream climates are arid, water demands are high and glaciers are abundant. In such basins, the hydrological cycle depends heavily on high-altitude precipitation. Yet direct observations of high-altitude precipitation are lacking and satellite derived products are of insufficient resolution and quality to capture spatial variation and magnitude of mountain precipitation. Here we use glacier mass balances to inversely infer the high-altitude precipitation in the upper Indus basin and show that the amount of precipitation required to sustain the observed mass balances of large glacier systems is far beyond what is observed at valley stations or estimated by gridded precipitation products. An independent validation with observed river flow confirms that the water balance can indeed only be closed when the high altitude precipitation on average is more than twice as high and in extreme cases up to a factor of 10 higher than previously thought. We conclude that these findings alter the present understanding of high-altitude hydrology and will have an important bearing on climate change impact studies, planning and design of hydropower plants and irrigation reservoirs as well as the regional geopolitical situation in general.

  10. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2003-12-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the trajectory of the spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred on January 2, 1997 in the Japan Sea by fusing two microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. In this study 'fusion' is defined as the method of more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil than before. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced drift vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. The distribution of component of spill vector is mostly accounted for by the distribution of geostrophic velocity component during the study period with some discrepancies during March, 1997.

  11. Evaluation of NASA's MERRA Precipitation Product in Reproducing the Observed Trend and Distribution of Extreme Precipitation Events in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Hamed; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Lee, Jaechoul; Wehner, Michael F.; Collow, Allison

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) precipitation product in reproducing the trend and distribution of extreme precipitation events. Utilizing the extreme value theory, time-invariant and time-variant extreme value distributions are developed to model the trends and changes in the patterns of extreme precipitation events over the contiguous United States during 1979-2010. The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) U.S.Unified gridded observation data are used as the observational dataset. The CPC analysis shows that the eastern and western parts of the United States are experiencing positive and negative trends in annual maxima, respectively. The continental-scale patterns of change found in MERRA seem to reasonably mirror the observed patterns of change found in CPC. This is not previously expected, given the difficulty in constraining precipitation in reanalysis products. MERRA tends to overestimate the frequency at which the 99th percentile of precipitation is exceeded because this threshold tends to be lower in MERRA, making it easier to be exceeded. This feature is dominant during the summer months. MERRA tends to reproduce spatial patterns of the scale and location parameters of the generalized extreme value and generalized Pareto distributions. However, MERRA underestimates these parameters, particularly over the Gulf Coast states, leading to lower magnitudes in extreme precipitation events. Two issues in MERRA are identified: 1) MERRA shows a spurious negative trend in Nebraska and Kansas, which is most likely related to the changes in the satellite observing system over time that has apparently affected the water cycle in the central United States, and 2) the patterns of positive trend over the Gulf Coast states and along the East Coast seem to be correlated with the tropical cyclones in these regions. The analysis of the trends in the seasonal precipitation extremes indicates that

  12. Spatial Correlation of Satellite-Derived PM2.5 with Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ju Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory diseases, particularly allergic rhinitis, are spatially and temporally correlated with the ground PM2.5 level. A study of the correlation between the two factors should therefore account for spatiotemporal variations. Satellite observation has the advantage of wide spatial coverage over pin-point style ground-based in situ monitoring stations. Therefore, the current study used both ground measurement and satellite data sets to investigate the spatial and temporal correlation of satellite-derived PM2.5 with respiratory diseases. This study used 4-year satellite data and PM2.5 levels of the period at eight stations in Taiwan to obtain the spatial and temporal relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD and PM2.5. The AOD-PM2.5 model was further examined using the cross-validation (CV technique and was found to have high reliability compared with similar models. The model was used to obtain satellite-derived PM2.5 levels and to analyze the hospital admissions for allergic rhinitis in 2008. The results suggest that adults (18–65 years and children (3–18 years are the most vulnerable groups to the effect of PM2.5 compared with infants and elderly people. This result may be because the two affected age groups spend longer time outdoors. This result may also be attributed to the long-range PM2.5 transport from upper stream locations and the atmospheric circulation patterns, which are significant in spring and fall. The results of the current study suggest that additional environmental factors that might be associated with respiratory diseases should be considered in future studies.

  13. Can satellite-derived water surface changes be used to calibrate a hydrodynamic model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Beck, Hylke; Salamon, Peter; Burek, Peter; de Roo, Ad; Thielen, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    The limited availability of recent ground observational data is one of the main challenges for validation of hydrodynamic models. This is especially relevant for real-time global applications such as flood forecasting models. In this study, we aim to use remotely-sensed data from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) as a proxy of river discharge time series and test its value through calibration of the hydrological model LISFLOOD. This was carried out for the time period 1998-2010 at 40 sites in Africa, Europe, North America and South America by calibrating the parameters that control the flow routing and groundwater processes. We compared the performance of the calibrated simulated discharge time series that used satellite-derived data with the ground discharge time series. Furthermore, we compared it with the independent calibrated run that used ground data and also, to the non-calibrated simulated discharge time series. The non-calibrated set up used a set of parameters which values were predefined by expert-knowledge. This is currently being used by the LISFLOOD set up model embedded in the pre-operational Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS). The results of this study showed that the satellite surface water changes from the Global Flood Detection System can be used as a proxy of river discharge data, through the demonstration of its added value for model calibration and validation. Using satellite-derived data, the skill scores obtained by the calibrated simulated model discharge improved when comparing to non-calibrated simulated time series. Calibration, post-processing and data assimilation strategies of satellite data as a proxy for streamflow data within the global hydrological model are outlined and discussed.

  14. Temporal Trends in Satellite-Derived Erythemal UVB and Implications for Ambient Sun Exposure Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Langston

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UVR has been associated with various health outcomes, including skin cancers, vitamin D insufficiency, and multiple sclerosis. Measurement of UVR has been difficult, traditionally relying on subject recall. We investigated trends in satellite-derived UVB from 1978 to 2014 within the continental United States (US to inform UVR exposure assessment and determine the potential magnitude of misclassification bias created by ignoring these trends. Monthly UVB data remotely sensed from various NASA satellites were used to investigate changes over time in the United States using linear regression with a harmonic function. Linear regression models for local geographic areas were used to make inferences across the entire study area using a global field significance test. Temporal trends were investigated across all years and separately for each satellite type due to documented differences in UVB estimation. UVB increased from 1978 to 2014 in 48% of local tests. The largest UVB increase was found in Western Nevada (0.145 kJ/m2 per five-year increment, a total 30-year increase of 0.87 kJ/m2. This largest change only represented 17% of total ambient exposure for an average January and 2% of an average July in Western Nevada. The observed trends represent cumulative UVB changes of less than a month, which are not relevant when attempting to estimate human exposure. The observation of small trends should be interpreted with caution due to measurement of satellite parameter inputs (ozone and climatological factors that may impact derived satellite UVR nearly 20% compared to ground level sources. If the observed trends hold, satellite-derived UVB data may reasonably estimate ambient UVB exposures even for outcomes with long latency phases that predate the satellite record.

  15. Comparison and evaluation of satellite- and reanalysis-based precipitation products for water resources management in the Brahmaputra River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh Khan, Abu; Sohel Masud, Md.; Abdulla Hel Kafi, Md.; Sultana, Tashrifa; Lopez Lopez, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    The Brahmaputra River, with a transboundary basin area of approx. 554,500 km2, has its origin on the northern slope of the Himalayas in China, from where it flows through India, Bhutan and finally Bangladesh. Brahmaputra basin's climatology is heavily conditioned by precipitation during the monsoon months, concentrating about the 85 % of the rainfall in this period and originating severe and frequent floods that impact specially the Bangladeshi population in the delta region. Recent campaigns to increase the quality and to share ground-based hydro-meteorological data, in particular precipitation, within the basin have provided limited results. Global rainfall data from satellite and reanalysis may improve the temporal and spatial availability of in-situ observations for advanced water resources management. This study aims to evaluate the applicability of several global precipitation products from satellite and reanalysis in comparison with in-situ data to quantify their added value for hydrological modeling at a basin and sub-basin scale for the Brahmaputra River. Precipitation products from CMORPH, TRMM-3B42, GsMAP, WFDEI, MSWEP and various combinations with ground-based data were evaluated at basin and sub-basin level at a daily and monthly temporal resolution. The Brahmaputra was delineated into 54 sub-basins for a more detailed evaluation of the precipitation products. The data were analysed and inter-compared for the time period from 2002 to 2010. Precipitation performance assessment was conducted including several indicators, such as probability of detection (POD), false alarm ratio (FAR), Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), bias and root mean square error (RMSE). Preliminary results indicate high correlation and low bias and RMSE values between WFDEI, TRMM-3B42 and CMORPH precipitation and in-situ observations at a monthly time scale. Lower correlations and higher bias and RMSE values were found between GsMAP and MSWEP and ground-observed precipitation

  16. SACRA – global data sets of satellite-derived crop calendars for agricultural simulations: an estimation of a high-resolution crop calendar using satellite-sensed NDVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kotsuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, many studies have performed numerical estimations of food production and agricultural water demand to understand the present and future supply–demand relationship. A crop calendar (CC is an essential input datum to estimate food production and agricultural water demand accurately with the numerical estimations. CC defines the date or month when farmers plant and harvest in cropland. This study aims to develop a new global data set of a satellite-derived crop calendar for agricultural simulations (SACRA and reveal advantages and disadvantages of the satellite-derived CC compared to other global products. We estimate global CC at a spatial resolution of 5 min (≈10 km using the satellite-sensed NDVI data, which corresponds well to vegetation growth and death on the land surface. We first demonstrate that SACRA shows similar spatial pattern in planting date compared to a census-based product. Moreover, SACRA reflects a variety of CC in the same administrative unit, since it uses high-resolution satellite data. However, a disadvantage is that the mixture of several crops in a grid is not considered in SACRA. We also address that the cultivation period of SACRA clearly corresponds to the time series of NDVI. Therefore, accuracy of SACRA depends on the accuracy of NDVI used for the CC estimation. Although SACRA shows different CC from a census-based product in some regions, multiple usages of the two products are useful to take into consideration the uncertainty of the CC. An advantage of SACRA compared to the census-based products is that SACRA provides not only planting/harvesting dates but also a peak date from the time series of NDVI data.

  17. Precipitation fields interpolated from gauge stations versus a merged radar-gauge precipitation product: influence on modelled soil moisture at local scale and at SMOS scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. dall'Amico

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the validation of coarse resolution soil moisture products from missions such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission, hydrological modelling of soil moisture is an important tool. The spatial distribution of precipitation is among the most crucial input data for such models. Thus, reliable time series of precipitation fields are required, but these often need to be interpolated from data delivered by scarcely distributed gauge station networks. In this study, a commercial precipitation product derived by Meteomedia AG from merging radar and gauge data is introduced as a novel means of adding the promising area-distributed information given by a radar network to the more accurate, but point-like measurements from a gauge station network. This precipitation product is first validated against an independent gauge station network. Further, the novel precipitation product is assimilated into the hydrological land surface model PROMET for the Upper Danube Catchment in southern Germany, one of the major SMOS calibration and validation sites in Europe. The modelled soil moisture fields are compared to those obtained when the operational interpolation from gauge station data is used to force the model. The results suggest that the assimilation of the novel precipitation product can lead to deviations of modelled soil moisture in the order of 0.15 m3 m−3 on small spatial (∼1 km2 and short temporal resolutions (∼1 day. As expected, after spatial aggregation to the coarser grid on which SMOS data are delivered (~195 km2, these differences are reduced to the order of 0.04 m3 m−3, which is the accuracy benchmark for SMOS. The results of both model runs are compared to brightness temperatures measured by the airborne L-band radiometer EMIRAD during the SMOS Validation Campaign 2010. Both comparisons yield equally good correlations, confirming the model's ability to

  18. Estimation of glacier mass balance: An approach based on satellite-derived transient snowlines and a temperature index driven by meteorological observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawde, S. A.; Kulkarni, A. V.; Bala, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Himalaya, large area is comprised of glaciers and seasonal snow, mainly due to its high elevated mountain ranges. Long term and continuous assessment of glaciers in this region is important for climatological and hydrological applications. However, rugged terrains and severe weather conditions in the Himalaya lead to paucity in field observations. Therefore, in recent decades, glacier dynamics are extensively monitored using remote sensing in inaccessible terrain like Himalaya. Estimation of glacier mass balance using empirical relationship between mass balance and area accumulation ratio (AAR) requires an accurate estimate of equilibrium-line altitude (ELA). ELA is defined as the snowline at the end of the hydrological year. However, identification of ELA, using remote sensing is difficult because of temporal gaps, cloud cover and intermediate snowfall on glaciers. This leads to large uncertainty in glacier mass-balance estimates by the conventional AAR method that uses satellite-derived highest snowline in ablation season as an ELA. The present study suggests a new approach to improve estimates of ELA location. First, positions of modelled snowlines are optimized using satellite-derived snowlines in the early melt season. Secondly, ELA at the end of the glaciological year is estimated by the melt and accumulation models driven using in situ temperature and precipitation records. From the modelled ELA, mass balance is estimated using the empirical relationship between AAR and mass balance. The modelled mass balance is validated using field measurements on Chhota Shigri and Hamtah glaciers, Himachal Pradesh, India. The new approach shows a substantial improvement in glacier mass-balance estimation, reducing bias by 46% and 108% for Chhota Shigiri and Hamtah glaciers respectively. The cumulative mass loss reconstructed from our approach is 0.85 Gt for nine glaciers in the Chandra basin from 2001 to 2009. The result of the present study is in agreement with

  19. Utilization of satellite-derived estimates of meteorological and land surface characteristics in the Land Surface Model for vast agricultural region territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzylev, Eugene; Startseva, Zoya; Uspensky, Alexander; Volkova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    data from named radiometers. All technologies have been adapted to the study area. Verification of the AVHRR- and MODIS-derived LST estimates has been performed through comparison with ground-measured temperatures and analogous estimates obtained from remaining sensors. The reliability of SEVIRI-derived LST estimates has been verified by comparison with similar synchronous SEVIRI-derived estimates produced in LSA SAF (Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility, Lisbon, Portugal). Correctness of LAI estimates has been confirmed by comparing time behavior of satellite- and ground-based LAI during vegetation season. Satellite-derived estimates of precipitation have been built using the Multi Threshold Method (MTM) developed for automatic pixel-by-pixel classification of AVHRR and SEVIRI data. The method is intended for the cloud detection and identification of its types, estimation of the maximum liquid water content and water content of the cloud layer, allocation of precipitation zones and determination of instantaneous maximum intensities of precipitation in the pixel range around the clock throughout the year independently of the land surface type. Measurement data from five AVHRR channels or from eleven SEVIRI channels as well as their differences have been used in the MTM as predictors. To validate the methodology, ground-based observation data on daily precipitation sums at agricultural meteorological stations of the study region have been used. The probability of correct precipitation zone detection from satellite data is at least 70% (80-85% in some cases) when compared with ground-based observations. In the frame of this approach the transition from the rainfall intensity estimation to the calculation of their daily values has been accomplished. In the study the AVHRR- and SEVIRI-derived daily, monthly and annual sums of precipitation for the region of interest have been calculated. The daily and monthly sums have been found to be in good agreement

  20. Nitrogen decreases and precipitation increases ectomycorrhizal extramatrical mycelia production in a longleaf pine forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Stephanie E; Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D

    2007-06-01

    The rates and controls of ectomycorrhizal fungal production were assessed in a 22-year-old longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantation using a complete factorial design that included two foliar scorching (control and 95% plus needle scorch) and two nitrogen (N) fertilization (control and 5 g N m(-2) year(-1)) treatments during an annual assessment. Ectomycorrhizal fungi production comprised of extramatrical mycelia, Hartig nets and mantles on fine root tips, and sporocarps was estimated to be 49 g m(-2) year(-1) in the control treatment plots. Extramatrical mycelia accounted for approximately 95% of the total mycorrhizal production estimate. Mycorrhizal production rates did not vary significantly among sample periods throughout the annual assessment (p = 0.1366). In addition, reduction in foliar leaf area via experimental scorching treatments did not influence mycorrhizal production (p = 0.9374), suggesting that stored carbon (C) may decouple the linkage between current photosynthate production and ectomycorrhizal fungi dynamics in this forest type. Nitrogen fertilization had a negative effect, whereas precipitation had a positive effect on mycorrhizal fungi production (p = 0.0292; r (2) = 0.42). These results support the widely speculated but poorly documented supposition that mycorrhizal fungi are a large and dynamic component of C flow and nutrient cycling dynamics in forest ecosystems.

  1. Evaluation of Satellite Precipitation Products with Rain Gauge Data at Different Scales: Implications for Hydrological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rain gauge and satellite-retrieved data have been widely used in basin-scale hydrological applications. While rain gauges provide accurate measurements that are generally unevenly distributed in space, satellites offer spatially regular observations and common error prone retrieval. Comparative evaluation of gauge-based and satellite-based data is necessary in hydrological studies, as precipitation is the most important input in basin-scale water balance. This study uses quality-controlled rain gauge data and prevailing satellite products (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM 3B43, 3B42 and 3B42RT to examine the consistency and discrepancies between them at different scales. Rain gauges and TRMM products were available in the Poyang Lake Basin, China, from 1998 to 2007 (3B42RT: 2000–2007. Our results show that the performance of TRMM products generally increases with increasing spatial scale. At both the monthly and annual scales, the accuracy is highest for TRMM 3B43, with 3B42 second and 3B42RT third. TRMM products generally overestimate precipitation because of a high frequency and degree of overestimation in light and moderate rain cases. At the daily scale, the accuracy is relatively low between TRMM 3B42 and 3B42RT. Meanwhile, the performances of TRMM 3B42 and 3B42RT are highly variable in different seasons. At both the basin and pixel scales, TRMM 3B43 and 3B42 exhibit significant discrepancies from July to September, performing worst in September. For TRMM 3B42RT, all statistical indices fluctuate and are low throughout the year, performing worst in July at the pixel scale and January at the basin scale. Furthermore, the spatial distributions of the statistical indices of TRMM 3B43 and 3B42 performed well, while TRMM 3B42RT displayed a poor performance.

  2. Validation of the H-SAF precipitation product H03 over Greece using rain gauge data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feidas, H.; Porcu, F.; Puca, S.; Rinollo, A.; Lagouvardos, C.; Kotroni, V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an extensive validation of the combined infrared/microwave H-SAF (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) precipitation product H03, for a 1-year period, using gauge observations from a relatively dense network of 233 stations over Greece. First, the quality of the interpolated data used to validate the precipitation product is assessed and a quality index is constructed based on parameters such as the density of the station network and the orography. Then, a validation analysis is conducted based on comparisons of satellite (H03) with interpolated rain gauge data to produce continuous and multi-categorical statistics at monthly and annual timescales by taking into account the different geophysical characteristics of the terrain (land, coast, sea, elevation). Finally, the impact of the quality of interpolated data on the validation statistics is examined in terms of different configurations of the interpolation model and the rain gauge network characteristics used in the interpolation. The possibility of using a quality index of the interpolated data as a filter in the validation procedure is also investigated. The continuous validation statistics show yearly root mean squared error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) corresponding to the 225 and 105 % of the mean rain rate, respectively. Mean error (ME) indicates a slight overall tendency for underestimation of the rain gauge rates, which takes large values for the high rain rates. In general, the H03 algorithm cannot retrieve very well the light (10 mm/h) precipitation. The poor correlation between satellite and gauge data points to algorithm problems in co-locating precipitation patterns. Seasonal comparison shows that retrieval errors are lower for cold months than in the summer months of the year. The multi-categorical statistics indicate that the H03 algorithm is able to discriminate efficiently the rain from the no rain events

  3. Assessment of Satellite-based Precipitation Products (TRMM) in Hydrologic Modeling: Case Studies from Northern Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL kadiri, R.; Milewski, A.; Durham, M.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation is the most important forcing parameter in hydrological modeling, yet it is largely unknown in the arid Middle East. We assessed the magnitude, probability of detection, and false alarm rates of various rainfall satellite products (e.g., TRMM, RFE2.0) compared to in situ gauge data (~79 stations) across the Our Er Rbia, Sebou, and Melouya Watersheds in Northern Morocco. Precipitation over the area is relatively high with an average of ~400mm/year according to TRMM (1998-2008). The existing gauges indicate that the average annual precipitation across the Tadla and Coastal Plains region is 260mm/year and 390mm/year across the Atlas Mountains. Following the assessment of satellite products against in situ gauge data, we evaluated the effects (e.g., runoff and recharge amounts) of using satellite driven hydrologic models using SWAT. Specifically, we performed a four-fold exercise: (1) The first stage focused on the analysis of the rainfall products; (2) the second stage involved the construction of a rainfall-runoff model using gauge data; (3) the third stage entailed the calibration of the model against flow gauges and/or dams storage variability, and (4) model simulation using satellite based rainfall products using the calibrated parameters from the initial simulation. Results suggest the TRMM V7 has a much better correlation with the field data over the Oum Er Rbia watershed. The Correlation E (Nash-Suncliffe coefficient) has a positive value of 0.5, while the correlation coefficient of TRMM V6 vs. gauges data is a negative value of -0.25. This first order evaluation of the TRMM V7 shows the new algorithm has partially overcame the underestimation effect in the semi-arid environments. However, more research needs to be done to increase the usability of TRMM V7 in hydrologic models. Low correlations are most likely a result of the following: (1) snow at the high elevations in the Oum Er Rbia watershed, (2) the ocean effect on TRMM measurements along

  4. Changes in satellite-derived spring vegetation green-up date and its linkage to climate in China from 1982 to 2010: a multimethod analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Nan; Wang, Tao; Nan, Huijuan; Ma, Yuecun; Wang, Xuhui; Myneni, Ranga B; Piao, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    The change in spring phenology is recognized to exert a major influence on carbon balance dynamics in temperate ecosystems. Over the past several decades, several studies focused on shifts in spring phenology; however, large uncertainties still exist, and one understudied source could be the method implemented in retrieving satellite-derived spring phenology. To account for this potential uncertainty, we conducted a multimethod investigation to quantify changes in vegetation green-up date from 1982 to 2010 over temperate China, and to characterize climatic controls on spring phenology. Over temperate China, the five methods estimated that the vegetation green-up onset date advanced, on average, at a rate of 1.3 ± 0.6 days per decade (ranging from 0.4 to 1.9 days per decade) over the last 29 years. Moreover, the sign of the trends in vegetation green-up date derived from the five methods were broadly consistent spatially and for different vegetation types, but with large differences in the magnitude of the trend. The large intermethod variance was notably observed in arid and semiarid vegetation types. Our results also showed that change in vegetation green-up date is more closely correlated with temperature than with precipitation. However, the temperature sensitivity of spring vegetation green-up date became higher as precipitation increased, implying that precipitation is an important regulator of the response of vegetation spring phenology to change in temperature. This intricate linkage between spring phenology and precipitation must be taken into account in current phenological models which are mostly driven by temperature. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Philip A.; Newingham, Beth A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.; Nowak, Robert S.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere will continue to be enriched with carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century. Carbon dioxide enrichment often reduces leaf transpiration, which in water-limited ecosystems may increase soil water content, change species abundances and increase the productivity of plant communities. The effect of increased soil water on community productivity and community change may be greater in ecosystems with lower precipitation, or on coarser-textured soils, but responses are likely absent in deserts. We tested correlations among yearly increases in soil water content, community change and community plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in experiments in a mesic grassland with fine- to coarse-textured soils, a semi-arid grassland and a xeric shrubland. We found no correlation between CO2-caused changes in soil water content and changes in biomass of dominant plant taxa or total community aboveground biomass in either grassland type or on any soil in the mesic grassland (P > 0.60). Instead, increases in dominant taxa biomass explained up to 85 % of the increases in total community biomass under CO2 enrichment. The effect of community change on community productivity was stronger in the semi-arid grassland than in the mesic grassland, where community biomass change on one soil was not correlated with the change in either the soil water content or the dominant taxa. No sustained increases in soil water content or community productivity and no change in dominant plant taxa occurred in the xeric shrubland. Thus, community change was a crucial driver of community productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in the grasslands, but effects of soil water change on productivity were not evident in yearly responses to CO2 enrichment. Future research is necessary to isolate and clarify the mechanisms controlling the temporal and spatial variations in the linkages among soil water, community change and plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment. PMID

  6. Improvements of Satellite-Derived Cyclonic Rainfall over the North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, Christian-Philipp; Bakan, Stephan; Graßl, Hartmut

    2003-02-01

    Case studies of rainfall, derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) satellite data during the passage of individual cyclones over the North Atlantic, are presented to enhance the knowledge of rainfall processes associated with frontal systems. A multisatellite method is applied for complete coverage of the North Atlantic twice a day. Different SSM/I precipitation algorithms have been tested for individual cyclones and compared to the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) datasets. An independent rainfall pattern and intensity validation method is presented using voluntary observing ship (VOS) datasets and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images.Intense cyclones occur frequently in the wintertime period, with cold fronts propagating far south over the North Atlantic. Following upstream, large cloud clusters are frequently embedded in the cellular structured cold air of the backside regions, which produce heavy convective rainfall events, especially in the region off Newfoundland around 50°N. These storms can be easily identified on AVHRR images. It transpired that only the SSM/I rainfall algorithm of Bauer and Schlüssel is sensitive enough to detect the rainfall patterns and intensities observed by VOS for those cyclone types over the North Atlantic. In contrast, the GPCP products do not recognize this backside rainfall, whereas the frontal rainfall conditions are well represented in all tested datasets. This is suggested from the results of an intensive intercomparison study with ship reports from the time period of the Fronts and Atlantic Storm Track Experiment (FASTEX) field campaign. For this purpose, a new technique has been developed to transfer ship report codes into rain-rate estimates. From the analysis of a complete life cycle of a cyclone, it follows that these mesoscale backside rainfall events contribute up to 25% to the total amount of rainfall in North Atlantic cyclones.

  7. Warming Nights and Increased Precipitation Event Size Decrease Picea engelmannii Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, A. N.; Laflin, M.; Walker, B. J.; Gill, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change has the potential to change the distribution of upper treeline in alpine systems. Two elements of climate change—rising low temperatures and changes in precipitation event size--are likely to influence the physiological ecology of treeline species. Rising low temperatures will influence plant carbon status, likely increasing respiration but reducing low-temperature stress. Changes in precipitation event size and frequency may influence the duration of dry periods between rain events. This growth-chamber study was designed to observe the physiological changes to Picea engelmannii (Engelman Spruce), a dominant treeline species in the subalpine, as the seedlings were subjected to warmer nighttime temperatures and less frequent but heavier waterings. The hypothesis was that warm nights were going to increase respiration rates, which would therefore decrease the available carbon and reduce productivity. The changes in water were expected to increase the time that the P. engelmannii were dry with the additional water not compensating for the time between events. Two growth chambers were programmed to the same daytime temperatures, but with one set three degrees warmer to imitate nighttime warming. Daylength was set to mimic daily patterns in the subalpine of central Utah, USA. Half of the seedlings received a watering schedule similar to its indigenous location, and the other half received an increase of 50% in water, but 50% more time between watering. There was a significant interaction between temperature and watering frequency. Maximum photosynthetic rates were sensitive to watering frequency in ambient conditions, but watering frequency had no influence under elevated nighttime temperature. Results indicated that the plants with longer periods between watering had higher glucose levels than the more frequently watered plants. Overall, the trees grown at ambient temperature with the more frequent watering were more productive than all other

  8. Global Precipitation Variations and Long-term Changes Derived from the GPCP Monthly Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert F.; Gu, Guojun; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Global and large regional rainfall variations and possible long-term changes are examined using the 25-year (1979-2004) monthly dataset from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). The emphasis is to discriminate among the variations due to ENSO, volcanic events and possible long-term changes. Although the global change of precipitation in the data set is near zero, the data set does indicate an upward trend (0.13 mm/day/25yr) and a downward trend (-0.06 mm/day/25yr) over tropical oceans and lands (25S-25N), respectively. This corresponds to a 4% increase (ocean) and 2% decrease (land) during this time period. Techniques are applied to attempt to eliminate variations due to ENSO and major volcanic eruptions. The impact of the two major volcanic eruptions over the past 25 years is estimated to be about a 5% reduction in tropical rainfall. The modified data set (with ENSO and volcano effect removed) retains the same approximate change slopes, but with reduced variance leading to significance tests with results in the 90-95% range. Inter-comparisons between the GPCP, SSWI (1988-2004), and TRMM (1998-2004) rainfall products are made to increase or decrease confidence in the changes seen in the GPCP analysis.

  9. Assessment of GPM and TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Products in Streamflow Simulations in a Data-Sparse Mountainous Watershed in Myanmar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fei Yuan; Limin Zhang; Khin Wah Wah Win; Liliang Ren; Chongxu Zhao; Yonghua Zhu; Shanhu Jiang; Yi Liu

    2017-01-01

    ...) final run and the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42V7 precipitation products, and their feasibility in streamflow simulations in the Chindwin River basin, Myanmar, from April 2014...

  10. High resolution satellite derived erodibility factors for WRF/Chem windblown dust simulations in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, Pablo Gabriel; Fernandez, Rafael Pedro; Allend, David; Mulena, Celeste; Puliafito, Salvador Enrique

    2017-04-01

    A proper representation of dust sources is critical to accurately predict atmospheric particle concentrations in regional windblown dust simulations. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) includes a topographic-based erodibility map originally conceived for global scale modeling, which fails to identify the geographical location of dust sources in many regions of Argentina. Therefore, this study aims at developing a method to obtain a high-resolution erodibility map suitable for regional or local scale modeling using WRF/Chem. We present two independent approaches based on global methods to estimate soil erodibility using satellite retrievals, i.e. topography from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and surface reflectance from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Simulation results of a severe Zonda wind episode in the arid central-west Argentina serve as bases for the analysis of these methods. Simulated dust concentration at surface level is compared with particulate matter measurements at one site in Mendoza city. In addition, we use satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals to investigate model performance in reproducing spatial distribution of dust emissions. The erodibility map based on surface reflectance from MODIS improves the representation of small scale features, and increases the overall dust aerosol loading with respect to the standard map included by default. Simulated concentrations are in good agreement with measurements as well as satellite derived dust spatial distribution.

  11. Comparative Study of Ground Measured, Satellite-Derived, and Estimated Global Solar Radiation Data in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluwaji M. Olomiyesan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of three global solar radiation models and the accuracy of global solar radiation data derived from three sources were compared. Twenty-two years (1984–2005 of surface meteorological data consisting of monthly mean daily sunshine duration, minimum and maximum temperatures, and global solar radiation collected from the Nigerian Meteorological (NIMET Agency, Oshodi, Lagos, and the National Aeronautics Space Agency (NASA for three locations in North-Western region of Nigeria were used. A new model incorporating Garcia model into Angstrom-Prescott model was proposed for estimating global radiation in Nigeria. The performances of the models used were determined by using mean bias error (MBE, mean percentage error (MPE, root mean square error (RMSE, and coefficient of determination (R2. Based on the statistical error indices, the proposed model was found to have the best accuracy with the least RMSE values (0.376 for Sokoto, 0.463 for Kaduna, and 0.449 for Kano and highest coefficient of determination, R2 values of 0.922, 0.938, and 0.961 for Sokoto, Kano, and Kaduna, respectively. Also, the comparative study result indicates that the estimated global radiation from the proposed model has a better error range and fits the ground measured data better than the satellite-derived data.

  12. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin [Department of Physics, University of Jaen (Spain); Cebecauer, Tomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); GeoModel s.r.o., Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Geography, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Suri, Marcel [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Ispra (Italy); GeoModel s.r.o., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  13. Poverty, health and satellite-derived vegetation indices: their inter-spatial relationship in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedda, Luigi; Tatem, Andrew J; Morley, David W; Atkinson, Peter M; Wardrop, Nicola A; Pezzulo, Carla; Sorichetta, Alessandro; Kuleszo, Joanna; Rogers, David J

    2015-03-01

    Previous analyses have shown the individual correlations between poverty, health and satellite-derived vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). However, generally these analyses did not explore the statistical interconnections between poverty, health outcomes and NDVI. In this research aspatial methods (principal component analysis) and spatial models (variography, factorial kriging and cokriging) were applied to investigate the correlations and spatial relationships between intensity of poverty, health (expressed as child mortality and undernutrition), and NDVI for a large area of West Africa. This research showed that the intensity of poverty (and hence child mortality and nutrition) varies inversely with NDVI. From the spatial point-of-view, similarities in the spatial variation of intensity of poverty and NDVI were found. These results highlight the utility of satellite-based metrics for poverty models including health and ecological components and, in general for large scale analysis, estimation and optimisation of multidimensional poverty metrics. However, it also stresses the need for further studies on the causes of the association between NDVI, health and poverty. Once these relationships are confirmed and better understood, the presence of this ecological component in poverty metrics has the potential to facilitate the analysis of the impacts of climate change on the rural populations afflicted by poverty and child mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Validation of Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperatures for Waters around Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-An Lee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to validate the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR-derived sea surface temperatures (SST of the waters around Taiwan, we generated a match-up data set of 961 pairs, which included in situ SSTs and concurrent AVHRR measurements for the period of 1998 to 2002. Availability of cloud-free images, i.e., images with more than 85% of cloud-free area in their coverage, was about 2.23% of all AVHRR images during the study period. The range of in situ SSTs was from _ to _ The satellite derived-SSTs through MCSST and NLSST algorithms were linearly related to the in situ SSTs with correlation coefficients of 0.985 and 0.98, respectively. The MCSSTs and NLSSTs had small biases of 0.009 _ and 0.256 _ with root mean square deviations of 0.64 _ and 0.801 _ respectively, therefore the AVHRR-based MCSSTs and NLSSTs had high accuracy in the seas around Taiwan.

  15. Evaluation of a physically-based snow model with infrared and microwave satellite-derived estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.

    2013-05-01

    Snow (with high albedo, as well as low roughness and thermal conductivity) has significant influence on the land-atmosphere interactions in the cold climate and regions of high elevation. The spatial and temporal variability of the snow distribution on a basin scale greatly determines the timing and magnitude of spring snowmelt runoff. For improved water resources management, a physically-based distributed snow model has been developed and applied to the upper Yellow River Basin to provide the outputs of snow variables as well as streamflows from 2001 to 2005. Remotely-sensed infrared information from MODIS satellites has been used to evaluate the model's outputs of spatially-distributed snow cover extent (SCE) and land surface temperature (LST); while the simulated snow depth (SD) and snow water equivalent (SWE) have been compared with the microwave information from SSM/I and AMSR-E satellites. In general, the simulated streamflows (including spring snowmelt) agree fairly well with the gauge-based observations; while the modeled snow variables show acceptable accuracies through comparing to various satellite-derived estimates from infrared or microwave information.;

  16. Comparison of precipitable water over Ghana using GPS signals and reanalysis products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheampong, A. A.; Fosu, C.; Amekudzi, L. K.; Kaas, E.

    2015-11-01

    Signals from Global Navigational Satellite Systems (GNSS) when integrated with surface meteorological parameters can be used to sense atmospheric water vapour. Using gLAB software and employing precise point positioning techniques, zenith troposphere delays (ZTD) for a GPS base station at KNUST, Kumasi have been computed and used to retrieve Precipitable Water (PW). The PW values obtained were compared with products from ERA-Interim and NCEP reanalysis data. The correlation coefficients, r, determined from these comparisons were 0.839 and 0.729 for ERA-interim and NCEP respectively. This study has demonstrated that water vapour can be retrieved with high precision from GNSS signal. Furthermore, a location map have been produced to serve as a guide in adopting and installing GNSS base stations in Ghana to achieve a country wide coverage of GNSS based water vapour monitoring.

  17. Comparing regional precipitation and temperature extremes in climate model and reanalysis products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Angélil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing field of research aims to characterise the contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the likelihood of extreme weather and climate events. These analyses can be sensitive to the shapes of the tails of simulated distributions. If tails are found to be unrealistically short or long, the anthropogenic signal emerges more or less clearly, respectively, from the noise of possible weather. Here we compare the chance of daily land-surface precipitation and near-surface temperature extremes generated by three Atmospheric Global Climate Models typically used for event attribution, with distributions from six reanalysis products. The likelihoods of extremes are compared for area-averages over grid cell and regional sized spatial domains. Results suggest a bias favouring overly strong attribution estimates for hot and cold events over many regions of Africa and Australia, and a bias favouring overly weak attribution estimates over regions of North America and Asia. For rainfall, results are more sensitive to geographic location. Although the three models show similar results over many regions, they do disagree over others. Equally, results highlight the discrepancy amongst reanalyses products. This emphasises the importance of using multiple reanalysis and/or observation products, as well as multiple models in event attribution studies.

  18. Comparing regional precipitation and temperature extremes in climate model and reanalysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angélil, Oliver; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah; Alexander, Lisa V; Stone, Dáithí; Donat, Markus G; Wehner, Michael; Shiogama, Hideo; Ciavarella, Andrew; Christidis, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    A growing field of research aims to characterise the contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the likelihood of extreme weather and climate events. These analyses can be sensitive to the shapes of the tails of simulated distributions. If tails are found to be unrealistically short or long, the anthropogenic signal emerges more or less clearly, respectively, from the noise of possible weather. Here we compare the chance of daily land-surface precipitation and near-surface temperature extremes generated by three Atmospheric Global Climate Models typically used for event attribution, with distributions from six reanalysis products. The likelihoods of extremes are compared for area-averages over grid cell and regional sized spatial domains. Results suggest a bias favouring overly strong attribution estimates for hot and cold events over many regions of Africa and Australia, and a bias favouring overly weak attribution estimates over regions of North America and Asia. For rainfall, results are more sensitive to geographic location. Although the three models show similar results over many regions, they do disagree over others. Equally, results highlight the discrepancy amongst reanalyses products. This emphasises the importance of using multiple reanalysis and/or observation products, as well as multiple models in event attribution studies.

  19. Potential for a biogenic influence on cloud microphysics over the ocean: a correlation study with satellite-derived data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have a large potential to influence climate through their effects on the microphysics and optical properties of clouds and, hence, on the Earth's radiation budget. Aerosol–cloud interactions have been intensively studied in polluted air, but the possibility that the marine biosphere plays an important role in regulating cloud brightness in the pristine oceanic atmosphere remains largely unexplored. We used 9 yr of global satellite data and ocean climatologies to derive parameterizations of the temporal variability of (a production fluxes of sulfur aerosols formed by the oxidation of the biogenic gas dimethylsulfide emitted from the sea surface; (b production fluxes of secondary organic aerosols from biogenic organic volatiles; (c emission fluxes of biogenic primary organic aerosols ejected by wind action on sea surface; and (d emission fluxes of sea salt also lifted by the wind upon bubble bursting. Series of global monthly estimates of these fluxes were correlated to series of potential cloud condensation nuclei (CCN numbers derived from satellite (MODIS. More detailed comparisons among weekly series of estimated fluxes and satellite-derived cloud droplet effective radius (re data were conducted at locations spread among polluted and clean regions of the oceanic atmosphere. The outcome of the statistical analysis was that positive correlation to CCN numbers and negative correlation to re were common at mid and high latitude for sulfur and organic secondary aerosols, indicating both might be important in seeding cloud droplet activation. Conversely, primary aerosols (organic and sea salt showed widespread positive correlations to CCN only at low latitudes. Correlations to re were more variable, non-significant or positive, suggesting that, despite contributing to large shares of the marine aerosol mass, primary aerosols are not widespread major drivers of the variability of cloud

  20. Potential of satellite-derived ecosystem functional attributes to anticipate species range shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Segura, Domingo; Lomba, Angela; Sousa-Silva, Rita; Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Alves, Paulo; Georges, Damien; Vicente, Joana R.; Honrado, João P.

    2017-05-01

    In a world facing rapid environmental changes, anticipating their impacts on biodiversity is of utmost relevance. Remotely-sensed Ecosystem Functional Attributes (EFAs) are promising predictors for Species Distribution Models (SDMs) by offering an early and integrative response of vegetation performance to environmental drivers. Species of high conservation concern would benefit the most from a better ability to anticipate changes in habitat suitability. Here we illustrate how yearly projections from SDMs based on EFAs could reveal short-term changes in potential habitat suitability, anticipating mid-term shifts predicted by climate-change-scenario models. We fitted two sets of SDMs for 41 plant species of conservation concern in the Iberian Peninsula: one calibrated with climate variables for baseline conditions and projected under two climate-change-scenarios (future conditions); and the other calibrated with EFAs for 2001 and projected annually from 2001 to 2013. Range shifts predicted by climate-based models for future conditions were compared to the 2001-2013 trends from EFAs-based models. Projections of EFAs-based models estimated changes (mostly contractions) in habitat suitability that anticipated, for the majority (up to 64%) of species, the mid-term shifts projected by traditional climate-change-scenario forecasting, and showed greater agreement with the business-as-usual scenario than with the sustainable-development one. This study shows how satellite-derived EFAs can be used as meaningful essential biodiversity variables in SDMs to provide early-warnings of range shifts and predictions of short-term fluctuations in suitable conditions for multiple species.

  1. Effects of precipitation and temperature on crop production variability in northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannayan, Mohammad; Lotfabadi, Sajad Sadeghi; Sanjani, Sarah; Mohamadian, Azadeh; Aghaalikhani, Majid

    2011-05-01

    Climate variability adversely impacts crop production and imposes a major constraint on farming planning, mostly under rainfed conditions, across the world. Considering the recent advances in climate science, many studies are trying to provide a reliable basis for climate, and subsequently agricultural production, forecasts. The El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon (ENSO) is one of the principle sources of interannual climatic variability. In Iran, primarily in the northeast, rainfed cereal yield shows a high annual variability. This study investigated the role played by precipitation, temperature and three climate indices [Arctic Oscillation (AO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and NINO 3.4] in historically observed rainfed crop yields (1983-2005) of both barley and wheat in the northeast of Iran. The results revealed differences in the association between crop yield and climatic factors at different locations. The south of the study area is a very hot location, and the maximum temperature proved to be the limiting and determining factor for crop yields; temperature variability resulted in crop yield variability. For the north of the study area, NINO 3.4 exhibited a clear association trend with crop yields. In central locations, NAO provided a solid basis for the relationship between crop yields and climate factors.

