WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite glial cells

  1. Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia: its role in pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Alexandra Leite Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia are a recent subject of research in the field of pain and a possible therapeutic target in the future. Therefore, the aim of this study was to summarize some of the important physiological and morphological characteristics of these cells and gather the most relevant scientific evidence about its possible role in the development of chronic pain. CONTENT: In the sensory ganglia, each neuronal body is surrounded by satellite glial cells forming distinct functional units. This close relationship enables bidirectional communication via a paracrine signaling between those two cell types. There is a growing body of evidence that glial satellite cells undergo structural and biochemical changes after nerve injury, which influence neuronal excitability and consequently the development and/or maintenance of pain in different animal models of chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: Satellite glial cells are important in the establishment of physiological pain, in addition to being a potential target for the development of new pain treatments.

  2. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Taro, E-mail: koiket@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  3. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-05

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  4. Connexin43 Hemichannels in Satellite Glial Cells, Can They Influence Sensory Neuron Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Alcayaga, Julio

    2017-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize the current insight on the role of Connexin- and Pannexin-based channels as modulators of sensory neurons. The somas of sensory neurons are located in sensory ganglia (i.e., trigeminal and nodose ganglia). It is well known that within sensory ganglia, sensory neurons do not form neither electrical nor chemical synapses. One of the reasons for this is that each soma is surrounded by glial cells, known as satellite glial cells (SGCs). Recent evidence shows that connexin43 (Cx43) hemichannels and probably pannexons located at SGCs have an important role in paracrine communication between glial cells and sensory neurons. This communication may be exerted via the release of bioactive molecules from SGCs and their subsequent action on receptors located at the soma of sensory neurons. The glio-neuronal communication seems to be relevant for the establishment of chronic pain, hyperalgesia and pathologies associated with tissue inflammation. Based on the current literature, it is possible to propose that Cx43 hemichannels expressed in SGCs could be a novel pharmacological target for treating chronic pain, which need to be directly evaluated in future studies. PMID:29200997

  5. Long term effects of lipopolysaccharide on satellite glial cells in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, E. [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91240 (Israel); Procacci, P.; Conte, V.; Sartori, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, University of Milan, via Mangiagalli 14, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Hanani, M., E-mail: hananim@cc.huji.ac.il [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91240 (Israel)

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been used extensively to study neuroinflammation, but usually its effects were examined acutely (24 h<). We have shown previously that a single intraperitoneal LPS injection activated satellite glial cells (SGCs) in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and altered several functional parameters in these cells for at least one week. Here we asked whether the LPS effects would persist for 1 month. We injected mice with a single LPS dose and tested pain behavior, assessed SGCs activation in DRG using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining, and injected a fluorescent dye intracellularly to study intercellular coupling. Electron microscopy was used to quantitate changes in gap junctions. We found that at 30 days post-LPS the threshold to mechanical stimulation was lower than in controls. GFAP expression, as well as the magnitude of dye coupling among SGCs were greater than in controls. Electron microscopy analysis supported these results, showing a greater number of gap junctions and an abnormal growth of SGC processes. These changes were significant, but less prominent than at 7 days post-LPS. We conclude that a single LPS injection exerts long-term behavioral and cellular changes. The results are consistent with the idea that SGC activation contributes to hyperalgesia. - Highlights: • A single lipopolysaccharides injection activated glia in mouse dorsal root ganglia for 30 days. • This was accompanied by increased communications by gap junctions among glia and by hyperalgesia. • Glial activation and coupling may contribute to chronic pain.

  6. Satellite glial cells in dorsal root ganglia are activated in streptozotocin-treated rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanani, Menachem; Blum, Erez; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Liang, Shangdong

    2014-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a very common complication in diabetes mellitus (DM), and treatment for it is limited. As DM is becoming a global epidemic it is important to understand and treat this problem. The mechanisms of diabetic neuropathic pain are largely obscure. Recent studies have shown that glial cells are important for a variety of neuropathic pain types, and we investigated what are the changes that satellite glial cells (SGCs) in dorsal root ganglia undergo in a DM type 1 model, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in mice and rats. We carried out immunohistochemical studies to learn about changes in the activation marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in SGCs. We found that after STZ-treatment the number of neurons surrounded with GFAP-positive SGCs in dorsal root ganglia increased 4-fold in mice and 5-fold in rats. Western blotting for GFAP, which was done only on rats because of the larger size of the ganglia, showed an increase of about 2-fold in STZ-treated rats, supporting the immunohistochemical results. These results indicate for the first time that SGCs are activated in rodent models of DM1. As SGC activation appears to contribute to chronic pain, these results suggest that SGCs may participate in the generation and maintenance of diabetic neuropathic pain, and can serve as a potential therapeutic target. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  7. Communication between neuronal somata and satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Yen M; Gu, Yanping; Chen, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Studies of the structural organization and functions of the cell body of a neuron (soma) and its surrounding satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia have led to the realization that SGCs actively participate in the information processing of sensory signals from afferent terminals to the spinal cord. SGCs use a variety ways to communicate with each other and with their enwrapped soma. Changes in this communication under injurious conditions often lead to abnormal pain conditions. "What are the mechanisms underlying the neuronal soma and SGC communication in sensory ganglia?" and "how do tissue or nerve injuries affect the communication?" are the main questions addressed in this review. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuron-Derived ADAM10 Production Stimulates Peripheral Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain by Cleavage of E-Cadherin in Satellite Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ouyang, Qing; Chen, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Li, Xiang-Nan; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the potential involvement of metalloproteinase family proteins in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using the spinal nerve ligation model, we investigated whether ADAM10 proteins participate in pain regulation. By implementing invitro methods, we produced a purified culture of satellite glial cells to study the underlying mechanisms of ADAM10 in regulating neuropathic pain. Results showed that the ADAM10 protein was expressed in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing neurons of the dorsal root ganglia, and expression was upregulated following spinal nerve ligation surgery invivo. Intrathecal administration of GI254023X, an ADAM10 selective inhibitor, to the rats one to three days after spinal nerve ligation surgery attenuated the spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of ADAM10 recombinant protein simulated pain behavior in normal rats to a similar extent as those treated by spinal nerve ligation surgery. These results raised a question about the relative contribution of ADAM10 in pain regulation. Further results showed that ADAM10 might act by cleaving E-cadherin, which is mainly expressed in satellite glial cells. GI254023X reversed spinal nerve ligation-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and activation of cyclooxygenase 2 after spinal nerve ligation. β-catenin, which creates a complex with E-cadherin in the membranes of satellite glial cells, was also downregulated by spinal nerve ligation surgery in satellite glial cells. Finally, knockdown expression of β-catenin by lentiviral infection in purified satellite glial cells increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Our findings indicate that neuron-derived ADAM10 production stimulates peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain by cleaving E-cadherin in satellite glial cells.

  9. Acute morphine activates satellite glial cells and up-regulates IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia in mice via matrix metalloprotease-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Temugin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of spinal cord glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes has been shown to regulate chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and hyperalgesia, due to spinal up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β. Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9 has been implicated in IL-1β activation in neuropathic pain. However, it is unclear whether acute opioid treatment can activate glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. We examined acute morphine-induced activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs and up-regulation of IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs, and further investigated the involvement of MMP-9 in these opioid-induced peripheral changes. Results Subcutaneous morphine injection (10 mg/kg induced robust peripheral glial responses, as evidenced by increased GFAP expression in DRGs but not in spinal cords. The acute morphine-induced GFAP expression is transient, peaking at 2 h and declining after 3 h. Acute morphine treatment also increased IL-1β immunoreactivity in SGCs and IL-1β activation in DRGs. MMP-9 and GFAP are expressed in DRG neurons and SGCs, respectively. Confocal analysis revealed a close proximity of MMP-9 and GFAP immunostaining. Importantly, morphine-induced DRG up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation was abolished after Mmp9 deletion or naloxone pre-treatment. Finally, intrathecal injections of IL-1β-selective siRNA not only reduced DRG IL-1β expression but also prolonged acute morphine-induced analgesia. Conclusions Acute morphine induces opioid receptors- and MMP-9-dependent up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation in SGCs of DRGs. MMP-9 could mask and shorten morphine analgesia via peripheral neuron-glial interactions. Targeting peripheral glial activation might prolong acute opioid analgesia.

  10. [Effects of Electroacupuncture on Activities of Satellite Glial Cells of Dorsal Root Ganglia in Rats with Neck Incision Pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Li-Na; Tan, Lian-Hong; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Gao, Qiao-Ling; Zhu, Jiang; Rong, Pei-Jing; Zhu, Bing; Yang, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Jun-Ling

    2017-08-25

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of "Futu"(LI 18), etc. on activities of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats with neck-incision pain so as to explore its mechanism underlying reduction of post-surgical pain of thyroidectomy. Male SD rats were randomly divided into control, model, EA-Futu (LI 18), EA-Hegu (LI 4)-Neiguan (PC 6), and EA-Zusanli (ST 36)-Yanglingquan (GB 34) groups, with 20 rats in each group. The neck-incision pain model was established by making a longitudinal incision and repeated mechanical stimulation. In the EA-LI 18, EA-LI 4-PC 6 and EA-ST 36-GB 34 groups, EA stimulation was administrated for 30 min, once a day,continuously for 3 days. The thermal pain threshold (PT) of the neck-incision region was detected. The immunoactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP,a specific marker for SGCs) and connexin 43 (Cx 43) of DRGs (C 2-C 6) was determined by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of GFAP, IL-1 β, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNAs were determined by quantitative Real-time PCR, and the contents of IL-1 β,IL-6,TNF-α assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the expression of Cx 43 protein was detected by Western blot. After EA intervention at LI 18 and LI 4-PC 6 (but not ST 36-GB 34), neck incision-induced reduction of the thermal PT was obviously prolonged in comparison with the model group (PGB 34 group except the down-regulated IL-1 β and TNF-α mRNAs, in the contents of IL-1 β and TNF-α of the EA-LI 4-PC 6 group, and in the IL-6 content of the EA-LI 18 group (P>0.05). EA stimulation of LI 18 and LI 4-PC 6 can significantly suppress pain reaction of neck incision in the rat, which is closely associated with its effects in down-regulating the activity of SGCs, decreasing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and in weakening the expression of Cx 43 in the cervical DRGs.

  11. Perineuronal satellite neuroglia in the telencephalon of New Caledonian crows and other Passeriformes: evidence of satellite glial cells in the central nervous system of healthy birds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe S. Medina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Glia have been implicated in a variety of functions in the central nervous system, including the control of the neuronal extracellular space, synaptic plasticity and transmission, development and adult neurogenesis. Perineuronal glia forming groups around neurons are associated with both normal and pathological nervous tissue. Recent studies have linked reduction in the number of perineuronal oligodendrocytes in the prefrontal cortex with human schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Therefore, perineuronal glia may play a decisive role in homeostasis and normal activity of the human nervous system.Here we report on the discovery of novel cell clusters in the telencephala of five healthy Passeriforme, one Psittaciform and one Charadriiforme bird species, which we refer to as Perineuronal Glial Clusters (PGCs. The aim of this study is to describe the structure and distribution of the PGCs in a number of avian species.PGCs were identified with the use of standard histological procedures. Heterochromatin masses visible inside the nuclei of these satellite glia suggest that they may correspond to oligodendrocytes. PGCs were found in the brains of nine New Caledonian crows, two Japanese jungle crows, two Australian magpies, two Indian mynah, three zebra finches (all Passeriformes, one Southern lapwing (Charadriiformes and one monk parakeet (Psittaciformes. Microscopic survey of the brain tissue suggests that the largest PGCs are located in the hyperpallium densocellulare and mesopallium. No clusters were found in brain sections from one Gruiform (purple swamphen, one Strigiform (barn owl, one Trochiliform (green-backed firecrown, one Falconiform (chimango caracara, one Columbiform (pigeon and one Galliform (chick.Our observations suggest that PGCs in Aves are brain region- and taxon-specific and that the presence of perineuronal glia in healthy human brains and the similar PGCs in avian gray matter is the result of convergent evolution. The

  12. Glial cells and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Guerra-Cantera, Santiago; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2017-01-01

    The search for new strategies and drugs to abate the current obesity epidemic has led to the intensification of research aimed at understanding the neuroendocrine control of appetite and energy expenditure. This intensified investigation of metabolic control has also included the study of how glial cells participate in this process. Glia, the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, perform a wide spectrum of functions and are vital for the correct functioning of neurons and neuronal circuits. Current evidence indicates that hypothalamic glia, in particular astrocytes, tanycytes and microglia, are involved in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of appetite and metabolic control, at least in part by regulating the signals reaching metabolic neuronal circuits. Glia transport nutrients, hormones and neurotransmitters; they secrete growth factors, hormones, cytokines and gliotransmitters and are a source of neuroprogenitor cells. These functions are regulated, as glia also respond to numerous hormones and nutrients, with the lack of specific hormonal signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes disrupting metabolic homeostasis. Here, we review some of the more recent advances in the role of glial cells in metabolic control, with a special emphasis on the differences between glial cell responses in males and females. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Satellite glial cell P2Y12 receptor in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in lingual neuropathic pain mechanisms in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katagiri Ayano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R is involved in satellite glial cells (SGCs activation, indicating that P2Y12R expressed in SGCs may play functional roles in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms. However, the involvement of P2Y12R in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. We therefore studied the reflex to noxious mechanical or heat stimulation of the tongue, P2Y12R and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunohistochemistries in the trigeminal ganglion (TG in a rat model of unilateral lingual nerve crush (LNC to evaluate role of P2Y12R in SGC in lingual neuropathic pain. Results The head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the lateral tongue were significantly decreased in LNC-rats compared to sham-rats. These nocifensive effects were apparent on day 1 after LNC and lasted for 17 days. On days 3, 9, 15 and 21 after LNC, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-immunoreactive (IR cells significantly increased in the ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular branch regions of TG. On day 3 after LNC, P2Y12R expression occurred in GFAP-IR cells but not neuronal nuclei (NeuN-IR cells (i.e. neurons in TG. After 3 days of successive administration of the P2Y12R antagonist MRS2395 into TG in LNC-rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly decreased coincident with a significant reversal of the lowered head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue compared to vehicle-injected rats. Furthermore, after 3 days of successive administration of the P2YR agonist 2-MeSADP into the TG in naïve rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly increased and head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle-injected rats

  14. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  15. P2Y12 receptor upregulation in satellite glial cells is involved in neuropathic pain induced by HIV glycoprotein 120 and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhihua; Xie, Lihui; Zhou, Congfa; Yuan, Huilong; Ouyang, Shuai; Fang, Zhi; Zhao, Shanhong; Jia, Tianyu; Zou, Lifang; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Gao, Yun; Li, Guilin; Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Hong; Xu, Changshui; Zhang, Chunping; Liang, Shangdong

    2017-11-20

    The direct neurotoxicity of HIV and neurotoxicity of combination antiretroviral therapy medications both contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) plays a crucial role in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. The P2Y12 receptor expressed in SGCs of the DRG is involved in pain transmission. In this study, we explored the role of the P2Y12 receptor in neuropathic pain induced by HIV envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) combined with ddC (2',3'-dideoxycytidine). A rat model of gp120+ddC-induced neuropathic pain was used. Peripheral nerve exposure to HIV-gp120+ddC increased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated model rats. The gp120+ddC treatment increased expression of P2Y12 receptor mRNA and protein in DRG SGCs. In primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC, the levels of [Ca2+]i activated by the P2Y12 receptor agonist 2-(Methylthio) adenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt (2-MeSADP) were significantly increased. P2Y12 receptor shRNA treatment inhibited 2-MeSADP-induced [Ca2+]i in primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC. Intrathecal treatment with a shRNA against P2Y12 receptor in DRG SGCs reduced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in the DRG of gp120+ddC-treated rats. Thus, downregulating the P2Y12 receptor relieved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated rats.

  16. Communication between satellite glial cells and ganglion neurons in sensory ganglia under normal and pathological pain signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazerani, Parisa

    2017-01-01

    Connexins (Cx) form gap junction channels made up of two connexons (hemichannels) from adjacent cells. Although their biophysical characteristics and physiological importance remain debated, unopposed hemichannels may open towards the extracellular space upon stimulation by e.g. removal of extrac...

  17. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 1. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - An Introduction to Glial Cells. Medha S Rajadhyaksha Yasmin Khan. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 1 January 2002 pp 4-10 ...

  18. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    series of articles that aims to update students on what is known about glia today. It provides an overview of the various types of glia and their origins. The following .... The advancement in glial cell biology in the recent years has been immense. In the following four articles some aspects of each of the glial cell types will be ...

  19. Neocortical glial cell numbers in human brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelvig, D.P.; Pakkenberg, H.; Stark, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    Stereological cell counting was applied to post-mortem neocortices of human brains from 31 normal individuals, age 18-93 years, 18 females (average age 65 years, range 18-93) and 13 males (average age 57 years, range 19-87). The cells were differentiated in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia...... while the total astrocyte number is constant through life; finally males have a 28% higher number of neocortical glial cells and a 19% higher neocortical neuron number than females. The overall total number of neocortical neurons and glial cells was 49.3 billion in females and 65.2 billion in males......, a difference of 24% with a high biological variance. These numbers can serve as reference values in quantitative studies of the human neocortex. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  20. Glial cell contributions to auditory brainstem development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S Cramer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of specialized auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits.

  1. Primary culture of glial cells from mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion: a valuable tool for studying glial cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2010-12-15

    Central nervous system glial cells as astrocytes and microglia have been investigated in vitro and many intracellular pathways have been clarified upon various stimuli. Peripheral glial cells, however, are not as deeply investigated in vitro despite its importance role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Based on our previous experience of culturing neuronal cells, our objective was to standardize and morphologically characterize a primary culture of mouse superior cervical ganglion glial cells in order to obtain a useful tool to study peripheral glial cell biology. Superior cervical ganglia from neonatal C57BL6 mice were enzymatically and mechanically dissociated and cells were plated on diluted Matrigel coated wells in a final concentration of 10,000cells/well. Five to 8 days post plating, glial cell cultures were fixed for morphological and immunocytochemical characterization. Glial cells showed a flat and irregular shape, two or three long cytoplasm processes, and round, oval or long shaped nuclei, with regular outline. Cell proliferation and mitosis were detected both qualitative and quantitatively. Glial cells were able to maintain their phenotype in our culture model including immunoreactivity against glial cell marker GFAP. This is the first description of immunocytochemical characterization of mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion glial cells in primary culture. This work discusses the uses and limitations of our model as a tool to study many aspects of peripheral glial cell biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Glial-specific cAMP response of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, R; Hagiwara, N; Leader, K; Sueoka, N

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the rat glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene is responsive to the intracellular level of cAMP. We have examined the sequence 5'-upstream of the transcription start site of the rat GFAP-encoding gene to determine the elements responsible for regulating the cAMP response. The RT4 cell lines consist of a neural stem-cell type RT4-AC and its three derivative cell types, one glial-cell type, RT4-D, and two neuronal-cell types, RT4-B and RT4-E. GFAP is expressed in the stem-cel...

  3. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conduction is restored within a few days. This is probably because at this stage the spinal cord lacks myelin and has few glial cells. Thus the inhibitory signals are absent and the regeneration is possible. 2. Transplantation of Schwann cells (either a graft of sciatic nerve or cultured Schwann cells) into the lesioned area of the.

  4. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 6. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Oligodendrocytes – Ensheathers of the CNS. Yasmin Khan Medha S Rajadhyaksha. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 6 June 2002 pp 6-13 ...

  5. Probing the enigma: unraveling glial cell biology in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Freeman, Marc R

    2013-12-01

    Despite their predominance in the nervous system, the precise ways in which glial cells develop and contribute to overall neural function remain poorly defined in any organism. Investigations in simple model organisms have identified remarkable morphological, molecular, and functional similarities between invertebrate and vertebrate glial subtypes. Invertebrates like Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans offer an abundance of tools for in vivo genetic manipulation of single cells or whole populations of glia, ease of access to neural tissues throughout development, and the opportunity for forward genetic analysis of fundamental aspects of glial cell biology. These features suggest that invertebrate model systems have high potential for vastly improving the understanding of glial biology. This review highlights recent work in Drosophila and other invertebrates that reveal new insights into basic mechanisms involved in glial development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glial Tissue Mechanics and Mechanosensing by Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pogoda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanical behavior of human brain is critical to interpret the role of physical stimuli in both normal and pathological processes that occur in CNS tissue, such as development, inflammation, neurodegeneration, aging, and most common brain tumors. Despite clear evidence that mechanical cues influence both normal and transformed brain tissue activity as well as normal and transformed brain cell behavior, little is known about the links between mechanical signals and their biochemical and medical consequences. A multi-level approach from whole organ rheology to single cell mechanics is needed to understand the physical aspects of human brain function and its pathologies. This review summarizes the latest achievements in the field.

  7. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  8. Photodynamic injury of isolated crayfish neuron and surrounding glial cells: the role of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifulina, S. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 is involved in cell responses to injurious impacts. Using its inhibitor pifithrin- α and activators tenovin-1, RITA and WR-1065, we studied its potential participation in inactivation and death of isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron and satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In dark, p53 activation by tenovin-1 or WR-1065 shortened activity of isolated neurons. Tenovin-1 and WR-1065 induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas pifithrin-α was anti-apoptotic. Therefore, p53 mediated glial apoptosis and suppression of neuronal activity after axotomy. Tenovin-1 but not other p53 modulators induced necrosis of axotomized neurons and surrounding glia, possibly, through p53-independent pathway. Under photodynamic treatment, p53 activators tenovin-1 and RITA enhanced glial apoptosis indicating the pro-apoptotic activity of p53. Photoinduced necrosis of neurons and glia was suppressed by tenovin-1 and, paradoxically, by pifithrin-α. Modulation of photoinduced changes in the neuronal activity and necrosis of neurons and glia was possibly p53-independent. The different effects of p53 modulators on neuronal and glial responses to axotomy and photodynamic impact were apparently associated with different signaling pathways in neurons and glial cells.

  9. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-03-31

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration.

  10. [Death of neurons and glial cells, induced by a photodynamic injury: signaling processes and neurone-glial interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdenskiĭ, A B; Kolosov, M S; Lobanov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of photodynamic (PD) injury of neurons and glial cells are reviewed. Neuron responses: firing stimulation at high photosensitizer concentrations and inhibition at low concentrations (neuron enhanced PD-induced apoptosis of glial cells, thus indicating that neuron maintained the survival of glia. Inter- and intracellular signaling mediated photodamage of these cells. Using inhibitors or activators of signaling proteins, the involvement of Ca(2+)-, adenylate cyclase- and tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways in responses of neurons and glial cells to photosensitization was shown. Their pharmacological modulation can change selectivity of PD injury of neuronal and glial cells and efficiency of PD therapy.

  11. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Kis

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets (LDs are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain's LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp, as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain.

  12. Radial glial cells defined and major intermediates between embryonic stem cells and CNS neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Magdalena; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2005-05-05

    Radial glial cells have been identified as a major source of neurons during development. Here, we review the evidence for the distinct "glial" nature of radial glial cells and contrast these cells with their progenitors, the neuroepithelial cells. Recent results also suggest that not only during neurogenesis in vivo, but also during the differentiation of cultured embryonic stem cells toward neurons, progenitors with clear glial antigenic characteristics act as cellular intermediates.

  13. Probing the enigma: Unraveling glial cell biology in invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Freeman, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their predominance in the nervous system, the precise ways in which glial cells develop and contribute to overall neural function remain poorly defined in any organism. Investigations in simple model organisms have identified remarkable morphological, molecular, and functional similarities between invertebrate and vertebrate glial subtypes. Invertebrates like Drosophila and C. elegans offer an abundance of tools for in vivo genetic manipulation of single cells or whole populations of ...

  14. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Charlton-Perkins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively. Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1. These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates.

  15. Progenitor cell-based treatment of glial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A

    2017-01-01

    -based neurodegenerative conditions may now be compelling targets for cell-based therapy. As such, glial cell-based therapies may offer potential benefit to a broader range of diseases than ever before contemplated, including disorders such as Huntington's disease and the motor neuron degeneration of amyotrophic lateral...... sclerosis, which have traditionally been considered neuronal in nature....

  16. Rapid method for culturing embryonic neuron-glial cell cocultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Åsa Fex; Shan, Wei-Song; Colman, David R

    2003-01-01

    to cultures first treated with antimitotic agents. It also ensures that all the cells present in vivo will be present in the culture. Myelination commences after approximately 2 weeks in culture for dissociated DRG and 3-4 weeks in cerebellar cultures. In enteric cultures, glial wrapping of the enteric...... neurons is seen after 3 weeks (2 weeks in ascorbic acid), suggesting that basal lamina production is important even for glial ensheathment in the enteric nervous system. No overgrowth of fibroblasts or other nonneuronal cells was noted in any cultures, and myelination of the peripheral nervous system...

  17. Distinct types of glial cells populate the Drosophila antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhaveri Dhanisha

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of nervous systems involves reciprocal interactions between neurons and glia. In the Drosophila olfactory system, peripheral glial cells arise from sensory lineages specified by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Atonal. These glia wrap around the developing olfactory axons early during development and pattern the three distinct fascicles as they exit the antenna. In the moth Manduca sexta, an additional set of central glia migrate to the base of the antennal nerve where axons sort to their glomerular targets. In this work, we have investigated whether similar types of cells exist in the Drosophila antenna. Results We have used different P(Gal4 lines to drive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP in distinct populations of cells within the Drosophila antenna. Mz317::GFP, a marker for cell body and perineural glia, labels the majority of peripheral glia. An additional ~30 glial cells detected by GH146::GFP do not derive from any of the sensory lineages and appear to migrate into the antenna from the brain. Their appearance in the third antennal segment is regulated by normal function of the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor and small GTPases. We denote these distinct populations of cells as Mz317-glia and GH146-glia respectively. In the adult, processes of GH146-glial cells ensheath the olfactory receptor neurons directly, while those of the Mz317-glia form a peripheral layer. Ablation of GH146-glia does not result in any significant effects on the patterning of the olfactory receptor axons. Conclusion We have demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct populations of glial cells within the Drosophila antenna. GH146-glial cells originate in the brain and migrate to the antenna along the newly formed olfactory axons. The number of cells populating the third segment of the antenna is regulated by signaling through the Epidermal Growth Factor receptor. These glia share several features of the sorting

  18. Giant Glial Cell: New Insight Through Mechanism-Based Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Brazhe, Nadezda

    2008-01-01

    of the glial cell activation: (1) via IP3 production and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and (2) via increase of the extracellular potassium concentration, glia depolarization, and opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. We suggest that the second pathway is the more significant...

  19. Glial cells assemble hyaluronan-based pericellular matrices in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleski, M; Hockfield, S

    1997-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the brain contains hyaluronan and proteoglycans, as does the ECM of cartilage. Aggrecan, the major proteoglycan of cartilage, forms large aggregates with hyaluronan, which then associate with the chondrocyte cell surface through an interaction with surface hyaluronan binding proteins. In culture, chondrocytes elaborate hyaluronan-proteoglycan aggregates, which form large hydrated pericellular matrices (PCMs) that can be visualized by a particle exclusion assay (Knudson and Toole: Dev Biol 112:308, 1985). It has recently been demonstrated that embryonic glial cells can also elaborate PCMs in culture (Deyst and Toole: Dev Brain Res 28:351, 1995). We demonstrate here that different classes of glial cells elaborate different types of endogenous PCMs in culture. Less differentiated glial cells, as evidenced by their immunoreactivity for nestin, elaborate larger endogenously produced PCMs than differentiated astrocytes, as defined by immunoreactivity for GFAP. This in vitro result may be a reflection of the larger volume of extracellular space present in the embryonic than in the mature brain. We show further that glial cells can incorporate cartilage aggrecan into their PCMs, and that both endogenous and aggrecan-supplemented glial PCMs are dependent on hyaluronan. In contrast, primary neurons from newborn (P0) and P1 rat cortex neither express endogenous matrices nor can assemble exogenous hyaluronan/aggrecan aggregates into PCMs. These results suggest that immature neurons may not have the ability to assemble hyaluronan-based PCMs, and they raise the possibility that neural proteoglycans associate with neuronal surfaces through a mechanism that may not directly involve hyaluronan.

  20. Glial cells aneuploid from culture of equine neonatal spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Leandro [UNESP; Mota, Ligia Souza Lima de Oliveira da [UNESP; Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz Landrim e [UNESP; Amorim, Renée Laufer [UNESP; Vita, Bruna de [UNESP; Moraes, Carolina Nogueira de [UNESP; Amorim, Rogério Martins [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this communication is to report the occurrence of glia cells aneuploid obtained from the culture of spinal cord of a newborn horse. Cells were maintained in culture until the sixth passage characterized by imunocytochemistry technique prior to cytogenetic analysis. Karyotype analysis showed loss or gain of one or more chromosomes in glial cells analyzed, when compared with the normal karyotype for equine specie. The occurrence of aneuploidy may be considered a normal finding in you...

  1. Pathway analyses implicate glial cells in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laramie E Duncan

    Full Text Available The quest to understand the neurobiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is ongoing with multiple lines of evidence indicating abnormalities of glia, mitochondria, and glutamate in both disorders. Despite high heritability estimates of 81% for schizophrenia and 75% for bipolar disorder, compelling links between findings from neurobiological studies, and findings from large-scale genetic analyses, are only beginning to emerge.Ten publically available gene sets (pathways related to glia, mitochondria, and glutamate were tested for association to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using MAGENTA as the primary analysis method. To determine the robustness of associations, secondary analyses were performed with: ALIGATOR, INRICH, and Set Screen. Data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC were used for all analyses. There were 1,068,286 SNP-level p-values for schizophrenia (9,394 cases/12,462 controls, and 2,088,878 SNP-level p-values for bipolar disorder (7,481 cases/9,250 controls.The Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia, after correction for multiple tests, according to primary analysis (MAGENTA p = 0.0005, 75% requirement for individual gene significance and also achieved nominal levels of significance with INRICH (p = 0.0057 and ALIGATOR (p = 0.022. For bipolar disorder, Set Screen yielded nominally and method-wide significant associations to all three glial pathways, with strongest association to the Glia-Astrocyte pathway (p = 0.002.Consistent with findings of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia by other methods of study, the Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia in our genomic study. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of myelination observed in schizophrenia are at least in part due to inherited factors, contrasted with the alternative of purely environmental causes (e.g. medication effects or lifestyle. While not the primary purpose of our study

  2. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Kaminsky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a “hostile” environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  3. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osório, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group...... has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe...

  4. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System-Schwann Cells ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 8. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Schwann Cells – Regulators of the Periphery. Yasmin Khan Medha S Rajadhyaksha. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 8 August 2002 pp 8-15 ...

  5. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  6. Minocycline blocks glial cell activation and ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jennifer A; Arbogast, Tara E; Moya, Esteban A; Fu, Zhenxing; Powell, Frank L

    2017-04-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) is the time-dependent increase in ventilation, which persists upon return to normoxia and involves plasticity in both central nervous system respiratory centers and peripheral chemoreceptors. We investigated the role of glial cells in VAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats using minocycline, an antibiotic that inhibits microglia activation and has anti-inflammatory properties, and barometric pressure plethysmography to measure ventilation. Rats received either minocycline (45mg/kg ip daily) or saline beginning 1 day before and during 7 days of chronic hypoxia (CH, PiO2  = 70 Torr). Minocycline had no effect on normoxic control rats or the hypercapnic ventilatory response in CH rats, but minocycline significantly (P minocycline administration during only the last 3 days of CH did not reverse VAH. Microglia and astrocyte activation in the nucleus tractus solitarius was quantified from 30 min to 7 days of CH. Microglia showed an active morphology (shorter and fewer branches) after 1 h of hypoxia and returned to the control state (longer filaments and extensive branching) after 4 h of CH. Astrocytes increased glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody immunofluorescent intensity, indicating activation, at both 4 and 24 h of CH. Minocycline had no effect on glia in normoxia but significantly decreased microglia activation at 1 h of CH and astrocyte activation at 24 h of CH. These results support a role for glial cells, providing an early signal for the induction but not maintenance of neural plasticity underlying ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The signals for neural plasticity in medullary respiratory centers underlying ventilatory acclimatization to chronic hypoxia are unknown. We show that chronic hypoxia activates microglia and subsequently astrocytes. Minocycline, an antibiotic that blocks microglial activation and has anti-inflammatory properties, also blocks astrocyte activation in respiratory

  7. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  8. How do glial cells contribute to motor control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Kordt; Petersen, Anders Victor; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2013-01-01

    including glutamate, ATP, GABA or serine. In the present review we will focus on astrocytes and review the evidence suggesting and demonstrating their role in motor control. Rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion, swimming or chewing are generated by networks of neurons termed central pattern...... of the blood pH by releasing ATP on neurons that in turn adapt the frequency of respiration. In the spinal cord, diverse transmitters such as ATP, adenosine or endocannabinoids modulate the CPG responsible for locomotion. A growing body of evidence suggests that glial cells release some of these molecules....... These data suggest that astrocytes play an essential role in motor control and we believe that a range of studies will confirm this view in the near future....

  9. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules R Freitas

    Full Text Available Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells, while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells. BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  10. Plasmin Activation of Glial Cells through Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André R. Greenidge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether plasmin could induce morphological changes in human glial cells via PAR1. Human glioblastoma A172 cells were cultured in the presence of plasmin or the PAR1 specific activating hexapeptide, SFLLRN. Cells were monitored by flow cytometry to detect proteolytic activation of PAR1 receptor. Morphological changes were recorded by photomicroscopy and apoptosis was measured by annexinV staining. Plasmin cleaved the PAR1 receptor on glial cells at 5 minutes (P=0.02. After 30 minutes, cellular processes had begun to retract from the basal substratum and by 4 hours glial cells had become detached. Similar results were obtained by generating plasmin de novo from plasminogen. Morphological transformation was blocked by plasmin inhibitors aprotinin or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (P=0.03. Cell viability was unimpaired during early morphological changes, but by 24 hours following plasmin treatment 22% of glial cells were apoptotic. PAR1 activating peptide SFLLRN (but not inactive isomer FSLLRN promoted analogous glial cell detachment (P=0.03, proving the role for PAR1 in this process. This study has identified a plasmin/PAR1 axis of glial cell activation, linked to changes in glial cell morophology. This adds to our understanding of pathophysiological disease mechanisms of plasmin and the plasminogen system in neuroinjury.

  11. Proliferation of differentiated glial cells in the brain stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barradas P.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies of macroglial proliferation in muride rodents have provided conflicting evidence concerning the proliferating capabilities of oligodendrocytes and microglia. Furthermore, little information has been obtained in other mammalian orders and very little is known about glial cell proliferation and differentiation in the subclass Metatheria although valuable knowledge may be obtained from the protracted period of central nervous system maturation in these forms. Thus, we have studied the proliferative capacity of phenotypically identified brain stem oligodendrocytes by tritiated thymidine radioautography and have compared it with known features of oligodendroglial differentiation as well as with proliferation of microglia in the opossum Didelphis marsupialis. We have detected a previously undescribed ephemeral, regionally heterogeneous proliferation of oligodendrocytes expressing the actin-binding, ensheathment-related protein 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase, that is not necessarily related to the known regional and temporal heterogeneity of expression of CNPase in cell bodies. On the other hand, proliferation of microglia tagged by the binding of Griffonia simplicifolia B4 isolectin, which recognizes an alpha-D-galactosyl-bearing glycoprotein of the plasma membrane of macrophages/microglia, is known to be long lasting, showing no regional heterogeneity and being found amongst both ameboid and differentiated ramified cells, although at different rates. The functional significance of the proliferative behavior of these differentiated cells is unknown but may provide a low-grade cell renewal in the normal brain and may be augmented under pathological conditions.

  12. Radial glial cells play a key role in echinoderm neural regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the CNS of echinoderms is capable of fast and efficient regeneration following injury and constitutes one of the most promising model systems that can provide important insights into evolution of the cellular and molecular events involved in neural repair in deuterostomes. So far, the cellular mechanisms of neural regeneration in echinoderm remained obscure. In this study we show that radial glial cells are the main source of new cells in the regenerating radial nerve cord in these animals. Results We demonstrate that radial glial cells of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima react to injury by dedifferentiation. Both glia and neurons undergo programmed cell death in the lesioned CNS, but it is the dedifferentiated glial subpopulation in the vicinity of the injury that accounts for the vast majority of cell divisions. Glial outgrowth leads to formation of a tubular scaffold at the growing tip, which is later populated by neural elements. Most importantly, radial glial cells themselves give rise to new neurons. At least some of the newly produced neurons survive for more than 4 months and express neuronal markers typical of the mature echinoderm CNS. Conclusions A hypothesis is formulated that CNS regeneration via activation of radial glial cells may represent a common capacity of the Deuterostomia, which is not invoked spontaneously in higher vertebrates, whose adult CNS does not retain radial glial cells. Potential implications for biomedical research aimed at finding the cure for human CNS injuries are discussed. PMID:23597108

  13. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  14. Specific tools for targeting and expression in Müller glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie P Pellissier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite their physiological roles, Müller glial cells are involved directly or indirectly in retinal disease pathogenesis and are an interesting target for therapeutic approaches for retinal diseases and regeneration such as CRB1 inherited retinal dystrophies. In this study, we characterized the efficiency of adeno-associated virus (AAV capsid variants and different promoters to drive protein expression in Müller glial cells. ShH10Y and AAV9 were the most powerful capsids to infect mouse Müller glial cells. Retinaldehyde-binding protein 1 (RLBP1 promoter was the most powerful promoter to transduce Müller glial cells. ShH10Y capsids and RLBP1 promoter targeted human Müller glial cells in vitro. We also developed and tested smaller promoters to express the large CRB1 gene via AAV vectors. Minimal cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter allowed expression of full-length CRB1 protein in Müller glial cells. In summary, ShH10Y and AAV9 capsids, and RLBP1 or minimal CMV promoters are of interest as specific tools to target and express in mouse or human Müller glial cells.

  15. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  16. [Fine structure of glial cells in the central nervous system of the tapeworm Grillotia erinaceus (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biserova, N M

    2008-01-01

    The problem of glial cells existing in parasitic and free living flatworms is correlated with organization of parenchyma in platyhelmintes. In the contrary to the widespread opinion that myelin-like envelopes and glial cells do not exist in the nervous system of parasitic flatworms, it has been shown by ultrastructural researches that Amphilina foliacea (Cestoda, Amphilinidea) has well developed glial cells and myelin-like envelopes in the ganglia and main cords, which include both glial cells and intercellular components. The aim of our research was to reveal and investigate in details structural components corresponding to the concept of the glial cell in the CNS of Grillotia erinaceus (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha). Three types of glial cells have been found. The first type is the fibroblast-like glial cells; cells locate in the cerebral ganglion, contain in cytoplasm and extract out fibrillar matrix, form desmosomes and have supporting function. The glial cells of the second type form myeline-like envelope of the giant axons and bulbar nerves in scolex and have laminar cytoplasm. These cells are numerous and exceed in number the neurons bodies into the nerve. The glial cells of the third type form multilayer envelopes in the main nerve cords; extra cellular fibers and gap-junctions take place between the layers. There are contacts between the glial cells of the third type and excretory epithelium but specialized contacts with neurons have been not found. The existing of glial cells in free living and parasitic flatworms is discussed.

  17. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System-Astrocytes–Star ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 4. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Astrocytes – Star Performers in the Neural Tissue. Medha S Rajadhyaksha Daya Manghani. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 4 April 2002 pp 20-26 ...

  18. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System-Microglia–The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 10. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Microglia – The Guardians of the CNS. Medha S Rajadhyaksha Daya Manghani. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 10 October 2002 pp 23-29 ...

  19. Cytotoxic Effects of Environmental Toxins on Human Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, Fiona; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Guillemin, Gilles; Rossi, Fanny; Chinian, Mirielle; Laurent, Dominique; Teo, Charles; Neilan, Brett A

    2017-02-01

    Toxins produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates have increasingly become a public health concern due to their degenerative effects on mammalian tissue and cells. In particular, emerging evidence has called attention to the neurodegenerative effects of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Other toxins such as the neurotoxins saxitoxin and ciguatoxin, as well as the hepatotoxic microcystin, have been previously shown to have a range of effects upon the nervous system. However, the capacity of these toxins to cause neurodegeneration in human cells has not, to our knowledge, been previously investigated. This study aimed to examine the cytotoxic effects of BMAA, microcystin-LR (MC-LR), saxitoxin (STX) and ciguatoxin (CTX-1B) on primary adult human astrocytes. We also demonstrated that α-lipoate attenuated MC-LR toxicity in primary astrocytes and characterised changes in gene expression which could potentially be caused by these toxins in primary astrocytes. Herein, we are the first to show that all of these toxins are capable of causing physiological changes consistent with neurodegeneration in glial cells, via oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, leading to a reduction in cell proliferation culminating in cell death. In addition, MC-LR toxicity was reduced significantly in astrocytes-treated α-lipoic acid. While there were no significant changes in gene expression, many of the probes that were altered were associated with neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. Overall, this is important in advancing our current understanding of the mechanism of toxicity of MC-LR on human brain function in vitro, particularly in the context of neurodegeneration.

  20. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  1. Fgf-dependent glial cell bridges facilitate spinal cord regeneration in zebrafish

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldshmit, Yona; Sztal, Tamar E; Jusuf, Patricia R; Hall, Thomas E; Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Currie, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    .... The reasons for this interspecies difference in regenerative capacity remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a novel role for Fgf signaling during glial cell morphogenesis in promoting axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury...

  2. Observation and manipulation of glial cell function by virtue of sufficient probe expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyo eNatsubori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of gene-encoded indicators and actuators to observe and manipulate cellular functions is being advanced and investigated. Expressing these probe molecules in glial cells is expected to enable observation and manipulation of glial cell activity, leading to elucidate the behaviors and causal roles of glial cells. The first step toward understanding glial cell functions is to express the probes in sufficient amounts, and the Knockin-mediated ENhanced Gene Expression (KENGE-tet system provides a strategy for achieving this. In the present article, three examples of KENGE-tet system application are reviewed: depolarization of oligodendrocytes, intracellular acidification of astrocytes, and observation of intracellular calcium levels in the fine processes of astrocytes.

  3. Aquaporin-4 independent Kir4.1 K+ channel function in brain glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A S

    2008-01-01

    Functional interaction of glial water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir4.1 has been suggested from their apparent colocalization and biochemical interaction, and from the slowed glial cell K+ uptake in AQP4-deficient brain. Here, we report multiple lines of evidence against functionally significant AQP4-Kir4.1 interactions. Whole-cell patch-clamp of freshly isolated glial cells from brains of wild-type and AQP4 null mice showed no significant differences in membrane potential, barium-sensitive Kir4.1 K+ current or current-voltage curves. Single-channel patch-clamp showed no differences in Kir4.1 unitary conductance, voltage-dependent open probability or current-voltage relationship. Also, Kir4.1 protein expression and distribution were similar in wild-type and AQP4 null mouse brain and in the freshly isolated glial cells. Functional inhibition of Kir4.1 by barium or RNAi knock-down in primary glial cell cultures from mouse brain did not significantly alter AQP4 water permeability, as assayed by calcein fluorescence quenching following osmotic challenge. These studies provide direct evidence against functionally significant AQP4-Kir4.1 interactions in mouse glial cells, indicating the need to identify new mechanism(s) to account for altered seizure dynamics and extracellular space K+ buffering in AQP4 deficiency.

  4. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purified 5chwann cells from monkey sciatic nerve grown in culture. Note the typical bipolar spindle shaped appearance of the cells (x 200). shaped appearance when grown in isolation in tissue culture. (Figure 2), stretch in cords around the axons. While one Schwann cell can enclose several small unmyelinated axons, one ...