  2. Particulate emissions in the flue gas of flat glass production after electrostatic precipitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, A.; Carduck, E.; Manges, M.; Stadelmann, H.; Klinkers, J. [Saint-Gobain Glass Deutschland GmbH, Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    As a contribution to the current discussion about fine dust and fine quartz and cristobalite particulate emissions and immissions, the authors point out the role the flat glass industry plays in this context. The main part of the raw material used in this industry is quartz sand (about 60%), but the latter's granulometry is such that it contains practically no fine particles. This fact is inherent in undisturbed glass production because quartz sand particles with grain size below 80 {mu}m would cause bad glass quality. Also other possible sources for silicon dioxide in the flue gas are discussed. In order to show the composition of the dust escaped to the electrostatic precipitators (EPs), the filters exclusively used in flat glass production, a number of quartz glass fiber filters used to measure the dust content in various plants were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Only in one case a quartz or cristobalite grain was identified, but with 30 {mu}m it was bigger than the respiratory fraction (<10 {mu}m) under discussion. In summary, it can be said that the findings are not at all alarming. In order to finally prove that there is no need to worry about emissions of carcinogenic dust for the whole glass industry future cooperative research will be necessary. (orig.)

  3. Stochastic error model corrections to improve the performance of bottom-up precipitation products for hydrologic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, V.; Massari, C.; Ciabatta, L.; Brocca, L.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation is of great importance for water resources management, agricultural planning, and forecasting and monitoring of natural hazards such as flash floods and landslides. In situ observations are limited around the Earth, especially in remote areas (e.g., complex terrain, dense vegetation), but currently available satellite precipitation products are able to provide global precipitation estimates with an accuracy that depends upon many factors (e.g., type of storms, temporal sampling, season, etc.). The recent SM2RAIN approach proposes to estimate rainfall by using satellite soil moisture observations. As opposed to traditional satellite precipitation methods, which sense cloud properties to retrieve instantaneous estimates, this new bottom-up approach makes use of two consecutive soil moisture measurements for obtaining an estimate of the fallen precipitation within the interval between two satellite overpasses. As a result, the nature of the measurement is different and complementary to the one of classical precipitation products and could provide a different valid perspective to substitute or improve current rainfall estimates. However, uncertainties in the SM2RAIN product are still not well known and could represent a limitation in utilizing this dataset for hydrological applications. Therefore, quantifying the uncertainty associated with SM2RAIN is necessary for enabling its use. The study is conducted over the Italian territory for a 5-yr period (2010-2014). A number of satellite precipitation error properties, typically used in error modeling, are investigated and include probability of detection, false alarm rates, missed events, spatial correlation of the error, and hit biases. After this preliminary uncertainty analysis, the potential of applying the stochastic rainfall error model SREM2D to correct SM2RAIN and to improve its performance in hydrologic applications is investigated. The use of SREM2D for

  4. Sensitivity of a Cumulus Parameterization Scheme to Precipitation Production Representation and Its Impact on a Heavy Rain Event over Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ji-Young; Hong, Song-You; Sunny Lim, Kyo-Sun; Han, Jongil

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of a cumulus parameterization scheme (CPS) to a representation of precipitation production is examined. To do this, the parameter that determines the fraction of cloud condensate converted to precipitation in the simplified Arakawa–Schubert (SAS) convection scheme is modified following the results from a cloud-resolving simulation. While the original conversion parameter is assumed to be constant, the revised parameter includes a temperature dependency above the freezing level, whichleadstolessproductionoffrozenprecipitating condensate with height. The revised CPS has been evaluated for a heavy rainfall event over Korea as well as medium-range forecasts using the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs). The inefficient conversion of cloud condensate to convective precipitation at colder temperatures generally leads to a decrease in pre-cipitation, especially in the category of heavy rainfall. The resultant increase of detrained moisture induces moistening and cooling at the top of clouds. A statistical evaluation of the medium-range forecasts with the revised precipitation conversion parameter shows an overall improvement of the forecast skill in precipitation and large-scale fields, indicating importance of more realistic representation of microphysical processes in CPSs.

  5. Correcting satellite-based precipitation products from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation using two models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Cascón, Carlos; Pellarin, Thierry; Gibon, François

    2017-04-01

    Real-time precipitation information at the global scale is quite useful information for many applications. However, satellite-based precipitation products in real time are known to be biased from real values observed in situ. On the other hand, the information about precipitation contained in soil moisture data can be very useful to improve precipitation estimation, since the evolution of this variable is highly influenced by the amount of rainfall at a certain area after a rain event. In this context, the soil moisture data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used to correct the precipitation provided by real-time satellite-based products such as CMORPH, TRMM-3B42RT or PERSIANN. In this work, we test an assimilation algorithm based on the data assimilation of SMOS measurements in two models of different complexity: a simple hydrological model (Antecedent Precipitation Index (API)) and a state-of-the-art complex land-surface model (Surface Externalisée (SURFEX)). We show how the assimilation technique, based on a particle filter method, leads to the improvement of correlation and root mean squared error (RMSE) of precipitation estimates, with slightly better results for the simpler (and less expensive computationally) API model. This methodology has been evaluated for six years in ten sites around the world with different features, showing the limitations of the methodology in regions affected by mountainous terrain or by high radio-frequency interferences (RFI), which notably affect the quality of the soil moisture retrievals from brightness temperatures by SMOS. The presented results are promising for a potential near-real time application at the global scale.

  6. MASS PRODUCTION OF NANOPARTICLES BY HIGH GRAVITY REACTIVE PRECIPITATION TECHNOLOGY WITH LOW COST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Chen; Lei Shao

    2003-01-01

    Mass production of nanoparticles at low cost has attracted much attention from industrial and academic circles. In this paper, a novel method, the high gravity reactive precipitation (HGRP) technology, of manufacturing CaCO3 nanoparticles, presently scaled-up to an annual capacity of 10,000 tons, is presented. This paper describes the process principle, the process design and experiments on the syntheses of 15-30 nm CaCO3, 30-50 nm SiO2,20-30 nm TiO2, 20-60 nm ZnO, 20-30 nm ZnS, 30 nm SrCO3, 40-70 nm BaTiO3, stick-like nano BaCO3 as well as nano-fibrillar aluminum hydroxide measuring 1-10 nm in diameter and 50-300 nm in length, using liquid-liquid,gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid reactant systems. The advantage of using the HGRP technology is illustrated by comparison to conventional methods.

  7. Evaluation of Atmospheric Precipitable Water from Reanalysis Products Using Homogenized Radiosonde Observations over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Wang, J.; Dai, A.

    2015-12-01

    Many multi-decadal atmospheric reanalysis products are avialable now, but their consistencies and reliability are far from perfect. In this study, atmospheric precipitable water (PW) from the NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE, MERRA, JRA-55, JRA-25, ERA-Interim, ERA-40, CFSR and 20CR reanalyses is evaluated against homogenized radiosonde observations over China during 1979-2012 (1979-2001 for ERA-40). Results suggest that the PW biases in the reanalyses are within ˜20% for most of northern and eastern China, but the reanalyses underestimate the observed PW by 20%-40% over western China, and by ˜60% over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau. The newer-generation reanalyses (e.g., JRA25, JRA55, CFSR and ERA-Interim) have smaller root-mean-square error (RMSE) than the older-generation ones (NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE and ERA-40). Most of the reanalyses reproduce well the observed PW climatology and interannual variations over China. However, few reanalyses capture the observed long-term PW changes, primarily because they show spurious wet biases before about 2002. This deficiency results mainly from the discontinuities contained in reanalysis RH fields in the mid-lower troposphere due to the wet bias in older radiosonde records that are assimilated into the reanalyses. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis revealed two leading modes that represent the long-term PW changes and ENSO-related interannual variations with robust spatial patterns. The reanalysis products, especially the MERRA and JRA-25, roughly capture these EOF modes, which account for over 50% of the total variance. The results show that even during the post-1979 satellite era, discontinuities in radiosonde data can still induce large spurious long-term changes in reanalysis PW and other related fields. Thus, more efforts are needed to remove spurious changes in input data for future long-term reanlayses.

  8. Development of Deep Learning Based Data Fusion Approach for Accurate Rainfall Estimation Using Ground Radar and Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandra, C. V.; Tan, H.; Cifelli, R.; Xie, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall estimation based on onboard satellite measurements has been an important topic in satellite meteorology for decades. A number of precipitation products at multiple time and space scales have been developed based upon satellite observations. For example, NOAA Climate Prediction Center has developed a morphing technique (i.e., CMORPH) to produce global precipitation products by combining existing space based rainfall estimates. The CMORPH products are essentially derived based on geostationary satellite IR brightness temperature information and retrievals from passive microwave measurements (Joyce et al. 2004). Although the space-based precipitation products provide an excellent tool for regional and global hydrologic and climate studies as well as improved situational awareness for operational forecasts, its accuracy is limited due to the sampling limitations, particularly for extreme events such as very light and/or heavy rain. On the other hand, ground-based radar is more mature science for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), especially after the implementation of dual-polarization technique and further enhanced by urban scale radar networks. Therefore, ground radars are often critical for providing local scale rainfall estimation and a "heads-up" for operational forecasters to issue watches and warnings as well as validation of various space measurements and products. The CASA DFW QPE system, which is based on dual-polarization X-band CASA radars and a local S-band WSR-88DP radar, has demonstrated its excellent performance during several years of operation in a variety of precipitation regimes. The real-time CASA DFW QPE products are used extensively for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. In this paper, a neural network based data fusion mechanism is introduced to improve the satellite-based CMORPH precipitation product by taking into account the ground radar measurements. A deep learning system is

  9. Precipitation Analysis at Fine Time Scales Using Multiple Satellites: Real-time and Research Products and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Huffman, George; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Curtis, Scott; Pierce, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-global precipitation analyses at fine time scales (3-hr) are described. TRMM observations (radar and passive microwave) are used to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I (and other satellites instruments, including AMSR and AMSU) and geosynchronous IR observations. The individual data sets are then merged using a priority order based on quality to form the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA). Raingauge information is used to help constrain the satellite-based estimates over land. The TRMM standard research product (Version 6 3B-42 of the TRMM products) will be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998-present) in 2004. The real-time version of this merged product has been produced over the past two years and is available on the U.S. TRMM web site (trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov) at 0.25" latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 5O"N-5O0S. Validation of daily totals indicates good results, with limitations noted in mid-latitude winter over land and regions of shallow, orographic precipitation. Various applications of these estimates are described, including: 1) detecting potential floods in near real-time; 2) analyzing Indian Ocean precipitation variations related to the initiation of El Nino; 3) determining characteristics of the African monsoon; and 4) analysis of diurnal variations.

  10. Precipitation Analysis at Fine Time Scales using TRMM and Other Satellites: Real-time and Research Products and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Huffman, George; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Curtis, Scott; Pierce, Harold; Gu, Guo-Jon

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-global precipitation analyses at fine time scales (3-hr) are described. TRMM observations (radar and passive microwave) are used to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I (and other satellites instruments, including AMSR and AMSU) and geosynchronous IR observations. The individual data sets are then merged using a priority order based on quality to form the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA). Raingauge information is used to help constrain the satellite-based estimates over land. The TRMM standard research product (Version 6 3B-42 of the TRMM products) will be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998-present) by the end of 2004. The real-time version of this merged product has been produced over the past two years and is available on the U.S. TRMM web site (trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov) at 0.25" latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 5O0N-50"S. Validation of daily totals indicates good results, with limitations noted in mid-latitude winter over land and regions of shallow, orographic precipitation. Various applications of these estimates are described, includmg: 1) detecting potential floods in near real-time; 2) analyzing Indian Ocean precipitation variations related to the initiation of El Nino; 3) determining characteristics of the African monsoon; and 4) analysis of diurnal variations.

  11. Multi-scale evaluation of high-resolution multi-sensor blended global precipitation products over the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Yang, Dawen; Hong, Yang

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, four high-resolution multi-sensor blended precipitation products, TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) research product (3B42 V7) and near real-time product (3B42 RT), Climate Prediction Center MORPHing technique (CMORPH) and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN), are evaluated over the Yangtze River basin from April 2008 to March 2012 using the gauge data. This regional evaluation is performed at temporal scales ranging from annual to daily, based on a number of diagnostic statistics. Gauge adjustment greatly reduces the bias in 3B42 V7, a post real-time research product. Additionally, it helps the product maintain a stable skill level in winter. When additional indicators such as spatial correlation, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and Probability of Detection (POD) are considered, 3B42 V7 is not always superior to other products (especially CMORPH) at the daily scale. Among the near real-time datasets, 3B42 RT overestimates annual rainfall over the basin; CMORPH and PERSIANN underestimate it. In particular, the upper Yangtze always suffers from positive bias (>1 mm day-1) in the 3B42 RT dataset and negative bias (-0.2 to -1 mm day-1) in the CMORPH dataset. When seasonal scales are considered, CMORPH exhibits negative bias, mainly introduced during cold periods. The correlation between CMORPH and gauge data is the highest. On the contrary, the correlation between 3B42 RT and gauge data is more scattered; statistically, this results in lower bias. Finally, investigation of the probability distribution functions (PDFs) suggests that 3B42 V7 and 3B42 RT are consistently better at retrieving the PDFs in high-intensity events. Overall, this study provides useful information about the error characteristics associated with the four mainstream satellite precipitation products and their implications regarding hydrological applications over the Yangtze River basin.

  12. Evaluation of the latest satellite-gauge precipitation products and their hydrologic applications over the Huaihe River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruochen; Yuan, Huiling; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Xiaoman

    2016-05-01

    Satellite-gauge quantitative precipitation estimate (QPE) products may reduce the errors in near real-time satellite precipitation estimates by combining rain gauge data, which provides great potential to hydrometeorological applications. This study aims to comprehensively evaluate four of the latest satellite-gauge QPEs, including NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42V7 product, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) MORPHing technique (CMORPH) bias-corrected product (CMORPH CRT), CMORPH satellite-gauge merged product (CMORPH BLD) and CMORPH satellite-gauge merged product developed at the National Meteorological Information Center (NMIC) of the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) (CMORPH CMA). These four satellite-gauge QPEs are statistically evaluated over the Huaihe River basin during 2003-2012 and applied into the distributed Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model to assess hydrologic utilities. Compared to the China Gauge-based Daily Precipitation Analysis (CGDPA) newly developed at CMA/NMIC, the four satellite-gauge QPEs generally depict the spatial distribution well, with the underestimation in the southern mountains and overestimation in the northern plain of the Huaihe River basin. Specifically, both TRMM and CMORPH CRT adopt simple gauge adjustment algorithms and exhibit relatively poor performance, with evidently deteriorated quality in winter. In contrast, the probability density function-optimal interpolation (PDF-OI) gauge adjustment procedure has been applied in CMORPH BLD and CMORPH CMA, resulting in higher quality and more stable performance. CMORPH CMA further benefits from a merged dense gauge observation network and outperforms the other QPEs with significant improvements in rainfall amount and spatial/temporal distributions. Due to the insufficient gauge observations in the merging process, CMORPH BLD features the similar error characteristics of CMORPH CRT with a positive bias of light precipitation and a negative

  13. Advantages of using satellite soil moisture estimates over precipitation products to assess regional vegetation water availability and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiexi

    2017-04-01

    To improve the understanding of water-vegetation relationships, direct comparative studies assessing the utility of satellite remotely sensed soil moisture, gridded precipitation products, and land surface model output are needed. A case study was investigated for a water-limited, lateral inflow receiving area in northeastern Australia during December 2008 to May 2009. In January 2009, monthly precipitation showed strong positive anomalies, which led to strong positive soil moisture anomalies. The precipitation anomalies disappeared within a month. In contrast, the soil moisture anomalies persisted for months. Positive anomalies of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) appeared in February, in response to water supply, and then persisted for several months. In addition to these temporal characteristics, the spatial patterns of NDVI anomalies were more similar to soil moisture patterns than to those of precipitation and land surface model output. The long memory of soil moisture mainly relates to the presence of clay-rich soils. Modeled soil moisture from four of five global land surface models failed to capture the memory length of soil moisture and all five models failed to present the influence of lateral inflow. This case study indicates that satellite-based soil moisture is a better predictor of vegetation water availability than precipitation in environments having a memory of several months and thus is able to persistently affect vegetation dynamics. These results illustrate the usefulness of satellite remotely sensed soil moisture in ecohydrology studies. This case study has the potential to be used as a benchmark for global land surface model evaluations. The advantages of using satellite remotely sensed soil moisture over gridded precipitation products are mainly expected in lateral-inflow and/or clay-rich regions worldwide.

  14. A new Grid Product of Tropical Cyclone Precipitation (TCP) for North America from 1930 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    We first developed a new method that collects daily TCP by using historical storm tracks and precipitation observation based on daily rain gauges in both U.S. and Mexico and calibrated it with satellite precipitation observation. We used a parametrized wind field to correct the possible under-estimations of precipitation in rain gauges. Grid interpolation parameters were optimized by testing different historical rain gauge densities and comparing our grid estimation of TCP and the observation from TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (3B42) by for the data available period from 1998 to 2013. The calibrated method was then used for the whole 94 years of TCP estimation. The preliminary result shows that the frequency of TCP events does not have significant change but the TCP intensity has significant increasing trends, especially in certain locations in North Carolina and Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. This new long term TCP climatology can potentially assist model calibration and disaster prevention/mitigation.

  15. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) NCEP-Global Forecast System (GFS) Precipitation Forecast Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Forecast System (GFS) forecast precipitation data at 37.5km resolution is created at the NOAA Climate Prediction Center for the purpose of near real-time...

  16. The precipitation products generation chain for the EUMETSAT Hydrological Satellite Application Facility at C.N.M.C.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, Daniele; Melfi, Davide; Zauli, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility in support to Hydrology (H-SAF) focuses on development of new geophysical products on precipitation, soil moisture and snow parameters and the utilisation of these parameters in hydrological models, NWP models and water management. The development phase of the H-SAF started in September 2005 under the leadership of Italian Meteorological Service. The "Centro Nazionale di Meteorologia e Climatologia Aeronautica (C.N.M.C.A.)", the Italian National Weather Centre, that physically hosts the generation chain of precipitation products, carried on activities to reach the final target: development of algorithms, validation of results, implementation of operative procedure to supply the service and to monitor the service performances. The paper shows the architectural status of the H-SAF precipitation group and stress the component of operations. It is shown the full correspondence with the EUMETSAT approved H-SAF documents, in particular the Algorithm Theoretical Design Document (ATDD), where products characteristics are referenced. Are also reported the first results, produced during the first H-SAF Workshop, held in Rome in October 2007, of validation activities performed on version 1 products, and last results of products distribution to beta-users in preparation of distributing version 2.

  17. Interactive Visualization of Near Real-Time and Production Global Precipitation Mission Data Online Using CesiumJS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, M.

    2016-12-01

    Advancements in the capabilities of JavaScript frameworks and web browsing technology make online visualization of large geospatial datasets viable. Commonly this is done using static image overlays, pre-rendered animations, or cumbersome geoservers. These methods can limit interactivity and/or place a large burden on server-side post-processing and storage of data. Geospatial data, and satellite data specifically, benefit from being visualized both on and above a three-dimensional surface. The open-source JavaScript framework CesiumJS, developed by Analytical Graphics, Inc., leverages the WebGL protocol to do just that. It has entered the void left by the abandonment of the Google Earth Web API, and it serves as a capable and well-maintained platform upon which data can be displayed. This paper will describe the technology behind the two primary products developed as part of the NASA Precipitation Processing System STORM website: GPM Near Real Time Viewer (GPMNRTView) and STORM Virtual Globe (STORM VG). GPMNRTView reads small post-processed CZML files derived from various Level 1 through 3 near real-time products. For swath-based products, several brightness temperature channels or precipitation-related variables are available for animating in virtual real-time as the satellite observed them on and above the Earth's surface. With grid-based products, only precipitation rates are available, but the grid points are visualized in such a way that they can be interactively examined to explore raw values. STORM VG reads values directly off the HDF5 files, converting the information into JSON on the fly. All data points both on and above the surface can be examined here as well. Both the raw values and, if relevant, elevations are displayed. Surface and above-ground precipitation rates from select Level 2 and 3 products are shown. Examples from both products will be shown, including visuals from high impact events observed by GPM constellation satellites.

  18. Projected changes in daily precipitation in West Africa with implications for crop production around 2050 in CORDEX simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Dominik; Müller, Marc; Bamba Sylla, Mouhamadou; Ibrahim, Boubacar; Henning Sommer, Jan

    2015-04-01

    With irrigation occupying less than 1% of all croplands, agricultural production in West Africa can potentially severely impacted by changes in precipitation. We identified a number of precipitation characteristics that impact crop yields and analyze mid 21st century changes in these characteristics over croplands in West Africa using a multi model ensemble of 16 RCM/GCM combinations providing data for the CORDEX Africa domain. Besides long term mean values, we analyze interannual variability of these precipitation characteristics. Despite a moderate increase (~3%) in total rainy season precipitation in the ensemble mean prediction, we find other characteristics that could potentially have detrimental effects on crop yields. A robust and consistent delay in the onset of the rainy season (1 to 4 days from South to North), with no apparent change in the cessation of the rainy season, leads to a general shortening of the rainy season. Rainfall intensity generally increases with a slight decrease in the number of rainy days (> 5mm) during the rainy season. No noticeable change was found in the dry spell frequency (5-15 days). These changes do not only impact agricultural production but can have wide ranging effects on other sectors. The spatial consistency of these changes highlight the need for regional prioritization of adaptation measures such as an expansion of irrigated areas.

  19. Waste oil shale ash as a novel source of calcium for precipitated calcium carbonate: Carbonation mechanism, modeling, and product characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velts, O., E-mail: olga.velts@ttu.ee [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia); Laboratory of Separation Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta FI-53851 (Finland); Uibu, M.; Kallas, J.; Kuusik, R. [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} A method for converting oil shale waste ash into precipitated CaCO{sub 3} is elucidated. {yields} We discuss the mechanism of hazardous alkaline ash leachates carbonation. {yields} We report a model describing precipitation of CaCO{sub 3} from multi-ionic ash leachates. {yields} Model enables simulation of reactive species concentration profiles. {yields} Product contained {approx}96% CaCO{sub 3} with 4-10 {mu}m size calcite or/and vaterite particles. - Abstract: In this paper, a method for converting lime-containing oil shale waste ash into precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), a valuable commodity is elucidated. The mechanism of ash leachates carbonation was experimentally investigated in a stirred semi-batch barboter-type reactor by varying the CO{sub 2} partial pressure, gas flow rate, and agitation intensity. A consistent set of model equations and physical-chemical parameters is proposed to describe the CaCO{sub 3} precipitation process from oil shale ash leachates of complex composition. The model enables the simulation of reactive species (Ca{sup 2+}, CaCO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, CaSO{sub 4}, OH{sup -}, CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, H{sup +}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) concentration profiles in the liquid, gas, and solid phases as well as prediction of the PCC formation rate. The presence of CaSO{sub 4} in the product may also be evaluated and used to assess the purity of the PCC product. A detailed characterization of the PCC precipitates crystallized from oil shale ash leachates is also provided. High brightness PCC (containing up to {approx}96% CaCO{sub 3}) with mean particle sizes ranging from 4 to 10 {mu}m and controllable morphology (such as rhombohedral calcite or coexisting calcite and spherical vaterite phases) was obtained under the conditions studied.

  20. Analysis of Satellite-Derived Arctic Tropospheric BrO Columns in Conjunction with Aircraft Measurements During ARCTAS and ARCPAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S.; Wang, Y.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T.; Joiner, J.; Zeng, T.; Kurosu, T. P.; Chance, K.; Richter, A.; Huey, L. G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We derive tropospheric column BrO during the ARCTAS and ARCPAC field campaigns in spring 2008 using retrievals of total column BrO from the satellite UV nadir sensors OMI and GOME-2 using a radiative transfer model and stratospheric column BrO from a photochemical simulation. We conduct a comprehensive comparison of satellite-derived tropospheric BrO column to aircraft in-situ observations ofBrO and related species. The aircraft profiles reveal that tropospheric BrO, when present during April 2008, was distributed over a broad range of altitudes rather than being confined to the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Perturbations to the total column resulting from tropospheric BrO are the same magnitude as perturbations due to longitudinal variations in the stratospheric component, so proper accounting of the stratospheric signal is essential for accurate determination of satellite-derived tropospheric BrO. We find reasonably good agreement between satellite-derived tropospheric BrO and columns found using aircraft in-situ BrO profiles, particularly when satellite radiances were obtained over bright surfaces (albedo> 0.7), for solar zenith angle BrO due to surface processes (the bromine explosion) is apparent in both the OMI and GOME-2 based tropospheric columns. The wide orbital swath of OMI allows examination of the evolution of tropospheric BrO on about hourly time intervals near the pole. Low surface pressure, strong wind, and high PBL height are associated with an observed BrO activation event, supporting the notion of bromine activation by high winds over snow.

  1. Analysis of satellite-derived Arctic tropospheric BrO columns in conjunction with aircraft measurements during ARCTAS and ARCPAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We derive tropospheric column BrO during the ARCTAS and ARCPAC field campaigns in spring 2008 using retrievals of total column BrO from the satellite UV nadir sensors OMI and GOME-2 using a radiative transfer model and stratospheric column BrO from a photochemical simulation. We conduct a comprehensive comparison of satellite-derived tropospheric BrO column to aircraft in-situ observations of BrO and related species. The aircraft profiles reveal that tropospheric BrO, when present during April 2008, was distributed over a broad range of altitudes rather than being confined to the planetary boundary layer (PBL. Perturbations to the total column resulting from tropospheric BrO are the same magnitude as perturbations due to longitudinal variations in the stratospheric component, so proper accounting of the stratospheric signal is essential for accurate determination of satellite-derived tropospheric BrO. We find reasonably good agreement between satellite-derived tropospheric BrO and columns found using aircraft in-situ BrO profiles, particularly when satellite radiances were obtained over bright surfaces (albedo >0.7, for solar zenith angle <80° and clear sky conditions. The rapid activation of BrO due to surface processes (the bromine explosion is apparent in both the OMI and GOME-2 based tropospheric columns. The wide orbital swath of OMI allows examination of the evolution of tropospheric BrO on about hourly time intervals near the pole. Low surface pressure, strong wind, and high PBL height are associated with an observed BrO activation event, supporting the notion of bromine activation by high winds over snow.

  2. The HOAPS-II climatology - Release II of the satellite-derived freshwater flux climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennig, K.; Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Schulz, J.; Graßl, H.

    2003-04-01

    HOAPS-II (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data) is the improved global climatology of sea surface parameters and surface energy and freshwater fluxes derived from satellite radiances for the time period July 1987 until the recent dates. Data from polar orbiting radiometers, all available Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiometers and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), have been used to get global fields of surface meteorological and oceanographic parameters but also latent heat flux, evaporation, precipitation and net freshwater flux as well as the wind speed, water vapor- and total water content over ice free ocean areas for various averaging periods and grid sizes including scan orientated data in the NetCDF data format. All retrieval methods have been validated with in situ data on a global scale with a focus on precipitation validation. The new release of the data base is freely available to the community. Additionally, applications of the HOAPS-II data base will demonstrate its ability to detect ground validated High Impact Weather over global oceans that the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) climatology and the ECMWF model is frequently missing. Nowcasting of model-unpredicted storms is a high potential application of this new data base.

  3. Detecting shifts in tropical moisture imbalances with satellite-derived isotope ratios in water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, A.; Blossey, P. N.; Noone, D.; Nusbaumer, J.; Wood, R.

    2017-06-01

    As global temperatures rise, regional differences in evaporation (E) and precipitation (P) are likely to become more disparate, causing the drier E-dominated regions of the tropics to become drier and the wetter P-dominated regions to become wetter. Models suggest that such intensification of the water cycle should already be taking place; however, quantitatively verifying these changes is complicated by inherent difficulties in measuring E and P with sufficient spatial coverage and resolution. This paper presents a new metric for tracking changes in regional moisture imbalances (e.g., E-P) by defining δDq—the isotope ratio normalized to a reference water vapor concentration of 4 mmol mol-1—and evaluates its efficacy using both remote sensing retrievals and climate model simulations in the tropics. By normalizing the isotope ratio with respect to water vapor concentration, δDq isolates the portion of isotopic variability most closely associated with shifts between E- and P-dominated regimes. Composite differences in δDq between cold and warm phases of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) verify that δDq effectively tracks changes in the hydrological cycle when large-scale convective reorganization takes place. Simulated δDq also demonstrates sensitivity to shorter-term variability in E-P at most tropical locations. Since the isotopic signal of E-P in free tropospheric water vapor transfers to the isotope ratios of precipitation, multidecadal observations of both water vapor and precipitation isotope ratios should provide key evidence of changes in regional moisture imbalances now and in the future.

  4. Evaluation of GPM-based Multi-satellite IMERG Precipitation Products Over the Lower Colorado River Basin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omranian, S. E.; Sharif, H. O.

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluates the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite products by analyzing extreme rainfall events over the Lower Colorado River Basin, Texas that resulted in unprecedented flash floods in May 2015. Records of a dense rain gauge network (241 stations) are compared with Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products. The spatial resolution of the GPM satellite product is 0.1º x 0.1º and the temporal resolution is 30 minutes. Reference gauge-based observations are distributed through the basin with total area of over 5,000 square kilometers at 15-minute time intervals. A preliminary assessment of GPM-based IMERG precipitation products shows reasonable correlation, especially when for periods of high amounts of rainfall. the results indicate that GPM satellite products can potentially be employed in hydrologic modeling, especially for large events. Moreover, since the IMERG products have semi-global coverage, it can be extremely useful in hydrological modeling and analysis studies over ungauged or poorly gauged regions.

  5. [Optimal formation conditions and analytical methods of the target product by MAP precipitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiao-Di; Lan, Li; Wang, Chong-Chen; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2009-04-15

    In order to establish optimal conditions of the struvite (MAP: MgNH4PO4 x 6H2O) formation, acid dissolution was applied and developed to perform element analyses on the precipitates obtained from MAP precipitation, and a novel analyzing and calculating method was developed to quantitatively determine the struvite content (purity) in the harvested precipitates according to the NH4+-N content. With this method, the purities of struvite were respectively determined for both ultra pure water and tap water used as solutes. At the same time, the effect of pH and Ca2+ on the formation and crystallization of struvite was evaluated. The newly developed method was effective enough to determine the purities of struvite, which could be a better method than qualitative X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on the developed method, it was found that the optimal pH ranges for having a high struvite content (> 90%) were respectively at 7.5-9.0 with ultra pure water as solute and at 7.0-7.5 with tap water as solute. In real wastewater, Ca2+ at pH > 8.0 might result in impurities rather than struvite. Therefore, a neutral pH range (struvite precipitation in wastewater.

  6. Analysis of satellite-derived Arctic tropospheric BrO columns in conjunction with aircraft measurements during ARCTAS and ARCPAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Choi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We derive estimates of tropospheric BrO column amounts during two Arctic field campaigns in 2008 using information from the satellite UV nadir sensors Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2 as well as estimates of stratospheric BrO columns from a model simulation. The sensitivity of the satellite-derived tropospheric BrO columns to various parameters is investigated using a radiative transfer model. We conduct a comprehensive analysis of satellite-derived tropospheric BrO columns including a detailed comparison with aircraft in-situ observations of BrO and related species obtained during the field campaigns. In contrast to prior expectation, tropospheric BrO, when present, existed over a broad range of altitudes. Our results show reasonable agreement between tropospheric BrO columns derived from the satellite observations and columns found using aircraft in-situ BrO. After accounting for the stratospheric contribution to total BrO column, several events of rapid BrO activation due to surface processes in the Arctic are apparent in both the OMI and GOME-2 based tropospheric columns. The wide orbital swath of OMI allows examination of the evolution of tropospheric BrO on about hourly time intervals near the pole. Low pressure systems, strong surface winds, and high planetary boundary layer heights are associated with the observed tropospheric BrO activation events.

  7. Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP continental hydrologic system over the Niger basin using in situ and satellite derived datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedinotti, V.; Boone, A.; Decharme, B.; Crétaux, J. F.; Mognard, N.; Panthou, G.; Papa, F.; Tanimoun, B. A.

    2012-06-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, West Africa has faced extreme climate variations with extended drought conditions. Of particular importance is the Niger basin, since it traverses a large part of the Sahel and is thus a critical source of water for an ever-increasing local population in this semi arid region. However, the understanding of the hydrological processes over this basin is currently limited by the lack of spatially distributed surface water and discharge measurements. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the ISBA-TRIP continental hydrologic system to represent key processes related to the hydrological cycle of the Niger basin. ISBA-TRIP is currently used within a coupled global climate model, so that the scheme must represent the first order processes which are critical for representing the water cycle while retaining a limited number of parameters and a simple representation of the physics. To this end, the scheme uses first-order approximations to account explicitly for the surface river routing, the floodplain dynamics, and the water storage using a deep aquifer reservoir. In the current study, simulations are done at a 0.5 by 0.5° spatial resolution over the 2002-2007 period (in order to take advantage of the recent satellite record and data from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses project, AMMA). Four configurations of the model are compared to evaluate the separate impacts of the flooding scheme and the aquifer on the water cycle. Moreover, the model is forced by two different rainfall datasets to consider the sensitivity of the model to rainfall input uncertainties. The model is evaluated using in situ discharge measurements as well as satellite derived flood extent, total continental water storage changes and river height changes. The basic analysis of in situ discharges confirms the impact of the inner delta area, known as a significant flooded area, on the discharge, characterized by a strong reduction of the

  8. Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP continental hydrologic system over the Niger basin using in situ and satellite derived datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pedinotti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available During the 1970s and 1980s, West Africa has faced extreme climate variations with extended drought conditions. Of particular importance is the Niger basin, since it traverses a large part of the Sahel and is thus a critical source of water for an ever-increasing local population in this semi arid region. However, the understanding of the hydrological processes over this basin is currently limited by the lack of spatially distributed surface water and discharge measurements. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the ISBA-TRIP continental hydrologic system to represent key processes related to the hydrological cycle of the Niger basin. ISBA-TRIP is currently used within a coupled global climate model, so that the scheme must represent the first order processes which are critical for representing the water cycle while retaining a limited number of parameters and a simple representation of the physics. To this end, the scheme uses first-order approximations to account explicitly for the surface river routing, the floodplain dynamics, and the water storage using a deep aquifer reservoir. In the current study, simulations are done at a 0.5 by 0.5° spatial resolution over the 2002–2007 period (in order to take advantage of the recent satellite record and data from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses project, AMMA. Four configurations of the model are compared to evaluate the separate impacts of the flooding scheme and the aquifer on the water cycle. Moreover, the model is forced by two different rainfall datasets to consider the sensitivity of the model to rainfall input uncertainties. The model is evaluated using in situ discharge measurements as well as satellite derived flood extent, total continental water storage changes and river height changes. The basic analysis of in situ discharges confirms the impact of the inner delta area, known as a significant flooded area, on the discharge, characterized by a strong

  9. Linking Satellite Derived Land Surface Temperature with Cholera: A Case Study for South Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaach, H. S. V.; Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    A sudden onset of cholera in South Sudan, in April 2014 in Northern Bari in Juba town resulted in more than 400 cholera cases after four weeks of initial outbreak with a case of fatality rate of CFR 5.4%. The total number of reported cholera cases for the period of April to July, 2014 were 5,141 including 114 deaths. With the limited efficacy of cholera vaccines, it is necessary to develop mechanisms to predict cholera occurrence and thereafter devise intervention strategies for mitigating impacts of the disease. Hydroclimatic processes, primarily precipitation and air temperature are related to epidemic and episodic outbreak of cholera. However, due to coarse resolution of both datasets, it is not possible to precisely locate the geographical location of disease. Here, using Land Surface Temperature (LST) from MODIS sensors, we have developed an algorithm to identify regions susceptible for cholera. Conditions for occurrence of cholera were detectable at least one month in advance in South Sudan and were statistically sensitive to hydroclimatic anomalies of land surface and air temperature, and precipitation. Our results indicate significant spatial and temporal averaging required to infer usable information from LST over South Sudan. Preliminary results that geographically location of cholera outbreak was identifiable within 1km resolution of the LST data.

  10. Influence of satellite-derived rainfall patterns on plague occurrence in northeast Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debien, Annekatrien; Neerinckx, Simon; Kimaro, Didas; Gulinck, Hubert

    2010-12-13

    In the tropics, rainfall data are seldom accurately recorded, and are often discontinuous in time. In the scope of plague-research in northeast Tanzania, we adapted previous research to reconstruct rainfall patterns at a suitable resolution (1 km), based on time series of NDVI: more accurate satellite imagery was used, in the form of MODIS NDVI, and rainfall data were collected from the TRMM sensors instead of in situ data. First, we established a significant relationship between monthly rainfall and monthly composited MODIS NDVI. The established linear relationship was then used to reconstruct historic precipitation patterns over a mountainous area in northeastern Tanzania. We validated the resulting precipitation estimates with in situ rainfall time series of three meteorological stations located in the study area. Taking the region's topography into account, a correlation coefficient of 0.66 was obtained for two of the three meteorological stations. Our results suggest that the adapted strategy can be applied fruitfully to estimate rainfall variability and seasonality, despite the underestimation of overall rainfall rates. Based on this model, rainfall in previous years (1986) is modelled to obtain a dataset with which we can compare plague occurrence in the area. A positive correlation of 82% is obtained between high rainfall rates and plague incidence with a two month lag between rainfall and plague cases. We conclude that the obtained results are satisfactory in support of the human plague research in which this study is embedded, and that this approach can be applied in other studies with similar goals.

  11. Assessing Land Degradation/Recovery in the African Sahel from Long-Term Earth Observation Based Primary Productivity and Precipitation Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Kaspersen, Per Skougaard;

    2013-01-01

    The ‘rain use efficiency’ (RUE) may be defined as the ratio of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) to annual precipitation, and it is claimed to be a conservative property of the vegetation cover in drylands, if the vegetation cover is not subject to non-precipitation related land degrad...

  12. A Rapid Protoyping Approach for the Evaluation of Potential GPM-Era Precipitation Products for Water Resources Management Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaj, V. G.; Houser, P. R.; Turk, F. J.; Peterson, C. A.; Hossain, F.; Moorhead, R. J.; Toll, D. L.; Mostovoy, G.

    2009-04-01

    societal benefits related to human health (soil moisture, climate and disease outbreak), homeland security (removal of chemical/biological/nuclear agents), flooding potential and warning, water availability, water quality, and agriculture and food security. In 2006, the NASA ASP sponsored two RPC experiments to evaluate potential GPM-era high resolution satellite precipitation products for water management applications. One of the current uncertainties involved in the GPM missions is the nature of the exact configuration of the constellations of satellites and hence the potential for the dynamic error characteristics over time of the precipitation estimates. For the RPC evaluations, we needed a satellite precipitation product that would be analogous to the GPM-era products. Our solution was to develop a suite of high resolution precipitation products, based on the NRL-Blend algorithm. We created a set of 10 different satellite precipitation estimates (hereafter referred to as the "GPM-proxy data"), using the currently available IR and microwave sensors. However, in each product we systematically left out sets of observations and/or sensors, such as AM orbits. The geographical focus of our study was the operational domain of the Arkansas Basin River Forecast Center (ABRFC) of the U.S. National Weather Service. We have evaluated the GPM-proxy data against the operational product (radar and gauge based) used by ABRFC. Further, we also performed a set of soil water content (SWC) sensitivity experiments using the Noah and Mosaic Land Surface Models (LSM) to quantify the impacts on water management applications involving land surface hydrology. Both the LSMs were forced with the same set of GPM-proxy data. Though the overall spatial patterns for both the models were similar, there were subtle differences in the respective model sensitivities to the different precipitation forcings. These experimental results illustrate the need for comprehensive pre-evaluations of applications

  13. Production and characterization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) generated by Alcaligenes latus using lactose and whey after acid protein precipitation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwig, Karina Hammel; Baldasso, Camila; Dettmer, Aline

    2016-10-01

    Whey after acid protein precipitation was used as substrate for PHB production in orbital shaker using Alcaligenes latus. Statistical analysis determined the most appropriate hydroxide for pH neutralization of whey after protein precipitation among NH4OH, KOH and NaOH 10%w/v. The results were compared to those of commercial lactose. A scale-up test in a 4L bioreactor was done at 35°C, 750rpm, 7L/min air flow, and 6.5 pH. The PHB was characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. NH4OH provided the best results for productivity (p), 0.11g/L.h, and for polymer yield, (YP/S), 1.08g/g. The bioreactor experiment resulted in lower p and YP/S. PHB showed maximum degradation temperature (291°C), melting temperature (169°C), and chemical properties similar to those of standard PHB. The use of whey as a substrate for PHB production did not affect significantly the final product quality.

  14. Comparison of Products from ERA-40, NCEP-2, and CRU with Station Data for Summer Precipitation over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Summer precipitation products from the 45-Year European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) Reanalysis (ERA-40), and NCEP-Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-Ⅱ) Reanalysis (NCEP-2), and Climatic Research Unit (CRU) TS 2.1dataset are compared with the corresponding observations over China in order to understand the quality and utility of the reanalysis datasets for the period 1979-2001. The results reveal that although the magnitude and location of the rainfall belts differ among the reanalysis, CRU, and station data over South and West China, the spatial distributions show good agreement over most areas of China. In comparison with the observations in most areas of China, CRU best matches the observed summer precipitation,while ERA-40 reports less precipitation and NCEP-2 reports more precipitation than the observations.With regard to the amplitude of the interannual variations, CRU is better than either of the reanalyses in representing the corresponding observations. The amplitude in NCEP-2 is stronger but that of ERA-40 is weaker than the observations in most study domains. NCEP-2 has a more obvious interannual variability than ERA-40 or CRU in most areas of East China. Through an Empirical orthogonal function (EOF)analysis, the main features of the rainfall belts produced by CRU agree better with the observations than with those produced by the reanalyses in the Yangtze-Huaihe River valley. In East of China, particularly in the Yangtze-Huaihe River valley, CRU can reveal the quasi-biennial oscillation of summer precipitation represented by the observations, but the signal of ERA-40 is comparatively weak and not very obvious,whereas that of NCEP-2 is also weak before 1990 but very strong after 1990. The results also suggest that the magnitude of the precipitation difference between ERA-40 and the observations is smaller than that between NCEP-2 and the observations, but the variations represented by NCEP-2

  15. Precipitation and Carbon-Water Coupling Jointly Control the Interannual Variability of Global Land Gross Primary Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Xiao, Xiangming; Guanter, Luis; Zhou, Sha; Ciais, Philippe; Joiner, Joanna; Sitch, Stephen; Wu, Xiaocui; Nabel, Julian; Dong, Jinwei; Kato, Etsushi; Jain, Atul K.; Wiltshire, Andy; Stocker, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems is increasing along with the rising of atmospheric CO2 concentration. Embedded in this trend, recent studies suggested that the interannual variability (IAV) of global carbon fluxes may be dominated by semi-arid ecosystems, but the underlying mechanisms of this high variability in these specific regions are not well known. Here we derive an ensemble of gross primary production (GPP) estimates using the average of three data-driven models and eleven process-based models. These models are weighted by their spatial representativeness of the satellite-based solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF). We then use this weighted GPP ensemble to investigate the GPP variability for different aridity regimes. We show that semi-arid regions contribute to 57% of the detrended IAV of global GPP. Moreover, in regions with higher GPP variability, GPP fluctuations are mostly controlled by precipitation and strongly coupled with evapotranspiration (ET). This higher GPP IAV in semi-arid regions is co-limited by supply (precipitation)-induced ET variability and GPP-ET coupling strength. Our results demonstrate the importance of semi-arid regions to the global terrestrial carbon cycle and posit that there will be larger GPP and ET variations in the future with changes in precipitation patterns and dryland expansion.

  16. Precipitation and carbon-water coupling jointly control the interannual variability of global land gross primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Xiao, Xiangming; Guanter, Luis; Zhou, Sha; Ciais, Philippe; Joiner, Joanna; Sitch, Stephen; Wu, Xiaocui; Nabel, Julia; Dong, Jinwei; Kato, Etsushi; Jain, Atul K.; Wiltshire, Andy; Stocker, Benjamin D.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems is increasing along with the rising of atmospheric CO2 concentration. Embedded in this trend, recent studies suggested that the interannual variability (IAV) of global carbon fluxes may be dominated by semi-arid ecosystems, but the underlying mechanisms of this high variability in these specific regions are not well known. Here we derive an ensemble of gross primary production (GPP) estimates using the average of three data-driven models and eleven process-based models. These models are weighted by their spatial representativeness of the satellite-based solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF). We then use this weighted GPP ensemble to investigate the GPP variability for different aridity regimes. We show that semi-arid regions contribute to 57% of the detrended IAV of global GPP. Moreover, in regions with higher GPP variability, GPP fluctuations are mostly controlled by precipitation and strongly coupled with evapotranspiration (ET). This higher GPP IAV in semi-arid regions is co-limited by supply (precipitation)-induced ET variability and GPP-ET coupling strength. Our results demonstrate the importance of semi-arid regions to the global terrestrial carbon cycle and posit that there will be larger GPP and ET variations in the future with changes in precipitation patterns and dryland expansion.

  17. A Bayesian kriging approach for blending satellite and ground precipitation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, Andrew; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Kleiber, William; Funk, Chris

    2015-02-01

    Drought and flood management practices require accurate estimates of precipitation. Gauge observations, however, are often sparse in regions with complicated terrain, clustered in valleys, and of poor quality. Consequently, the spatial extent of wet events is poorly represented. Satellite-derived precipitation data are an attractive alternative, though they tend to underestimate the magnitude of wet events due to their dependency on retrieval algorithms and the indirect relationship between satellite infrared observations and precipitation intensities. Here we offer a Bayesian kriging approach for blending precipitation gauge data and the Climate Hazards Group Infrared Precipitation satellite-derived precipitation estimates for Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela. First, the gauge observations are modeled as a linear function of satellite-derived estimates and any number of other variables—for this research we include elevation. Prior distributions are defined for all model parameters and the posterior distributions are obtained simultaneously via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The posterior distributions of these parameters are required for spatial estimation, and thus are obtained prior to implementing the spatial kriging model. This functional framework is applied to model parameters obtained by sampling from the posterior distributions, and the residuals of the linear model are subject to a spatial kriging model. Consequently, the posterior distributions and uncertainties of the blended precipitation estimates are obtained. We demonstrate this method by applying it to pentadal and monthly total precipitation fields during 2009. The model's performance and its inherent ability to capture wet events are investigated. We show that this blending method significantly improves upon the satellite-derived estimates and is also competitive in its ability to represent wet events. This procedure also provides a means to estimate a full conditional distribution

  18. Handling of subpixel structures in the application of satellite derived irradiance data for solar energy system analysis - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Hans Georg

    2016-04-01

    With the increasing availability of satellite derived irradiance information, this type of data set is more and more in use for the design and operation of solar energy systems, most notably PV- and CSP-systems. By this, the need for data measured on-site is reduced. However, due to basic limitations of the satellite-derived data, several requirements put by the intended application cannot be coped with this data type directly. Traw satellite information has to be enhanced in both space and time resolution by additional information to be fully applicable for all aspects of the modelling od solar energy systems. To cope with this problem, several individual and collaborative projects had been performed in the recent years or are ongoing. Approaches are on one hand based on pasting synthesized high-resolution data into the low-resolution original sets. Pre-requite is an appropriate model, validated against real world data. For the case of irradiance data, these models can be extracted either directly from ground measured data sets or from data referring to the cloud situation as gained from the images of sky cameras or from monte -carlo initialized physical models. The current models refer to the spatial structure of the cloud fields. Dynamics are imposed by moving the cloud structures according to a large scale cloud motion vector, either extracted from the dynamics interfered from consecutive satellite images or taken from a meso-scale meteorological model. Dynamic irradiance information is then derived from the cloud field structure and the cloud motion vector. This contribution, which is linked to subtask A - Solar Resource Applications for High Penetration of Solar Technologies - of IEA SHC task 46, will present the different approaches and discuss examples in view of validation, need for auxiliary information and respective general applicability.

  19. Disentangling the Relationships between Net Primary Production and Precipitation in Southern Africa Savannas Using Satellite Observations from 1982 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Southworth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a better understanding of the variability in net primary production (NPP in savannas is important for the study of the global carbon cycle and the management of this particular ecosystem. Using satellite and precipitation data sets, we investigated the variations in NPP in southern African savannas from 1982 to 2010, and disentangled the relationships between NPP and precipitation by land cover classes and mean annual precipitation (MAP gradients. Specifically, we evaluate the utility of the third generation Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling System (GIMMS3g normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI dataset, in comparison with Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS derived NPP products, and find strong relationships between the overlapping data periods (2000–2010, such that we can apply our model to derive NPP estimates to the full 29-year NDVI time-series. Generally, the northern portion of the study area is characterized by high NPP and low variability, whereas the southern portion is characteristic of low NPP and high variability. During the period 1982 through 2010, NPP has reduced at a rate of −2.13 g∙C∙m−2∙yr−1 (p < 0.1, corresponding to a decrease of 6.7% over 29 years, and about half of bush and grassland savanna has experienced a decrease in NPP. There is a significant positive relationship between mean annual NPP and MAP in bush and grassland savannas, but no significant relationship is observed in tree savannas. The relationship between mean annual NPP and MAP varies with increases in MAP, characterized as a linear relationship that breaks down when MAP exceeding around 850–900 mm.

  20. Multi-site assimilation of a terrestrial biosphere model (BETHY) using satellite derived soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mousong; Sholze, Marko

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the importance of soil moisture data on assimilation of a terrestrial biosphere model (BETHY) for a long time period from 2010 to 2015. Totally, 101 parameters related to carbon turnover, soil respiration, as well as soil texture were selected for optimization within a carbon cycle data assimilation system (CCDAS). Soil moisture data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) product was derived for 10 sites representing different plant function types (PFTs) as well as different climate zones. Uncertainty of SMOS soil moisture data was also estimated using triple collocation analysis (TCA) method by comparing with ASCAT dataset and BETHY forward simulation results. Assimilation of soil moisture to the system improved soil moisture as well as net primary productivity(NPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) when compared with soil moisture derived from in-situ measurements and fluxnet datasets. Parameter uncertainties were largely reduced relatively to prior values. Using SMOS soil moisture data for assimilation of a terrestrial biosphere model proved to be an efficient approach in reducing uncertainty in ecosystem fluxes simulation. It could be further used in regional an global assimilation work to constrain carbon dioxide concentration simulation by combining with other sources of measurements.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Satellite-Derived Cloud and Surface Characteristics During FIRE-ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J.; Fowler, C. W.; Nguyen, T.; Wang, X.a

    2000-01-01

    Advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) products calculated for the western Arctic for April-July 1998 are used to investigate spatial, temporal, and regional patterns and variability in energy budget parameters associated with ocean- ice-atmosphere interactions over the Arctic Ocean during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project and the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). The AVHRR-derived parameters include cloud fraction, clear-sky and all-sky skin temperature and broadband albedo, upwelling and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation, cloud top pressure and temperature, and cloud optical depth. The remotely sensed products generally agree well with field observations at the SHEBA site, which in turn is shown to be representative of a surrounding region comparable in size to a climate-model grid cell. Time series of products for other locations in the western Arctic illustrate the magnitude of spatial variability during the study period and provide spatial and temporal detail useful for studying regional processes. The data illustrate the progression of reduction in cloud cover, albedo decrease, and the considerable heating of the open ocean associated with the anomalous decrease in sea ice cover in the eastern Beaufort Sea that began in late spring. Above-freezing temperatures are also recorded within the ice pack, suggesting warming of the open water areas within the ice cover.

  2. Characteristics of lignin precipitated with organic acids as a source for valorisation carbon products

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Namane, M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available biomass derived industries. It’s richness in carbon appropriates it for far more than the industry is currently utilizing it for, therefore production of high value products (and energy) from lignin could be a significant step towards appreciating...

  3. Developing a new global network of river reaches from merged satellite-derived datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, C.; Allen, G. H.; Beighley, E.; Pavelsky, T.

    2015-12-01

    In 2020, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite (SWOT), a joint mission of NASA/CNES/CSA/UK will be launched. One of its major products will be the measurements of continental water extent, including the width, height, and slope of rivers and the surface area and elevations of lakes. The mission will improve the monitoring of continental water and also our understanding of the interactions between different hydrologic reservoirs. For rivers, SWOT measurements of slope must be carried out over predefined river reaches. As such, an a priori dataset for rivers is needed in order to facilitate analysis of the raw SWOT data. The information required to produce this dataset includes measurements of river width, elevation, slope, planform, river network topology, and flow accumulation. To produce this product, we have linked two existing global datasets: the Global River Widths from Landsat (GRWL) database, which contains river centerline locations, widths, and a braiding index derived from Landsat imagery, and a modified version of the HydroSHEDS hydrologically corrected digital elevation product, which contains heights and flow accumulation measurements for streams at 3 arcsecond spatial resolution. Merging these two datasets requires considerable care. The difficulties, among others, lie in the difference of resolution: 30m versus 3 arseconds, and the age of the datasets: 2000 versus ~2010 (some rivers have moved, the braided sections are different). As such, we have developed custom software to merge the two datasets, taking into account the spatial proximity of river channels in the two datasets and ensuring that flow accumulation in the final dataset always increases downstream. Here, we present our preliminary results for a portion of South America and demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of the method.

  4. How consistent is the satellite derived SST-LHF relationship in comparison with observed values ?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.

    derived products. It is quite natural that the relationship, in general, resembled one another in the left and right panels except that of SST and D q with LHF, where the mean trend appears to be opposite (figure 3 (a),(b),(e),(f)). The reason...C and 2ms 21 , respectively and underestimates the humidity gradient by 2 g kg 21 (figure 6(b),(d),(f)). The process of underestimation of SST below 28.5uC, therefore, induces high LHF by invoking the thumb rule proposed by Zhang and McPhaden (1995...

  5. Effect of Vegetation and Precipitation upon Runoff and Sediment Production on Slope Lands of the Loess Area in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Sihong; ZHANG Xiaoming; ZHU Qinke

    2006-01-01

    According to fixed-position data for 1992-2003 from 16 runoff plots of Caijiachuan watershed which lie in Jixian County,Shanxi Province,in the loess area,this paper studied the relationship between vegetation and runoff and sediment production on slope lands.The results showed as follows:1)Runoff and sediment production in Robinia pseudoacacia forest and Pinus tabulaeformis forest had a high correlation with precipitation amount and rainfall intensity,but the correlation decreased gradually with the increase of canopy density;2)The secondary forest had better function of soil and water conservation than artificial R.pseudoacacia forest,and runoff and sediment production in the former in an individual rain event was 65%-82% and 23%-92% lower than those in the latter,respectively;3)The difference of runoff and sediment production in several land uses was very distinct.Runoff and sediment production in Ostryopsis davidiana forest and the secondary forest were the least;runoff and sediment production in artificial R.pseudoacacia forest and P. tabulaeformis forest were 5-fold as much as those in O.davidiana forest.Besides.runoff and sediment production in mixed stand of apple trees and crops were 16.14-fold and 2.96-fold higher than that in O.davidiana forest,respectively,but the amount decreased obviously after high-standard soil preparation for the former;4)Based on gray correlation analysis of various factors affecting runoff and sediment production on slope lands,it can be seen that stand canopy density and herb and litter biomass were the most significant ones,whose gray correlation values all exceeded 0.6.Therefore.mixed forest with multi-layer stand structure and shrub forest should be developed in vegetation reconstruction of the loess area,which help to increase coverage and litter thickness to cut down the runoff and sediment production dramatically on slope lands.

  6. Satellite-derived mineral mapping and monitoring of weathering, deposition and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudahy, Thomas; Caccetta, Mike; Thomas, Matilda; Hewson, Robert; Abrams, Michael; Kato, Masatane; Kashimura, Osamu; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Collings, Simon; Laukamp, Carsten; Ong, Cindy; Lau, Ian; Rodger, Andrew; Chia, Joanne; Warren, Peter; Woodcock, Robert; Fraser, Ryan; Rankine, Terry; Vote, Josh; de Caritat, Patrice; English, Pauline; Meyer, Dave; Doescher, Chris; Fu, Bihong; Shi, Pilong; Mitchell, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Earth’s surface comprises minerals diagnostic of weathering, deposition and erosion. The first continental-scale mineral maps generated from an imaging satellite with spectral bands designed to measure clays, quartz and other minerals were released in 2012 for Australia. Here we show how these satellite mineral maps improve our understanding of weathering, erosional and depositional processes in the context of changing weather, climate and tectonics. The clay composition map shows how kaolinite has developed over tectonically stable continental crust in response to deep weathering during northwardly migrating tropical conditions from 45 to 10 Ma. The same clay composition map, in combination with one sensitive to water content, enables the discrimination of illite from montmorillonite clays that typically develop in large depositional environments over thin (sinking) continental crust such as the Lake Eyre Basin. Cutting across these clay patterns are sandy deserts that developed <10 Ma and are well mapped using another satellite product sensitive to the particle size of silicate minerals. This product can also be used to measure temporal gains/losses of surface clay caused by periodic wind erosion (dust) and rainfall inundation (flood) events. The accuracy and information content of these satellite mineral maps are validated using published data. PMID:27025192

  7. Satellite-derived mineral mapping and monitoring of weathering, deposition and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudahy, Thomas; Caccetta, Mike; Thomas, Matilda; Hewson, Robert; Abrams, Michael; Kato, Masatane; Kashimura, Osamu; Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Collings, Simon; Laukamp, Carsten; Ong, Cindy; Lau, Ian; Rodger, Andrew; Chia, Joanne; Warren, Peter; Woodcock, Robert; Fraser, Ryan; Rankine, Terry; Vote, Josh; de Caritat, Patrice; English, Pauline; Meyer, Dave; Doescher, Chris; Fu, Bihong; Shi, Pilong; Mitchell, Ross

    2016-03-30

    The Earth's surface comprises minerals diagnostic of weathering, deposition and erosion. The first continental-scale mineral maps generated from an imaging satellite with spectral bands designed to measure clays, quartz and other minerals were released in 2012 for Australia. Here we show how these satellite mineral maps improve our understanding of weathering, erosional and depositional processes in the context of changing weather, climate and tectonics. The clay composition map shows how kaolinite has developed over tectonically stable continental crust in response to deep weathering during northwardly migrating tropical conditions from 45 to 10 Ma. The same clay composition map, in combination with one sensitive to water content, enables the discrimination of illite from montmorillonite clays that typically develop in large depositional environments over thin (sinking) continental crust such as the Lake Eyre Basin. Cutting across these clay patterns are sandy deserts that developed <10 Ma and are well mapped using another satellite product sensitive to the particle size of silicate minerals. This product can also be used to measure temporal gains/losses of surface clay caused by periodic wind erosion (dust) and rainfall inundation (flood) events. The accuracy and information content of these satellite mineral maps are validated using published data.

  8. Precipitation over urban areas in the western Maritime Continent using a convection-permitting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüeso, Daniel; Di Luca, Alejandro; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of urban areas on precipitation in the western Maritime Continent using a convection-permitting regional atmospheric model. The Weather Research and Forecasting model was used to simulate the atmosphere at a range of spatial resolutions using a multiple nesting approach. Two experiments (with and without urban areas) were completed over a 5-year period (2008-2012) each to estimate the contribution of cities to changes in local circulation. At first, the model is evaluated against two satellite-derived precipitation products and the benefit of using a very high-resolution model (2-km grid spacing) over a region where rainfall is dominated by convective processes is demonstrated, particularly in terms of its diurnal cycle phase and amplitude. The influence of cities on precipitation characteristics is quantified for two major urban nuclei in the region (Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur) and results indicate that their presence locally enhances precipitation by over 30 %. This increase is mainly due to an intensification of the diurnal cycle. We analyse the impact on temperature, humidity and wind to put forward physical mechanisms that explain such changes. Cities increase near surface temperature, generating instability. They also make land-sea temperature contrasts stronger, which enhances sea breeze circulations. Together, they increase near-surface moisture flux convergence and favour convective processes leading to an overall increase of precipitation over urban areas. The diurnal cycle of these effects is reflected in the atmospheric footprint of cities on variables such as humidity and cloud mixing ratio and accompanies changes in precipitation.

  9. Spatio-temporal variability of satellite derived aerosol optical thickness and ground measurements over East China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fei; Shi, Tongguang

    2016-04-01

    Two-year records of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Intermediate Product (IP) data on the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 550 nm were evaluated by comparing them with sun-sky radiometer measurements from the Chinese sun hazemeter network (CSHNET) and the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The monthly and seasonal variations in the aerosol optical properties over eastern China were then investigated using collocated VIIRS IP data and CSHNET and AERONET measurements.Results show that the performances of the current VIIRS IP AOT retrievals at the provisional stage were consistent with ground measurements. Similar characteristics of seasonal and monthly variations were found among the measurements, though the observational methodologies were different, showing maxima in the summer and spring and minima in the winter and autumn.

  10. Validation of satellite derived LHF using coare_3.0 scheme and time series data over north-east Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Sathe, P.V.

    -6538 versión on-line Gayana (Concepc.) v.68 n.2 supl.TIIProc Concepción 2004 Como citar este artículo Gayana 68(2): 420-426, 2004 VALIDATION OF SATELLITE DERIVED LHF USING COARE_3.0 SCHEME AND TIME SERIES DATA OVER NORTH-EAST INDIAN...

  11. Evaluation of feed COD/sulfate ratio as a control criterion for the biological hydrogen sulfide production and lead precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, Antonio [Direccion General del Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental-Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: jvelasco@ine.gob.mx; Ramirez, Martha [Direccion General del Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental-Instituto Nacional de Ecologia, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Volke-Sepulveda, Tania [Departamento de Biotecnologia, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez-Sanchez, Armando [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico); Revah, Sergio [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnologia, UAM-Cuajimalpa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina. Iztapalapa, Mexico 09340, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-03-01

    The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to produce hydrogen sulfide and the high affinity of sulfide to react with divalent metallic cations represent an excellent option to remove heavy metals from wastewater. Different parameters have been proposed to control the hydrogen sulfide production by anaerobic bacteria, such as the organic and sulfate loading rates and the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. This work relates the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio with the hydrogen sulfide production and dissolved lead precipitation, using ethanol as carbon and energy source in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. A maximum dissolved sulfide concentration of 470 {+-} 7 mg S/L was obtained at a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 2.5, with sulfate and ethanol conversions of approximately 94 and 87%, respectively. The lowest dissolved sulfide concentration (145 {+-} 10 mg S/L) was observed with a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 0.67. Substantial amounts of acetate (510-1730 mg/L) were produced and accumulated in the bioreactor from ethanol oxidation. Although only incomplete oxidation of ethanol to acetate was observed, the consortium was able to remove 99% of the dissolved lead (200 mg/L) with a feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio of 1.5. It was found that the feed COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio could be an adequate parameter to control the hydrogen sulfide production and the consequent precipitation of dissolved lead.

  12. Validation of three satellite-derived databases of surface solar radiation using measurements performed at 42 stations in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Claire; Wey, Etienne; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-06-01

    The SoDa website (www.soda-pro.com) is populated with numerous solar-related Web services. Among them, three satellite-derived irradiation databases can be manually or automatically accessed to retrieve radiation values within the geographical coverage of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite: the two most advanced versions of the HelioClim-3 database (versions 4 and 5, respectively HC3v4 and HC3v5), and the CAMS radiation service. So far, these databases have been validated against measurements of several stations in Europe and North Africa only. As the quality of such databases depends on the geographical regions and the climates, this paper extends this validation campaign and proposes an extensive comparison on Brazil and global irradiation received on a horizontal surface. Eleven stations from the Brazilian Institute of Space Research (INPE) network offer 1 min observations, and thirty-one stations from the Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (INMET) network offer hourly observations. The satellite-derived estimates have been compared to the corresponding observations on hourly, daily and monthly basis. The bias relative to the mean of the measurements for HC3v5 is mostly comprised between 1 and 3 %, and that for HC3v4 between 2 and 5 %. These are very satisfactory results and they demonstrate that HC3v5, and to a lesser extent HC3v4, may be used in studies of long-term changes in SSI in Brazil. The situation is not so good with CAMS radiation service for which the relative bias is mostly comprised between 5 and 10 %. For hourly irradiation, the relative RMSE ranges from 15 to 33 %. The correlation coefficient is very large for all stations and the three databases, with an average of 0.96. The three databases reproduce well the hour from hour changes in SSI. The errors show a tendency to increase with the viewing angle of the MSG satellite. They are greater in tropical areas where the relative humidity in the atmosphere is important. It is concluded

  13. Improvements of Satellite Derived Cyclonic Rainfall Over The North Atlantic and Implications Upon The Air-sea Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Grassl, H.

    Case studies of rainfall, derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) satellite data, during the passage of individual cyclones over the North Atlantic are presented to enhance the knowledge of rainfall processes asso ciated with frontal sys- tems. The Multi-Satellite-Technique (MST) is described to receive a complete cov- erage of the North Atlantic twice a day. Different SSM/I precipitation algorithms (Bauer and Schlüssel, Ferraro, Wentz) have been tested for individual cyclones and were compared to the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data sets and NWP model results (ECMWF, REMO). An independent rainfall pattern and -intensity vali dation method is presented using voluntary observing ship (VOS) data sets and AVHRR images. Intense storms occur very often in the wintertime period with cold fronts propagating far south over the North Atlantic. Large frontal conditions are mostly well represented in all tested data sets. Following upstream numerous showers are usually embedded in the cellular structures of the cold air on the backside of post frontal subsidences. Cold air clusters frequently occur in these backside regions which produce heavy convective rainfall events. Espe cially in the region off Newfoundland at 50o North, where very cold air within arctic cold air outbreaks is advected over the warm waters of the Gulfstream current, these heavily raining clusters often rapidly form into mesoscale storms. These small but intense cyclones up to 1500km in diame- ter are characterized by very heavy precipitation over the entire region and may occur every three days in wintertime. The storms can be easily identified on AVHRR im- ages. Only the SSM/I rainfall algorithm of Bauer and Schlüssel in combination with the presented MST is sensitive enough to detect the correct patterns and intensities of rainfall for those cyclone types over the North Atlantic, whereas the GPCP products fail in recognizing any rainfall at all. A SLP study figures

  14. Comparison between MODIS and AIRS/AMSU satellite-derived surface skin temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-R. Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface skin temperatures of the Version 5 Level 3 products of MODIS and AIRS/AMSU have been compared in terms of monthly anomaly trends and climatology over the globe during the period from September 2002 to August 2011. The MODIS temperatures in the 50° N–50° S region tend to systematically be ~1.7 K colder over land and ~0.5 K warmer over ocean than the AIRS/AMSU temperatures. Over high latitude ocean the MODIS values are ~5.5 K warmer than the AIRS/AMSU. The discrepancies between the annual averages of the two sensors are as much as ~12 K in the sea ice regions. Both MODIS and AIRS/AMSU show cooling trends from −0.05 ± 0.06 to −0.14 ± 0.07 K (9 yr−1 over the globe, but warming trends (0.02 ± 0.12–0.15 ± 0.19 K (9 yr−1 in the high latitude regions. The disagreement between the two sensors results mainly from the differences in ice/snow emissivity between MODIS infrared and AMSU microwave, and also in their observational local times.

  15. A hybrid Bayesian-SVD based method to detect false alarms in PERSIANN precipitation estimation product using related physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarnia, Navid; Arasteh, Peyman D.; Araghinejad, Shahab; Liaghat, Majid A.

    2016-07-01

    Incorrect estimation of rainfall occurrence, so called False Alarm (FA) is one of the major sources of bias error of satellite based precipitation estimation products and may even cause lots of problems during the bias reduction and calibration processes. In this paper, a hybrid statistical method is introduced to detect FA events of PERSIANN dataset over Urmia Lake basin in northwest of Iran. The main FA detection model is based on Bayesian theorem at which four predictor parameters including PERSIANN rainfall estimations, brightness temperature (Tb), precipitable water (PW) and near surface air temperature (Tair) is considered as its input dataset. In order to decrease the dimensions of input dataset by summarizing their most important modes of variability and correlations to the reference dataset, a technique named singular value decomposition (SVD) is used. The application of Bayesian-SVD method in FA detection of Urmia Lake basin resulted in a trade-off between FA detection and Hit events loss. The results show success of proposed method in detecting about 30% of FA events in return for loss of about 12% of Hit events while better capability of this method in cold seasons is observed.

  16. Using satellite-derived optical thickness to assess the influence of clouds on terrestrial carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S. J.; Steiner, A. L.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Bohrer, G.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2016-07-01

    Clouds scatter direct solar radiation, generating diffuse radiation and altering the ratio of direct to diffuse light. If diffuse light increases plant canopy CO2 uptake, clouds may indirectly influence climate by altering the terrestrial carbon cycle. However, past research primarily uses proxies or qualitative categories of clouds to connect the effect of diffuse light on CO2 uptake to sky conditions. We mechanistically link and quantify effects of cloud optical thickness (τc) to surface light and plant canopy CO2 uptake by comparing satellite retrievals of τc to ground-based measurements of diffuse and total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) and gross primary production (GPP) in forests and croplands. Overall, total PAR decreased with τc, while diffuse PAR increased until an average τc of 6.8 and decreased with larger τc. When diffuse PAR increased with τc, 7-24% of variation in diffuse PAR was explained by τc. Light-use efficiency (LUE) in this range increased 0.001-0.002 per unit increase in τc. Although τc explained 10-20% of the variation in LUE, there was no significant relationship between τc and GPP (p > 0.05) when diffuse PAR increased. We conclude that diffuse PAR increases under a narrow range of optically thin clouds and the dominant effect of clouds is to reduce total plant-available PAR. This decrease in total PAR offsets the increase in LUE under increasing diffuse PAR, providing evidence that changes within this range of low cloud optical thickness are unlikely to alter the magnitude of terrestrial CO2 fluxes.

  17. The Orbits of Saturn's Small Satellites Derived from Combined Historic and Cassini Imaging Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, J. N.; Jacobson, R. A.; Porco, C. C.; Owen, W. M., Jr.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the orbits of the small, inner Saturnian satellites, either recovered or newly discovered in recent Cassini imaging observations. The orbits presented here reflect improvements over our previously published values in that the time base of Cassini observations has been extended, and numerical orbital integrations have been performed in those cases in which simple precessing elliptical, inclined orbit solutions were found to be inadequate. Using combined Cassini and Voyager observations, we obtain an eccentricity for Pan 7 times smaller than previously reported because of the predominance of higher quality Cassini data in the fit. The orbit of the small satellite (S/2005 S1 [Daphnis]) discovered by Cassini in the Keeler gap in the outer A ring appears to be circular and coplanar; no external perturbations are apparent. Refined orbits of Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus are based on Cassini , Voyager, Hubble Space Telescope, and Earth-based data and a numerical integration perturbed by all the massive satellites and each other. Atlas is significantly perturbed by Prometheus, and to a lesser extent by Pandora, through high-wavenumber mean-motion resonances. Orbital integrations involving Atlas yield a mass of GMAtlas=(0.44+/-0.04)×10-3 km3 s -2, 3 times larger than reported previously (GM is the product of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G and the satellite mass M). Orbital integrations show that Methone is perturbed by Mimas, Pallene is perturbed by Enceladus, and Polydeuces librates around Dione's L5 point with a period of about 791 days. We report on the nature and orbits of bodies sighted in the F ring, two of which may have persisted for a year or more.

  18. Study on the Separation of 132Te From Fission Products by Precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOGuo-shu; ZHANGSheng-dong; CUIAn-zhi; GUOJing-ru; YANGLei; DINGYou-qian

    2003-01-01

    In order to measure precisely the decay data of 132I, radiochemical purity 132I is directly or indirectly separated and prepared from fission products of 235U. The source of 132I which is separated directly has some isotope nuclides such as 131I, 133I, 135I etc. that interfere measurement of 132I by HPGe γ detector. The method of 132I separated indirectly has two steps: 1) Its mother nuclide 132Te is separated from fission products; 2) 132I is separated from 132Te. By this method, the interference of other isotope nuclides of 132I is greatly decreased and even eliminated.

  19. Online Tools for Uncovering Data Quality (DQ) Issues in Satellite-Based Global Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Heo, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Data quality (DQ) has many attributes or facets (i.e., errors, biases, systematic differences, uncertainties, benchmark, false trends, false alarm ratio, etc.)Sources can be complicated (measurements, environmental conditions, surface types, algorithms, etc.) and difficult to be identified especially for multi-sensor and multi-satellite products with bias correction (TMPA, IMERG, etc.) How to obtain DQ info fast and easily, especially quantified info in ROI Existing parameters (random error), literature, DIY, etc.How to apply the knowledge in research and applications.Here, we focus on online systems for integration of products and parameters, visualization and analysis as well as investigation and extraction of DQ information.

  20. Mapping Annual Precipitation across Mainland China in the Period 2001–2010 from TRMM3B43 Product Using Spatial Downscaling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Shi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatially explicit precipitation data is often responsible for the prediction accuracy of hydrological and ecological models. Several statistical downscaling approaches have been developed to map precipitation at a high spatial resolution, which are mainly based on the valid conjugations between satellite-driven precipitation data and geospatial predictors. Performance of the existing approaches should be first evaluated before applying them to larger spatial extents with a complex terrain across different climate zones. In this paper, we investigate the statistical downscaling algorithms to derive the high spatial resolution maps of precipitation over continental China using satellite datasets, including the Normalized Distribution Vegetation Index (NDVI from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, the Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER, and the rainfall product from the Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission (TRMM. We compare three statistical techniques (multiple linear regression, exponential regression, and Random Forest regression trees for modeling precipitation to better understand how the selected model types affect the prediction accuracy. Then, those models are implemented to downscale the original TRMM product (3B43; 0.25° resolution onto the finer grids (1 × 1 km2 of precipitation. Finally we validate the downscaled annual precipitation (a wet year 2001 and a dry year 2010 against the ground rainfall observations from 596 rain gauge stations over continental China. The result indicates that the downscaling algorithm based on the Random Forest regression outperforms, when compared to the linear regression and the exponential regression. It also shows that the addition of the residual terms does not significantly improve the accuracy of results for the RF model. The analysis of the variable importance reveals the NDVI related predictors

  1. Computing solubility products using ab initio methods; precipitation of NbC in low alloyed steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klymko, T.; Sluiter, M.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility product of NbC in low alloyed steel is computed from electronic density functional methods including the effects of electronic, vibrational, and magnetic excitations. Although many simplifications are made in the computations, agreement with experimental data is within the scatter of

  2. Effect of gas field production and CO2 injection on brine flow and salt precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeve, D.; Tambach, T.J.; Hofstee, C.; Plug, W.J.; Maas, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports modeling of gas field produc-tion and CO2 injection from a theoretical reser-voir based on characteristics of the P18 gas field in the Dutch offshore, which consists of four geological deposits with different petrophysical properties. We especially focus on the brine flow during

  3. Effect of CO2 injection on brine flow and salt precipitation after gas field production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambach, T.J.; Loeve, D.; Hofstee, C.; Plug, W.J.; Maas, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports modeling of gas field production and CO2 injection in a theoretical reservoir based on characteristics of the P18 gas field in the Dutch offshore, which consists of four geological deposits with different petrophysical properties. We especially focus on the brine flow during and

  4. Numerical simulation of flow field and optimization of structure parameters of seed precipitation tank for production of alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong-jie; ZHOU Jie-min; L(U) Zi-jian; ZHOU Huai-min

    2005-01-01

    In order to overcome the defects of air-agitated seed precipitation, such as scaring, liquid short-circuiting, the three-dimension flow fields with different structure are numerically simulated by computational fluid dynamics software. Euler/Euler approach was used to study the effects of structure on the flow field in the tank. Multi-fluid model, body-fitted coordinates and multi-block gird were adopted in the simulation. The simulating results are well consonant with the practical situations. The flow field is improved obviously when the flow velocity increases from 0.089 m/s to 0.192-0.300 m/s at the bottom of the optimized tank and therefore the scaring is reduced greatly in the industrial production. With a gathering sill, the problem of short-circuiting, which always appeares in the upper of the tank, can be solved very well.

  5. Modeling of groundwater draft based on satellite-derived crop acreage estimation over an arid region of northwest India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Bidyut Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Paliwal, Rakesh; Jeyaseelan, A. T.

    2016-11-01

    Over-exploitation of groundwater for agricultural crops puts stress on the sustainability of natural resources in the arid region of Rajasthan state, India. Hydrogeological study of groundwater levels of the study area during the pre-monsoon (May to June), post-monsoon (October to November) and post-irrigation (February to March) seasons of 2004-2005 to 2011-2012 shows a steady decline of groundwater levels at the rate of 1.28-1.68 m/year, mainly due to excessive groundwater draft for irrigation. Due to the low density of the groundwater observation-well network in the study area, assessment of groundwater draft, and thus groundwater resource management, becomes a difficult task. To overcome the situation, a linear groundwater draft model (LGDM) has been developed based on the empirical relationship between satellite-derived crop acreage and the observed groundwater draft for the year 2003-2004. The model has been validated for a decade, during three year-long intervals (2005-2006, 2008-2009 and 2011-2012) using groundwater draft, estimated through a discharge factor method. Further, the estimated draft was validated through observed pumping data from random sampled villages (2011-2012). The results suggest that the developed LGDM model provides a good alternative to the estimation of groundwater draft based on satellite-based crop area in the absence of groundwater observation wells in arid regions of northwest India.

  6. Mesoscale and Local Scale Evaluations of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates by Weather Radar Products during a Heavy Rainfall Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basile Pauthier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-hour heavy rainfall event occurred in northeastern France from November 3 to 4, 2014. The accuracy of the quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE by PANTHERE and ANTILOPE radar-based gridded products during this particular event, is examined at both mesoscale and local scale, in comparison with two reference rain-gauge networks. Mesoscale accuracy was assessed for the total rainfall accumulated during the 24-hour event, using the Météo France operational rain-gauge network. Local scale accuracy was assessed for both total event rainfall and hourly rainfall accumulations, using the recently developed HydraVitis high-resolution rain gauge network Evaluation shows that (1 PANTHERE radar-based QPE underestimates rainfall fields at mesoscale and local scale; (2 both PANTHERE and ANTILOPE successfully reproduced the spatial variability of rainfall at local scale; (3 PANTHERE underestimates can be significantly improved at local scale by merging these data with rain gauge data interpolation (i.e., ANTILOPE. This study provides a preliminary evaluation of radar-based QPE at local scale, suggesting that merged products are invaluable for applications at very high resolution. The results obtained underline the importance of using high-density rain-gauge networks to obtain information at high spatial and temporal resolution, for better understanding of local rainfall variation, to calibrate remotely sensed rainfall products.

  7. Precipitation Ground Validation over the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.

    2012-04-01

    State-of-the-art satellite derived and reanalysis based precipitation climatologies show remarkably large differences in detection, amount, variability and temporal behavior of precipitation over the oceans. The uncertainties are largest for light precipitation within the ITCZ and for cold season high-latitude precipitation including snowfall. Our HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite data, www.hoaps.org) precipitation retrieval exhibits fairly high accuracy in such regions compared to our ground validation data. However, the statistical basis for a conclusive validation has to be significantly improved with comprehensive ground validation efforts. However, existing in-situ instruments are not designed for precipitation measurements under high wind speeds on moving ships. To largely improve the ground validation data basis of precipitation over the oceans, especially for snow, the systematic data collection effort of the Initiative Pro Klima funded project at the KlimaCampus Hamburg uses automated shipboard optical disdrometers, called ODM470 that are capable of measuring liquid and solid precipitation on moving ships with high accuracy. The main goal of this project is to constrain the precipitation retrievals for HOAPS and the new Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite constellation. Currently, three instruments are long-term mounted on the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern (Alfred Wegner Institut) since June 2010, on R/V Akademik Ioffe (P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, Moscow, Russia) since September 2010 and on R/V Maria S. Merian (Brise Research, University of Hamburg) since December 2011. Three more instruments will follow shortly on further ships. The core regions for these long-term precipitation measurements comprise the Arctic Ocean, the Nordic Seas, the Labrador Sea, the subtropical Atlantic trade wind regions, the Caribbean, the ITCZ, and the Southern Oceans as far south to Antarctica. This

  8. Evaluating the performance of real-time streamflow forecasting using multi-satellite precipitation products in the Upper Zambezi, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, E. M.; Valdes, J. B.; Wi, S.; Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Valdés-Pineda, R.; Durcik, M.

    2016-12-01

    In under-instrumented basins around the world, accurate and timely forecasts of river streamflows have the potential of assisting water and natural resource managers in their management decisions. The Upper Zambezi river basin is the largest basin in southern Africa and its water resources are critical to sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction in eight riparian countries. We present a real-time streamflow forecast for the basin using a multi-model-multi-satellite approach that allows accounting for model and input uncertainties. Three distributed hydrologic models with different levels of complexity: VIC, HYMOD_DS, and HBV_DS are setup at a daily time step and a 0.25 degree spatial resolution for the basin. The hydrologic models are calibrated against daily observed streamflows at the Katima-Mulilo station using a Genetic Algorithm. Three real-time satellite products: Climate Prediction Center's morphing technique (CMORPH), Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN), and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM-3B42RT) are bias-corrected with daily CHIRPS estimates. Uncertainty bounds for predicted flows are estimated with the Inverse Variance Weighting method. Because concentration times in the basin range from a few days to more than a week, we include the use of precipitation forecasts from the Global Forecasting System (GFS) to predict daily streamflows in the basin with a 10-days lead time. The skill of GFS-predicted streamflows is evaluated and the usefulness of the forecasts for short term water allocations is presented.

  9. A description of the global land-surface precipitation data products of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre with sample applications including centennial (trend analysis from 1901–present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Becker

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The availability of highly accessible and reliable monthly gridded data sets of global land-surface precipitation is a need that was already identified in the mid-1980s when there was a complete lack of globally homogeneous gauge-based precipitation analyses. Since 1989, the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC has built up its unique capacity to assemble, quality assure, and analyse rain gauge data gathered from all over the world. The resulting database has exceeded 200 yr in temporal coverage and has acquired data from more than 85 000 stations worldwide. Based on this database, this paper provides the reference publication for the four globally gridded monthly precipitation products of the GPCC, covering a 111-yr analysis period from 1901–present. As required for a reference publication, the content of the product portfolio, as well as the underlying methodologies to process and interpolate are detailed. Moreover, we provide information on the systematic and statistical errors associated with the data products. Finally, sample applications provide potential users of GPCC data products with suitable advice on capabilities and constraints of the gridded data sets. In doing so, the capabilities to access El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO sensitive precipitation regions and to perform trend analyses across the past 110 yr are demonstrated. The four gridded products, i.e. the Climatology (CLIM V2011, the Full Data Reanalysis (FD V6, the Monitoring Product (MP V4, and the First Guess Product (FG, are publicly available on easily accessible latitude/longitude grids encoded in zipped clear text ASCII files for subsequent visualization and download through the GPCC download gate hosted on ftp://ftp.dwd.de/pub/data/gpcc/html/download_gate.html by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, Offenbach, Germany. Depending on the product, four (0.25°, 0.5°, 1.0°, 2.5° for CLIM, three (0.5°, 1.0°, 2.5°, for FD

  10. The utilization of waste by-products for removing silicate from mineral processing wastewater via chemical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jianhua; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Runqing; Zhang, Qingpeng; Liu, Hang; Meng, Xiangsong

    2017-08-22

    This study investigates an environmentally friendly technology that utilizes waste by-products (waste acid and waste alkali liquids) to treat mineral processing wastewater. Chemical precipitation is used to remove silicate from scheelite (CaWO4) cleaning flotation wastewater and the waste by-products are used as a substitute for calcium chloride (CaCl2). A series of laboratory experiments is conducted to explain the removal of silicate and the characterization and formation mechanism of calcium silicate. The results show that silicate removal reaches 90% when the Ca:Si molar ratio exceeds 1.0. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the characterization and formation of calcium silicate. The pH is the key factor for silicate removal, and the formation of polysilicic acid with a reduction of pH can effectively improve the silicate removal and reduce the usage of calcium. The economic analysis shows that the treatment costs with waste acid (0.63 $/m(3)) and waste alkali (1.54 $/m(3)) are lower than that of calcium chloride (2.38 $/m(3)). The efficient removal of silicate is confirmed by industrial testing at a plant. The results show that silicate removal reaches 85% in the recycled water from tailings dam. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the TMPA-3B42 precipitation product using a high-density rain gauge network over complex terrain in northeastern Iberia

    KAUST Repository

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.