  5. The involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-κB in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-κB modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-κB during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-κB during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-κB modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-κB-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-κB is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  6. Glial cells physiologically modulate clock neurons and circadian behavior in a calcium-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fanny S; Tangredi, Michelle M; Jackson, F Rob

    2011-04-26

    An important goal of contemporary neuroscience research is to define the neural circuits and synaptic interactions that mediate behavior. In both mammals and Drosophila, the neuronal circuitry controlling circadian behavior has been the subject of intensive investigation, but roles for glial cells in the networks controlling rhythmic behavior have only begun to be defined in recent studies. Here, we show that conditional, glial-specific genetic manipulations affecting membrane (vesicle) trafficking, the membrane ionic gradient, or calcium signaling lead to circadian arrhythmicity in adult behaving Drosophila. Correlated and reversible effects on a clock neuron peptide transmitter (PDF) and behavior demonstrate the capacity for glia-to-neuron signaling in the circadian circuitry. These studies also reveal the importance of a single type of glial cell-the astrocyte-and glial internal calcium stores in the regulation of circadian rhythms. This is the first demonstration in any system that adult glial cells can physiologically modulate circadian neuronal circuitry and behavior. A role for astrocytes and glial calcium signaling in the regulation of Drosophila circadian rhythms emphasizes the conservation of cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate behavior in mammals and insects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Proteomic profiling reveals dopaminergic regulation of progenitor cell functions of goldfish radial glial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Esau, Crystal; Da Fonte, Dillon F; Trudeau, Vance L

    2016-07-20

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) are stem-like cells found in the developing and adult central nervous system. They function as both a scaffold to guide neuron migration and as progenitor cells that support neurogenesis. Our previous study revealed a close anatomical relationship between dopamine neurons and RGCs in the telencephalon of female goldfish. In this study, label-free proteomics was used to identify the proteins in a primary RGC culture and to determine the proteome response to the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 (10μM), in order to better understand dopaminergic regulation of RGCs. A total of 689 unique proteins were identified in the RGCs and these were classified into biological and pathological pathways. Proteins such as nucleolin (6.9-fold) and ependymin related protein 1 (4.9-fold) were increased in abundance while proteins triosephosphate isomerase (10-fold) and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (5-fold) were decreased in abundance. Pathway analysis revealed that proteins that consistently changed in abundance across biological replicates were related to small molecules such as ATP, lipids and steroids, hormones, glucose, cyclic AMP and Ca(2+). Sub-network enrichment analysis suggested that estrogen receptor signaling, among other transcription factors, is regulated by D1 receptor activation. This suggests that these signaling pathways are correlated to dopaminergic regulation of radial glial cell functions. Most proteins down-regulated by SKF 38393 were involved in cell cycle/proliferation, growth, death, and survival, which suggests that dopamine inhibits the progenitor-related processes of radial glial cells. Examples of differently expressed proteins including triosephosphate isomerase, nucleolin, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and capping protein (actin filament) muscle Z-line beta were validated by qPCR and western blot, which were consistent with MS/MS data in the direction of change. This is the first study to characterize the RGC

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinoblastoma cell phenotype using neuronal and glial cell markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Orellana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The cellular origin of retinoblastoma is uncertain as constituent tumor cells heterogeneously express markers of both immature and mature retinal cells. An immunohistochemical analysis of cellular origin may yield valuable insights into disease progression and treatment options. This study aimed to determine the cellular origin of retinoblastoma in a large case series and correlate these findings with histopathological prognostic factors. Methods: Thirty-nine retinoblastoma cases were histopathologically diagnosed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the immature neural cell marker SRY-box containing gene 2 (SOX-2, the mature neuronal cell marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2, and the mature glial cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Histopathological features were also evaluated, including patterns of growth, differentiation, vitreous seeding, and choroidal/scleral, optic nerve, and anterior chamber invasion. Two retinoblastoma cell lines, WERI-1 and Y79, were studied by immunocytochemistry using the same antibodies. Results: Expression of SOX-2 was strong in 97.4% of retinoblastoma cases, while MAP-2 was expressed in 59% of cases. Immunostaining for GFAP was positive only in reactive stromal astrocytes interspersed amongst tumor cells and in peritumoral tissue. There was no correlation between histopathological prognostic factors and immunohistochemical markers. Retinoblastoma cell lines showed strong positivity for SOX2 (90% of WERI-1 cells and 70% of Y79 cells and MAP2 (90% of cells in both lines. GFAP was completely negative in both cell lines. Conclusion: The majority of retinoblastomas and both RB cell lines expressed an immature neural and/or a mature neuronal cell marker, but not a glial marker. These results indicate a typical neuroblast or neuronal origin and eliminate astrocyte differentiation from neural stem cells as the source of retinoblastoma.

  10. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    biology. Daya Maghani is the. Deputy Director of the. Depa rtment of N europa- thology and Applied. Biology, Medical. Research Center, Bombay. Hospital, Mumbai. She specializes in electron microscopy of muscle, ... update students about these important other cells of the nervous system. The present article highlights ...

  11. Role of glial-cell-derived neurotrophic factor in salivary gland stem cell response to irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xiaohong; Varendi, Kärt; Maimets, Martti

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Recently, stem cell therapy has been proposed to allow regeneration of radiation damaged salivary glands. It has been suggested that glial-cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of mice salivary gland stem cells (mSGSCs). The purpose of this study...... was to investigate the role of GDNF in the modulation of mSGSC response to irradiation and subsequent salivary gland regeneration. Methods Salivary gland sphere derived cells of Gdnf hypermorphic (Gdnfwt/hyper) and wild type mice (Gdnfwt/wt) were irradiated (IR) with γ-rays at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 Gy. mSGSC survival...

  12. The Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The skeletal muscle satellite cell was first described and named based on its anatomic location between the myofiber plasma and basement membranes. In 1961, two independent studies by Alexander Mauro and Bernard Katz provided the first electron microscopic descriptions of satellite cells in frog and rat muscles. These cells were soon detected in other vertebrates and acquired candidacy as the source of myogenic cells needed for myofiber growth and repair throughout life. Cultures of isolated myofibers and, subsequently, transplantation of single myofibers demonstrated that satellite cells were myogenic progenitors. More recently, satellite cells were redefined as myogenic stem cells given their ability to self-renew in addition to producing differentiated progeny. Identification of distinctively expressed molecular markers, in particular Pax7, has facilitated detection of satellite cells using light microscopy. Notwithstanding the remarkable progress made since the discovery of satellite cells, researchers have looked for alternative cells with myogenic capacity that can potentially be used for whole body cell-based therapy of skeletal muscle. Yet, new studies show that inducible ablation of satellite cells in adult muscle impairs myofiber regeneration. Thus, on the 50th anniversary since its discovery, the satellite cell’s indispensable role in muscle repair has been reaffirmed. PMID:22147605

  13. DMPD: Multifunctional effects of bradykinin on glial cells in relation to potentialanti-inflammatory effects. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17669557 Multifunctional effects of bradykinin on glial cells in relation to potent... Epub 2007 Jun 27. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Multifunctional effects of bradykinin on glial cells i...n relation to potentialanti-inflammatory effects. PubmedID 17669557 Title Multifunction

  14. Possible role of glial cells in the onset and progression of Lyme neuroborreliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Mary B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB may present as meningitis, cranial neuropathy, acute radiculoneuropathy or, rarely, as encephalomyelitis. We hypothesized that glia, upon exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, produce inflammatory mediators that promote the acute cellular infiltration of early LNB. This inflammatory context could potentiate glial and neuronal apoptosis. Methods We inoculated live B. burgdorferi into the cisterna magna of rhesus macaques and examined the inflammatory changes induced in the central nervous system (CNS, and dorsal root nerves and ganglia (DRG. Results ELISA of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF showed elevated IL-6, IL-8, CCL2, and CXCL13 as early as one week post-inoculation, accompanied by primarily lymphocytic and monocytic pleocytosis. In contrast, onset of the acquired immune response, evidenced by anti-B. burgdorferi C6 serum antibodies, was first detectable after 3 weeks post-inoculation. CSF cell pellets and CNS tissues were culture-positive for B. burgdorferi. Histopathology revealed signs of acute LNB: severe multifocal leptomeningitis, radiculitis, and DRG inflammatory lesions. Immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy detected B. burgdorferi antigen in the CNS and DRG. IL-6 was observed in astrocytes and neurons in the spinal cord, and in neurons in the DRG of infected animals. CCL2 and CXCL13 were found in microglia as well as in endothelial cells, macrophages and T cells. Importantly, the DRG of infected animals showed significant satellite cell and neuronal apoptosis. Conclusion Our results support the notion that innate responses of glia to B. burgdorferi initiate/mediate the inflammation seen in acute LNB, and show that neuronal apoptosis occurs in this context.

  15. Phenotype overlap in glial cell populations: astroglia, oligodendroglia and NG-2(+) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Badrah; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which NG-2(+) cells form a distinct population separate from astrocytes is central to understanding whether this important cell class is wholly an oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) or has additional functions akin to those classically ascribed to astrocytes. Early immuno-staining studies indicate that NG-2(+) cells do not express the astrocyte marker GFAP, but orthogonal reconstructions of double-labeled confocal image stacks here reveal a significant degree of co-expression in individual cells within post-natal day 10 (P10) and adult rat optic nerve (RON) and rat cortex. Extensive scanning of various antibody/fixation/embedding approaches identified a protocol for selective post-embedded immuno-gold labeling. This first ultrastructural characterization of identified NG-2(+) cells revealed populations of both OPCs and astrocytes in P10 RON. NG-2(+) astrocytes had classic features including the presence of glial filaments but low levels of glial filament expression were also found in OPCs and myelinating oligodendrocytes. P0 RONs contained few OPCs but positively identified astrocytes were observed to ensheath pre-myelinated axons in a fashion previously described as a definitive marker of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Astrocyte ensheathment was also apparent in P10 RONs, was absent from developing nodes of Ranvier and was never associated with compact myelin. Astrocyte processes were also shown to encapsulate some oligodendrocyte somata. The data indicate that common criteria for delineating astrocytes and oligodendroglia are insufficiently robust and that astrocyte features ascribed to OPCs may arise from misidentification.

  16. Multipotent neural stem cells generate glial cells of the central complex through transit amplifying intermediate progenitors in Drosophila brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorin, Gudrun; Riebli, Nadia; Popkova, Anna; Giangrande, Angela; Reichert, Heinrich

    2011-08-15

    The neural stem cells that give rise to the neural lineages of the brain can generate their progeny directly or through transit amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells (INPs). The INP-producing neural stem cells in Drosophila are called type II neuroblasts, and their neural progeny innervate the central complex, a prominent integrative brain center. Here we use genetic lineage tracing and clonal analysis to show that the INPs of these type II neuroblast lineages give rise to glial cells as well as neurons during postembryonic brain development. Our data indicate that two main types of INP lineages are generated, namely mixed neuronal/glial lineages and neuronal lineages. Genetic loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments show that the gcm gene is necessary and sufficient for gliogenesis in these lineages. The INP-derived glial cells, like the INP-derived neuronal cells, make major contributions to the central complex. In postembryonic development, these INP-derived glial cells surround the entire developing central complex neuropile, and once the major compartments of the central complex are formed, they also delimit each of these compartments. During this process, the number of these glial cells in the central complex is increased markedly through local proliferation based on glial cell mitosis. Taken together, these findings uncover a novel and complex form of neurogliogenesis in Drosophila involving transit amplifying intermediate progenitors. Moreover, they indicate that type II neuroblasts are remarkably multipotent neural stem cells that can generate both the neuronal and the glial progeny that make major contributions to one and the same complex brain structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gastrin Induces Nuclear Export and Proteasome Degradation of Menin in Enteric Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Meininger, Cameron A; Kang, Anthony J; Photenhauer, Amanda L; Hayes, Michael M; Sahoo, Nirakar; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Ding, Lin; Giordano, Thomas J; Else, Tobias; Madrigal, David J; Low, Malcolm J; Campbell, Fiona; Baker, Ann-Marie; Xu, Haoxing; Wright, Nicholas A; Merchant, Juanita L

    2017-12-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (MEN1) locus encodes the nuclear protein and tumor suppressor menin. MEN1 mutations frequently cause neuroendocrine tumors such as gastrinomas, characterized by their predominant duodenal location and local metastasis at time of diagnosis. Diffuse gastrin cell hyperplasia precedes the appearance of MEN1 gastrinomas, which develop within submucosal Brunner's glands. We investigated how menin regulates expression of the gastrin gene and induces generation of submucosal gastrin-expressing cell hyperplasia. Primary enteric glial cultures were generated from the VillinCre:Men1FL/FL:Sst-/- mice or C57BL/6 mice (controls), with or without inhibition of gastric acid by omeprazole. Primary enteric glial cells from C57BL/6 mice were incubated with gastrin and separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Cells were incubated with forskolin and H89 to activate or inhibit protein kinase A (a family of enzymes whose activity depends on cellular levels of cyclic AMP). Gastrin was measured in blood, tissue, and cell cultures using an ELISA. Immunoprecipitation with menin or ubiquitin was used to demonstrate post-translational modification of menin. Primary glial cells were incubated with leptomycin b and MG132 to block nuclear export and proteasome activity, respectively. We obtained human duodenal, lymph node, and pancreatic gastrinoma samples, collected from patients who underwent surgery from 1996 through 2007 in the United States or the United Kingdom. Enteric glial cells that stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP+) expressed gastrin de novo through a mechanism that required PKA. Gastrin-induced nuclear export of menin via cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR)-mediated activation of PKA. Once exported from the nucleus, menin was ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. GFAP and other markers of enteric glial cells (eg, p75 and S100B), colocalized with gastrin in human duodenal gastrinomas. MEN1-associated

  18. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC) might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL), corticomedial and central groups), 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3) and mean cell numbers (x10(6)) were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  19. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García-Amado

    Full Text Available Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL, corticomedial and central groups, 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3 and mean cell numbers (x10(6 were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  20. Flavonoids Modulate the Proliferation of Neospora caninum in Glial Cell Primary Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa de Matos, Rosan; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pena Seara Pitanga, Bruno; Amaral da Silva, Victor Diógenes; Viana de Jesus, Erica Etelvina; Morales Pinheiro, Alexandre; Dias Costa, Maria de Fátima; dos Santos El-Bacha, Ramon; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Cátia Suse

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation. PMID:25548412

  1. Microbiota controls the homeostasis of glial cells in the gut lamina propria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S; Lasrado, Reena; McCallum, Sarah; Chng, Song Hui; Snippert, HJG; Clevers, Hans; Pettersson, Sven; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic neural networks of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from dedicated neural crest progenitors that colonize the gut during embryogenesis and give rise to enteric neurons and glia. Here, we study how an essential subpopulation of enteric glial cells (EGCs) residing within the

  2. Aging of myelinating glial cells predominantly affects lipid metabolism and immune response pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdier, V.; Csárdi, G.; de Preux-Charles, A.S.; Médard, J.J.; Smit, A.B.; Verheijen, M.H.G.; Bergmann, S.; Chrast, R.

    2012-01-01

    Both the central and the peripheral nervous systems are prone to multiple age-dependent neurological deficits, often attributed to still unknown alterations in the function of myelinating glia. To uncover the biological processes affected in glial cells by aging, we analyzed gene expression of the

  3. Glial cell response after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage - Functional consequences and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, B.J.; Vergouwen, M.D.I.; Kelfkens, M.M.; Rinkel, G.J.E.; Hol, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, both astrocytes and microglia, respond to neurodegenerative processes and to brain damage by a process called reactive gliosis. This response is highly context dependent, varies from mild to severe, and can be protective or detrimental for neural functioning. In patients with a

  4. Specific tools for targeting and expression in Müller glial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Hoek, Robert M; Vos, Rogier M; Aartsen, Wendy M; Klimczak, Ryan R; Hoyng, Stefan A; Flannery, John G; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physiological roles, Müller glial cells are involved directly or indirectly in retinal disease pathogenesis and are an interesting target for therapeutic approaches for retinal diseases and regeneration such as CRB1 inherited retinal dystrophies. In this study, we characterized the

  5. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Meertens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ZIKA virus (ZIKV is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies.

  6. Neurotransmitters involved in fast excitatory neurotransmission directly activate enteric glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesmans, W; Cirillo, C; Van den Abbeel, V; Van den Haute, C; Depoortere, I; Tack, J; Vanden Berghe, P

    2013-02-01

    The intimate association between glial cells and neurons within the enteric nervous system has confounded careful examination of the direct responsiveness of enteric glia to different neuroligands. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether neurotransmitters known to elicit fast excitatory potentials in enteric nerves also activate enteric glia directly. We studied the effect of acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin (5-HT), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on intracellular Ca(2+) signaling using aequorin-expressing and Fluo-4 AM-loaded CRL-2690 rat and human enteric glial cell cultures devoid of neurons. The influence of these neurotransmitters on the proliferation of glia was measured and their effect on the expression of c-Fos as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Sox10, and S100 was examined by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. Apart from ATP, also ACh and 5-HT induced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in CRL-2690 cells. Similarly, these neurotransmitters also evoked Ca(2+) transients in human primary enteric glial cells obtained from mucosal biopsies. In contrast with ATP, stimulation with ACh and 5-HT induced early gene expression in CRL-2690 cells. The proliferation of enteric glia and their expression of GFAP, Sox10, and S100 were not affected following stimulation with these neurotransmitters. We provide evidence that enteric glial cells respond to fast excitatory neurotransmitters by changes in intracellular Ca(2+). On the basis of our experimental in vitro setting, we show that enteric glia are not only directly responsive to purinergic but also to serotonergic and cholinergic signaling mechanisms. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Engulfing action of glial cells is required for programmed axon pruning during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasaki, Takeshi; Ito, Kei

    2004-04-20

    Axon pruning is involved in establishment and maintenance of functional neural circuits. During metamorphosis of Drosophila, selective pruning of larval axons is developmentally regulated by ecdysone and caused by local axon degeneration. Previous studies have revealed intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms that trigger this pruning process, but how pruning is accomplished remains essentially unknown. Detailed analysis of morphological changes in the axon branches of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons revealed that during early pupal stages, clusters of neighboring varicosities, each of which belongs to different axons, disappear simultaneously shortly before the onset of local axon degeneration. At this stage, bundles of axon branches are infiltrated by the processes of surrounding glia. These processes engulf clusters of varicosities and accumulate intracellular degradative compartments. Selective inhibition of cellular functions, including endocytosis, in glial cells via the temperature-sensitive allele of shibire both suppresses glial infiltration and varicosity elimination and induces a severe delay in axon pruning. Selective inhibition of ecdysone receptors in the MB neurons severely suppressed not only axon pruning but also the infiltration and engulfing action of the surrounding glia. These findings strongly suggest that glial cells are extrinsically activated by ecdysone-stimulated MB neurons. These glial cells infiltrate the mass of axon branches to eliminate varicosities and break down axon branches actively rather than just scavenging already-degraded debris. We therefore propose that neuron-glia interaction is essential for the precisely coordinated axon-pruning process during Drosophila metamorphosis.

  8. The Comparative Utility of Viromer RED and Lipofectamine for Transient Gene Introduction into Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheendra Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of genes into glial cells for mechanistic studies of cell function and as a therapeutic for gene delivery is an expanding field. Though viral vector based systems do exhibit good delivery efficiency and long-term production of the transgene, the need for transient gene expression, broad and rapid gene setup methodologies, and safety concerns regarding in vivo application still incentivize research into the use of nonviral gene delivery methods. In the current study, aviral gene delivery vectors based upon cationic lipid (Lipofectamine 3000 lipoplex or polyethylenimine (Viromer RED polyplex technologies were examined in cell lines and primary glial cells for their transfection efficiencies, gene expression levels, and toxicity. The transfection efficiencies of polyplex and lipoplex agents were found to be comparable in a limited, yet similar, transfection setting, with or without serum across a number of cell types. However, differential effects on cell-specific transgene expression and reduced viability with cargo loaded polyplex were observed. Overall, our data suggests that polyplex technology could perform comparably to the market dominant lipoplex technology in transfecting various cells lines including glial cells but also stress a need for further refinement of polyplex reagents to minimize their effects on cell viability.

  9. The Comparative Utility of Viromer RED and Lipofectamine for Transient Gene Introduction into Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sudheendra; Morales, Alejo A; Pearse, Damien D

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of genes into glial cells for mechanistic studies of cell function and as a therapeutic for gene delivery is an expanding field. Though viral vector based systems do exhibit good delivery efficiency and long-term production of the transgene, the need for transient gene expression, broad and rapid gene setup methodologies, and safety concerns regarding in vivo application still incentivize research into the use of nonviral gene delivery methods. In the current study, aviral gene delivery vectors based upon cationic lipid (Lipofectamine 3000) lipoplex or polyethylenimine (Viromer RED) polyplex technologies were examined in cell lines and primary glial cells for their transfection efficiencies, gene expression levels, and toxicity. The transfection efficiencies of polyplex and lipoplex agents were found to be comparable in a limited, yet similar, transfection setting, with or without serum across a number of cell types. However, differential effects on cell-specific transgene expression and reduced viability with cargo loaded polyplex were observed. Overall, our data suggests that polyplex technology could perform comparably to the market dominant lipoplex technology in transfecting various cells lines including glial cells but also stress a need for further refinement of polyplex reagents to minimize their effects on cell viability.

  10. Stress proteins and glial cell functions during chronic aluminium exposures: protective role of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Pooja Khanna; Nahar, Uma; Nehru, Bimla

    2012-03-01

    Involved in the ongoing debate is the speculation that aluminium is somehow toxic for neurons. Glial cells cope up to protect neurons from this toxic insult by maintaining the glutathione homeostasis. Of late newer and newer roles of glial cells have been depicted. The present work looks into the other regulatory mechanisms that show the glial cells response to pro-oxidant effects of aluminium exposure. In the present investigation we have evaluated the inflammatory responses of the glial cells as well as HSP70-induction during aluminium exposure. Further, the protective role of curcumin is also evaluated. Aluminium was administered by oral gavage at a dose level of 100 mg/kg b.wt/day for a period of 8 weeks. Curcumin was administered i.p. at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.wt./day on alternate days. Enhanced gene and protein expression of HSP70 in the glial fractions of the aluminium exposed animals as compared to the corresponding neuronal population. Aluminium exposure resulted in a significant increase in the NF-κB and TNF-α expression suggesting inflammatory responses. In the conjunctive treatment group of aluminium and curcumin exposure marked reduction in the gene and protein expression of NF-κB and TNF-α was observed. This was further reflected in histopathological studies showing no evidence of inflammation in conjunctive group as compared to aluminium treatment. From the present study, it can be concluded that curcumin has a potential anti-inflammatory action and can be exploited in other toxicological conditions also.

  11. Glial cell-expressed mechanosensitive channel TRPV4 mediates infrasound-induced neuronal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming; Du, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Li; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tian; Cheng, Hao-Ran; Liu, Xue-Dong; Xiong, Li-Ze; Zhao, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Vibroacoustic disease, a progressive and systemic disease, mainly involving the central nervous system, is caused by excessive exposure to low-frequency but high-intensity noise generated by various heavy transportations and machineries. Infrasound is a type of low-frequency noise. Our previous studies demonstrated that infrasound at a certain intensity caused neuronal injury in rats but the underlying mechanism(s) is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that glial cell-expressed TRPV4, a Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive channel, mediated infrasound-induced neuronal injury. Among different frequencies and intensities, infrasound at 16 Hz and 130 dB impaired rat learning and memory abilities most severely after 7-14 days exposure, a time during which a prominent loss of hippocampal CA1 neurons was evident. Infrasound also induced significant astrocytic and microglial activation in hippocampal regions following 1- to 7-day exposure, prior to neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glial activation in vivo protected against neuronal apoptosis. In vitro, activated glial cell-released proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were found to be key factors for this neuronal apoptosis. Importantly, infrasound induced an increase in the expression level of TRPV4 both in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of TRPV4 expression by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV4 in cultured glial cells decreased the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, attenuated neuronal apoptosis, and reduced TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) influx and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Finally, using various antagonists we revealed that calmodulin and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in TRPV4-triggered NF-κB activation. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that glial cell-expressed TRPV4 is a potential key factor responsible for infrasound-induced neuronal impairment.

  12. Bone marrow-derived fibroblast growth factor-2 induces glial cell proliferation in the regenerating peripheral nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro-Resende Victor

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the essential biological roles of bone marrow-derived cells, secretion of many soluble factors is included and these small molecules can act upon specific receptors present in many tissues including the nervous system. Some of the released molecules can induce proliferation of Schwann cells (SC, satellite cells and lumbar spinal cord astrocytes during early steps of regeneration in a rat model of sciatic nerve transection. These are the major glial cell types that support neuronal survival and axonal growth following peripheral nerve injury. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 is the main mitogenic factor for SCs and is released in large amounts by bone marrow-derived cells, as well as by growing axons and endoneurial fibroblasts during development and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Results Here we show that bone marrow-derived cell treatment induce an increase in the expression of FGF-2 in the sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglia and the dorsolateral (DL region of the lumbar spinal cord (LSC in a model of sciatic nerve transection and connection into a hollow tube. SCs in culture in the presence of bone marrow derived conditioned media (CM resulted in increased proliferation and migration. This effect was reduced when FGF-2 was neutralized by pretreating BMMC or CM with a specific antibody. The increased expression of FGF-2 was validated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry in co-cultures of bone marrow derived cells with sciatic nerve explants and regenerating nerve tissue respectivelly. Conclusion We conclude that FGF-2 secreted by BMMC strongly increases early glial proliferation, which can potentially improve PNS regeneration.

  13. Glial cell activation, recruitment, and survival of B-lineage cells following MCMV brain infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokensgard, James R; Mutnal, Manohar B; Prasad, Sujata; Sheng, Wen; Hu, Shuxian

    2016-05-20

    Chemokines produced by reactive glia drive migration of immune cells and previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that CD19(+) B cells infiltrate the brain. In this study, in vivo and in vitro experiments investigated the role of reactive glial cells in recruitment and survival of B-lineage cells in response to (murine cytomegalovirus) MCMV infection. Flow cytometric analysis was used to assess chemokine receptor expression on brain-infiltrating B cells. Real-time RT-PCR and ELISA were used to measure chemokine levels. Dual-immunohistochemical staining was used to co-localize chemokine production by reactive glia. Primary glial cell cultures and migration assays were used to examine chemokine-mediated recruitment. Astrocyte: B cell co-cultures were used to investigate survival and proliferation. The chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR5, CCR5, and CCR7 were detected on CD19(+) cells isolated from the brain during MCMV infection. In particular, CXCR3 was found to be elevated on an increasing number of cells over the time course of infection, and it was the primary chemokine receptor expressed at 60 days post infection Quite different expression kinetics were observed for CXCR5, CCR5, and CCR7, which were elevated on the highest number of cells early during infection and decreased by 14, 30, and 60 days post infection Correspondingly, elevated levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL13, as well as CCL5, were found within the brains of infected animals, and only low levels of CCL3 and CCL19 were detected. Differential expression of CXCL9/CXCL10 and CXCL13 between microglia and astrocytes was apparent, and B cells moved towards supernatants from MCMV-infected microglia, but not astrocytes. Pretreatment with neutralizing Abs to CXCL9 and CXCL10 inhibited this migration. In contrast, neutralizing Abs to the ligand of CXCR5 (i.e., CXCL13) did not significantly block chemotaxis. Proliferation of brain-infiltrating B cells was detected at 7 days post infection and

  14. Glial cell modulators attenuate methamphetamine self-administration in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Sarah E.; Hendrick, Elizabeth S.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation induced by activated microglia and astrocytes can be elicited by drugs of abuse. Methamphetamine administration activates glial cells and increases proinflammatory cytokine production, and there is recent evidence of a linkage between glial cell activation and drug abuse-related behavior. We have previously reported that ibudilast (AV411; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine), which inhibits phosphodiesterase (PDE) and pro-inflammatory activity, blocks reinstatement of methamphetamine-maintained responding in rats, and that ibudilast and AV1013, an amino analog of ibudilast, which has similar glial-attenuating properties but limited PDE activity, attenuate methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity and sensitization in mice. The present study's objective was to determine whether co-administered ibudilast, AV1013, or minocycline, which is a tetracycline derivative that also suppresses methamphetamine-induced glial activation, would attenuate active methamphetamine i.v. self-administration in Long-Evans hooded rats. Rats were initially trained to press a lever for 0.1 mg/kg/inf methamphetamine according to a FR1 schedule during 2-h daily sessions. Once stable responding was obtained, twice daily ibudilast (1, 7.5, 10 mg/kg), AV1013 (1, 10, 30 mg/kg), or once daily minocycline (10, 30, 60 mg/kg), or their corresponding vehicles, were given i.p. for three consecutive days during methamphetamine (0.001, 0.03, 0.1 mg/kg/inf) self-administration. Ibudilast, AV1013, and minocycline all significantly (pmethamphetamine that had maintained the highest level of infusions under vehicle conditions. These results suggest that targeting glial cells may provide a novel approach to pharmacotherapy for treating methamphetamine abuse. PMID:23375937

  15. Alginate-matrigel microencapsulated schwann cells for inducible secretion of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Roche C; Ereifej, Evon S; Broadrick, Kristy M; Rogers, Richard A; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2008-10-01

    Controlled expression of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf) can be integrated in the development of a system for repair of injured peripheral nerves. This delivery strategy was demonstrated via inducible Gdnf from microencapsulated cells in barium alginate. The Schwann cell line RT4-D6P2T was initially modified utilizing an ecdysone-based stable transfection system to produce RT4-Gdnf cells. During construct preparation, it was found that C6 cells (where Gdnf cDNA was isolated) make three Gdnf transcript variants. Additionally, the importance of 5' untranslated region to drive biologically-functional Gdnf synthesis was shown. Encapsulation of RT4-Gdnf in 1% alginate was then performed. It was determined that cells were able to survive at least 1 month in vitro using starting densities of 20, 200 and 2000 cells/capsule and barium ion concentrations of 10, 50, 100 and 200 mM. Most importantly, encapsulated cells secreted exogenous Gdnf upon ponasterone A induction. Mixture of basement membrane extract Matrigel to alginate promoted increased proliferation, cell spreading and Gdnf release. Finally, compression tests showed that cell-loaded microcapsules fractured at 75% diameter compression with 38 kPa of stress. Regulated Gdnf release from these microcapsules in vivo may potentially aid in the regeneration of damaged nerves.

  16. Cell-type specific segregation of transcriptional expression of glial genes in the rat peripheral neurotumor RT4 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, N; Imada, S; Sueoka, N

    1993-12-15

    Four types of cells, RT4-AC (stem cell type), RT4-B and RT4-E (neuronal cell types), and RT4-D (glial cell type) were previously isolated from an ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induced rat peripheral neurotumor RT4. In a phenomenon termed cell-type conversion, RT4-AC spontaneously and permanently gives rise to the three other cell types in culture. In the RT4 system the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100 beta protein genes segregates in a cell-type specific manner. To further characterize the RT4 family, the expression of four myelin-forming glial genes--P0 glycoprotein, suppressed cAMP inducible POU (SCIP), 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), and myelin basic protein (MBP)--has been studied in the RT4 cell lines. In addition to these genes, the expression of the low-affinity nerve growth factor (LNGF) receptor (expressed in immature Schwann cells) has been examined. We have found the following results. 1) The stem cell type RT4-AC and the glial cell type RT4-D express mRNA transcripts of P0, SCIP, and CNP (the larger form, 2.8 kb), and the amount of mRNA of these genes was increased by forskolin. 2) RT4-AC and RT4-D also express a low level of MBP mRNA upon forskolin treatment. 3) The neuronal cell types RT4-B and RT4-E do not express any of these myelin-forming glial genes with or without forskolin treatment. 4) The LNGF receptor mRNA is expressed in RT4-AC and RT4-D and at a lower level in RT4-B; its expression is stimulated by forskolin.

  17. Immortalization of different precursors of glial cells with a targeted and temperature-sensitive oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, R; Le Bert, M; Borde, I; Galiana, E; Evrard, C; Rouget, P

    1994-09-01

    Different types of glial precursor cell lines were obtained after stable transfection of brain cells with the pJC-SVLTtsA vector carrying the tsA58 simian virus 40 large T (SVLT) gene driven by the promoter of a gliotropic strain of JC papovavirus. The immortalized cells were conditional for growth: they expressed the SVLT antigen and proliferated at 34 degrees C, but their growth was either reduced or arrested when they were shifted to 39 degrees C. The differentiation characteristics of four representative lines were more extensively studied. The CR15 and CM8 lines displayed properties of bipotential glial progenitors: they were able to express oligodendrocyte markers at both temperatures, but could differentiate into astrocytes only at 39 degrees C. In contrast, the CR19 and CM3r lines corresponded to more committed oligodendrocyte precursors: they expressed various oligodendroglial markers but they could not synthesize the glial fibrillary acidic protein. More particularly, the CM3r mouse cells displayed a typical oligodendrocyte progenitor morphology and expressed the proteolipid protein mRNA.

  18. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris I De Zeeuw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impressive range of functions that optimize information processing in the adult brain. In this review we expand on the function of the Bergmann glial cell in the cerebellum to highlight the importance of astrocytes not only in housekeeping functions, but also in contributing to plasticity and information processing in the cerebellum.

  19. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused...... hr after axotomy, whereas MCP-1/CCL2 was significantly induced before leukocyte infiltration occurred. Neither T cells nor macrophages infiltrated the denervated hippocampus of CCR2-deficient mice, arguing for a critical role for the CCR2 ligand MCP-1/CCL2 in leukocyte migration. Both T cells......+ microglia and GFAP+ astrocytes as major sources of MCP-1/CCL2 within the lesion-reactive hippocampus. We conclude that leukocyte responses to CNS axonal injury are directed via innate glial production of chemokines....

  20. Modelling cell cycle synchronisation in networks of coupled radial glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrack, Duncan S; Thul, Rüdiger; Owen, Markus R

    2015-07-21

    Radial glial cells play a crucial role in the embryonic mammalian brain. Their proliferation is thought to be controlled, in part, by ATP mediated calcium signals. It has been hypothesised that these signals act to locally synchronise cell cycles, so that clusters of cells proliferate together, shedding daughter cells in uniform sheets. In this paper we investigate this cell cycle synchronisation by taking an ordinary differential equation model that couples the dynamics of intracellular calcium and the cell cycle and extend it to populations of cells coupled via extracellular ATP signals. Through bifurcation analysis we show that although ATP mediated calcium release can lead to cell cycle synchronisation, a number of other asynchronous oscillatory solutions including torus solutions dominate the parameter space and cell cycle synchronisation is far from guaranteed. Despite this, numerical results indicate that the transient and not the asymptotic behaviour of the system is important in accounting for cell cycle synchronisation. In particular, quiescent cells can be entrained on to the cell cycle via ATP mediated calcium signals initiated by a driving cell and crucially will cycle in near synchrony with the driving cell for the duration of neurogenesis. This behaviour is highly sensitive to the timing of ATP release, with release at the G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle far more likely to lead to near synchrony than release during mid G1 phase. This result, which suggests that ATP release timing is critical to radial glia cell cycle synchronisation, may help us to understand normal and pathological brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of neuronal excitability by release of proteins from glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igelhorst, Birte A.; Niederkinkhaus, Vanessa; Karus, Claudia; Lange, Maren D.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of glial cells on electrical isolation and shaping of synaptic transmission between neurons have been extensively studied. Here we present evidence that the release of proteins from astrocytes as well as microglia may regulate voltage-activated Na+ currents in neurons, thereby increasing excitability and speed of transmission in neurons kept at distance from each other by specialized glial cells. As a first example, we show that basic fibroblast growth factor and neurotrophin-3, which are released from astrocytes by exposure to thyroid hormone, influence each other to enhance Na+ current density in cultured hippocampal neurons. As a second example, we show that the presence of microglia in hippocampal cultures can upregulate Na+ current density. The effect can be boosted by lipopolysaccharides, bacterial membrane-derived stimulators of microglial activation. Comparable effects are induced by the exposure of neuron-enriched hippocampal cultures to tumour necrosis factor-α, which is released from stimulated microglia. Taken together, our findings suggest that release of proteins from various types of glial cells can alter neuronal excitability over a time course of several days. This explains changes in neuronal excitability occurring in states of thyroid hormone imbalance and possibly also in seizures triggered by infectious diseases. PMID:26009773

  2. Bioengineered 3D Glial Cell Culture Systems and Applications for Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P Marc D; Kavanagh, Edel; Allenby, Gary; Vassey, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are key features in a range of chronic central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, as well as acute conditions like stroke and traumatic brain injury, for which there remains significant unmet clinical need. It is now well recognized that current cell culture methodologies are limited in their ability to recapitulate the cellular environment that is present in vivo, and there is a growing body of evidence to show that three-dimensional (3D) culture systems represent a more physiologically accurate model than traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Given the complexity of the environment from which cells originate, and their various cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, it is important to develop models that can be controlled and reproducible for drug discovery. 3D cell models have now been developed for almost all CNS cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocyte cells. This review will highlight a number of current and emerging techniques for the culture of astrocytes and microglia, glial cell types with a critical role in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. We describe recent advances in glial cell culture using electrospun polymers and hydrogel macromolecules, and highlight how these novel culture environments influence astrocyte and microglial phenotypes in vitro, as compared to traditional 2D systems. These models will be explored to illuminate current trends in the techniques used to create 3D environments for application in research and drug discovery focused on astrocytes and microglial cells.

  3. Increased population of immature enteric glial cells in the resected proximal ganglionic bowel of Hirschsprung's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Gakuto; Tomuschat, Christian; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2017-10-01

    Enteric glial cells are essential for normal gastrointestinal function. Abnormalities in glial structure, development, or function lead to disturbances in gastrointestinal physiology. Fatty acid-binding protein 7 (FABP7) is a marker of immature enteric glial cells, whereas S100 is expressed only by mature glial cells. Patients with Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) often suffer from dysmotility and enterocolitis despite proper surgery. We designed this study to determine the distribution and expression of glial cells in patients with HSCR compared to normal controls. We investigated FABP7, S100, and PGP 9.5 expressions in both the ganglionic and aganglionic bowel of patients with HSCR (n = 6) versus normal control colon (n = 6). Protein distribution was assessed by using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Gene and protein expressions were quantified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Western blot analysis, and densitometry. qPCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a significantly increased FABP7 expression in ganglionic specimens compared to control specimen (P < 0.05). Confocal microscopy revealed FABP7+ glia cells lie under the colonic epithelium and in close apposition to enteric neurons in the ganglionic bowel. The significantly increased number of immature enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the ganglionic bowel of HSCR patients may have adverse effect on the function of enteric neurons and intestinal barrier and thus predispose these patients to intestinal motility problems and enterocolitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Activity of glial cells in trigeminal nervous system in rats with experimental pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Liu, Na; Liu, Hongchen

    2014-04-29

    To observe the activity change of astrocyte in related nucleus caused by acute pulpitis in rats. Rat acute pulpitis model was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). And, according to processing time, a total of 30 rats were divided into 5 groups of control, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were employed to detect the dynamic expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve (Vc). The relative gray value of ipsilateral Vc GFAP expression in experimental groups was 153 ± 11 at 12 h. And it significantly increased versus the control group (100 ± 4)(P pulpitis model, activated glial cells are probably involved in the processes of pulpitis and hyperalgesia.

  5. Induction and segregation of glial intermediate filament expression in the RT4 family of peripheral nervous system cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, M R; Sueoka, N

    1987-01-01

    We have found glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, to be expressed in cell lines of the RT4 peripheral neurotumor family. The RT4 family is a "stem-cell-like" cell line, RT4-AC, that spontaneously undergoes differentiation in culture to three derivative cell types. This process, termed cell-type conversion, results in a segregation among the derivative cell types of parental cell phenotypes that have been described as neuronal-like or glial-like. We have identified a 50-kDa GFAP-immunoreactive cytoskeletal protein and GFAP mRNA in continuous RT4-AC and RT4-D (glial-type derivative) cell lines, but not in two presumptive neuronal-type cell lines. This result suggests that GFAP gene expression is coordinately coupled with the expression of other glial properties during cell-type conversion. In addition, the RT4-AC and RT4-D sublines were found to significantly express GFAP only at high cell densities and not during logarithmic growth and to express GFAP precociously during morphological differentiation following treatment with 1 mM N6, O2'-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. These observations closely reflect reports of glial filament expression in astrocyte cultures, suggesting that a common regulatory mechanism is employed by central and peripheral nervous system glia. Images PMID:2441395

  6. GABA and glutamate uptake and metabolism in retinal glial (Müller cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBringmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the shaping and termination of the synaptic activity, particularly in the inner retina. Reactive Müller cells are neuroprotective, e.g., by the clearance of excess extracellular glutamate, but may also contribute to neuronal degeneration by a malfunctioning or even reversal of glial glutamate transporters, or by a downregulation of the key enzyme, glutamine synthetase. This review summarizes the present knowledge about the role of Müller cells in the clearance and metabolization of extracellular glutamate and GABA. Some major pathways of GABA and glutamate metabolism in Müller cells are described; these pathways are involved in the glutamate-glutamine cycle of the retina, in the defense against oxidative stress via the production of glutathione, and in the production of substrates for the neuronal energy metabolism.

  7. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Potential for otoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, R; Hever, G; Zajic, G; Yan, Q; Collins, F; Louis, J C; Keithley, E; Magal, E

    1999-11-28

    Sensorineural hearing loss results from the degeneration of hair cells and/or auditory neurons in the cochlea of the inner ear. BDNF and NT-3 were shown to support survival of auditory neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Cochlea from P3-P4 rats were cultured as floating explants and hair cells in the organ of Corti were identified by phalloidin-FITC immunostaining. Treatment with cisplatin (35 micrograms/mL) or neomycin (0.6 mM) resulted in 21.2 +/- 6.0% and 7.4 +/- 4.7% surviving hair cells, respectively, after 3 days in culture. GDNF, added together with the ototoxins, increased their number to 46.7% and 37.4%, respectively. In cultures of dissociated cochlea from 4-week-old rat, cisplatin (5 mg/mL) added 24 h after seeding resulted in only 6.1 +/- 1.2% surviving neurons. However, when cisplatin was added together with GDNF (10 ng/mL), 32.8 +/- 1.0% of the neurons survived. The efficacy of GDNF in animal models of ototoxicity was tested next. Guinea pigs were pretreated with GDNF in one ear, delivered either by infusion into the inner ear (scala tympani) with Alzet minipumps (50 ng/mL at a 0.5 microL/h), or injected into the middle ear (120 microL at 1 mg/mL) through the tympanic membrane. The ear that did not receive GDNF always served as control. Ototoxicity was induced systemically either by intraperitoneal cisplatin injections (1 mg/kg/day for 15 days or two injections of 7.5 mg/kg at a 5-day interval or by a combination of kanamycin (200-300 mg/kg, administered subcutaneously) and ethacrinic acid (40 mg/kg, intravenous). It was found that the number of surviving hair cells in GDNF-treated ears was about twice that of control ears in animals exposed to the ototoxins. The transducing GDNF receptor (ret) is expressed in the inner ear.

  8. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels and postoperative cognitive dysfunction after surgery for rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chan; Zhang, Guanpeng; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Luye; Wang, Maohua; Wang, Xiaobin

    2018-03-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is an important complication of cardiac surgery with poor outcomes. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels are decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but the association between glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels and postoperative cognitive dysfunction is poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of postoperative serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels to predict postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing heart valve replacement. This was a prospective observational study of 80 patients undergoing elective heart valve replacement surgery from June 2015 to June 2016 at the Affiliated Hospital of Southeast Medical University. Cognitive functions were assessed 1 day before and 7 days after surgery. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before (T1) and 1 (T2), 2 (T3), and 7 (T4) days after surgery. Perioperative parameters were evaluated to assess the relationship between glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction was identified in 38 patients (47.5%) 7 days after surgery. Average glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels at 2 and 7 days after surgery in the postoperative cognitive dysfunction group were lower than in the nonpostoperative cognitive dysfunction group at the same time points (P derived neurotrophic factor (T1-T3) and Δglial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (T1-T4) were identified as good predictors of postoperative cognitive dysfunction with threshold for postoperative cognitive dysfunction detection of 49.10 and 60.90, respectively. The perioperative glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with postoperative cognitive dysfunction were lower than in patients without postoperative

  9. Glial Cells Missing Homologue 1 Is Induced in Differentiating Equine Chorionic Girdle Trophoblast Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestre, Amanda M.; Miller, Donald; Roberson, Mark S.; Liford, Jenny; Chizmar, Lisay C.; McLaughlin, Kristin E.; Antczak, Douglas F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify transcription factors associated with differentiation of the chorionic girdle, the invasive form of equine trophoblast. The expression patterns of five transcription factors were determined on a panel of conceptus tissues from early horse pregnancy. Tissues from Days 15 through 46 were tested. Eomesodermin (EOMES), glial cells missing homologue 1 (GCM1), heart and neural crest derivatives expressed transcript 1 (HAND1), caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), and distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3) were detected in horse trophoblast, but the expression patterns for these genes varied. EOMES had the most restricted distribution, while DLX3 CDX2, and HAND1 were widely expressed. GCM1 seemed to increase in the developing chorionic girdle, and this was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR assays. GCM1 expression preceded a striking increase in expression of equine chorionic gonadotropin beta (CGB) in the chorionic girdle, and binding sites for GCM1 were discovered in the promoter region of the CGB gene. GCM1, CGB, and CGA mRNA were expressed preferentially in binucleate cells as opposed to uninucleate cells of the chorionic girdle. Based on these findings, it is likely that GCM1 has a role in differentiation and function of the invasive trophoblast of the equine chorionic girdle and endometrial cups. The equine binucleate chorionic girdle (CG) secreting trophoblast shares molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics with human syncytiotrophoblast and represents a model for studies of human placental function. PMID:18971425

  10. Specification of neuronal and glial subtypes from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huisheng; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), provide a dynamic tool for revealing early embryonic development, modeling pathological processes, and developing therapeutics through drug discovery and potential cell replacement. The first step toward the utilities of human PSCs is directed differentiation to functionally specialized cell tissue types. Following developmental principles, human ESCs, and lately iPSCs, have been effectively differentiated to region-and/or transmitter-specific neuronal and glial types, including cerebral glutamatergic, striatal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic, forebrain cholinergic, midbrain dopaminergic, and spinal motor neurons, as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. These studies also reveal unique aspects of human cell biology, including intrinsically programmed developmental course, differential uses of transcription factors for neuroectoderm specification, and distinct responses to extracellular signals in regulating cell fate. Such information will be instrumental for translating biological findings to therapeutic development. PMID:21786144

  11. Characterization of human satellite cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gloy, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells guarantee the regeneration of skeletal muscle until old age. They are genuine muscle stem cells that are localized in a characteristic anatomic localization between basal lamina and sarkolemma of each muscle fiber. On protein level they are characterized by their expression of the transcription factor Pax7 and different other markers like c-Met and CXCR4. Most of our knowledge is based on studies with mouse models. Due to their availability and remarkable capacity to regen...