    2015-08-29

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA)-3B42 version 7 product is assessed over north-eastern Iberia, a region with considerable topographical gradients and complexity. Precipitation characteristics from a dense network of 656 rain gauges, spanning the period from 1998 to 2009, are used to evaluate TMPA-3B42 estimates on a daily scale. A set of accuracy estimators, including the relative bias, mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and Spearman coefficient was used to evaluate the results. The assessment indicates that TMPA-3B42 product is capable of describing the seasonal characteristics of the observed precipitation over most of the study domain. In particular, TMPA-3B42 precipitation agrees well with in situ measurements, with MAE less than 2.5mm.day-1, RMSE of 6.4mm.day-1 and Spearman correlation coefficients generally above 0.6. TMPA-3B42 provides improved accuracies in winter and summer, whereas it performs much worse in spring and autumn. Spatially, the retrieval errors show a consistent trend, with a general overestimation in regions of low altitude and underestimation in regions of heterogeneous terrain. TMPA-3B42 generally performs well over inland areas, while showing less skill in the coastal regions. A set of skill metrics, including a false alarm ratio [FAR], frequency bias index [FBI], the probability of detection [POD] and threat score [TS], is also used to evaluate TMPA performance under different precipitation thresholds (1, 5, 10, 25 and 50mm.day-1). The results suggest that TMPA-3B42 retrievals perform well in specifying moderate rain events (5-25mm.day-1), but show noticeably less skill in producing both light (<1mm.day-1) and heavy rainfall thresholds (more than 50mm.day-1). Given the complexity of the terrain and the associated high spatial variability of precipitation in north-eastern Iberia, the results reveal that TMPA-3B42 data provide an

  12. Principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level and base level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived data and the original software Baz

    OpenAIRE

    Akihisa Motoki; Kenji Freire Motoki; Susanna Eleonora Sichel; Samuel da Silva; José Ribeiro Aires

    2015-01-01

    This article presents principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived topographicdata. Summit level corresponds to thevirtualtopographic surface constituted bylocalhighest points, such as peaks and plateau tops, and reconstitutes palaeo-geomorphology before the drainage erosion. Summit level map is efficient for reconstitution of palaeo-surfaces and detection of active tectonic movement. Base level is thevirtualsurface composed oflocal...

  13. Precipitates in electrical steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Keith [Development and Market Research, Cogent Power Limited, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: keith.jenkins@cogent-power.com; Lindenmo, Magnus [Development and Market Research, Cogent Power Limited, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Precipitates heavily influence the magnetic properties of electrical steels, either as a key controlled requirement as part of the manufacturing process or as an unwanted harmful residual in the final product. In this current work copper-manganese sulphides precipitates are the primary inhibitor species in the conventional grain-oriented (CGO) steels examined and grain boundary pinning is effective at a mean precipitate size of 30-70 nm. The growth of CuMnS has been studied and the results show that a precipitate size above {approx}100 nm allows the onset of secondary recrystallisation in the heating conditions applied. The effect of precipitates on the magnetic properties of both grain-oriented and non-oriented steels in their final product form is then examined. Examples of grain-oriented material still containing large numbers of precipitates clearly show the detrimental effects with increases in total power loss of 40% or more. Loss deterioration by about 20% is also seen in samples of high silicon non-oriented material in which titanium carbo-nitride precipitates have been observed. In this case the precipitates are believed to have formed during cooling after final annealing. Finally a grain-oriented steel with a large number of very small precipitates, which do not seem to have any harmful effect on the magnetic properties, is demonstrated.

  14. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  15. Calcium carbonate precipitation by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from biofilms formed on deteriorated ignimbrite stones: influence of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation by these isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Angélica; Sepúlveda-Sánchez, José David; Mercedes Alonso Guzmán, Elia Mercedes; Le Borgne, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic CaCO3-precipitating bacteria were isolated from biofilms on deteriorated ignimbrites, siliceous acidic rocks, from Morelia Cathedral (Mexico) and identified as Enterobacter cancerogenus (22e), Bacillus sp. (32a) and Bacillus subtilis (52g). In solid medium, 22e and 32a precipitated calcite and vaterite while 52g produced calcite. Urease activity was detected in these isolates and CaCO3 precipitation increased in the presence of urea in the liquid medium. In the presence of calcium, EPS production decreased in 22e and 32a and increased in 52g. Under laboratory conditions, ignimbrite colonization by these isolates only occurred in the presence of calcium and no CaCO3 was precipitated. Calcium may therefore be important for biofilm formation on stones. The importance of the type of stone, here a siliceous stone, on biological colonization is emphasized. This calcium effect has not been reported on calcareous materials. The importance of the effect of calcium on EPS production and biofilm formation is discussed in relation to other applications of CaCO3 precipitation by bacteria.

  16. Evaluation of the TMPA-3B42 precipitation product using a high-density rain gauge network over complex terrain in northeastern Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.; Lopez-Moreno, Juan I.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA)-3B42 version 7 product is assessed over north-eastern Iberia, a region with considerable topographical gradients and complexity. Precipitation characteristics from a dense network of 656 rain gauges, spanning the period from 1998 to 2009, are used to evaluate TMPA-3B42 estimates on a daily scale. A set of accuracy estimators, including the relative bias, mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and Spearman coefficient was used to evaluate the results. The assessment indicates that TMPA-3B42 product is capable of describing the seasonal characteristics of the observed precipitation over most of the study domain. In particular, TMPA-3B42 precipitation agrees well with in situ measurements, with MAE less than 2.5 mm.day- 1, RMSE of 6.4 mm.day- 1 and Spearman correlation coefficients generally above 0.6. TMPA-3B42 provides improved accuracies in winter and summer, whereas it performs much worse in spring and autumn. Spatially, the retrieval errors show a consistent trend, with a general overestimation in regions of low altitude and underestimation in regions of heterogeneous terrain. TMPA-3B42 generally performs well over inland areas, while showing less skill in the coastal regions. A set of skill metrics, including a false alarm ratio [FAR], frequency bias index [FBI], the probability of detection [POD] and threat score [TS], is also used to evaluate TMPA performance under different precipitation thresholds (1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 mm.day- 1). The results suggest that TMPA-3B42 retrievals perform well in specifying moderate rain events (5-25 mm.day- 1), but show noticeably less skill in producing both light (informative addition to the spatial and temporal coverage of rain gauges in the domain, offering insights into characteristics of average precipitation and their spatial patterns. However, the satellite-based precipitation data should be

  17. Assessing Land Degradation/Recovery in the African Sahel from Long-Term Earth Observation Based Primary Productivity and Precipitation Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else Swinnen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The ‘rain use efficiency’ (RUE may be defined as the ratio of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP to annual precipitation, and it is claimed to be a conservative property of the vegetation cover in drylands, if the vegetation cover is not subject to non-precipitation related land degradation. Consequently, RUE may be regarded as means of normalizing ANPP for the impact of annual precipitation, and as an indicator of non-precipitation related land degradation. Large scale and long term identification and monitoring of land degradation in drylands, such as the Sahel, can only be achieved by use of Earth Observation (EO data. This paper demonstrates that the use of the standard EO-based proxy for ANPP, summed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies 3rd generation (GIMMS3g over the year (ΣNDVI, and the blended EO/rain gauge based data-set for annual precipitation (Climate Prediction Center Merged Analysis of Precipitation, CMAP results in RUE-estimates which are highly correlated with precipitation, rendering RUE useless as a means of normalizing for the impact of annual precipitation on ANPP. By replacing ΣNDVI by a ‘small NDVI integral’, covering only the rainy season and counting only the increase of NDVI relative to some reference level, this problem is solved. Using this approach, RUE is calculated for the period 1982–2010. The result is that positive RUE-trends dominate in most of the Sahel, indicating that non-precipitation related land degradation is not a widespread phenomenon. Furthermore, it is argued that two preconditions need to be fulfilled in order to obtain meaningful results from the RUE temporal trend analysis: First, there must be a significant positive linear correlation between annual precipitation and the ANPP proxy applied. Second, there must be a near

  18. Production of long-term global water vapor and liquid water data set using ultra-fast methods to assimilate multi-satellite and radiosonde observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, Thomas H.; Randel, David L.; Reinke, Donald L.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Ringerud, Mark A.; Combs, Cynthia L.; Greenwald, Thomas J.; Wittmeyer, Ian L.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years climate research scientists have recognized the need for increased time and space resolution precipitable and liquid water data sets. This project is designed to meet those needs. Specifically, NASA is funding STC-METSAT to develop a total integrated column and layered precipitable water data set. This is complemented by a total column liquid water data set. These data are global in extent, 1 deg x 1 deg in resolution, with daily grids produced. Precipitable water is measured by a combination of in situ radiosonde observations and satellite derived infrared and microwave retrievals from four satellites. This project combines these data into a coherent merged product for use in global climate research. This report is the Year 2 Annual Report from this NASA-sponsored project and includes progress-to-date on the assigned tasks.

  19. Amino acid, fatty acid, and mineral profiles of materials recovered from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) processing by-products using isoelectric solubilization/precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-C; Tou, J C; Jaczynski, J

    2007-11-01

    Protein, lipid, and insolubles (bones, skin, scales, fins, insoluble protein, and more) were recovered from rainbow trout processing by-products by means of isoelectric solubilization/precipitation at basic pH and acidic pH. Isoelectric solubilization/precipitation of the trout processing by-products resulted in the recovery of protein that was higher (P processing by-products. Basic pH treatments yielded a higher (P processing by-products, indicating that the pH treatments had no effect on these FAs. Ca and P contents of the processing by-products exceeded the recommended dietary allowances (RDA), but Fe and Mg did not. Basic pH treatments yielded protein with the lowest (P minerals and the highest (P processing by-products effectively removed minerals from the recovered protein without removal of the bones, skin, scales, fins, and so on, prior to processing. The results indicated that isoelectric solubilization/precipitation, particularly at basic pH, permitted recovery of high-quality protein and lipids from fish processing by-products for human food uses; also, the recovered insolubles may be used in animal feeds as a source of minerals.

  20. Influence of nonnative and native ungulate biomass and seasonal precipitation on vegetation production in a Great Basin ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigenfuss, Linda C.; Schoenecker, Kathryn A.; Ransom, Jason I.; Ignizio, Drew A.; Mask, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    The negative effects of equid grazers in semiarid ecosystems of the American West have been considered disproportionate to the influence of native ungulates in these systems because of equids' large body size, hoof shape, and short history on the landscape relative to native ungulates. Tools that can analyze the degree of influence of various ungulate herbivores in an ecosystem and separate effects of ungulates from effects of other variables (climate, anthropomorphic disturbances) can be useful to managers in determining the location of nonnative herbivore impacts and assessing the effect of management actions targeted at different ungulate populations. We used remotely sensed data to determine the influence of native and nonnative ungulates and climate on vegetation productivity at wildlife refuges in Oregon and Nevada. Our findings indicate that ungulate biomass density, particularly equid biomass density, and precipitation in winter and spring had the greatest influence on normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values. Our results concur with those of other researchers, who found that drought exacerbated the impacts of ungulate herbivores in arid systems.

  1. Satellite Derived Water Quality Observations Are Related to River Discharge and Nitrogen Loads in Pensacola Bay, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Lehrter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between satellite-derived water quality variables and river discharges, concentrations and loads of nutrients, organic carbon, and sediments were investigated over a 9-year period (2003–2011 in Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA. These analyses were conducted to better understand which river forcing factors were the primary drivers of estuarine variability in several water quality variables. Remote sensing reflectance time-series data were retrieved from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS and used to calculate monthly and annual estuarine time-series of chlorophyll a (Chla, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, and total suspended sediments (TSS. Monthly MERIS Chla varied from 2.0 mg m−3 in the lower region of the bay to 17.2 mg m−3 in the upper bay. MERIS CDOM and TSS exhibited similar patterns with ranges of 0.51–2.67 (m−1 and 0.11–8.9 (g m−3. Variations in the MERIS-derived monthly and annual Chla, CDOM, and TSS time-series were significantly related to monthly and annual river discharge and loads of nitrogen, organic carbon, and suspended sediments from the Escambia and Yellow rivers. Multiple regression models based on river loads (independent variables and MERIS Chla, CDOM, or TSS (dependent variables explained significant fractions of the variability (up to 62% at monthly and annual scales. The most significant independent variables in the regressions were river nitrogen loads, which were associated with increased MERIS Chla, CDOM, and TSS concentrations, and river suspended sediment loads, which were associated with decreased concentrations. In contrast, MERIS water quality variations were not significantly related to river total phosphorus loads. The spatially synoptic, nine-year satellite record expanded upon the spatial extent of past field studies to reveal previously unseen system-wide responses to river discharge and loading variation. The results indicated that variations in Pensacola Bay Chla

  2. Zirconia powders production by precipitation: state-of-art review; Producao de pos de zirconia por precipitacao - revisao do estado da arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ana Paula Almeida de; Torem, Mauricio Leonardo [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    1994-12-31

    The important role played by zirconia in advanced ceramics can be attributed to its excellent wear and corrosion resistance and refractory character. The polymorphic nature of zirconia made the controlled addition of stabilizing oxides or the constraining effect of a dense ceramics matrix necessary to maintain high parameters had a significant influence on powder properties and on compacted powder behaviour in sintering. Particle shape and size, purity and crystalline structure were specially influenced by precipitation parameters. Therefore, this work presented a review of the state of the art in zirconia powder production and in the recent research on precipitation of that powder. (author) 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Quantifying the impacts of ENSO and IOD on rain gauge and remotely sensed precipitation products over Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Forootan, Ehsan; Khandu, .; Awange, J.; Schumacher, M; Anyah, R.; A. I. J. M. van Dijk; Kusche, J.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale ocean-atmospheric phenomena like the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) have significant influence on Australia's precipitation variability. In this study, multi-linear regression (MLR) and complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analyses were applied to isolate (i) the continental precipitation variations likely associated with ENSO and IOD, here referred to as ‘ENSO/IOD mode’, and (ii) the variability not associated with ENSO/IOD (the ‘non-ENS...

  4. Precipitation of Synthesized Wastewater Containing Lead Ions and Characterization of Precipitation Products%含铅离子模拟废水沉淀处理理论分析及产物表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francis Ruzagiliza Innocent; 李新颖; 陈泉源

    2011-01-01

    Calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate and sodium sulfide were used as precipitants to remove lead ions from synthesized wastewater. Based on measurements of concentration, pH, ζ-potential and supernatant turbidity of lead ions, the influence of precipitant dosage on lead ions removals, as well as the reaction mechanisms were examined with solution chemical equilibrium calculations and characterization of precipitation products. Results show that the removal rate of lead ion maximally reaches 76.10% as the dosage of calcium hydroxide being 2.5 times as much as the theoretical calculations. As compared, it maximally reaches 99. 80% and 99.70% , respectively, as the dosage of sodium carbonate and sodium sulfide being 1. 5 times and 2. 5 times, respectively, as much as the theoretical calculations. The solubility product of PbS is very low, but the removal rate of lead ion is lower than theoretical value, because some precipitant with particle size less than 0.45 μm penetrated through the filtration membrane due to a higher saturation. Results from X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis showed that calcium hydroxide reacting with lead-containing wastewater resulted in the precipitant of PbO and Pb5Og, sodium carbonate reacting with lead-containing wastewater resulted in the precipitant of PbCO3, and sodium sulfide reacting with lead-containing wastewater resulted in the precipitants of PbS,PbSO4 and Pb10 ( CO3 )6 ( OH)6O. This can play a role in guiding the treatment and recycling usage of sludge in the future.%采用氢氧化钙、碳酸钠和硫化钠处理含铅废水,在测定铅离子浓度、pH值、ξ电位、上清液浊度等指标的基础上,结合溶液化学平衡分析及沉淀产物结构表征,探讨了沉淀剂用量对铅离子去除率的影响及沉淀剂作用机理.研究结果表明:氢氧化钙用量为理论计算量的2.5倍时,铅离子去除率达到最高值,为76.10%;碳酸钠用量为理论计算量的1.5倍时,铅离子

  5. Modeling solid-state precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nebylov, AlexanderKozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, modeling and simulation of solid-state precipitation has attracted increased attention in academia and industry due to their important contributions in designing properties of advanced structural materials and in increasing productivity and decreasing costs for expensive alloying. In particular, precipitation of second phases is an important means for controlling the mechanical-technological properties of structural materials. However, profound physical modeling of precipitation is not a trivial task. This book introduces you to the classical methods of precipitation model

  6. Diurnal Variation of Precipitation During MC3E Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Matsui, Toshi; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Rienecker, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The diurnal variation of precipitation processes in the United States (US) is well recognized but incompletely understood (Cabone et al. 2002). The diurnal cycle of precipitation has been studied using surface rainfall data, radar reflectivity data, and satellite-derived cloudiness and precipitation (Wallace 1975; Dai et al. 1999; Carbone et al. 2002; Carbone and Tuttle, 2008; Parker and Ahijevych, 2007; Matsui et al. 2010 and others). These observations indicate that the summer-time precipitation most of the North America and typically feature late-afternoon precipitation maxima. These diurnal variation of precipitation can also be generally categorized into three different types: 1) afternoon rainfall maxima due to mesoscale and local circulations over the south and east of the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, 2) nocturnal rainfall maxima from eastward-propagating mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over the Lee side of Rocky Mountain regions and 3) afternoon rainfall maxima in the Appalachian Mountains, and then propagate eastward toward the coast. The main objective of this paper is to use a regional cloud-scale model with very high-resolution (i.e., WRF) to examine the WRF ability to simulate diurnal variation of precipitation. Specifically, the study will (1) identify the physical processes responsible to diurnal variation of precipitation, (2) examine the sensitivity of resolution (2, 6, 18, and 30 km) to model simulated diurnal variation of precipitation and (3) identify the relationships between microphysics and cumulus parameterization schemes.

  7. High precipitation rate in a Middle Triassic carbonate platform: Implications on the relationship between seawater saturation state and carbonate production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Marco; Preto, Nereo; Marangon, Alessandro; Gattolin, Giovanni; Meda, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional geological modeling of the Middle Triassic Latemar carbonate platform is coupled with facies modal analysis to estimate its carbonate precipitation rate (G). The 3D model, strongly constrained by field data, encompasses a specific stratigraphic interval of the platform, bounded by two isochronous surfaces. Modal analysis of thin sections allows estimating the proportion of syndepositional vs postdepositional carbonate in the facies associations of the platform. This, together with the 3D facies distribution in the model that takes into account lateral and vertical facies variability, permits to calculate the volumes of syndepositional carbonate preserved at Latemar between the two considered isochrones. Given the peculiar characteristics of the platform, that does not show evidences of strong dissolution processes or large carbonate mass loss through export in the nearby basins, results can be used to estimate the average precipitation rate of the platform in the considered time interval. This estimate allows discussion in relation to models of ocean water saturation state (Ω) with respect to carbonates in the geological past, and comparison to the calculated precipitation rates of modern tropical coral reef ecosystems at global and reef scale. A high G value is found at Latemar and represents the first empirical confirmation that, in the Triassic, extremes in Ω may have triggered high carbonate precipitation in shallow water settings; moreover, comparison to modern reefs points to a possible common relationship that may link seawater Ω and precipitation rate in carbonate platform ecosystems through geological time.

  8. A description of the global land-surface precipitation data products of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre with sample applications including centennial (trend analysis from 1901–present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Becker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of highly accessible and reliable monthly gridded data sets of the global land-surface precipitation is a need that has already been identified in the mid-80s when there was a complete lack of a globally homogeneous gauge based precipitation analysis. Since 1989 the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC has built up a unique capacity to assemble, quality assure, and analyse rain gauge data gathered from all over the world. The resulting data base has exceeded 200 yr in temporal coverage and has acquired data from more than 85 000 stations world-wide. This paper provides the reference publication for the four globally gridded monthly precipitation products of the GPCC covering a 111-yr analysis period from 1901–present, processed from this data base. As required for a reference publication, the content of the product portfolio, as well as the underlying methodologies to process and interpolate are detailed. Moreover, we provide information on the systematic and statistical errors associated with the data products. Finally, sample applications provide potential users of GPCC data products with suitable advice on capabilities and constraints of the gridded data sets. In doing so, the capabilities to access ENSO and NAO sensitive precipitation regions and to perform trend analysis across the past 110 yr are demonstrated. The four gridded products, i.e. the Climatology V2011 (CLIM, the Full Data Reanalysis (FD V6, the Monitoring Product (MP V4, and the First Guess Product (FG are public available on easy accessible latitude longitude grids encoded in zipped clear text ASCII files for subsequent visualization and download through the GPCC download gate hosted on ftp://ftp.dwd.de/pub/data/gpcc/html/download_gate.html by the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, Offenbach, Germany. Depending on the product four (0.25°, 0.5°, 1.0°, 2.5° for CLIM

  9. Real-time Data Assimilation of Satellite Derived Ice Concentration into the Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System (ACNFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    North America , Technology Solutions Group Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 USA M.W. Phelps Jacobs Engineering Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 USA...precipitation rates (i.e., snowfall ); a model of ice dynamics that predicts the velocity field of the ice pack based on a model of the material strength of the...the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiments North Atlantic data, the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean data, the

  10. Improvements of Satellite-derived High Impact Weather Rainfall over Global Oceans and Implications for NWP models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Graßl, H.

    2003-04-01

    High impact weather precipitation fields of cyclone case studies over global ocean precipitation centers are presented using the technology of the HOAPS-II (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite data) data base. All case studies are compared to the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data set and to ECMWF numerical weather prediction output. A detailed in situ rainfall validation is presented using voluntary observing ships (VOS). Results show that only the HOAPS data base recognizes the development of frequently occurring mesoscale cyclones and gales over the North Atlantic and North Pacific ocean as observed by VOS data. In case of landfall these events cause high socio-economic impact to the society. GPCP and the ECMWF model are frequently missing these mesoscale storms. For example, the gale Lothar known as the `Christmas Storm', could have been nowcasted using the HOAPS data base. HOAPS probably allows to give high impact weather warning in the near future on a near real time basis.

  11. Relationship between extreme Precipitation and Temperature over Japan: An analysis from Multi-GCMs and Multi-RCMs products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S.; Dairaku, K.; Takayabu, I.

    2014-12-01

    According to the IPCC reports, the concentration of CO­2 has been increasing and projected to be increased significantly in future (IPCC, 2012). This can have significant impacts on climate. For instance, Dairaku and Emori (2006) examined over south Asia by doubling CO2 and documented an increase in precipitation intensities during Indian summer monsoon. This would increase natural disasters such as floods, landslide, coastal disaster, erosion etc. Recent studies investigated whether the rate of increase of extreme precipitation is related with the rate expected by Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relationship (approximately 7% per degree temperature rise). In our study, we examine whether this rate can increase or decrease in the future regional climate scenarios over Japan. We have analysed the ensemble experiments by three RCMs(NHRCM, NRAMS, WRF) forced by JRA25 as well as three GCMs (CCSM4, MIROC5, MRI-GCM3) for the current climate (1981-2000) and future scenario (2081-2100, RCP4.5) over Japan. We have stratified the extreme (99th, 95th, 90th, 75th percentile) precipitation of daily sum and daily maximum of hourly precipitation intensities of wet events based on daily mean temperature in bins of 1°C width for annual as well as for each season (DJF, MAM, JJA, SON). The results indicate that precipitation intensity increases when temperature increases roughly up to 22 °C and further increase of temperature decreases the precipitation intensities. The obtained results are consistent and match with the observation (APHRODITE dataset) over Japan. The decrease of precipitation at higher temperature mainly can be found in JJA. It is also noticed that the rate of specific humidity is estimated higher during JJA than other seasons. The rate of increase of extreme precipitation is similar to the rate expected by CC relation except DJF (nearly twice of CC relation) in current climate. This rate becomes to be significantly larger in future scenario for higher temperatures than

  12. SPECIAL SESSION: (H21) on Global Precipitation Mission for Hydrology and Hydrometeorology. Sampling-Error Considerations for GPM-Era Rainfall Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) builds on the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), offering a constellation of microwave-sensor-equipped smaller satellites in addition to a larger, multiply-instrumented "mother" satellite that will include an improved precipitation radar system to which the precipitation estimates of the smaller satellites can be tuned. Coverage by the satellites will be nearly global rather than being confined as TRMM was to lower latitudes. It is hoped that the satellite constellation can provide observations at most places on the earth at least once every three hours, though practical considerations may force some compromises. The GPM system offers the possibility of providing precipitation maps with much better time resolution than the monthly averages around which TRMM was planned, and therefore opens up new possibilities for hydrology and data assimilation into models. In this talk, methods that were developed for estimating sampling error in the rainfall averages that TRMM is providing will be used to estimate sampling error levels for GPM-era configurations. Possible impacts on GPM products of compromises in the sampling frequency will be discussed.

  13. NASA-modified precipitation products to improve USEPA nonpoint source water quality modeling for the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The USEPA has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires states to monitor the total maximum daily load, or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted," for any watershed in the United States (Copeland, 2005). In response to this mandate, the USEPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a decision support tool for assessing pollution and to guide the decision-making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), computes continuous streamflow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events, especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA-modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, streamflow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better streamflow statistics and, potentially, in improved water quality assessment.

  14. Spatial Downscaling of TRMM Precipitation Product Using a Combined Multifractal and Regression Approach: Demonstration for South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghua Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lack of high spatial resolution precipitation data, which are crucial for the modeling and managing of hydrological systems, has triggered many attempts at spatial downscaling. The essence of downscaling lies in extracting extra information from a dataset through some scale-invariant characteristics related to the process of interest. While most studies utilize only one source of information, here we propose an approach that integrates two independent information sources, which are characterized by self-similar and relationship with other geo-referenced factors, respectively. This approach is applied to 16 years (1998–2013 of TRMM 3B43 monthly precipitation data in an orographic and monsoon influenced region in South China. Elevation, latitude, and longitude are used as predictive variables in the regression model, while self-similarity is characterized by multifractals and modeled by a log-normal multiplicative random cascade. The original 0.25° precipitation field was downscaled to the 0.01° scale. The result was validated with rain gauge data. Good consistency was achieved on coefficient of determination, bias, and root mean square error. This study contributes to the current precipitation downscaling methodology and is helpful for hydrology and water resources management, especially in areas with insufficient ground gauges.

  15. Calcium in milk products precipitates intestinal fatty acids and secondary bile acids and thus inhibits colonic cytotoxicity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, MJAP; Termont, DSML; Lapre, JA; Kleibeuker, JH; Vonk, RJ; VanderMeer, R

    1996-01-01

    Dietary calcium may reduce the risk of colon cancer, probably by precipitating cytotoxic surfactants, such as secondary bile acids, in the colonic lumen. We previously showed that milk mineral, an important source of calcium, decreases metabolic risk factors and colonic proliferation in rats, We non

  16. Production and precipitation of rare earth elements in acidic to alkaline coal mine discharges, Appalachian Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.; Hedin, B. C.; Wallrich, I. L. R.; Hedin, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Abandoned coal mine discharges are a serious threat to ground and surface waters due to their high metal content and often high acidity. However, these discharges represent a potential source of rare earth elements (REE), many of which are considered to be critical resources. Trace element data from 18 coal mine drainage (CMD) sites within the Appalachian Basin suggest CMD is enriched in total REE by 1-4 orders of magnitude relative to concentrations expected in unaffected surface or ground waters. When normalized to the North American Shale Composite (NASC), the discharges generally show a pattern of enrichment in the middle REE, including several identified as critical resources (Nd, Eu, Dy, Tb). In contrast, shale, sandstone and coal samples from Appalachian Basin coal-bearing units have concentrations and patterns similar to NASC, indicating that the REE in CMD are fractionated during interaction with rock in the mine pool. The highest total REE contents (up to 2800 mg/L) are found in low-pH discharges (acid mine drainage, or AMD). A precipitous drop in REE concentration in CMD with pH ≥6.6 suggests adsorption or precipitation of REE in the mine pool at circumneutral pH. Precipitated solids from 21 CMD active and passive treatment sites in the Appalachian Basin, including Fe oxy-hydroxides, Ca-Mg lime slurries, and Si- and Al-rich precipitates, are enriched in total REE content relative to the average CMD discharges by about four orders of magnitude. Similar REE trends in the discharges and precipitates, including MREE enrichment, suggest minimal fractionation of REE during precipitation; direct comparisons over multiple seasonal cycles are needed to confirm this. Although the data are limited, Al-rich precipitates generally have high REE concentrations, while those in iron oxy-hydroxides tend to be lower. Based on the area of mined coal in the Appalachian Basin, estimated infiltration rates, and the mean REE flux from discharges analyzed in this study and

  17. How robust are in situ observations for validating satellite-derived albedo over the dark zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Hubbard, A.; Irvine-Fynn, T. D.; Doyle, S. H.; Cook, J. M.; Stibal, M.; Box, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    Calibration and validation of satellite-derived ice sheet albedo data require high-quality, in situ measurements commonly acquired by up and down facing pyranometers mounted on automated weather stations (AWS). However, direct comparison between ground and satellite-derived albedo can only be justified when the measured surface is homogeneous at the length-scale of both satellite pixel and in situ footprint. Here we use digital imagery acquired by an unmanned aerial vehicle to evaluate point-to-pixel albedo comparisons across the western, ablating margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Our results reveal that in situ measurements overestimate albedo by up to 0.10 at the end of the melt season because the ground footprints of AWS-mounted pyranometers are insufficient to capture the spatial heterogeneity of the ice surface as it progressively ablates and darkens. Statistical analysis of 21 AWS across the entire Greenland Ice Sheet reveals that almost half suffer from this bias, including some AWS located within the wet snow zone.

  18. NASA-Modified Precipitation Products to Improve EPA Nonpoint Source Water Quality Modeling for the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. Ninety percent of the impairments are typically caused by nonpoint sources. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires States to monitor the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted", for any watershed in the U.S.. In response to this mandate, the EPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a Decision Support Tool (DST) for assessing pollution and to guide the decision making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program -- Fortran (HSPF), computes daily stream flow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, stream flow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better stream flow statistics and, ultimately, in improved water quality assessment.

  19. A three-prong strategy to develop functional food using protein isolates recovered from chicken processing by-products with isoelectric solubilization/precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahergorabi, Reza; Sivanandan, Litha; Beamer, Sarah K; Matak, Kristen E; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Skin-on bone-in chicken drumsticks were processed with isoelectric solubilization/precipitation to recover muscle proteins. The drumsticks were used as a model for dark chicken meat processing by-products. The main objective of this study was conversion of dark chicken meat processing by-products to restructured functional food product. An attempt was made to develop functional food product that would resemble respective product made from boneless skinless chicken breast meat. A three-prong strategy to address diet-driven cardiovascular disease (CVD)with a functional food was used in this study. The strategy included addition of three ingredients with well-documented cardiovascular benefits: (i) ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oil (flaxseed-algae, 9:1); (ii) soluble fiber; and (iii) salt substitute. Titanium dioxide, potato starch, polyphosphate, and transglutaminase were also added. The batters were formulated and cooked resulting in heat-set gels. Color (L*a*b*), texture (torsion test, Kramer shear test, and texture profile analysis), thermal denaturation (differential scanning calorimetry), and gelation (dynamic rheology) of chicken drumstick gels and chicken breast gels were determined and compared. Chicken drumstick gels generally had comparable color and texture properties to the gels made from chicken breast meat. The endothermic transition (thermal denaturation) of myosin was more pronounced and gelation properties were better for the drumstick gels. This study demonstrated a feasibility to develop functional food made of muscle proteins recovered with isoelectric solubilization/precipitation from low-value dark chicken meat processing by-products. The functional food developed in this study was enriched with CVD-beneficial nutrients and had comparable instrumental quality attributes to respective products made of chicken breast meat. Although the results of this study point towards the potential for a novel, marketable functional food product, sensory

  20. Dynamic Response of Satellite-Derived Vegetation Growth to Climate Change in the Three North Shelter Forest Region in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1970s, the Chinese government has initiated ecological restoration programs in the Three North Shelter Forest System Project (TNSFSP area. Whether accelerated climate change will help or hinder these efforts is still poorly understood. Using the updated and extended AVHRR NDVI3g dataset from 1982 to 2011 and corresponding climatic data, we investigated vegetation variations in response to climate change. The results showed that the overall state of vegetation in the study region has improved over the past three decades. Vegetation cover significantly decreased in 23.1% and significantly increased in 21.8% of the study area. An increase in all three main vegetation types (forest, grassland, and cropland was observed, but the trend was only statistically significant in cropland. In addition, bare and sparsely vegetated areas, mainly located in the western part of the study area, have significantly expanded since the early 2000s. A moisture condition analysis indicated that the study area experienced significant climate variations, with warm-wet conditions in the western region and warm-dry conditions in the eastern region. Correlation analysis showed that variations in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI were positively correlated with precipitation and negatively correlated with temperature. Ultimately, climate change influenced vegetation growth by controlling the availability of soil moisture. Further investigation suggested that the positive impacts of precipitation on NDVI have weakened in the study region, whereas the negative impacts from temperature have been enhanced in the eastern study area. However, over recent years, the negative temperature impacts have been converted to positive impacts in the western region. Considering the variations in the relationship between NDVI and climatic variables, the warm–dry climate in the eastern region is likely harmful to vegetation growth, whereas the warm

  1. Precipitation Mediates the Response of Carbon Cycle to Rising Temperature in the Mid-to-High Latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lin

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, rising air temperature has been accompanied by changes in precipitation. Despite relatively robust literature on the temperature sensitivity of carbon cycle at continental to global scales, less is known about the way this sensitivity is affected by precipitation. In this study we investigate how precipitation mediates the response of the carbon cycle to warming over the mid-to-high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (north of 30 °N. Based on atmospheric CO2 observations at Point Barrow (BRW in Alaska, satellite-derived NDVI (a proxy of vegetation productivity, and temperature and precipitation data, we analyzed the responses of carbon cycle to temperature change in wet and dry years (with precipitation above or below the multiyear average. The results suggest that, over the past three decades, the net seasonal atmospheric CO2 changes at BRW were significantly correlated with temperature in spring and autumn, yet only weakly correlated with temperature and precipitation during the growing season. We further found that responses of the net CO2 changes to warming in spring and autumn vary with precipitation levels, with the absolute temperature sensitivity in wet years roughly twice that in dry years. The analyses of NDVI and climate data also identify higher sensitivity of vegetation growth to warming in wet years for the growing season, spring and summer. The different temperature sensitivities in wet versus dry years probably result from differences in soil moisture and/or nutrient availability, which may enhance (inhibit the responsiveness of carbon assimilation and/or decomposition to warming under high (low precipitation levels. The precipitation-mediated response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to warming reported here emphasizes the important role of precipitation in assessing the temporal variations of carbon budgets in the past as well as in the future. More efforts are required to reduce uncertainty in future

  2. Precipitation Mediates the Response of Carbon Cycle to Rising Temperature in the Mid-to-High Latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Li, Junsheng; Luo, Jianwu; Wu, Xiaopu; Tian, Yu; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, rising air temperature has been accompanied by changes in precipitation. Despite relatively robust literature on the temperature sensitivity of carbon cycle at continental to global scales, less is known about the way this sensitivity is affected by precipitation. In this study we investigate how precipitation mediates the response of the carbon cycle to warming over the mid-to-high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (north of 30 °N). Based on atmospheric CO2 observations at Point Barrow (BRW) in Alaska, satellite-derived NDVI (a proxy of vegetation productivity), and temperature and precipitation data, we analyzed the responses of carbon cycle to temperature change in wet and dry years (with precipitation above or below the multiyear average). The results suggest that, over the past three decades, the net seasonal atmospheric CO2 changes at BRW were significantly correlated with temperature in spring and autumn, yet only weakly correlated with temperature and precipitation during the growing season. We further found that responses of the net CO2 changes to warming in spring and autumn vary with precipitation levels, with the absolute temperature sensitivity in wet years roughly twice that in dry years. The analyses of NDVI and climate data also identify higher sensitivity of vegetation growth to warming in wet years for the growing season, spring and summer. The different temperature sensitivities in wet versus dry years probably result from differences in soil moisture and/or nutrient availability, which may enhance (inhibit) the responsiveness of carbon assimilation and/or decomposition to warming under high (low) precipitation levels. The precipitation-mediated response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to warming reported here emphasizes the important role of precipitation in assessing the temporal variations of carbon budgets in the past as well as in the future. More efforts are required to reduce uncertainty in future precipitation

  3. Statistical and Hydrological Evaluation of TRMM-Based Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis over the Wangchu Basin of Bhutan: Are the Latest Satellite Precipitation Products 3B42V7 Ready for Use in Ungauged Basins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xianwu; Hong, Yang; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Gourley, Jonathan; Huffman, George J.; Khan, Sadiq Ibrahim; Dorji, Chhimi; Chen, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the successive Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) products and further to explore the improvements and error propagation of the latest 3B42V7 algorithm relative to its predecessor 3B42V6 using the Coupled Routing and Excess Storage (CREST) hydrologic model in the mountainous Wangchu Basin of Bhutan. First, the comparison to a decade-long (2001-2010) daily rain gauge dataset reveals that: 1) 3B42V7 generally improves upon 3B42V6s underestimation both for the whole basin (bias from -41.15 to -8.38) and for a 0.250.25 grid cell with high-density gauges (bias from -40.25 to 0.04), though with modest enhancement of correlation coefficients (CC) (from 0.36 to 0.40 for basin-wide and from 0.37 to 0.41 for grid); and 2) 3B42V7 also improves its occurrence frequency across the rain intensity spectrum. Using the CREST model that has been calibrated with rain gauge inputs, the 3B42V6-based simulation shows limited hydrologic prediction NSCE skill (0.23 in daily scale and 0.25 in monthly scale) while 3B42V7 performs fairly well (0.66 in daily scale and 0.77 in monthly scale), a comparable skill score with the gauge rainfall simulations. After recalibrating the model with the respective TMPA data, significant improvements are observed for 3B42V6 across all categories, but not as much enhancement for the already well-performing 3B42V7 except for a reduction in bias (from -26.98 to -4.81). In summary, the latest 3B42V7 algorithm reveals a significant upgrade from 3B42V6 both in precipitation accuracy (i.e., correcting the underestimation) thus improving its potential hydrological utility. Forcing the model with 3B42V7 rainfall yields comparable skill scores with in-situ gauges even without recalibration of the hydrological model by the satellite precipitation, a compensating approach often used but not favored by the hydrology community, particularly in ungauged basins.

  4. MODIS vegetation products as proxies of photosynthetic potential: a look across meteorological and biologic driven ecosystem productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Restrepo-Coupe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A direct relationship between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP measured by the eddy covariance (EC method and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS vegetation indices (VIs has been observed in many temperate and tropical ecosystems. However, in Australian evergreen forests, and particularly sclerophyll woodlands, MODIS VIs do not capture seasonality of GEP. In this study, we re-evaluate the connection between satellite and flux tower data at four contrasting Australian ecosystems, through comparisons of ecosystem photosynthetic activity (GEP and potential (e.g. ecosystem light use efficiency and quantum yield with MODIS vegetation satellite products, including VIs, gross primary productivity (GPPMOD, leaf area index (LAIMOD, and fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (fPARMOD. We found that satellite derived greenness products constitute a measurement of ecosystem structure (e.g. leaf area index – quantity of leaves and function (e.g. leaf level photosynthetic assimilation capacity – quality of leaves, rather than productivity. Our results show that in primarily meteorological-driven (e.g. photosynthetic active radiation, air temperature and/or precipitation and relatively aseasonal vegetation photosynthetic potential ecosystems (e.g. evergreen wet sclerophyll forests, there were no statistically significant relationships between GEP and satellite derived measures of greenness. In contrast, for phenology-driven ecosystems (e.g. tropical savannas, changes in the vegetation status drove GEP, and tower-based measurements of photosynthetic activity were best represented by VIs. We observed the highest correlations between MODIS products and GEP in locations where key meteorological variables and vegetation phenology were synchronous (e.g. semi-arid Acacia woodlands and low correlation at locations where they were asynchronous (e.g. Mediterranean ecosystems. Eddy covariance data offer much more than validation and

  5. Towards stochastically downscaled precipitation in the Tropics based on a robust 1DD combined satellite product and a high resolution IR-based rain mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloteau, Clement; Roca, Rémy; Gosset, Marielle

    2015-04-01

    In the Tropics where the ground-based rain gauges network is very sparse, satellite rainfall estimates are becoming a compulsory source of information for various applications: hydrological modeling, water resources management or vegetation-monitoring. The tropical Tropical Amount of Precipitation with Estimate of Error (TAPEER) algorithm, developed within the framework of Megha-Tropiques satellite mission is a robust estimate of surface rainfall accumulations at the daily, one degree resolution. TAPEER validation in West Africa has proven its accuracy. Nevertheless applications that involve non-linear processes (such as surface runoff) require finer space / time resolution than one degree one day, or at least the statistical characterization of the sub-grid rainfall variability. TAPEER is based on a Universally Adjusted Global Precipitation Index (UAGPI) technique. The one degree, one day estimation relies on the combination of observations from microwave radiometers embarked on the 7 platforms forming the GPM constellation of low earth orbit satellites together with geostationary infra-red (GEO-IR) imagery. TAPEER provides as an intermediate product a high-resolution rain-mask based on the GEO-IR information (2.8 km, 15 min in Africa). The main question of this work is, how to use this high-resolution mask information as a constraint for downscaling ? This work first presents the multi-scale evaluation of TAPEER's rain detection mask against ground X-band polarimetric radar data and TRMM precipitation radar data in West Africa, through wavelet transform. Other algorithms (climate prediction center morphing technique CMORPH, global satellite mapping of precipitation GSMaP, multi-sensor precipitation estimate MPE) detection capabilities are also evaluated. Spatio-temporal wavelet filtering of the detection mask is then used to compute precipitation probability at the GEO-IR resolution. The wavelet tool is finally used to stochastically generate rain / no rain field

  6. Validating NEXRAD MPE and Stage III precipitation products for uniform rainfall on the Upper Guadalupe River Basin of the Texas Hill Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Xie, Hongjie; Sharif, Hatim; Zeitler, Jon

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis study examines the performance of the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and Stage III precipitation products, using a high-density rain gauge network located on the Upper Guadalupe River Basin of the Texas Hill Country. As point-area representativeness error of gauge rainfall is a major concern in assessment of radar rainfall estimation, this study develops a new method to automatically select uniform rainfall events based on coefficient of variation criterion of 3 by 3 radar cells. Only gauge observations of those uniform rainfall events are used as ground truth to evaluate radar rainfall estimation. This study proposes a new parameter probability of rain detection (POD) instead of the conditional probability of rain detection (CPOD) commonly used in previous studies to assess the capability that a radar or gauge detects rainfall. Results suggest that: (1) gauge observations of uniform rainfall better represent ground truth of a 4 × 4 km 2 radar cell than non-uniform rainfall; (2) the MPE has higher capability of rain detection than either gauge-only or Stage III; (3) the MPE has much higher linear correlation and lower mean relative difference with gauge measurements than the Stage III does; (4) the Stage III tends to overestimate precipitation (20%), but the MPE tends to underestimate (7%).