  12. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  13. Studying subcellular detail in fixed astrocytes: Dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHaseleu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Studying the distribution of astrocytic antigens is particularly hard when they are localized in their fine, peripheral astrocyte processes (PAPs, since these processes often have a diameter comparable to vesicles and small organelles. The most appropriate technique is immunoelectron microscopy, which is, however, a time-consuming procedure. Even in high resolution light microscopy, antigen localization is difficult to detect due to the small dimensions of these processes, and overlay from antigen in surrounding non-glial cells. Yet, PAPs frequently display antigens related to motility and glia-synaptic interaction. Here, we describe the dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs, permitting unambiguous antigen localization using epifluorescence microscopy. Astrocytes are dissociated from juvenile (p13-15 mouse cortex by applying papain treatment and cytospin centrifugation to attach the cells to a slide. The cells and their complete processes including the PAPs is thus projected in 2D. The entire procedure takes 2½-3 hours. We show by morphometry that the diameter of DIMIGs, including the PAPs is similar to that of astrocytes in situ. In contrast to cell culture, results derived from this procedure allow for direct conclusions relating to (i the presence of an antigen in cortical astrocytes, (ii subcellular antigen distribution, in particular when localized in the PAPs. The detailed resolution is shown in an exemplary study of the organization of the astrocytic cytoskeleton components actin, ezrin, tubulin, and GFAP. The distribution of connexin 43 in relation to a single astrocyte’s process tree is also investigated.

  14. Studying subcellular detail in fixed astrocytes: dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseleu, Julia; Anlauf, Enrico; Blaess, Sandra; Endl, Elmar; Derouiche, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Studying the distribution of astrocytic antigens is particularly hard when they are localized in their fine, peripheral astrocyte processes (PAPs), since these processes often have a diameter comparable to vesicles and small organelles. The most appropriate technique is immunoelectron microscopy, which is, however, a time-consuming procedure. Even in high resolution light microscopy, antigen localization is difficult to detect due to the small dimensions of these processes, and overlay from antigen in surrounding non-glial cells. Yet, PAPs frequently display antigens related to motility and glia-synaptic interaction. Here, we describe the dissociation of morphologically intact glial cells (DIMIGs), permitting unambiguous antigen localization using epifluorescence microscopy. Astrocytes are dissociated from juvenile (p13-15) mouse cortex by applying papain treatment and cytospin centrifugation to attach the cells to a slide. The cells and their complete processes including the PAPs is thus projected in 2D. The entire procedure takes 2.5-3 h. We show by morphometry that the diameter of DIMIGs, including the PAPs is similar to that of astrocytes in situ. In contrast to cell culture, results derived from this procedure allow for direct conclusions relating to (1) the presence of an antigen in cortical astrocytes, (2) subcellular antigen distribution, in particular when localized in the PAPs. The detailed resolution is shown in an exemplary study of the organization of the astrocytic cytoskeleton components actin, ezrin, tubulin, and GFAP. The distribution of connexin 43 in relation to a single astrocyte's process tree is also investigated.

  15. Glial cells as key players in schizophrenia pathology: recent insights and concepts of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Guest, Paul C; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of knowledge on the impact of glia for the neurobiological foundation of schizophrenia. A plethora of studies have shown structural and functional abnormalities in all three types of glial cells. There is convincing evidence of reduced numbers of oligodendrocytes, impaired cell maturation and altered gene expression of myelin/oligodendrocyte-related genes that may in part explain white matter abnormalities and disturbed inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity, which are characteristic signs of schizophrenia. Earlier reports of astrogliosis could not be confirmed by later studies, although the expression of a variety of astrocyte-related genes is abnormal in psychosis. Since astrocytes play a key role in the synaptic metabolism of glutamate, GABA, monoamines and purines, astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to certain aspects of disturbed neurotransmission in schizophrenia. Finally, increased densities of microglial cells and aberrant expression of microglia-related surface markers in schizophrenia suggest that immunological/inflammatory factors are of considerable relevance for the pathophysiology of psychosis. This review describes current evidence for the multifaceted role of glial cells in schizophrenia and discusses efforts to develop glia-directed therapies for the treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid by 3H-glial cells and synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex under the influence of psychotropic substances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭsov, N I; Chipashvili, M D; Aleksidze, N G; Raevskiĭ, K S

    1977-05-01

    Chlorpromazine was shown to inhibit non-competitively the 3H-GABA uptake both by the glial cells and synaptosomes; synaptosomal uptake was more sensitive to the inhibitor. Only the low-affinity GABA uptake in the glial cells was competitively inhibited by beta-alanine. On the whole, there was a correlation between the inhibition of GABA uptake by psychotropic drugs in the glial cells and in the synaptosomes. It is assumed that there existed two different systems of GABA uptake (of high and low affinity) in the nerve endings and glial cells.

  17. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  18. Regulation of human neurotropic JC virus replication by alternative splicing factor SF2/ASF in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Khalili, Kamel

    2011-01-31

    The human neurotropic virus, JC virus (JCV), is the etiologic agent of the fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) that is seen primarily in immunodeficient individuals. Productive infection of JCV occurs only in glial cells, and this restriction is, to a great extent, due to the activation of the viral promoter that has cell type-specific characteristics. Earlier studies led to the hypothesis that glial-specific activation of the JCV promoter is mediated through positive and negative transcription factors that control reactivation of the JCV genome under normal physiological conditions and suppress its activation in non-glial cells. Using a variety of virological and molecular biological approaches, we demonstrate that the alternative splicing factor SF2/ASF has the capacity to exert a negative effect on transcription of the JCV promoter in glial cells through direct association with a specific DNA sequence within the viral enhancer/promoter region. Our results show that down-regulation of SF2/ASF in fetal and adult glial cells increases the level of JCV gene expression and its replication indicating that negative regulation of the JCV promoter by SF2/ASF may control reactivation of JCV replication in brain. Our results establish a new regulatory role for SF2/ASF in controlling gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  19. Leucocytes, cytokines and satellite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Gøran; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Raastad, Truls

    2012-01-01

    and inflammation in otherwise healthy human skeletal muscles. We approach this concept by comparing changes in muscle function (i.e., the force-generating capacity) with the degree of leucocyte accumulation in muscle following exercise. In the second section, we explore the cytokine response to 'muscle......-damaging exercise', primarily eccentric exercise. We review the evidence for the notion that the degree of muscle damage is related to the magnitude of the cytokine response. In the third and final section, we look at the satellite cell response to a single bout of eccentric exercise, as well as the role...... variation in individual responses to a given exercise should, however be expected. The link between cytokine and satellite cell responses and exercise-induced muscle damage is not so clear The systemic cytokine response may be linked more closely to the metabolic demands of exercise rather than muscle...

  20. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Juan A; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  1. Griffonia simplicifolia II lectin labels a population of radial glial cells in the embryonic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, S D; Streit, W J

    1995-01-01

    Staining with the Griffonia simplicifolia II lectin (GSL II), a marker for adult rat oligodendrocytes, was studied in rat brain at embryonic (E) days E14, E16, E18, and E20. At E14, only two regions of the CNS showed labeling--the hippocampal primordium and the ventromedial floor of the mesencephalic aqueduct and fourth ventricle. Labeling in these areas was confined to cells with bipolar processes which spanned from the ventricular lumen to the pial surface. At E16, GSL II+ radial glia were present in the hippocampus, septal area, cerebral peduncle, thalamus, tegmentum, and throughout much of the midbrain. At E16, E18, and E20, GSL II strongly labeled two midline radial glial raphes--dorsal to the mesencephalic aqueduct and ventral to the mesencephalic aqueduct and fourth ventricle. Comparison of GSL II lectin labeling with nestin immunostaining, using Rat-401, showed that GSL II labeled a distinct population of radial cells different from nestin-positive radial glia. GSL II also labeled a group of neurons at E16 and E18 in the hypothalamus and basal striatum. We suggest that GSL II+ radial glia represent a population of oligodendroglial precursors present in the embryonic brain, and that GSL II reactivity could serve as a differentiation marker for cells committed to the oligodendroglial lineage. This work supports the possibility that some oligodendroglia, like astrocytes, are derived from radial glial precursors.

  2. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Juan A.; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression. PMID:25883550

  3. Effects of Flavonoids from Food and Dietary Supplements on Glial and Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidak, Marko; Rozman, Damjana; Komel, Radovan

    2015-10-23

    Quercetin, catechins and proanthocyanidins are flavonoids that are prominently featured in foodstuffs and dietary supplements, and may possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most dangerous form of glioma, a malignancy of the brain connective tissue. This review assesses molecular structures of these flavonoids, their importance as components of diet and dietary supplements, their bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, their reported beneficial health effects, and their effects on non-malignant glial as well as glioblastoma tumor cells. The reviewed flavonoids appear to protect glial cells via reduction of oxidative stress, while some also attenuate glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and reduce neuroinflammation. Most of the reviewed flavonoids inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induce their death. Moreover, some of them inhibit pro-oncogene signaling pathways and intensify the effect of conventional anti-cancer therapies. However, most of these anti-glioblastoma effects have only been observed in vitro or in animal models. Due to limited ability of the reviewed flavonoids to access the brain, their normal dietary intake is likely insufficient to produce significant anti-cancer effects in this organ, and supplementation is needed.

  4. Induction and segregation of glial intermediate filament expression in the RT4 family of peripheral nervous system cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, M. R.; Sueoka, N

    1987-01-01

    We have found glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, to be expressed in cell lines of the RT4 peripheral neurotumor family. The RT4 family is a "stem-cell-like" cell line, RT4-AC, that spontaneously undergoes differentiation in culture to three derivative cell types. This process, termed cell-type conversion, results in a segregation among the derivative cell types of parental cell phenotypes that have been described as neuronal-like o...

  5. Possible role of glial cells in the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami eNoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that there is a close relationship between the endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS. Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs are critical for the development and function of the CNS; not only for neuronal cells but also for glial development and differentiation. Any impairment of TH supply to the developing CNS causes severe and irreversible changes in the overall architecture and function of human brain, leading to various neurological dysfunctions. In adult brain, impairment of THs, such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, can cause psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Though hypothyroidism impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity, its effect on glial cells and cellular mechanisms are unknown. This mini-review article summarizes how THs are transported to the brain, metabolized in astrocytes and affect microglia and oligodendrocytes, showing an example of glioendocrine system. It may help to understand physiological and/or pathophysiological functions of THs in the CNS and how hypo- and hyper-thyroidism may cause mental disorders.

  6. Synchronization of stochastic systems: from paddlefish electroreceptors to human epileptic glial cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Alexander

    2000-03-01

    Synchronization is one of the fundamental nonlinear phenomena observed in nature. We have studied stochastic synchronization in the electrosensitive system of the paddlefish, Polyodon spathula and have also applied synchronization analysis to networks of glial cells cultured from brain tissue of patients with severe epilepsy. We also present theoretical and numerical models for stochastic synchronization. The electrosensitive system of the paddlefish consists of tens of thousands of electroreceptors located mainly on the "rostrum", which serves as an antenna to locate plankton. Each electroreceptor is a noisy oscillator with natural frequencies in the range of 30-90 Hz. We study synchronization in vivo due to 3-20 Hz external periodic electric fields, which correspond to natural signals produced by Daphnia, the usual prey of paddlefish. We find that for signals whose strengths are in the range that paddlefish customarily encounter in the wild, synchronization coding offers a plausible alternative to the more usual rate coding. We also have studied mutual synchronization between different electroreceptors. Although the spontaneous firing of distant electroreceptors is not synchronized, synchronization is observed when external periodic or even noisy electric fields are applied. We have applied the same analysis techniques to examine synchronization between groups of glial cells. In contrast to cultures of healthy astrocytes, which demonstrate calcium waves, the networks from epileptic tissue are characterized by spatially disordered hyper activity. Nevertheless, we have found that, in many cases, synchronized activity is a rather typical for tissue taken from the uncus region of the brain.

  7. Glial cells of the central nervous system of Bothrops jararaca (Reptilia, Ofidae: an ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo F. Bondan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although ultrastructural characteristics of mature neuroglia in the central nervous system (CNS are very well described in mammals, much less is known in reptiles, especially serpents. In this context, two specimens of Bothrops jararaca were euthanized for morphological analysis of CNS glial cells. Samples from telencephalon, mesencephalon and spinal cord were collected and processed for light and transmission electron microscopy investigation. Astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and ependymal cells, as well as myelin sheaths, presented similar ultrastructural features to those already observed in mammals and tended to maintain their general aspect all over the distinct CNS regions observed. Morphological similarities between reptilian and mammalian glia are probably linked to their evolutionary conservation throughout vertebrate phylogeny.

  8. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep deprivation induces spatial memory impairment by altered hippocampus neuroinflammatory responses and glial cells activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Meetu; Kumari, Punita; Chauhan, Garima; Roy, Koustav; Alam, Shahnawaz; Kishore, Krishna; Ray, Koushik; Panjwani, Usha

    2017-11-15

    We aimed to investigate the glial cells activation as a potential mechanism involved in the sleep deprivation (SD) induced cognitive impairment through changes in inflammatory cytokines. We analyzed the spatial memory, inflammatory cytokine levels, and gliosis during SD. SD induced spatial memory impairment, imbalance of inflammatory (increased pro- and decreased anti-) cytokines in both hippocampus and plasma in association with glial cells activation in the hippocampus of sleep-deprived rats were observed. Further analysis of the data presented a correlation between spatial memory impairment and activated microglia induced increased pro-inflammatory cytokines after 48h of SD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Abrogation of β-catenin signaling in oligodendrocyte precursor cells reduces glial scarring and promotes axon regeneration after CNS injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Justin P; Coulter, Michael; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Levine, Joel M

    2014-07-30

    When the brain or spinal cord is injured, glial cells in the damaged area undergo complex morphological and physiological changes resulting in the formation of the glial scar. This scar contains reactive astrocytes, activated microglia, macrophages and other myeloid cells, meningeal cells, proliferating oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and a dense extracellular matrix. Whether the scar is beneficial or detrimental to recovery remains controversial. In the acute phase of recovery, scar-forming astrocytes limit the invasion of leukocytes and macrophages, but in the subacute and chronic phases of injury the glial scar is a physical and biochemical barrier to axonal regrowth. The signals that initiate the formation of the glial scar are unknown. Both canonical and noncanonical signaling Wnts are increased after spinal cord injury (SCI). Because Wnts are important regulators of OPC and oligodendrocyte development, we examined the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the glial reactions to CNS injury. In adult female mice carrying an OPC-specific conditionally deleted β-catenin gene, there is reduced proliferation of OPCs after SCI, reduced accumulation of activated microglia/macrophages, and reduced astrocyte hypertrophy. Using an infraorbital optic nerve crush injury, we show that reducing β-catenin-dependent signaling in OPCs creates an environment that is permissive to axonal regeneration. Viral-induced expression of Wnt3a in the normal adult mouse spinal cord induces an injury-like response in glia. Thus canonical Wnt signaling is both necessary and sufficient to induce injury responses among glial cells. These data suggest that targeting Wnt expression after SCI may have therapeutic potential in promoting axon regeneration. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410285-13$15.00/0.

  11. HSV amplicon delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor is neuroprotective against ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, B K; Chang, C F; Chiang, Y H; Bowers, W J; Morales, M; Hoffer, B J; Wang, Y; Federoff, H J

    2003-09-01

    Direct intracerebral administration of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is neuroprotective against ischemia-induced cerebral injury. Utilizing viral vectors to deliver and express therapeutic genes presents an opportunity to produce GDNF within localized regions of an evolving infarct. We investigated whether a herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon-based vector encoding GDNF (HSVgdnf) would protect neurons against ischemic injury. In primary cortical cultures HSVgdnf reduced oxidant-induced injury compared to the control vector HSVlac. To test protective effects in vivo, HSVgdnf or HSVlac was injected into the cerebral cortex 4 days prior to, or 3 days, after a 60-min unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Control stroke animals developed bradykinesia and motor asymmetry; pretreatment with HSVgdnf significantly reduced such motor deficits. Animals receiving HSVlac or HSVgdnf after the ischemic insult did not exhibit any behavioral improvement. Histological analyses performed 1 month after stroke revealed a reduction in ischemic tissue loss in rats pretreated with HSVgdnf. Similarly, these animals exhibited less immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and the apoptotic marker caspase-3. Taken together, our data indicate that HSVgdnf pretreatment provides protection against cerebral ischemia and supports the utilization of the HSV amplicon for therapeutic delivery of trophic factors to the CNS.

  12. Sox8 gene expression identifies immature glial cells in developing cerebellum and cerebellar tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y C; Lee, C J; Badge, R M; Orme, A T; Scotting, P J

    2001-08-15

    Sox8 is a member of the E subgroup of Sox genes, the other members of which are Sox9 and Sox10, both of which are implicated in specific human disorders. Recently, Sox8 homologues have been cloned in chick, mouse and human and have been shown to be strongly expressed in the embryonic and adult brain. Nevertheless, the cell types that express Sox8 have not been determined. We show here that Sox8 is expressed in immature glia in the developing cerebellum. Sox8 is also expressed in scattered cells in the cerebellar tumour, medulloblastoma. This gene therefore provides an early glial marker that may provide more detailed insight into the cellular makeup and consequent behaviour of medulloblastomas.

  13. Immunohistochemical demonstration of glial markers in retinoblastomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1987-01-01

    Twenty retinoblastomas were studied immunohistochemically in order to visualize glial cells. In the retina, the glial cells in the ganglion cell layer and the Müller cells were GFAP positive, while only the glial cells of the ganglion cell layer expressed S-100 reactivity. In the tumours S-100/GF...... cells reactive for both S-100 and GFAP were demonstrated. The latter findings may represent differentiation in a glial direction in the more mature parts of retinoblastoma....

  14. Glial cells transform glucose to alanine, which fuels the neurons in the honeybee retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsacopoulos, M; Veuthey, A L; Saravelos, S G; Perrottet, P; Tsoupras, G

    1994-03-01

    The retina of honeybee drone is a nervous tissue with a crystal-like structure in which glial cells and photoreceptor neurons constitute two distinct metabolic compartments. The phosphorylation of glucose and its subsequent incorporation into glycogen occur in glia, whereas O2 consumption (QO2) occurs in the photoreceptors. Experimental evidence showed that glia phosphorylate glucose and supply the photoreceptors with metabolic substrates. We aimed to identify these transferred substrates. Using ion-exchange and reversed-phase HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that more than 50% of 14C(U)-glucose entering the glia is transformed to alanine by transamination of pyruvate with glutamate. In the absence of extracellular glucose, glycogen is used to make alanine; thus, its pool size in isolated retinas is maintained stable or even increased. Our model proposes that the formation of alanine occurs in the glia, thereby maintaining the redox potential of this cell and contributing to NH3 homeostasis. Alanine is released into the extracellular space and is then transported into photoreceptors using an Na(+)-dependent transport system. Purified suspensions of photoreceptors have similar alanine aminotransferase activity as glial cells and transform 14C-alanine to glutamate, aspartate, and CO2. Therefore, the alanine entering photoreceptors is transaminated to pyruvate, which in turn enters the Krebs cycle. Proline also supplies the Krebs cycle by making glutamate and, in turn, the intermediate alpha-ketoglutarate. Light stimulation caused a 200% increase of QO2 and a 50% decrease of proline and of glutamate. Also, the production of 14CO2 from 14C-proline was increased. The use of these amino acids would sustain about half of the light-induced delta QO2, the other half being sustained by glycogen via alanine formation. The use of proline meets a necessary anaplerotic function in the Krebs cycle, but implies high NH3 production. The results showed

  15. Effects of increased extracellular K on the elemental composition and water content of neuron and glial cells in leech CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saubermann, A.J.; Stockton, J.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elemental (Na, Cl, K) and water contents of leech (Macrobdella decora) neurons and glial cells were determined under steady-state exposure to 4, 10, and 20 mM KCl concentrations (bathing media) using x-ray microanalysis for quantitative digital imaging of frozen hydrated and dried cryosections. Effects of furosemide, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and ouabain on elemental distribution changes, induced by exposure to 20 mM K, were also determined. Results demonstrated that packet glial cells and neurons accumulated substantial amounts of K that appeared evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Cell water content also increased as a function of increased cytoplasmic K so that the net effect was an unchanged wet-weight K concentration (expressed as millimoles per kilogram wet weight). Dry-weight Na and Cl concentration (expressed as millimoles per kilogram dry weight) increased slightly in glial cells; however, because cell water increased, both Na and Cl (wet-weight) concentrations decreased. Neurons, in contrast, had no significant change in either Na or K on a wet-weight basis, so a relatively constant Na/K ratio was maintained despite a small, but significant, increase in K (dry weight) and cell water. These increases, like those in packet glia, were a function of exposure to different concentrations of extracellular space K. These changes were completely abolished by 10(-4) M ouabain. Neither furosemide nor 5-HT appeared to affect neuronal or glial K wet-weight concentrations. These data show that both glial cells and neurons can act as substantial reservoirs for K while maintaining stable K concentrations (by altering cell water content and elemental composition). This process appears to depend on a functioning Na+, K+-ATPase system.

  16. Glial cell activity is maintained during prolonged inflammatory challenge in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, B.C.; Rorato, R.; Antunes-Rodrigues, J.; Elias, L.L.K. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-04

    We evaluated the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), ionized calcium binding adaptor protein-1 (Iba-1), and ferritin in rats after single or repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, which is known to induce endotoxin tolerance and glial activation. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g) received ip injections of LPS (100 µg/kg) or saline for 6 days: 6 saline (N = 5), 5 saline + 1 LPS (N = 6) and 6 LPS (N = 6). After the sixth injection, the rats were perfused and the brains were collected for immunohistochemistry. After a single LPS dose, the number of GFAP-positive cells increased in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC; 1 LPS: 35.6 ± 1.4 vs control: 23.1 ± 2.5) and hippocampus (1 LPS: 165.0 ± 3.0 vs control: 137.5 ± 2.5), and interestingly, 6 LPS injections further increased GFAP expression in these regions (ARC = 52.5 ± 4.3; hippocampus = 182.2 ± 4.1). We found a higher GS expression only in the hippocampus of the 6 LPS injections group (56.6 ± 0.8 vs 46.7 ± 1.9). Ferritin-positive cells increased similarly in the hippocampus of rats treated with a single (49.2 ± 1.7 vs 28.1 ± 1.9) or repeated (47.6 ± 1.1 vs 28.1 ± 1.9) LPS dose. Single LPS enhanced Iba-1 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN: 92.8 ± 4.1 vs 65.2 ± 2.2) and hippocampus (99.4 ± 4.4 vs 73.8 ± 2.1), but had no effect in the retrochiasmatic nucleus (RCA) and ARC. Interestingly, 6 LPS increased the Iba-1 expression in these hypothalamic and hippocampal regions (RCA: 57.8 ± 4.6 vs 36.6 ± 2.2; ARC: 62.4 ± 6.0 vs 37.0 ± 2.2; PVN: 100.7 ± 4.4 vs 65.2 ± 2.2; hippocampus: 123.0 ± 3.8 vs 73.8 ± 2.1). The results suggest that repeated LPS treatment stimulates the expression of glial activation markers, protecting neuronal activity during prolonged inflammatory challenges.

  17. Glial cell activity is maintained during prolonged inflammatory challenge in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Borges

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, glutamine synthetase (GS, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein-1 (Iba-1, and ferritin in rats after single or repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment, which is known to induce endotoxin tolerance and glial activation. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g received ip injections of LPS (100 µg/kg or saline for 6 days: 6 saline (N = 5, 5 saline + 1 LPS (N = 6 and 6 LPS (N = 6. After the sixth injection, the rats were perfused and the brains were collected for immunohistochemistry. After a single LPS dose, the number of GFAP-positive cells increased in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC; 1 LPS: 35.6 ± 1.4 vs control: 23.1 ± 2.5 and hippocampus (1 LPS: 165.0 ± 3.0 vs control: 137.5 ± 2.5, and interestingly, 6 LPS injections further increased GFAP expression in these regions (ARC = 52.5 ± 4.3; hippocampus = 182.2 ± 4.1. We found a higher GS expression only in the hippocampus of the 6 LPS injections group (56.6 ± 0.8 vs 46.7 ± 1.9. Ferritin-positive cells increased similarly in the hippocampus of rats treated with a single (49.2 ± 1.7 vs 28.1 ± 1.9 or repeated (47.6 ± 1.1 vs 28.1 ± 1.9 LPS dose. Single LPS enhanced Iba-1 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN: 92.8 ± 4.1 vs 65.2 ± 2.2 and hippocampus (99.4 ± 4.4 vs 73.8 ± 2.1, but had no effect in the retrochiasmatic nucleus (RCA and ARC. Interestingly, 6 LPS increased the Iba-1 expression in these hypothalamic and hippocampal regions (RCA: 57.8 ± 4.6 vs 36.6 ± 2.2; ARC: 62.4 ± 6.0 vs 37.0 ± 2.2; PVN: 100.7 ± 4.4 vs 65.2 ± 2.2; hippocampus: 123.0 ± 3.8 vs 73.8 ± 2.1. The results suggest that repeated LPS treatment stimulates the expression of glial activation markers, protecting neuronal activity during prolonged inflammatory challenges.

  18. Implantation of encapsulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting cells prevents long-lasting learning impairment following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain insult in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Shinji; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Date, Isao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Yasuhara, Takao; Mishima, Kenichi; Aoo, Naoya; Harada, Kazuhiko; Egashira, Nobuaki; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2005-04-01

    Implantation of encapsulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting cells into brain parenchyma reduces histological brain damage following hypoxic-ischemic stress in neonatal rats. We examined the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors on long-term learning and memory impairment and morphological changes up to 18 weeks after hypoxic-ischemic stress in neonatal rats. Baby hamster kidney cells were transfected with expression vector either including (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group; n = 10) or not including (control-hypoxic-ischemic group; n = 8) human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor cDNA, encapsulated in semipermeable hollow fibers, and implanted into the left brain parenchyma of 7-day-old Wistar rats. Two days after implantation the rats received hypoxic-ischemic stress, and their behavior was then examined in several learning tasks: the 8-arm radial maze, choice reaction time, and water maze tasks, which examine short-term working memory, attention process, and long-term reference memory, respectively. The rats were killed 18 weeks after the hypoxic-ischemic insult for evaluation of brain damage. Two additional control groups were used: the control group (n = 15), which underwent no treatment, and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor group (n = 6), which underwent implantation of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor capsule but did not undergo hypoxic-ischemic stress. The decrease in the size of the cerebral hemisphere was significantly less in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group, compared with the control-hypoxic-ischemic group, and improved performance was observed in all three tasks for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group: for the control-hypoxic-ischemic group versus the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group, respectively, in the 8-arm radial maze test, average

  19. Clonal Heterogeneity in the Neuronal and Glial Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser I. Young

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity presents an important challenge to the development of cell-based therapies where there is a fundamental requirement for predictable and reproducible outcomes. Transplanted Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells (DPSCs have demonstrated early promise in experimental models of spinal cord injury and stroke, despite limited evidence of neuronal and glial-like differentiation after transplantation. Here, we report, for the first time, on the ability of single cell-derived clonal cultures of murine DPSCs to differentiate in vitro into immature neuronal-like and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Importantly, only DPSC clones with high nestin mRNA expression levels were found to successfully differentiate into Map2 and NF-positive neuronal-like cells. Neuronally differentiated DPSCs possessed a membrane capacitance comparable with primary cultured striatal neurons and small inward voltage-activated K+ but not outward Na+ currents were recorded suggesting a functionally immature phenotype. Similarly, only high nestin-expressing clones demonstrated the ability to adopt Olig1, Olig2, and MBP-positive immature oligodendrocyte-like phenotype. Together, these results demonstrate that appropriate markers may be used to provide an early indication of the suitability of a cell population for purposes where differentiation into a specific lineage may be beneficial and highlight that further understanding of heterogeneity within mixed cellular populations is required.

  20. Distinctive response of CNS glial cells in oro-facial pain associated with injury, infection and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro-da-Silva Alfredo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oro-facial pain following injury and infection is frequently observed in dental clinics. While neuropathic pain evoked by injury associated with nerve lesion has an involvement of glia/immune cells, inflammatory hyperalgesia has an exaggerated sensitization mediated by local and circulating immune mediators. To better understand the contribution of central nervous system (CNS glial cells in these different pathological conditions, in this study we sought to characterize functional phenotypes of glial cells in response to trigeminal nerve injury (loose ligation of the mental branch, infection (subcutaneous injection of lipopolysaccharide-LPS and to sterile inflammation (subcutaneous injection of complete Freund's adjuvant-CFA on the lower lip. Each of the three insults triggered a specific pattern of mechanical allodynia. In parallel with changes in sensory response, CNS glial cells reacted distinctively to the challenges. Following ligation of the mental nerve, both microglia and astrocytes in the trigeminal nuclear complex were highly activated, more prominent in the principal sensory nucleus (Pr5 and subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C area. Microglial response was initiated early (days 3-14, followed by delayed astrocytes activation (days 7-28. Although the temporal profile of microglial and astrocyte reaction corresponded respectively to the initiation and chronic stage of neuropathic pain, these activated glial cells exhibited a low profile of cytokine expression. Local injection of LPS in the lower lip skin also triggered a microglial reaction in the brain, which started in the circumventricular organs (CVOs at 5 hours post-injection and diffused progressively into the brain parenchyma at 48 hours. This LPS-induced microglial reaction was accompanied by a robust induction of IκB-α mRNA and pro-inflammatory cytokines within the CVOs. However, LPS induced microglial activation did not specifically occur along the pain signaling pathway. In

  1. HDAC1 regulates the proliferation of radial glial cells in the developing Xenopus tectum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tao

    Full Text Available In the developing central nervous system (CNS, progenitor cells differentiate into progeny to form functional neural circuits. Radial glial cells (RGs are a transient progenitor cell type that is present during neurogenesis. It is thought that a combination of neural trophic factors, neurotransmitters and electrical activity regulates the proliferation and differentiation of RGs. However, it is less clear how epigenetic modulation changes RG proliferation. We sought to explore the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity on the proliferation of RGs in the visual optic tectum of Xenopus laevis. We found that the number of BrdU-labeled precursor cells along the ventricular layer of the tectum decrease developmentally from stage 46 to stage 49. The co-labeling of BrdU-positive cells with brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP, a radial glia marker, showed that the majority of BrdU-labeled cells along the tectal midline are RGs. BLBP-positive cells are also developmentally decreased with the maturation of the brain. Furthermore, HDAC1 expression is developmentally down-regulated in tectal cells, especially in the ventricular layer of the tectum. Pharmacological blockade of HDACs using Trichostatin A (TSA or Valproic acid (VPA decreased the number of BrdU-positive, BLBP-positive and co-labeling cells. Specific knockdown of HDAC1 by a morpholino (HDAC1-MO decreased the number of BrdU- and BLBP-labeled cells and increased the acetylation level of histone H4 at lysine 12 (H4K12. The visual deprivation-induced increase in BrdU- and BLBP-positive cells was blocked by HDAC1 knockdown at stage 49 tadpoles. These data demonstrate that HDAC1 regulates radial glia cell proliferation in the developing optical tectum of Xenopus laevis.

  2. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions (AJs play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  3. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  4. Expression and role of the TGF-β family in glial cells infected with Borna disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Yoshii; Murakami, Masaru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    A previous study revealed that the expression of the Borna disease virus (BDV)-encoding phosphoprotein in glial cells was sufficient to induce neurobehavioral abnormalities resembling Borna disease. To evaluate the involvement of the TGF-β family in BDV-induced changes in cell responses by C6 glial cells, we examined the expression levels of the TGF-β family and effects of inhibiting the TGF-β family pathway in BDV-infected C6 (C6BV) cells. The expression of activin βA and BMP7 was markedly increased in BDV-infected cells. Expression of Smad7, a TGF-β family-inducible gene, was increased by BDV infection, and the expression was decreased by treatment with A-83-01 or LDN-193189, inhibitors of the TGF-β/activin or BMP pathway, respectively. These results suggest autocrine effects of activin A and BMP7 in C6BV cells. IGFBP-3 expression was also induced by BDV infection; it was below the detection limit in C6 cells. The expression level of IGFBP-3 was decreased by LDN-193189 in C6BV cells, suggesting that endogenous BMP activity is responsible for IGFBP-3 gene induction. Our results reveal the regulatory expression of genes related to the TGF-β family, and the role of the enhanced BMP pathway in modulating cell responses in BDV-infected glial cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The search for true numbers of neurons and glial cells in the human brain: A review of 150 years of cell counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bartheld, Christopher S; Bahney, Jami; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2016-12-15

    For half a century, the human brain was believed to contain about 100 billion neurons and one trillion glial cells, with a glia:neuron ratio of 10:1. A new counting method, the isotropic fractionator, has challenged the notion that glia outnumber neurons and revived a question that was widely thought to have been resolved. The recently validated isotropic fractionator demonstrates a glia:neuron ratio of less than 1:1 and a total number of less than 100 billion glial cells in the human brain. A survey of original evidence shows that histological data always supported a 1:1 ratio of glia to neurons in the entire human brain, and a range of 40-130 billion glial cells. We review how the claim of one trillion glial cells originated, was perpetuated, and eventually refuted. We compile how numbers of neurons and glial cells in the adult human brain were reported and we examine the reasons for an erroneous consensus about the relative abundance of glial cells in human brains that persisted for half a century. Our review includes a brief history of cell counting in human brains, types of counting methods that were and are employed, ranges of previous estimates, and the current status of knowledge about the number of cells. We also discuss implications and consequences of the new insights into true numbers of glial cells in the human brain, and the promise and potential impact of the newly validated isotropic fractionator for reliable quantification of glia and neurons in neurological and psychiatric diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3865-3895, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Search for True Numbers of Neurons and Glial Cells in the Human Brain: A Review of 150 Years of Cell Counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bartheld, Christopher S.; Bahney, Jami; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    For half a century, the human brain was believed to contain about 100 billion neurons and one trillion glial cells, with a glia:neuron ratio of 10:1. A new counting method, the isotropic fractionator, has challenged the notion that glia outnumber neurons and revived a question that was widely thought to have been resolved. The recently validated isotropic fractionator demonstrates a glia:neuron ratio of less than 1:1 and a total number of less than 100 billion glial cells in the human brain. A survey of original evidence shows that histological data always supported a 1:1 ratio of glia to neurons in the entire human brain, and a range of 40–130 billion glial cells. We review how the claim of one trillion glial cells originated, was perpetuated, and eventually refuted. We compile how numbers of neurons and glial cells in the adult human brain were reported and we examine the reasons for an erroneous consensus about the relative abundance of glial cells in human brains that persisted for half a century. Our review includes a brief history of cell counting in human brains, types of counting methods that were and are employed, ranges of previous estimates, and the current status of knowledge about the number of cells. We also discuss implications and consequences of the new insights into true numbers of glial cells in the human brain, and the promise and potential impact of the newly validated isotropic fractionator for reliable quantification of glia and neurons in neurological and psychiatric diseases. PMID:27187682

  7. Acquisition of glial cells missing 2 enhancers contributes to a diversity of ionocytes in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Shono

    Full Text Available Glial cells missing 2 (gcm2 encoding a GCM-motif transcription factor is expressed in the parathyroid in amniotes. In contrast, gcm2 is expressed in pharyngeal pouches (a homologous site of the parathyroid, gills, and H(+-ATPase-rich cells (HRCs, a subset of ionocytes on the skin surface of the teleost fish zebrafish. Ionocytes are specialized cells that are involved in osmotic homeostasis in aquatic vertebrates. Here, we showed that gcm2 is essential for the development of HRCs and Na(+-Cl(- co-transporter-rich cells (NCCCs, another subset of ionocytes in zebrafish. We also identified gcm2 enhancer regions that control gcm2 expression in ionocytes of zebrafish. Comparisons of the gcm2 locus with its neighboring regions revealed no conserved elements between zebrafish and tetrapods. Furthermore, We observed gcm2 expression patterns in embryos of the teleost fishes Medaka (Oryzias latipes and fugu (Fugu niphobles, the extant primitive ray-finned fishes Polypterus (Polypterus senegalus and sturgeon (a hybrid of Huso huso × Acipenser ruhenus, and the amphibian Xenopus (Xenopus laevis. Although gcm2-expressing cells were observed on the skin surface of Medaka and fugu, they were not found in Polypterus, sturgeon, or Xenopus. Our results suggest that an acquisition of enhancers for the expression of gcm2 contributes to a diversity of ionocytes in zebrafish during evolution.

  8. The role of glial cells in Alzheimer disease: potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopategui Cabezas, I; Herrera Batista, A; Pentón Rol, G

    2014-06-01

    Alzheimer (AD) disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease characterised by inflammation, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, and reactive gliosis. Microglia and astrocytes not only act as antigen-presenting cells, but also function as effector cells releasing pro-inflammatory molecules that promote excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration. In the present review we discuss the role of glia, specifically microglia and astrocytes, in the pathophysiology of AD and possible therapeutic implications. The growing body of evidence suggesting that microglia and astrocytes play a pathogenic role and activate inflammation pathways, the neurotoxic factors released by these cells when activated, and the way these factors may disrupt the homeostasis of the central nervous system all support the hypothesis that glia-induced inflammation exacerbates AD. Inhibiting inflammation by deactivating glial cells may reduce the production of factors which contribute to neurotoxicity, and therefore result in clinical improvement. Microglia and astrocytes are therapeutic targets for the development of new drugs to combat this disease. Therapeutic strategies designed to counter the detrimental effects of overactivation of these cell populations should be investigated. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Olfactory Ensheathing Glial Cells Cultured on Polyurethane/Polylactide Electrospun Nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Grzesiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate novel biomaterials for neural regeneration. The investigated materials were composed of polyurethane (PU and polylactide (PLDL blended at three different w/w ratios, that is, 5/5, 6/4, and 8/2 of PU/PLDL. Ultrathin fibrous scaffolds were prepared using electrospinning. The scaffolds were investigated for their applicability for nerve regeneration by culturing rat olfactory ensheathing glial cells. Cells were cultured on the materials for seven days, during which cellular morphology, phenotype, and metabolic activity were analysed. SEM analysis of the fabricated fibrous scaffolds showed fibers of a diameter mainly lower than 600 μm with unimportant volume of protrusions situated along the fibers, with nonsignificant differences between all analysed materials. Cells cultured on the materials showed differences in their morphology and metabolic activity, depending on the blend composition. The most proper morphology, with numerous p75+ and GFAP+ cells present, was observed in the sample 6/4, whereas the highest metabolic activity was measured in the sample 5/5. However, none of the investigated samples showed cytotoxicity or negatively influenced cellular morphology. Therefore, the novel electrospun fibrous materials may be considered for regenerative medicine applications, and especially when contacting with highly sensitive nervous cells.

  10. Effects of blast overpressure on neurons and glial cells in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna P Miller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low and 280 kPa (high as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at approximately 24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low and high blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglia cells in low and high blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure.

  11. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Ishii

    Full Text Available TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  12. In vitro segregation of different cell lines with neuronal and glial properties from a stem cell line of rat neurotumor RT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomozawa, Y; Sueoka, N

    1978-01-01

    A clonal stem cell line, RT4-AC, of the rat peripheral neurotumor RT4 differentiates in culture into morphologically distinct cell types RT4-B, RT4-D, and RT4-E (cell type conversion). The multipotential stem cell type RT4-AC and cell type RT4-D produce a glial marker, S100 protein, but RT4-B and RT4-E do not. The stem cells also show a small but significant response to veratridine on voltage-dependent Na+ influx. Cell types RT4-B and RT4-E show a clear response of voltage-dependent Na+ influx to veratridine, typical of neuronal cells, whereas cell type RT4-D is completely negative. These results indicate that (i) the stem cell type RT4-AC shows both neuronal and glial properties, (ii) cell types RT4-B and RT4-E have a neuronal property, and (iii) cell type RT4-D has a glial property. Therefore, cell type conversion of stem cell RT4-AC to RT4-B and RT4-E cells seems to result in differentiation towards neuronal cell types, and cell type conversion of RT4-AC to RT4-D results in differentiation towards a glial type in culture. PMID:282647

  13. Act1 mediates IL-17-induced EAE pathogenesis selectively in NG2+ glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zizhen; Wang, Chenhui; Zepp, Jarod; Wu, Ling; Sun, Kevin; Zhao, Junjie; Chandrasekharan, Unni; DiCorleto, Paul E.; Trapp, Bruce D.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Li, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 17(IL-17) is a signature cytokine of Th17 cells. We previously reported that deletion of NF-κ B activator 1(Act1), the key transducer of IL-17R signaling, from the neuroectodermal lineage in mice (neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes)results in attenuated severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here we examined the cellular basis of this observation. EAE disease course was unaffected by deleting Act1 from neurons or mature oligodendrocytes and Act1 deletion from astrocytes only modestly affected disease course. Deletion of Act1 from NG2+ glia resulted in markedly reduced EAE severity. Furthermore, IL-17 induced characteristic inflammatory mediator expression in NG2+ glial cells. Additionally, IL-17 also exhibited strong inhibitory effects on the maturation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells in vitro and reduced their survival. These data identify NG2+ glia as the major CNS cellular target of IL-17 in EAE. The sensitivity of oligodendrocyte lineage cells to IL-17-mediated toxicity further suggests a direct link between inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:23995070

  14. Regulation of satellite cell function in sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Alway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms contributing to sarcopenia include reduced satellite cell (myogenic stem cell function that is impacted by the environment (niche of these cells. Satellite cell function is affected by oxidative stress, which is elevated in aged muscles, and this along with changes in largely unknown systemic factors, likely contribute to the manner in which satellite cells respond to stressors such as exercise, disuse or rehabilitation in sarcopenic muscles. Nutritional intervention provides one therapeutic strategy to improve the satellite cell niche and systemic factors, with the goal of improving satellite cell function in aging muscles. Although many elderly persons consume various nutraceuticals with the hope of improving health, most of these compounds have not been thoroughly tested, and the impacts that they might have on sarcopenia, and satellite cell function are not clear. This review discusses data pertaining to the satellite cell responses and function in aging skeletal muscle, and the impact that three compounds: resveratrol, green tea catechins and β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate have on regulating satellite cell function and therefore contributing to reducing sarcopenia or improving muscle mass after disuse in aging. The data suggest that these nutraceutical compounds improve satellite cell function during rehabilitative loading in animal models of aging after disuse (i.e., muscle regeneration. While these compounds have not been rigorously tested in humans, the data from animal models of aging provide a strong basis for conducting additional focused work to determine if these or other nutraceuticals can offset the muscle losses, or improve regeneration in sarcopenic muscles of older humans via improving satellite cell function.

  15. The glial cell modulators, ibudilast and its amino analog, AV1013, attenuate methamphetamine locomotor activity and its sensitization in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    SNIDER, SARAH E.; VUNCK, SARAH A.; VAN DEN OORD, EDWIN J.C.G.; ADKINS, DANIEL E.; MCCLAY, JOSEPH L.; BEARDSLEY, PATRICK M.

    2014-01-01

    Over 800,000 Americans abuse the psychomotor stimulant, methamphetamine, yet its abuse is without an approved medication. Methamphetamine induces hypermotor activity, and sensitization to this effect is suggested to represent aspects of the addiction process. Methamphetamine’s regulation of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels may be partially responsible for its behavioral effects, and compounds that inhibit phosphodiesterase (PDE), the enzyme that degrades cAMP, can alter methamphetamine-induced behaviors. Methamphetamine also activates glial cells and causes a subsequent increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Modulation of glial cell activation is associated with changes in behavioral responses, and substances that oppose inflammatory activity can attenuate drug-induced behaviors. Ibudilast (aka AV411; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine), inhibits both PDE and glial pro-inflammatory activity. Ibudilast’s amino analogue, AV1013, modulates similar glial targets but negligibly inhibits PDE. The present study determined whether ibudilast and AV1013 would attenuate methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity and its sensitization in C57BL/6J mice. Mice were treated b.i.d. with ibudilast (1.8-13 mg/kg), AV1013 (10-56mg/kg) or their vehicles intraperitoneally for 7 days, beginning 48 h before 5 days of daily 1-h locomotor activity tests. Each test was initiated by either a methamphetamine (3 mg/kg) or a saline injection. Ibudilast significantly (Pmethamphetamine's locomotor activity without significantly affecting activity by itself. AV1013 had similar anti-methamphetamine effects, suggesting that glial cell activity, by itself, can modulate methamphetamine's effects and perhaps serve as a medication target for its abuse. PMID:22306241

  16. Validation of the isotropic fractionator: comparison with unbiased stereology and DNA extraction for quantification of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahney, Jami; von Bartheld, Christopher S

    2014-01-30

    The "isotropic fractionator" (IF) is a novel cell counting technique that homogenizes fixed tissue, recovers cell nuclei in solution, and samples and quantifies nuclei by extrapolation. Studies using this technique indicate that the ratio of glia to neurons in the human brain is approximately 1:1 rather than the 10:1 or 50:1 ratio previously assumed. Although some results obtained with the IF have been similar to those obtained by stereology, the IF has never been calibrated or validated. It is conceivable that only a fraction of glial cell nuclei are recovered intact or recognized after the homogenization step. To rule out this simple explanation for the claim of a 1:1 glia-neuron ratio, we compared cell numbers obtained from adjacent, weight-normalized samples of human and macaque monkey white matter using three techniques: the IF, unbiased stereology of histological sections in exhaustively sectioned samples, and cell numbers calculated from DNA extraction. In primate forebrains, the IF yielded 73,000-90,000 nuclei/mg white matter, unbiased stereology yielded 75,000-92,000 nuclei/mg, with coefficients of error ranging from 0.013 to 0.063, while DNA extraction yielded only 4000-23,000 nuclei/mg in fixed white matter tissues. Since the IF revealed about 100% of the numbers produced by unbiased stereology, there is no significant underestimate of glial cells. This confirms the notion that the human brain overall contains glial cells and neurons with a ratio of about 1:1 - far from the originally assumed ratio of 10:1 in favor of glial cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular signatures of cell cycle transcripts in the pathogenesis of Glial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Rabindra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocytic brain tumors are among the most lethal and morbid tumors of adults, often occurring during the prime of life. These tumors form an interesting group of cancer to understand the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis. Histological grading of Astrocytoma based on WHO classification does not provide complete information on the proliferation potential and biological behavior of the tumors. It is known that cancer results from the disruption of the orderly regulated cycle of replication and division. In the present study, we made an attempt to identify the cell cycle signatures and their involvement in the clinical aggressiveness of gliomas. Methods The variation in expression of various cell cycle genes was studied in different stages of glial tumor progression (low and high grades, and the results were compared with their corresponding expression levels in the normal brain tissue. Macroarray analysis was used for the purpose. Results Macroarray analysis of 114 cell cycle genes in different grades of glioma indicated differential expression pattern in 34% of the gene transcripts, when compared to the normal tissue. Majority of the transcripts belong to the intracellular kinase networks, cell cycle regulating kinases, transcription factors and transcription activators. Conclusion Based on the observation in the expression pattern in low grade and high grade gliomas, it can be suggested that the upregulation of cell cycle activators are seen as an early event in glioma; however, in malignancy it is not the cell cycle activators alone, which are involved in tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular details of cell cycle regulation and checkpoint abnormalities in cancer could offer an insight into potential therapeutic strategies.

  18. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eSnijders

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodelling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodelling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodelling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  19. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  20. Combined treatment with ribavirin and tiazofurin attenuates response of glial cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Nadežda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a human inflammatory and demyelinating disease. Microglia and astrocytes are glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS that play a dual role in MS and EAE pathology. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of combined treatment with two nucleoside analogues, ribavirin and tiazofurin, on microglia and astrocytes in actively induced EAE. Therapeutic treatment with a combination of these two nucleoside analogues reduced disease severity, mononuclear cell infiltration and demyelination. The obtained histological results indicate that ribavirin and tiazofurin changed activated microglia into an inactive type and attenuated astrocyte reactivity at the end of the treatment period. Since reduction of reactive microgliosis and astrogliosis correlated with EAE suppression, the present study also suggests that the obtained beneficial effect of ribavirin and tiazofurin could be a consequence of their action inside as well as outside the CNS. [Acknowledgments. This work was supported by the Serbian Ministry of Education and Science, Project No: III41014.

  1. SF2/ASF binding region within JC virus NCCR limits early gene transcription in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uleri, Elena; Regan, Patrick; Dolei, Antonina; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret

    2013-05-14

    Patients undergoing immune modulatory therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and individuals with an impaired-immune system, most notably AIDS patients, are in the high risk group of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease of the white matter caused by human neurotropic polyomavirus, JC virus. It is now widely accepted that pathologic strains of JCV shows unique rearrangements consist of deletions and insertions within viral NCCR. While these kinds of rearrangements are related to viral tropism and pathology of the disease, their roles in molecular regulation of JCV gene expression and replication are unclear. We have previously identified SF2/ASF as a negative regulator of JCV gene expression in glial cells. This negative impact of SF2/ASF was dependent on its ability to bind a specific region mapped to the tandem repeat within viral promoter. In this report, functional role of SF2/ASF binding region in viral gene expression and replication was investigated by using deletion mutants of viral regulatory sequences. The second 98-base-pair tandem repeat on Mad1 strain was first mutated by deletion and named Mad1-(1X98). In addition to this mutant, the CR3 region which served the binding side for SF2/ASF was also mutated and named Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73). Both mutations were tested for SF2/ASF binding by ChIP assay. While SF2/ASF was associated with Mad1-WT and Mad1-(1X98), its interaction was completely abolished on Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) construct as expected. Surprisingly, reporter gene analysis of Mad1-(1X98) and Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) early promoter sequences showed two and three fold increase in promoter activities, respectively. The impact of "CR3" region on JCV propagation was also tested on the viral background. While replication of Mad1-(1X98) strain in glial cells was similar to Mad1-WT strain, propagation of Mad1-ΔCR3 (1X73) was less productive. Further analysis of the

  2. Membrane-bound catechol-O-methyl transferase in cortical neurons and glial cells is intracellularly oriented

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn H Schott

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT is involved in the inactivation of dopamine in brain regions in which the dopamine transporter (DAT1 is sparsely expressed. The membrane-bound isoform of COMT (MB-COMT is the predominantly expressed form in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. It has been a matter of debate whether in neural cells of the CNS the enzymatic domain of MB-COMT is oriented towards the cytoplasmic or the extracellular compartment. Here we used live immunocytochemistry on cultured neocortical neurons and glial cells to investigate the expression and membrane orientation of native COMT and of transfected MB-COMT fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP. After live staining, COMT immunoreactivity was reliably detected in both neurons and glial cells after permeabilization, but not on unpermeabilized cells. Similarly, autofluorescence of COMT-GFP fusion protein and antibody fluorescence showed overlap only in permeabilized neurons. Our data provide converging evidence for an intracellular membrane orientation of MB-COMT in neurons and glial cells, suggesting the presence of a DAT1-independent postsynaptic uptake mechanism for dopamine, prior to its degradation via COMT.

  3. Human Satellite Cell Isolation and Xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Steven M; Tamaki, Stanley; Xu, Xiaoti; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells are mononucleated cells of the skeletal muscle lineage that exist beneath the basal lamina juxtaposed to the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. It is widely accepted that satellite cells mediate skeletal muscle regeneration. Within the satellite cell pool of adult muscle are skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also called satellite stem cells, which fulfill criteria of tissue stem cells: They proliferate and their progeny either occupies the adult MuSC niche during self-renewal or differentiates to regenerate mature muscle fibers. Here, we describe robust methods for the isolation of enriched populations of human satellite cells containing MuSCs from fresh human muscle, utilizing mechanical and enzymatic dissociation and purification by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We also describe a process for xenotransplantation of human satellite cells into mouse muscle by injection into irradiated, immunodeficient, mouse leg muscle with concurrent notexin or bupivacaine muscle injury to increase engraftment efficiency. The engraftment of human MuSCs and the formation of human muscle can then be analyzed by histological and immunofluorescence staining, or subjected to in vivo experimentation.

  4. Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorpisms affect severity and functionality of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Tunca, Zeliha; Özerdem, Ayşegül; Ceylan, Deniz; Yalçın, Yaprak; Sakizli, Meral

    2017-01-01

    Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and other neurotrophins have important role in the development of mental disorders. Here, we aimed to assess the effects of Single nucleotide polymorphisms at potentially regulated regions of GDNF on severity and functionality of bipolar disorder and GDNF serum levels in bipolar disorder patients and healthy volunteers. Severity and functionality of bipolar disorder were evaluated using the Clinical Global Impression and Global Assessment of Functioning scales in sixty-six bipolar disorder patients. The GDNF serum levels obtained from bipolar disorder patients and healthy volunteers who had been already reported SNPs information by our group. GAF scales were lower and GDNF serum levels were higher in Bipolar disorder patients with T/A genotype at 5:37812784 and 5:37812782 compared to patients with T/T genotype. There were significant difference in severity and functionality scores, but not in GDNF serum levels, between patients with G/G and G/A genotype of rs62360370 G > A SNP.rs2075680 C > A and rs79669773 T > C SNPs had no effect on bipolar disorder severity and functionality scores and GDNF serum levels. The results suggest that some SNPs of GDNF have potential association with severity and functionality of bipolar disorder. In addition, except two SNPs, none of GDNF SNPs had association with GDNF serum levels.

  5. Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor-dependent fusimotor neuron survival during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Jennifer; Keller-Peck, Cynthia; Kucera, Jan; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2005-01-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival factor for motor neurons. Previous studies have shown that some motor neurons depend upon GDNF during development but this GDNF-dependent motor neuron subpopulation has not been characterized. We examined GDNF expression patterns in muscle and the impact of altered GDNF expression on the development of subtypes of motor neurons. In GDNF hemizygous mice, motor neuron innervation to muscle spindle stretch receptors (fusimotor neuron innervation) was decreased, whereas in transgenic mice that overexpress GDNF in muscle, fusimotor innervation to muscle spindles was increased. Facial motor neurons, which do not contain fusimotor neurons, were not changed in number when GDNF was over expressed by facial muscles during their development. Taken together, these data indicate that fusimotor neurons depend upon GDNF for survival during development. Since the fraction of cervical and lumbar motor neurons lost in GDNF-deficient mice at birth closely approximates the size of the fusimotor neuron pool, these data suggest that motor neuron loss in GDNF-deficient mice may be primarily of fusimotor neuron origin.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of intravitreal glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor: experimental studies in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Rasmus; Kiilgaard, J F; Tucker, B A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the intravitreal (ITV) pharmacokinetics of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and observe possible complications after ITV injection. Twenty Danish landrace pigs and 34 eyes were included in the study; 30 were injected with 100 ng of GDNF......, two controls were injected without GDNF, and two received no injection. At post-injection time points of 1, 2, 3, 6 hours (h), 1, 2, 4 or 7 days (d) eyes were enucleated and the ITV concentration of GDNF (cGDNF) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and activity was tested using......GDNF was normalized to 5 ng/ml. A semi-logarithmic dose-response curve showed linearity between 0.1 and 10 ng/ml. None of the eyes showed any signs of inflammation or other complications. A single ITV GDNF injection of 100 ng leads to therapeutic levels for 15 days in the porcine eye. The GDNF was stable...

  7. Reductions in hypothalamic Gfap expression, glial cells and α-tanycytes in lean and hypermetabolic Gnasxl-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew P; Wong, Shi Quan; Pulix, Michela; Johnson, Kirsty; Horton, Niamh S; Thomas, Patricia; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Plagge, Antonius

    2016-04-14

    Neuronal and glial differentiation in the murine hypothalamus is not complete at birth, but continues over the first two weeks postnatally. Nutritional status and Leptin deficiency can influence the maturation of neuronal projections and glial patterns, and hypothalamic gliosis occurs in mouse models of obesity. Gnasxl constitutes an alternative transcript of the genomically imprinted Gnas locus and encodes a variant of the signalling protein Gαs, termed XLαs, which is expressed in defined areas of the hypothalamus. Gnasxl-deficient mice show postnatal growth retardation and undernutrition, while surviving adults remain lean and hypermetabolic with increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Effects of this knock-out on the hypothalamic neural network have not yet been investigated. RNAseq analysis for gene expression changes in hypothalami of Gnasxl-deficient mice indicated Glial fibrillary acid protein (Gfap) expression to be significantly down-regulated in adult samples. Histological analysis confirmed a reduction in Gfap-positive glial cell numbers specifically in the hypothalamus. This reduction was observed in adult tissue samples, whereas no difference was found in hypothalami of postnatal stages, indicating an adaptation in adult Gnasxl-deficient mice to their earlier growth phenotype and hypermetabolism. Especially noticeable was a loss of many Gfap-positive α-tanycytes and their processes, which form part of the ependymal layer that lines the medial and dorsal regions of the 3(rd) ventricle, while β-tanycytes along the median eminence (ME) and infundibular recesses appeared unaffected. This was accompanied by local reductions in Vimentin and Nestin expression. Hypothalamic RNA levels of glial solute transporters were unchanged, indicating a potential compensatory up-regulation in the remaining astrocytes and tanycytes. Gnasxl deficiency does not directly affect glial development in the hypothalamus, since it is expressed in neurons, and Gfap

  8. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, T.; Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersen...

  9. Transplantation of germ cells from glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-overexpressing mice to host testes depleted of endogenous spermatogenesis by fractionated irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Meng, X.; den Ouden, K.; van Pelt, A. M. M.; Izadyar, F.; Santoro, M.; Sariola, H.; de rooij, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    With a novel method of eliminating spermatogenesis in host animals, male germ cells isolated from mice with targeted overexpression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were transplanted to evaluate their ability to reproduce the phenotype previously found in the transgenic animals.

  10. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-08

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413819-15$15.00/0.

  11. Cabergoline Decreases Alcohol Drinking and Seeking Behaviors Via Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicella, Sebastien; Ahmadiantehrani, Somayeh; He, Dao-Yao; Nielsen, Carsten K.; Bartlett, Selena E.; Janak, Patricia H.; Ron, Dorit

    2010-01-01

    Background Cabergoline is an ergotamine derivative that increases the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro. We recently showed that GDNF in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces the motivation to consume alcohol. We therefore set out to determine whether cabergoline administration decreases alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors via GDNF. Methods Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) were used to measure GDNF levels. Western blot analysis was used for phosphorylation experiments. Operant self-administration in rats and a two-bottle choice procedure in mice were used to assess alcohol-drinking behaviors. Instrumental performance tested during extinction was used to measure alcohol-seeking behavior. The [35S]GTPγS binding assay was used to assess the expression and function of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R). Results We found that treatment of the dopaminergic-like cell line SH-SY5Y with cabergoline and systemic administration of cabergoline in rats resulted in an increase in GDNF level and in the activation of the GDNF pathway. Cabergoline treatment decreased alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors including relapse, and its action to reduce alcohol consumption was localized to the VTA. Finally, the increase in GDNF expression and the decrease in alcohol consumption by cabergoline were abolished in GDNF heterozygous knockout mice. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that cabergoline-mediated upregulation of the GDNF pathway attenuates alcohol-drinking behaviors and relapse. Alcohol abuse and addiction are devastating and costly problems worldwide. This study puts forward the possibility that cabergoline might be an effective treatment for these disorders. PMID:19232578

  12. Proliferation conditions for human satellite cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Beck-Nielsen, H; Schrøder, H D

    2001-01-01

    Primary satellite cell cultures have become an important tool as a model system for skeletal muscles. A common problem in human satellite cell culturing is fibroblast overgrowth. We combined N-CAM (Leu19) immunocytochemical staining of satellite cells (Sc) with stereological methods to estimate...... the fraction of Sc in culture. Evaluation of different culture conditions allowed us to find proliferation conditions preferentially for Sc: a) Sc should be cultured on surfaces coated with ECM-gel. b) Primary cell culture should be inoculated in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum to increase cell...... adherence. c) Change of media to DMEM supplemented with 2% Ultroser-G and 2% FCS after 24 h.d) Before subcultivation, cells should be preplated for 30 min. The fractional content of Sc in passage four when applying this method of cultivation was 0.82 +/- 0.07 (mean +/- SE, N = 10). Our method enabled us...

  13. Succinate supplementation improves metabolic performance of mixed glial cell cultures with mitochondrial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgi-Coll, Susan; Amaral, AI; Hutchinson, Peter John; Kotter, Mark Reinhard; Carpenter, Keri Linda

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, the inability to efficiently utilise metabolic fuels and oxygen, contributes to pathological changes following traumatic spinal cord or traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that succinate supplementation can improve cellular energy state under metabolically stressed conditions in a robust, reductionist in vitro model of mitochondrial dysfunction in which primary mixed glial cultures (astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes)...

  14. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-Jun; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Li-Ya, A; Kou, Yu-Hui; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  15. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  16. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adães, Sara; Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3-L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  17. Mitotic activity of multinucleated giant cells with glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in glioblastomas: an immunohistochemical double labeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Sato, Kazufumi; Ido, Kazunori; Kubota, Toshihiko

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the mitotic activity of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in glioblastomas, double immunohistochemical staining for GFAP and Ki67 was performed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens obtained from 12 primary glioblastomas with MNGCs including three giant cell glioblastomas. The Ki67 labeling index (LI:%) of GFAP+ tumor cells ranged from 0 to 5.6 (2.5+/-1.7, mean+/-standard deviation). The Ki67 LI of GFAP- tumor cells ranged from 18.6 to 35.9 (24.7+/-6.6). The Ki67 LI of GFAP+ cells was significantly lower than that of GFAP- cells (Pglioblastomas. MNGCs identified in glioblastomas may develop via not only the proliferation of abnormal nuclei in a single tumor cell but also other processes.

  18. Spatial and temporal activation of spinal glial cells: role of gliopathy in central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-04-01

    In the spinal cord, neuron and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to 1 month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not simple events, rather they are the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinflammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neuron and glial cells via their own receptors

  19. Human iPSC Glial Mouse Chimeras Reveal Glial Contributions to Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windrem, Martha S; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Liu, Zhengshan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether intrinsic glial dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia (SCZ). Our approach was to establish humanized glial chimeric mice using glial progenitor cells (GPCs) produced from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with childh...

  20. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  1. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzesiak, Jakub, E-mail: grzesiak.kuba@gmail.com [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Szarek, Dariusz [Department of Neurosurgery, Lower Silesia Specialist Hospital of T. Marciniak, Emergency Medicine Center, Traugutta 116, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Bednarz, Paulina [State Higher Vocational School in Tarnów, Mickiewicza 8, 33-100 Tarnów (Poland); Laska, Jadwiga [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology.

  2. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to optimize the potential benefits of neural stem cell (NSC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, it is necessary to understand their biological characteristics. Although neurotrophin transduction strategies are promising, alternative approaches such as the modulation of intrinsic neurotrophin expression by NSCs, could also be beneficial. Therefore, utilizing the C17.2 neural stem cell line, we have examined the expression of selected neurotrophic factors under different in vitro conditions. In view of recent evidence suggesting a role for the pineal hormone melatonin in vertebrate development, it was also of interest to determine whether its G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in NSCs. Results RT-PCR analysis revealed robust expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in undifferentiated cells maintained for two days in culture. After one week, differentiating cells continued to exhibit high expression of BDNF and NGF, but GDNF expression was lower or absent, depending on the culture conditions utilized. Melatonin MT1 receptor mRNA was detected in NSCs maintained for two days in culture, but the MT2 receptor was not seen. An immature MT1 receptor of about 30 kDa was detected by western blotting in NSCs cultured for two days, whereas a mature receptor of about 40 – 45 kDa was present in cells maintained for longer periods. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that the MT1 receptor is expressed in both neural (β-tubulin III positive and glial (GFAP positive progenitor cells. An examination of the effects of melatonin on neurotrophin expression revealed that low physiological concentrations of this hormone caused a significant induction of GDNF mRNA expression in NSCs following treatment for 24 hours. Conclusions The phenotypic characteristics of C17.2 cells suggest that they are

  3. Andrographolide - A promising therapeutic agent, negatively regulates glial cell derived neurodegeneration of prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and working memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeshna; Mishra, K P; Ganju, Lilly; Singh, S B

    2017-12-15

    Over activation of glial cell derived innate immune factors induces neuro-inflammation that results in neurodegenerative disease, like working memory impairment. In this study, we have investigated the role of andrographolide, a major constituent of Andrographis paniculata plant, in reduction of reactive glial cell derived working memory impairment. Real time PCR, Western bloting, flow cytometric and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that andrographolide inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced overexpression of HMGB1, TLR4, NFκB, COX-2, iNOS, and release of inflammatory mediators in primary mix glial culture, adult mice prefrontal cortex and hippocampus region. Active microglial and reactive astrocytic makers were also downregulated after andrographolide treatment. Andrographolide suppressed overexpression of microglial MIP-1α, P2X7 receptor and its downstream signaling mediators including-inflammasome NLRP3, caspase1 and mature IL-1β. Furthermore, in vivo maze studies suggested that andrographolide treatment reversed LPS-induced behavioural and working memory disturbances including regulation of expression of protein markers like PKC, p-CREB, amyloid beta, APP, p-tau, synapsin and PSD-95. Andrographolide, by lowering expression of pro apoptotic genes and enhancing the expression of anti-apoptotic gene showed its anti-apoptotic nature that in turn reduces neurodegeneration. Morphology studies using Nissl and FJB staining also showed the neuroprotective effect of andrographolide in the prefrontal cortex region. The above studies indicated that andrographolide prevented neuroinflammation-associated neurodegeneration and improved synaptic plasticity markers in cortical as well as hippocampal region which suggests that andrographolide could be a novel pharmacological countermeasure for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders related to memory impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle Satellite Cell Heterogeneity and Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio eMotohashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD.

  5. Muscle satellite cell heterogeneity and self-renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Norio; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle possesses extraordinary regeneration capacities. After muscle injury or exercise, large numbers of newly formed muscle fibers are generated within a week as a result of expansion and differentiation of a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells termed muscle satellite cells. Normally, satellite cells are mitotically quiescent and reside beneath the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Upon regeneration, satellite cells are activated, and give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells. After several rounds of proliferation, these myogenic precursor cells contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. During cell division, a minor population of myogenic precursor cells returns to quiescent satellite cells as a self-renewal process. Currently, accumulating evidence has revealed the essential roles of satellite cells in muscle regeneration and the regulatory mechanisms, while it still remains to be elucidated how satellite cell self-renewal is molecularly regulated and how satellite cells are important in aging and diseased muscle. The number of satellite cells is decreased due to the changing niche during ageing, resulting in attenuation of muscle regeneration capacity. Additionally, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, the loss of satellite cell regenerative capacity and decreased satellite cell number due to continuous needs for satellite cells lead to progressive muscle weakness with chronic degeneration. Thus, it is necessary to replenish muscle satellite cells continuously. This review outlines recent findings regarding satellite cell heterogeneity, asymmetric division and molecular mechanisms in satellite cell self-renewal which is crucial for maintenance of satellite cells as a muscle stem cell pool throughout life. In addition, we discuss roles in the stem cell niche for satellite cell maintenance, as well as related cell therapies for approaching treatment of DMD. PMID:25364710

  6. A preliminary investigation into the impact of a pesticide combination on human neuronal and glial cell lines in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Coleman

    Full Text Available Many pesticides are used increasingly in combinations during crop protection and their stability ensures the presence of such combinations in foodstuffs. The effects of three fungicides, pyrimethanil, cyprodinil and fludioxonil, were investigated together and separately on U251 and SH-SY5Y cells, which can be representative of human CNS glial and neuronal cells respectively. Over 48h, all three agents showed significant reductions in cellular ATP, at concentrations that were more than tenfold lower than those which significantly impaired cellular viability. The effects on energy metabolism were reflected in their marked toxic effects on mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, evidence of oxidative stress was seen in terms of a fall in cellular thiols coupled with increases in the expression of enzymes associated with reactive species formation, such as GSH peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. The glial cell line showed significant responsiveness to the toxin challenge in terms of changes in antioxidant gene expression, although the neuronal SH-SY5Y line exhibited greater vulnerability to toxicity, which was reflected in significant increases in caspase-3 expression, which is indicative of the initiation of apoptosis. Cyprodinil was the most toxic agent individually, although oxidative stress-related enzyme gene expression increases appeared to demonstrate some degree of synergy in the presence of the combination of agents. This report suggests that the impact of some pesticides, both individually and in combinations, merits further study in terms of their impact on human cellular health.

  7. Interactions between a receptor tyrosine phosphatase and a cell surface ligand regulate axon guidance and glial-neuronal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Kook Peter; Cording, Amy; Vielmetter, Jost; Zinn, Kai

    2013-06-05

    We developed a screening method for orphan receptor ligands, in which cell-surface proteins are expressed in Drosophila embryos from GAL4-dependent insertion lines and ligand candidates identified by the presence of ectopic staining with receptor fusion proteins. Stranded at second (Sas) binds to the receptor tyrosine phosphatase Ptp10D in embryos and in vitro. Sas and Ptp10D can interact in trans when expressed in cultured cells. Interactions between Sas and Ptp10D on longitudinal axons are required to prevent them from abnormally crossing the midline. Sas is expressed on both neurons and glia, whereas Ptp10D is restricted to CNS axons. We conducted epistasis experiments by overexpressing Sas in glia and examining how the resulting phenotypes are changed by removal of Ptp10D from neurons. We find that neuronal Ptp10D restrains signaling by overexpressed glial Sas, which would otherwise produce strong glial and axonal phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Submucosal neurons and enteric glial cells expressing the P2X7 receptor in rat experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Marosti, Aline Rosa; Mendes, Cristina Eusébio; Palombit, Kelly; Castelucci, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ulcerative colitis on the submucosal neurons and glial cells of the submucosal ganglia of rats. 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS; colitis group) was administered in the colon to induce ulcerative colitis, and distal colons were collected after 24h. The colitis rats were compared with those in the sham and control groups. Double labelling of the P2X7 receptor with calbindin (marker for intrinsic primary afferent neurons, IPANs, submucosal plexus), calretinin (marker for secretory and vasodilator neurons of the submucosal plexus), HuC/D and S100β was performed in the submucosal plexus. The density (neurons per area) of submucosal neurons positive for the P2X7 receptor, calbindin, calretinin and HuC/D decreased by 21%, 34%, 8.2% and 28%, respectively, in the treated group. In addition, the density of enteric glial cells in the submucosal plexus decreased by 33%. The profile areas of calbindin-immunoreactive neurons decreased by 25%. Histological analysis revealed increased lamina propria and decreased collagen in the colitis group. This study demonstrated that ulcerative colitis affected secretory and vasodilatory neurons, IPANs and enteric glia of the submucosal plexus expressing the P2X7 receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Rostro-caudal maturation of glial cells in the accessory olfactory system during development: involvement in outgrowth of GnRH neurites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Sarah; Lomet, Didier; Caraty, Alain; Tillet, Yves; Duittoz, Anne; Vaudin, Pascal

    2017-10-03

    During mammalian embryonic development, GnRH neurones differentiate from the nasal placode and migrate through the nasal septum towards the forebrain. We previously showed that a category of glial cells, the olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), forms the microenvironment of migrating GnRH neurones. Here, to characterize the quantitative and qualitative importance of this glial, we investigated the spatiotemporal maturation of glial cells in situ and the role of maturing glia in GnRH neurones development ex vivo. More than 90% of migrating GnRH neurones were found to be associated with glial cells. There was no change in the cellular microenvironment of GnRH neurones in the regions crossed during embryonic development as glial cells formed the main microenvironment of these neurones (53.4%). However, the phenotype of OEC associated with GnRH neurones changed across regions. The OEC progenitors immunoreactive to brain lipid binding protein formed the microenvironment of migrating GnRH neurones from the vomeronasal organ to the telencephalon and were also present in the diencephalon. However, during GnRH neurone migration, maturation of OEC to [GFAP+] state (glial fibrillary acid protein) was only observed in the nasal septum. Inducing depletion of OEC in maturation, using transgenic mice expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase driven by the GFAP promoter, had no impact on neurogenesis or on triggering GnRH neurones migration in nasal explant culture. Nevertheless, depletion of [GFAP+] cells decreased GnRH neurites outgrowth by 57.4%. This study suggests that specific maturation of OEC in the nasal septum plays a role in morphological differentiation of GnRH neurones. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Imaging of glial cell morphology, SOD1 distribution and elemental composition in the brainstem and hippocampus of the ALS hSOD1(G93A) rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, Stefan; Dučić, Tanja; Stamenković, Vera; Kranz, Alexander; Andjus, Pavle R

    2017-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor and cognitive domains of the CNS. Mutations in the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20% of familial ALS and provoke formation of intracellular aggregates and copper and zinc unbinding, leading to glial activation and neurodegeneration. Therefore, we investigated glial cell morphology, intracellular SOD1 distribution, and elemental composition in the brainstem and hippocampus of the hSOD1(G93A) transgenic rat model of ALS. Immunostaining for astrocytes, microglia and SOD1 revealed glial proliferation and progressive tissue accumulation of SOD1 in both brain regions of ALS rats starting already at the presymptomatic stage. Glial cell morphology analysis in the brainstem of ALS rats revealed astrocyte activation occurring before disease symptoms onset, followed by activation of microglia. Hippocampal ALS astrocytes exhibited an identical reactive profile, while microglial morphology was unchanged. Additionally, ALS brainstem astrocytes demonstrated progressive SOD1 accumulation in the cell body and processes, while microglial SOD1 levels were reduced and its distribution limited to distal cell processes. In the hippocampus both glial cell types exhibited SOD1 accumulation in the cell body. X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed decreased P and increased Ca, Cl, K, Ni, Cu and Zn in the brainstem, and higher levels of Cl, Ni and Cu, but lower levels of Zn in the hippocampus of symptomatic ALS rats. These results bring new insights into the glial response during disease development and progression in motor as well as in non-motor CNS structures, and indicate disturbed tissue elemental homeostasis as a prominent hallmark of disease pathology. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. GFAP-driven GFP expression in activated mouse Muller glial cells aligning retinal blood vessels following intravitreal injection of AAV2/6 vectors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsen, W.M.; Cleef, K.W.R. van; Pellissier, L.P.; Hoek, R.M.; Vos, R.M.; Blits, B.; Ehlert, E.M.; Balaggan, K.S.; Ali, R.R.; Verhaagen, J.; Wijnholds, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Muller cell gliosis occurs in various retinal pathologies regardless of the underlying cellular defect. Because activated Muller glial cells span the entire retina and align areas of injury, they are ideal targets for therapeutic strategies, including gene therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL

  12. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  14. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  15. Comparative study of Pax2 expression in glial cells in the retina and optic nerve of birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Jennifer; Moose, Holly E; El-Hodiri, Heithem M; Fischer, Andy J

    2010-06-15

    Little is known about the expression of Pax2 in mature retina or optic nerve. Here we probed for the expression of Pax2 in late stages of embryonic development and in mature chick retina. We find two distinct Pax2 isoforms expressed by cells within the retina and optic nerve. Surprisingly, Müller glia in central regions of the retina express Pax2, and levels of expression are decreased with increasing distance from the nerve head. In Müller glia, the expression levels of Pax2 are increased by acute retinal damage or treatment with growth factors. At the optic nerve, Pax2 is expressed by peripapillary glia, at the junction of the neural retina and optic nerve head and by glia within the optic nerve. In addition, we assayed for Pax2 expression in glial cells in mammalian retinas. In mammalian retinas, unlike the case in chick retina, the Müller glia do not express Pax2. Pax2-expressing cells are found in the optic nerve and astrocytes within the mouse retina. By comparison, Pax2-positive cells are not found within the guinea pig retina; Pax2-expressing glia are confined to the optic nerve. In dog and monkey (Macaca fascicularis), Pax2 is expressed by astrocytes that are scattered across inner retinal layers and by numerous glia within the optic nerve. Interestingly, Pax2-positive glial cells are found at the peripheral edge of the dog retina, but only in older animals. We conclude that the expression of Pax2 in the vertebrate eye is restricted to retinal astrocytes, peripapillary glia, and glia within the optic nerve. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Pervasive satellite cell contribution to uninjured adult muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Pulliam, Crystal; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Kardon, Gabrielle; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle adapts to functional needs, maintaining consistent numbers of myonuclei and stem cells. Although resident muscle stem cells or satellite cells are required for muscle growth and repair, in uninjured muscle, these cells appear quiescent and metabolically inactive. To investigate the satellite cell contribution to myofibers in adult uninjured skeletal muscle, we labeled satellite cells by inducing a recombination of LSL-tdTomato in Pax7(CreER) mice and scoring tdTomato+ myofibers as an indicator of satellite cell fusion. Satellite cell fusion into myofibers plateaus postnatally between 8 and 12 weeks of age, reaching a steady state in hindlimb muscles, but in extra ocular or diaphragm muscles, satellite cell fusion is maintained at postnatal levels irrespective of the age assayed. Upon recombination and following a 2-week chase in 6-month-old mice, tdTomato-labeled satellite cells fused into myofibers as 20, 50, and 80 % of hindlimb, extra ocular, and diaphragm myofibers, respectively, were tdTomato+. Satellite cells contribute to uninjured myofibers either following a cell division or directly without an intervening cell division. The frequency of satellite cell fusion into the skeletal muscle fibers is greater than previously estimated, suggesting an important functional role for satellite cell fusion into adult myofibers and a requirement for active maintenance of satellite cell numbers in uninjured skeletal muscle.

  17. Antihyperalgesic effects of dexketoprofen and tramadol in a model of postoperative pain in mice - effects on glial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Puig, Margarita M; Romero, Asunción

    2016-08-01

    To define likely targets (i.e. glia) and protocols (analgesic combinations) to improve postoperative pain outcomes and reduce chronic pain after surgery. Specifically, to assess the antihyperalgesic effects of the dexketoprofen : tramadol (DEX : TRM) combination, exploring the implication of glial activation. In a mouse model of postincisional pain, we evaluated mechanical nociceptive thresholds (Von Frey) for 21 days postoperatively. We assessed DEX and TRM alone and combined (1 : 1 ratio) on postoperative hyperalgesia (POH, day 1) and delayed latent pain sensitisation (substantiated by a naloxone challenge; PS, day 21). The interactions were analysed using isobolograms, and concomitant changes in spinal glial cell activation were measured. On day 1, DEX completely blocked POH, whereas TRM induced 32% inhibition. TRM, but not DEX, partially (47%) protected against PS, at 21 days. Co-administration of DEX : TRM (1 : 1 ratio) showed additivity for antihyperalgesia. Both drugs and their combination totally inhibited surgery-induced microglia activation on day 1, but had no effect on surgery-induced astrocyte activation (1 day) or re-activation after naloxone (21 days). The DEX : TRM combination could have clinical advantages: a complete prevention of POH after surgery, together with a substantial (48%) inhibition of the development of PS by TRM. Microglia, but not astrocyte activation, could play a relevant role in the development of postoperative pain hypersensitivity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Spinal NF-κB and chemokine ligand 5 expression during spinal glial cell activation in a neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NF-κB pathway and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 are involved in pain modulation; however, the precise mechanisms of their interactions in chronic neuropathic pain have yet to be established. METHODS: The present study examined the roles of spinal NF-κB and CCL5 in a neuropathic pain model after chronic constriction injury (CCI surgery. CCI-induced pain facilitation was evaluated using the Plantar and von Frey tests. The changes in NF-κB and CCL5 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Spinal NF-κB and CCL5 expression increased after CCI surgery. Repeated intrathecal infusions of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor decreased CCL5 expression, inhibited the activation of microglia and astrocytes, and attenuated CCI-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of a CCL5-neutralizing antibody attenuated CCI-induced pain facilitation and also suppressed spinal glial cell activation after CCI surgery. However, the CCL5-neutralizing antibody did not affect NF-κB expression. Furthermore, selective glial inhibitors, minocycline and fluorocitrate, attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of spinal CCL5 expression may provide a new method to prevent and treat nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  19. Downregulation of the Glial GLT1 Glutamate Transporter and Purkinje Cell Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Sicot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain function is compromised in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To gain insight into the cellular and molecular pathways primarily affected, we studied a mouse model of DM1 and brains of adult patients. We found pronounced RNA toxicity in the Bergmann glia of the cerebellum, in association with abnormal Purkinje cell firing and fine motor incoordination in DM1 mice. A global proteomics approach revealed downregulation of the GLT1 glutamate transporter in DM1 mice and human patients, which we found to be the result of MBNL1 inactivation. GLT1 downregulation in DM1 astrocytes increases glutamate neurotoxicity and is detrimental to neurons. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of GLT1 corrected Purkinje cell firing and motor incoordination in DM1 mice. Our findings show that glial defects are critical in DM1 brain pathophysiology and open promising therapeutic perspectives through the modulation of glutamate levels.

  20. Butyrate promotes visceral hypersensitivity in an IBS-like model via enteric glial cell-derived nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, X; Li, M; Li, L-X; Sun, Y-Y; Zhang, W-X; Zhao, D-Y; Li, Y-Q

    2017-10-20

    Altered visceral sensation is common in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and nerve growth factor (NGF) participates in visceral pain development. Sodium butyrate (NaB) could induce colonic hypersensitivity via peripheral up-regulation of NGF in animals. Enteric glial cells (EGCs) appear to be an important source of NGF. Whether butyrate could induce visceral hypersensitivity via increased EGC-derived NGF is still unknown. CRL-2690 cells were used for transcriptome analyses after butyrate treatment. Rats received butyrate enemas to induce colonic hypersensitivity. Colorectal distention test was performed to assess visceral sensitivity. Immunofluorescence studies were used to evaluate the co-expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NGF or growth associated protein 43 in animal model. NGF expression in rat colon was also investigated. In vitro, CRL-2690 cells were stimulated with NaB or trichostatin A (TSA). NGF or GFAP expression was also examined. Transcriptome analyses showed that butyrate induced marked changes of genes expression related to neurotrophic signaling pathways. NaB-treated rats showed increased visceral sensitivity. An improved NGF expression level was observed in NaB-treated rats. Meanwhile, a 2.1-fold increase in co-expression of GFAP and NGF was also determined in rats received NaB enemas. In cultured cells, both NaB and TSA treatment could cause obvious NGF expression. Thus, butyrate might regulate EGC function via histone deacetylase inhibition. Butyrate-EGC interplay may play a pivotal role in regulation of NGF expression and the development of colonic hypersensitivity in IBS-like animal model. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Loss of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Proinflammatory Response in Unstimulated Abcd1-Knockout Mice Mixed Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is caused by mutations and/or deletions in the ABCD1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions can give rise to variable phenotypes ranging from mild adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN to inflammatory fatal cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD via unknown mechanisms. We recently reported the loss of the anti-inflammatory protein adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPKα1 exclusively in ALD patient-derived cells. X-ALD mouse model (Abcd1-knockout (KO mice mimics the human AMN phenotype and does not develop the cerebral inflammation characteristic of human ALD. In this study we document that AMPKα1 levels in vivo (in brain cortex and spinal cord and in vitro in Abcd1-KO mixed glial cells are similar to that of wild type mice. Deletion of AMPKα1 in the mixed glial cells of Abcd1-KO mice induced spontaneous mitochondrial dysfunction (lower oxygen consumption rate and ATP levels. Mitochondrial dysfunction in ALD patient-derived cells and in AMPKα1-deleted Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells was accompanied by lower levels of mitochondrial complex (1-V subunits. More importantly, AMPKα1 deletion induced proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the unstimulated Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells. Taken together, this study provides novel direct evidence for a causal role for AMPK loss in the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and proinflammatory response in X-ALD.

  2. Therapeutic effects of NogoA vaccine and olfactory ensheathing glial cell implantation on acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Z

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhicheng Zhang, Fang Li, Tiansheng Sun, Dajiang Ren, Xiumei Liu PLA Institute of Orthopedics, Beijing Army General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Many previous studies have focused on the effects of IN-1, a monoclonal antibody that neutralizes Nogo (a neurite growth inhibitory protein, on neurologic regeneration in spinal cord injury (SCI. However, safety problems and the short half-life of the exogenous antibody are still problematic. In the present study, the NogoA polypeptide was used as an antigen to make a therapeutic NogoA vaccine. Rats were immunized with this vaccine and were able to secrete the polyclonal antibody before SCI. The antibody can block NogoA within the injured spinal cord when the antibody gains access to the spinal cord due to a compromised blood–spinal cord barrier. Olfactory ensheathing glial cell transplantation has been used in a spinal cord contusion model to promote the recovery of SCI. The present study was designed to verify the efficacy and safety of NogoA polypeptide vaccine, the effects of immunotherapy with this vaccine, and the synergistic effects of the vaccine and olfactory ensheathing glial cells in repair of SCI. Methods: A 13-polypeptide fragment of NogoA was synthesized. This fragment was then coupled with keyhole limpet hemocyanin to improve the immunogenicity of the polypeptide vaccine. Immunization via injection into the abdominal cavity was performed in rats before SCI. The serum antibody level and ability of the vaccine to bind with Nogo were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The safety of the vaccine was evaluated according to the incidence and severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Olfactory ensheathing glia cells were obtained, purified, and subsequently implanted into a Wistar rat model of thoracic spinal cord contusion injury. The rats were divided into four groups, ie, an SCI model group, an olfactory ensheathing glia group, a vaccine

  3. Mactosylceramide Prevents Glial Cell Overgrowth by Inhibiting Insulin and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdøe-Kristensen, Stine; Lund, Viktor K; Wandall, Hans H

    2017-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) signaling controls key aspects of cellular differentiation, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. Deregulated RTK signaling also underlies many cancers. Glycosphingolipids (GSL) are essential elements of the plasma membrane. By affecting clustering...... and activity of membrane receptors, GSL modulate signal transduction, including that mediated by the RTK. GSL are abundant in the nervous system, and glial development in Drosophila is emerging as a useful model for studying how GSL modulate RTK signaling. Drosophila has a simple GSL biosynthetic pathway...... hyperactivation is caused by absence of MacCer and not by GlcCer accumulation. We conclude that an early product in GSL biosynthesis, MacCer, prevents inappropriate activation of Insulin and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors in Drosophila glia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  4. Developmental modulation of a glial cell-associated glycoprotein, 5B12, in an insect, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M R; Brunner, P; Edwards, J S

    1988-11-01

    The expression of an insect (Acheta domesticus) adult glial cell-specific antigen, 5B12 undergoes major changes during development. The 5B12 antigen is detected as early as 20-25% of embryonic development, when immunoreactivity is distributed throughout the periphery, present at the luminal surface of epithelial cells which compose developing limb buds, sensory appendages, and the body cavity. The antigen is also localized on the cell surface of neural elements within commissural tracts in the embryonic CNS. 5B12 is secreted extracellularly in the periphery, where it is associated with the embryonic basal lamina in developing cercal sensory appendages. Luminal surface expression is transient, and disappears by 95% of embryonic development. As development proceeds, 5B12 distribution becomes more restricted, so that in the adult the antigen is predominantly associated with specific glial elements within the nervous system where it occurs as a specialized component of the extracellular matrix. The 5B12 antigen is also associated with discrete central and peripheral fiber tracts. Antigen 5B12 is present in whole embryos and in the adult CNS as a Mr 185-kDa glycoprotein. Distinct carbohydrate moieties with chondroitin sulfate-like properties are situated on the 5B12 epitope. Thus the glia-associated 5B12 macromolecule has the characteristics of a small proteoglycan. Based upon features of its distribution, pattern of spatiotemporal expression, and biochemical properties, it is speculated that 5B12 participates in events related sequentially to the development and the function of the insect nervous system.

  5. Plasma glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depressive disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bun-Hee; Hong, Jin-Pyo; Hwang, Jung-A; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Kim, Won-Joong; Trigo, Jose; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2016-02-01

    Some clinical studies have reported reduced peripheral glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) level in elderly patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We verified whether a reduction in plasma GDNF level was associated with MDD. Plasma GDNF level was measured in 23 healthy control subjects and 23 MDD patients before and after 6 weeks of treatment. Plasma GDNF level in MDD patients at baseline did not differ from that in healthy controls. Plasma GDNF in MDD patients did not differ significantly from baseline to the end of treatment. GDNF level was significantly lower in recurrent-episode MDD patients than in first-episode patients before and after treatment. Our findings revealed significantly lower plasma GDNF level in recurrent-episode MDD patients, although plasma GDNF levels in MDD patients and healthy controls did not differ significantly. The discrepancy between our study and previous studies might arise from differences in the recurrence of depression or the ages of the MDD patients.

  6. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzesiak, Jakub; Marycz, Krzysztof; Szarek, Dariusz; Bednarz, Paulina; Laska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane-polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane-polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  8. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  9. Donor Satellite Cell Engraftment is Significantly Augmented When the Host Niche is Preserved and Endogenous Satellite Cells are Incapacitated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Luisa; Neal, Alice; Zammit, Peter S; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is already in clinical practice for certain genetic diseases and is a promising therapy for dystrophic muscle. We used the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to investigate the effect of the host satellite cell niche on the contribution of donor muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to muscle regeneration. We found that incapacitation of the host satellite cells and preservation of the muscle niche promote donor satellite cell contribution to muscle regeneration and functional reconstitution of the satellite cell compartment. But, if the host niche is not promptly refilled, or is filled by competent host satellite cells, it becomes nonfunctional and donor engraftment is negligible. Application of this regimen to aged host muscles also promotes efficient regeneration from aged donor satellite cells. In contrast, if the niche is destroyed, yet host satellite cells remain proliferation-competent, donor-derived engraftment is trivial. Thus preservation of the satellite cell niche, concomitant with functional impairment of the majority of satellite cells within dystrophic human muscles, may improve the efficiency of stem cell therapy. Stem Cells2012;30:1971–1984 PMID:22730231

  10. miRNA profiling of exosomes from trigeminal satellite glial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duroux, Meg; Vinterhøj, Hye Sook Han; Gazerani, Parisa

    2017-01-01

    ,5-DHBA. However, application of lactate to our cultures completely restored myelination in WT, but only partly in HCAR1 KO mice. Our findings reveal previously unknown receptor-mediated actions of lactate in brain development and neuroprotection and suggest HCAR1 as a new therapeutic target...