  7. Definition and impact of a quality index for radar-based reference measurements in the H-SAF precipitation product validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinollo, A.; Vulpiani, G.; Puca, S.; Pagliara, P.; Kaňák, J.; Lábó, E.; Okon, L'.; Roulin, E.; Baguis, P.; Cattani, E.; Laviola, S.; Levizzani, V.

    2013-10-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management (H-SAF) provides rainfall estimations based on infrared and microwave satellite sensors on board polar and geostationary satellites. The validation of these satellite estimations is performed by the H-SAF Precipitation Product Validation Group (PPVG). A common validation methodology has been defined inside the PPVG in order to make validation results from several institutes comparable and understandable. The validation of the PR-OBS-3 (blended infrared-microwave (IR-MW) instantaneous rainfall estimation) product using radar-based rainfall estimations as ground reference is described herein. A network of C-band and Ka-band radars throughout Europe ensures a wide area coverage with different orographic configurations and climatological regimes, but the definition of a quality control protocol for obtaining consistent ground precipitation fields across several countries is required. Among the hydro-meteorological community, the evaluation of the data quality is a quite consolidated practice, even though a unique definition of a common evaluation methodology between different countries and institutions has not been set up yet. Inside H-SAF, the first definition of the quality index of the radar rainfall observations has been introduced at the Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC). In the evaluation of the DPC quality index, several parameters are considered, some measured by the radar itself (static clutter map, range distance, radial velocity, texture of differential reflectivity, texture of co-polar correlation coefficient and texture of differential phase shift) and some obtained by external sources (digital elevation model, freezing layer height). In some cases, corrections were applied for clutter and beam blocking. The DPC quality index was calculated and applied to some relevant meteorological events reported by a radar test site in Italy. The precipitation

  8. Predicting bird phenology from space: satellite-derived vegetation green-up signal uncovers spatial variation in phenological synchrony between birds and their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Ella F; Long, Peter R; Zelazowski, Przemyslaw; Szulkin, Marta; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-11-01

    Population-level studies of how tit species (Parus spp.) track the changing phenology of their caterpillar food source have provided a model system allowing inference into how populations can adjust to changing climates, but are often limited because they implicitly assume all individuals experience similar environments. Ecologists are increasingly using satellite-derived data to quantify aspects of animals' environments, but so far studies examining phenology have generally done so at large spatial scales. Considering the scale at which individuals experience their environment is likely to be key if we are to understand the ecological and evolutionary processes acting on reproductive phenology within populations. Here, we use time series of satellite images, with a resolution of 240 m, to quantify spatial variation in vegetation green-up for a 385-ha mixed-deciduous woodland. Using data spanning 13 years, we demonstrate that annual population-level measures of the timing of peak abundance of winter moth larvae (Operophtera brumata) and the timing of egg laying in great tits (Parus major) and blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) is related to satellite-derived spring vegetation phenology. We go on to show that timing of local vegetation green-up significantly explained individual differences in tit reproductive phenology within the population, and that the degree of synchrony between bird and vegetation phenology showed marked spatial variation across the woodland. Areas of high oak tree (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) density showed the strongest match between remote-sensed vegetation phenology and reproductive phenology in both species. Marked within-population variation in the extent to which phenology of different trophic levels match suggests that more attention should be given to small-scale processes when exploring the causes and consequences of phenological matching. We discuss how use of remotely sensed data to study within-population variation

  9. MODIS vegetation products as proxies of photosynthetic potential along a gradient of meteorologically and biologically driven ecosystem productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Huete, Alfredo; Davies, Kevin; Cleverly, James; Beringer, Jason; Eamus, Derek; van Gorsel, Eva; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Meyer, Wayne S.

    2016-10-01

    A direct relationship between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) estimated by the eddy covariance (EC) method and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation indices (VIs) has been observed in many temperate and tropical ecosystems. However, in Australian evergreen forests, and particularly sclerophyll and temperate woodlands, MODIS VIs do not capture seasonality of GEP. In this study, we re-evaluate the connection between satellite and flux tower data at four contrasting Australian ecosystems, through comparisons of GEP and four measures of photosynthetic potential, derived via parameterization of the light response curve: ecosystem light use efficiency (LUE), photosynthetic capacity (Pc), GEP at saturation (GEPsat), and quantum yield (α), with MODIS vegetation satellite products, including VIs, gross primary productivity (GPPMOD), leaf area index (LAIMOD), and fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (fPARMOD). We found that satellite-derived biophysical products constitute a measurement of ecosystem structure (e.g. leaf area index - quantity of leaves) and function (e.g. leaf level photosynthetic assimilation capacity - quality of leaves), rather than GEP. Our results show that in primarily meteorological-driven (e.g. photosynthetic active radiation, air temperature, and/or precipitation) and relatively aseasonal ecosystems (e.g. evergreen wet sclerophyll forests), there were no statistically significant relationships between GEP and satellite-derived measures of greenness. In contrast, for phenology-driven ecosystems (e.g. tropical savannas), changes in the vegetation status drove GEP, and tower-based measurements of photosynthetic activity were best represented by VIs. We observed the highest correlations between MODIS products and GEP in locations where key meteorological variables and vegetation phenology were synchronous (e.g. semi-arid Acacia woodlands) and low correlation at locations where they were asynchronous (e

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Products and Services at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrenga, D.; Liu, Z.; Vollmer, B.; Teng, W. L.; Kempler, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    On February 27, 2014, the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched to provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow (http://pmm.nasa.gov/GPM). The GPM mission consists of an international network of satellites in which a GPM "Core Observatory" satellite carries both active and passive microwave instruments to measure precipitation and serve as a reference standard, to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of other research and operational satellites. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data within the NASA Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS). The GES DISC is home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Over the past 16 years, the GES DISC has served the scientific as well as other communities with TRMM data and user-friendly services. During the GPM era, the GES DISC will continue to provide user-friendly data services and customer support to users around the world. GPM products currently and to-be available include the following: Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products (early, late, and final) A dedicated Web portal (including user guides, etc.) has been developed for GPM data (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gpm). Data services that are currently and to-be available include Google-like Mirador (http://mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov/) for data search and access; data access through various Web services (e.g., OPeNDAP, GDS, WMS, WCS); conversion into various formats (e.g., netCDF, HDF, KML (for Google Earth), ASCII); exploration, visualization, and statistical online analysis through Giovanni (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov); generation of value-added products; parameter and spatial subsetting; time aggregation; regridding

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Products and Services at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Deshong, B.; Greene, M.; Teng, W.; Kempler, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    On February 27, 2014, the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched to provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow (http:pmm.nasa.govGPM). The GPM mission consists of an international network of satellites in which a GPM Core Observatory satellite carries both active and passive microwave instruments to measure precipitation and serve as a reference standard, to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of other research and operational satellites. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data within the NASA Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS). The GES DISC is home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Over the past 16 years, the GES DISC has served the scientific as well as other communities with TRMM data and user-friendly services. During the GPM era, the GES DISC will continue to provide user-friendly data services and customer support to users around the world. GPM products currently and to-be available include the following: 1. Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products. 2. Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products. 3. Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products. (early, late, and final)A dedicated Web portal (including user guides, etc.) has been developed for GPM data (http:disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.govgpm). Data services that are currently and to-be available include Google-like Mirador (http:mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov) for data search and access; data access through various Web services (e.g., OPeNDAP, GDS, WMS, WCS); conversion into various formats (e.g., netCDF, HDF, KML (for Google Earth), ASCII); exploration, visualization, and statistical online analysis through Giovanni (http:giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov); generation of value-added products; parameter and spatial subsetting; time aggregation; regridding; data

  12. Comparison of NEXRAD Stage III and MPE precipitation products with constraints from high quality and density of raingauge networks in the Upper Guadalupe River Basin, Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Wang, X.

    2006-05-01

    NEXRAD's Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) product replaced the Stage III product started in October 2003 at the West Gulf River Forecast Center (WGRFC) where includes most of the Texas and New Mexico. The MPE is an integrated product of rain gauge, NEXRAD, and satellite (GOES) precipitation estimates. The main objective of MPE is to reduce both areal-mean bias error and local bias error. The overall improved quality of MPE over Stage 3 is evident at the WGRFC. However, so far, there is no quantitative evaluation in a relative long period (one year or more) of a large area. In this study, high quality and density of 50 raingauge networks (6 minutes temporal resolution) in the Upper Guadalupe River Basin, Central Texas are used to evaluate both the Stage III (years 2001 and 2002) and MPE (year 2004) products. In this study, we propose two types of comparison (1) directly compare collocated radar cell and gauge of all rainfall events and (2) only compare collocated radar cell and gauge of homogeneous/uniform rainfall events. To find uniform rainfall events, 6-mintutes raingauge rainfall were used to calculate the correlation coefficient (CC) and coefficient of variation (CV) of a hour among one central gauge and its surrounding gauges (>= 4). For a particular rainfall hour, when CV is 0.5, or CV is <0.1, the rainfall event of this hour is thus selected as a uniform or homogeneous rainfall event. Our preliminary results of CC from all rainfall events and homogeneous rainfall events for year 2004 (MPE) are 0.79 and 0.96, respectively. This indicates an overall good quality of MPE product in comparison with raingauge rainfall, especially for the homogeneous rainfall events. Work is in progress.

  13. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Combined Precipitation Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Arkin, Philip; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Gruber, Arnold; Janowiak, John; McNab, Alan; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo

    1997-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) has released the GPCP Version 1 Combined Precipitation Data Set, a global, monthly precipitation dataset covering the period July 1987 through December 1995. The primary product in the dataset is a merged analysis incorporating precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit -satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The dataset also contains the individual input fields, a combination of the microwave and infrared satellite estimates, and error estimates for each field. The data are provided on 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude global grids. Preliminary analyses show general agreement with prior studies of global precipitation and extends prior studies of El Nino-Southern Oscillation precipitation patterns. At the regional scale there are systematic differences with standard climatologies.

  14. Influence of management and precipitation on carbon fluxes in greatplains grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigge, Matthew B.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Zhang, Li; Boyte, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Suitable management and sufficient precipitation on grasslands can provide carbon sinks. The net carbon accumulation of a site from the atmosphere, modeled as the Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP), is a useful means to gauge carbon balance. Previous research has developed methods to integrate flux tower data with satellite biophysical datasets to estimate NEP across large regions. A related method uses the Ecosystem Performance Anomaly (EPA) as a satellite-derived indicator of disturbance intensity (e.g., livestock stocking rate, fire, and insect damage). To better understand the interactions among management, climate, and carbon dynamics, we evaluated the relationship between EPA and NEP data at the 250 m scale for grasslands in the Central Great Plains, USA (ranging from semi-arid to mesic). We also used weekly estimates of NEP to evaluate the phenology of carbon dynamics, classified by EPA (i.e., by level of disturbance impact). Results show that the cumulative carbon balance over these grasslands from 2000 to 2008 was a weak net sink of 13.7 g C m−2 yr−1. Overall, NEP increased with precipitation (R2 = 0.39, P management practices in the tallgrass and mixed-grass prairie may potentially induce a period of average net carbon sink until a new equilibrium soil organic carbon is achieved. In the shortgrass prairie, management should be considered sustainable if carbon stocks are simply maintained. The consideration of site carbon balance adds to the already difficult task of managing grasslands appropriately to site conditions. Results clarify the seasonal and interannual dynamics of NEP, specifically the influence of disturbance and moisture availability.

  15. Generation of dose-response relationships to assess the effects of acidity in precipitation on growth and productivity of vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed with several plant species in natural environments as well in a greenhouse and/or tissue culture facilities to establish dose-response functions of plant responses to simulated acidic rain in order to determine environmental risk assessments to ambient levels of acidic rain. Response functions of foliar injury, biomass of leaves and seed of soybean and pinto beans, root yields of radishes and garden beets, and reproduction of bracken fern are considered. The dose-response function of soybean seed yields with the hydrogen ion concentration of simulated acidic rainfalls was expressed by the equation y = 21.06-1.01 log x where y = seed yield in grams per plant and x = the hydrogen concentration if ..mu..eq l/sup -1/. The correlation coefficient of this relationship was -0.90. A similar dose-response function was generated for percent fertilization of ferns in a forest understory. When percent fertilization is plotted on logarithmic scale with hydrogen ion concentration of the simulated rain solution, the Y intercept is 51.18, slope -0.041 with a correlation coefficient of -0.98. Other dose-response functions were generated that assist in a general knowledge as to which plant species and which physiological processes are most impacted by acidic precipitation. Some responses did not produce convenient dose-response relationships. In such cases the responses may be altered by other environmental factors or there may be no differences among treatment means.

  16. An Ecoinformatic Analysis of the Effect of Seasonal and Annual Variation in Temperature, Precipitation, and Solar Irradiance on Pollen Productivity in Two Neotropical Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselhorst, D. S.; Tcheng, D. K.; Moreno, J. E.; Punyasena, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Observational data provide a powerful source of information for understanding the phenological response of tropical forests to a changing climate. Annual changes in mean temperature, precipitation, and solar irradiance, in part driven by ENSO cycles, provide a natural experiment. However, these time series are often relatively short (several years to several decades), the average climatic variability experienced in that timeframe is relatively small, and the corresponding response is therefore often very weak. As a result, standard statistical approaches may fail in detecting a biological response. We present an alternative ecoinformatic analysis that demonstrates the power of weak models in the discovery and interpretation of statistically significant signals in short, noisy, ecological time series. We developed a simple response prediction model that uses cross-validation to explore a landscape of models that correlate the phenological behavior of individual taxa (pollen production, flowering, fruiting) to seasonal and annual mean temperature, precipitation, and solar irradiance using multivariate linear regression. We use a sign slope sensitivity analysis of each linear model that tallies positive and negative slope counts of a taxon's phenological behavior to our environmental and null variables. We applied this analysis to pollen trap data collected from 1996 to 2006 from two lowland Panamanian forests, Barro Colorado Island and Parque National San Lorenzo. We also tested the performance of our predictive model using published data of annual flowering and fruiting from BCI to corroborate that our approach could reproduce previously published results on tropical phenology. Our results indicate that although the overall variation in temperature was 3.28 °C over the ten year period, pollen productivity at both sites was most consistently affected by changes in temperature. This result was replicated by the published BCI flower and fruit data, which also

  17. Recursive estimators of mean-areal and local bias in precipitation products that account for conditional bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Seo, Dong-Jun

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents novel formulations of Mean field bias (MFB) and local bias (LB) correction schemes that incorporate conditional bias (CB) penalty. These schemes are based on the operational MFB and LB algorithms in the National Weather Service (NWS) Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE). By incorporating CB penalty in the cost function of exponential smoothers, we are able to derive augmented versions of recursive estimators of MFB and LB. Two extended versions of MFB algorithms are presented, one incorporating spatial variation of gauge locations only (MFB-L), and the second integrating both gauge locations and CB penalty (MFB-X). These two MFB schemes and the extended LB scheme (LB-X) are assessed relative to the original MFB and LB algorithms (referred to as MFB-O and LB-O, respectively) through a retrospective experiment over a radar domain in north-central Texas, and through a synthetic experiment over the Mid-Atlantic region. The outcome of the former experiment indicates that introducing the CB penalty to the MFB formulation leads to small, but consistent improvements in bias and CB, while its impacts on hourly correlation and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) are mixed. Incorporating CB penalty in LB formulation tends to improve the RMSE at high rainfall thresholds, but its impacts on bias are also mixed. The synthetic experiment suggests that beneficial impacts are more conspicuous at low gauge density (9 per 58,000 km2), and tend to diminish at higher gauge density. The improvement at high rainfall intensity is partly an outcome of the conservativeness of the extended LB scheme. This conservativeness arises in part from the more frequent presence of negative eigenvalues in the extended covariance matrix which leads to no, or smaller incremental changes to the smoothed rainfall amounts.

  18. Estimating ground-level PM_{2.5} concentrations over three megalopolises in China using satellite-derived aerosol optical depth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yixuan; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Yang; Geng, Guannan; He, Kebin

    2016-04-01

    Numerous previous studies have revealed that statistical models which combine satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM2.5 measurements acquired at scattered monitoring sites provide an effective method for deriving continuous spatial distributions of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations. Using the national monitoring networks that have recently been established by central and local governments in China, we developed linear mixed-effects (LMEs) models that integrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD measurements, meteorological parameters, and satellite-derived tropospheric NO2 column density measurements as predictors to estimate PM2.5 concentrations over three major industrialized regions in China, namely, the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region (BTH), the Yangtze River Delta region (YRD), and the Pearl River Delta region (PRD). The models developed for these three regions exploited different predictors to account for their varying topographies and meteorological conditions. Considering the importance of unbiased PM2.5 predictions for epidemiological studies, the correction factors calculated from the surface PM2.5 measurements were applied to correct biases in the predicted annual average PM2.5 concentrations introduced by non-stochastic missing AOD measurements. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) was used to quantify the accuracy of our models. Cross-validation of the daily predictions yielded R2 values of 0.77, 0.8 and 0.8 and normalized mean error (NME) values of 22.4%, 17.8% and 15.2% for BTH, YRD and PRD, respectively. For the annual average PM2.5 concentrations, the LOOCV R2 values were 0.85, 0.76 and 0.71 for the three regions, respectively, whereas the LOOCV NME values were 8.0%, 6.9% and 8.4%, respectively. We found that the incorporation of satellite-based NO2 column density into the LMEs model contribute to considerable improvements in annual prediction accuracy for both BTH and YRD. The satisfactory performance of our

  19. Comparisons between buoy-observed, satellite-derived, and modeled surface shortwave flux over the subtropical North Atlantic during the Subduction Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waliser, Duane E. [Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, State University of New York, Stony Brook (United States); Weller, Robert A. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts (United States); Cess, Robert D. [Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, State University of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1999-12-27

    satellite-derived climatologies. These comparisons showed much better and more consistent agreement, with relative bias errors ranging from about -1 to 6%. Comparisons to contemporaneous, daily-average satellite derived values show relatively good agreement as well, with relative biases of the order of 2% ({approx}3-9 W m-2) and root-mean-square differences of {approx}10% (25-30 W m-2). Aspects of the role aerosols play in the above results are discussed along with the implications of the above results on the integrity of open-ocean buoy measurements of surface shortwave flux and the possibility of using the techniques developed in this study to remotely monitor the operating condition of buoy-based shortwave radiometers. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  20. Uncertainties in Arctic Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, I.; Alexeev, V. A.; Cherry, J. E.; Cohen, J. L.; Groisman, P. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic precipitation is riddled with measurement biases; to address the problem is imperative. Our study focuses on comparison of various datasets and analyzing their biases for the region of Siberia and caution that is needed when using them. Five sources of data were used ranging from NOAA's product (RAW, Bogdanova's correction), Yang's correction technique and two reanalysis products (ERA-Interim and NCEP). The reanalysis dataset performed better for some months in comparison to Yang's product, which tends to overestimate precipitation, and the raw dataset, which tends to underestimate. The sources of bias vary from topography, to wind, to missing data .The final three products chosen show higher biases during the winter and spring season. Emphasis on equations which incorporate blizzards, blowing snow and higher wind speed is necessary for regions which are influenced by any or all of these factors; Bogdanova's correction technique is the most robust of all the datasets analyzed and gives the most reasonable results. One of our future goals is to analyze the impact of precipitation uncertainties on water budget analysis for the Siberian Rivers.

  1. Climatological Processing and Product Development for the TRMM Ground Validation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, D. A.; Kulie, M. S.; Robinson, M.; Silberstein, D. S.; Wolff, D. B.; Ferrier, B. S.; Amitai, E.; Fisher, B.; Wang, J.; Augustine, D.; Thiele, O.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was successfully launched in November 1997.The main purpose of TRMM is to sample tropical rainfall using the first active spaceborne precipitation radar. To validate TRMM satellite observations, a comprehensive Ground Validation (GV) Program has been implemented. The primary goal of TRMM GV is to provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements over monthly climatologies for the following primary sites: Melbourne, FL; Houston, TX; Darwin, Australia- and Kwajalein Atoll, RMI As part of the TRMM GV effort, research analysts at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) generate standardized rainfall products using quality-controlled ground-based radar data from the four primary GV sites. This presentation will provide an overview of TRMM GV climatological processing and product generation. A description of the data flow between the primary GV sites, NASA GSFC, and the TRMM Science and Data Information System (TSDIS) will be presented. The radar quality control algorithm, which features eight adjustable height and reflectivity parameters, and its effect on monthly rainfall maps, will be described. The methodology used to create monthly, gauge-adjusted rainfall products for each primary site will also be summarized. The standardized monthly rainfall products are developed in discrete, modular steps with distinct intermediate products. A summary of recently reprocessed official GV rainfall products available for TRMM science users will be presented. Updated basic standardized product results involving monthly accumulation, Z-R relationship, and gauge statistics for each primary GV site will also be displayed.

  2. Satellite-derived changes in the permafrost landscape of central Yakutia, 2000-2011: wetting, drying, and fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boike, Julia; Grau, Thomas; Heim, Birgit; Günther, Frank; Langer, Moritz; Muster, Sina; Gouttevin, Isabelle; Lange, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this research has been on detecting changes in lake areas, vegetation, land surface temperatures, and the area covered by snow, using data from remote sensing. The study area covers the main (central) part of the Lena River catchment in the Yakutia region of Siberia (Russia), extending from east of Yakutsk to the central Siberian Plateau, and from the southern Lena River to north of the Vilyui River. Approximately 90% of the area is underlain by continuous permafrost. Remote sensing products were used to analyze changes in water bodies, land surface temperature (LST), and leaf area index (LAI), as well as the occurrence and extent of forest fires, and the area and duration of snow cover. The remote sensing analyses (for LST, snow cover, LAI, and fire) were based on MODIS-derived NASA products for 2000 to 2011. Changes in water bodies were calculated from two mosaics of (USGS) Landsat high resolution (30 m) satellite images from 2002 and 2009. Within the study area's 315,000 km² the total area covered by lakes increased by 17.5% between 2002 and 2009, but this increase varied in different parts of the study area, ranging between 11% and 42%. The land surface temperatures showed a consistent warming trend, with an average increase of about 0.12°C/year. The average rate of warming during the April-May transition period was 0.15°C/year and 0.19°C/year in the September-October period, but ranged up to 0.45°C/year in some areas during April-May. Regional differences in the rates of land surface temperature change, and possible reasons for the temperature changes, are discussed with respect to changes in the land cover. Our analysis of a broad spectrum of variables over the study area suggests that the spring warming trend is very likely to be due to changes in the area covered by snow. The warming trend observed in fall does not, however, appear to be directly related to any changes in the area of snow cover, or to the atmospheric conditions, or to the

  3. On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates Parameterization of Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  4. Spatio-temporal assessment of WRF, TRMM and in situ precipitation data in a tropical mountain environment (Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mourre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of precipitation over the broad range of scales of interest for climatologists, meteorologists and hydrologists is challenging in high altitudes of tropical regions, where the spatial variability of precipitation is important while in situ measurements remain scarce largely due to operational constraints. Three different types of rainfall products – ground based, satellite derived, RCM outputs – are compared here during the hydrological year 2012/13 in order to retrieve rainfall patterns at time scales ranging from sub-daily to annual over a watershed of approximately 10 000 km2 in Peru. It is a high altitude catchment, located in the region of the Cordillera Blanca, with 41 % of its area above 4000 m a.s.l. and 340 km2 glaciated. Daily in situ data are interpolated using a kriging with external drift (KED algorithm; the satellite product is TRMM 3B42, which incorporates monthly gauge data; RCM outputs are obtained from WRF run with a Thompson microphysical scheme at three nested resolutions: 27, 9 and 3 km. The performances of each product are assessed from a double perspective. A local comparison with gauge data is first carried out when relevant (diurnal and seasonal cycles, statistics of rainfall occurrence; then the ability of each product to reproduce some well-known spatial features of rain fields at various time scales (from annual down to daily is analysed. WRF simulations largely overestimate the annual totals, especially at low spatial resolution, while reproducing correctly the diurnal cycle and locating the spots of heavy rainfall more realistically than either the ground-based KED or the TRMM products. The main weakness of the KED data is the production of annual rainfall maxima over the summit rather than on the slopes, induced by a lack of in situ data above 3800 m a.s.l. One main limitation of the TRMM product is its poor performance over ice-covered areas because ice on the ground behaves in a similar way as

  5. Characterizing Seasonal Drought, Water Supply Pattern and Their Impact on Vegetation Growth Using Satellite Soil Moisture Data, GRACE Water Storage and Precipitation Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Du, J.; Kim, Y.; Njoku, E. G.; Colliander, A.

    2016-12-01

    We combine soil moisture (SM) data from AMSR-E, AMSR-2 and SMAP, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE and precipitation measurements from GPCP to delineate and characterize drought and water supply pattern and its impact on vegetation growth. GRACE TWS provides spatially continuous observations of total terrestrial water storage changes and regional drought extent, persistence and severity, while satellite derived soil moisture estimates provide enhanced delineation of plant-available soil moisture. Together these data provide complementary metrics quantifying available plant water supply and have important implications for water resource management. We use these data to investigate the supply changes from different water components in relation to satellite based vegetation productivity metrics from MODIS, before, during and following the major drought events observed in the continental US during the past 13 years. We observe consistent trends and significant correlations between monthly time series of TWS, SM, and vegetation productivity. In Texas and surrounding semi-arid areas, we find that the spatial pattern of the vegetation-moisture relation follows the gradient in mean annual precipitation. In Texas, GRACE TWS and surface SM show strong coupling and similar characteristic time scale in relatively normal years, while during the 2011 onward hydrological drought, GRACE TWS manifests a longer time scale than that of surface SM, implying stronger drought persistence in deeper water storage. In the Missouri watershed, we find a spatially varying vegetation-moisture relationship where in the drier northwestern portion of the basin, the inter-annual variability in summer vegetation productivity is closely associated with changes in carry-on GRACE TWS from spring, whereas in the moist southeastern portion of the basin, summer precipitation is the dominant controlling factor on vegetation growth.

  6. Satellite-Derived Photic Depth on the Great Barrier Reef: Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Water Clarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarla Weeks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Detecting changes to the transparency of the water column is critical for understanding the responses of marine organisms, such as corals, to light availability. Long-term patterns in water transparency determine geographical and depth distributions, while acute reductions cause short-term stress, potentially mortality and may increase the organisms’ vulnerability to other environmental stressors. Here, we investigated the optimal, operational algorithm for light attenuation through the water column across the scale of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR, Australia. We implemented and tested a quasi-analytical algorithm to determine the photic depth in GBR waters and matched regional Secchi depth (ZSD data to MODIS-Aqua (2002–2010 and SeaWiFS (1997–2010 satellite data. The results of the in situ ZSD/satellite data matchup showed a simple bias offset between the in situ and satellite retrievals. Using a Type II linear regression of log-transformed satellite and in situ data, we estimated ZSD and implemented the validated ZSD algorithm to generate a decadal satellite time series (2002–2012 for the GBR. Water clarity varied significantly in space and time. Seasonal effects were distinct, with lower values during the austral summer, most likely due to river runoff and increased vertical mixing, and a decline in water clarity between 2008–2012, reflecting a prevailing La Niña weather pattern. The decline in water clarity was most pronounced in the inshore area, where a significant decrease in mean inner shelf ZSD of 2.1 m (from 8.3 m to 6.2 m occurred over the decade. Empirical Orthogonal Function Analysis determined the dominance of Mode 1 (51.3%, with the greatest variation in water clarity along the mid-shelf, reflecting the strong influence of oceanic intrusions on the spatio-temporal patterns of water clarity. The newly developed photic depth product has many potential applications for the GBR from water quality monitoring to analyses of

  7. Photocatalytic hydrogen production by water/methanol decomposition using Au/TiO{sub 2} prepared by deposition–precipitation with urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros-Ruiz, Socorro, E-mail: coco.oros@yahoo.com [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Zanella, Rodolfo, E-mail: rodolfo.zanella@ccadet.unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); López, Rosendo; Hernández-Gordillo, Agileo; Gómez, Ricardo [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Departamento de Química, ECOCATAL, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, C.P. 09340 México, D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Photocatalytic hydrogen production using Au/TiO{sub 2} prepared by deposition–precipitation with urea (DPU). • The gold NPs on the titania surface showed to have contributed to the high improvement in the activity of bare TiO{sub 2}. • DPU is an easy and feasible way to improve the photocatalytic properties of titania for photocatalytic water splitting. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles deposited on TiO{sub 2} Degussa P25, prepared by deposition–precipitation with urea, were studied in the photocatalytic hydrogen production. The effect of parameters such as mass of catalyst, gold loading, thermal treatment, and atmosphere of treatment was evaluated and optimized. The presence of metallic gold on the titania surface showed to have contributed to the high improvement in the activity of bare TiO{sub 2} for hydrogen generation under UV light (λ = 254 nm) using a lamp of low energy (2 W) consumption. The optimal gold loading for the photocatalysts was 0.5 wt.%, the mass of catalyst in the reactor was 0.5 g/L in a water/methanol 1:1 vol. solution, and the thermal treatment that produced the most active gold nanoparticles was found at 300 °C. The photocatalysts thermally treated under hydrogen at 300 °C produced 1492 μmol g{sup −1} h{sup −1} of hydrogen; the same catalyst activated in air produced 1866 μmol g{sup −1} h{sup −1} of hydrogen.

  8. The Greenhouse Gas Climate Change Initiative (GHG-CCI): comparison and quality assessment of near-surface-sensitive satellite-derived CO2 and CH4 global data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The GHG-CCI project is one of several projects of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI). The goal of the CCI is to generate and deliver data sets of various satellite-derived Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) in line with GCOS (Global Climate Observing System) requirements. The "ECV Greenhouse Gases" (ECV GHG) is the global distribution of important climate relevant gases - atmospheric CO2 and CH4 - with a quality sufficient to obtain information on regional CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks. Two satellite instruments deliver the main input data for GHG-CCI: SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT and TANSO-FTS/GOSAT. The first order priority goal of GHG-CCI is the further development of retrieval algorithms for near-surface-sensitive column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4, denoted XCO2 and XCH4, to meet the demanding user requirements. GHG-CCI focusses on four core data products: XCO2 from SCIAMACHY and TANSO and XCH4 from the same two sensors. For each of the four core data products at least two candidate retrieval algorithms have been independently further developed and the corresponding data products have been quality assessed and inter-compared. This activity is referred to as "Round Robin" (RR) activity within the CCI. The main goal of the RR was to identify for each of the four core products which algorithm to be used to generate the Climate Research Data Package (CRDP), which will essentially be the first version of the ECV GHG. This manuscript gives an overview about the GHG-CCI RR and related activities. This comprises the establishment of the user requirements, the improvement of the candidate retrieval algorithms and comparisons with ground-based observations and models. The manuscript summarizes the final RR algorithm selection decision and its justification. Comparison with ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) data indicates that the "breakthrough" single measurement precision requirement has been met for

  9. Principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level and base level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived data and the original software Baz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihisa Motoki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents principle and geomorphological applicability of summit level technique using Aster Gdem satellite-derived topographicdata. Summit level corresponds to thevirtualtopographic surface constituted bylocalhighest points, such as peaks and plateau tops, and reconstitutes palaeo-geomorphology before the drainage erosion. Summit level map is efficient for reconstitution of palaeo-surfaces and detection of active tectonic movement. Base level is thevirtualsurface composed oflocallowest points, as valley bottoms. The difference between summit level and base level is called relief amount. Thesevirtualmapsareconstructed by theoriginalsoftwareBaz. Themacroconcavity index, MCI, is calculated from summit level and relief amount maps. The volume-normalised three-dimensional concavity index, TCI, is calculated from hypsometric diagram. The massifs with high erosive resistance tend to have convex general form and low MCI and TCI. Those with low resistance have concave form and high MCI and TCI. The diagram of TCI vs. MCI permits to distinguish erosive characteristics of massifs according to their constituent rocks. The base level map for ocean bottom detects the basement tectonic uplift which occurred before the formation of the volcanic seamounts.

  10. Towards Calibration of Sentinel 3 Data: Validation of Satellite-Derived SST Against In Situ Coastal Observations of the Portuguese Marine Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ricardo; Esteves, Rita; Lamas, Luisa; Pinto, Jose Paulo; Almeida, Sara; de Azevedo, Eduardo; Correia, Cecilia; Reis, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Validation of future Sentinel-3 SLSTR data in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean was analysed here through a comparison of satellite-derived STT against in situ mooring buoys observations.SSTskin retrieved from IR satellite radiometers on- board ERS 1-2, Envisat, and Aqua, and concurrent SSTbulk measured with 14 buoy thermistors located at 1m depth were used to assess the statistical relationships between these datasets, with 20038 match- ups spanning from 1996 to 2015.As expected, results showed consistency between SSTskin and SSTbulk, exhibiting a correlation coefficient on the order of 98 %. Biases of both (A)ATSR and MODIS for day-time suggest a warmer satellite skin retrieval of + 0.15o and + 0.06o, respectively. For the night-time dataset, biases of - 0.25o and - 0.17o for (A)A TSR and MODIS, respectively, indicate cooler skin retrievals and reveal an inversion of the upper ocean thermic gradient. The RMSE ´s found were 0.53o for (A)ATSR and 0.41o for MODIS datasets.

  11. Estimating carbon flux phenology with satellite-derived land surface phenology and climate drivers for different biomes: a synthesis of AmeriFlux observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenquan Zhu

    Full Text Available Carbon Flux Phenology (CFP can affect the interannual variation in Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. In this study, we proposed a methodology to estimate CFP metrics with satellite-derived Land Surface Phenology (LSP metrics and climate drivers for 4 biomes (i.e., deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, grasslands and croplands, using 159 site-years of NEE and climate data from 32 AmeriFlux sites and MODIS vegetation index time-series data. LSP metrics combined with optimal climate drivers can explain the variability in Start of Carbon Uptake (SCU by more than 70% and End of Carbon Uptake (ECU by more than 60%. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of the estimations was within 8.5 days for both SCU and ECU. The estimation performance for this methodology was primarily dependent on the optimal combination of the LSP retrieval methods, the explanatory climate drivers, the biome types, and the specific CFP metric. This methodology has a potential for allowing extrapolation of CFP metrics for biomes with a distinct and detectable seasonal cycle over large areas, based on synoptic multi-temporal optical satellite data and climate data.

  12. Estimating carbon flux phenology with satellite-derived land surface phenology and climate drivers for different biomes: a synthesis of AmeriFlux observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenquan; Chen, Guangsheng; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jianhong; Mou, Minjie

    2013-01-01

    Carbon Flux Phenology (CFP) can affect the interannual variation in Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. In this study, we proposed a methodology to estimate CFP metrics with satellite-derived Land Surface Phenology (LSP) metrics and climate drivers for 4 biomes (i.e., deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, grasslands and croplands), using 159 site-years of NEE and climate data from 32 AmeriFlux sites and MODIS vegetation index time-series data. LSP metrics combined with optimal climate drivers can explain the variability in Start of Carbon Uptake (SCU) by more than 70% and End of Carbon Uptake (ECU) by more than 60%. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the estimations was within 8.5 days for both SCU and ECU. The estimation performance for this methodology was primarily dependent on the optimal combination of the LSP retrieval methods, the explanatory climate drivers, the biome types, and the specific CFP metric. This methodology has a potential for allowing extrapolation of CFP metrics for biomes with a distinct and detectable seasonal cycle over large areas, based on synoptic multi-temporal optical satellite data and climate data.

  13. A photogrammetric DEM of Greenland based on 1978-1987 aerial photos: validation and integration with laser altimetry and satellite-derived DEMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsgaard, N. J.; Kjaer, K. H.; Nuth, C.; Khan, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present a DEM of Greenland covering all ice-free terrain and the margins of the GrIS and local glaciers and ice caps. The DEM is based on the 3534 photos used in the aero-triangulation which were recorded by the Danish Geodata Agency (then the Geodetic Institute) in survey campaigns spanning the period 1978-1987. The GrIS is covered tens of kilometers into the interior due to the large footprints of the photos (30 x 30 km) and control provided by the aero-triangulation. Thus, the data are ideal for providing information for analysis of ice marginal elevation change and also control for satellite-derived DEMs.The results of the validation, error assessments and predicted uncertainties are presented. We test the DEM using Airborne Topographic Mapper (IceBridge ATM) as reference data; evaluate the a posteriori covariance matrix from the aero-triangulation; and co-register DEM blocks of 50 x 50 km to ICESat laser altimetry in order to evaluate the coherency.We complement the aero-photogrammetric DEM with modern laser altimetry and DEMs derived from stereoscopic satellite imagery (AST14DMO) to examine the mass variability of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS). Our analysis suggests that dynamically-induced mass loss started around 2003 and continued throughout 2014.

  14. Modeling solid-state precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nebylov, AlexanderKozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, modeling and simulation of solid-state precipitation has attracted increased attention in academia and industry due to their important contributions in designing properties of advanced structural materials and in increasing productivity and decreasing costs for expensive alloying. In particular, precipitation of second phases is an important means for controlling the mechanical-technological properties of structural materials. However, profound physical modeling of precipitation is not a trivial task. This book introduces you to the classical methods of precipitation modeling and to recently-developed advanced, computationally-efficient techniques. If you're a research professional, academic, or student, you'll learn: nucleation theory, precipitate growth, calculation of interfacial energies. advanced techniques for technologically relevant multicomponent systems and complex thermo-mechanical treatments. numerical approaches using evolution equations and discrete particle size distribu...

  15. Nickel hydroxide precipitation from aqueous sulfate media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sist, Cinziana; Demopoulos, George P.

    2003-08-01

    Hydrometallurgical processing of laterite ores constitutes a major industrial and R&D activity in extractive metallurgy. In some of the process flowsheets, nickel hydroxide precipitation is incorporated. For these operations, the optimization of nickel hydroxide precipitation is important to assure efficiency and product quality. The main objective of this investigation was to study and improve the precipitation characteristics of Ni(OH)2 in a sulfate system using supersaturation controlled precipitation.

  16. Testing the limits of the diffusion-production-equilibrium model of soil CO2: The effect of rapid carbonate precipitation on the pedogenic carbonate proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J. G.; Chelladurai, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    A large body of terrestrial paleoenvironmental proxy research hinges on the well-established diffusion-production-equilibrium model of soil CO2. Although soil CO2 is the linchpin between the isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate and the terrestrial biomass, it is not preserved directly in paleosols, and the model makes important boundary condition assumptions on processes that control its isotopic composition. The standard model assumes two-end member diffusional mixing between soil-respired CO2 and atmospheric CO2, and equilibrium precipitation of soil CaCO3 in an open system. We modified the boundary conditions of the standard model to specifically account for the flux and stable isotope fractionation of CO2 into the CaCO3 reservoir under partially closed-system conditions. Model calculations show that diversion of a relatively small fraction of the CO2 flux into CaCO3 results in a large change in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 and hence of CaCO3 at the sites of pedogenic carbonate accumulation. We also incubated two types of biomass (derived from C3 and C4 photosynthesis) in synthetic profiles with controlled conditions designed to test this modified model hypothesis. While soil CO2 from the surface horizons validated two-end member mixing, the δ13C values of CO2 from developing carbonate horizons was consistently 13C-depleted by several per mil compared to model predictions. This negative offset from the standard model mixing diagram (a Keeling Plot) is only consistent with the positive fractionation factor for carbonate precipitation in partially-closed system conditions. We also consider the conditions under which terrestrial paleoenvironmental proxy studies may be compromised by inappropriate boundary condition assumptions, in an effort to provide more robust model validation and application to terrestrial proxy data.