  11. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV, which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs. We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF. SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen.Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins.Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral reactivation leading to

  12. Amantadine alleviates postoperative cognitive dysfunction possibly by increasing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Tan, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a clinical entity that is associated with poor outcome. We determined the effectiveness of amantadine in reducing surgery-induced cognitive impairment and the role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in this effect. Four-month old male Fischer 344 rats were subjected to right carotid exposure under intravenous anesthesia. Some rats received intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg/day amantadine for 3 days with the first dose at 15 min before the surgery or intracerebroventricular injection of GDNF or an anti-GDNF antibody at the end of surgery. One week later, rats were started to be tested by Barnes maze and fear conditioning. Hippocampus was harvested at 6 h, 24 h or 10 days after the surgery for biochemical analysis. C8-B4 cells, a microglial cell line, were pretreated with 1 ng/ml GDNF for 30 min before being exposed to 5 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide for 2 h. Surgery increased the time to identify the target box in the Barnes maze when tested 1 day [22 (median) (11-66) (interquartile range) of control group vs. 158 (29-180) of surgery group, n = 15, P = 0.022) or 8 days after the training sessions and reduced context-related freezing behavior in the fear conditioning test. These effects were attenuated by amantadine (25 (14-90), n = 15, P = 0.029 compared with surgery group at 1 day after the training sessions in Barnes maze) and intracerebroventricular GDNF. Amantadine increased GDNF that was co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocytic marker, in the hippocampus. Intracerebroventricular injection of an anti-GDNF antibody but not the denatured antibody blocked the effects of amantadine on cognition. Surgery induced neuroinflammation that was inhibited by amantadine. Lipopolysaccharide increased interleukin 1β production from C8-B4 cells. This effect was inhibited by GDNF. Our results suggest that amantadine attenuated surgery-induced learning and memory impairment. This effect may be

  13. The multifaceted effects of agmatine on functional recovery after spinal cord injury through Modulations of BMP-2/4/7 expressions in neurons and glial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mi Park

    Full Text Available Presently, few treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI are available and none have facilitated neural regeneration and/or significant functional improvement. Agmatine (Agm, a guanidinium compound formed from decarboxylation of L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase, is a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator and been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in central nervous system injury models including SCI. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the multifaceted effects of Agm on functional recovery and remyelinating events following SCI. Compression SCI in mice was produced by placing a 15 g/mm(2 weight for 1 min at thoracic vertebra (Th 9 segment. Mice that received an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of Agm (100 mg/kg/day within 1 hour after SCI until 35 days showed improvement in locomotor recovery and bladder function. Emphasis was made on the analysis of remyelination events, neuronal cell preservation and ablation of glial scar area following SCI. Agm treatment significantly inhibited the demyelination events, neuronal loss and glial scar around the lesion site. In light of recent findings that expressions of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are modulated in the neuronal and glial cell population after SCI, we hypothesized whether Agm could modulate BMP- 2/4/7 expressions in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and play key role in promoting the neuronal and glial cell survival in the injured spinal cord. The results from computer assisted stereological toolbox analysis (CAST demonstrate that Agm treatment dramatically increased BMP- 2/7 expressions in neurons and oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, BMP- 4 expressions were significantly decreased in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes around the lesion site. Together, our results reveal that Agm treatment improved neurological and histological outcomes, induced oligodendrogenesis, protected neurons, and decreased glial scar formation through modulating the BMP- 2/4/7 expressions following

  14. Learning, memory, and glial cell changes following recovery from chronic unpredictable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yanqing; Pan, Zhuo; Hou, Ziyuan; Huang, Cui; Li, Wei; Zhao, Baohua

    2012-08-01

    Previous research has indicated that chronic stress induces inflammatory responses, cognitive impairments, and changes in microglia and astrocytes. However, whether stress-induced changes following recovery are reversible is unclear. The present study examined the effects of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) following recovery on spatial learning and memory impairments, changes in microglia and astrocytes, and interleukine-1β (IL-1β) and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels. Mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and recovery groups, and CUS was applied to mice in the stress and recovery groups for 40 days. Following the application of CUS, the recovery group was allowed 40 days without stress. The results of the Morris water maze illustrated that CUS-induced spatial learning and memory impairments could be reversed or even improved by a period of recovery. Immunohistochemical tests revealed that CUS-induced alterations in microglia could dissipate with time in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and prelimbic areas. However, CUS-induced activation of astrocytes was sustained in the CA3 area following recovery. Western blot analyses revealed that CUS induced a significant increase of GDNF and a significant decrease in IL-1β. Additionally, increased GDNF levels were sustained in the hippocampus during recovery. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that CUS-induced learning and memory impairments could be reversible following recovery. However, activated astrocytes and increased GDNF levels in the hippocampus remained elevated after recovery, suggesting that activated astrocytes and increased GDNF play important roles in the adaptation of the brain to CUS and in repairing CUS-induced impairments during recovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization and isolation of highly purified porcine satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shijie; Wang, Fei; Liu, Yan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Guanghong; Hu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Pig is an important food source and an excellent system to model human diseases. Careful characterization of the swine skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells) will shed lights on generation of swine skeletal muscle disease model and efficient production of porcine meat for the food industry. Paired box protein 7 (Pax7) is a highly conserved transcription factor shared by satellite cells from various species. However, the sequence of Pax7 has not been characterized in pig. The lack of method to isolate highly purified satellite cells hinders the thorough characterization of the swine satellite cells. Here we found molecular markers for swine satellite cells and revealed that the porcine satellite cells were heterogeneous in various pieces of skeletal muscle. We further developed a method to isolate highly purified satellite cells directly from porcine muscles using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We next characterized the proliferation and differentiation abilities of isolated satellite cells in vitro; and found that long-term culturing of satellite cells in vitro led to stemness loss.

  16. A diphenyl diselenide-supplemented diet and swimming exercise promote neuroprotection, reduced cell apoptosis and glial cell activation in the hypothalamus of old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Marlon R; Cechella, José L; Pinton, Simone; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a process characterized by deterioration of the homeostasis of various physiological systems; although being a process under influence of multiple factors, the mechanisms involved in aging are not well understood. Here we investigated the effect of a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet (1ppm, 4weeks) and swimming exercise (1% of body weight, 20min per day, 4weeks) on proteins related to glial cells activation, apoptosis and neuroprotection in the hypothalamus of old male Wistar rats (27month-old). Old rats had activation of astrocytes and microglia which was demonstrated by the increase in the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) in hypothalamus. A decrease of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and procaspase-3 levels as well as an increase of the cleaved PARP/full length PARP ratio (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, PARP) and the pJNK/JNK ratio (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, JNK) were observed. The levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF), the pAkt/Akt ratio (also known as protein kinase B) and NeuN (neuronal nuclei), a neuron marker, were decreased in the hypothalamus of old rats. Old rats that received a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and performed swimming exercise had the hypothalamic levels of Iba-1 and GFAP decreased. The combined treatment also increased the levels of Bcl-2 and procaspase-3 and decreased the ratios of cleaved PARP/full length PARP and pJNK/JNK in old rats. The levels of mBDNF and NeuN, but not the pAkt/Akt ratio, were increased by combined treatment. In conclusion, a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and swimming exercise promoted neuroprotection in the hypothalamus of old rats, reducing apoptosis and glial cell activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CNTF-mediated protection of photoreceptors requires initial activation of the cytokine receptor gp130 in Müller glial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Kun Do; Nusinowitz, Steven; Chao, Kevin; Yu, Fei; Bok, Dean; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine CNTF has been approved by the FDA as a neuroprotective treatment for major retinal degenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of CNTF-triggered protection and CNTF-responsive cells in the retina remains unknown. Using molecular genetic analyses in a retinal degeneration mouse model, we identify the Müller glial cell as the direct initial target of exogenous CNTF signals. We provide evidence that CNTF signals stimulate a Müller glia and photoreceptor intercellular signaling loo...

  18. Co-transplantation of syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells improves survival of allogeneic glial-restricted precursors in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit K; Bulte, Camille A; Shats, Irina; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of functional cells from immunorejection during the early post-transplantation period is an important factor that reduces the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. Recent studies have shown that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can exert therapeutic effects by secreting anti-inflammatory and pro-survival trophic factors. We investigated whether co-transplantation of MSCs could improve the survival of other transplanted therapeutic cells. Allogeneic glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) were isolated from the brain of a firefly luciferase transgenic FVB mouse (at E13.5 stage) and intracerebrally transplanted, either alone, or together with syngeneic MSCs in immunocompetent BALB/c mice (n=20) or immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice as survival control (n=8). No immunosuppressive drug was given to any animal. Using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive readout of cell survival, we found that co-transplantation of MSCs significantly improved (ptransplanted cells surviving in both the GRP only and the GRP+MSC group. In contrast, on day 21 post-transplantation, we observed a 94.2% decrease in BLI signal intensity in immunocompetent mice transplanted with GRPs alone versus 68.1% in immunocompetent mice co-transplanted with MSCs and GRPs (pcells, reduced astrogliosis, and a higher number of FoxP3(+) cells at the site of transplantation for the immunocompetent mice receiving MSCs. The present study demonstrates that co-transplantation of MSCs can be used to create a microenvironment that is more conducive to the survival of allogeneic GRPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging of Glial Cell Activation and White Matter Integrity in Brains of Active and Recently Retired National Football League Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jennifer M; Wang, Yuchuan; Minn, Il; Bienko, Nicholas; Ambinder, Emily B; Xu, Xin; Peters, Matthew E; Dougherty, John W; Vranesic, Melin; Koo, Soo Min; Ahn, Hye-Hyun; Lee, Merton; Cottrell, Chris; Sair, Haris I; Sawa, Akira; Munro, Cynthia A; Nowinski, Christopher J; Dannals, Robert F; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Kassiou, Michael; Smith, Gwenn; Caffo, Brian; Mori, Susumu; Guilarte, Tomas R; Pomper, Martin G

    2017-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, play an important role in the brain's response to injury and neurodegenerative processes. It has been proposed that prolonged microglial activation occurs after single and repeated traumatic brain injury, possibly through sports-related concussive and subconcussive injuries. Limited in vivo brain imaging studies months to years after individuals experience a single moderate to severe traumatic brain injury suggest widespread persistent microglial activation, but there has been little study of persistent glial cell activity in brains of athletes with sports-related traumatic brain injury. To measure translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), a marker of activated glial cell response, in a cohort of National Football League (NFL) players and control participants, and to report measures of white matter integrity. This cross-sectional, case-control study included young active (n = 4) or former (n = 10) NFL players recruited from across the United States, and 16 age-, sex-, highest educational level-, and body mass index-matched control participants. This study was conducted at an academic research institution in Baltimore, Maryland, from January 29, 2015, to February 18, 2016. Positron emission tomography-based regional measures of TSPO using [11C]DPA-713, diffusion tensor imaging measures of regional white matter integrity, regional volumes on structural magnetic resonance imaging, and neuropsychological performance. The mean (SD) ages of the 14 NFL participants and 16 control participants were 31.3 (6.1) years and 27.6 (4.9) years, respectively. Players reported a mean (SD) of 7.0 (6.4) years (range, 1-21 years) since the last self-reported concussion. Using [11C]DPA-713 positron emission tomographic data from 12 active or former NFL players and 11 matched control participants, the NFL players showed higher total distribution volume in 8 of the 12 brain regions examined (P players compared with 15

  20. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells

  1. Secretion of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in co-culture of four cell types in cerebrospinal fluid-containing medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sanjiang; Zhuang, Minghua; Wu, Rui

    2012-12-25

    The present study co-cultured human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells in complete culture medium-containing cerebrospinal fluid. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor secretion in the supernatant of co-cultured cells. Results showed that the number of all cell types reached a peak at 7-10 days, and the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor peaked at 9 days. Levels of secreted nerve growth factor were four-fold higher than brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was three-fold higher than glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Increasing concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (10%, 20% and 30%) in the growth medium caused a decrease of neurotrophic factor secretion. Results indicated co-culture of human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells improved the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The reduction of cerebrospinal fluid extravasation at the transplant site after spinal cord injury is beneficial for the survival and secretion of neurotrophic factors from transplanted cells.

  2. Nuclear factor-I regulates glial fibrillary acidic protein gene expression in astrocytes differentiated from cortical precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebolla, Beatriz; Vallejo, Mario

    2006-05-01

    The elucidation of the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene expression is important for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control astrocyte differentiation during brain development. We investigated regulatory elements located in a proximal region of the GFAP promoter, important for expression in cortical precursor cells differentiating into astrocytes. One of these elements recognizes transcription factors of the nuclear factor-I family (NFI). We found that, in primary cultures of cortical cells, NFI occupies the GFAP promoter prior to the induction of astrocyte differentiation. In the developing cerebral cortex, the onset of expression of NFI coincides chronologically with the beginning of astrocytogenesis. Mutational analysis of the GFAP gene and transfections in primary cortical precursors show that inhibition of binding of NFI to the GFAP promoter results in decreased levels of transcriptional activity and is required for the synergistic stimulation of the GFAP promoter by the astrogenic agents, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and ciliary neurotrophic factor, which in combination enhance astrocyte differentiation to generate astrocytes with longer processes. Thus, NFI appears to be an important factor for the integration of astrogenic stimuli in the developing central nervous system.

  3. Glucose transporter 1 and monocarboxylate transporters 1, 2, and 4 localization within the glial cells of shark blood-brain-barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Balmaceda-Aguilera

    Full Text Available Although previous studies showed that glucose is used to support the metabolic activity of the cartilaginous fish brain, the distribution and expression levels of glucose transporter (GLUT isoforms remained undetermined. Optic/ultrastructural immunohistochemistry approaches were used to determine the expression of GLUT1 in the glial blood-brain barrier (gBBB. GLUT1 was observed solely in glial cells; it was primarily located in end-feet processes of the gBBB. Western blot analysis showed a protein with a molecular mass of 50 kDa, and partial sequencing confirmed GLUT1 identity. Similar approaches were used to demonstrate increased GLUT1 polarization to both apical and basolateral membranes in choroid plexus epithelial cells. To explore monocarboxylate transporter (MCT involvement in shark brain metabolism, the expression of MCTs was analyzed. MCT1, 2 and 4 were expressed in endothelial cells; however, only MCT1 and MCT4 were present in glial cells. In neurons, MCT2 was localized at the cell membrane whereas MCT1 was detected within mitochondria. Previous studies demonstrated that hypoxia modified GLUT and MCT expression in mammalian brain cells, which was mediated by the transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1. Similarly, we observed that hypoxia modified MCT1 cellular distribution and MCT4 expression in shark telencephalic area and brain stem, confirming the role of these transporters in hypoxia adaptation. Finally, using three-dimensional ultrastructural microscopy, the interaction between glial end-feet and leaky blood vessels of shark brain was assessed in the present study. These data suggested that the brains of shark may take up glucose from blood using a different mechanism than that used by mammalian brains, which may induce astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling and metabolic coupling as observed in mammalian brain. Our data suggested that the structural conditions and expression patterns of GLUT1, MCT1, MCT2 and MCT4 in shark

  4. The Neuro-Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Perilla frutescens var. japonicaand Rosmarinic Acid against H₂O₂-Induced Oxidative Stress in C6 Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah Young; Wu, Ting Ting; Hwang, Bo Ra; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Myoung-Hee; Lee, Sanghyun; Cho, Eun Ju

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with oxidative damage in neuronal cells. This study was conducted to investigate the neuro-protective effect of methanolic (MeOH) extract of Perilla frutescens var. japonica and its one of the major compounds, rosmarinic acid, under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in C6 glial cells. Exposure of C6 glial cells to H₂O₂ enhanced oxidative damage as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance assays. The MeOH extract and rosmarinic acid prevented oxidative stress by increasing cell viability and inhibiting cellular lipid peroxidation. In addition, the MeOH extract and rosmarinic acid reduced H₂O₂-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level. Moreover, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression was down-regulated in H₂O₂-indcued C6 glial cells treated with the MeOH extract and rosmarinic acid. These findings suggest that P. frutescens var. japonica and rosmarinic acid could prevent the progression of neurodegenerative diseases through attenuation of neuronal oxidative stress.

  5. Functional Overload Enhances Satellite Cell Properties in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Fujimaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle represents a plentiful and accessible source of adult stem cells. Skeletal-muscle-derived stem cells, termed satellite cells, play essential roles in postnatal growth, maintenance, repair, and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Although it is well known that the number of satellite cells increases following physical exercise, functional alterations in satellite cells such as proliferative capacity and differentiation efficiency following exercise and their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that functional overload, which is widely used to model resistance exercise, causes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and converts satellite cells from quiescent state to activated state. Our analysis showed that functional overload induces the expression of MyoD in satellite cells and enhances the proliferative capacity and differentiation potential of these cells. The changes in satellite cell properties coincided with the inactivation of Notch signaling and the activation of Wnt signaling and likely involve modulation by transcription factors of the Sox family. These results indicate the effects of resistance exercise on the regulation of satellite cells and provide insight into the molecular mechanism of satellite cell activation following physical exercise.

  6. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-jiang Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  7. Gene expression changes under cyclic mechanical stretching in rat retinal glial (Müller) cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Xin; Fan, Jiawen; Zhang, Meng; Sun, Zhongcui; Xu, Gezhi

    2013-01-01

    ..., Müller cells are active players in all forms of retinal injury and disease. In this study, we aim to identify patterns of gene expression changes induced by cyclic mechanical stretching in Müller cells. Rat...

  8. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemia-like injury in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, K S; Polansky, M M; Graves, D J; Urban, J F; Anderson, R A

    2012-01-27

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury, including cell swelling, increased free radical production, increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial dysfunction, and the reduction in glutamate uptake. Astrocyte (glial) swelling is a major component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemia and, along with vasogenic edema, may contribute to increased intracranial pressure, brain herniation, and additional ischemic injuries. C6 glial cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 5 h, and cell swelling was determined at 90 min after the end of OGD. OGD-induced increases in glial swelling were significantly blocked by trimer 1, but not by the major nonpolyphenol fractions of CE including cinnamaldehyde and coumarin. Increased free radical production, a contributing factor in cell swelling following ischemic injury, was also significantly reduced by trimer 1. Mitochondrial dysfunction, another key feature of ischemic injury, is hypothesized to contribute to glial swelling. Depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) was assessed using a fluorescent dye (tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester [TMRE]), and was significantly attenuated by trimer 1 as was OGD-induced increased [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together with our previous observation that blockers of [Ca(2+)](i) reduce cell swelling, our results indicate that trimer 1 may attenuate cell swelling by regulating [Ca(2+)](i). Trimer 1 also significantly attenuated the OGD-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. In addition, cyclosporin A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability pore (mPT), but not FK506 (that does not block the mPT), reduced the OGD-induced decline in glutamate uptake indicating a role of the mPT in such effects. Thus, the effects of trimer 1 in attenuating the

  9. Satellite cells from dystrophic muscle retain regenerative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Luisa; Zammit, Peter S; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder that is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, with a failure of muscle maintenance/repair mediated by satellite cells (muscle stem cells). The function of skeletal muscle stem cells resident in dystrophic muscle may be perturbed by being in an increasing pathogenic environment, coupled with constant demands for repairing muscle. To investigate the contribution of satellite cell exhaustion to this process, we tested the functionality of satellite cells isolated from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that satellite cells derived from young mdx mice contributed efficiently to muscle regeneration within our in vivo mouse model. To then test the effects of long-term residence in a dystrophic environment, satellite cells were isolated from aged mdx muscle. Surprisingly, they were as functional as those derived from young or aged wild type donors. Removing satellite cells from a dystrophic milieu reveals that their regenerative capacity remains both intact and similar to satellite cells derived from healthy muscle, indicating that the host environment is critical for controlling satellite cell function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Cytokines secreted by glial cells infected with HTLV-I modulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitor (TIMPs): possible involvement in neurodegenerative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudon, P; Buart, S; Bernard, A; Belin, M F

    1997-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) known to be fundamental to normal physiological processes, also contribute to several pathologies associated with uncontrolled tissue degradation. Recent observation of MMPs and TIMPs in the central nervous system suggest they could play a role in the neurodegenerative process following viral infection. We have investigated the expression of these molecules in human and rat glial cells infected with retrovirus HTLV-I, the causative agent of HTLV-I associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). We report that cytokines secreted by infected glial cells are responsible for the increased expression of MMP-3, MMP-9 and TIMP-3, while MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 remained stable. The role of dysregulated MMPs/TIMPs in the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM may be related to various functions of these proteases, namely degradation of the blood-brain barrier, myelin constituent cleavage and conversion of inactive TNF-precursor to active form.

  11. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of

  12. [Increase in cell metabolism in normal, diploid human glial cells in stationary cell cultures induced by meclofenoxate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Festl, M; Gräter, B; Bayreuther, K

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative biochemical studies were undertaken in order to examine the influence of the accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes on cell metabolic activities of normal diploid human glia cells in a stationary cell culture system. Glia cells accumulate lipofuscin as a function of the duration of the stationary cultivation in vitro. The accumulation of lipofuscin can be decreased by the long-term treatment with the pharmacon meclofenoxate (centrophenoxine, Helfergin). Concomitant with the reduction of the accumulated lipofuscin, meclofenoxate-treated glia cells show enhanced rates of RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose uptake. Most likely, in meclofenoxate-treated normal diploid human glia cells in vitro, the utilisation of glucose is shifted from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway. The data suggest that the meclofenoxate-induced reduction of lipofuscin accumulation has a positive effect on cell metabolic functions and causes a delay of the cellular aging of the human glia cells in vitro.

  13. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor protein prevents motor neuron loss of transgenic model mice for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Y; Nagano, I; Gazi, M S A; Murakami, T; Shiote, M; Shoji, M; Kitagawa, H; Abe, K

    2003-03-01

    Effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were studied in transgenic (Tg) mice model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. GDNF protein or vehicle was injected three times a week from 35 weeks of age into the right gastrocnemius muscle of Tg mice carrying mutant human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene, and histological analysis was performed at 46 weeks. Clinical data showed a tendency of improvement, but was not significantly different between the two animal groups. In contrast, total number of and phospho-Akt (p-Akt) positive large motor neurons in the treated side was significantly more preserved in GDNF-treated group than in vehicle group (p < 0.05). Immunoreactivity of phospho-ERK and active caspases-3 and -9 showed no difference. These results indicate that the intramuscular injection of GDNF protein prevented motor neuron loss while preserving survival p-Akt signal and without affecting caspase activations, suggesting a future possibility for the therapy of the disease.

  14. Leukoencephalopathy associated with 11q24 deletion involving the gene encoding hepatic and glial cell adhesion molecule in two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Shino; Shimojima, Keiko; Sangu, Noriko; Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Kubota, Masaya

    2015-09-01

    Leukoencephalopathies are heterogeneous entities with white matter abnormalities. Mutations of the gene encoding hepatic and glial cell adhesion molecule (HEPACAM) located on 11q24 are related to one of the leukoencephalopathies: megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts type 2 (MLC2). Genomic copy number aberrations were analyzed by microarray comparative hybridization for two patients. One patient who presented with abnormal intensity of the white matter had been previously been diagnosed with the typical genotype and phenotype of Jacobsen syndrome due to an 11q subtelomere deletion, which was further characterized here. In a second patient who exhibited the characteristic finding of leukoencephalopathy, an interstitial deletion of 11q24 was also identified. HEPACAM was involved in both deletions. We therefore suggest that haploinsufficiency of HEPACAM, a gene previously associated with the features of MLC2 and located on the overlapping deletion region between the two patients, might be related to the observed white matter abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Sympathetic Innervation Induced in Engrafted Engineered Cardiomyocyte Sheets by Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-ming Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of myocardial tissue engineering is to repair or regenerate damaged myocardium with engineered cardiac tissue. However, this strategy has been hampered by lack of functional integration of grafts with native myocardium. Autonomic innervation may be crucial for grafts to function properly with host myocardium. In this study, we explored the feasibility of in vivo induction of autonomic innervation to engineered myocardial tissue using genetic modulation by adenovirus encoding glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. GFP-transgene (control group or GDNF overexpressing (GDNF group engineered cardiomyocyte sheets were transplanted on cryoinjured hearts in rats. Nerve fibers in the grafts were examined by immunohistochemistry at 1, 2, and 4 weeks postoperatively. Growth associated protein-43 positive growing nerves and tyrosine hydroxylase positive sympathetic nerves were first detected in the grafts at 2 weeks postoperatively in control group and 1 week in GDNF group. The densities of growing nerve and sympathetic nerve in grafts were significantly increased in GDNF group. No choline acetyltransferase immunopositive parasympathetic nerves were observed in grafts. In conclusion, sympathetic innervation could be effectively induced into engrafted engineered cardiomyocyte sheets using GDNF.

  16. Enteric glial cells and their role in the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-Bo; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-28

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a physical and functional barrier between the external environment and the host organism. It is formed by a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells maintained together by intercellular junctional complex, limiting access of pathogens, toxins and xenobiotics to host tissues. Once this barrier integrity is disrupted, inflammatory disorders and tissue injury are initiated and perpetuated. Beneath the intestinal epithelial cells lies a population of astrocyte-like cells that are known as enteric glia. The morphological characteristics and expression markers of these enteric glia cells were identical to the astrocytes of the central nervous system. In the past few years, enteric glia have been demonstrated to have a trophic and supporting relationship with intestinal epithelial cells. Enteric glia lesions and/or functional defects can be involved in the barrier dysfunction. Besides, factors secreted by enteric glia are important for the regulation of gut barrier function. Moreover, enteric glia have an important impact on epithelial cell transcriptome and induce a shift in epithelial cell phenotype towards increased cell adhesion and cell differentiation. Enteric glia can also preserve epithelial barrier against intestinal bacteria insult. In this review, we will describe the current body of evidence supporting functional roles of enteric glia on intestinal barrier.

  17. Not Just the Brain: Methamphetamine Disrupts Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier and Induces Acute Glial Activation and Structural Damage of Spinal Cord Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene A Kiyatkin; Sharma, Hari S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier (BBB), acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potent...

  18. The gene coding for glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) maps to chromosome 5p12-p13.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindelhauer, D.; Schuffenhauer, S.; Meitinger, T. [Maximiland-Universitaet, Munich (Germany)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    The gene coding for glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has biological properties that may have potential as a treatment for Parkinson`s and motoneuron diseases. Using the NIGMS Mapping Panel 2, we have localized the GDNF gene to human chromosome 5p12-p13.1. Large NruI and NotI fragments on chromosome 5 will facilitate the construction of a long-range map of the region. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Treadmill running induces satellite cell activation in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-12-01

    Skeletal muscle-derived stem cells, termed as satellite cells, play essential roles in regeneration after muscle injury in adult skeletal muscle. Diabetes mellitus (DM), one of the most common metabolic diseases, causes impairments of satellite cell function. However, the studies of the countermeasures for the DM-induced dysfunction of satellite cells have been poor. Here, we investigated the effects of chronic running exercise on satellite cell activation in diabetic mice focused on the molecular mechanism including Notch and Wnt signaling, which are contribute to the fate determination of satellite cells. Male C57BL/6 mice 4 weeks of age were injected with streptozotocin and were randomly divided into runner group and control group. Runner group mice were performed treadmill running for 4 weeks. DM attenuated satellite cell activation and the expressions of the components of Notch and Wnt signaling. However, chronic running resulted in activation of satellite cells in diabetic mice and salvaged the inactivity of Wnt signaling but not Notch signaling. Our results suggest that chronic running induces satellite cell activation via upregulation of Wnt signaling in diabetic as well as normal mice.

  20. The saucor, a new stereological tool for analysing the spatial distributions of cells, exemplified by human neocortical neurons and glial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette K.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    . Subsequently, smaller counting windows are drawn with random orientation around every primary particle, and the positions of all secondary particles within the windows are recorded. The shape of the counting windows is designed such that a large portion of the volume close to the primary particle is examined......The three dimensional spatial arrangement of particles or cells, for example glial cells, with respect to other particles or cells, for example neurons, can be characterized by the radial number density function, which expresses the number density of so called “secondary” particles as a function...... of their distance to a “primary” particle. The present paper introduces a new stereological method, the saucor, for estimating the radial number density from thick isotropic uniform random (IUR) or vertical uniform random (VUR) sections. In the first estimation step, primary particles are registered in a disector...

  1. The saucor, a new stereological tool for analysing the spatial distributions of cells, exemplified by human neocortical neurons and glial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette K; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2011-01-01

    counting windows are drawn with random orientation around every primary particle, and the positions of all secondary particles within the windows are recorded. The shape of the counting windows is designed such that a large portion of the volume close to the primary particle is examined and a smaller......The 3D spatial arrangement of particles or cells, for example glial cells, with respect to other particles or cells, for example neurons, can be characterized by the radial number density function, which expresses the number density of so-called ‘secondary’ particles as a function of their distance...... to a ‘primary’ particle. The present paper introduces a new stereological method, the saucor, for estimating the radial number density using thick isotropic uniform random or vertical uniform random sections. In the first estimation step, primary particles are registered in a disector. Subsequently, smaller...

  2. Social Behavior in Medulloblastoma: Functional Analysis of Tumor-Supporting Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    tumor-derived astrocytes form a niche that can co- evolve with the expanding tumor mass and provide optimal support for the intrinsic robustness of...1994; Hatten, 1985): Transfer cell suspension to a 15 mL polystyrene conical tube. Underlay cell suspension with 35% Percoll solution (For 10 mL: 4

  3. Transduction efficiency of neurons and glial cells by AAV-1, -5, -9, -rh10 and -hu11 serotypes in rat spinal cord following contusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, H A; Alessi, V; Singh, V; Hunanyan, A S; Levine, J M; Arvanian, V L

    2014-12-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are a promising system for therapeutic gene delivery to neurons in a number of neurodegenerative conditions including spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Considering the role of macrophages and glia in the progression of 'secondary damage', we searched for the optimal vectors for gene transfer to both neurons and glia following contusion SCI in adult rats. Contusion models share many similarities to most human spinal cord traumas. Several AAV serotypes known for their neuronal tropism expressing enhanced green-fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected intraspinally following thoracic T10 contusion. We systematically compared the transduction efficacy and cellular tropism of these vectors for neurons, macrophages/microglia, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and NG2-positive glial cells following contusion SCI. No additional changes in inflammatory responses or behavioral performance were observed for any of the vectors. We identified that AAV-rh10 induced robust transduction of both neuronal and glial cells. Even though efficacy to transduce neurons was comparable to already established AAV-1, AAV-5 and AAV-9, AAV-rh10 transduced significantly higher number of macrophages/microglia and oligodendrocytes in damaged spinal cord compared with other serotypes tested. Thus, AAV-rh10 carries promising potential as a gene therapy vector, particularly if both the neuronal and glial cell populations in damaged spinal cord are targeted.

  4. Enzymic synthesis of 1-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylethanolamine through ethanolaminephosphotransferase activity in the neuronal and glial cells of rabbit in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, R; Binaglia, L; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Porcellati, G

    1975-03-01

    The transfer of radioactivity from cytidine-5'-diphosphate ethanolamine into 1-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphorylethanolamine of neuronal and glial cells from adult rabbit brain cortex has been investigated in vitro. The synthesis of 1-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphorylethanolamine in both cell populations was stimulated 23-25-fold by the addition of 6 mM alkylacylglycerol. The neuronal cell-enriched fraction was found to possess/unit protein a 1.7-1.8-fold ethanolaminephosphotransferase activity (EC 2.7.8.1), as compared to the glial fraction, when saturating concentrations (6 mM) of alkylacylglycerols were added in the incubation system. The neuronal/glial ratio was 2.6-2.8 in the absence of lipid acceptor or with low concentrations of alkylacylglycerol. Under most favorable conditions, 6.4 and 3.3 nmoles 1-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphorylethanolamine/mg protein/30 min was obtained for neurons and glia, respectively. Various kinetic properties of the 1-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphorylethanolamine synthesizing phosphotransferase activity were found to be similar both in neurons and glia.

  5. Mobilisation of satellite cells following ischaemia and reperfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mobilisation of satellite cells following ischaemia and reperfusion in primate skeletal muscle. MA Gregory, M Mars. Abstract. Objective. To describe the morphological and morphometric features of activated skeletal muscle satellite cells in primates, using an ischaemic reperfusion model. Setting. The study was undertaken at ...

  6. Mobilisation of satellite cells following ischaemia and reperfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    muscle to supplement defective satellite cells.6,25,28. This opens the possibility of supplementing satellite cell populations to both augment hypertrophy and to delay muscle ageing. Skeletal muscle blood flow is not homogeneous throughout a contracting muscle. During both dynamic and isometric mus- cle contractions ...

  7. Bone marrow stromal cell sheets may promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery with suppression of glial scar formation after spinal cord transection injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Akinori; Horii-Hayashi, Noriko; Sasagawa, Takayo; Shimizu, Takamasa; Shigematsu, Hideki; Iwata, Eiichiro; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Koizumi, Munehisa; Akahane, Manabu; Nishi, Mayumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) is a theoretical potential as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although a scaffold is sometimes used for retaining transplanted cells in damaged tissue, it is also known to induce redundant immunoreactions during the degradation processes. In this study, the authors prepared cell sheets made of BMSCs, which are transplantable without a scaffold, and investigated their effects on axonal regeneration, glial scar formation, and functional recovery in a completely transected SCI model in rats. METHODS BMSC sheets were prepared from the bone marrow of female Fischer 344 rats using ascorbic acid and were cryopreserved until the day of transplantation. A gelatin sponge (GS), as a control, or BMSC sheet was transplanted into a 2-mm-sized defect of the spinal cord at the T-8 level. Axonal regeneration and glial scar formation were assessed 2 and 8 weeks after transplantation by immunohistochemical analyses using anti-Tuj1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibodies, respectively. Locomotor function was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale. RESULTS The BMSC sheets promoted axonal regeneration at 2 weeks after transplantation, but there was no significant difference in the number of Tuj1-positive axons between the sheet- and GS-transplanted groups. At 8 weeks after transplantation, Tuj1-positive axons elongated across the sheet, and their numbers were significantly greater in the sheet group than in the GS group. The areas of GFAP-positive glial scars in the sheet group were significantly reduced compared with those of the GS group at both time points. Finally, hindlimb locomotor function was ameliorated in the sheet group at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS The results of the present study indicate that an ascorbic acid-induced BMSC sheet is effective in the treatment of SCI and enables autologous transplantation without requiring a

  8. Neuronal-glial plasticity in gonadotropin-releasing hormone release in adult female rats: role of the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Jyoti; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2005-08-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory system undergoes marked structural and functional changes during the ovarian cycle. The aim of this study was to examine the neuroanatomical relationship between GnRH neurons and a polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), a known marker of neuronal plasticity. Using immunohistofluorescent dual labeling, we determined that axon terminals of GnRH in the median arcuate nucleus (ME-ARC) region of the hypothalamus in the proestrous phase of the estrous cycle were intimately associated with PSA-NCAM. To further examine whether PSA-NCAM expression associated with GnRH neuron terminals varies in conjugation with cyclic changes in ovarian steroid hormone levels, we examined GnRH and PSA-NCAM dual expression in ovariectomized (OVX) and estrogen-progesterone-primed OVX (EBP-OVX) rats. The expression of PSA-NCAM immunoreactivity associated with the GnRH neurons in the proestrous phase and EBP-OVX rats was significantly higher than during the diestrous phase and in OVX rats where GnRH secretion declines. We further examined whether the structural changes in GnRH axon terminals in the ME-ARC region are also associated with glial plasticity. By extension and retraction of the glial processes, the GnRH neuron terminals in the ME-ARC region could undergo dynamic plastic changes that control GnRH release during the proestrous phase. PSA-NCAM expression was also seen on glial cells in the ME-ARC region. The close association between PSA-NCAM on GnRH and glial cells in the ME-ARC region of the hypothalamus in the rat showed dynamic structural changes in GnRH neuron terminals during the estrous cycle. These observations suggested that PSA-NCAM may act as a molecular substrate to promote neuroplastic changes in the GnRH neurosecretory system.

  9. The Effect of Glucocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptor Interactions on Brain, Spinal Cord, and Glial Cell Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Madalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress, injury, and disease trigger glucocorticoid (GC elevation. Elevated GCs bind to the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR. While GRs are in every cell in the nervous system, the expression level varies, suggesting that diverse cell types react differently to GR activation. Stress/GCs induce structural plasticity in neurons, Schwann cells, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes as well as affect neurotransmission by changing the release and reuptake of glutamate. While general nervous system plasticity is essential for adaptation and learning and memory, stress-induced plasticity is often maladaptive and contributes to neuropsychiatric disorders and neuropathic pain. In this brief review, we describe the evidence that stress/GCs activate GR to promote cell type-specific changes in cellular plasticity throughout the nervous system.

  10. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanrieder, Jørg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination...

  11. Amplification and propagation of interleukin-1β signaling by murine brain endothelial and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Stephanie M; Knoll, J Gabriel; Verghese, Santhosh Chakkaramakkil; Levasseur, Peter R; Marks, Daniel L

    2017-07-01

    During acute infections and chronic illnesses, the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) acts within the brain to elicit metabolic derangements and sickness behaviors. It is unknown which cells in the brain are the proximal targets for IL-1β with respect to the generation of these illness responses. We performed a series of in vitro experiments to (1) investigate which brain cell populations exhibit inflammatory responses to IL-1β and (2) examine the interactions between different IL-1β-responsive cell types in various co-culture combinations. We treated primary cultures of murine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMEC), astrocytes, and microglia with PBS or IL-1β, and then performed qPCR to measure inflammatory gene expression or immunocytochemistry to evaluate nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation. To evaluate whether astrocytes and/or BMEC propagate inflammatory signals to microglia, we exposed microglia to astrocyte-conditioned media and co-cultured endothelial cells and glia in transwells. Treatment groups were compared by Student's t tests or by ANOVA followed by Bonferroni-corrected t tests. IL-1β increased inflammatory gene expression and NF-κB activation in primary murine-mixed glia, enriched astrocyte, and BMEC cultures. Although IL-1β elicited minimal changes in inflammatory gene expression and did not induce the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in isolated microglia, these cells were more robustly activated by IL-1β when co-cultured with astrocytes and/or BMEC. We observed a polarized endothelial response to IL-1β, because the application of IL-1β to the abluminal endothelial surface produced a more complex microglial inflammatory response than that which occurred following luminal IL-1β exposure. Inflammatory signals are detected, amplified, and propagated through the CNS via a sequential and reverberating signaling cascade involving communication between brain endothelial cells and

  12. Satellite cell proliferation in adult skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W. (Inventor); Thomason, Donald B. (Inventor); Morrison, Paul R. (Inventor); Stancel, George M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Novel methods of retroviral-mediated gene transfer for the in vivo corporation and stable expression of eukaryotic or prokaryotic foreign genes in tissues of living animals is described. More specifically, methods of incorporating foreign genes into mitotically active cells are disclosed. The constitutive and stable expression of E. coli .beta.-galactosidase gene under the promoter control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat is employed as a particularly preferred embodiment, by way of example, establishes the model upon which the incorporation of a foreign gene into a mitotically-active living eukaryotic tissue is based. Use of the described methods in therapeutic treatments for genetic diseases, such as those muscular degenerative diseases, is also presented. In muscle tissue, the described processes result in genetically-altered satellite cells which proliferate daughter myoblasts which preferentially fuse to form a single undamaged muscle fiber replacing damaged muscle tissue in a treated animal. The retroviral vector, by way of example, includes a dystrophin gene construct for use in treating muscular dystrophy. The present invention also comprises an experimental model utilizable in the study of the physiological regulation of skeletal muscle gene expression in intact animals.

  13. Sexual dimorphism in the human olfactory bulb: females have more neurons and glial cells than males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V Oliveira-Pinto

    Full Text Available Sex differences in the human olfactory function reportedly exist for olfactory sensitivity, odorant identification and memory, and tasks in which odors are rated based on psychological features such as familiarity, intensity, pleasantness, and others. Which might be the neural bases for these behavioral differences? The number of cells in olfactory regions, and especially the number of neurons, may represent a more accurate indicator of the neural machinery than volume or weight, but besides gross volume measures of the human olfactory bulb, no systematic study of sex differences in the absolute number of cells has yet been undertaken. In this work, we investigate a possible sexual dimorphism in the olfactory bulb, by quantifying postmortem material from 7 men and 11 women (ages 55-94 years with the isotropic fractionator, an unbiased and accurate method to estimate absolute cell numbers in brain regions. Female bulbs weighed 0.132 g in average, while male bulbs weighed 0.137 g, a non-significant difference; however, the total number of cells was 16.2 million in females, and 9.2 million in males, a significant difference of 43.2%. The number of neurons in females reached 6.9 million, being no more than 3.5 million in males, a difference of 49.3%. The number of non-neuronal cells also proved higher in women than in men: 9.3 million and 5.7 million, respectively, a significant difference of 38.7%. The same differences remained when corrected for mass. Results demonstrate a sex-related difference in the absolute number of total, neuronal and non-neuronal cells, favoring women by 40-50%. It is conceivable that these differences in quantitative cellularity may have functional impact, albeit difficult to infer how exactly this would be, without knowing the specific circuits cells make. However, the reported advantage of women as compared to men may stimulate future work on sex dimorphism of synaptic microcircuitry in the olfactory bulb.

  14. Midazolam suppresses interleukin-1β-induced interleukin-6 release from rat glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Hiroki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR expression levels are low in normal human brain, but their levels increase in inflammation, brain injury, neurodegenerative states and gliomas. It has been reported that PBR functions as an immunomodulator. The mechanisms of action of midazolam, a benzodiazepine, in the immune system in the CNS remain to be fully elucidated. We previously reported that interleukin (IL-1β stimulates IL-6 synthesis from rat C6 glioma cells and that IL-1β induces phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκB, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase, stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3. It has been shown that p38 MAP kinase is involved in IL-1β-induced IL-6 release from these cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of midazolam on IL-1β-induced IL-6 release from C6 cells, and the mechanisms of this effect. Methods Cultured C6 cells were stimulated by IL-1β. IL-6 release from C6 cells was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and phosphorylation of IκB, the MAP kinase superfamily, and STAT3 was analyzed by Western blotting. Results Midazolam, but not propofol, inhibited IL-1β-stimulated IL-6 release from C6 cells. The IL-1β-stimulated levels of IL-6 were suppressed by wedelolactone (an inhibitor of IκB kinase, SP600125 (an inhibitor of SAPK/JNK, and JAK inhibitor I (an inhibitor of JAK 1, 2 and 3. However, IL-6 levels were not affected by PD98059 (an inhibitor of MEK1/2. Midazolam markedly suppressed IL-1β-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation without affecting the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, SAPK/JNK or IκB. Conclusion These results strongly suggest that midazolam inhibits IL-1β-induced IL-6 release in rat C6 glioma cells via suppression of STAT3 activation. Midazolam may affect immune system function in the CNS.

  15. Effects of that ATRA inhibits Nrf2-ARE pathway on glial cells activation after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Dan; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Bao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway plays a neruo-protective role in glia cell, however, the mechanism was also elusive. This study aims to explore the inhibitive function of all-trans-retinoic (ATRA) on Nrf2-ARE pathway in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and investigate the mechanism. In this study, the femoral artery injection method was employed to establish ICH model. The model rats were randomly divided into four groups, including Sham group, ICH group, ATRA group and DMSO group. The neurological scores were evaluated for the four groups at different time points. Hematoxylin-Eosin staining was used to stain the CD11b positive glia cells. Double immunofluorescence staining method was utilized to observe the co-expression of HO-1, NF-κB, Nrf2 and TNF-α and CD11b marker in glia cells. Western blot assay was used to detect the Nrf2 protein (total and binding Nrf2), HO-1, NF-κB and TNF-α proteins in every group. The results indicated that neurologiclal scores were significantly decreased in ATRA group compared to ICH gorup (P ATRA significantly decreased co-expression of Nrf2, HO-1 and CD11b, and increased co-expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and CD11b of glia cells. ATRA significantly decreased total Nrf2 expression and increased binding Nrf2 expression in ATRA group compared to ICH group (P ATRA decreased anti-oxygen protein Nrf2 and HO-1, and increases inflammatory factors NF-κB and TNF-α. In conclusion, the application of ATRA could inhibit the neuro-protective function effectively by blocking the Nrf2-ARE pathway in glia cells.

  16. The niche-derived glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF induces migration of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dovere

    Full Text Available In mammals, the biological activity of the stem/progenitor compartment sustains production of mature gametes through spermatogenesis. Spermatogonial stem cells and their progeny belong to the class of undifferentiated spermatogonia, a germ cell population found on the basal membrane of the seminiferous tubules. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a Sertoli-derived factor, is essential for in vivo and in vitro stem cell self-renewal. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are not completely understood. In this study, we show that GDNF induces dose-dependent directional migration of freshly selected undifferentiated spermatogonia, as well as germline stem cells in culture, using a Boyden chamber assay. GDNF-induced migration is dependent on the expression of the GDNF co-receptor GFRA1, as shown by migration assays performed on parental and GFRA1-transduced GC-1 spermatogonial cell lines. We found that the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP is specifically expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. VASP belongs to the ENA/VASP family of proteins implicated in actin-dependent processes, such as fibroblast migration, axon guidance, and cell adhesion. In intact seminiferous tubules and germline stem cell cultures, GDNF treatment up-regulates VASP in a dose-dependent fashion. These data identify a novel role for the niche-derived factor GDNF, and they suggest that GDNF may impinge on the stem/progenitor compartment, affecting the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration.