  17. Analysis of Multiple Precipitation Products and Preliminary Assessment of Their Impact on Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) Land Surface States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalck, Jon; Meng, Jesse; Rodel, Matt; Houser, paul

    2005-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are computer programs, similar to weather and climate prediction models, which simulate the stocks and fluxes of water (including soil moisture, snow, evaporation, and runoff) and energy (including the temperature of and sensible heat released from the soil) after they arrive on the land surface as precipitation and sunlight. It is not currently possible to measure all of the variables of interest everywhere on Earth with sufficient accuracy and space-time resolution. Hence LSMs have been developed to integrate the available observations with our understanding of the physical processes involved, using powerful computers, in order to map these stocks and fluxes as they change in time. The maps are used to improve weather forecasts, support water resources and agricultural applications, and study the Earth's water cycle and climate variability. NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) project facilitates testing of several different LSMs with a variety of input datasets (e.g., precipitation, plant type). Precipitation is arguably the most important input to LSMs. Many precipitation datasets have been produced using satellite and rain gauge observations and weather forecast models. In this study, seven different global precipitation datasets were evaluated over the United States, where dense rain gauge networks contribute to reliable precipitation maps. We then used the seven datasets as inputs to GLDAS simulations, so that we could diagnose their impacts on output stocks and fluxes of water. In terms of totals, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) had the closest agreement with the US rain gauge dataset for all seasons except winter. The CMAP precipitation was also the most closely correlated in time with the rain gauge data during spring, fall, and winter, while the satellitebased estimates performed best in summer. The GLDAS simulations revealed that modeled soil moisture is highly

  18. Subsidence hazard and risk assessments for Mexico City: An interdisciplinary analysis of satellite-derived subsidence map (PSInSAR) and census data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Rojas, D. E.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Wdowinski, S.; Hernaández Espriú, A.; Falorni, G.; Bohane, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is the largest urban center in the American continent, with 20.4 millions of inhabitants, representing 17.8% of the total population of the country. Over the past several decades Mexico City has been experienced rapid subsidence, up to ~370 mm/yr, caused by groundwater extraction. The subsidence rate is inhomogeneous, as it controlled by the local geology. Unconsolidated sediments tend to compact and induce rapid subsidence, whereas subsurface volcanic rocks are less prone to subsidence. Intensive faulting in the city has been observed in areas of differential deformation; in these areas buildings and infrastructure are highly damaged. Quantification of subsidence-induce damage is needed for establishing the magnitude of the phenomenon. Our study uses three data sources: a satellite-derived subsidence map, census information of population distribution for 2010, and information on buildings and infrastructure. The subsidence map was calculated from 29 SAR scene acquired by the Envisat satellite during the years 2003-2010 using the Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI) method with the SqueeSAR algorithm. The information of the census of population comes from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI), which also provides the information about infrastructure. We intersected the information from the three maps using a geographic information system (GIS), which cover an area of 1, 640 km2. As subsidence-induced damage occurs mainly in areas of differential subsidence, we based the GIS analysis on the subsidence gradients, rather than subsidence rates. In order to evaluate subsidence-induced faulting risk, we generated a risk matrix that worked as the main parameter to create a risk map. We then reclassified the urban area into 5 zones according to the related risk, with R0 for the lowest risk and R4 for the highest. Our counting showed that 350 km2 of the city is located in an urban area of high to very high risk

  19. Prognostic land surface albedo from a dynamic global vegetation model clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme and satellite-derived geographic forest heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation cover was introduced into general circulations models (GCMs) in the 1980's to account for the effect of land surface albedo and water vapor conductance on the Earth's climate. Schemes assigning canopy albedoes by broad biome type have been superceded in 1990's by canopy radiative transfer schemes for homogeneous canopies obeying Beer's Law extinction as a function of leaf area index (LAI). Leaf albedo and often canopy height are prescribed by plant functional type (PFT). It is recognized that this approach does not effectively describe geographic variation in the radiative transfer of vegetated cover, particularly for mixed and sparse canopies. GCM-coupled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have retained these simple canopy representations, with little further evaluation of their albedos. With the emergence lidar-derived canopy vertical structure data, DGVM modelers are now revisiting albedo simulation. We present preliminary prognostic global land surface albedo produced by the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), a DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. The Ent TBM is a next generation DGVM designed to incorporate variation in canopy heights, and mixed and sparse canopies. For such dynamically varying canopy structure, it uses the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer model, which is derived from gap probability theory for canopies of tree cohorts with ellipsoidal crowns, and accounts for soil, snow, and bare stems. We have developed a first-order global vegetation structure data set (GVSD), which gives a year of satellite-derived geographic variation in canopy height, maximum canopy leaf area, and seasonal LAI. Combined with Ent allometric relations, this data set provides population density and foliage clumping within crowns. We compare the Ent prognostic albedoes to those of the previous GISS GCM scheme, and to satellite estimates. The impact of albedo differences on surface

  20. Application of quantitative precipitation forecasting and precipitation ensemble prediction for hydrological forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, P.; Tie-Yuan, S.; Zhi-Yuan, Y.; Jun-Chao, W.

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation in the forecast period influences flood forecasting precision, due to the uncertainty of the input to the hydrological model. Taking the ZhangHe basin as the example, the research adopts the precipitation forecast and ensemble precipitation forecast product of the AREM model, uses the Xin Anjiang hydrological model, and tests the flood forecasts. The results show that the flood forecast result can be clearly improved when considering precipitation during the forecast period....

  1. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  2. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  3. Study of the changes in composition of ammonium diuranate with progress of precipitation, and study of the properties of ammonium diuranate and its subsequent products produced from both uranyl nitrate and uranyl fluoride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Subhankar; Kumar, Raj; Satpati, Santosh K.; Roy, Saswati B. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Uranium metal used for fabrication of fuel for research reactors in India is generally produced by magnesio-thermic reduction of UF{sub 4}. Performance of magnesio-thermic reaction and recovery and quality of uranium largely depends on properties of UF{sub 4}. As ammonium diuranate (ADU) is first product in powder form in the process flow-sheet, properties of UF{sub 4} depend on properties of ADU. ADU is generally produced from uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) for natural uranium metal production and from uranyl fluoride solution (UFS) for low enriched uranium metal production. In present paper, ADU has been produced via both the routes. Variation of uranium recovery and crystal structure and composition of ADU with progress in precipitation reaction has been studied with special attention on first appearance of the precipitate Further, ADU produced by two routes have been calcined to UO{sub 3}, then reduced to UO{sub 2} and hydroflorinated to UF{sub 4}. Effect of two different process routes of ADU precipitation on the characteristics of ADU, UO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2} and UF{sub 4} were studied here.

  4. Modelled Precipitation Over Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the annual total precipitation from 1985 to 1999 and monthly total precipitation from January 1985 to December 1999. The data is derived from...

  5. Application of quantitative precipitation forecasting and precipitation ensemble prediction for hydrological forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation in the forecast period influences flood forecasting precision, due to the uncertainty of the input to the hydrological model. Taking the ZhangHe basin as the example, the research adopts the precipitation forecast and ensemble precipitation forecast product of the AREM model, uses the Xin Anjiang hydrological model, and tests the flood forecasts. The results show that the flood forecast result can be clearly improved when considering precipitation during the forecast period. Hydrological forecast based on Ensemble Precipitation prediction gives better hydrological forecast information, better satisfying the need for risk information for flood prevention and disaster reduction, and has broad development opportunities.

  6. Impacts of climate change on plant productivity in the Cajander larch woodlands of northeastern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, L. T.; Beck, P.; Bunn, A. G.; Goetz, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change in Northern Eurasia is driving shifts in the productivity and extent of forest ecosystems, which can in turn feedback on the climate system. Few studies have examined plant response to climate change near latitudinal treeline in northeastern Siberia. We therefore quantified trends in climate and plant productivity, as well as productivity-climate relationships, in the Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr.) woodlands of the Kolyma River watershed using satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI), tree ring measurements, and climate data. Averaged across the watershed there was a 1.0°C increase in mean summer temperature (T) from 1938 to 2009, but no systematic change in precipitation or climate moisture index (CMI). Plant productivity, as indicated by mean summer NDVI (NDVIs), was widely correlated with T and exhibited positive trends across 20% of the watershed, primarily in the climatically coolest area. In the climatically warmest areas NDVIs was positively associated with CMI instead of T and positive trends in NDVIs were uncommon. Annual larch basal area increment was positively correlated with NDVIs (r=0.44, Plimited increases in productivity. Unless there is a concomitant increase in moisture availability with future warming, it is possible that increased moisture stress could progressively limit forest productivity and perhaps slow the rate of forest expansion into the tundra, which could have significant climate feedback implications dues to impacts on carbon storage and surface energy balance.

  7. Towards Quantitative Ocean Precipitation Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepp, C.; Bakan, S.; Andersson, A.

    2009-04-01

    A thorough knowledge of global ocean precipitation is an indispensable prerequisite for the understanding and successful modelling of the global climate system as it is an important component of the water cycle. However, reliable detection of quantitative precipitation over the global oceans, especially at high latitudes during the cold season remains a challenging task for remote sensing and model based estimates. Quantitative ship validation data using reliable instruments for measuring rain and snowfall hardly exist but are highly demanded for ground validation of such products. The satellite based HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data) climatology contains fields of precipitation, evaporation and the resulting freshwater flux along with 12 additional atmospheric parameters over the global ice-free ocean between 1987 and 2005. Except for the NOAA Pathfinder SST, all basic state variables are calculated from SSM/I passive microwave radiometer measurements. HOAPS contains three main data subsets that originate from one common pixel-level data source. Gridded 0.5 degree monthly, pentad and twice daily data products are freely available from www.hoaps.org. Especially for North Atlantic mid-latitude mix-phase precipitation, the HOAPS precipitation retrieval has been investigated in some depth. This analysis revealed that the HOAPS retrieval qualitatively well represents cyclonic and intense mesoscale precipitation in agreement with ship observations and Cloudsat data, while GPCP, ECMWF forecast, ERA-40 and regional model data miss mesoscale precipitation substantially. As the differences between the investigated data sets are already large under mix-phase precipitation conditions, further work is carried out on snowfall validation during the cold season at high-latitudes. A Norwegian Sea field campaign in winter 2005 was carried out using an optical disdrometer capable of measuring quantitative amounts of snowfall over the ocean

  8. Assessing Land Degradation/Recovery in the African Sahel from Long-Term Earth Observation Based Primary Productivity and Precipitation Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Kaspersen, Per Skougaard

    2013-01-01

    useless as a means of normalizing for the impact of annual precipitation on ANPP. By replacing ΣNDVI by a ‘small NDVI integral’, covering only the rainy season and counting only the increase of NDVI relative to some reference level, this problem is solved. Using this approach, RUE is calculated...

  9. Impacts of extreme precipitation and seasonal changes in precipitation on plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. B. Zeppel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydrological cycle is predicted to become more intense in future climates, with both larger precipitation events and longer times between events. Redistribution of precipitation may occur both within and across seasons, and the resulting wide fluctuations in soil water content may dramatically affect plants. Though these responses remain poorly understood, recent research in this emerging field suggests the effects of redistributed precipitation may differ from predictions based on previous drought studies. We review available studies on both extreme precipitation (redistribution within seasons and seasonal changes in precipitation (redistribution across seasons on grasslands and forests. Extreme precipitation differentially affected Aboveground Net Primary Productivity (ANPP, depending on whether extreme precipitation led to increased or decreased soil water content (SWC, which differed based on the current precipitation at the site. Specifically, studies to date reported that extreme precipitation decreased ANPP in mesic sites, but, conversely, increased ANPP in xeric sites, suggesting that plant available water is a key factor driving responses to extreme precipitation. Similarly, the effects of seasonal changes in precipitation on ANPP, phenology, and leaf and fruit development varied with the effect on SWC. Reductions in spring or summer generally had negative effects on plants, associated with reduced SWC, while subsequent reductions in autumn or winter had little effect on SWC or plants. Similarly, increased summer precipitation had a more dramatic impact on plants than winter increases in precipitation. The patterns of response suggest xeric biomes may respond positively to extreme precipitation, while comparatively mesic biomes may be more likely to be negatively affected. And, seasonal changes in precipitation during warm or dry seasons may have larger effects than changes during cool or wet seasons. Accordingly, responses to

  10. Satellite-derived estimates of forest leaf area index in southwest Western Australia are not tightly coupled to interannual variations in rainfall: implications for groundwater decline in a drying climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smettem, Keith R J; Waring, Richard H; Callow, John N; Wilson, Melissa; Mu, Qiaozhen

    2013-08-01

    There is increasing concern that widespread forest decline could occur in regions of the world where droughts are predicted to increase in frequency and severity as a result of climate change. The average annual leaf area index (LAI) is an indicator of canopy cover and the difference between the annual maximum and minimum LAI is an indicator of annual leaf turnover. In this study, we analyzed satellite-derived estimates of monthly LAI across forested coastal catchments of southwest Western Australia over a 12 year period (2000-2011) that included the driest year on record for the last 60 years. We observed that over the 12 year study period, the spatial pattern of average annual satellite-derived LAI values was linearly related to mean annual rainfall. However, interannual changes to LAI in response to changes in annual rainfall were far less than expected from the long-term LAI-rainfall trend. This buffered response was investigated using a physiological growth model and attributed to availability of deep soil moisture and/or groundwater storage. The maintenance of high LAIs may be linked to a long-term decline in areal average underground water storage and diminished summer flows, with an emerging trend toward more ephemeral flow regimes.

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: NASA Precipitation Processing System (PPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2008-01-01

    NASA is contributing the precipitation measurement data system PPS to support the GPM mission. PPS will distribute all GPM data products including NASA s GMI data products freely and quickly. PPS is implementing no system mechanisms for restricting access to GPM data. PPS is implementing no system mechanisms for charging for GPM data products. PPS will provide a number of geographical and parameter subsetting features available to its users. The first implementation of PPS (called PPS--) will assume processing of TRMM data effective 1 June 2008. TRMM realtime data will be available via PPS- to all users requesting access

  12. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of {sup 36}Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric {sup 36}Cl production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide {sup 32}Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of {sup 32}Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured {sup 32}Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 {mu}Bql{sup -1}. These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured {sup 32}Si/Si{sub tot} ratios ranged from 2.5.10{sup -17} to 2.3.10{sup -15} and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10{sup -14}, showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X){sup 7}Be and N(p,X){sup 10}Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,{alpha}n)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of {sup 36}Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric {sup 36}Cl production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrat, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide {sup 32}Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of {sup 32}Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured {sup 32}Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 {mu}Bql{sup -1}. These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured {sup 32}Si/Si{sub tot} ratios ranged from 2.5.10{sup -17} to 2.3.10{sup -15} and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10{sup -14}, showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of {sup 32}Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X){sup 7}Be and N(p,X){sup 10}Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction {sup 40}Ar(p,X){sup 36}Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,{alpha}n)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  14. Assessing Land Degradation/Recovery in the African Sahel from Long-Term Earth Observation Based Primary Productivity and Precipitation Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, Rasmus; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Kaspersen, Per Skougaard;

    2013-01-01

    be achieved by use of Earth Observation (EO) data. This paper demonstrates that the use of the standard EO-based proxy for ANPP, summed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Global Inventory...... useless as a means of normalizing for the impact of annual precipitation on ANPP. By replacing ΣNDVI by a ‘small NDVI integral’, covering only the rainy season and counting only the increase of NDVI relative to some reference level, this problem is solved. Using this approach, RUE is calculated...... for the period 1982–2010. The result is that positive RUE-trends dominate in most of the Sahel, indicating that non-precipitation related land degradation is not a widespread phenomenon. Furthermore, it is argued that two preconditions need to be fulfilled in order to obtain meaningful results from the RUE...

  15. Effects of elevated soil temperature and altered precipitation patterns on N-cycling and production of N2O and CO2 in an agricultural soil

    OpenAIRE

    Latt, Yadana Khin

    2016-01-01

    Both temperature and precipitation regimes are expected to change with climate change and are, at the same time, major environmental factors regulating biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, crop water availability, soil nitrogen transformations, losses, and uptake by plants as well as CO2 emissions from soil are likely to be changed by climate change. Agriculture is known to be one of the most important human activities for releasing significant amounts of N2O and CO2 to...

  16. Ionization of molecular hydrogen and stripping of oxygen atoms and ions in collisions of Oq++H2 (q = 0- 8): Data for secondary electron production from ion precipitation at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ozak, N.; Cravens, T. E.; Gharibnejad, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic oxygen and sulfur ion precipitation into the atmosphere of Jupiter is thought to produce an X-ray aurora as well as to contribute to ionization, heating, and dissociation of the molecules of the atmosphere. At high energy, stripping of electrons from these ions by atmospheric gas molecules results in the production of high charge states throughout a portion of this passage through the atmosphere. Therefore, to enable modeling of the effects of secondary electrons produced by this ion precipitation, from either the solar wind or magnetospheric sources such as the Galilean moons, a large range of ionization and stripping data is calculated and tabulated here that otherwise is not available. The present data are for the abundant precipitating species, oxygen, colliding with the dominant upper atmosphere gas, molecular hydrogen, and cover the principal reaction channels leading to secondary electron production (single and double ionization, transfer ionization, and double capture followed by autoionization, and single and double stripping of electrons from the projectile). Since the ions possess initial energies at the upper atmosphere in the keV to MeV range, and are then slowed as they pass through the atmosphere, results are calculated for 1-2000 keV/u Oq++H2 (q =0-8). In addition to the total cross sections for ionization and stripping processes, models require the distribution in energy and angle of the ejected electrons, so cross sections differential in these parameters are also calculated. The data may be used to model the energy deposited by ion precipitation in Jupiter's atmosphere and thereby contribute to the elucidation of the ionosphere-atmosphere coupling.

  17. Measurement of precipitation using lysimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    Austria's alpine foothill aquifers contain important drinking water resources, but are also used intensively for agricultural production. These groundwater bodies are generally recharged by infiltrating precipitation. A sustainable water resources management of these aquifers requires quantifying real evapotranspiration (ET), groundwater recharge (GR), precipitation (P) and soil water storage change (ΔS). While GR and ΔS can be directly measured by weighable lysimeters and P by separate precipitation gauges, ET is determined by solving the climatic water balance ET = P GR ± ΔS. According to WMO (2008) measurement of rainfall is strongly influenced by precipitation gauge errors. Most significant errors result from wind loss, wetting loss, evaporation loss, and due to in- and out-splashing of water. Measuring errors can be reduced by a larger area of the measuring gaugés surface and positioning the collecting vessel at ground level. Modern weighable lysimeters commonly have a surface of 1 m², are integrated into their typical surroundings of vegetation cover (to avoid oasis effects) and allow scaling the mass change of monolithic soil columns in high measuring accuracy (0.01 mm water equivalent) and high temporal resolution. Thus, also precipitation can be quantified by measuring the positive mass changes of the lysimeter. According to Meissner et al. (2007) also dew, fog and rime can be determined by means of highly precise weighable lysimeters. Furthermore, measuring precipitation using lysimeters avoid common measuring errors (WMO 2008) at point scale. Though, this method implicates external effects (background noise, influence of vegetation and wind) which affect the mass time series. While the background noise of the weighing is rather well known and can be filtered out of the mass time series, the influence of wind, which blows through the vegetation and affects measured lysimeter mass, cannot be corrected easily since there is no clear relation between

  18. Regional Bias of Satellite Precipitation Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrick, T. M.; Georgakakos, K. P.; Spencer, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite-based estimates of precipitation have improved the spatial availability of precipitation data particularly for regions with limited gauge networks due to limited accessibility or infrastructure. Understanding the quality and reliability of satellite precipitation estimates is important, especially when the estimates are utilitized for real-time hydrologic forecasting and for fast-responding phenomena. In partnership with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the U.S. Agency of International Development (USAID) and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Hydrologic Research Center has begun implementation of real-time flash flood warning systems for diverse regions around the world. As part of this effort, bias characteristics of satellite precipitation have been examined in these various regions, such includes portions of Southeastern Asia, Southeastern Europe, the Middle East, Central America, and the southern half of the African continent. The work has focused on the Global Hydro-Estimator (GHE) precipitation product from NOAA/NESDIS. These real-time systems utilize the GHE given low latency times of this product. This presentation focuses on the characterization of precipitation bias as compared to in-situ gauge records, and the regional variations or similarities. Additional analysis is currently underway considering regional bias for other satellite precipitation products (e.g., CMORPH) for comparison with the GHE results.

  19. Experimental study of brushite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifuzzaman, S. M.; Rohani, S.

    2004-07-01

    A systematic approach was developed for the synthesis of orthophosphates in the laboratory. A set of experiments was designed to investigate the influence of initial calcium and phosphorus concentration on the precipitated phase, nucleation pH and product size distribution at 25°C. Another goal was to characterize the precipitated phase. The investigation was conducted in a batch reactor. The initial molar concentration of calcium chloride and hydrated sodium phosphate solutions was varied from 0.005 to 0.08-mole dm -3 and the solution pH was kept under 7.1. Analysis by powder XRD, FTIR and elemental P/Ca revealed that the crystals precipitated were pure brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate), as expected, except in one experiment in which amorphous calcium phosphate precipitated. The brushite crystals produced had plate-like morphology as investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nucleation pH showed a decreasing trend as the concentration of the calcium and phosphorus increased in the reactor, but the volume mean diameter of the crystals and the span of the crystal size distribution did not show any sensitivity to the changes in the initial calcium and phosphorus concentration.

  20. Production of hydrogen from methanol over Cu/ZnO and Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by homogeneous precipitation : Steam reforming and oxidative steam reforming

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Two series of Cu/ZnO and Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts with varying Cu/Zn ratio have been prepared by the homogeneous precipitation (hp) method using urea hydrolysis. Steam reforming and oxidative steam reforming of methanol were performed using the hp-Cu/Zn-based catalysts for catalytic production of hydrogen. The hp-Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst showed a higher activity than the hp-Cu/ZnO catalysts. In both cases, the catalytic activity was well correlated with the surface area of Cu metal, and the maximu...

  1. Precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC - cellulose composite fillers: Effects of PCC particle structure on the production and properties of uncoated fine paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulapuro, H.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the precipitation of PCC – pulp composite fillers with varying crystal habits and their effects on the papermaking properties of printing and writing paper. Colloidal (c-PCC, rhombohedral (r-PCC, and scalenohedral types (s-PCC of composite PCCs were produced and compared with commercial reference PCCs. Scanning electron micros-copy showed the c-PCC to be a high-surface-area nano-structured PCC. The rhombohedral composite was formed in clusters like a spider-web structure. Under similar experimental conditions, composite PCC was formed as individual ellipsoidal crystals and some of the particles had malformed structure, in contrast to the structured reference s-PCC. The co-precipitation and the structure of PCC significantly influence the forming, consolidation, and properties of paper, as well as its perform-ance in printing.Composite c-PCC showed the highest retention during forming. At higher filler contents, dewatering was reduced significantly with handsheets containing s- and r-PCC composite fillers. Colloidal composite hand-sheets showed the lowest tensile index and internal bond strength, while the rhombohedral composite gave the highest z-directional bond strength. Compared with the traditional reference samples containing commercial PCCs, paper with s- and r-composites had significantly higher density but similar light scattering ability. Addition of fibrillar fines to fine paper increased print rub fastness significantly in both laser and inkjet printed samples.

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  3. A New Method for Near Real Time Precipitation Estimates Using a Derived Statistical Relationship between Precipitable Water Vapor and Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, J.

    2015-12-01

    The IPCC 5th Assessment found that the predicted warming of 1oC would increase the risk of extreme events such as heat waves, droughts, and floods. Weather extremes, like floods, have shown the vulnerability and susceptibility society has to these extreme weather events, through impacts such as disruption of food production, water supply, health, and damage of infrastructure. This paper examines a new way of near-real time forecasting of precipitation. A 10-year statistical climatological relationship was derived between precipitable water vapor (PWV) and precipitation by using the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder daily gridded PWV product and the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission daily gridded precipitation total. Forecasting precipitation estimates in real time is dire for flood monitoring and disaster management. Near real time PWV observations from AIRS on Aqua are available through the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center. In addition, PWV observations are available through direct broadcast from the NASA Suomi-NPP ATMS/CrIS instrument, the operational follow on to AIRS. The derived climatological relationship can be applied to create precipitation estimates in near real time by utilizing the direct broadcasting capabilities currently available in the CONUS region. The application of this relationship will be characterized through case-studies by using near real-time NASA AIRS Science Team v6 PWV products and ground-based SuomiNet GPS to estimate the current precipitation potential; the max amount of precipitation that can occur based on the moisture availability. Furthermore, the potential contribution of using the direct broadcasting of the NUCAPS ATMS/CrIS PWV products will be demonstrated. The analysis will highlight the advantages of applying this relationship in near-real time for flash flood monitoring and risk management. Relevance to the NWS River Forecast Centers will be discussed.

  4. Study on Fixation of CO2 and Production of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate Using Steel Slag%利用钢渣固结CO2制备沉淀碳酸钙的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱蓓蓉; 杨全兵

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of fixation of CO2 and production of precipitated calcium carbonate by carbonating acetate solution of calcium extracted from steel slag was investigated. The composition of precipitate produced after carbonation was then analyzed with XRD and TG-DTA. The results show that calcium acetate must be converted into calcium hydroxide by adding sodium hydroxide into calcium acetate solution and then precipitated calcium carbonate can be produced by carbonating the solution. Acetate solution of calcium extracted from steel slag can be carbonated by adding enough sodium hydroxide but the purity of precipitated calcium carbonate produced is only about 60% and the conversion of calcium is only about 35. 00%. To improve the effect of carbonation and to produce precipitated calcium carbonate with a high purity, other ions dissolved in steel slag should be removed from acetate solution of calcium extracted from steel slag.%研究了基于醋酸提取钢渣中钙离子所获得的醋酸钙溶液碳化固结CO2并制备沉淀碳酸钙的可行性,借助于XRD,TG-DTA对碳化后生成的沉淀物进行了成分分析和综合热分析.结果表明:醋酸钙溶液需掺入氢氧化钠,将其中的醋酸钙转化成氢氧化钙,方可碳化生成沉淀碳酸钙;在由醋酸提取钢渣中钙离子所获得的醋酸钙溶液中掺入足量氢氧化钠,可使其中的钙离子碳化生成沉淀碳酸钙,但该碳酸钙的纯度(质量分数)仅为60%左右,钙离子转化率(质量分数)仅为35.00%左右,如果将该溶液进行分离处理,除去其中其他离子的干扰,则可高效碳化成高纯度沉淀碳酸钙.

  5. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  6. TODS BioCast User Manual, Forecasting 3D Satellite Derived Optical Properties Using Eulerian Advection Procedure, Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-17

    materials) in aquatic environments. It requires a set of flow fields (North/South and East/West velocity components), bathymetric data, an initial...of forecasting applications and basic oceanographic/ aquatic research programs. A conceptual overview of forecasting the distribution of bio-optical...BioCast processing for Chesapeake Bay, Virginia during the Trident Warrior exercise using the MODIS satellite product for beam attenuation (proxy for

  7. Assessing the Sensitivity of Satellite-Derived Estimates of Ice Sheet Mass Balance to Regional Climate Model Simulations of Snow Accumulation and Firn Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, K.; Shepherd, A.; Horwath, M.; Horvath, A.; Nagler, T.; Wuite, J.; Muir, A.; Gilbert, L.; Mouginot, J.

    2015-12-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) estimates from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are fundamental for assessing and understanding ice sheet mass trends. Mass budget and altimetry assessments rely on RCMs both directly for estimates of the SMB contribution to the total mass trend, and indirectly for ancillary data in the form of firn compaction corrections. As such, mass balance assessments can be highly sensitive to RCM outputs and therefore their accuracy. Here we assess the extent to which geodetic measurements of mass balance are sensitive to RCM model outputs at different resolutions. We achieve this by comparing SMB dependent estimates of mass balance from the mass budget method and altimetry, with those from satellite gravimetry that are independent of SMB estimates. Using the outputs of the RACMO/ANT 2.3 model at 5.5 km and 27 km horizontal spatial resolution, we generate estimates of mass balance using the mass budget method and altimetry for the Western Palmer Land region of the Antarctic Peninsula between 2003 and 2014. We find a 19% increase in the long-term (1980 to 2014) mean annual SMB for the region when enhancing the model resolution to 5.5 km. This translates into an approximate 50% reduction in the total mass loss from 2003 to 2014 calculated with the mass budget method and a 15% increase in the altimetry estimate. The use of the enhanced resolution product leads to consistency between the estimates of mass loss from the altimetry and the mass budget method that is not observed with the coarser resolution product, in which estimates of cumulative mass fall beyond the relative errors. Critically, when using the 5.5 km product, we find excellent agreement, both in pattern and magnitude, with the independent estimate derived from gravimetry. Our results point toward the crucial need for high resolution SMB products from RCMs for mass balance assessments, particularly in regions of high mass turnover and complex terrain as found over the Antarctic Peninsula.

  8. Storage Gage Precipitation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A storage gage is a precipitation gage that requires reading and maintenance only monthly or seasonal intervals. This library includes reports from such gages,...

  9. WPA Precipitation Tabulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly precipitation data tabulated under the Work Projects Administration (WPA), a New Deal program created to reduce unemployment during the Great Depression....

  10. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  11. Widespread Occurrence of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product (AMPA) in U.S. Soils, Surface Water, Groundwater, and Precipitation, 2001-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauman, K. A.; Flörke, M.; Mueller, N. D.; Foley, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Water is integral to agricultural production, and agriculture is by far the largest human use of water, so food security and water sustainability are inexorably linked. When water goes to food production, however, the benefits and costs are not uniformly distributed across the globe. We quantify the magnitude and global range of the multidimensional tradeoffs among food production, water consumption, and water quality impairment. To evaluate the productivity of water consumption in agriculture, we quantified the magnitude and global range of crop water productivity, the amount of food produced per unit of water consumed, for 16 major food crops (Brauman et al., 2013). We now expand on this, contextualizing the impact of high or low water productivity with information about water availability. Using outputs from the WaterGAP3 model (Flörke et al., 2013, Verzano et al. 2012), we map the burden of agricultural water consumption on total water availability. To incorporate impacts of agriculture on water quality, we include areas of excess nutrient application (Mueller et al., 2012). The integrated information about yield, water consumption, water availability, and nutrient application shows that benefits and impacts to water quantity and quality are not evenly distributed. Analogous to previous investigations of 'yield gaps,' which identified areas where biophysical conditions are sufficient for achieving yields higher than those that are attained (Licker et al., 2010), we show that in many places, for the given impacts to water, food production could be increased.

  12. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Products and Services at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Kempler, S.; Deshong, B.; Greene, M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data within the NASA Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS). The GES DISC is also home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Over the past 17 years, the GES DISC has served the scientific as well as other communities with TRMM data and user-friendly services. During the GPM era, the GES DISC will continue to provide user-friendly data services and customer support to users around the world. GPM products currently and to-be available: -Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products, DPR products -Level-2 Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products, DPR products -Level-3 daily and monthly products, DPR products -Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products (early, late, and final) A dedicated Web portal (including user guides, etc.) has been developed for GPM data (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gpm). Data services that are currently and to-be available include Google-like Mirador (http://mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov/) for data search and access; data access through various Web services (e.g., OPeNDAP, GDS, WMS, WCS); conversion into various formats (e.g., netCDF, HDF, KML (for Google Earth), ASCII); exploration, visualization, and statistical online analysis through Giovanni (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov); generation of value-added products; parameter and spatial subsetting; time aggregation; regridding; data version control and provenance; documentation; science support for proper data usage, FAQ, help desk; monitoring services (e.g. Current Conditions) for applications. The United User Interface (UUI) is the next step in the evolution of the GES DISC web site. It attempts to provide seamless access to data, information and services through a single interface without sending the user to different applications or URLs (e.g., search, access

  13. 序批式中和沉淀法处理钛生产含铬废水研究%Research on Treatment of Titanium Production Chromium- containing Wastewater with Sequencing Batch Reactor Neutralization Precipitation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王威

    2012-01-01

    氯化法海绵钛生产过程中会产生大量的含重金属离子的酸性废水,含有大量的重金属氯化物,主要污染物为Cr(Ⅲ)和Mn(Ⅱ),应当调节pH值至Cr3+沉淀完全,将含铬废水单独处理。采用传统工艺投加石灰乳后沉淀[1],会产生大量的含铬废渣难于处置。本研究通过实验室研究和工程实践,开发了一种序批式的中和沉淀法,可以实现连续准确控制pH值,使铬渣控制在最少量。%A great amount of acidic wastewater containing heavy metal ion will be produced in the process of titanium sponge production, containing a large amount of heavy metal chloride, with principle pollutant of Cr( Ⅲ ) and Mn (Ⅱ). PH value shall be adjusted until Cr3 + is precipitated completely. Chromium- containing wastewater shall be treated separately. To adopt traditional technology of precipitating after add of lime milk will produce a lot of chromium residue which is difficult to be treated. Through lab research and engineering practice, this research develops a sequencing batch reactor neutralization precipitation method which can control pH value continuously and accurately so as to control chromium residue at the minimum amount.

  14. Reducing the Impact of Sampling Bias in NASA MODIS and VIIRS Level 3 Satellite Derived IR SST Observations over the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, P. J.; Liu, Y.; Kilpatrick, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Sea-surface temperature (SST) measurements by satellites in the northern hemisphere high latitudes confront several difficulties. Year-round prevalent clouds, effects near ice edges, and the relative small difference between SST and low-level cloud temperatures lead to a significant loss of infrared observations regardless of the more frequent polar satellite overpasses. Recent research (Liu and Minnett, 2016) identified sampling issues in the Level 3 NASA MODIS SST products when 4km observations are aggregated into global grids at different time and space scales, particularly in the Arctic, where a binary decision cloud mask designed for global data is often overly conservative at high latitudes and results in many gaps and missing data. This under sampling of some Arctic regions results in a warm bias in Level 3 products, likely a result of warmer surface temperature, more distant from the ice edge, being identified more frequently as cloud free. Here we present an improved method for cloud detection in the Arctic using a majority vote from an ensemble of four classifiers trained based on an Alternative Decision Tree (ADT) algorithm (Freund and Mason 1999, Pfahringer et. al. 2001). This new cloud classifier increases sampling of clear pixel by 50% in several regions and generally produces cooler monthly average SST fields in the ice-free Arctic, while still retaining the same error characteristics at 1km resolution relative to in situ observations. SST time series of 12 years of MODIS (Aqua and Terra) and more recently VIIRS sensors are compared and the improvements in errors and uncertainties resulting from better cloud screening for Level 3 gridded products are assessed and summarized.

  15. Comparison of Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature from Meteorological Stations on the Pan-Arctic Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Schmullius

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based temperature measurements are an important indicator for global climate change studies over large areas. Records from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR and (Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer ((AATSR are providing long-term time series information. Assessing the quality of remote sensing-based temperature measurements provides feedback to the climate modeling community and other users by identifying agreements and discrepancies when compared to temperature records from meteorological stations. This paper presents a comparison of state-of-the-art remote sensing-based land surface temperature data with air temperature measurements from meteorological stations on a pan-arctic scale (north of 60° latitude. Within this study, we compared land surface temperature products from (AATSR, MODIS and AVHRR with an in situ air temperature (Tair database provided by the National Climate Data Center (NCDC. Despite analyzing the whole acquisition time period of each land surface temperature product, we focused on the inter-annual variability comparing land surface temperature (LST and air temperature for the overlapping time period of the remote sensing data (2000–2005. In addition, land cover information was included in the evaluation approach by using GLC2000. MODIS has been identified as having the highest agreement in comparison to air temperature records. The time series of (AATSR is highly variable, whereas inconsistencies in land surface temperature data from AVHRR have been found.

  16. Global Precipitation Mission Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Mathew

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) software provides graphic visualization tools that enable easy comparison of ground- and space-based radar observations. It was initially designed to compare ground radar reflectivity from operational, ground-based, S- and C-band meteorological radars with comparable measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite's precipitation radar instrument. This design is also applicable to other groundbased and space-based radars, and allows both ground- and space-based radar data to be compared for validation purposes. The tool creates an operational system that routinely performs several steps. It ingests satellite radar data (precipitation radar data from TRMM) and groundbased meteorological radar data from a number of sources. Principally, the ground radar data comes from national networks of weather radars (see figure). The data ingested by the visualization tool must conform to the data formats used in GPM Validation Network Geometry-matched data product generation. The software also performs match-ups of the radar volume data for the ground- and space-based data, as well as statistical and graphical analysis (including two-dimensional graphical displays) on the match-up data. The visualization tool software is written in IDL, and can be operated either in the IDL development environment or as a stand-alone executable function.

  17. Distribution of soluble and precipitated iron and chromium products generated by anodic dissolution of 316L stainless steel and alloy C-22: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J; Farmer, J; Gordon, S; King, K; Logotetta, L; Silberman, D

    1999-08-11

    At near neutral pH and at applied potentials above the threshold potential for localized breakdown of the passive film, virtually all of the dissolved chromium appeared to be in the hexavalent oxidation state (Cr(VI)). In acidic environments, such as crevice solutions formed during the crevice corrosion of 316L and C-22 samples in 4 M NaCl, virtually all of the dissolved chromium appeared to be in the trivalent oxidation state (Cr(III)). These general observations appear to be consistent with the Pourbaix diagram for chromium (Pourbaix 1974), pp. 307-321. At high pH and high anodic polarization (pH {approximately} 8 and 800 mV vs. SHE), the predominate species is believed to be the soluble chromate anion (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}). At the same pH, but lower polarization (pH {approximately} 8 and 0 mV vs. SHE), the predominate species are believed to be precipitates such as trivalent Cr(OH){sub 3} {center_dot} n(H{sub 2}O) and hexavalent Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In acidified environments such as those found in crevices (pH < 3), soluble Cr{sup 3+} is expected to form over a wide range of potential extending from 400 mV vs. SHE to approximately 1200 mV vs. SHE. Again, this is consistent with the observations from the creviced samples. In earlier studies by the principal investigator, it has been found that low-level chromium contamination in ground water is usually in the hexavalent oxidation state (Farmer et al. 1996). In general, dissolved iron measured during the crevice experiments appears to be Fe(II) in acidic media and Fe(III) in near-neutral and alkaline solutions (table 3). In the case of cyclic polarization measurements, the dissolved iron measured at the end of some cyclic polarization measurements with C-22 appeared to be in the Fe(III) state. This is probably due to the high electrochemical potential at which these species were generated during the potential scan. Note that the reversal potential was approximately 1200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl during these scans. These

  18. Multiresolution comparison of precipitation datasets for large-scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, K. P.; Sapriza Azuri, G.; Davison, B.; DeBeer, C. M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Gridded precipitation datasets are crucial for driving large-scale models which are related to weather forecast and climate research. However, the quality of precipitation products is usually validated individually. Comparisons between gridded precipitation products along with ground observations provide another avenue for investigating how the precipitation uncertainty would affect the performance of large-scale models. In this study, using data from a set of precipitation gauges over British Columbia and Alberta, we evaluate several widely used North America gridded products including the Canadian Gridded Precipitation Anomalies (CANGRD), the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis, the Water and Global Change (WATCH) project, the thin plate spline smoothing algorithms (ANUSPLIN) and Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA). Based on verification criteria for various temporal and spatial scales, results provide an assessment of possible applications for various precipitation datasets. For long-term climate variation studies (~100 years), CANGRD, NCEP, WATCH and ANUSPLIN have different comparative advantages in terms of their resolution and accuracy. For synoptic and mesoscale precipitation patterns, CaPA provides appealing performance of spatial coherence. In addition to the products comparison, various downscaling methods are also surveyed to explore new verification and bias-reduction methods for improving gridded precipitation outputs for large-scale models.

  19. Time series analysis of precipitation and vegetation to detect food production anomalies in the Horn of Africa. The case of Lower Shabelle (Somalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Belenguer-Plomer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Horn of Africa is one of the most food-insecure locations around the world due to the continuous increase of its population and the practice of the subsistence agriculture. This causes that much of the population cannot take the minimum nutritional needs for a healthy life. Moreover, this situation of food vulnerability may be seriously affected in the coming years due to the effects of climate change. The aim of this work is combine the information about the state of the vegetation that offers the NDVI with rainfall data to detect negative anomalies in food production. This work has been used the monthly products of NDVI MOD13A3 of MODIS and the rainfall estimation product TAMSAT, both during the period 2001-2015. With these products we have calculated the average of the entire time period selected and we have detected the years whose NDVI values were further away from the average, being these 2010, 2011 and 2014. Once detected the years with major anomalies in NDVI, there has been an exclusive monthly analysis of those years, where we have analysed the relationships between the value of NDVI and monthly rainfall, obtaining a direct relationship between the two values. It also has been used crop calendar to focus the analysis in the months of agricultural production and finding that the main cause of anomalies in vegetation is a decrease in the registration of rainfall during the months of agricultural production. This reason explains the origin of the food shortages that occurred in 2010 and 2011 that generated an enormous humanitarian crisis in this area.

  20. Impact of Precipitation Fluctuation on Desert-Grassland ANPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangxu Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation change has significantly influenced annual net primary productivity (ANPP at either annual or seasonal scales in desert steppes in arid and semi-arid regions. In order to reveal the process of precipitation driving ANPP at different time scales, responses of different ANPP levels to the inter-annual and intra-annual precipitation fluctuations were analyzed. ANPP was reversed by building a ground reflectance spectrum model, from 2000 to 2015, using the normalized differential vegetation index of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-NDVI data at 250 m × 250 m spatial resolution. Since the description of the differently expressing forms of precipitation are not sufficient in former studies in order to overcome the deficiency of former studies, in this study, intra-annual precipitation fluctuations were analyzed not only with precipitation of May–August, June–August, July–August, and August, respectively, which have direct influence on vegetation productivity within the year, but quantitative description, vector precipitation (R, concentration ratio (Cd, and concentration period (D, were also used to describe the overall characteristics of intra-annual precipitation fluctuations. The concentration ratio and the maximum precipitation period of the intra-annual precipitation were represented by using monthly precipitation. The results showed that: (1 in the period from 1971 to 2015, the maximum annual precipitation is 3.76 times that of the minimum in the Urat desert steppe; (2 vector precipitation is more significantly related to ANPP (r = 0.7724, p = 0.000 compared to meteorological annual precipitation and real annual precipitation influence; and (3 annual precipitation is almost concentrated in 5–8 months and monthly precipitation accumulation has significantly effected ANPP, especially in the period of June–August, since the vegetation composition in the study area was mainly sub-shrubs and perennial

  1. Acid precipitation - Effects on forest and fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overrein, L.N.; Seip, H.M.; Tollan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The Norwegian Interdisciplinary Research Programme 'Acid Precipitation - Effects on Forest and Fish' (The SNSF-project) was initiated in 1972. The main objectives of the SNSF-project have been to: (1) establish as precisely as possible the effects of acid precipitation on forest and freshwater fish, (2) investigate the effects of air pollutants on soil, vegetation and water, required to satisfy point 1. The final report summarizes the results of the entire program on the basis of some 300 SNSF reports and data presented in various international journals in the period 1972-80. Attention is given to emissions and transport, atmospheric deposits in Norway, water acidification - status and trends, chemical modifications of precipitation in contact with soil and vegetation, snow and snowmelt, land-use changes and acidification, conceptual models for water acidification, effects of acid precipitation on soil productivity and plant growth, and effects of acid water on aquatic life.

  2. Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ: Part II - Parameterization Based on Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  3. Lightning NOx Production in CMAQ: Part II - Parameterization Based on Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning Strikes and Modeled Convective Precipitation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past dec...

  4. Real-Time Estimation of Satellite-Derived PM2.5 Based on a Semi-Physical Geographically Weighted Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhao; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Zhongmin; Gong, Wei; Ji, Yuxi; Huang, Yusi

    2016-01-01

    The real-time estimation of ambient particulate matter with diameter no greater than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is currently quite limited in China. A semi-physical geographically weighted regression (GWR) model was adopted to estimate PM2.5 mass concentrations at national scale using the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aerosol Optical Depth product fused by the Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) algorithms, combined with meteorological parameters. The fitting results could explain over 80% of the variability in the corresponding PM2.5 mass concentrations, and the estimation tends to overestimate when measurement is low and tends to underestimate when measurement is high. Based on World Health Organization standards, results indicate that most regions in China suffered severe PM2.5 pollution during winter. Seasonal average mass concentrations of PM2.5 predicted by the model indicate that residential regions, namely Jing-Jin-Ji Region and Central China, were faced with challenge from fine particles. Moreover, estimation deviation caused primarily by the spatially uneven distribution of monitoring sites and the changes of elevation in a relatively small region has been discussed. In summary, real-time PM2.5 was estimated effectively by the satellite-based semi-physical GWR model, and the results could provide reasonable references for assessing health impacts and offer guidance on air quality management in China. PMID:27706054

  5. Satellite-Derived Distributions, Inventories and Fluxes of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matter Along the Northeastern U.S. Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, A.; Hooker, S. B.; Hyde, K.; Novak, M. G.; Pan, X.; Friedrichs, M.; Cahill, B.; Wilkin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries and the coastal ocean experience a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as a consequence of riverine and estuarine fluxes of terrigenous DOM, sediments, detritus and nutrients into coastal waters and associated phytoplankton blooms. Our approach integrates biogeochemical measurements, optical properties and remote sensing to examine the distributions and inventories of organic carbon in the U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine. Algorithms developed to retrieve colored DOM (CDOM), Dissolved (DOC) and Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) from NASA's MODIS-Aqua and SeaWiFS satellite sensors are applied to quantify the distributions and inventories of DOC and POC. Horizontal fluxes of DOC and POC from the continental margin to the open ocean are estimated from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua distributions of DOC and POC and horizontal divergence fluxes obtained from the Northeastern North Atlantic ROMS model. SeaWiFS and MODIS imagery reveal the importance of estuarine outflow to the export of CDOM and DOC to the coastal ocean and a net community production of DOC on the shelf.

  6. as the Strengthening Precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2014-12-01

    Generally, Laves phase and M23C6 are regarded as undesirable phases in creep-resistant steels due to their very high-coarsening rates and the resulting depletion of beneficial alloying elements from the matrix. In this study, a computational alloy design approach is presented to develop martensitic steels strengthened by Laves phase and/or M23C6, for which the coarsening rates are tailored such that they are at least one order of magnitude lower than those in existing alloys. Their volume fractions are optimized by tuning the chemical composition in parallel. The composition domain covering 10 alloying elements at realistic levels is searched by a genetic algorithm to explore the full potential of simultaneous maximization of the volume fraction and minimization of the precipitates coarsening rate. The calculations show that Co and W can drastically reduce the coarsening rate of Laves and M23C6 and yield high-volume fractions of precipitates. Mo on the other hand was shown to have a minimal effect on coarsening. The strengthening effects of Laves phase and M23C6 in the newly designed alloys are compared to existing counterparts, showing substantially higher precipitation-strengthening contributions especially after a long service time. New alloys were designed in which both Laves phase and M23C6 precipitates act as strengthening precipitates. Successfully combining MX and M23C6 was found to be impossible.

  7. Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) - Pentad, Version 2.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) comprises a total of 27 products. The Version 2.2 Pentad product covers the period January 1979 to the present,...

  8. Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) - Monthly, Version 2.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) comprises a total of 27 products with the two primary products being the monthly satellite-gauge and associated...

  9. Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) - Daily, Version 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) comprises a total of 27 products. The Version 1.2 Daily product covers the period October 1998 to the present,...

  10. High-resolution satellite-derived ocean surface winds in the Nordic-Barents seas region: Implications for ocean modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukhovskoy, D. S.; Bourassa, M. A.; Hughes, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution (0.25°) ocean surface wind velocity data derived from satellite observations are used to analyze winds in the Nordic-Barents seas during 2007-2008. For the analysis, a Cross-Calibrated, Multi-Platform (CCMP), multi-instrument ocean surface wind velocity data set is utilized. The product has been developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) within Making Earth Science data records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Program. A variational method was used to combine wind measurements derived from satellite-born active and passive remote sensing instruments. In the objective procedure, winds from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Operational Analysis (DS111.1) were used as the background fields. The ocean surface wind fields are compared with those derived from the National Centers for Environmental Protection/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. The NCEP/NCAR fields are commonly used to provide atmospheric forcing for Arctic Ocean models. The utility of using high-resolution winds in the ocean modeling is discussed. In particular, air-sea heat fluxes estimated from the two wind data sets are compared. It is anticipated that wind fields with higher spatial and temporal resolution will better resolve small-scale, short-lived atmospheric systems. As an example, the ice free region in the Nordic and Barents seas is frequently impacted by very intense cyclones known as “polar lows” with wind speeds near to or above gale force. A polar low forms over the sea and predominantly during the winter months. The size of these cyclones varies greatly from 100 to 1000 km. Presumably small-scale cyclones are misrepresented or not resolved in the NCAR fields leading to biases in the air-sea flux calculations in the ocean models. Inaccurate estimates of the air-sea fluxes eventually lead to biases in the Arctic Ocean model solutions.

  11. Using the satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to explain ranging patterns in a lek-breeding antelope: the importance of scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro-Jørgensen, Jakob; Brown, Molly E; Pettorelli, Nathalie

    2008-11-01

    Lek-breeding species are characterized by a negative association between territorial resource availability and male mating success; however, the impact of resources on the overall distribution patterns of the two sexes in lek systems is not clear. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) has recently emerged as a powerful proxy measure for primary productivity, allowing the links between the distributions of animals and resources to be explored. Using NDVI at four spatial resolutions, we here investigate how the distribution of the two sexes in a lek-breeding population of topi antelopes relates to resource abundance before and during the rut. We found that in the dry season preceding the rut, topi density correlated positively with NDVI at the large, but not the fine, scale. This suggests that before the rut, when resources were relatively scant, topi preferred pastures where green grass was widely abundant. The pattern was less pronounced in males, suggesting that the need for territorial attendance prevents males from tracking resources as freely as females do. During the rut, which occurs in the wet season, both male and female densities correlated negatively with NDVI at the fine scale. At this time, resources were generally plentiful and the results suggest that, rather than by resource maximization, distribution during the rut was determined by benefits of aggregating on relatively resource-poor leks for mating, and possibly antipredator, purposes. At the large scale, no correlation between density and NDVI was found during the rut in either sex, which can be explained by leks covering areas too small to be reflected at this resolution. The study illustrates that when investigating spatial organization, it is important: (1) to choose the appropriate analytic scale, and (2) to consider behavioural as well as strictly ecological factors.

  12. Uncertainty Estimation of Global Precipitation Measurement through Objective Validation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, H.; Utsumi, N.; Seto, S.; Oki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Since Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has been launched in 1997 as the first satellite mission dedicated to measuring precipitation, the spatiotemporal gaps of precipitation observation have been filled significantly. On February 27th, 2014, Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) satellite has been launched as a core observatory of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), an international multi-satellite mission aiming to provide the global three hourly map of rainfall and snowfall. In addition to Ku-band, Ka-band radar is newly equipped, and their combination is expected to introduce higher precision than the precipitation measurement of TRMM/PR. In this study, the GPM level-2 orbit products are evaluated comparing to various precipitation observations which include TRMM/PR, in-situ data, and ground radar. In the preliminary validation over intercross orbits of DPR and TRMM, Ku-band measurements in both satellites shows very close spatial pattern and intensity, and the DPR is capable to capture broader range of precipitation intensity than of the TRMM. Furthermore, we suggest a validation strategy based on 'objective classification' of background atmospheric mechanisms. The Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) and auxiliary datasets (e.g., tropical cyclone best track) is used to objectively determine the types of precipitation. Uncertainty of abovementioned precipitation products is quantified as their relative differences and characterized for different precipitation mechanism. Also, it is discussed how the uncertainty affects the synthesis of TRMM and GPM for a long-term satellite precipitation observation records which is internally consistent.

  13. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  14. Relationship Between Satellite-Derived Snow Cover and Snowmelt-Runoff Timing and Stream Power in the Wind River Range, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Riggs, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Earlier onset of springtime weather including earlier snowmelt has been documented in the western United States over at least the last 50 years. Because the majority (>70%) of the water supply in the western U.S. comes from snowmelt, analysis of the declining spring snowpack (and shrinking glaciers) has important implications for streamflow management. The amount of water in a snowpack influences stream discharge which can also influence erosion and sediment transport by changing stream power, or the rate at which a stream can do work such as move sediment and erode the stream bed. The focus of this work is the Wind River Range (WRR) in west-central Wyoming. Ten years of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover, cloud- gap-filled (CGF) map products and 30 years of discharge and meteorological station data are studied. Streamflow data from six streams in the WRR drainage basins show lower annual discharge and earlier snowmelt in the decade of the 2000s than in the previous three decades, though no trend of either lower streamflow or earlier snowmelt was observed using MODIS snow-cover maps within the decade of the 2000s. Results show a statistically-significant trend at the 95% confidence level (or higher) of increasing weekly maximum air temperature (for three out of the five meteorological stations studied) in the decade of the 1970s, and also for the 40-year study period. MODIS-derived snow cover (percent of basin covered) measured on 30 April explains over 89% of the variance in discharge for maximum monthly streamflow in the decade of the 2000s using Spearman rank correlation analysis. We also investigated stream power for Bull Lake Creek Above Bull Lake from 1970 to 2009; a statistically-significant end toward reduced stream power was found (significant at the 90% confidence level). Observed changes in streamflow and stream power may be related to increasing weekly maximum air temperature measured during the 40-year study period. The

  15. Satellite-derived high resolution PM2.5 concentrations in Yangtze River Delta Region of China using improved linear mixed effects model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zongwei; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyue; Liu, Miaomiao; Zhou, Yuanchun; Bi, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Satellite remotely sensed aerosol optical depth (AOD) provides an effective way to fill the spatial and temporal gaps left by ground PM2.5 monitoring network. Previous studies have established robust advanced statistical models to estimate PM2.5 using AOD data in China. However, their coarse resolutions (˜10 km or greater) of PM2.5 estimations are not enough to support the health effect studies at urban scales. In this study, 3 km AOD data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 products were used to estimate the high resolution PM2.5 concentrations in Yangtze Delta Region of China. We proposed a nested linear mixed effects (LME) model including nested month-, week-, and day-specific random effects of PM2.5-AOD relationships. Validation results show that the LME model only with day-specific random effects (non-nested model) used in previous studies has poor performance in the days without PM2.5-AOD matchups (the R2 of day-of-year-based cross validation (DOY-based CV) is 0.148). The results also show that our nested model cannot improve the performance of non-nested model in the days with PM2.5-AOD matchups (sample-based CV R2 = 0.671 for nested model vs. 0.661 for non-nested model), but can greatly improve the model performance beyond those days (DOY-based CV R2 = 0.339 for nested model vs. 0.148 for non-nested model). To further improve the model performance, we applied the "buffer models" (i.e., models fitted from datasets which ground PM2.5 were matched with the average AOD values within certain radius buffer zones of gridded PM2.5 data) on the 3 km AOD data since the "buffer models" has more days with PM2.5-AOD matchups and can provide more day-specific relationships. The results of this study show that 3 km MODIS C6 AOD data can be used to estimate PM2.5 concentrations and can provide more detailed spatial information for urban scale studies. The application of our nested LME model can greatly improve the accuracy of 3 km PM2

  16. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  17. Influência das precipitações na produtividade agrícola no Estado da Paraíba Influence of precipitations on agricultural productivity in Paraíba State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindenberg L. da Silva

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, realizado em quatro microrregiões da Paraíba no período de 1990 a 2005, objetivou-se determinar as correlações entre as precipitações pluviais durante a safra para as culturas de cana-de-açúcar e abacaxi, nas microrregiões do Litoral e Brejo, e as correlações entre as precipitações durante o período chuvoso e as produtividades de algodão herbáceo, na microrregião do Sertão e do sisal, no Cariri/Curimataú. Os testes realizados com as equações de regressões polinomiais utilizando-se apenas a precipitação pluvial da pré-estação chuvosa ou do período chuvoso como variável independente, não foram suficientes para estimar a produtividade da cana-de-açúcar no Litoral, vez que pequenos volumes de precipitação não suprem as necessidades hídricas da cultura. A produtividade do abacaxi não mostrou correlações significativas com as precipitações pluviais nas microrregiões do Litoral e Brejo. Obtiveram-se fortes correlações entre as precipitações pluviais durante o período chuvoso e as produtividades de algodão herbáceo no Sertão paraibano e, para o sisal no Cariri/Curimataú. Com a estimativa da precipitação durante o período chuvoso poder-se-á decidir plantar, ou não, em determinada microrregião.This study was carried out in four homogeneous pluviometric micro regions of Paraíba State between 1990 and 2005. The aims were to determine the relationships between crops of sugar-cane and pineapple productivity and production season rainfall in the Litoral and 'Brejo' micro regions, the relationships between the rainy season precipitations and herbecious cotton productivity in the Sertão, and sisal in the Cariri/Curimataú micro regions. Tests accomplished with polinomial regression equations, using only early rainy season or rainy season as the independent variable were not sufficient to estimate sugar-cane productivity in the Litoral, therefore small rainfall quantities do not supply the

  18. Satellite derived 30-year trends in terrestrial frozen and non-frozen seasons and associated impacts to vegetation and atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Kimball, J. S.; McDonald, K. C.; Glassy, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    surface air temperatures for the domain as derived from global model reanalysis. The F/T results explain much (64.5%, P<0.001) of the mean temporal variability in the timing of CO2 drawdown by vegetation photosynthesis in spring over northern land areas. The F/T results also correspond significantly with NDVI temporal anomalies. However, correspondence between non-frozen period and NDVI is weaker after 2000 relative to earlier decades due to recent increases in the extent and severity of drought and associated water balance limitations to productivity. This work was performed at the University of Montana and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. 丙烯腈水相沉淀聚合生产工艺研究%Research on productive process of precipitation polymerization of acrylonitrilein water phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐振波

    2011-01-01

    对丙烯腈/醋酸乙烯酯二元共聚体系进行了研究,分析了影响丙烯腈水相沉淀聚合的工艺因素.结果表明:NaClO3的加入量是单体质量的0.45%~0.65%,m(NaClO3):m(NaHSO3)=(1:3)~(1:5),单体浓度为30%~35%,m(AN):m(VAc)控制在7.5~12;聚合停留时间45~50 min;聚合温度55~60℃(偏差在±0.5℃);Cu2+含量30~45 mL/m3;NaNO3加入量为单体质量的0.4%~0.6%;聚合体系pH值是2.1~2.7;巯基乙醇(β-ME)的加人量为单体质量的0.15%~0.55%,搅拌速度为200 r/min左右.在此操作条件下,聚合物平均分子量在48000~64000范围内,聚合反应转化率超过81%,不但满足多种性能腈纶纤维的生产要求,而且经济合理.%AN/VAc terpolymer was studied by aqueous deposited polymerization , the influence factors on precipitation polymerization of acrylonitrile were analyzed in aqueous medium. The result shows that under the conditions of NaClO3/( AN + VAc) mass ratio of 0. 45% ~0. 65% , NaClO3/NaHSO3 mass ratio of ( 1∶ 3) ~ ( 1∶ 5) , monomer concentration of 30% ~ 35% . AN/VAc mass ratio of 7. 5 ~ 12, polymerization remaining time of 45 ~50 min , polymerization temperature of 55 ~ 60 ℃ ( deviton ± 0. 5℃ ) , Cu2 + content of 30~45 mL/m3·NaNO3/( AN + VAc) mass ratio of 0. 4% ~ 0. 6% , the system pH value of 2. 1 ~ 2. 7 ,β-ME/( AN + VAc) mass ratio of 0. 15 %~ 0. 55% , stirring velocity about 200 r/min, molecular weight of the polymer was 48 000 - 64 000, the conversion of polymerization over 81% . Not only can the polymer technology meet the demand of many kinds property acrylic fiber,but also it is economic and reasonable.

  20. Precipitation-induced runoff and leaching from milled peat mining mires by peat types: A comparative method for estimating the loading of water bodies during peat production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svahnbaeck, L.

    2007-07-01

    Finland has some 10 million hectares of peatland, accounting for almost a third of its total area. Macroclimatic conditions have varied in the course of the Holocene growth and development of this peatland, and with them the habitats of the peat-forming plants. Temperatures and moisture conditions have played a significant role in determining the dominant species of mire plants growing there at any particular time, the resulting mire types and the accumulation and deposition of plant remains to form the peat. While in a natural state the mires of Finland have functioned as carbon dioxide sinks throughout the post-glacial period, but the ditching of peatland for forestry and agriculture, amounting to some 5,7 million hectares in Finland, has affected their water balance, especially over the last hundred years, and has thereby altered the quantity and species composition of the mire vegetation. The invasion of trees and woody plants to replace the typical mire plants following ditching for forestry purposes has stimulated the decomposition of the already accumulated peat and promoted the humification of the microbiologically active root system layer. The above climatic, environmental and mire development factors, together with ditching, have contributed, and continue to contribute, to the existence of peat horizons that differ in their physical and chemical properties, leading to differences in material transport between peatlands in a natural state and mires that have been ditched or prepared for forestry and peat production. Watercourse loading from the ditching of mires or their use for peat production can have detrimental effects on river and lake environments and their recreational use, especially where oxygen-consuming organic solids and soluble organic substances and nutrients are concerned. It has not previously been possible, however, to estimate in advance the watercourse loading likely to arise from ditching and peat production on the basis of the

  1. Precipitation Reconstruction (PREC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The PREC data set is an analysis of monthly precipitation constructed on a 2.5(o)lat/lon grid over the global for the period from 1948 to the present. The land...

  2. Reaction systems with precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rogalski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes expanding Reaction Systems of Ehrenfeucht and Rozenberg by incorporating precipitation reactions into it. This improves the computing power of Reaction Systems by allowing us to implement a stack. This addition enables us to implement a Deterministic Pushdown Automaton.

  3. The Contribution Of Sampling Errors In Satellite Precipitation Estimates To High Flood Uncertainty In Subtropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, E. M.; Valdes, J. B.; Nijssen, B.; Rodriguez, D.; Su, F.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite precipitation estimates are becoming increasingly available at temporal and spatial scales of interest for hydrological applications. Unfortunately precipitation estimated from global satellites is prone to errors hailing from different sources. The impact of sampling errors on the hydrological cycle of a large-size basin was assessed with a macroscale hydrological model. Synthetic precipitation fields were generated in a Monte Carlo fashion by perturbing observed precipitation fields with sampling errors. Three sampling intervals were chosen to generate the precipitation fields: one-hour, three-hours which is the canonical Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sampling interval, and six-hours. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model was used to assess the impact of sampling errors on hydrological fluxes and states in the Iguazu basin in South America for the period 1982-2005. The propagation of sampling errors through the hydrological cycle was evaluated for high flow events that have the 2% chance of being exceeded in any given time. Results show that observed event volumes are underestimated for small volumes for the three and six-hours sampling intervals but for the one-hour sampling interval the difference is almost negligible.The timing of the hydrograph is not affected by uncertainty existent in satellite-derived precipitation when it propagates through the hydrological cycle. Results of two non-parametric tests: the Kruskal-Wallis test on the mean ranks of the population and the Ansari-Bradley test on the equality of the variances indicate that sampling errors do no affect the occurrence of high flows since their probability distribution is not affected. The applicability of these results is limited to a humid climate. However the Iguazu basin is representative of several basins located in subtropical regions around the world, many of which are under-instrumented catchments, where satellite precipitation might be one of the few available data

  4. Limnological aspects of acid precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrey, G.R. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Lakes and streams in parts of Norway, Sweden, Canada, and the United States are being severely impacted by acidic precipitation. Scientists meeting at Sagamore, New York, agreed that this is the most serious limnological problem today. The factor responsible for determining the sensitivity of surface waters to acidification is alkalinity derived by weathering of soils and bedrock in the watershed. Acidification, defined as a reduction in alkalinity, can be quantified if preacidification alkalinity data exist, but often they do not. Data on pH and Ca from surface waters in areas not affected by acid precipitation were compared to similar data from areas which receive precipitation with a weighted average hydrogen ion concentration of pH < 4.6. A semiquantitative estimation of surface water acidification can be made for lakes and streams, where earlier chemistry data are lacking, based on this analysis of pH and Ca data. Biological responses to acidification range from a reduction in numbers of species of algae and zooplankton to complete elimination of all fish life. Major biological processes such as primary production and decomposition may be altered leading to an accumulation of plant material and organic debris within lakes and streams. Increased concentrations of aluminum from the ..mu..g/l to mg/l range have been found at levels shown to be toxic to fish. These elevated levels apparently result from the exchange of H/sup +/ and Al in the watershed. There also appears to be a relationship between lake acidification and the accumulation of mercury in fish. Problems of aluminum analysis received detailed attention, and watershed mass balances, comparative watershed studies, whole lake manipulations, synoptic surveys, and the liming of acidified waters were discussed. A priority-rated list of recommendations for research was presented.

  5. Ethanol precipitation analysis of thymus histone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvoet, P.

    1957-01-01

    An analytical ethanol precipitation technique, similar to 's salting-out procedure, was used for the characterisation of whole thymus histone and the products obtained by preparative ethanol fractionation. The analysis was carried out at —5° C and pH 6.5. Whole histone prepared according to et al.,

  6. A global analysis of the impact of drought on net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of drought on interannual variability of net primary productivity (NPP from 1997 to 2009, using the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI drought index and satellite-derived vegetation greenness converted to NPP. SPEI is positive for wet conditions and negative for dry conditions. We found that SPEI and NPP were coupled and showed in-phase behaviour on a global scale. We then used the Köppen climate classification to study the SPEI–NPP relations regionally and found that while NPP and SPEI were positively related (high SPEI, high NPP in arid and in seasonal dry regions, the opposite occurs in most boreal regions (high SPEI, low NPP. High intensity drought events, such as the 2003 drought in Europe were picked up by our analysis. Our findings suggest that the strong positive relation between global average moisture availability and NPP consists of a composite of the positive relation across dry regions and the coherent NPP decline during and after intensive drought events in humid regions. Importantly, we also found that there are many areas on the globe that show no strong correlation between drought and NPP.

  7. A global analysis of the impact of drought on net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of drought on interannual variability of NPP from 1997 to 2009 using the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI drought index and satellite-derived vegetation greenness converted net primary productivity (NPP. We found that SPEI and NPP were coupled and in phase on a global scale. We then used the Köppen climate classification to study the SPEI-NPP relations regionally and found that while NPP and SPEI were positively related in arid and in seasonal dry regions, the opposite occurs in most boreal regions. However, high intensity drought events, such as the 2003 drought in Europe, will lead to a reduction of NPP despite NPP being usually limited by temperature and radiation here. Our findings suggest that the strong positive relation between global average moisture availability and NPP is a composite of the positive relation across dry regions and the coherent NPP decline during and after intensive drought event in humid regions. The spatial patterns of drought impact on NPP could thus be categorized by climate classification, which implies that the predication of climate zone evaluation will contribute to the quantification of the future terrestrial carbon cycle.

  8. Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bora Mavis

    2003-12-12

    Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of

  9. Validation of remote sensed precipitation with the use of hydrological models - methodology and first results achieved in the frame of EUMETSAT H-SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeta, B.; Niedbala, J. M.; Niedbala, J. S.; Struzik, P.

    2009-04-01

    High variability of precipitation in space and time causes difficulties in proper validation of remote sensed rain rates using conventional ground measurements and observations. Insufficient number and spatial resolution of ground data and their questionable quality make this task even more difficult. Therefore, the idea of independent assessment of the quality of satellite-derived data with the use of operational hydrological models has been implemented in the frame of EUMETSAT. In the paper, the assumptions and methodology of H-SAF hydrological validation will be described. Additionally, the preliminary hydrological validation results obtained for the six month time series of H-SAF precipitation rain rate will be presented. The quality of the rain rate were analyzed using two hydrological model MIKE 11 and Modelling Platform, run in Hydrological Forecasting Office in Krakow, Poland. The differences between the outcomes from these models will be discussed as well.

  10. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  11. A multi-source precipitation approach to fill gaps over a radar precipitation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfagiorgis, K. B.; Mahani, S. E.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite Precipitation Estimates (SPEs) may be the only available source of information for operational hydrologic and flash flood prediction due to spatial limitations of radar and gauge products. The present work develops an approach to seamlessly blend satellite, radar, climatological and gauge precipitation products to fill gaps over ground-based radar precipitation fields. To mix different precipitation products, the bias of any of the products relative to each other should be removed. For bias correction, the study used an ensemble-based method which aims to estimate spatially varying multiplicative biases in SPEs using a radar rainfall product. Bias factors were calculated for a randomly selected sample of rainy pixels in the study area. Spatial fields of estimated bias were generated taking into account spatial variation and random errors in the sampled values. A weighted Successive Correction Method (SCM) is proposed to make the merging between error corrected satellite and radar rainfall estimates. In addition to SCM, we use a Bayesian spatial method for merging the gap free radar with rain gauges, climatological rainfall sources and SPEs. We demonstrate the method using SPE Hydro-Estimator (HE), radar- based Stage-II, a climatological product PRISM and rain gauge dataset for several rain events from 2006 to 2008 over three different geographical locations of the United States. Results show that: the SCM method in combination with the Bayesian spatial model produced a precipitation product in good agreement with independent measurements. The study implies that using the available radar pixels surrounding the gap area, rain gauge, PRISM and satellite products, a radar like product is achievable over radar gap areas that benefits the scientific community.

  12. Public Release of 30-year (1979-2008) NLDAS High-resolution Products - Analysis and Validation for Soil Moisture and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y.; Ek, M. B.; Wood, E. F.; Luo, L.; Sheffield, J.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Livneh, B.; Mocko, D. M.; Cosgrove, B.; Meng, C. J.; Wei, H.; Koren, V.; Schaake, J. C.; Mo, K. C.; Mitchell, K.

    2009-12-01

    The NCEP Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) collaborated with its CPPA (Climate Prediction Program of the Americas) partners to develop a North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS, http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/mmb/nldas). The NLDAS includes multi-model analysis/monitoring products to focus on drought and flooding monitoring. NLDAS products consist of 30-year (1979-2008) retrospective and 0.5-year near realtime (2009-current time, with a 4-day lag) water (i.e., evapotranspiration, runoff, canopy evaporation, sublimation) and energy (sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, ground heat flux, net radiation) fluxes, and state (i.e., soil moisture with different layers, soil temperatures, snow water equivalent, snow depth, snow cover) variables with an hourly temporal resolution and a 1/8th degree spatial resolution for four land surface models (NCEP/Noah, NASA/Mosaic, OHD/SAC, and Princeton/VIC). This study used common hourly land surface forcing derived from NCEP's retrospective and realtime North American Regional Reanalysis System (NARR) except for precipitation. The precipitation forcing is anchored to a daily gauge-only precipitation analysis over CONUS that applies the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) correction. This daily precipitation analysis is then temporally disaggregated to hourly precipitation amounts using stage II radar and satellite retrieved precipitation products. The NARR-based surface downward solar radiation is bias-corrected using seven years (1997-2004) of GOES satellite-derived solar radiation retrievals. This presentation summarizes the NLDAS concept, configuration, forcing data, the four land surface models and their output. All 30-year hourly forcing and hourly outputs from four land surface models are stored on a NCEP public server, which can be download by public users. In this presentation, we analyze soil moisture and temperature for four models and validate them using the Illinois soil

  13. A comparison study of summer-time synoptic-scale waves in South China and the Yangtze River basin using the TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis daily product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Summer-time synoptic-scale waves in South China and the Yangtze River basin are quantified and compared by means of analyzing the 6-year (1998-2004) TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) daily product. An innovative 3-dimensional spectrum analysis method is applied. The results indicate that synoptic-scale waves appearing in South China prominently propagate westward within a zonal wavenumber range of 9-21 and a frequency range of -0.12--0.22 cycles day?1, while those in the Yangtze River basin primarily move eastward with the same characteristic wavenumbers of 9-21, but within a frequency range of 0.2-0.29 cycles day-1. Zonal and meridional distributions, and seasonal variations of these waves are further explored and compared. It shows that summer-time synoptic-scale waves in the South China result from the northward migration and oscillation of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the western Pacific, whereas the ones in the Yangtze River basin are generally related to the synoptic troughs within the westerly flow, originating from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  14. Precipitation alters interactions in a grassland ecological community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguines, Nicolas; Brashares, Justin S; Prugh, Laura R

    2017-03-01

    Climate change is transforming precipitation regimes world-wide. Changes in precipitation regimes are known to have powerful effects on plant productivity, but the consequences of these shifts for the dynamics of ecological communities are poorly understood. This knowledge gap hinders our ability to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. Precipitation may affect fauna through direct effects on physiology, behaviour or demography, through plant-mediated indirect effects, or by modifying interactions among species. In this paper, we examined the response of a semi-arid ecological community to a fivefold change in precipitation over 7 years. We examined the effects of precipitation on the dynamics of a grassland ecosystem in central California from 2007 to 2013. We conducted vegetation surveys, pitfall trapping of invertebrates, visual surveys of lizards and capture-mark-recapture surveys of rodents on 30 plots each year. We used structural equation modelling to evaluate the direct, indirect and modifying effects of precipitation on plants, ants, beetles, orthopterans, kangaroo rats, ground squirrels and lizards. We found pervasive effects of precipitation on the ecological community. Although precipitation increased plant biomass, direct effects on fauna were often stronger than plant-mediated effects. In addition, precipitation altered the sign or strength of consumer-resource and facilitative interactions among the faunal community such that negative or neutral interactions became positive or vice versa with increasing precipitation. These findings indicate that precipitation influences ecological communities in multiple ways beyond its recognized effects on primary productivity. Stochastic variation in precipitation may weaken the average strength of biotic interactions over time, thereby increasing ecosystem stability and resilience to climate change.

  15. Assessing surface water consumption using remotely-sensed groundwater, evapotranspiration, and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ray G.; Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of consumptive use of surface water by agriculture are vital for assessing food security, managing water rights, and evaluating anthropogenic impacts on regional hydrology. However, reliable, current, and public data on consumptive use can be difficult to obtain, particularly in international and less developed basins. We combine remotely-sensed precipitation and satellite observations of evapotranspiration and groundwater depletion to estimate surface water consumption by irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley for the 2004-09 water years. We validated our technique against measured consumption data determined from streamflow observations and water export data in the Central Valley. Mean satellite-derived surface water consumption was 291.0 ± 32.4 mm/year while measured surface water consumption was 308.1 ± 6.5 mm/year. The results show the potential for remotely-sensed hydrologic data to independently observe irrigated agriculture's surface water consumption in contested or unmonitored basins. Improvements in the precision and spatial resolution of satellite precipitation, evapotranspiration and gravimetric groundwater observations are needed to reduce the uncertainty in this method and to allow its use on smaller basins and at shorter time scales.

  16. The Version 2 Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Monthly Precipitation Analysis (1979-Present)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Chang, Alfred; Ferraro, Ralph; Xie, Ping-Ping; Janowiak, John; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David

    2003-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Version 2 Monthly Precipitation Analysis is described. This globally complete, monthly analysis of surface precipitation at 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees latitude-longitude resolution is available from January 1979 to the present. It is a merged analysis that incorporates precipitation estimates from low-orbit-satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit-satellite infrared data, and rain gauge observations. The merging approach utilizes the higher accuracy of the low-orbit microwave observations to calibrate, or adjust, the more frequent geosynchronous infrared observations. The data set is extended back into the premicrowave era (before 1987) by using infrared-only observations calibrated to the microwave-based analysis of the later years. The combined satellite-based product is adjusted by the raingauge analysis. This monthly analysis is the foundation for the GPCP suite of products including those at finer temporal resolution, satellite estimate, and error estimates for each field. The 23-year GPCP climatology is characterized, along with time and space variations of precipitation.

  17. Study of aluminum nitride precipitation in Fe- 3%Si steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.L. Alcântara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For good performance of electrical steels it is necessary a high magnetic induction and a low power loss when submitted to cyclic magnetization. A fine dispersion of precipitates is a key requirement in the manufacturing process of Fe- 3%Si grain oriented electrical steel. In the production of high permeability grain oriented steel precipitate particles of copper and manganese sulphides and aluminium nitride delay normal grain growth during primary recrystallization, causing preferential growth of grains with Goss orientation during secondary recrystallization. The sulphides precipitate during the hot rolling process. The aluminium nitride particles are formed during hot rolling and the hot band annealing process. In this work AlN precipitation during hot deformation of a high permeability grain oriented 3%Si steel is examined. In the study, transfer bar samples were submitted to controlled heating, compression and cooling treatments in order to simulate a reversible hot rolling finishing. The samples were analyzed using the transmission electron microscope (TEM in order to identify the precipitates and characterize size distribution. Precipitate extraction by dissolution method and analyses by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES were used to quantify the precipitation. The results allowed to describe the precipitation kinetics by a precipitation-time-temperature (PTT diagram for AlN formation during hot rolling.

  18. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    CERN Document Server

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  19. 温度降水等气候因子变化对中国玉米产量的影响%Effect of climatic factors such as temperature, precipitation on maize production in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王柳; 熊伟; 温小乐; 冯灵芝

    2014-01-01

    . Information about the climatic risks posed on crop growth, and yield responses to the specific climatic risks is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms of climate change impacts and devising appropriate adaptation strategies. This study first identified the changes of growing-season climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation) from 1982-2006 for China’s maize production. Using the relationships between changes in survey maize yield and climatic variables and their spatial variations, we investigated and untangled the impacts of different climatic variables on maize yield. Our analysis demonstrated that the growing-season temperatures, including daily maximum, minimum and mean temperatures, exhibited significant increase during 1981-2006, indicating the potential climatic risks for maize growth in China. Growing-season diurnal temperature range, precipitation and solar radiation also exhibited detectable changes, but limited to small parts of the maize area. During 1981-2006, there were significant negative correlations between national maize yield and temperatures (include mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures). Maize yield in some maize areas also exhibited linear correlation relationship to growing-season diurnal temperature range, solar radiation, and precipitation. With a 1℃ warming in growing-season temperature, 1℃ increase in diurnal temperature range, a 10% decrease in radiation and precipitation, much of the maize area showed detectable yield response to these changes. Maize experienced depressed yield to the 1℃ warming in growing-season temperature, denoting by roughly a quarter of China’s maize area exhibiting depressed yield and an estimated reduction of 25.1%across the regions that have detectable negative yield responses. The four climatic variables have diverse impacts on the maize yield in terms of the magnitude of yield change and the spatial variation of yield response. We identified the key climatic

  20. A global satellite-assisted precipitation climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C.; Verdin, A.; Michaelsen, J.; Peterson, P.; Pedreros, D.; Husak, G.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti) are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high-resolution (0.05°) global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data-sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology, the Climate

  1. A global satellite assisted precipitation climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Funk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high resolution (0.05° global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology

  2. A global satellite assisted precipitation climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christopher C.; Verdin, Andrew P.; Michaelsen, Joel C.; Pedreros, Diego; Husak, Gregory J.; Peterson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate representations of mean climate conditions, especially in areas of complex terrain, are an important part of environmental monitoring systems. As high-resolution satellite monitoring information accumulates with the passage of time, it can be increasingly useful in efforts to better characterize the earth's mean climatology. Current state-of-the-science products rely on complex and sometimes unreliable relationships between elevation and station-based precipitation records, which can result in poor performance in food and water insecure regions with sparse observation networks. These vulnerable areas (like Ethiopia, Afghanistan, or Haiti) are often the critical regions for humanitarian drought monitoring. Here, we show that long period of record geo-synchronous and polar-orbiting satellite observations provide a unique new resource for producing high resolution (0.05°) global precipitation climatologies that perform reasonably well in data sparse regions. Traditionally, global climatologies have been produced by combining station observations and physiographic predictors like latitude, longitude, elevation, and slope. While such approaches can work well, especially in areas with reasonably dense observation networks, the fundamental relationship between physiographic variables and the target climate variables can often be indirect and spatially complex. Infrared and microwave satellite observations, on the other hand, directly monitor the earth's energy emissions. These emissions often correspond physically with the location and intensity of precipitation. We show that these relationships provide a good basis for building global climatologies. We also introduce a new geospatial modeling approach based on moving window regressions and inverse distance weighting interpolation. This approach combines satellite fields, gridded physiographic indicators, and in situ climate normals. The resulting global 0.05° monthly precipitation climatology, the Climate

  3. Effective Assimilation of Global Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, G.; Kalnay, E.; Miyoshi, T.; Huffman, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Assimilating precipitation observations by modifying the moisture and sometimes temperature profiles has been shown successful in forcing the model precipitation to be close to the observed precipitation, but only while the assimilation is taking place. After the forecast start, the model tends to "forget" the assimilation changes and lose their extra skill after few forecast hours. This suggests that this approach is not an efficient way to modify the potential vorticity field, since this is the variable that the model would remember. In this study, the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is used to effectively change the potential vorticity field by allowing ensemble members with better precipitation to receive higher weights. In addition to using an EnKF, two other changes in the precipitation assimilation process are proposed to solve the problems related to the highly non-Gaussian nature of the precipitation variable: a) transform precipitation into a Gaussian distribution based on its climatological distribution, and b) only assimilate precipitation at the location where some ensemble members have positive precipitation. The idea is first tested by the observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using SPEEDY, a simplified but realistic general circulation model. When the global precipitation is assimilated in addition to conventional rawinsonde observations, both the analyses and the medium range forecasts are significantly improved as compared to only having rawinsonde observations. The improvement is much reduced when only modifying the moisture field with the same approach, which shows the importance of the error covariance between precipitation and all other model variables. The effect of precipitation assimilation is larger in the Southern Hemisphere than that in the Northern Hemisphere because the Northern Hemisphere analyses are already accurate as a result of denser rawinsonde stations. Assimilation of precipitation using a more comprehensive

  4. Electrical operation of electrostatic precipitators

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The electrostatic precipitator remains on of the most cost effective means of controlling the emission of particulates from most industrial processes. This book will be of interest to both users and suppliers of electrostatic precipitators as well as advanced students on environmental based courses. The author identifies the physical and engineering basis for the development of electrical equipment for electrostatic precipitators and thoroughly explores the technological factors which optimize the efficiency of the precipitator and hence minimize emissions, as well as future developments in th

  5. Precipitation and Solubility of Calcium Hydrogenurate Hexahydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić-Ivančić, V; Füredi-Milhofer, H; Brničević, N; Marković, M

    1992-01-01

    Solid phases formed in the quaternary system: uric acid-calcium hydroxide -hydrochloric acid-water aged for 2 months at 310 K were studied to determine conditions for calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate, Ca(C5H3N4O)2 · 6H2O precipitation. The precipitates were identified by chemical and thermogravimetric analyses, x-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In the precipitation diagram the concentration region in which calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate precipitated as a single solid phase was established. The solubility of calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate was investigated in the pH range from 6.2 to 10.1 at different temperatures. The total soluble and ionic concentration of calcium (atomic absorption spectroscopy and Ca-selective electrode), total urate concentration (spectrophotometry), and pH were determined in equilibrated solutions. The data are presented in the form of tables and chemical potential diagrams. By using these data the thermodynamic solubility products of calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate, Ks = a(Ca(2+)) · a(2)(C5H3N4O3(-)), were determined: [Formula: see text]The formation of calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate crystals in urinary tract of patients with pathologically high concentrations of calcium and urates (hypercalciuria and hyperuricosiuria) is possible.

  6. Rising Precipitation Extremes across Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchandra Karki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a mountainous country, Nepal is most susceptible to precipitation extremes and related hazards, including severe floods, landslides and droughts that cause huge losses of life and property, impact the Himalayan environment, and hinder the socioeconomic development of the country. Given that the countrywide assessment of such extremes is still lacking, we present a comprehensive picture of prevailing precipitation extremes observed across Nepal. First, we present the spatial distribution of daily extreme precipitation indices as defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection, Monitoring and Indices (ETCCDMI from 210 stations over the period of 1981–2010. Then, we analyze the temporal changes in the computed extremes from 76 stations, featuring long-term continuous records for the period of 1970–2012, by applying a non-parametric Mann−Kendall test to identify the existence of a trend and Sen’s slope method to calculate the true magnitude of this trend. Further, the local trends in precipitation extremes have been tested for their field significance over the distinct physio-geographical regions of Nepal, such as the lowlands, middle mountains and hills and high mountains in the west (WL, WM and WH, respectively, and likewise, in central (CL, CM and CH and eastern (EL, EM and EH Nepal. Our results suggest that the spatial patterns of high-intensity precipitation extremes are quite different to that of annual or monsoonal precipitation. Lowlands (Terai and Siwaliks that feature relatively low precipitation and less wet days (rainy days are exposed to high-intensity precipitation extremes. Our trend analysis suggests that the pre-monsoonal precipitation is significantly increasing over the lowlands and CH, while monsoonal precipitation is increasing in WM and CH and decreasing in CM, CL and EL. On the other hand, post-monsoonal precipitation is significantly decreasing across all of Nepal while winter precipitation is decreasing

  7. Precipitation in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  8. Precipitation in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor, I am always looking for commonly observed Earthly experiences to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote a short TPT article on frost. This paper is on the related phenomena of precipitation. Precipitation, so common on most of the Earth's…

  9. Preliminary results on the comparison between satellite derived ground temperature and in-situ measurement of soil CO2 flux and soil temperature at Solfatara of Pozzuoli (Naples, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Silvestri, Malvina; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria

    2014-05-01

    temperature (at 10 cm depth) are measured periodically in about 400 point randomly distributed in the Solfatara crater area and in its surroundings. The data measured in 3 surveys performed from 2003 to 2010, in periods roughly correspondent to the available ASTER data, have been elaborated with the geostatistical method of Sequential Gaussian Simulation in order to obtain maps with a spatial resolution of 90X90 m to be compared to the ASTER data. The first results show a quite good correlations between ASTER derived temperatures and both temperatures and CO2 fluxes derived from ground measurement, especially in the most anomalous areas characterized by higher soil CO2 fluxes and temperatures. These first results encourage the possibility to use the satellite derived temperature as proxy of the CO2 fluxes and to implement methods to use long time series of satellite TIR data in a monitoring prospective.