  17. Preservation of biological activity of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) after microencapsulation and sterilization by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa-Casalengua, P; Jiang, C; Bravo-Osuna, I; Tucker, B A; Molina-Martínez, I T; Young, M J; Herrero-Vanrell, R

    2012-10-15

    A main issue in controlled delivery of biotechnological products from injectable biodegradable microspheres is to preserve their integrity and functional activity after the microencapsulation process and final sterilization. The present experimental work tested different technological approaches to maintain the biological activity of an encapsulated biotechnological product within PLGA [poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microspheres (MS) after their sterilization by gamma irradiation. GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), useful in the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases, was chosen as a labile model protein. In the particular case of optic nerve degeneration, GDNF has been demonstrated to improve the damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) survival. GDNF was encapsulated in its molecular state by the water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) technique or as solid according to the solid-in-oil-in-water (S/O/W) method. Based on the S/O/W technique, GDNF was included in the PLGA microspheres alone (S/O/W 1) or in combination with an antioxidant (vitamin E, Vit E) (S/O/W 2). Microspheres were sterilized by gamma-irradiation (dose of 25 kGy) at room and low (-78 °C) temperatures. Functional activity of GDNF released from the different microspheres was evaluated both before and after sterilization in their potential target cells (retinal cells). Although none of the systems proposed achieved with the goal of totally retain the structural stability of the GDNF-dimer, the protein released from the S/O/W 2 microspheres was clearly the most biologically active, showing significantly less retinal cell death than that released from either W/O/W or S/O/W 1 particles, even in low amounts of the neurotrophic factor. According to the results presented in this work, the biological activity of biotechnological products after microencapsulation and sterilization can be further preserved by the inclusion of the active molecule in its solid state in combination with

  18. The Evolving Landscape of Neurotoxicity by Unconjugated Bilirubin: Role of Glial Cells and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora eBrites

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a common condition in the first week of postnatal life. Although generally harmless, some neonates may develop very high levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB, which may surpass the protective mechanisms of the brain at preventing UCB accumulation. In this case, both short-term and long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as acute and chronic UCB encephalopathy, known as kernicterus, or more subtle alterations designed as bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND may be produced. There is a tremendous variability in babies’ vulnerability towards UCB for reasons not yet explained, but preterm birth, sepsis, hypoxia and haemolytic disease are comprised as risk factors. Therefore, UCB levels and neurological abnormalities are not strictly correlated. Even nowadays, the mechanisms of UCB neurotoxicity are still unclear, as are specific biomarkers, and little is known about lasting sequelae attributable to hyperbilirubinemia. On autopsy, UCB was shown to be within neurons, neuronal processes and microglia, and to produce loss of neurons, demyelination and gliosis. In isolated cell cultures, UCB was shown to impair neuronal arborization and to induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines from microglia and astrocytes. However, cell dependent-sensitivity to UCB toxicity and the role of each nerve cell type remain understood. This review provides a comprehensive insight into cell susceptibilities and molecular targets of UCB in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, and on phenotypic and functional responses of microglia to UCB. Interplay among glia elements and cross-talk with neurons, with a special emphasis in the UCB-induced immunostimulation, and the role of sepsis in BIND pathogenesis are highlighted. New and interesting data on the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of different pharmacological agents are also presented, as novel and promising additional therapeutic approaches to

  19. Nonyloxytryptamine Mimics Polysialic Acid and Modulates Neuronal and Glial Functions in Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cellswere prepared from 7-day-old C57BL/6J or NCAM-deficient mice (Loers et al. 2005; Mehanna et al. 2009); motoneurons were prepared from...adhesion molecule (NCAM) independent manner, but it stimulates neurite outgrowth of motoneurons and process formation of Schwann cells in an NCAM...dependent manner. Neurite outgrowth of wild-type (black bars, left) and NCAM-deficient (gray bars, right) hippocampal neurons (a), motoneurons (b) or

  20. A global downregulation of microRNAs occurs in human quiescent satellite cells during myogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Merel; Werker, Paul M N; van Luyn, Marja J A; Krenning, Guido; Harmsen, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    During myogenesis, human satellite cells differentiate and form multinucleated myotubes, while a fraction of the human satellite cells enter quiescence. These quiescent satellite cells are able to activate, proliferate and contribute to muscle regeneration. Post-transcriptional regulation of

  1. Healthy human CSF promotes glial differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells while retaining spontaneous activity in existing neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Kiiski

    2013-05-01

    The possibilities of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells from the basic research tool to a treatment option in regenerative medicine have been well recognized. These cells also offer an interesting tool for in vitro models of neuronal networks to be used for drug screening and neurotoxicological studies and for patient/disease specific in vitro models. Here, as aiming to develop a reductionistic in vitro human neuronal network model, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived neural cells could be cultured in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in order to better mimic the in vivo conditions. Our results showed that CSF altered the differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells towards glial cells at the expense of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation rate was reduced in CSF cultures. However, even though the use of CSF as the culture medium altered the glial vs. neuronal differentiation rate, the pre-existing spontaneous activity of the neuronal networks persisted throughout the study. These results suggest that it is possible to develop fully human cell and culture-based environments that can further be modified for various in vitro modeling purposes.

  2. Involvement of trigeminal ganglionic Nav 1.7 in hyperalgesia of inflamed temporomandibular joint is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of glial cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, R-Y; Kou, X-X; Meng, Z; Wang, X-D; Ding, Y; Gan, Y-H

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is a major cause of temporomandibular disorder-related pain. The Nav 1.7 sodium channel has a critical function in pain perceptions. However, whether and how Nav 1.7 in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammatory pain remains to be examined. TMJ inflammation was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in female rats. The expression of trigeminal ganglionic Nav 1.7 and other sodium channels was examined using real-time polymerase chain reaction or Western blotting. Immunohistofluorescence with fluorescent retrograde neuronal tracer DiI was used to confirm Nav 1.7 in the trigeminal neurons innervating TMJ. The functions of trigeminal ganglionic Nav 1.7 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation were blocked with the microinjection of the Nav 1.7 antibody or U0126 into the trigeminal ganglion. Head withdrawal threshold and food intake was measured to evaluate TMJ nociceptive responses. TMJ inflammation significantly up-regulated Nav 1.7 mRNA and protein; however, the mRNA of Nav 1.3 was not affected and those of Nav 1.8 and Nav 1.9 were only slightly up-regulated. TMJ inflammation specifically induced Nav 1.7 in the neurons innervating TMJ. In addition, blocking the Nav 1.7 function significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia of the inflamed TMJ. Moreover, TMJ inflammation up-regulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation only in the glials; blocking ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the glials blocked Nav 1.7 up-regulation in the neurons and correspondingly attenuated the hyperalgesia of the inflamed TMJ. Trigeminal ganglionic Nav 1.7 has an important function in the hyperalgesia of the inflamed TMJ, which is dependent on the communication with the satellite glials. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  3. Role of ventral tegmental area glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in incubation of cocaine craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Wang, Xi; Wu, Ping; Xu, Chunmei; Zhao, Mei; Morales, Marisela; Harvey, Brandon K; Hoffer, Barry J; Shaham, Yavin

    2009-07-15

    Ventral tegmental area (VTA) brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to time-dependent increases in cue-induced cocaine seeking after withdrawal (incubation of cocaine craving). Here, we studied the role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in incubation of cocaine craving because, like BDNF, GDNF provides trophic support to midbrain dopamine neurons. We first trained rats to self-administer intravenous cocaine for 10 days (6 hours/d, cocaine injections were paired with a tone-light cue). We then manipulated VTA GDNF function and assessed cue-induced cocaine seeking in extinction tests after withdrawal from cocaine. VTA injections of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing rat GDNF cDNA (5 x 10(8) viral genomes) on withdrawal Day 1 increased cue-induced cocaine seeking on withdrawal days 11 and 31; this effect was not observed after VTA injections of an AAV viral vector containing red fluorescent protein (RFP). Additionally, VTA, but not substantial nigra (SN), GDNF injections (1.25 microg or 12.5 microg/side) immediately after the last cocaine self-administration session increased cue-induced drug seeking on withdrawal days 3 and 10; this effect was reversed by VTA injections of U0126, which inhibits the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Finally, interfering with VTA GDNF function by chronic delivery of anti-GDNF monoclonal neutralizing antibodies via minipumps (600 ng/side/d) during withdrawal Days 1-14 prevented the time-dependent increases in cue-induced cocaine seeking on withdrawal days 11 and 31. Our results indicate that during the first weeks of withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, GDNF-dependent neuroadaptations in midbrain VTA neurons play an important role in the development of incubation of cocaine craving.

  4. Expression of aromatase in radial glial cells in the brain of the Japanese eel provides insight into the evolution of the cyp191a gene in Actinopterygians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ru Jeng

    Full Text Available The cyp19a1 gene that encodes aromatase, the only enzyme permitting conversion of C19 aromatizable androgens into estrogens, is present as a single copy in the genome of most vertebrate species, except in teleosts in which it has been duplicated. This study aimed at investigating the brain expression of a cyp19a1 gene expressed in both gonad and brain of Japanese eel, a basal teleost. By means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we show that cyp19a1 is expressed only in radial glial cells of the brain and in pituitary cells. Treatments with salmon pituitary homogenates (female or human chorionic gonadotrophin (male, known to turn on steroid production in immature eels, strongly stimulated cyp19a1 messenger and protein expression in radial glial cells and pituitary cells. Using double staining studies, we also showed that aromatase-expressing radial glial cells exhibit proliferative activity in both the brain and the pituitary. Altogether, these data indicate that brain and pituitary expression of Japanese eel cyp19a1 exhibits characteristics similar to those reported for the brain specific cyp19a1b gene in teleosts having duplicated cyp19a1 genes. This supports the hypothesis that, despite the fact that eels also underwent the teleost specific genome duplication, they have a single cyp19a1 expressed in both brain and gonad. Such data also suggest that the intriguing features of brain aromatase expression in teleost fishes were not gained after the whole genome duplication and may reflect properties of the cyp19a1 gene of ancestral Actinopterygians.

  5. Role of T cellglial cell interactions in creating and amplifying Central Nervous System inflammation and Multiple Sclerosis disease symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Huseby

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an inflammatory disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS that causes the demyelination of nerve cells and destroys oligodendrocytes, neurons and axons. Historically, MS has been thought of as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of CNS white matter. However, recent studies have identified gray matter lesions in MS patients, suggesting that CNS antigens other than myelin proteins may be involved during the MS disease process. We have recently found that T cells targeting astrocyte-specific antigens can drive unique aspects of inflammatory CNS autoimmunity, including the targeting of gray matter and white matter of the brain and inducing heterogeneous clinical disease courses. In addition to being a target of T cells, astrocytes play a critical role in propagating the inflammatory response within the CNS through cytokine induced NF-ΚB signaling. Here, we will discuss the pathophysiology of CNS inflammation mediated by T cellglial cell interactions and its contributions to CNS autoimmunity.

  6. In vitro non-viral lipofectamine delivery of the gene for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor to human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guolong; Borlongan, Cesar V; Ou, Yali; Stahl, Christine E; Yu, SeongJin; Bae, EungKyung; Kaneko, Yuji; Yang, Tianlun; Yuan, Chunjun; Fang, Li

    2010-04-14

    Using a lipofection technique, we explored a non-viral delivery of plasmid DNA encoding a rat pGDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) to CD34+ cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) cells in order to obtain cells stably expressing the GDNF gene. The target gene GDNF was amplified from cortex cells of newborn Sprague-Dawley rats by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and inserted into vector pEGFP-N1 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP/GDNF. The positive clones were identified by sequencing and endonuclease digestion. The expression of pEGFP/GDNF-transfected HUCB cells CD34+ was examined by ELISA. Single fragment of 640 bp was obtained after the rat GDNF cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR. Two fragments of about 4.3 kb and 640 pb were obtained after digestion of recombinant plasmid pEGFP/GDNF with XhoI/KpnI. The nucleic acid fragment of 640 bp was confirmed to agree well with the sequence of GDNF gene published by GenBank. The expression of GDNF mRNA and the level of GDNF from pEGFP/GDNF-transfected CD34+ cells were increased substantially, compared with pEGFP control plasmid transfected CD34+ cells (P<0.05). Moreover, co-culture of primary rat cells with the pEGFP/GDNF-transfected CD34+ cells promoted enhanced neuroprotection against oxygen-glucose deprivation induced cell dysfunctions. The present results support the use of the non-viral plasmid liposome for therapeutic gene expression for stem cell therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) interactions in induction of neurite outgrowth and identification of a binding site for NCAM in the heel region of GDNF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Li, Shizhong

    2009-01-01

    The formation of appropriate neuronal circuits is an essential part of nervous system development and relies heavily on the outgrowth of axons and dendrites and their guidance to their respective targets. This process is governed by a large array of molecules, including glial cell line-derived ne...

  8. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoti Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2–4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50–70 fiber-associated, or 1,000–5,000 FACS-enriched CD56+/CD29+ human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  9. Hyperglycemia and high nitric oxide level induced oxidative stress in the brain and molecular alteration in the neurons and glial cells of laboratory mouse, Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Rashmi; Yadawa, Arun Kumar; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2017-03-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia (glucotoxicity) is reported to have detrimental effects on various brain functions leading to neurodegenerative changes. However, the effect of hyperglycemia in combination with high nitric oxide (NO) level (reported to be increased during glucotoxicity), on brain functions is not clear yet. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hyperglycemic drug Streptozotocin (STZ) and NO donor Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the brain of laboratory mouse, Mus musculus. Effects of these conditions were studied on the markers of oxidative stress, NF-κB signalling and the markers of neuronal and glial cell activation/inflammation. Results indicate increased level of MDA and altered antioxidant enzymes activity in both the treated groups compared to control but high levels of AGEs, AOPP and AR activity (markers of diabetic complications) were observed in STZ group only. On the other hand, while STZ group showed decreased IL-6 level, it was increased in SNP group but IFN-ϒ level increased in both the treated groups compared to control. Further, in addition to alterations in the expressions of iNOS, IKKβ, IKBα and NF-κB subunits (RelA-p65/RelB-p50) observed in the neurons and glial cells of different brain regions (hypothalamus, basolateral amygdala and cerebral cortex), enhanced expression of microglial CD11b and astrocytic GFAP was also found in both the treated groups compared to control. Present findings led us to conclude that both hyperglycemia and high NO level causes oxidative stress in addition to molecular alteration in the neurons and glial cells. It is suggested that high blood glucose and NO level induced oxidative stress may lead to neuroinflammation possibly via NF-κB signalling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Activated microglia induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to produce glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor and protect neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingke Lv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated interactions among microglia (MG, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and neurons in cerebral ischemia and the potential mechanisms using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD model. Rat BMSCs were incubated with conditioned medium (CM from in vitro cultures of OGD-activated rat MG and murine BV2 MG cells. Effects of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF on rat neuron viability, apoptosis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH leakage and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP were analyzed in this model. OGD-activated MG promoted GDNF production by BMSCs (P < 0.01. TNFα, but not IL6 or IL1β, promoted GDNF production by BMSCs (P < 0.001. GDNF or CM pre-treated BMSCs elevated neuronal viability and suppressed apoptosis (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01; these effects were inhibited by the RET antibody. GDNF activated MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling but not JNK/c-JUN. Furthermore, GDNF upregulated B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2 and heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSP60 levels, suppressed LDH leakage, and promoted MMP. Thus, activated MG produce TNFα to stimulate GDNF production by BMSCs, which prevents and repairs OGD-induced neuronal injury, possibly via regulating MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling. These findings will facilitate the prevention and treatment of neuronal injury by cerebral ischemia.

  11. The Actin Cytoskeleton Is Involved in Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF-Induced Ret Translocation into Lipid Rafts in Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a potential therapeutic factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD, exerts its biological effects through the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase. The redistribution of Ret into lipid rafts substantially influences Ret signaling, but the mechanisms underlying Ret translocation remain unclear. The purpose of our study was to further explore the signaling mechanisms of GDNF and to determine whether the actin cytoskeleton is involved in the GDNF-induced Ret translocation into lipid rafts. In MN9D dopaminergic neuronal cells, we used density gradient centrifugation and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to separate and visualize lipid rafts, co-immunoprecipitation to analyze protein-protein interactions, and latrunculin B (Lat B and jasplakinolide (Jas to disrupt and enhance the polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton, respectively. The results showed that Ret translocated into lipid rafts and coimmunoprecipitated with actin in response to GDNF treatment. After Lat B or Jas treatment, the Ret–F-actin association induced by GDNF was impaired or enhanced respectively and then the levels of Ret translocated into lipid rafts were correspondingly inhibited or promoted. These data indicate that actin polymerization and cytoskeletal remodeling are integral to GDNF-induced cell signaling in dopaminergic cells and define a new role of the actin cytoskeleton in promoting Ret redistribution into lipid rafts.

  12. Efficient Transduction of Feline Neural Progenitor Cells for Delivery of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Using a Feline Immunodeficiency Virus-Based Lentiviral Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Joann You

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Work has shown that stem cell transplantation can rescue or replace neurons in models of retinal degenerative disease. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs modified to overexpress neurotrophic factors are one means of providing sustained delivery of therapeutic gene products in vivo. To develop a nonrodent animal model of this therapeutic strategy, we previously derived NPCs from the fetal cat brain (cNPCs. Here we use bicistronic feline lentiviral vectors to transduce cNPCs with glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF together with a GFP reporter gene. Transduction efficacy is assessed, together with transgene expression level and stability during induction of cellular differentiation, together with the influence of GDNF transduction on growth and gene expression profile. We show that GDNF overexpressing cNPCs expand in vitro, coexpress GFP, and secrete high levels of GDNF protein—before and after differentiation—all qualities advantageous for use as a cell-based approach in feline models of neural degenerative disease.

  13. S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruisong; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Zhihong; Wu, Kun

    2011-01-01

    Human milk contains a wide variety of nutrients that contribute to the fulfillment of its functions, which include the regulation of newborn development. However, few studies have investigated the concentrations of S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in human milk. The associations of the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF with maternal factors are not well explored. To investigate the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF in human milk and characterize the maternal factors associated with their levels in human milk, human milk samples were collected at days 3, 10, 30, and 90 after parturition. Levels of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF, and their mRNAs in the samples were detected. Then, these concentrations were compared with lactation and other maternal factors. S100B protein levels in human milk samples collected at 3, 10, 30, and 90 d after parturition were 1249.79±398.10, 1345.05±539.16, 1481.83±573.30, and 1414.39±621.31 ng/L, respectively. On the other hand, the BDNF concentrations in human milk samples were 10.99±4.55, 13.01±5.88, 13.35±6.43, and 2.83±5.47 µg/L, while those of GDNF were 10.90±1.65, 11.38±1., 11.29±3.10, and 11.40±2.21 g/L for the same time periods. Maternal post-pregnancy body mass index was positively associated with S100B levels in human milk (r = 0.335, P = 0.030milk. S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF are present in all samples of human milk, and they may be responsible for the long term effects of breast feeding.

  14. Ethanol intake-induced apoptosis in glial cells and axonal disorders in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats (voluntary ethanol consumers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Marcelo; Sauce, Rafael; Oliveira, Suelen Alves; de Almeida Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo; Stefanini, Maíra Aparecida; Lizarte Neto, Fermino Sanches; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Tirapelli, Luiz Fernando; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol intake may cause alterations in cellular metabolism altering motricity, learning and cognition. The cerebellum is one of the most susceptible organs to ethanol-related disorders during development, and is associated with oxidative stress-induced apoptosis being crucial for pathogenic consequences. The UChA variety is a special strain of Wistar rat genetically selected and represents a rare model for the studies related to genetic, biochemical, physiological, nutritional, and pharmacological effects of ethanol. We evaluated the structure and apoptosis in the cerebellar white matter of UChA rats. There were two groups of 09 rats: a control group that did not consume ethanol, and an experimental group of UChA rats that consumed ethanol at 10% (v/v) (group showed more glial cells immunoreactive for caspase-3 and less for XIAP than control group. Alcohol consumption affected myelin integrity. Severe ultrastructural damages in UChA group were observed such as disruption of the myelin sheath, disorganization and deformation of its components, and an increase in the interaxonal spaces. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that ethanol induced apoptosis in the glial cells and promoted an intense change in the myelin sheath of UChA rats, which may cause functional disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Solar power satellites - Heat engine or solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, H.; Gregory, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A solar power satellite is the energy-converting element of a system that can deliver some 10 GW of power to utilities on the earth's surface. We evaluated heat engines and solar cells for converting sunshine to electric power at the satellite. A potassium Rankine cycle was the best of the heat engines, and 50 microns thick single-crystal silicon cells were the best of the photovoltaic converters. Neither solar cells nor heat engines had a clear advantage when all factors were considered. The potassium-turbine power plant, however, was more difficult to assemble and required a more expensive orbital assembly base. We therefore based our cost analyses on solar-cell energy conversion, concluding that satellite-generated power could be delivered to utilities for around 4 to 5 cents a kWh.

  16. Role of Neuron-Glial Interaction Mediated by IL-1β in Ectopic Tooth Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, H; Shimizu, K; Noma, N; Tsuboi, Y; Honda, K; Kanno, K; Ohara, K; Shinoda, M; Ogiso, B; Iwata, K

    2017-11-01

    Although many reports have demonstrated that ectopic pain develops in the orofacial region following tooth pulp inflammation, which often causes misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment for patients with pulpitis, the precise mechanism remains unknown. In the present study, we hypothesized that the functional interaction between satellite glial cells and neurons mediated by interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) is involved in ectopic orofacial pain associated with tooth pulp inflammation. The digastric muscle electromyogram (D-EMG) activity elicited by capsaicin administration into the maxillary second molar tooth pulp was analyzed to evaluate the noxious reflex and was significantly increased in rats with inflammation of the maxillary first molar (M1) versus rats injected with saline. A significant increase in the expression of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction containing protein, was observed in activated satellite glial cells surrounding second molar-innervating neurons in the TG after M1 pulpitis. Daily administration of Gap26, a Cx43 mimetic peptide and inhibitor, in the TG significantly suppressed the enhancement of capsaicin-induced D-EMG activity and the percentage of Fluoro-Gold (FG)-labeled cells encircled by glial fibrillary acid protein-immunoreactive (IR) + Cx43-IR cells after M1 pulp inflammation ( P < 0.01). The percentage of FG-labeled cells encircled by glial fibrillary acid protein-IR + IL-1β-IR cells, IL-1 type I receptor-IR cells labeled with FG, and TRPV1-IR cells labeled with FG significantly increased after M1 pulp inflammation ( P < 0.01). Daily administration of IL-1ra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, into the TG significantly reduced the enhancement of capsaicin-induced D-EMG activity and the percentage of TRPV1-IR neurons labeled with FG after M1 pulp inflammation ( P < 0.01). The present findings suggest that satellite glial cell is activated in the TG via activated gap junctions composed of Cx43 following tooth pulp

  17. A Positive Feedback Loop between Glial Cells Missing 1 and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Regulates Placental hCGβ Expression and Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Mei-Leng; Wang, Liang-Jie; Chuang, Pei-Yun; Chang, Ching-Wen; Lee, Yun-Shien; Lo, Hsiao-Fan; Tsai, Ming-Song

    2015-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is composed of a common α subunit and a placenta-specific β subunit. Importantly, hCG is highly expressed in the differentiated and multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast, which is formed via trophoblast cell fusion and stimulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP). Although the ubiquitous activating protein 2 (AP2) transcription factors TFAP2A and TFAP2C may regulate hCGβ expression, it remains unclear how cAMP stimulates placenta-specific hCGβ gene expression and trophoblastic differentiation. Here we demonstrated that the placental transcription factor glial cells missing 1 (GCM1) binds to a highly conserved promoter region in all six hCGβ paralogues by chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip (ChIP-chip) analyses. We further showed that cAMP stimulates GCM1 and the CBP coactivator to activate the hCGβ promoter through a GCM1-binding site (GBS1), which also constitutes a previously identified AP2 site. Given that TFAP2C may compete with GCM1 for GBS1, cAMP enhances the association between the hCGβ promoter and GCM1 but not TFAP2C. Indeed, the hCG-cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway also stimulates Ser269 and Ser275 phosphorylation of GCM1, which recruits CBP to mediate GCM1 acetylation and stabilization. Consequently, hCG stimulates the expression of GCM1 target genes, including the fusogenic protein syncytin-1, to promote placental cell fusion. Our study reveals a positive feedback loop between GCM1 and hCG regulating placental hCGβ expression and cell differentiation. PMID:26503785

  18. Transformation of jaw muscle satellite cells to cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughters, Randall S; Keirstead, Susan A; Slack, Jonathan M W

    In the embryo a population of progenitor cells known as the second heart field forms not just parts of the heart but also the jaw muscles of the head. Here we show that it is possible to take skeletal muscle satellite cells from jaw muscles of the adult mouse and to direct their differentiation to become heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). This is done by exposing the cells to extracellular factors similar to those which heart progenitors would experience during normal embryonic development. By contrast, cardiac differentiation does not occur at all from satellite cells isolated from trunk and limb muscles, which originate from the somites of the embryo. The cardiomyocytes arising from jaw muscle satellite cells express a range of specific marker proteins, beat spontaneously, display long action potentials with appropriate responses to nifedipine, norepinephrine and carbachol, and show synchronized calcium transients. Our results show the existence of a persistent cardiac developmental competence in satellite cells of the adult jaw muscles, associated with their origin from the second heart field of the embryo, and suggest a possible method of obtaining cardiomyocytes from individual patients without the need for a heart biopsy. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Scolopendra Pharmacopuncture on the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Possible Involvement of Spinal Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengjin; Ji, Byeong Uk; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Min Young; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Seung Tae; Koo, Sungtae

    2015-10-01

    Scolopendra extracts were used for pharmacopuncture at the Kidney 1 acupoint to investigate the role of Scolopendra pharmacopuncture (SPP) in both the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats and the contribution of spinal glial cells. A single treatment and five once-daily treatments with SPP were given to evaluate its effects on the development and maintenance stages of neuropathic pain, respectively, which was followed by behavioral tests. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting tests were also carried out. A single treatment of SPP delayed spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and induced a profound decrease in the expression of ionized calcium binding adaptor protein in the lumbar spinal cord. Repeated SPP treatments reliably suppressed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at later time points, and these results correlated mainly with decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein. Intriguingly, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein expression was also reduced after repeated SPP. These results illustrate that neuropathic pain in the development and maintenance stages is alleviated by SPP treatment, which may be ascribed principally to deactivations of microglia and astroglia, respectively. Additionally, microglial inactivation seems to be partially involved in preventing neuropathic pain in the maintenance stage. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Ischemic regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated cell volume and TrkB expression in glial (Müller) and bipolar cells of the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Stefanie; Hollborn, Margrit; Berk, Benjamin-Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas; Seeger, Johannes; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Osmotic swelling of neurons and glial cells contributes to retinal edema and neurodegeneration. BDNF, a major neuroprotectant in the retina, was shown to inhibit osmotic swelling of glial (Müller) and bipolar cells in the rat retina; the effect of BDNF on the bipolar cell swelling is mediated by inducing a release of neuroprotective cytokines from Müller cells (Berk et al., Neuroscience 295:175-186, 2015). We determined whether BDNF-mediated cell volume regulation was altered after transient retinal ischemia. Retinal slices from the eyes of rats that underwent a 1-h pressure-induced retinal ischemia and from control eyes were superfused with a hypoosmotic solution. Exogenous BDNF prevented osmotic swelling of Müller cells in both control and post-ischemic retinal slices. BDNF also prevented osmotic swelling of bipolar cells in the control retina, but not in the ischemic retina. On the other hand, exogenous bFGF prevented the swelling of both Müller and bipolar cells in the ischemic retina. Freshly isolated Müller cells of control retinas displayed immunoreactivity of truncated but not full-length TrkB. In contrast, Müller cells of post-ischemic retinas displayed immunoreactivity of both TrkB isoforms. Bipolar cells isolated from control and post-ischemic retinas were immunolabeled for both TrkB isoforms. The data may suggest that the ischemic abrogation of the BDNF effect in bipolar cells is related to altered BDNF receptor expression in Müller cells. Glial upregulation of full-length TrkB may support the survival of Müller cells in the ischemic retina, but may impair the BDNF-induced release of neuroprotective cytokines such as bFGF from Müller cells.

  1. Further characterisation of the molecular signature of quiescent and activated mouse muscle satellite cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola F Gnocchi

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle. To date though, there is a paucity of native markers that can be used to easily identify quiescent satellite cells, with Pax7 probably being the best that is currently available. Here we have further characterized a number of recently described satellite cell markers, and also describe novel ones. Caveolin-1, integrin alpha7 and the calcitonin receptor proved reliable markers for quiescent satellite cells, being expressed by all satellite cells identified with Pax7. These three markers remained expressed as satellite cells were activated and underwent proliferation. The nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and emerin, mutations in which underlie Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, were also expressed in both quiescent and proliferating satellite cells. Conversely, Jagged-1, a Notch ligand, was not expressed in quiescent satellite cells but was induced upon activation. These findings further contribute to defining the molecular signature of muscle satellite cells.

  2. The production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor by human sertoli cells is substantially reduced in sertoli cell-only testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D; Paduch, D A; Schlegel, P N; Orwig, K E; Mielnik, A; Bolyakov, A; Wright, W W

    2017-05-01

    Do human Sertoli cells in testes that exhibit the Sertoli cell-only (SCO) phenotype produce substantially less glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) than Sertoli cells in normal testes? In human SCO testes, both the amounts of GDNF mRNA per testis and the concentration of GDNF protein per Sertoli cell are markedly reduced as compared to normal testes. In vivo, GDNF is required to sustain the numbers and function of mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and their immediate progeny, transit-amplifying progenitor spermatogonia. GDNF is expressed in the human testis, and the ligand-binding domain of the GDNF receptor, GFRA1, has been detected on human SSCs. The numbers and/or function of these stem cells are markedly reduced in some infertile men, resulting in the SCO histological phenotype. We determined the numbers of human spermatogonia per mm2 of seminiferous tubule surface that express GFRA1 and/or UCHL1, another marker of human SSCs. We measured GFRA1 mRNA expression in order to document the reduced numbers and/or function of SSCs in SCO testes. We quantified GDNF mRNA in testes of humans and mice, a species with GDNF-dependent SSCs. We also compared GDNF mRNA expression in human testes with normal spermatogenesis to that in testes exhibiting the SCO phenotype. As controls, we also measured transcripts encoding two other Sertoli cell products, kit ligand (KITL) and clusterin (CLU). Finally, we compared the amounts of GDNF per Sertoli cell in normal and SCO testes. Normal human testes were obtained from beating heart organ donors. Biopsies of testes from men who were infertile due to maturation arrest or the SCO phenotype were obtained as part of standard care during micro-testicular surgical sperm extraction. Cells expressing GFRA1, UCHL1 or both on whole mounts of normal human seminiferous tubules were identified by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy and their numbers were determined by image analysis. Human GDNF mRNA and GFRA1 mRNA were

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor upregulates peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibits apoptotic cell death in abcd1-deficient glial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh

    Full Text Available In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1 and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs (1 and 3 in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2 proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD.

  4. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  5. Ganglionic GFAP + glial Gq-GPCR signaling enhances heart functions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Alison Xiaoqiao; Lee, Jakovin J; McCarthy, Ken D

    2017-01-26

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) accelerates heart rate, increases cardiac contractility, and constricts resistance vessels. The activity of SNS efferent nerves is generated by a complex neural network containing neurons and glia. Gq G protein-coupled receptor (Gq-GPCR) signaling in glial fibrillary acidic protein-expressing (GFAP + ) glia in the central nervous system supports neuronal function and regulates neuronal activity. It is unclear how Gq-GPCR signaling in GFAP + glia affects the activity of sympathetic neurons or contributes to SNS-regulated cardiovascular functions. In this study, we investigated whether Gq-GPCR activation in GFAP + glia modulates the regulatory effect of the SNS on the heart; transgenic mice expressing Gq-coupled DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) (hM3Dq) selectively in GFAP + glia were used to address this question in vivo. We found that acute Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP + glia significantly accelerated heart rate and increased left ventricle contraction. Pharmacological experiments suggest that the glial-induced cardiac changes were due to Gq-GPCR activation in satellite glial cells within the sympathetic ganglion; this activation led to increased norepinephrine (NE) release and beta-1 adrenergic receptor activation within the heart. Chronic glial Gq-GPCR activation led to hypotension in female Gfap -hM3Dq mice. This study provides direct evidence that Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP + glia regulates cardiovascular functions in vivo.

  6. Neonatal Satellite Cells Form Small Myotubes in Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvajal Monroy, P.L.; Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Den Hoff, Von J.W.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.

    2017-01-01

    Although palatal muscle reconstruction in patients with cleft palate takes place during early childhood, normal speech development is often not achieved. We hypothesized that the intrinsic properties of head satellite cells (SCs) and the young age of these patients contribute to the poor muscle

  7. Opposing Actions of Fgf8a on Notch Signaling Distinguish Two Muller Glial Cell Populations that Contribute to Retina Growth and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The teleost retina grows throughout life and exhibits a robust regenerative response following injury. Critical to both these events are Muller glia (or, Muller glial cells; MGs, which produce progenitors for retinal growth and repair. We report that Fgf8a may be an MG niche factor that acts through Notch signaling to regulate spontaneous and injury-dependent MG proliferation. Remarkably, forced Fgf8a expression inhibits Notch signaling and stimulates MG proliferation in young tissue but increases Notch signaling and suppresses MG proliferation in older tissue. Furthermore, cessation of Fgf8a signaling enhances MG proliferation in both young and old retinal tissue. Our study suggests that multiple MG populations contribute to retinal growth and regeneration, and it reveals a previously unappreciated role for Fgf8a and Notch signaling in regulating MG quiescence, activation, and proliferation.

  8. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear...... cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our...... for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human...

  9. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  10. Neurons but not glial cells overexpress ubiquitin in the rat brain following focused ultrasound-induced opening of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, A; Reinz, E; Fatar, M; Jenne, J; Hennerici, M G; Meairs, S

    2010-08-11

    Focused ultrasound-induced opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents is a promising strategy for a targeted drug delivery to the brain. The aim of our study was to identify whether brain molecular stress pathways are targeted by ultrasound treatment. Using an upper level of acoustic pressures in combination with microbubbles, which have been previously reported as reliable for BBB opening without causing tissue damage, we found that ultrasound leads to an increased ubiquitinylation of proteins in neuronal (11+/-3 ubiquitin-overexpressing cells per optical field) but not glial cells 6 h post-insonation, increasing to 16 (+/-4) labelled cells after 24 h. No changes in the expression of Hsp70 and Hsc70 were detected over 24 h. Ultrasound treatment was followed by limited apoptosis after 24 h (32+/-6 cleaved-caspase 3-positive cells per optical field) in the insonated areas. Only neurons were identified in the apoptotic population. Although these observations may not be applicable for all acoustic parameters useful for BBB opening, they demonstrate that insonation of the rat brain with the parameters used in our experiments is a useful tool for BBB opening and induces specific cellular stress response restricted to neuronal cells. Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adaptive Calcified Matrix Response of Dental Pulp to Bacterial Invasion Is Associated with Establishment of a Network of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein+/Glutamine Synthetase+ Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Ramin M.; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Simonian, Mary; Hunter, Neil

    2010-01-01

    We report evidence for anatomical and functional changes of dental pulp in response to bacterial invasion through dentin that parallel responses to noxious stimuli reported in neural crest-derived sensory tissues. Sections of resin-embedded carious adult molar teeth were prepared for immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, ultrastructural analysis, and microdissection to extract mRNA for quantitative analyses. In odontoblasts adjacent to the leading edge of bacterial invasion in carious teeth, expression levels of the gene encoding dentin sialo-protein were 16-fold greater than in odontoblasts of healthy teeth, reducing progressively with distance from this site of the carious lesion. In contrast, gene expression for dentin matrix protein-1 by odontoblasts was completely suppressed in carious teeth relative to healthy teeth. These changes in gene expression were related to a gradient of deposited reactionary dentin that displayed a highly modified structure. In carious teeth, interodontoblastic dentin sialo-protein− cells expressing glutamine synthetase (GS) showed up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These cells extended processes that associated with odontoblasts. Furthermore, connexin 43 established a linkage between adjacent GFAP+/GS+ cells in carious teeth only. These findings indicate an adaptive pulpal response to encroaching caries that includes the deposition of modified, calcified, dentin matrix associated with networks of GFAP+/GS+ interodontoblastic cells. A regulatory role for the networks of GFAP+/GS+ cells is proposed, mediated by the secretion of glutamate to modulate odontoblastic response. PMID:20802180

  12. Identification of human SEP1 as a glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-inducible protein and its expression in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Y; Morikawa, Y; Ichihara, M; Kodama, Y; Fukuda, N; Hayashi, H; Morinaga, T; Iwashita, T; Murakumo, Y; Takahashi, M

    2003-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signals through multisubunit receptor complex consisting of RET tyrosine kinase and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored coreceptor called GDNF family receptor alpha1 (GFRalpha1). In the current study, we cloned a human SEP1 gene as a GDNF-inducible gene using human neuroblastoma cells that express RET and GFRalpha1. The induction of the SEP1 gene showed two peaks at 0.5-2 h and 24-48 h after GDNF stimulation by Northern blotting and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The late induction was also confirmed at protein levels by Western blotting with anti-SEP1 antibody. Immunostaining revealed that the expression of the SEP1 protein was detected in cell body, elongated neurites and growth cone-like structure of neuroblastoma cells treated with GDNF. In addition, we found a high level of SEP1 expression in neurons of the dorsal root and superior cervical ganglia and motor neurons of the spinal cord of mice in which RET is also expressed. SEP1 was co-immunoprecipitated with alpha- and beta-tubulins from the lysate of mouse brain. These results thus suggested that SEP1 is a GDNF-inducible and microtubule-associated protein that may play a role in the nervous system.

  13. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  14. Recent Developments of Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems for Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnes, Jarle; Vik, Arild; Bokach, Dmitry; Svendsen, Tjalve; Schautz, Max; Geneste, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    Next generation telecommunication satellites will demand increasingly more power. Power levels of 30 kW or more are foreseen for the next 10 years. Battery technology that can sustain 30 kW for eclipse lengths of up to 72 minutes will represent a major impact on the total mass of the satellite, even with new Li-ion battery technologies. Regenerative fuel cell systems (RFCS) were identified years ago as a possible alternative to rechargeable batteries. CMR Prototech has investigated this technology in a series of projects initiated by ESA focusing on both the essential fuel cell technology, demonstration of cycle performance of a RFCS, corresponding to 15 years in orbit, as well as the very important reactants storage systems. This paper includes the main results from this work from the past 5 years.

  15. Nerve growth factor injected into the gastric ulcer base incorporates into endothelial, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells: implications for angiogenesis, mucosal regeneration and ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, T; Ahluwalia, A; Watanabe, T; Arakawa, T; Tarnawski, A S

    2015-08-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that locally administered growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor can accelerate healing of experimental gastric ulcers in rats. That study indicates that locally administered growth factors can exert potent biological effects resulting in enhanced gastric ulcers healing. However, the fate of injected growth factors, their retention and localization to specific cellular compartments have not been examined. In our preliminary study, we demonstrated that local injection of nerve growth factor to the base of experimental gastric ulcers dramatically accelerates ulcer healing, increases angiogenesis - new blood vessel formation, and improves the quality of vascular and epithelial regeneration. Before embarking on larger, definitive and time sequence studies, we wished to determine whether locally injected nerve growth factor is retained in gastric ulcer's tissues and taken up by specific cells during gastric ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced in anesthetized rats by local application of acetic acid using standard methods; and, 60 min later fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor was injected locally to the ulcer base. Rats were euthanized 2, 5 and 10 days later. Gastric specimens were obtained and processed for histology. Unstained paraffin sections were examined under a fluorescence microscope, and the incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor into various gastric tissue cells was determined and quantified. In addition, we performed immunostaining for S100β protein that is expressed in neural components. Five and ten days after ulcer induction labeled nerve growth factor (injected to the gastric ulcer base) was incorporated into endothelial cells of blood vessels, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells, myofibroblasts and muscle cells. This study demonstrates for the first time that during gastric ulcer healing

  16. The G-Protein-Coupled Chemoattractant Receptor Fpr2 Exacerbates High Glucose-Mediated Proinflammatory Responses of Müller Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, activated Müller glial cells (MGCs exhibit increased motility and a fibroblast-like proliferation phenotype that contribute to the formation of fibrovascular membrane. In this study, we investigated the capacity of high glucose (HG to regulate the expression of cell surface receptors that may participate in the proinflammatory responses of MGCs. We found that MGCs express a G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptor formyl peptide receptor 2 (Fpr2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1, which mediated MGC migration and proliferation in response to corresponding ligands. HG upregulated Fpr2 through an NF-κB pathway in MGCs, increased the activation of MAPKs coupled to Fpr2 and FGFR1, which also further enhanced the production of vascular endothelial growth factor by MGCs in the presence of HG. In vivo, Fpr2 was more highly expressed by retina MGCs of diabetic mice and the human counterpart FPR2 was detected in the retina MGCs in fibrovascular membrane of PDR patients. To support the potential pathological relevance of Fpr2, an endogenous Fpr2 agonist cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide was detected in mouse MGCs and the retina, which was upregulated by HG. These results suggest that Fpr2, together with FGFR1, may actively participate in the pathogenesis of PDR thus may be considered as one of the potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Recent evolutionary origin of the expression of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in lens epithelial cells. A molecular and genetic analysis of various mouse species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, S; Montagutelli, X; Gomès, D; Simon-Chazottes, D; Guénet, J L; Dupouey, P

    1991-05-01

    We have investigated the phylogenetic distribution of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in lens epithelial cells (LEC) of various mouse species within the genus Mus. We have shown that lens GFAP is expressed in mice of the Mus musculus complex and in Mus spicilegus and Mus macedonicus species (L.GFAP(+) phenotype) while it is absent in Mus spretus, Mus caroli and Mus cooki species (L.GFAP(-) phenotype). Our results argue in favour of one of the phenograms illustrating the probable phylogenetic relationships between these species in the genus Mus. In animals where lens GFAP was immunodetected, Northern blots of lens RNA extracts hybridized with a mouse GFAP cDNA probe, revealed a single 2.7 kb band. Comparative Northern blot analysis of lens tissue from L.GFAP(+) mice or of brain tissue from L.GFAP(+) or L.GFAP(-) mice did not show any size heterogeneity of the GFAP mRNA. The pattern of the GFAP immunostaining of astroglial cells in brain was identical in both L.GFAP phenotypes. Analysis of interspecific crosses showed that the L.GFAP(+) character is transmitted in a dominant fashion and seems to be linked to the Mus musculus Gfap gene. In this study we have also confirmed the localization of the mouse Gfap gene on chromosome 11.

  18. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  19. Response of turkey muscle satellite cells to thermal challenge. I. transcriptome effects in proliferating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Kent M.; Kristelle M Mendoza; Abrahante, Juan E.; Barnes, Natalie E.; Velleman, Sandra G.; Strasburg, Gale M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Climate change poses a multi-dimensional threat to food and agricultural systems as a result of increased risk to animal growth, development, health, and food product quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells cultured under cold or hot thermal challenge to better define molecular mechanisms by which thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure. Results Satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major mu...

  20. Alexander Disease Mutations Produce Cells with Coexpression of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and NG2 in Neurosphere Cultures and Inhibit Differentiation into Mature Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Sirerol-Piquer, Maria Salomé; Durán-Moreno, María; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Matias-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by presence of GFAP aggregates in the cytoplasm of astrocytes and loss of myelin. Determine the effect of AxD-related mutations on adult neurogenesis. We transfected different types of mutant GFAP into neurospheres using the nucleofection technique. We find that mutations may cause coexpression of GFAP and NG2 in neurosphere cultures, which would inhibit the differentiation of precursors into oligodendrocytes and thus explain the myelin loss occurring in the disease. Transfection produces cells that differentiate into new cells marked simultaneously by GFAP and NG2 and whose percentage increased over days of differentiation. Increased expression of GFAP is due to a protein with an anomalous structure that forms aggregates throughout the cytoplasm of new cells. These cells display down-expression of vimentin and nestin. Up-expression of cathepsin D and caspase-3 in the first days of differentiation suggest that apoptosis as a lysosomal response may be at work. HSP27, a protein found in Rosenthal bodies, is expressed less at the beginning of the process although its presence increases in later stages. Our findings seem to suggest that the mechanism of development of AxD may not be due to a function gain due to increase of GFAP, but to failure in the differentiation process may occur at the stage in which precursor cells transform into oligodendrocytes, and that possibility may provide the best explanation for the clinical and radiological images described in AxD.

  1. Alexander Disease Mutations Produce Cells with Coexpression of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and NG2 in Neurosphere Cultures and Inhibit Differentiation into Mature Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Gómez-Pinedo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlexander disease (AxD is a rare disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. The disease is characterized by presence of GFAP aggregates in the cytoplasm of astrocytes and loss of myelin.ObjectivesDetermine the effect of AxD-related mutations on adult neurogenesis.MethodsWe transfected different types of mutant GFAP into neurospheres using the nucleofection technique.ResultsWe find that mutations may cause coexpression of GFAP and NG2 in neurosphere cultures, which would inhibit the differentiation of precursors into oligodendrocytes and thus explain the myelin loss occurring in the disease. Transfection produces cells that differentiate into new cells marked simultaneously by GFAP and NG2 and whose percentage increased over days of differentiation. Increased expression of GFAP is due to a protein with an anomalous structure that forms aggregates throughout the cytoplasm of new cells. These cells display down-expression of vimentin and nestin. Up-expression of cathepsin D and caspase-3 in the first days of differentiation suggest that apoptosis as a lysosomal response may be at work. HSP27, a protein found in Rosenthal bodies, is expressed less at the beginning of the process although its presence increases in later stages.ConclusionOur findings seem to suggest that the mechanism of development of AxD may not be due to a function gain due to increase of GFAP, but to failure in the differentiation process may occur at the stage in which precursor cells transform into oligodendrocytes, and that possibility may provide the best explanation for the clinical and radiological images described in AxD.