  10. Encoding information into precipitation structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Kirsten; Bena, Ioana; Droz, Michel; Rácz, Zoltan

    2008-12-01

    Material design at submicron scales would be profoundly affected if the formation of precipitation patterns could be easily controlled. It would allow the direct building of bulk structures, in contrast to traditional techniques which consist of removing material in order to create patterns. Here, we discuss an extension of our recent proposal of using electrical currents to control precipitation bands which emerge in the wake of reaction fronts in A+ + B- → C reaction-diffusion processes. Our main result, based on simulating the reaction-diffusion-precipitation equations, is that the dynamics of the charged agents can be guided by an appropriately designed time-dependent electric current so that, in addition to the control of the band spacing, the width of the precipitation bands can also be tuned. This makes straightforward the encoding of information into precipitation patterns and, as an amusing example, we demonstrate the feasibility by showing how to encode a musical rhythm.

  11. Fe-15Ni-13Cr austenitic stainless steels for fission and fusion reactor applications - Part 1: Effects of minor alloying elements on precipitate phases in melt products and implication in alloy fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E. H.; Mansur, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to develop alloys for fission and fusion reactor applications, 28Fe-15Ni-13Cr base alloys were fabricated by adding various combinations of the minor alloying elements, Mo, Ti, C, Si, P, Nb, and B. The results showed that a significant fraction of undesirable residual oxygen was removed as oxides when Ti, C, and Si were added. Accordingly, the concentrations of the latter three essential alloying elements were reduced also. Among these elements, Ti was the strongest oxide former, but the largest oxygen removal (over 80%) was observed when carbon was added alone without Ti, since gaseous CO boiled off during melting. This paper recommends an alloy melting procedure to mitigate solute losses while reducing the undesirable residual oxygen. In this work, 14 different types of precipitate phases were identified. Compositions of precipitate phases and their crystallographic data are documented. Finally, stability of precipitate phases was examined in view of Gibbs free energy of formation.

  12. Quantification of asphaltene precipitation by scaling equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janier, Josefina Barnachea; Jalil, Mohamad Afzal B. Abd.; Samin, Mohamad Izhar B. Mohd; Karim, Samsul Ariffin B. A.

    2015-02-01

    Asphaltene precipitation from crude oil is one of the issues for the oil industry. The deposition of asphaltene occurs during production, transportation and separating process. The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) during enhance oil recovery (EOR) is believed to contribute much to the precipitation of asphaltene. Precipitation can be affected by the changes in temperature and pressure on the crude oil however, reduction in pressure contribute much to the instability of asphaltene as compared to temperature. This paper discussed the quantification of precipitated asphaltene in crude oil at different high pressures and at constant temperature. The derived scaling equation was based on the reservoir condition with variation in the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) mixed with Dulang a light crude oil sample used in the experiment towards the stability of asphaltene. A FluidEval PVT cell with Solid Detection System (SDS) was the instrument used to gain experimental knowledge on the behavior of fluid at reservoir conditions. Two conditions were followed in the conduct of the experiment. Firstly, a 45cc light crude oil was mixed with 18cc (40%) of CO2 and secondly, the same amount of crude oil sample was mixed with 27cc (60%) of CO2. Results showed that for a 45cc crude oil sample combined with 18cc (40%) of CO2 gas indicated a saturation pressure of 1498.37psi and asphaltene onset point was 1620psi. Then for the same amount of crude oil combined with 27cc (60%) of CO2, the saturation pressure was 2046.502psi and asphaltene onset point was 2230psi. The derivation of the scaling equation considered reservoir temperature, pressure, bubble point pressure, mole percent of the precipitant the injected gas CO2, and the gas molecular weight. The scaled equation resulted to a third order polynomial that can be used to quantify the amount of asphaltene in crude oil.

  13. Precipitation Changes Throughout the South Pacific Convergence Zone During the Last 2000 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, A. E.; Nelson, D. B.; Sachs, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) is the southern hemisphere's most prominent precipitation feature extending 3000km southeastwards from Papua New Guinea to French Polynesia. Seasonal and interannual variability in SPCZ rainfall is well characterized by satellite data, however an understanding of this feature prior to the instrumental record is lacking. Rainfall in the western tropical Pacific is difficult to reconstruct due to a dearth of archives that are both high-resolution and continuous. Here we present molecular fossil hydroclimate reconstructions from the last 2000 years. The hydrogen isotopic composition of the algal lipid biomarker dinosterol was measured in 10 freshwater lake sediment cores from 7 lakes on 4 islands in Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands, and Wallis and Futuna. Coretop δ2Hdinosterol values were well correlated with satellite-derived rainfall rates, providing a transfer function for deriving precipitation rates from sedimentary δ2Hdinosterol values. The Vanuatu and Wallis records indicate that the south-western portion of the SPCZ was driest during the transition from the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) to the Little Ice Age (LIA) (1200-1400 CE) with rainfall rates as low as 2mm/day compare to more typical values of 4mm/day. Conversely, the central SPCZ (Solomon Islands) experienced the driest conditions ( 5mm/day) during the MWP (600-1200 CE) and has maintained high ( 9mm/day) rainfall rates since the LIA. The tropical water cycle influences global climate and these quantitative precipitation records are important for understanding SPCZ natural variability.

  14. Numerical Simulation of the Impact of Vegetation Index on the Interannual Variation of Summer Precipitation in the Yellow River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Two sets of numerical experiments using the coupled National Center for Environmental Prediction General Circulation Model (NCEP/GCM T42L18) and the Simplified Simple Biosphere land surface scheme (SSiB) were carried out to investigate the climate impacts of fractional vegetation cover (FVC)and leaf area index (LAI) on East Asia summer precipitation, especially in the Yellow River Basin (YRB).One set employed prescribed FVC and LAI which have no interannual variations based on the climatology of vegetation distribution; the other with FVC and LAI derived from satellite observations of the International Satellite Land Surface Climate Project (ISLSCP) for 1987 and 1988. The simulations of the two experiments were compared to study the influence of FVC, LAI on summer precipitation interannual variation in the YRB. Compared with observations and the NCEP reanalysis data, the experiment that included both the effects of satellite-derived vegetation indexes and sea surface temperature (SST)produced better seasonal and interannual precipitation variations than the experiment with SST but no interannual variations in FVC and LAI, indicating that better representations of the vegetation index and its interannual variation may be important for climate prediction. The difference between 1987 and 1988indicated that with the increase of FVC and LAI, especially around the YRB, surface albedo decreased,net surface radiation increased, and consequently local evaporation and precipitation intensified. Further more, surface sensible heat flux, surface temperature and its diurnal variation decreased around the YRB in response to more vegetation. The decrease of surface-emitting longwave radiation due to the cooler surface outweighed the decrease of surface solar radiation income with more cloud coverage, thus maintaining the positive anomaly of net surface radiation. Further study indicated that moisture flux variations associated with changes in the general circulation also

  15. Precipitation of phenyl and phenoxypenicillin from solutions using ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, J M

    1985-09-01

    An easy, rapid, and available method for separating 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), benzylpenicillin (penicillin G), and other related molecules from aqueous solutions or complex industrial broths is described. A high concentration of ammonium sulphate induces partially or totally the precipitation of the penicillin present in the solutions, while 6-APA, phenylacetic, and phenoxyacetic acid always remain in the supernatant. The filtration through No. 4 Pyrex glass-fiber filter or Whatman 3MM paper permits the separation of the compounds present in the supernatant from the other ones precipitated. The precipitated product was identified, in all cases, as ammonium penicillin. This method is described here for the first time.

  16. Atom probe analysis of titanium hydride precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J; Kawakami, K; Otsuka, H; Fujii, H

    2009-04-01

    It is expected that the three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) will be used as a tool to visualize the atomic scale of hydrogen atoms in steel is expected, due to its high spatial resolution and very low detection limit. In this paper, the first 3DAP analysis of titanium hydride precipitates in metal titanium is reported in terms of the quantitative detection of hydrogen. FIB fabrication techniques using the lift-out method have enabled the production of needle tips of hydride precipitates, of several tens of microns in size, within a titanium matrix. The hydrogen concentration estimated from 3DAP analysis was slightly smaller than that of the hydride phase predicted from the phase diagram. We discuss the origin of the difference between the experimental and predicted values and the performance of 3DAP for the quantitative detection of hydrogen.

  17. How Well Can We Estimate Error Variance of Satellite Precipitation Data Around the World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregiorgis, A. S.; Hossain, F.

    2014-12-01

    The traditional approach to measuring precipitation by placing a probe on the ground will likely never be adequate or affordable in most parts of the world. Fortunately, satellites today provide a continuous global bird's-eye view (above ground) at any given location. However, the usefulness of such precipitation products for hydrological applications depends on their error characteristics. Thus, providing error information associated with existing satellite precipitation estimates is crucial to advancing applications in hydrologic modeling. In this study, we present a method of estimating satellite precipitation error variance using regression model for three satellite precipitation products (3B42RT, CMORPH, and PERSIANN-CCS) using easily available geophysical features and satellite precipitation rate. The goal of this work is to explore how well the method works around the world in diverse geophysical settings. Topography, climate, and seasons are considered as the governing factors to segregate the satellite precipitation uncertainty and fit a nonlinear regression equation as function of satellite precipitation rate. The error variance models were tested on USA, Asia, Middle East, and Mediterranean region. Rain-gauge based precipitation product was used to validate the errors variance of satellite precipitation products. Our study attests that transferability of model estimators (which help to estimate the error variance) from one region to another is practically possible by leveraging the similarity in geophysical features. Therefore, the quantitative picture of satellite precipitation error over ungauged regions can be discerned even in the absence of ground truth data.

  18. STAMMEX high resolution gridded daily precipitation dataset over Germany: a new potential for regional precipitation climate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolina, Olga; Simmer, Clemens; Kapala, Alice; Mächel, Hermann; Gulev, Sergey; Groisman, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    We present new high resolution precipitation daily grids developed at Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn and German Weather Service (DWD) under the STAMMEX project (Spatial and Temporal Scales and Mechanisms of Extreme Precipitation Events over Central Europe). Daily precipitation grids have been developed from the daily-observing precipitation network of DWD, which runs one of the World's densest rain gauge networks comprising more than 7500 stations. Several quality-controlled daily gridded products with homogenized sampling were developed covering the periods 1931-onwards (with 0.5 degree resolution), 1951-onwards (0.25 degree and 0.5 degree), and 1971-2000 (0.1 degree). Different methods were tested to select the best gridding methodology that minimizes errors of integral grid estimates over hilly terrain. Besides daily precipitation values with uncertainty estimates (which include standard estimates of the kriging uncertainty as well as error estimates derived by a bootstrapping algorithm), the STAMMEX data sets include a variety of statistics that characterize temporal and spatial dynamics of the precipitation distribution (quantiles, extremes, wet/dry spells, etc.). Comparisons with existing continental-scale daily precipitation grids (e.g., CRU, ECA E-OBS, GCOS) which include considerably less observations compared to those used in STAMMEX, demonstrate the added value of high-resolution grids for extreme rainfall analyses. These data exhibit spatial variability pattern and trends in precipitation extremes, which are missed or incorrectly reproduced over Central Europe from coarser resolution grids based on sparser networks. The STAMMEX dataset can be used for high-quality climate diagnostics of precipitation variability, as a reference for reanalyses and remotely-sensed precipitation products (including the upcoming Global Precipitation Mission products), and for input into regional climate and operational weather forecast models. We will present

  19. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Reactive Transport and Mineral Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Redden, George; Meakin, Paul; Fang, Yilin

    2006-06-30

    A new Lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics was used to simulate pore scale precipitation reactions. The side-by-side injection of reacting solutions into two halves of a two-dimensional granular porous medium was simulated. Precipitation on grain surfaces occurred along a narrow zone in the middle of the domain, where the reacting solutes mixed to generate a supersaturated reaction product. The numerical simulations qualitatively reproduced the behavior observed in related laboratory experiments.

  20. Flood Forecasting Based on TIGGE Precipitation Ensemble Forecast

    OpenAIRE

    Jinyin Ye; Yuehong Shao; Zhijia Li

    2016-01-01

    TIGGE (THORPEX International Grand Global Ensemble) was a major part of the THORPEX (Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment). It integrates ensemble precipitation products from all the major forecast centers in the world and provides systematic evaluation on the multimodel ensemble prediction system. Development of meteorologic-hydrologic coupled flood forecasting model and early warning model based on the TIGGE precipitation ensemble forecast can provide flood probability fo...

  1. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission for Science and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gail

    2016-04-01

    Water is fundamental to life on Earth. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched February 27, 2014, is an international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. The joint NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone and anchor to unite the constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is designed to (1) advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive microwave sensors, (2) advance the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle and freshwater availability through better description of the space-time variability of global precipitation, and (3) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous precipitation rates and time-integrated rainfall accumulation. Since launch, the instruments have been collecting outstanding precipitation data. New scientific insights resulting from GPM data, an overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities in the United States

  2. Evaluation of extreme precipitation estimates from TRMM in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Sandra; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Proença

    2015-04-01

    In situ ground observation measurement of precipitation is difficult in vast and sparsely populated areas, with poor road networks. This paper examines the use of remote sensors installed in satellites and evaluates the accuracy of TRMM 3B42 annual maximum daily precipitation estimates in Angola, in West Africa, a region where ground monitoring networks are generally. TRMM 3B42 estimates of annual maximum daily precipitation are compared to ground observation data from 159 locations. As a direct comparison between the two datasets for a common specific period and sites is not possible, a statistical approach was adopted to test the hypothesis that the TRMM 3B42 estimates and the ground monitoring records exhibit similar statistical characteristics. The study shows that the annual maximum daily precipitation estimates obtained from TRMM 3B42 slightly underestimate the quantiles obtained from the in situ observations. The use of remote sensing products to estimate extreme precipitation values for engineering design purposes is however promising. A maximum daily precipitation map for a return period of 20 years was computed and in the future, as the length of the remote sensing data series increases, it may be possible to estimate annual maximum daily precipitation estimates exclusively from these datasets for larger return periods. The paper also presents maps of the PdT/PDT ratios, where PdT is the annual maximum precipitation for a duration d and a return period of T years, and PDT is the annual maximum daily precipitation for a return period of T years. In conjunction with these maps it is possible to estimate the maximum precipitation for durations between 3 h and 5 days.

  3. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2015-01-01

    Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  4. CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The monthly data set consists of two files containing global monthly averaged precipitation rate values at a 2.5x2.5 resolution starting in 1979. Values are obtained...

  5. Hourly and Daily Precipitation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Precipitation reports submitted on many form types, including tabular and autographic charts. Reports are almost exclusively from the US Cooperative Observer Network.

  6. Impact on watershed resilience due to variation of precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, H.; Kumar, P.

    2013-12-01

    values of precipitation as a noise. The methodology of this analysis can be used to determine the extent to which current high rates of sediment production in Minnesota River basin are influenced by precipitation variation.

  7. Precipitation Depth-Duration-Frequency Analysis for the Nevada National Security Site and Surrounding Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Li [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences; Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences

    2016-08-01

    Accurate precipitation frequency data are important for Environmental Management Soils Activities on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are important for environmental assessments performed for regulatory closure of Soils Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Sites, as well as engineering mitigation designs and post-closure monitoring strategies to assess and minimize potential contaminant migration from Soils CAU Sites. Although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Atlas 14 (Bonnin et al., 2011) provides precipitation frequency data for the NNSS area, the NNSS-specific observed precipitation data were not consistent with the NOAA Atlas 14 predicted data. This is primarily due to the NOAA Atlas 14 products being produced from analyses without including the approximately 30 NNSS precipitation gage records, several of which approach or exceed 50 year of record. Therefore, a study of precipitation frequency that incorporated the NNSS precipitation gage records into the NOAA Atlas 14 dataset, was performed specifically for the NNSS to derive more accurate site-specific precipitation data products. Precipitation frequency information, such as the depth-duration-frequency (DDF) relationships, are required to generate synthetic standard design storm hydrographs and assess actual precipitation events. In this study, the actual long-term NNSS precipitation gage records, some of which are the longest gage records in southern and central Nevada, were analyzed to allow for more accurate precipitation DDF estimates to be developed for the NNSS. Gridded maps of precipitation frequency for the NNSS and surrounding areas were then produced.

  8. Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Terrestrial Gross Primary Production along the Southern California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Rivas, David; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Hernandez-Ayon, J. Martin; Lara-Lara, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Some land and ocean processes are related through connections (and synoptic-scale teleconnections) to the atmosphere. Synoptic-scale atmospheric (El Niño/Southern Oscillation [ENSO], Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO], and North Atlantic Oscillation [NAO]) decadal cycles are known to influence the global terrestrial carbon cycle. Potentially, smaller scale land-ocean connections influenced by coastal upwelling (changes in sea surface temperature) may be important for local-to-regional water-limited ecosystems where plants may benefit from air moisture transported from the ocean to terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use satellite-derived observations to test potential connections between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in regions with strong coastal upwelling and terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) across the Baja California Peninsula. This region is characterized by an arid/semiarid climate along the southern California Current. We found that SST was correlated with the fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (fPAR; as a proxy for GPP) with lags ranging from 0 to 5 months. In contrast ENSO was not as strongly related with fPAR as SST in these coastal ecosystems. Our results show the importance of local-scale changes in SST during upwelling events, to explain the variability in GPP in coastal, water-limited ecosystems. The response of GPP to SST was spatially-dependent: colder SST in the northern areas increased GPP (likely by influencing fog formation), while warmer SST at the southern areas was associated to higher GPP (as SST is in phase with precipitation patterns). Interannual trends in fPAR are also spatially variable along the Baja California Peninsula with increasing secular trends in subtropical regions, decreasing trends in the most arid region, and no trend in the semi-arid regions. These findings suggest that studies and ecosystem process based models should consider the lateral influence of local-scale ocean processes that could

  9. Extreme Precipitation and High-Impact Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Adler, Robert; Huffman, George; Peters-Lidard, Christa

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that extreme or prolonged rainfall is the dominant trigger of landslides; however, there remain large uncertainties in characterizing the distribution of these hazards and meteorological triggers at the global scale. Researchers have evaluated the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme rainfall and landslides at local and regional scale primarily using in situ data, yet few studies have mapped rainfall-triggered landslide distribution globally due to the dearth of landslide data and consistent precipitation information. This research uses a newly developed Global Landslide Catalog (GLC) and a 13-year satellite-based precipitation record from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. For the first time, these two unique products provide the foundation to quantitatively evaluate the co-occurence of precipitation and rainfall-triggered landslides globally. The GLC, available from 2007 to the present, contains information on reported rainfall-triggered landslide events around the world using online media reports, disaster databases, etc. When evaluating this database, we observed that 2010 had a large number of high-impact landslide events relative to previous years. This study considers how variations in extreme and prolonged satellite-based rainfall are related to the distribution of landslides over the same time scales for three active landslide areas: Central America, the Himalayan Arc, and central-eastern China. Several test statistics confirm that TRMM rainfall generally scales with the observed increase in landslide reports and fatal events for 2010 and previous years over each region. These findings suggest that the co-occurrence of satellite precipitation and landslide reports may serve as a valuable indicator for characterizing the spatiotemporal distribution of landslide-prone areas in order to establish a global rainfall-triggered landslide climatology. This research also considers the sources for this extreme rainfall, citing

  10. Degradable starch nanoparticle assisted ethanol precipitation of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alexander C-F; Tsai, Tsung Hao; Khimji, Imran; Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Liu, Juewen

    2014-09-22

    Precipitation of DNA from a large volume of aqueous solution is an important step in many molecular biology and analytical chemistry experiments. Currently, this is mainly achieved by ethanol precipitation, where a long-term incubation (usually overnight) at low temperature of -20 to -80°C with high salt concentration is required. This method also requires a large quantity of DNA to form a visible pellet and was tested mainly for double-stranded DNA. To improve DNA precipitation, co-precipitating polymers such as linear polyacrylamide has been used. In this work, we report that starch nanoparticles (SNPs) can achieve convenient DNA precipitation at room temperature with a low salt concentration and short incubation time. This method requires as low as 0.01-0.1% SNPs and can precipitate both single- and double-stranded DNA of various lengths. The effect of salt concentration, pH and the crosslinking density of SNPs has been systematically studied. Compared to other types of precipitating agents, SNPs are highly biocompatible and can be degraded by a common enzyme (amylase). This work suggests a novel application of a bio-based material that is prepared in mass production.

  11. Molecular thermodynamics for prevention of asphaltene precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianzhong; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Crude petroleum is a complex mixture of compounds with different chemical structures and molecular weights. Asphaltenes, the heaviest and most polar fraction of crude oil, are insoluble in normal alkanes such as n-heptane, but they are soluble in aromatic solvents such as toluene. The molecular nature of asphaltenes and their role in production and processing of crude oils have been the topic of numerous studies. Under some conditions, asphaltenes precipitate from a petroleum fluid, causing severe problems in production and transportation Our research objective is to develop a theoretically based, but engineering-oriented, molecular-thermodynamic model which can describe the phase behavior of asphaltene precipitation in petroleum fluids, to provide guidance for petroleum-engineering design and production. In this progress report, particular attention is given to the potential of mean force between asphaltene molecules in a medium of asphaltene-free solvent. This potential of mean force is derived using the principles of colloid science. It depends on the properties of asphaltene and those of the solvent as well as on temperature and pressure. The effect of a solvent on interactions between asphaltenes is taken into account through its density and through its molecular dispersion properties.

  12. Preliminary microphysical characterization of precipitation at ground over Antarctica coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Montopoli, Mario; Baldini, Luca; Dietrich, Stefano; Porcù, Federico

    2017-04-01

    The primary mass input of the Antarctic ice sheet is snow precipitation which is one of the most direct climatic indicators. Climatic model simulations of precipitations over Antarctica is an important task to assess the variation of ice sheet over long temporal scale. The main source of precipitation information in Antarctica regions derive from satellite observations. However, satellite measurements and products need to be calibrated and validated with observations from ground sensors. In spite of their key role, precipitation measurements at ground are scarce and not appropriate to provide the specific characteristic of precipitation particles that influence the scattering and absorption properties of ice particles. Recently, different stations in Antarctica (Princess Elizabeth, McMurdo, Mario Zucchelli) are equipping observatories for cloud and precipitation observations. The setup of the observatory at the Italian Station, Mario Zucchelli (MZ) plans to integrate the current instrumentation for weather measurements with other instruments specific for precipitation observations, in particular, a 24-GHz vertical pointing radar and a laser disdrometer Parsivel. The synergetic use of the set of instruments allows for characterizing precipitation and studying properties of Antarctic precipitation such as dimension, shapes, fall behavior, density of particles, particles size distribution, particles terminal velocity, reflectivity factor and including some information on their vertical extent. Last November, the OTT Parsivel disdrometer was installed on the roof of a logistic container (at 6 m of height) of the MZ station (Latitude 74° 41' 42" S; Longitude 164° 07' 23E") in the Terranova Bay. The disdrometer measures size and fall velocity of particles, passing through a laser matrix from which the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) is obtained. In addition, some products such as reflectivity factor, snow rate and snow accumulation can be inferred by properly

  13. Chemical Data for Precipitate Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.; Koski, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    During studies of sulfide oxidation in coastal areas of Prince William Sound in 2005, precipitate samples were collected from onshore and intertidal locations near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson mine sites (chapter A, fig. 1; table 7). The precipitates include jarosite and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Ellamar, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Threeman, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, and schwertmannite from Beatson. Precipitates occurring in the form of loose, flocculant coatings were harvested using a syringe and concentrated in the field by repetitive decanting. Thicker accumulations were either scraped gently from rocks using a stainless steel spatula or were scooped directly into receptacles (polyethylene jars or plastic heavy-duty zippered bags). Most precipitate samples contain small amounts of sedimentary detritus. With three jarosite-bearing samples from Ellamar, an attempt was made to separate the precipitate from the heavy-mineral fraction of the sediment. In this procedure, the sample was stirred in a graduated cylinder containing deionized water. The jarosite-rich suspension was decanted onto analytical filter paper and air dried before analysis. Eleven precipitate samples from the three mine sites were analyzed in laboratories of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado (table 8). Major and trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following multiacid (HCl-HNO3-HClO4-HF) digestion (Briggs and Meier, 2002), except for mercury, which was analyzed by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (Brown and others, 2002a). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on powdered samples (<200 mesh) by S. Sutley of the USGS. Additional details regarding sample preparation and detection limits are found in Taggert (2002). Discussions of the precipitate chemistry and associated microbial communities are presented in Koski and others (2008) and Foster and others (2008), respectively.

  14. Mucuna pruriens (Konch Beej precipitates manic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Vaish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the popular misconception that all ayurvedic preparations are completely safe, a vast majority of these are indiscriminately consumed by people procured as over the counter drugs. These preparations are combinations of multiple products that are often unidentified and dangerous and can precipitate various psychiatric symptoms. Hereby, we present a case of adolescent male in acute manic excitement after consumption of ayurvedic preparation containing "konchbeej" (Mucuna pruriens which is rich in l-3,4 dihydroxyphenyl alanine; precursor of dopamine.

  15. The simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land in a global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, P.; Chaboureau, J. P.; Beljaars, A.; Betts, A. K.; Köhler, M.; Miller, M.; Redelsperger, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    In the context of the European Cloud Systems project, the problem of the simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land is addressed with the aid of cloud-resolving (CRM) and single-column (SCM) model simulations of an idealized midlatitude case for which observations of large-scale and surface forcing are available. The CRM results are compared to different versions of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) convection schemes using different convective trigger procedures and convective closures. In the CRM, maximum rainfall intensity occurs at 15 h (local time). In this idealized midlatitude case, most schemes do not reproduce the afternoon precipitation peak, as (i) they cannot reproduce the gradual growth (typically over 3 hours) of the deep convective cloud layer and (ii) they produce a diurnal cycle of precipitation that is in phase with the diurnal cycle of the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition (CIN), consistent with the parcel theory and CAPE closure used in the bulk mass-flux scheme. The scheme that links the triggering to the large-scale vertical velocity gets the maximum precipitation at the right time, but this may be artificial as the vertical velocity is enforced in the single-column context. The study is then extended to the global scale using ensembles of 72-hour global forecasts at resolution T511 (40 km), and long-range single 40-day forecasts at resolution T159 (125 km) with the ECMWF general-circulation model. The focus is on tropical South America and Africa where the diurnal cycle is most pronounced. The forecasts are evaluated against analyses and observed radiosonde data, as well as observed surface and satellite-derived rainfall rates. The ECMWF model version with improved convective trigger produces the smallest biases overall. It also shifts the rainfall maximum to 12 h compared to 9.5 h in the original version. In contrast to the SCM, the vertical

  16. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model (GCE): Improvements and Applications for Studying Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Zeng, Xiping; Li, Xiaowen; Matsui, Toshi; Mohr, Karen; Posselt, Derek; Chern, Jiundar; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Norris, Peter M.; Kang, In-Sik; Choi, Ildae; Hou, Arthur; Lau, K.-M.; Yang, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    precipitation processes, utilizing a satellite simulator to improve the microphysics, providing better simulations for satellite-derived latent heating retrieval, and coupling with a general circulation model to improve the representation of precipitation processes.

  17. Economic impacts of increasing seasonal precipitation variation on southeast Wyoming cow-calf enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic impacts of predicted increases in precipitation variability on cow-calf enterprises, through influences of precipitation on both forage and cattle productivity, are needed by land managers for risk management strategies. Here we utilize existing forage production and cattle performance data...

  18. Metal particle's precipitation behavior in direct reading ferrography precipitator tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹凤福; 李谋渭

    2004-01-01

    A new metal particle monitoring instrument was developed by improving the traditional direct reading ferrography. The precipitation behaviors of sub-magnetic particles, magnetic particles, and the mixture of these particles were examined with the instrument. The results show that the precipitation behavior of sub-magnetic metal particles of copper and aluminum is not random as it was believed previously. The sub-magnetic particles show a distribution in the precipitator tube, almost the same as the deposition curves as the magnetic particles have. The deposition amount of particles is increased in the oil which consists of several different kinds of particles. On the base of these experiments, a new index used for the total quantity of wear was redefined.

  19. Making Satellite Precipitation Data Work for the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregiorgis, A. S.; Hossain, F.

    2013-12-01

    The traditional approach to measuring precipitation by placing a probe on the ground will likely never be adequate or affordable in most parts of the world. Fortunately, satellites today provide a continuous global bird's-eye view (above ground) at any given location.However, the usefulness of such precipitation products for hydrological applications depends on their error characteristics and how intelligently we can harness the implications of uncertainty for surface hydrology. Satellite precipitation data is most useful where there exists little to none conventional measurements. As a result, the conventional method of comparing satellite estimate against in-situ records to 'harness' the uncertainty is unrealistic and impractical. As a community tasked with the job of making satellite precipitation 'work' for applications in most parts of the world, there is now a need think outside the box. The manuscript aims to describe a method that will 'truly' work in the developing world. The proposed manuscript aims to provide a broad view summary of our work on making hydrologically merged precipitation data work in the Middle East, Europe, Asia and Mediterranean regions. The aim will be to appeal to a broad range of water managers, climate decision makers and policy and planners in the developing world. The merged precipitation data has already been created for 2002-2010 and will be made freely available to BAMS readers through our ftp site. Globally selected study regions for developing and validating error variance regression model and satellite rainfall products merging scheme

  20. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  1. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C-1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  2. Assessment of Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts from Operational NWP Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiano, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Previous work has shown that satellite and numerical model estimates of precipitation have complimentary strengths, with satellites having greater skill at detecting convective precipitation events and model estimates having greater skill at detecting stratiform precipitation. This is due in part to the challenges associated with retrieving stratiform precipitation from satellites and the difficulty in resolving sub-grid scale processes in models. These complimentary strengths can be exploited to obtain new merged satellite/model datasets, and several such datasets have been constructed using reanalysis data. Whilst reanalysis data are stable in a climate sense, they also have relatively coarse resolution compared to the satellite estimates (many of which are now commonly available at quarter degree resolution) and they necessarily use fixed forecast systems that are not state-of-the-art. An alternative to reanalysis data is to use Operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model estimates, which routinely produce precipitation with higher resolution and using the most modern techniques. Such estimates have not been combined with satellite precipitation and their relative skill has not been sufficiently assessed beyond model validation. The aim of this work is to assess the information content of the models relative to satellite estimates with the goal of improving techniques for merging these data types. To that end, several operational NWP precipitation forecasts have been compared to satellite and in situ data and their relative skill in forecasting precipitation has been assessed. In particular, the relationship between precipitation forecast skill and other model variables will be explored to see if these other model variables can be used to estimate the skill of the model at a particular time. Such relationships would be provide a basis for determining weights and errors of any merged products.

  3. Classification of daily precipitation patterns on the basis of radar-derived precipitation rates for Saxony, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, Rico; Franke, Johannes; Bernhofer, Christian [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Meteorologie

    2012-10-15

    We present a radar-based climatology of precipitation fields summarised into characteristic daily precipitation patterns. These patterns were derived by temporal classification, applying a neural network and data from Saxony during the period from 2004 to 2010. The properties of the dataset (RADOLAN rw-product) are discussed in detail and reviewed with respect to their adequacy for the intended application. The analysis showed a systematic dependence of the precipitation error on the altitude and aggregation period. Accordingly, for future applications of the considered radar product, we recommend the use of a maximal aggregation time step of 24 hours. The classification reveals significant precipitation patterns. Comparison of the qualitative features exhibited by the precipitation patterns, such as the synoptic scale flow direction, pressure distribution and atmospheric humidity, showed general trends as well as distinct spatial and atmospheric properties in dependence of the incidence rate. The lowest statistical qualities were shown by the patterns with the most distinct spatial characteristics due to a low incidence rate and high standard deviations. Nevertheless, the applied method led to a robust classification and the derived patterns appropriately summarized the mean daily precipitation behaviour in Saxony. (orig.)

  4. Real-Time Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis for Floods and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets-- both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers, In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  5. Application of Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis to Floods and Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Huffman, George

    2007-01-01

    Satellite data acquired and processed in real time now have the potential to provide the spacetime information on rainfall needed to monitor flood and landslide events around the world. This can be achieved by integrating the satellite-derived forcing data with hydrological models and landslide algorithms. Progress in using the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) as input to flood and landslide forecasts is outlined, with a focus on understanding limitations of the rainfall data and impacts of those limitations on flood/landslide analyses. Case studies of both successes and failures will be shown, as well as comparison with ground comparison data sets both in terms of rainfall and in terms of flood/landslide events. In addition to potential uses in real-time, the nearly ten years of TMPA data allow retrospective running of the models to examine variations in extreme events. The flood determination algorithm consists of four major components: 1) multi-satellite precipitation estimation; 2) characterization of land surface including digital elevation from NASA SRTM (Shuttle Radar Terrain Mission), topography-derived hydrologic parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, basin, and river network etc.; 3) a hydrological model to infiltrate rainfall and route overland runoff; and 4) an implementation interface to relay the input data to the models and display the flood inundation results to potential users and decision-makers. In terms of landslides, the satellite rainfall information is combined with a global landslide susceptibility map, derived from a combination of global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a weighted linear combination approach. In those areas identified as "susceptible" (based on the surface characteristics), landslides are forecast where and when a rainfall intensity/duration threshold is exceeded. Results are described

  6. Declining streamflows reveal nonstationary orographic precipitation enhancement driven by reduced westerly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Charles; Abatzoglou, John; Holden, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    Although orographic enhancement of precipitation lends mountains an important role in water resources, they are dramatically undersampled by long-term precipitation gages. This has led to the widespread practice of extrapolating trends in low-elevation precipitation gage networks to high elevations via simple climatological precipitation ratios developed from isohyetal maps. An implicit assumption in such a process is non-stationarity in orographic precipitation enhancement, an assumption that can lead to large errors in trend detection and attribution of climate change effects. We show an example from the Northwestern United States where streamflows from mountain watersheds show substantial declines over the last 60 years, even while long-term precipitation gage networks in the region show no trend. We demonstrate that these observed streamflow declines are driven by previously unexplored differential trends in precipitation. November to March westerly winds are strongly correlated with high-elevation precipitation but weakly correlated with low-elevation precipitation. Decreases in winter westerlies across the region from 1950 to 2012 are hypothesized to have reduced orographic precipitation enhancement, yielding differential trends in precipitation across elevations leading to the apparent paradox. Climate projections show continued weakening meridional pressure gradients and westerly flow across the region under greenhouse forcing, highlighting an additional stressor that is relevant for climate change impacts on water resources. This study also reveals the potential of wind speed data from circulation reanalysis products to better inform historical precipitation reconstructions.

  7. Kinetics of asphaltene precipitation from crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maqbool, T.; Hussein, I.A.; Fogler, H.S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of asphaltene precipitation from crude oils was investigated using n-alkane precipitants. Recent studies have shown that there is a kinetic phenomenon associated with asphaltene precipitation. This study showed that the time needed to precipitate the asphaltenes can vary from a few minutes to several months, depending on the amount of n-alkane precipitant added. As such, the onset of asphaltene precipitation is a function of the concentration of precipitant and time. A technique to quantify the amount of asphaltenes precipitated as a function of time and precipitant concentration was presented. This study also investigated the kinetic effects caused by various precipitants. Optical microscopy was used to monitor the growth of asphaltene aggregates with time. Refractive index measurements provided further insight into the kinetics of asphaltene precipitation. Polarity based fractionation and dielectric constant measurements were used to compare the nature of asphaltenes precipitated early in the precipitation process with the asphaltenes precipitated at later times. It was concluded that asphaltenes precipitating at different times from the same crude oil-precipitant mixture are different from one another. 3 refs.

  8. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  9. Radar-Derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Based on Precipitation Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving radar-derived quantitative precipitation estimation is proposed. Tropical vertical profiles of reflectivity (VPRs are first determined from multiple VPRs. Upon identifying a tropical VPR, the event can be further classified as either tropical-stratiform or tropical-convective rainfall by a fuzzy logic (FL algorithm. Based on the precipitation-type fields, the reflectivity values are converted into rainfall rate using a Z-R relationship. In order to evaluate the performance of this rainfall classification scheme, three experiments were conducted using three months of data and two study cases. In Experiment I, the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D default Z-R relationship was applied. In Experiment II, the precipitation regime was separated into convective and stratiform rainfall using the FL algorithm, and corresponding Z-R relationships were used. In Experiment III, the precipitation regime was separated into convective, stratiform, and tropical rainfall, and the corresponding Z-R relationships were applied. The results show that the rainfall rates obtained from all three experiments match closely with the gauge observations, although Experiment II could solve the underestimation, when compared to Experiment I. Experiment III significantly reduced this underestimation and generated the most accurate radar estimates of rain rate among the three experiments.

  10. Production of nano-solid dispersions using a novel solvent-controlled precipitation process - Benchmarking their in vivo performance with an amorphous micro-sized solid dispersion produced by spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Íris; Corvo, M Luísa; Serôdio, Pedro; Vicente, João; Pinto, João F; Temtem, Márcio

    2016-10-10

    A novel solvent controlled precipitation (SCP) process based on microfluidization was assessed to produce solid dispersions of carbamazepine, a poorly water-soluble drug with dissolution-rate limited absorption. A half-factorial design (2(3-1)+2 central points) was conducted to study the effect of different formulation variables (viz. polymer type, drug load, and feed solids' concentration) on the particle size and morphology, drug's solid state and drug's molecular distribution within the carrier of the co-precipitated materials produced. Co-precipitated powders were isolated via spray drying (SD). Nano-composite aggregated particles were obtained among all the tests. The particle size of the aggregates was dependent on the feed solids' concentration, while the level of aggregation between nanoparticles was dependent on the drug-polymer ratio. Both amorphous and crystalline nano-solid dispersions were produced using the proposed SCP process. The solid dispersion produced was dependent on both the type of polymeric stabilizer chosen and the drug load. Controls of amorphous and crystalline nano-solid dispersions produced by SCP and an amorphous micro-solid dispersion produced by SD were tested for: in vitro dissolution, in vivo pharmacokinetics in mice, and long-term storage physical stability. Both nano-amorphous and nano-crystalline presented faster dissolution rates and enhanced bioavailabilities than the micro-sized amorphous powder. The reduction of particle size to the nano-scale was found to be more important than the amorphization of the drug. The long-term physical stability of the amorphous nano-solid dispersion and the amorphous micro-solid dispersion were comparable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbially induced and microbially catalysed precipitation: two different carbonate factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The landmark paper by Schlager (2003) has revealed three types of benthic carbonate production referred to as "carbonate factories", operative at different locations at different times in Earth history. The tropical or T-factory comprises the classical platforms and fringing reefs and is dominated by carbonate precipitation by autotrophic calcifying metazoans ("biotically controlled" precipitation). The cool or C-factory is also biotically controlled but via heterotrophic, calcifying metazoans in cold and deep waters at the continental margins. A further type is the mud-mound or M-factory, where carbonate precipitation is supported by microorganisms but not controlled by a specific enzymatic pathway ("biotically induced" precipitation). How exactly the microbes influence precipitation is still poorly understood. Based on recent experimental and field studies, the microbial influence on modern mud mound and microbialite growth includes two fundamentally different processes: (1) Metabolic activity of microbes may increase the saturation state with respect to a particular mineral phase, thereby indirectly driving the precipitation of the mineral phase: microbially induced precipitation. (2) In a situation, where a solution is already supersaturated but precipitation of the mineral is inhibited by a kinetic barrier, microbes may act as a catalyser, i.e. they lower the kinetic barrier: microbially catalysed precipitation. Such a catalytic effect can occur e.g. via secreted polymeric substances or specific chemical groups on the cell surface, at which the minerals nucleate or which facilitate mechanistically the bonding of new ions to the mineral surface. Based on these latest developments in microbialite formation, I propose to extend the scheme of benthic carbonate factories of Schlager et al. (2003) by introducing an additional branch distinguishing microbially induced from microbially catalysed precipitation. Although both mechanisms could be operative in a M

  12. The Day-1 GPM Combined Precipitation Algorithm: IMERG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, G. J.; Bolvin, D. T.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K.; Joyce, R.; Kidd, C.; Sorooshian, S.; Xie, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission (IMERG) algorithm will provide the at-launch combined-sensor precipitation dataset being produced by the U.S. GPM Science Team. IMERG is being developed as a unified U.S. algorithm that takes advantage of strengths in three current U.S. algorithms: - the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), which addresses inter-satellite calibration of precipitation estimates and monthly scale combination of satellite and gauge analyses; - the CPC Morphing algorithm with Kalman Filtering (KF-CMORPH), which provides quality-weighted time interpolation of precipitation patterns following storm motion; and - the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks using a Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS), which provides a neural-network-based scheme for generating microwave-calibrated precipitation estimates from geosynchronous infrared brightness temperatures, and filters out some non-raining cold clouds. The goal is to provide a long-term, fine-scale record of global precipitation from the entire constellation of precipitation-relevant satellite sensors, with input from surface precipitation gauges. The record will begin January 1998 at the start of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and extend as GPM records additional data. Although homogeneity is considered desirable, the use of diverse and evolving data sources works against the strict long-term homogeneity that characterizes a Climate Data Record (CDR). This talk will briefly review the design requirements for IMERG, including multiple runs at different latencies (most likely around 4 hours, 12 hours, and 2 months after observation time), various intermediate data fields as part of the IMERG data file, and the plans to bring up IMERG with calibration by TRMM initially, transitioning to GPM when its individual-sensor precipitation algorithms are fully functional

  13. Facile gold nanorod purification by fractionated precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, T.; Zheng, Y.; Ng, S. H.; Ohshima, H.; Altissimo, M.; Bach, U.

    2014-05-01

    An efficient and facile size- and shape-selective separation of gold nanorod (G