  2. EphA4 Regulates the Balance between Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Radial Glial Cells and Intermediate Neuronal Precursors in Cooperation with FGF Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfa Chen

    Full Text Available In mouse cerebral corticogenesis, neurons are generated from radial glial cells (RGCs or from their immediate progeny, intermediate neuronal precursors (INPs. The balance between self-renewal of these neuronal precursors and specification of cell fate is critical for proper cortical development, but the signaling mechanisms that regulate this progression are poorly understood. EphA4, a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily, is expressed in RGCs during embryogenesis. To illuminate the function of EphA4 in RGC cell fate determination during early corticogenesis, we deleted Epha4 in cortical cells at E11.5 or E13.5. Loss of EphA4 at both stages led to precocious in vivo RGC differentiation toward neurogenesis. Cortical cells isolated at E14.5 and E15.5 from both deletion mutants showed reduced capacity for neurosphere formation with greater differentiation toward neurons. They also exhibited lower phosphorylation of ERK and FRS2α in the presence of FGF. The size of the cerebral cortex at P0 was smaller than that of controls when Epha4 was deleted at E11.5 but not when it was deleted at E13.5, although the cortical layers were formed normally in both mutants. The number of PAX6-positive RGCs decreased at later developmental stages only in the E11.5 Epha4 deletion mutant. These results suggest that EphA4, in cooperation with an FGF signal, contributes to the maintenance of RGC self-renewal and repression of RGC differentiation through the neuronal lineage. This function of EphA4 is especially critical and uncompensated in early stages of corticogenesis, and thus deletion at E11.5 reduces the size of the neonatal cortex.

  3. Cannabidiol stimulates Aml-1a-dependent glial differentiation and inhibits glioma stem-like cells proliferation by inducing autophagy in a TRPV2-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabissi, Massimo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Liberati, Sonia; Santoni, Matteo; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-10-15

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) correspond to a tumor cell subpopulation, involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor initiation and acquired chemoresistance. Currently, drug-induced differentiation is considered as a promising approach to eradicate this tumor-driving cell population. Recently, the effect of cannabinoids (CBs) in promoting glial differentiation and inhibiting gliomagenesis has been evidenced. Herein, we demonstrated that cannabidiol (CBD) by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid-2 (TRPV2) triggers GSCs differentiation activating the autophagic process and inhibits GSCs proliferation and clonogenic capability. Above all, CBD and carmustine (BCNU) in combination overcome the high resistance of GSCs to BCNU treatment, by inducing apoptotic cell death. Acute myeloid leukemia (Aml-1) transcription factors play a pivotal role in GBM proliferation and differentiation and it is known that Aml-1 control the expression of several nociceptive receptors. So, we evaluated the expression levels of Aml-1 spliced variants (Aml-1a, b and c) in GSCs and during their differentiation. We found that Aml-1a is upregulated during GSCs differentiation, and its downregulation restores a stem cell phenotype in differentiated GSCs. Since it was demonstrated that CBD induces also TRPV2 expression and that TRPV2 is involved in GSCs differentiation, we evaluated if Aml-1a interacted directly with TRPV2 promoters. Herein, we found that Aml-1a binds TRPV2 promoters and that Aml-1a expression is upregulated by CBD treatment, in a TRPV2 and PI3K/AKT dependent manner. Altogether, these results support a novel mechanism by which CBD inducing TRPV2-dependent autophagic process stimulates Aml-1a-dependent GSCs differentiation, abrogating the BCNU chemoresistance in GSCs. © 2015 UICC.

  4. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  5. Glial-glial and glial-neuronal interfaces in radiation-induced, glia-depleted spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Sims, T.J. [Arkansas Univ., Little Rock, AR (United States). Medical Center

    1997-01-01

    This review summarises some of the major findings derived from studies using the model of a glia-depleted environment developed and characterised in this laboratory. Glial depletion is achieved by exposure of the immature rodent spinal cord to x-radiation which markedly reduces both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte populations and severely impairs myelination. This glia-depleted, hypomylinated state presents a unique opportunity to examine aspects of spinal cord maturation in the absence of a normal glial population. An associated sequela within 2-3 wk following irradiation is the appearance of Schwann cells in the dorsal portion of the spinal cord. Characteristics of these intraspinal Schwann cells, their patterns of myelination or ensheathment, and their interrelations with the few remaining central glia have been examined. A later sequela is the development of Schwann cells in the ventral aspect of the spinal cord where they occur predominantly in the grey matter. (author).

  6. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  7. ­Glial and stem cell expression of murine Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 in the embryonic and perinatal nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantzen C. Collette

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors (FGFRs are involved in the development and function of multiple organs and organ systems, including the central nervous system (CNS. FGF signaling via FGFR1, one of the three FGFRs expressed in the CNS, stimulates proliferation of stem cells during prenatal and postnatal neurogenesis and participates in regulating cell-type ratios in many developing regions of the brain. Anomalies in FGFR1 signaling have been implicated in certain neuropsychiatric disorders. Fgfr1 expression has been shown, via in situ hybridization, to vary spatially and temporally throughout embryonic and postnatal development of the brain. However, in situ hybridization lacks sufficient resolution to identify which cell-types directly participate in FGF signaling. Furthermore, because antibodies raised against FGFR1 commonly cross-react with other members of the FGFR family, immunocytochemistry is not alone sufficient to accurately document Fgfr1 expression. Here, we elucidate the identity of Fgfr1 expressing cells in both the embryonic and perinatal mouse brain. Methods To do this, we utilized a tgFGFR1-EGFPGP338Gsat BAC line (tgFgfr1-EGFP+ obtained from the GENSAT project. The tgFgfr1-EGFP+ line expresses EGFP under the control of a Fgfr1 promoter, thereby causing cells endogenously expressing Fgfr1 to also present a positive GFP signal. Through simple immunostaining using GFP antibodies and cell-type specific antibodies, we were able to accurately determine the cell-type of Fgfr1 expressing cells. Results This technique revealed Fgfr1 expression in proliferative zones containing BLBP+ radial glial stem cells, such as the cortical and hippocampal ventricular zones, and cerebellar anlage of E14.5 mice, in addition to DCX+ neuroblasts. Furthermore, our data reveal Fgfr1 expression in proliferative zones containing BLBP+ cells of the anterior midline, hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum of P0.5 mice

  8. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor prevents motor neuron loss of transgenic model mice for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yasuhiro; Nagano, I; Gazi, M S A; Murakami, T; Shiote, M; Shoji, M; Kitagawa, H; Setoguchi, Y; Abe, K

    2002-08-01

    Effects of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were studied in transgenic (Tg) mice model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Adenoviral vector containing GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF), E. coli lacZ (Ad-LacZ), or vehicle was injected once a week from 35 weeks of age into the right gastrocnemius muscle of Tg mice carrying mutant human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene, and histological analysis was performed at 46 W. Clinical data showed a tendency of improvement, but was not significantly different among the three animal groups. In contrast, total number of and phospho-Akt (p-Akt) positive large motor neurons in the treated side was significantly preserved in Ad-GDNF-treated group than in vehicle- and Ad-LacZ-treated groups (*p < 0.05). Immunoreactivity of phospho-ERK (p-ERK) and active caspases-3 and -9 showed no difference. These results indicate that the Ad-GDNF treatment prevented motor neuron loss with preserving survival p-Akt signal and without affecting caspase activations, suggesting a future possibility for the therapy of the disease.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor mediated by an adeno-associated virus vector in a transgenic animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Lu, Yan-Yan; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Ikeguchi, Kunihiko; Fujimoto, Ken-ichi; Okada, Takashi; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Takashi; Hanazono, Yutaka; Kume, Akihiro; Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Ozawa, Keiya; Nakano, Imaharu

    2002-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a relentlessly progressive lethal disease that involves selective annihilation of motoneurons. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is proposed to be a promising therapeutic agent for ALS and other motor neuron diseases. Because adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been developed as an attractive gene delivery system with proven safety, we explored the therapeutic efficacy of intramuscular delivery of the GDNF gene mediated by an AAV vector (AAV-GDNF) in the G93A mouse model of ALS. We show here that AAV-GDNF leads to substantial and long-lasting expression of transgenic GDNF in a large number of myofibers with its accumulation at the sites of neuromuscular junctions. Detection of GDNF labeled with FLAG in the anterior horn neurons, but not beta-galactosidase expressed as a control, indicates that most of the transgenic GDNF observed there is retrogradely transported GDNF protein from the transduced muscles. This transgenic GDNF prevents motoneurons from their degeneration, preserves their axons innervating the muscle, and inhibits the treated-muscle atrophy. Furthermore, four-limb injection of AAV-GDNF postpones the disease onset, delays the progression of the motor dysfunction, and prolongs the life span in the treated ALS mice. Our finding thus indicates that AAV-mediated GDNF delivery to the muscle is a promising means of gene therapy for ALS.

  10. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide stimulates glial fibrillary acidic protein gene expression in cortical precursor cells by activating Ras and Rap1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio; Cebolla, Beatriz; Vallejo, Mario

    2008-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) acts on cortical precursor cells to trigger glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene expression and astrocyte differentiation by stimulation of intracellular cAMP production. Here, we show that as expected, PACAP activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. However, inhibition of protein kinase A does not prevent PACAP-induced GFAP gene expression or astrocytogenesis. PACAP also activates the small GTPases Rap1 and Ras, but either activation of Rap1 alone by selective stimulation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac, or expression of a constitutively active form of Ras, do not induce GFAP gene expression. Ras is activated by PACAP in a cAMP-dependent manner, and inhibition of Ras and/or Rap1 decreases PACAP-induced GFAP promoter stimulation. Thus, cAMP-dependent PACAP-induced GFAP expression during astrocytogenesis involves the coordinated activation of both Ras and Rap1, but activation of either one of them in isolation is not sufficient to trigger this response.

  11. Transport of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor into Liposomes across the Blood-Brain Barrier: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoling Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF was encapsulated into liposomes in order to protect it from enzyme degradation in vivo and promote its permeability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In this study, GDNF conventional liposomes (GDNF-L and GDNF target sterically stabilized liposomes (GDNF-SSL-T were prepared. The average size of liposomes was below 90 nm. A primary model of BBB was established and evaluated by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and permeability. This BBB model was employed to study the permeability of GDNF liposomes in vitro. The results indicated that the liposomes could enhance transport of GDNF across the BBB and GDNF-SSL-T had achieved the best transport efficacy. The distribution of GDNF liposomes was studied in vivo. Free GDNF and GDNF-L were eliminated rapidly in the circulation. GDNF-SSL-T has a prolonged circulation time in the blood and favorable brain delivery. The values of the area under the curve (AUC(0–1 h in the brain of GDNF-SSL-T was 8.1 times and 6.8 times more than that of free GDNF and GDNF-L, respectively. These results showed that GDNF-SSL-T realized the aim of targeted delivery of therapeutic proteins to central nervous system.

  12. Roles of Notch1 Signaling in Regulating Satellite Cell Fates Choices and Postnatal Skeletal Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tizhong; Xu, Ziye; Wu, Weiche; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Yizhen

    2017-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, also called satellite cells, are indispensable for the growth, maintenance, and regeneration of the postnatal skeletal muscle. Satellite cells, predominantly quiescent in mature resting muscles, are activated after skeletal muscle injury or degeneration. Notch1 signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays crucial roles in satellite cells homeostasis and postnatal skeletal myogenesis and regeneration. Activation of Notch1 signaling promotes the muscle satellite cells quiescence and proliferation, but inhibits differentiation of muscle satellite cells. Notably, the new roles of Notch1 signaling during late-stage of skeletal myogenesis including in post-differentiation myocytes and post-fusion myotubes have been recently reported. Here, we mainly review and discuss the regulatory roles of Notch1 in regulating satellite cell fates choices and skeletal myogenesis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2964-2967, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Established cell surface markers efficiently isolate highly overlapping populations of skeletal muscle satellite cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesner, Claire C; Almada, Albert E; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) has enabled the direct isolation of highly enriched skeletal muscle stem cell, or satellite cell, populations from postnatal tissue. Several distinct surface marker panels containing different positively selecting surface antigens have been used to distinguish muscle satellite cells from other non-myogenic cell types. Because functional and transcriptional heterogeneity is known to exist within the satellite cell population, a direct comparison of results obtained in different laboratories has been complicated by a lack of clarity as to whether commonly utilized surface marker combinations select for distinct or overlapping subsets of the satellite cell pool. This study therefore sought to evaluate phenotypic and functional overlap among popular satellite cell sorting paradigms. Utilizing a transgenic Pax7-zsGreen reporter mouse, we compared the overlap between the fluorescent signal of canonical paired homeobox protein 7 (Pax7) expressing satellite cells to cells identified by combinations of surface markers previously published for satellite cells isolation. We designed two panels for mouse skeletal muscle analysis, each composed of markers that exclude hematopoietic and stromal cells (CD45, CD11b, Ter119, CD31, and Sca1), combined with previously published antibody clones recognizing surface markers present on satellite cells (β1-integrin/CXCR4, α7-integrin/CD34, and Vcam1). Cell populations were comparatively analyzed by flow cytometry and FACS sorted for functional assessment of myogenic activity. Consistent with prior reports, each of the commonly used surface marker schemes evaluated here identified a highly enriched satellite cell population, with 89-90 % positivity for Pax7 expression based on zsGreen fluorescence. Distinct surface marker panels were also equivalent in their ability to identify the majority of the satellite cell pool, with 90-93 % of all Pax7-zsGreen positive cells marked by each of the surface

  14. Effect of iron deficiency on the expression of insulin-like growth factor-II and its receptor in neuronal and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales González, E; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that iron deficiency modifies the normal function of the central nervous system and alters cognitive abilities. When cellular damage occurs in the central nervous system, neuroprotective mechanisms, such as the production of neurotrophic factors, are essential in order for nervous tissue to function correctly. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF- II) is a neurotrophic factor that was recently shown to be involved in the normal functioning of cognitive processes in animal models. However, the impact of iron deficiency on the expression and function of this molecule has not yet been clarified. Mixed primary cell cultures from the central nervous system were collected to simulate iron deficiency using deferoxamine. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-IIR was determined with the western blot test. We observed increased expression of IGF-II, along with a corresponding decrease in the expression of IGF-IIR, in iron-deficient mixed primary cell cultures. We did not observe alterations in the expression of these proteins in isolated microglia or neuronal cultures under the same conditions. We did not detect differences in the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR in iron-deficient cultures. In vitro iron deficiency increases the expression of IGF-II in mixed glial cell cultures, which may have a beneficial effect on brain tissue homeostasis in a situation in which iron availability is decreased. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Does an NSAID a Day Keep Satellite Cells at Bay?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed among athletes worldwide, despite growing evidence for a negative influence on the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise, at least in young healthy individuals. This review focuses on the potential of NSAIDs to alter......, although this clearly requires further study. The long-term implications for the muscle of the apparent inhibitory effect of NSAIDs on satellite cells in younger individuals are not clear and it is possible these may first become apparent with chronic use in athletes training at a high level...

  16. Spatial distribution of human neocortical neurons and glial cells according to sex and age measured by the saucer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette Kirstine; Petersen, A O; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2007-01-01

    primary neurons in the human neocortex (divided into frontal-, temporal-, parietal- and occipital cortex) of young and old subjects free of neurological or psychological disease to test if age and gender has any influence on the cell distribution in human neocortex. Plots of the spatial distribution...... of the densities of all cell types did not show any difference between women and men and no difference between brains of young and old subjects. Thus it is concluded that in this small study the spatial distribution of the densities of the different types of cells in brains from individuals free of neurological...... disorders was independent of age and gender....

  17. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-23

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis.

  18. CD44 is expressed in non-myelinating Schwann cells of the adult rat, and may play a role in neurodegeneration-induced glial plasticity at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlewicz, Adam; Wlodarczyk, Jakub; Wilczek, Ewa; Gawlak, Maciej; Cabaj, Anna; Majczynski, Henryk; Nestorowicz, Klaudia; Herbik, Magdalena Aneta; Grieb, Pawel; Slawinska, Urszula; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M

    2009-05-01

    CD44 is a multifunctional cell surface glycoprotein which regulates cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in a variety of tissues. In particular, the protein was found to be expressed in glial cells of developing, but not adult, peripheral nerves, where it takes part in signaling mediated by ErbB class of receptors for neuregulins. Here, we demonstrate, using high resolution morphological methods, tissue fractionation and RT-PCR, that CD44 is strongly expressed in terminal Schwann cell (TSC) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of the adult rat skeletal muscle. As CD44 is also expressed by Schwann cells of the non-myelinated Remak bundles of the proximal peripheral nerves, it appears to be a marker of non-myelinating Schwann cell subpopulation. The analysis of transgenic rats bearing a mutated superoxide-dismutase gene (SOD1(G93A)) causing familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) revealed that TSC activation and morphological plasticity at the NMJ, caused by ongoing denervation-reinnervation is associated with a strong increase in CD44 expression therein. Notably, CD44 immunoreactivity is present in fine axon-escheating processes of the glial cells that guide reinnervation. In addition, we found that both in normal and SOD1(G93A) muscle, CD44 expressed in TSC partially colocalizes with immunoreactivities of neuregulin receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3. The colocalization appears to reflect a physical interaction, as evidenced by co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis between CD44 and ErbB3. Importantly, TSC activation upon ALS-like neurodegeneration results in significant increase in molecular proximity of CD44 and ErbB3, which may have an impact on glial plasticity at the NMJ.

  19. Enteroglial-derived S100B protein integrates bacteria-induced Toll-like receptor signalling in human enteric glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Fabio; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Cirillo, Carla; Palumbo, Ilaria; De Giorgi, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Cammarota, Marcella; Giuliano, Mariateresa; Cuomo, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) have been suggested to participate in host-bacteria cross-talk, playing a protective role within the gut. The way EGC interact with microorganisms is still poorly understood. We aimed to evaluate whether: EGC participate in host-bacteria interaction; S100B and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling converge in a common pathway leading to nitric oxide (NO) production. Primary cultures of human EGC were exposed to pathogenic (enteroinvasive Escherichia coli; EIEC) and probiotic (Lactobacillus paracasei F19) bacteria. Cell activation was assessed by evaluating the expression of cFos and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. TLR expression in EGC was evaluated at both baseline and after exposure to bacteria by real-time PCR, fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis. S100B expression and NO release from EGC, following exposure to bacteria, were measured in the presence or absence of specific TLR and S100B pathway inhibitors. EIEC activated EGC by inducing the expression of cFos and MHC II. EGC expressed TLR at baseline. Pathogens and probiotics differentially modulated TLR expression in EGC. Pathogens, but not probiotics, significantly induced S100B protein overexpression and NO release from EGC. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of TLR and S100B pathways abolished bacterial-induced NO release from EGC. Human EGC interact with bacteria and discriminate between pathogens and probiotics via a different TLR expression and NO production. In EGC, NO release is impaired in the presence of specific inhibitors of the TLR and S100B pathways, suggesting the presence of a novel common pathway involving both TLR stimulation and S100B protein upregulation.

  20. Direct Regulation of Aromatase B Expression by 17β-Estradiol and Dopamine D1 Receptor Agonist in Adult Radial Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Esau, Crystal; Trudeau, Vance L

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase cytochrome P450arom (cyp19) is the only enzyme that has the ability to convert androgens into estrogens. Estrogens, which are produced locally in the vertebrate brain play many fundamental roles in neuroendocrine functions, reproductive functions, socio-sexual behaviors, and neurogenesis. Radial glial cells (RGCs) are neuronal progenitor cells that are abundant in fish brains and are the exclusive site of aromatase B expression and neuroestrogen synthesis. Using a novel in vitro RGC culture preparation we studied the regulation of aromatase B by 17β-estradiol (E2) and dopamine (DA). We have established that activation of the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) by SKF 38393 up-regulates aromatase B gene expression most likely through the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). This up-regulation can be enhanced by low concentration of E2 (100 nM) through increasing the expression of D1R and the level of p-CREB protein. However, a high concentration of E2 (1 μM) and D1R agonist together failed to up-regulate aromatase B, potentially due to attenuation of esr2b expression and p-CREB levels. Furthermore, we found the up-regulation of aromatase B by E2 and DA both requires the involvement of esr1 and esr2a. The combined effect of E2 and DA agonist indicates that aromatase B in the adult teleost brain is under tight control by both steroids and neurotransmitters to precisely regulate neuroestrogen levels.

  1. Intrathecal injection of lentivirus-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor RNA interference relieves bone cancer-induced pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fu-Fen; Xu, Yang; Dan, Qi-Qin; Wei, La; Deng, Ying-Jie; Liu, Jia; He, Mu; Liu, Wei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Zhou, Fiona H; Wang, Ting-Hua; Wang, Xi-Yan

    2015-04-01

    Bone cancer pain is a common symptom in cancer patients with bone metastases and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the endogenous analgesic mechanisms to develop new therapeutic strategies for bone-cancer induced pain (BCIP) as a result of metastases. MRMT-1 tumor cells were injected into bilateral tibia of rats and X-rays showed that the area suffered from bone destruction, accompanied by an increase in osteoclast numbers. In addition, rats with bone cancer showed apparent mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at day 28 after intratibial MRMT-1 inoculation. However, intrathecal injection of morphine or lentivirus-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor RNAi (Lvs-siGDNF) significantly attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, as shown by increases in paw withdrawal thresholds and tail-flick latencies, respectively. Furthermore, Lvs-siGDNF interference not only substantially downregulated GDNF protein levels, but also reduced substance P immunoreactivity and downregulated the ratio of pERK/ERK, where its activation is crucial for pain signaling, in the spinal dorsal horn of this model of bone-cancer induced pain. In this study, Lvs-siGDNF gene therapy appeared to be a beneficial method for the treatment of bone cancer pain. As the effect of Lvs-siGDNF to relieve pain was similar to morphine, but it is not a narcotic, the use of GDNF RNA interference may be considered as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bone cancer pain in the future. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. Upregulation of Glycolytic Enzymes, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Increased Cytotoxicity in Glial Cells Treated with Alzheimer’s Disease Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Tharusha; Poljak, Anne; Braidy, Nady; Smythe, George; Raftery, Mark; Hill, Mark; Brodaty, Henry; Trollor, Julian; Kochan, Nicole; Sachdev, Perminder

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Markers of increased protein, lipid and nucleic acid oxidation and reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes have been reported in AD plasma. Amyloid plaques in the AD brain elicit a range of reactive inflammatory responses including complement activation and acute phase reactions, which may also be reflected in plasma. Previous studies have shown that human AD plasma may be cytotoxic to cultured cells. We investigated the effect of pooled plasma (n = 20 each) from healthy controls, individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on cultured microglial cells. AD plasma and was found to significantly decrease cell viability and increase glycolytic flux in microglia compared to plasma from healthy controls. This effect was prevented by the heat inactivation of complement. Proteomic methods and isobaric tags (iTRAQ) found the expression level of complement and other acute phase proteins to be altered in MCI and AD plasma and an upregulation of key enzymes involved in the glycolysis pathway in cells exposed to AD plasma. Altered expression levels of acute phase reactants in AD plasma may alter the energy metabolism of glia. PMID:25785936

  3. Characterization of glial cell models and in vitro manipulation of the neuregulin1/ErbB system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascal, Davide; Giovannelli, Alessia; Gnavi, Sara; Hoyng, Stefan Adriaan; de Winter, Fred; Morano, Michela; Fregnan, Federica; Dell'Albani, Paola; Zaccheo, Damiano; Perroteau, Isabelle; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Gambarotta, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    The neuregulin1/ErbB system plays an important role in Schwann cell behavior both in normal and pathological conditions. Upon investigation of the expression of the neuregulin1/ErbB system in vitro, we explored the possibility to manipulate the system in order to increase the migration of Schwann

  4. Cytotoxicity effect of alkaloidal extract from Prosopis juliflora Sw. D.C. (Algaroba pods on glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bentes Hughes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosopis juliflora is largely used for feeding cattle and humans. Neurological signals have been reported in cattle due to intoxication with this plant. In this study, an alkaloidal fraction (AF obtained from P. juliflora pods was tested on astrocyte primary cultures. Astrocytes display physiological functions essential to development, homeostasis and detoxification in the central nervous system (CNS. These cells are known for their role on energetic support and immune response in the CNS. Concentrations between 0.03 to 30 µg/ml AF were assayed for 24 - 72 h. The mitochondrial activity, assayed by MTT test, showed cytotoxicity at 30 µg/ml AF after 24 h. At concentrations ranging between 0.3 - 3 µg/ml, the AF induced an increase on mitochondrial activity, indicating cell reactivity. Immunocytochemistry assay for GFAP cytoskeletal protein, revealed alterations on cell morphology after treatment with 0.3 - 3 µg/ml AF for 72 h. This result corroborates with western blot analysis when cells treated with 0.3 - 3 µg/ml AF for 72 h showed GFAP upregulation. The vimentin expression was not significantly altered in all tested concentrations. These results suggest that alkaloids induce astrocyte reactivity and might be involved in the neurotoxic effects induced by P. juliflora consumption.

  5. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Bendali

    Full Text Available Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  6. Muscle satellite cells are a functionally heterogeneous population in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yusuke; Boldrin, Luisa; Knopp, Paul; Morgan, Jennifer E; Zammit, Peter S

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscles of body and limb are derived from somites, but most head muscles originate from cranial mesoderm. The resident stem cells of muscle are satellite cells, which have the same embryonic origin as the muscle in which they reside. Here, we analysed satellite cells with a different ontology, comparing those of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the limb with satellite cells from the masseter of the head. Satellite cell-derived myoblasts from MAS and EDL muscles had distinct gene expression profiles and masseter cells usually proliferated more and differentiated later than those from EDL. When transplanted, however, masseter-derived satellite cells regenerated limb muscles as efficiently as those from EDL. Clonal analysis showed that functional properties differed markedly between satellite cells: ranging from clones that proliferated extensively and gave rise to both differentiated and self-renewed progeny, to others that divided minimally before differentiating completely. Generally, masseter-derived clones were larger and took longer to differentiate than those from EDL. This distribution in cell properties was preserved in both EDL-derived and masseter-derived satellite cells from old mice, although clones were generally less proliferative. Satellite cells, therefore, are a functionally heterogeneous population, with many occupants of the niche exhibiting stem cell characteristics in both somite-derived and branchiomeric muscles.

  7. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martín A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not...

  8. Response of Turkey Muscle Satellite Cells to Thermal Challenge. II. Transcriptome Effects in Differentiating Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent M. Reed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure of poultry to extreme temperatures during the critical period of post-hatch growth can seriously affect muscle development and thus compromise subsequent meat quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells by thermal challenge during differentiation. Our goal is to better define how thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure and subsequent development.Results: Skeletal muscle satellite cells previously isolated from the Pectoralis major muscle of 7-wk-old male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo from two breeding lines: the F-line (16 wk body weight-selected and RBC2 (randombred control line were used in this study. Cultured cells were induced to differentiate at 38°C (control or thermal challenge temperatures of 33 or 43°C. After 48 h of differentiation, cells were harvested and total RNA was isolated for RNAseq analysis. Analysis of 39.9 Gb of sequence found 89% mapped to the turkey genome (UMD5.0, annotation 101 with average expression of 18,917 genes per library. In the cultured satellite cells, slow/cardiac muscle isoforms are generally present in greater abundance than fast skeletal isoforms. Statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed among treatments and between turkey lines, with a greater number of genes affected in the F-line cells following cold treatment whereas more differentially expressed (DE genes were observed in the RBC2 cells following heat treatment. Many of the most significant pathways involved signaling, consistent with ongoing cellular differentiation. Regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis appears to be significantly affected by temperature treatment, particularly cold treatment.Conclusions: Satellite cell differentiation is directly influenced by temperature at the level of gene transcription with greater effects attributed to selection for fast growth. At lower temperature, muscle-associated genes in the

  9. Alterations in BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) and GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) serum levels in bipolar disorder: The role of lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Yalçın, Yaprak; Can, Güneş; Resmi, Halil; Akan, Pınar; Ergör, Gül; Aydemir, Omer; Cengisiz, Cengiz; Kerim, Doyuran

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been consistently reported to be decreased in mania or depression in bipolar disorders. Evidence suggests that Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has a role in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Whether GDNF and BDNF act in the same way across different episodes in bipolar disorders is unclear. BDNF and GDNF serum levels were measured simultaneously by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in 96 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder according to DSM-IV (37 euthymic, 33 manic, 26 depressed) in comparison to 61 healthy volunteers. SCID- I and SCID-non patient version were used for clinical evaluation of the patients and healthy volunteers respectively. Correlations between the two trophic factor levels, and medication dose, duration and serum levels of lithium or valproate were studied across different episodes of illness. Patients had significantly lower BDNF levels during mania and depression compared to euthymic patients and healthy controls. GDNF levels were not distinctive. However GDNF/BDNF ratio was higher in manic state compared to euthymia and healthy controls. Significant negative correlation was observed between BDNF and GDNF levels in euthymic patients. While BDNF levels correlated positively, GDNF levels correlated negatively with lithium levels. Regression analysis confirmed that lithium levels predicted only GDNF levels positively in mania, and negatively in euthymia. Small sample size in different episodes and drug-free patients was the limitation of thestudy. Current data suggests that lithium exerts its therapeutic action by an inverse effect on BDNF and GDNF levels, possibly by up-regulating BDNF and down-regulating GDNF to achieve euthymia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor modulates the excitability of nociceptive trigeminal ganglion neurons via a paracrine mechanism following inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mamoru; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hara, Norifumi; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2013-02-01

    Previous our report indicated that acute application of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances the neuronal excitability of adult rat small-diameter trigeminal ganglion (TRG) neurons, which innervate the facial skin in the absence of neuropathic and inflammatory conditions. This study investigated whether under in vivo conditions, GDNF modulates the excitability of nociceptive Aδ-TRG neurons innervating the facial skin via a paracrine mechanism following inflammation. We used extracellular electrophysiological recording with multibarrel-electrodes in this study. Spontaneous Aδ-TRG neuronal activity was induced in control rats after iontophoretic application of GDNF into the trigeminal ganglia (TRGs). Noxious and non-noxious mechanical stimuli evoked Aδ-TRG neuronal firing rate were significantly increased by iontophoretic application of GDNF. The mean mechanical threshold of nociceptive TRG neurons was significantly decreased by GDNF application. The increased discharge frequency and decreased mechanical threshold induced by GDNF were antagonized by application of the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, K252b. The number of Aδ-TRG neurons with spontaneous firings and their firing rates in rats with inflammation induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant were significantly higher than control rats. The firing rates of Aδ-TRG spontaneous neuronal activity were significantly decreased by iontophoretic application of K252b in inflamed rats. K252b also inhibited Aδ-TRG neuron activity evoked by mechanical stimulation in inflamed rats. These results suggest that in vivo GDNF enhances the excitability of nociceptive Aδ-TRG neurons via a paracrine mechanism within TRGs following inflammation. GDNF paracrine mechanism could be important as a therapeutic target for trigeminal inflammatory hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Protection of Glial Müller Cells by Dexamethasone in a Mouse Model of Surgically Induced Blood-Retinal Barrier Breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueiros-Marquez, Lourdes; Bénard, Romain; Vacca, Ophélie; Charles-Messance, Hugo; Bolaños-Jimenez, Rodrigo; Guilloneau, Xavier; Sennlaub, Florian; Montañez, Cecilia; Sahel, José Alain; Rendon, Alvaro; Tadayoni, Ramin; Giocanti-Aurégan, Audrey

    2017-02-01

    Breakdown of the inner blood-retinal barrier (iBRB) occurs in many retinal disorders and may cause retinal edema often responsible for vision loss. Dexamethasone is used in clinical practice to restore iBRB. The aim of this study was to characterize the impact of a surgically induced iBRB breakdown on retinal homeostatic changes due to dystrophin Dp71, aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and Kir4.1 alterations in Müller glial cells (MGC) in a mouse model. The protective effect of dexamethasone was assessed in this model. Moreover, retinal explants were used to control MGC exposure to a hypoosmotic solution containing barium. Partial lens surgery was performed in C57BL6/J mice. Dystrophin Dp71, AQP4, and Kir4.1 expression was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Twenty-four hours after surgery, mice received a single intravitreal injection of dexamethasone or of vehicle. After partial lens surgery, iBRB permeability increased while Dp71 and AQP4 were downregulated and Kir4.1 was delocalized. These effects were partially prevented by dexamethasone injection. In the retinal explant model, MGC were swollen and Dp71, AQP4, and Kir4.1 were downregulated after exposure to a hypoosmotic solution containing barium, but not in the presence of dexamethasone. Heat shock factor protein 1 (HSF1) was overexpressed in dexamethasone-treated retinas. Partial lens surgery induces iBRB breakdown and molecular changes in MGC, including a downregulation of Dp71 and AQP4 and the delocalization of Kir4.1. Dexamethasone seems to protect retina from these molecular changes by upregulating HSF1.

  12. Effect of microgravity on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor gene expression in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybko, A S; Ilchibaeva, T V; Kulikov, A V; Kulikova, E A; Krasnov, I B; Sychev, V N; Shenkman, B S; Popova, N K; Naumenko, V S

    2015-09-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 month of space flight on the Russian biosatellite BION-M1 to determine its effect on the expression of genes involved in the maintenance of the mouse brain dopamine system. The current article focuses on the genes encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF). Space flight reduced expression of the GDNF gene in the striatum and hypothalamus but increased it in the frontal cortex and raphe nuclei area. At the same time, actual space flight reduced expression of the gene encoding CDNF in the substantia nigra but increased it in the raphe nuclei area. To separate the effects of space flight from environmental stress contribution, we analyzed expression of the investigated genes in mice housed for 1 month on Earth in the same shuttle cabins that were used for space flight and in mice of the vivarium control group. Shuttle cabin housing failed to alter the expression of the GDNF and CDNF genes in the brain structures investigated. Thus, actual long-term space flight produced dysregulation in genetic control of GDNF and CDNF genes. These changes may be related to downregulation of the dopamine system after space flight, which we have shown earlier. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Our results provide the first evidence of microgravity effects on expression of the GDNF and CDNF neurotrophic factor genes. A considerable decrease in mRNA level of GDNF and CDNF in the nigrostriatal dopamine system was found. Because both GDNF and CDNF play a significant role in maintenance and survival of brain dopaminergic neurons, we can assume that this dysregulation in genetic control of GDNF and CDNF genes in substantia nigra could be among the reasons for the deleterious effects of space flight on the dopamine system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Harmonin (Ush1c is required in zebrafish Müller glial cells for photoreceptor synaptic development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer B. Phillips

    2011-11-01

    Usher syndrome is the most prevalent cause of hereditary deaf-blindness, characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing impairment and progressive photoreceptor degeneration beginning in childhood or adolescence. Diagnosis and management of this disease are complex, and the molecular changes underlying sensory cell impairment remain poorly understood. Here we characterize two zebrafish models for a severe form of Usher syndrome, Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C: one model is a mutant with a newly identified ush1c nonsense mutation, and the other is a morpholino knockdown of ush1c. Both have defects in hearing, balance and visual function from the first week of life. Histological analyses reveal specific defects in sensory cell structure that are consistent with these behavioral phenotypes and could implicate Müller glia in the retinal pathology of Usher syndrome. This study shows that visual defects associated with loss of ush1c function in zebrafish can be detected from the onset of vision, and thus could be applicable to early diagnosis for USH1C patients.

  14. The relationship between the occurrence of intractable epilepsy with glial cells and myelin sheath - an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Wang, J-Y; Gu, R; Qu, H; Li, M; Chen, L; Liu, R; Yuan, P

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of epilepsy is associated with myelin sheath injury; oligodendrocyte (OL) is the main cell of myelin sheath; In this study, we observed the changes of OL, demyelination, and myelin associated protein in different stages of intractable epilepsy (IE) at the epileptic foci of patients, and provide useful information for the pathophysiology of IE. IE patients who received epileptogenic focus resection were recruited as the experimental group, their medical records were collected and postoperative follow-up was performed. The brain tissues from10 cases with non-brain disorders were obtained as controls. Immunofluorescence double staining was used to observe OL expression. The demyelination in epileptic foci was observed by luxol fast blue (LFB) staining method. Real-time fluorescent quantitative (RT) PCR, Western blot methods were used to detect the expressions of myelin-related proteins. We observed increased OL precursor cells, former OL and decreased mature OL in experimental group when compared with controls (both p myelin basic protein (MBP), oligodendrocytes myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) and other MAG associated proteins-Nogo receptors (NgRs) and GD1α (p myelin associated protein are related to the occurrence of IE.

  15. Alcohol abuse promotes changes in non-synaptic epileptiform activity with concomitant expression changes in cotransporters and glial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Canton Santos

    Full Text Available Non-synaptic mechanisms are being considered the common factor of brain damage in status epilepticus and alcohol intoxication. The present work reports the influence of the chronic use of ethanol on epileptic processes sustained by non-synaptic mechanisms. Adult male Wistar rats administered with ethanol (1, 2 e 3 g/kg/d during 28 days were compared with Control. Non-synaptic epileptiform activities (NEAs were induced by means of the zero-calcium and high-potassium model using hippocampal slices. The observed involvement of the dentate gyrus (DG on the neurodegeneration promoted by ethanol motivated the monitoring of the electrophysiological activity in this region. The DG regions were analyzed for the presence of NKCC1, KCC2, GFAP and CD11b immunoreactivity and cell density. The treated groups showed extracellular potential measured at the granular layer with increased DC shift and population spikes (PS, which was remarkable for the group E1. The latencies to the NEAs onset were more prominent also for the treated groups, being correlated with the neuronal loss. In line with these findings were the predispositions of the treated slices for neuronal edema after NEAs induction, suggesting that restrict inter-cell space counteracts the neuronal loss and subsists the hyper-synchronism. The significant increase of the expressions of NKCC1 and CD11b for the treated groups confirms the existence of conditions favorable to the observed edematous necrosis. The data suggest that the ethanol consumption promotes changes on the non-synaptic mechanisms modulating the NEAs. For the lower ethanol dosage the neurophysiological changes were more effective suggesting to be due to the less intense neurodegenertation.

  16. Altered Satellite Cell Responsiveness and Denervation Implicated in Progression of Rotator-Cuff Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Deanna; Leiter, Jeff R S; MacDonald, Peter B; Peeler, Jason; Anderson, Judy E

    Rotator-cuff injury (RCI) is common and painful; even after surgery, joint stability and function may not recover. Relative contributions to atrophy from disuse, fibrosis, denervation, and satellite-cell responsiveness to activating stimuli are not known. Potential contributions of denervation and disrupted satellite cell responses to growth signals were examined in supraspinatus (SS) and control (ipsilateral deltoid) muscles biopsied from participants with RCI (N = 27). Biopsies were prepared for explant culture (to study satellite cell activity), immunostained to localize Pax7, BrdU, and Semaphorin 3A in satellite cells, sectioning to study blood vessel density, and western blotting to measure the fetal (γ) subunit of acetylcholine receptor (γ-AchR). Principal component analysis (PCA) for 35 parameters extracted components identified variables that contributed most to variability in the dataset. γ-AchR was higher in SS than control, indicating denervation. Satellite cells in SS had a low baseline level of activity (Pax7+ cells labelled in S-phase) versus control; only satellite cells in SS showed increased proliferative activity after nitric oxide-donor treatment. Interestingly, satellite cell localization of Semaphorin 3A, a neuro-chemorepellent, was greater in SS (consistent with fiber denervation) than control muscle at baseline. PCAs extracted components including fiber atrophy, satellite cell activity, fibrosis, atrogin-1, smoking status, vascular density, γAchR, and the time between symptoms and surgery. Use of deltoid as a control for SS was supported by PCA findings since "muscle" was not extracted as a variable in the first two principal components. SS muscle in RCI is therefore atrophic, denervated, and fibrotic, and has satellite cells that respond to activating stimuli. Since SS satellite cells can be activated in culture, a NO-donor drug combined with stretching could promote muscle growth and improve functional outcome after RCI. PCAs suggest

  17. Isolation, culture and biological characteristics of multipotent porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinjuan; Liu, Hao; Wang, Kunfu; Li, Lu; Yuan, Hongyi; Liu, Xueting; Liu, Yingjie; Guan, Weijun

    2017-03-02

    Skeletal muscle has a huge regenerative potential for postnatal muscle growth and repair, which mainly depends on a kind of muscle progenitor cell population, called satellite cell. Nowadays, the majority of satellite cells were obtained from human, mouse, rat and other animals but rarely from pig. In this article, the porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells were isolated and cultured in vitro. The expression of surface markers of satellite cells was detected by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays. The differentiation capacity was assessed by inducing satellite cells into adipocytes, myoblasts and osteoblasts. The results showed that satellite cells isolated from porcine tibialis anterior were subcultured up to 12 passages and were positive for Pax7, Myod, c-Met, desmin, PCNA and NANOG but were negative for Myogenin. Satellite cells were also induced to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts and myoblasts, respectively. These findings indicated that porcine satellite cells possess similar biological characteristics of stem cells, which may provide theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application in the treatment of dystrophic muscle and other muscle injuries.

  18. Response of turkey muscle satellite cells to thermal challenge. I. transcriptome effects in proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kent M; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Abrahante, Juan E; Barnes, Natalie E; Velleman, Sandra G; Strasburg, Gale M

    2017-05-06

    Climate change poses a multi-dimensional threat to food and agricultural systems as a result of increased risk to animal growth, development, health, and food product quality. This study was designed to characterize transcriptional changes induced in turkey muscle satellite cells cultured under cold or hot thermal challenge to better define molecular mechanisms by which thermal stress alters breast muscle ultrastructure. Satellite cells isolated from the pectoralis major muscle of 7-weeks-old male turkeys from two breeding lines (16 weeks body weight-selected and it's randombred control) were proliferated in culture at 33 °C, 38 °C or 43 °C for 72 h. Total RNA was isolated and 12 libraries subjected to RNAseq analysis. Statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed among treatments and between turkey lines with a greater number of genes altered by cold treatment than by hot and fewer differences observed between lines than between temperatures. Pathway analysis found that cold treatment resulted in an overrepresentation of genes involved in cell signaling/signal transduction and cell communication/cell signaling as compared to control (38 °C). Heat-treated muscle satellite cells showed greater tendency towards expression of genes related to muscle system development and differentiation. This study demonstrates significant transcriptome effects on turkey skeletal muscle satellite cells exposed to thermal challenge. Additional effects on gene expression could be attributed to genetic selection for 16 weeks body weight (muscle mass). New targets are identified for further research on the differential control of satellite cell proliferation in poultry.

  19. Understanding the role of P2X7 in affective disorders – are glial cells the major players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne eStokes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders has been linked to biomarkers of inflammation generating a theory of major depressive disorder as an inflammatory disease and infection and autoimmunity as major risk factors for schizophrenia. The idea of pro-inflammatory cytokines altering behavior is now well accepted however many questions remain. Microglia can produce a plethora of inflammatory cytokines and these cells appear to be critical in the link between inflammatory changes and depressive disorders. Microglia play a known role in sickness behavior which has many components of depressive-like behavior such as social withdrawal, sleep alterations, and anorexia. Numerous candidate genes have been identified for psychiatric disorders in the last decade. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human P2X7 gene have been linked to bipolar disorder, depression, and to the severity of depressive symptoms. P2X7 is a ligand-gated cation channel expressed on microglia with lower levels found on astrocytes and on some neuronal populations. In microglia P2X7 is a major regulator of pro-inflammatory cytokines of the interleukin-1 family. Genetic deletion of P2X7 in mice is protective for depressive behavior in addition to inflammatory responses. P2X7-/- mice have been shown to demonstrate anti-depressive-like behavior in forced swim and tail suspension behavioral tests and stressor-induced behavioral responses were blunted. Both neurochemical (norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and inflammatory changes have been observed in the brains of P2X7-/- mice. This review will discuss the recent evidence for involvement of P2X7 in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and propose mechanisms by which altered signaling through this ion channel may affect the inflammatory state of the brain.

  20. Effects of dexamethasone and meloxicam on Borrelia burgdorferi-induced inflammation in glial and neuronal cells of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Geeta; Martinez, Alejandra N; Martin, Dale S; Philipp, Mario T

    2017-02-02

    Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), affects both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Previously, we reported that in a model of acute LNB in rhesus monkeys, treatment with the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone significantly reduced both pleocytosis and levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immune mediators that were induced by Bb. Dexamethasone also inhibited the formation of inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and demyelinating lesions in the brain and spinal cord of these animals. In contrast, these signs were evident in the infected animals that were left untreated or in those that were treated with meloxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. To address the differential anti-inflammatory effects of dexamethasone and meloxicam in the central nervous system (CNS), we evaluated the potential of these drugs to alter the levels of Bb-induced inflammatory mediators in culture supernatants of rhesus frontal cortex (FC) explants, primary rhesus astrocytes and microglia, and human oligodendrocytes. We also ascertained the potential of dexamethasone to modulate Bb-induced apoptosis in rhesus FC explants. As meloxicam is a known COX-2 inhibitor, we evaluated whether meloxicam altered the levels of COX-2 as induced by live Bb in cell lysates of primary rhesus astrocytes and microglia. Dexamethasone but not meloxicam significantly reduced the levels of several Bb-induced immune mediators in culture supernatants of FC explants, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Dexamethasone also had a protective effect on Bb-induced neuronal and oligodendrocyte apoptosis in rhesus FC explants. Further, meloxicam significantly reduced the levels of Bb-induced COX-2 in microglia, while both Bb and meloxicam were unable to alter the constitutive levels of COX-2 in astrocytes. These data indicate that dexamethasone and meloxicam have differential anti-inflammatory effects on Bb-induced inflammation in glial and neuronal cells

  1. Neonatal Satellite Cells Form Small Myotubes In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, P L; Grefte, S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W; Wagener, F A D T G

    2017-03-01

    Although palatal muscle reconstruction in patients with cleft palate takes place during early childhood, normal speech development is often not achieved. We hypothesized that the intrinsic properties of head satellite cells (SCs) and the young age of these patients contribute to the poor muscle regeneration after surgery. First, we studied the fiber type distribution and the expression of SC markers in ex vivo muscle tissue from head (branchiomeric) and limb (somite-derived) muscles from neonatal (2-wk-old) and young (9-wk-old) rats. Next, we cultured SCs isolated from these muscles for 5, 7, and 9 d, and investigated the in vitro expression of SC markers, as well as changes in proliferation, early differentiation, and fusion index (myotube formation) in these cells. In our ex vivo samples, we found that virtually all myofibers in both the masseter (Mass) and the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscles contained fast myosin heavy chain (MyHC), and a small percentage of digastric (Dig) and extensor digitorum longus myofibers also contained slow MyHC. This was independent of age. More SCs were found in muscles from neonatal rats as compared with young rats [17.6 (3.8%) v. 2.3 (1.6%); P form myotubes less efficiently than those from young muscles. These age-dependent differences in stem cell properties urge careful consideration for future clinical applications in patients with cleft palate.

  2. Inducible satellite cell depletion attenuates skeletal muscle regrowth following a scald-burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; McKenna, Colleen F; Cambias, Lauren A; Brightwell, Camille R; Prasai, Anesh; Wang, Ye; El Ayadi, Amina; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E; Fry, Christopher S

    2017-11-01

    Severe burns result in significant skeletal muscle cachexia that impedes recovery. Activity of satellite cells, skeletal muscle stem cells, is altered following a burn injury and likely hinders regrowth of muscle. Severe burn injury induces satellite cell proliferation and fusion into myofibres with greater activity in muscles proximal to the injury site. Conditional depletion of satellite cells attenuates recovery of myofibre area and volume following a scald burn injury in mice. Skeletal muscle regrowth following a burn injury requires satellite cell activity, underscoring the therapeutic potential of satellite cells in the prevention of prolonged frailty in burn survivors. Severe burns result in profound skeletal muscle atrophy; persistent muscle atrophy and weakness are major complications that hamper recovery from burn injury. Many factors contribute to the erosion of muscle mass following burn trauma, and we have previously shown concurrent activation and apoptosis of muscle satellite cells following a burn injury in paediatric patients. To determine the necessity of satellite cells during muscle recovery following a burn injury, we utilized a genetically modified mouse model (Pax7 CreER -DTA) that allows for the conditional depletion of satellite cells in skeletal muscle. Additionally, mice were provided 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine to determine satellite cell proliferation, activation and fusion. Juvenile satellite cell-wild-type (SC-WT) and satellite cell-depleted (SC-Dep) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to sham or burn injury consisting of a dorsal scald burn injury covering 30% of total body surface area. Both hindlimb and dorsal muscles were studied at 7, 14 and 21 days post-burn. SC-Dep mice had >93% depletion of satellite cells compared to SC-WT (P injury induced robust atrophy in muscles located both proximal and distal to the injury site (∼30% decrease in fibre cross-sectional area, P injury induced skeletal muscle regeneration, satellite

  3. Assessment of satellite cell number and activity status in human skeletal muscle biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L; Kjær, Michael; Charifi, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    The primary aim of our study was to validate the assessment of myonuclear and satellite cell number in biopsies from human skeletal muscle. We found that 25 type I and 25 type II fibers are sufficient to estimate the mean number of myonuclei per fiber. In contrast, the assessment of satellite cells...

  4. Methods for animal satellite cell culture under a variety of conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, N M; Vierck, J; Krabbenhoft, L; Bryne, K; Dodson, M V

    2000-03-01

    Primary and clonal culture systems have been devised and refined for animal-derived satellite cells. Satellite cell (SC) culture development includes efficient cell isolation techniques, establishment of effective plating and growth conditions, formulation of media requirements and thorough evaluation of experimental limitations. As the field of muscle cell culture has expanded, the number of animal species from which satellite cells have been isolated has increased. The focus of this paper is to compare and contrast SC culture conditions presently used by a variety of researchers and to introduce a new source of SC from wapiti (elk).

  5. Spinster controls Dpp signaling during glial migration in the Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuva-Aydemir, Yeliz; Bauke, Ann-Christin; Klämbt, Christian

    2011-05-11

    The development of multicellular organisms requires the well balanced and coordinated migration of many cell types. This is of particular importance within the developing nervous system, where glial cells often move long distances to reach their targets. The majority of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system of the Drosophila embryo is derived from the CNS and migrates along motor axons toward their targets. In the developing Drosophila eye, CNS-derived glial cells move outward toward the nascent photoreceptor cells, but the molecular mechanisms coupling the migration of glial cells with the growth of the eye imaginal disc are mostly unknown. Here, we used an enhancer trap approach to identify the gene spinster, which encodes a multipass transmembrane protein involved in endosome-lysosome trafficking, as being expressed in many glial cells. spinster mutants are characterized by glial overmigration. Genetic experiments demonstrate that Spinster modulates the activity of several signaling cascades. Within the migrating perineurial glial cells, Spinster is required to downregulate Dpp (Decapentaplegic) signaling activity, which ceases migratory abilities. In addition, Spinster affects the growth of the carpet cell, which indirectly modulates glial migration.

  6. Differential requirement for satellite cells during overload-induced muscle hypertrophy in growing versus mature mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; White, Sarah H; Wen, Yuan; Ho, Angel; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-07-10

    Pax7+ satellite cells are required for skeletal muscle fiber growth during post-natal development in mice. Satellite cell-mediated myonuclear accretion also appears to persist into early adulthood. Given the important role of satellite cells during muscle development, we hypothesized that the necessity of satellite cells for adaptation to an imposed hypertrophic stimulus depends on maturational age. Pax7(CreER)-R26R(DTA) mice were treated for 5 days with vehicle (satellite cell-replete, SC+) or tamoxifen (satellite cell-depleted, SC-) at 2 months (young) and 4 months (mature) of age. Following a 2-week washout, mice were subjected to sham surgery or 10 day synergist ablation overload of the plantaris (n = 6-9 per group). The surgical approach minimized regeneration, de novo fiber formation, and fiber splitting while promoting muscle fiber growth. Satellite cell density (Pax7+ cells/fiber), embryonic myosin heavy chain expression (eMyHC), and muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA) were evaluated via immunohistochemistry. Myonuclei (myonuclei/100 mm) were counted on isolated single muscle fibers. Tamoxifen treatment depleted satellite cells by ≥90% and prevented myonuclear accretion with overload in young and mature mice (p Satellite cells did not recover in SC- mice after overload. Average muscle fiber CSA increased ~20% in young SC+ (p = 0.07), mature SC+ (p satellite cells for overload-induced hypertrophy is dependent on maturational age, and global responses to overload differ in young versus mature mice.

  7. The behaviour of satellite cells in response to exercise: what have we learned from human studies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadi, Fawzi; Olsen, Steen Schytte

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the complex role played by satellite cells in the adaptive response to exercise in human skeletal muscle has just begun. The development of reliable markers for the identification of satellite cell status (quiescence/activation/proliferation) is an important step towards...... the understanding of satellite cell behaviour in exercised human muscles. It is hypothesised currently that exercise in humans can induce (1) the activation of satellite cells without proliferation, (2) proliferation and withdrawal from differentiation, (3) proliferation and differentiation to provide myonuclei...... and (4) proliferation and differentiation to generate new muscle fibres or to repair segmental fibre injuries. In humans, the satellite cell pool can increase as early as 4 days following a single bout of exercise and is maintained at higher level following several weeks of training. Cessation...

  8. Differential effect of maternal diet supplementation with α-Linolenic adcid or n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on glial cell phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine fatty acid profile in neonate rat brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Hernandez Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA are of crucial importance for the development of neural tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dietary supplementation in n-3 fatty acids in female rats during gestation and lactation on fatty acid pattern in brain glial cells phosphatidylethanolamine (PE and phosphatidylserine (PS in the neonates. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed during the whole gestation and lactation period with a diet containing either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.55% and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 0.75% of total fatty acids or α-linolenic acid (ALA, 2.90%. At two weeks of age, gastric content and brain glial cell PE and PS of rat neonates were analyzed for their fatty acid and dimethylacetal (DMA profile. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results In the neonates from the group fed with n-3 LC-PUFA, the DHA level in gastric content (+65%, P Conclusion The present study confirms that early supplementation of maternal diet with n-3 fatty acids supplied as LC-PUFA is more efficient in increasing n-3 in brain glial cell PE and PS in the neonate than ALA. Negative correlation between n-6 DPA, a conventional marker of DHA deficiency, and DMA in PE suggests n-6 DPA that potentially be considered as a marker of tissue ethanolamine plasmalogen status. The combination of multivariate and bivariate statistics allowed to underline that the accretion pattern of n-3 LC-PUFA in PE and PS differ.

  9. Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregg, Jared M.; DePaul, Marc A.; Filous, Angela R.; Lang, Brad T.; Tran, Amanda; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes react to CNS injury by building a dense wall of filamentous processes around the lesion. Stromal cells quickly take up residence in the lesion core and synthesize connective tissue elements that contribute to fibrosis. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferate within the lesion and help to entrap dystrophic axon tips. Here we review evidence that this aggregate scar acts as the major barrier to regeneration of axons after injury. We also consider several exciting new interventions that allow axons to regenerate beyond the glial scar, and discuss the implications of this work for the future of regeneration biology. PMID:24424280

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 facilitates glial scar formation in the injured spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Jung-Yu C.; Bourguignon, Lilly Y.W.; Adams, Christen M.; Peyrollier, Karine; Zhang, Haoqian; Fandel, Thomas; Cun, Christine L.; Werb, Zena; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2008-01-01

    In the injured spinal cord, a glial scar forms and becomes a major obstacle to axonal regeneration. Formation of the glial scar involves migration of astrocytes toward the lesion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9 and MMP-2, govern cell migration through their ability to degrade constituents of the extracellular matrix. Although MMP-9 is expressed in reactive astrocytes, its involvement in astrocyte migration and formation of a glial scar is unknown. Here we found that spinal ...

  11. Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Delivery in Parkinson's Disease: A Delicate Balance between Neuroprotection, Trophic Effects, and Unwanted Compensatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Liliane; Humbert-Claude, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and Neurturin (NRTN) bind to a receptor complex consisting of a member of the GDNF family receptor (GFR)-α and the Ret tyrosine kinase. Both factors were shown to protect nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons and reduce motor symptoms when applied terminally in toxin-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) models. However, clinical trials based on intraputaminal GDNF protein administration or recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated NRTN gene delivery have been disappointing. In this review, several factors that could have limited the clinical benefits are discussed. Retrograde transport of GDNF/NRTN to the dopaminergic neurons soma is thought to be necessary for NRTN/GFR-α/Ret signaling mediating the pro-survival effect. Therefore, the feasibility of treating advanced patients with neurotrophic factors is questioned by recent data showing that: (i) tyrosine hydroxylase-positive putaminal innervation has almost completely disappeared at 5 years post-diagnosis and (ii) in patients enrolled in the rAAV-NRTN trial more than 5 years post-diagnosis, NRTN was almost not transported to the substantia nigra pars compacta. In addition to its anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic properties, GDNF also interferes with dopamine homeostasis via time and dose-dependent effects such as: stimulation of dopamine neuron excitability, inhibition of dopamine transporter activity, tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation, and inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase transcription. Depending on the delivery parameters, the net result of this intricate network of regulations could be either beneficial or deleterious. In conclusion, further unraveling of the mechanism of action of GDNF gene delivery in relevant animal models is still needed to optimize the clinical benefits of this new therapeutic approach. Recent developments in the design of regulated viral vectors will allow to finely adjust the GDNF dose and period of administration. Finally, new

  12. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin-4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin-4 (Ten-4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten-4-deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten-4-deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten-4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten-4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. © 2015 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  13. Muscle Satellite Cell Protein Teneurin‐4 Regulates Differentiation During Muscle Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Ito, Naoki; Kikura, Naomi; Fukada, So‐ichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Satellite cells are maintained in an undifferentiated quiescent state, but during muscle regeneration they acquire an activated stage, and initiate to proliferate and differentiate as myoblasts. The transmembrane protein teneurin‐4 (Ten‐4) is specifically expressed in the quiescent satellite cells; however, its cellular and molecular functions remain unknown. We therefore aimed to elucidate the function of Ten‐4 in muscle satellite cells. In the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of Ten‐4‐deficient mice, the number and the size of myofibers, as well as the population of satellite cells, were reduced with/without induction of muscle regeneration. Furthermore, we found an accelerated activation of satellite cells in the regenerated Ten‐4‐deficient TA muscle. The cell culture analysis using primary satellite cells showed that Ten‐4 suppressed the progression of myogenic differentiation. Together, our findings revealed that Ten‐4 functions as a crucial player in maintaining the quiescence of muscle satellite cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:3017–3027 PMID:26013034

  14. Satellite-like cells contribute to pax7-dependent skeletal muscle repair in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberoglu, Michael A; Gallagher, Thomas L; Morrow, Zachary T; Talbot, Jared C; Hromowyk, Kimberly J; Tenente, Inês M; Langenau, David M; Amacher, Sharon L

    2017-04-15

    Satellite cells, also known as muscle stem cells, are responsible for skeletal muscle growth and repair in mammals. Pax7 and Pax3 transcription factors are established satellite cell markers required for muscle development and regeneration, and there is great interest in identifying additional factors that regulate satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and/or skeletal muscle regeneration. Due to the powerful regenerative capacity of many zebrafish tissues, even in adults, we are exploring the regenerative potential of adult zebrafish skeletal muscle. Here, we show that adult zebrafish skeletal muscle contains cells similar to mammalian satellite cells. Adult zebrafish satellite-like cells have dense heterochromatin, express Pax7 and Pax3, proliferate in response to injury, and show peak myogenic responses 4-5 days post-injury (dpi). Furthermore, using a pax7a-driven GFP reporter, we present evidence implicating satellite-like cells as a possible source of new muscle. In lieu of central nucleation, which distinguishes regenerating myofibers in mammals, we describe several characteristics that robustly identify newly-forming myofibers from surrounding fibers in injured adult zebrafish muscle. These characteristics include partially overlapping expression in satellite-like cells and regenerating myofibers of two RNA-binding proteins Rbfox2 and Rbfoxl1, known to regulate embryonic muscle development and function. Finally, by analyzing pax7a; pax7b double mutant zebrafish, we show that Pax7 is required for adult skeletal muscle repair, as it is in the mouse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone-mediated long-lasting memory recovery, hippocampal neuroprotection, and reduction of glial cell activation after transient global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanini, Cássia Valério; Ferreira, Emilene Dias Fiuza; Soares, Lígia Mendes; Santiago, Amanda Nunes; Milani, Humberto; de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria Weffort

    2015-08-01

    4-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone (apocynin) is a naturally occurring methoxy-substitute catechol that is isolated from the roots of Apocynin cannabinum (Canadian hemp) and Picrorhiza kurroa (Scrophulariaceae). It has been previously shown to have antioxidant and neuroprotective properties in several models of neurodegenerative disease, including cerebral ischemia. The present study investigates the effects of apocynin on transient global cerebral ischemia (TGCI)-induced retrograde memory deficits in rats. The protective effects of apocynin on neurodegeneration and the glial response to TGCI are also evaluated. Rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of apocynin (5 mg/kg) 30 min before TGCI and were tested 7, 14, and 21 days later in the eight-arm aversive radial maze (AvRM). After behavioral testing, the hippocampi were removed for histological evaluation. The present results confirm that TGCI causes memory impairment in the AvRM and that apocynin prevents these memory deficits and attenuates hippocampal neuronal death in a sustained way. Apocynin also decreases OX-42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity induced by TGCI. These findings support the potential role of apocynin in preventing neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments following TGCI in rats. The long-term protective effects of apocynin may involve inhibition of the glial response. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Understanding the NG2 glial scar after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber R Hackett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, are located throughout the central nervous system and serve as a pool of progenitors to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. In response to spinal cord injury, NG2 cells increase their proliferation and differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. While astrocytes are typically associated with being the major cell type in the glial scar, many NG2 cells also accumulate within the glial scar but their function remains poorly understood. Similar to astrocytes, these cells hypertrophy, upregulate expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, inhibit axon regeneration, contribute to the glial-fibrotic scar border, and some even differentiate into astrocytes. Whether NG2 cells also have a role in other astrocyte functions, such as preventing the spread of infiltrating leukocytes and expression of inflammatory cytokines, is not yet known. Thus, NG2 cells are not only important for remyelination after spinal cord injury, but are also a major component of the glial scar with functions that overlap with astrocytes in this region. In this review, we describe the signaling pathways important for the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 cells, as well as the role of NG2 cells in scar formation and tissue repair.

  17. [The influence of satellite cells on meat quality and its differential regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin-Yuan; Zhang, Shun-Hua; Wu, Ze-Hui; Zheng, Meng-Yue; Li, Xue-Wei; Zhu, Li

    2013-09-01

    Satellite cell is a kind of myogenic stem cells, which plays an important role in muscle development and injury repair. Through proliferation, differentiation and fusion of muscle fiber can satellite cells make new myonuclear, leading to the hypertrophy of skeletal muscle and fiber type transformation, and this would further affect the meat quality. Here, we review the relationship between muscle fiber development and meat quality attributes as well as the influence of the satellite cell differentiation on muscle fiber character. Besides, we also summarize the classical signaling pathway (i.e., Notch etc.) and influence of epigenetic regulation (i.e. miRNA) on muscle quality.

  18. Satellite cells and myonuclei in young and elderly women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, Fawzi; Charifi, Nadia; Denis, Christian; Lexell, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to assess the effects of aging on the satellite cell population. Muscle biopsies were taken from the tibialis anterior muscle of healthy, moderately active young (age range, 20-32 years; n = 31) and elderly (age range, 70-83 years; n = 27) women and men with comparable physical activity pattern. Satellite cells and myonuclei were visualized using a monoclonal antibody against neural cell adhesion molecule and counterstained with Mayer's hematoxylin. An average of 211 (range, 192-241) muscle fibers were examined for each individual. Compared with the young women and men, the elderly subjects had a significantly lower (P < 0.011) number of satellite cells per muscle fiber but a significantly higher (P < 0.004) number of myonuclei per muscle fiber. The number of satellite cells relative to the total number of nuclei [satellite cells/(myonuclei + satellite cells)] was significantly lower in the elderly than in the young women and men. These results imply that a reduction in the satellite cell population occurs as a result of increasing age in healthy men and women.

  19. Asymmetric Distribution of Primary Cilia Allocates Satellite Cells for Self-Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar Marican, Nur Hayati; Cruz-Migoni, Sara B; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2016-06-14

    Regeneration of vertebrate skeletal muscles requires satellite cells, a population of stem cells that are quiescent in normal conditions and divide, differentiate, and self-renew upon activation triggered by exercise, injury, and degenerative diseases. Satellite cell self-renewal is essential for long-term tissue homeostasis, and previous work has identified a number of external cues that control this process. However, little is known of the possible intrinsic control mechanisms of satellite cell self-renewal. Here, we show that quiescent satellite cells harbor a primary cilium, which is rapidly disassembled upon entry into the cell cycle. Contrasting with a commonly accepted belief, cilia reassembly does not occur uniformly in cells exiting the cell cycle. We found that primary cilia reassemble preferentially in cells committed to self-renew, and disruption of cilia reassembly causes a specific deficit in self-renewing satellite cells. These observations indicate that primary cilia provide an intrinsic cue essential for satellite cell self-renewal. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. File list: InP.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Input control Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818834,SRX818832,SRX818833 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Unclassified Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 TFs and others Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818829,SRX818828,SRX818830,SRX818831 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 DNase-seq Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 No description Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Input control Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818832,SRX818833,SRX818834 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 RNA polymerase Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 RNA polymerase Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 All antigens Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle...18832,SRX818833 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Unclassified Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 DNase-seq Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 TFs and others Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818829,SRX818831,SRX818828,SRX818830 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 DNase-seq Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Input control Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818833,SRX818834,SRX818832 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 DNase-seq Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 RNA polymerase Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 TFs and others Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818829,SRX818828,SRX818830,SRX818831 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 All antigens Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle...18834,SRX818832 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 All antigens Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle...18833,SRX818834 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 No description Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Histone Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818827,SRX818826,SRX818825 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 All antigens Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle...18830,SRX818832 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 No description Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Input control Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818833,SRX818834,SRX818832 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 TFs and others Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... SRX818831,SRX818829,SRX818828,SRX818830 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Unclassified Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Unclassified Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal... Muscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Histone Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal... Muscle SRX818826,SRX818827,SRX818825 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Histone Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal... Muscle SRX818827,SRX818825,SRX818826 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.50.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 RNA polymerase Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal... Muscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 Histone Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal... Muscle SRX818827,SRX818825,SRX818826 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.20.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle mm9 No description Muscle Satellite Cells, Skeletal... Muscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Myo.05.AllAg.Satellite_Cells,_Skeletal_Muscle.bed ...

  12. Satellited 4q identified in amniotic fluid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, I.; Hsieh, C.L.; Songster, G. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    Extra material was identified on the distal long arm of a chromosome 4 in an amniotic fluid specimen sampled at 16.6 weeks of gestational age. There was no visible loss of material from chromosome 4, and no evidence for a balanced rearrangement. The primary counseling issue in this case was advanced maternal age. Ultrasound findings were normal, and family history was unremarkable. The identical 4qs chromosome was observed in cells from a paternal peripheral blood specimen and appeared to be an unbalanced rearrangement. This extra material was NOR positive in lymphocytes from the father, but was negative in the fetal amniocytes. Father`s relatives were studied to verify the familial origin of this anomaly. In situ hybridization with both exon and intron sequences of ribosomal DNA demonstrated that ribosomal DNA is present at the terminus of the 4qs chromosome in the fetus, father, and paternal grandmother. This satellited 4q might have been derived from a translocation event that resulted in very little or no loss from the 4q and no specific phenotype. This derivative chromosome 4 has been inherited through at least 3 generations of phenotypically normal individuals. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. The effects of exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy and satellite cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Shin; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle has a high degree of plasticity. The mass of skeletal muscle maintains owing to muscle protein synthesis and the regeneration by satellite cells. Skeletal muscle atrophy with aging (sarcopenia) is developed by decline of muscle protein synthesis and dysfunction of satellite cells. It is urgently necessary for today's highly aged society to elucidate the mechanism of sarcopenia and to establish prevention measure. This review shows that the positive effects of "exercise" on muscle protein synthesis and satellite cell function including their main molecular mechanism.

  14. [Nasal glial heterotopia: Clinical and morphological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, V P; Bakhtin, A A; Polyakov, D P; Yunusov, A S; Daikhes, N A

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a case of nasal glial heterotopia in a 10-month-old girl with a mixed (intranasal and subcutaneous) localization, which is accompanied by the divergence of the nasal bones. Histological examination supplemented by immunohistochemical reactions with antibodies to vimentin, S100 protein, neuron-specific enolase, as well as Ki-67 and smooth muscle actin confirmed the neural nature of the tumor. Fields of mature astrocytic glia including individual cells with neuronal differentiation were found among the fibrous and fibrovascular tissues. The paper provides a brief overview of the discussed pathology.

  15. Assisted morphogenesis: glial control of dendrite shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procko, Carl; Shaham, Shai

    2010-10-01

    Neurons display a myriad of dendritic architectures, reflecting their diverse roles in information processing and transduction in the nervous system. Recent findings suggest that neuronal signals may not account for all aspects of dendrite morphogenesis. Observations from C. elegans and other organisms suggest that glial cells can affect dendrite length and guidance, as well as localization and shapes of dendritic receptive structures, such as dendritic spines and sensory cilia. Thus, besides direct roles in controlling neuronal activity, glia contribute to neuron function by ensuring that neurons attain their proper shapes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Satellite Cells from Rat Head Branchiomeric Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-07-20

    Fibrosis and defective muscle regeneration can hamper the functional recovery of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair. This causes persistent problems in speech, swallowing, and sucking. In vitro culture systems that allow the study of satellite cells (myogenic stem cells) from head muscles are crucial to develop new therapies based on tissue engineering to promote muscle regeneration after surgery. These systems will offer new perspectives for the treatment of cleft palate patients. A protocol for the isolation, culture and differentiation of satellite cells from head muscles is presented. The isolation is based on enzymatic digestion and trituration to release the satellite cells. In addition, this protocol comprises an innovative method using extracellular matrix gel coatings of millimeter size, which requires only low numbers of satellite cells for differentiation assays.

  17. Pharyngeal Satellite Cells Undergo Myogenesis Under Basal Conditions and Are Required for Pharyngeal Muscle Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E; Phillips, Brittany L; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Vest, Katherine E; Vera, Yandery; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-12-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of the nasal, oral, and laryngeal pharynxes are required for swallowing. Pharyngeal muscles are preferentially affected in some muscular dystrophies yet spared in others. Muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, may be critical factors in the development of pharyngeal muscle disorders; however, very little is known about pharyngeal satellite cells (PSC) and their role in pharyngeal muscles. We show that PSC are distinct from the commonly studied hindlimb satellite cells both transcriptionally and biologically. Under basal conditions PSC proliferate, progress through myogenesis, and fuse with pharyngeal myofibers. Furthermore, PSC exhibit biologic differences dependent on anatomic location in the pharynx. Importantly, PSC are required to maintain myofiber size and myonuclear number in pharyngeal myofibers. Together, these results demonstrate that PSC are critical for pharyngeal muscle maintenance and suggest that satellite cell impairment could contribute to pharyngeal muscle pathology associated with various muscular dystrophies and aging. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  18. A Pitx2-MicroRNA Pathway Modulates Cell Proliferation in Myoblasts and Skeletal-Muscle Satellite Cells and Promotes Their Commitment to a Myogenic Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Vallejo, Daniel; Esteban, Francisco J.; Doherty, Chris; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Franco, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of a proliferating-cell status from a quiescent state as well as the shift between proliferation and differentiation are key developmental steps in skeletal-muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to provide proper muscle regeneration. However, how satellite cell proliferation is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we report that the c-isoform of the transcription factor Pitx2 increases cell proliferation in myoblasts by downregulating microRNA 15b (miR-15b), miR-23b, miR-106b, and miR-503. This Pitx2c-microRNA (miRNA) pathway also regulates cell proliferation in early-activated satellite cells, enhancing Myf5+ satellite cells and thereby promoting their commitment to a myogenic cell fate. This study reveals unknown functions of several miRNAs in myoblast and satellite cell behavior and thus may have future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:26055324

  19. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22871.001 PMID:28332979

  20. Pre-mRNA Processing Is Partially Impaired in Satellite Cell Nuclei from Aged Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Malatesta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are responsible for the capacity of mature mammalian skeletal muscles to repair and maintain mass. During aging, skeletal muscle mass as well as the muscle strength and endurance progressively decrease, leading to a condition termed sarcopenia. The causes of sarcopenia are manifold and remain to be completely elucidated. One of them could be the remarkable decline in the efficiency of muscle regeneration; this has been associated with decreasing amounts of satellite cells, but also to alterations in their activation, proliferation, and/or differentiation. In this study, we investigated the satellite cell nuclei of biceps and quadriceps muscles from adult and old rats; morphometry and immunocytochemistry at light and electron microscopy have been combined to assess the organization of the nuclear RNP structural constituents involved in different steps of mRNA formation. We demonstrated that in satellite cells the RNA pathways undergo alterations during aging, possibly hampering their responsiveness to muscle damage.

  1. Acute effects of hindlimb unweighting on satellite cells of growing skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Edward; Darr, Kevin C.; Macius, Allison

    1994-01-01

    The proliferative behavior of satellite cells in growing rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles was examined at short periods after initiation of hindlimb unweighting. Mitotic activity of satellite cells in both muscles decreased below weight-bearing control levels within 24 h of initiation of hindlimb unweighting. This satellite cell response was equal to or greater than 48 h before any atrophic morphological changes that take place in the muscles. Suppression of mitotic activity was most severe in the soleus muscle where continuous infusion of label demonstrated that virtually all mitotic activity was abolished between 3 and 5 days. The results of this study suggest that satellite cell mitotic activity is a sensitive indicator of primary atrophic changes occurring in growing myofibers and may be a predictor of future morphological changes.

  2. Enhanced satellite cell proliferation with resistance training in elderly men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Esmarck, B; Kadi, F

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the well-documented loss of muscle mass and strength associated with aging, there is evidence for the attenuating effects of aging on the number of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of satellite cells in elderly men...... and women to 12 weeks of resistance training. Biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis of 13 healthy elderly men and 16 healthy elderly women (mean age 76+/-SD 3 years) before and after the training period. Satellite cells were visualized by immunohistochemical staining of muscle cross.......15+/-0.06; mean+/-SD) and females (from 0.11+/-0.04 to 0.13+/-0.05). These results suggest that 12 weeks of resistance training is effective in enhancing the satellite cell pool in skeletal muscle in the elderly....

  3. The quasi-parallel lives of satellite cells and atrophying muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eBiressi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy or wasting accompanies various chronic illnesses and the aging process, thereby reducing muscle function. One of the most important components contributing to effective muscle repair in postnatal organisms, the satellite cells, have recently become the focus of several studies examining factors participating in the atrophic process. We critically examine here the experimental evidence linking satellite cell function with muscle loss in connection with various diseases as well as aging, and in the subsequent recovery process. Several recent reports have investigated the changes in satellite cells in terms of their differentiation and proliferative capacity in response to various atrophic stimuli. In this regard, we review the molecular changes within satellite cells that contribute to their dysfunctional status in atrophy, with the intention of shedding light on novel potential pharmacological targets to counteract the loss of muscle mass.

  4. Rapgef2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rap1 small GTPases, plays a crucial role in adherence junction (AJ) formation in radial glial cells through ERK-mediated upregulation of the AJ-constituent protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Maged Ibrahim; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Maeta, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Tohru

    2017-11-04

    Rapgef2 and Rapgef6 define a subfamily of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rap1, characterized by possession of the Ras/Rap-associating domains and implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia. We previously found that dorsal telencephalon-specific Rapgef2 conditional knockout mice exhibits severe defects in formation of apical surface adherence junctions (AJs) and localization of radial glial cells (RGCs). In this study, we analyze the underlying molecular mechanism by using primary cultures of RGCs established from the developing cerebral cortex. The results show that Rapgef2-deficient RGCs exhibit a decreased ability of neurosphere formation, morphological changes represented by regression of radial glial (RG) fibers and reduced expression of AJ-constituent proteins such as N-cadherin, zonula occludens-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rapgef2 or Rap1A inhibits the AJ protein expression and RG fiber formation while overexpression of Rapgef2, Rapgef6, Rap1AG12V or Rap1BG12V in Rapgef2-deficient RGCs restores them. Furthermore, Rapgef2-deficient RGCs exhibit a reduction in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) leading to downregulation of the expression of c-jun, which is implicated in the AJ protein expression. These results indicate a crucial role of the Rapgef2-Rap1A-ERK-c-jun pathway in regulation of the AJ formation in RGCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. EFFECTS OF VOLUNTARY WHEEL RUNNING ON SATELLITE CELLS IN THE RAT PLANTARIS MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kojima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on satellite cells in the rat plantaris muscle. Seventeen 5-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to a control (n = 5 or training (n = 12 group. Each rat in the training group ran voluntarily in a running-wheel cage for 8 weeks. After the training period, the animals were anesthetized, and the plantaris muscles were removed, weighed, and analyzed immunohistochemically and biochemically. Although there were no significant differences in muscle weight or fiber area between the groups, the numbers of satellite cells and myonuclei per muscle fiber, percentage of satellite cells, and citrate synthase activity were significantly higher in the training group compared with the control group (p < 0.05. The percentage of satellite cells was also positively correlated with distance run in the training group (r = 0.61, p < 0.05. Voluntary running can induce an increase in the number of satellite cells without changing the mean fiber area in the rat plantaris muscle; this increase in satellite cell content is a function of distance run

  6. Retained Myogenic Potency of Human Satellite Cells from Torn Rotator Cuff Muscles Despite Fatty Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yukinori; Minowa, Takashi; Takemura, Taro; Ando, Akira; Sekiguchi, Takuya; Yabe, Yutaka; Itoi, Eiji

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common shoulder problem in the elderly that can lead to both muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration due to less physical load. Satellite cells, quiescent cells under the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers, play a major role in muscle regeneration. However, the myogenic potency of human satellite cells in muscles with fatty infiltration is unclear due to the difficulty in isolating from small samples, and the mechanism of the progression of fatty infiltration has not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the population of myogenic and adipogenic cells in disused supraspinatus (SSP) and intact subscapularis (SSC) muscles of the RCTs from the same patients using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The microstructure of the muscle with fatty infiltration was observed as a whole mount condition under multi-photon microscopy. Myogenic differentiation potential and gene expression were evaluated in satellite cells. The results showed that the SSP muscle with greater fatty infiltration surrounded by collagen fibers compared with the SSC muscle under multi-photon microscopy. A positive correlation was observed between the ratio of muscle volume to fat volume and the ratio of myogenic precursor to adipogenic precursor. Although no difference was observed in the myogenic potential between the two groups in cell culture, satellite cells in the disused SSP muscle showed higher intrinsic myogenic gene expression than those in the intact SSC muscle. Our results indicate that satellite cells from the disused SSP retain sufficient potential of muscle growth despite the fatty infiltration.

  7. Protein misfolding and oxidative stress promote glial-mediated neurodegeneration in an Alexander disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Colodner, Kenneth J; Feany, Mel B

    2011-02-23

    Although alterations in glial structure and function commonly accompany death of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, the role glia play in modulating neuronal loss is poorly understood. We have created a model of Alexander disease in Drosophila by expressing disease-linked mutant versions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in fly glia. We find aggregation of mutant human GFAP into inclusions bearing the hallmarks of authentic Rosenthal fibers. We also observe significant toxicity of mutant human GFAP to glia, which is mediated by protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Both protein aggregation and oxidative stress contribute to activation of a robust autophagic response in glia. Toxicity of mutant GFAP to glial cells induces a non-cell-autonomous stress response and subsequent apoptosis in neurons, which is dependent on glial glutamate transport. Our findings thus establish a simple genetic model of Alexander disease and further identify cellular pathways critical for glial-induced neurodegeneration.

  8. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells....... By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells....... Inactivation of the proteasome in aged cells appeared as a key contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Untargeted metabolomic profiling and functional analyses indicated glucose metabolism impairment in senescent cells, although mitochondrial respiration remained unaffected. A metabolic shift...

  9. Go and stop signals for glial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alicia; Logan, Ann

    2017-12-01

    The regenerative response of ensheating glia to central nervous system (CNS) injury involves proliferation and differentiation, axonal re-enwrapment and some recovery of behaviour. Understanding this limited response could enable the enhancement of it. In Drosophila, the glial progenitor state is maintained by Notch, an activator of cell division and Prospero (Pros), a repressor. Injury provokes the activation of NFκB and up-regulation of Kon-tiki (Kon), driving cell proliferation. Homeostatic switch-off comes about as two negative feedback loops involving Pros terminate the response. Importantly, the functions of the kon and pros homologues NG2 and prox1, respectively, are conserved in mammalian NG2 glia. Controlling these genes is key for therapeutic manipulation of progenitors and stem cells to promote regeneration of the damaged CNS. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jiang, Qinyang [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); College of Animal Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zheng, Rong, E-mail: zhengrong@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  11. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β is required for satellite cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala-Tabbert, Neena; AlSudais, Hamood; Marchildon, François; Fu, Dechen; Wiper-Bergeron, Nadine

    2016-12-07

    Postnatal growth and repair of skeletal muscle relies upon a population of quiescent muscle precursor cells, called satellite cells that can be activated to proliferate and differentiate into new myofibers, as well as self-renew to replenish the satellite cell population. The balance between differentiation and self-renewal is critical to maintain muscle tissue homeostasis, and alterations in this equilibrium can lead to chronic muscle degeneration. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is expressed in Pax7(+) satellite cells of healthy muscle and is downregulated during myoblast differentiation. Persistent expression of C/EBPβ upregulates Pax7, inhibits MyoD, and blocks myogenic differentiation. Using genetic tools to conditionally abrogate C/EBPβ expression in Pax7(+) cells, we examined the role of C/EBPβ in self-renewal of satellite cells during muscle regeneration. We find that loss of C/EBPβ leads to precocious differentiation at the expense of self-renewal in primary myoblast and myofiber cultures. After a single muscle injury, C/EBPβ-deficient satellite cells fail to self-renew resulting in a reduction of satellite cells available for future rounds of regeneration. After a second round of injury, muscle regeneration is impaired in C/EBPβ conditional knockout mice compared to wild-type control mice. We find that C/EBPβ can regulate Notch2 expression and that restoration of Notch activity in myoblasts lacking C/EBPβ prevents precocious differentiation. These findings demonstrate that C/EBPβ is a novel regulator of satellite cell self-renewal during muscle regeneration acting at least in part through Notch2.

  12. ACL injury reduces satellite cell abundance and promotes fibrogenic cell expansion within skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Johnson, Darren L; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Noehren, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated with significant loss of strength in knee extensor muscles that persists despite physical therapy. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this protracted muscle weakness are poorly understood; however, we recently showed significant myofiber atrophy and altered muscle phenotype following ACL injury. We sought to further explore perturbations in skeletal muscle morphology and progenitor cell activity following an ACL injury. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the injured and non-injured vastus lateralis of young adults (n = 10) following ACL injury, and histochemical/immunohistochemical analyses were undertaken to determine collagen content, abundance of connective tissue fibroblasts, fibrogenic/adipogenic progenitor (FAP) cells, satellite cells, in addition to indices of muscle fiber denervation and myonuclear apoptosis. The injured limb showed elevated collagen content (p injury. The injured limb also displayed reduced satellite cell abundance, increased fiber denervation and DNA damage associated with apoptosis (p muscle itself after the ligament injury. Injury of the ACL induces a myriad of negative outcomes within knee extensor muscles, which likely compromise the restorative capacity and plasticity of skeletal muscle, impeding rehabilitative efforts. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1876-1885, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. HEXIM1 controls satellite cell expansion after injury to regulate skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Peng; Chen, Kang; Huang, Bihui; Liu, Min; Cui, Miao; Rozenberg, Inna; Chaqour, Brahim; Pan, Xiaoyue; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2012-01-01

    The native capacity of adult skeletal muscles to regenerate is vital to the recovery from physical injuries and dystrophic diseases. Currently, the development of therapeutic interventions has been hindered by the complex regulatory network underlying the process of muscle regeneration. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury, we identified hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible 1 (HEXIM1, also referred to as CLP-1), the inhibitory component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, as a pivotal regulator of skeletal muscle regeneration. Hexim1-haplodeficient muscles exhibited greater mass and preserved function compared with those of WT muscles after injury, as a result of enhanced expansion of satellite cells. Transplanted Hexim1-haplodeficient satellite cells expanded and improved muscle regeneration more effectively than WT satellite cells. Conversely, HEXIM1 overexpression restrained satellite cell proliferation and impeded muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, dissociation of HEXIM1 from P-TEFb and subsequent activation of P-TEFb are required for satellite cell proliferation and the prevention of early myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest a crucial role for the HEXIM1/P-TEFb pathway in the regulation of satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration and identify HEXIM1 as a potential therapeutic target for degenerative muscular diseases. PMID:23023707

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase stimulates Warburg-like glycolysis and activation of satellite cells during muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xing; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Dodson, Mike V; Du, Min

    2015-10-30

    Satellite cells are the major myogenic stem cells residing inside skeletal muscle and are indispensable for muscle regeneration. Satellite cells remain largely quiescent but are rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, and the derived myogenic cells then fuse to repair damaged muscle fibers or form new muscle fibers. However, mechanisms eliciting metabolic activation, an inseparable step for satellite cell activation following muscle injury, have not been defined. We found that a noncanonical Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway is rapidly activated in response to muscle injury, which activates AMPK and induces a Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells. AMPKα1 is the dominant AMPKα isoform expressed in satellite cells, and AMPKα1 deficiency in satellite cells impairs their activation and myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration. Drugs activating noncanonical Shh promote proliferation of satellite cells, which is abolished because of satellite cell-specific AMPKα1 knock-out. Taken together, AMPKα1 is a critical mediator linking noncanonical Shh pathway to Warburg-like glycolysis in satellite cells, which is required for satellite activation and muscle regeneration. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Function of Membrane-Associated Proteoglycans in the Regulation of Satellite Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Muscle growth can be divided into embryonic and postnatal periods. During the embryonic period, mesenchymal stem cells proliferate and differentiate to form muscle fibers. Postnatal muscle growth (hypertrophy) is characterized by the enlargement of existing muscle fiber size. Satellite cells (also known as adult myoblasts) are responsible for hypertrophy. The activity of satellite cells can be regulated by their extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is composed of collagens, proteoglycans, non-collagenous glycoproteins, cytokines and growth factors. Proteoglycans contain a central core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycans (GAGs: chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate) and N- or O-linked glycosylation chains. Membrane-associated proteoglycans attach to the cell membrane either through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor or transmembrane domain. The GAGs can bind proteins including cytokines and growth factors. Both cytokines and growth factors play important roles in regulating satellite cell growth and development. Cytokines are generally associated with immune cells. However, cytokines can also affect muscle cell development. For instance, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leukemia inhibitory factor have been reported to affect the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and myoblasts. Growth factors are potent stimulators or inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. The proper function of some cytokines and growth factors requires an interaction with the cell membrane-associated proteoglycans to enhance the affinity to bind to their primary receptors to initiate downstream signal transduction. This chapter is focused on the interaction of membrane-associated proteoglycans with cytokines and growth factors, and their role in satellite cell growth and development.

  16. Proton irradiation effects of amorphous silicon solar cell for solar power satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yousuke; Oshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sasaki, Susumu; Kuroda, Hideo; Ushirokawa, Akio

    1997-03-01

    Flexible amorphous silicon(fa-Si) solar cell module, a thin film type, is regarded as a realistic power generator for solar power satellite. The radiation resistance of fa-Si cells was investigated by the irradiations of 3,4 and 10 MeV protons. The hydrogen gas treatment of the irradiated fa-Si cells was also studied. The fa-Si cell shows high radiation resistance for proton irradiations, compared with a crystalline silicon solar cell. (author)

  17. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yosuke, E-mail: cynagata@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  18. Depletion of Pax7+ satellite cells does not affect diaphragm adaptations to running in young or aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Confides, Amy L; Ho, Angel; Jackson, Janna R; Ghazala, Lina S; Peterson, Charlotte A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cell depletion does not affect diaphragm adaptations to voluntary wheel running in young or aged mice. Satellite cell depletion early in life (4 months of age) has minimal effect on diaphragm phenotype by old age (24 months). Prolonged satellite cell depletion in the diaphragm does not result in excessive extracellular matrix accumulation, in contrast to what has been reported in hind limb muscles. Up-regulation of Pax3 mRNA+ cells after satellite cell depletion in young and aged mice suggests that Pax3+ cells may compensate for a loss of Pax7+ satellite cells in the diaphragm. Future investigations should focus on the role of Pax3+ cells in the diaphragm during adaptation to exercise and ageing. Satellite cell contribution to unstressed diaphragm is higher compared to hind limb muscles, which is probably attributable to constant activation of this muscle to drive ventilation. Whether satellite cell depletion negatively impacts diaphragm quantitative and qualitative characteristics under stressed conditions in young and aged mice is unknown. We therefore challenged the diaphragm with prolonged running activity in the presence and absence of Pax7+ satellite cells in young and aged mice using an inducible Pax7(CreER) -R26R(DTA) model. Mice were vehicle (Veh, satellite cell-replete) or tamoxifen (Tam, satellite cell-depleted) treated at 4 months of age and were then allowed to run voluntarily at 6 months (young) and 22 months (aged). Age-matched, cage-dwelling, Veh- and Tam-treated mice without wheel access served as activity controls. Diaphragm muscles were analysed from young (8 months) and aged (24 months) mice. Satellite cell depletion did not alter diaphragm mean fibre cross-sectional area, fibre type distribution or extracellular matrix content in young or aged mice, regardless of running activity. Resting in vivo diaphragm function was also unaffected by satellite cell depletion. Myonuclear density was maintained in young satellite cell

  19. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1 the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2 when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments.

  20. Delayed administration of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects retinal ganglion cells in a pig model of acute retinal ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhn, Maria Voss; Klassen, Henry; Johansson, Ulrica Englund

    2009-01-01

    electroretinography (mfERG), quantification of NeuN positive cells and evaluation of the degree of retinal perivasculitis and inflammation 6 weeks after the insult. In the post-injection eyes (days 14, 28 and 42), the ratios of the iN1 and the iP2 amplitudes were 0.10 (95% CI: 0.05-0.15) and 0.09 (95% CI: 0.......04-0.16) in eyes treated with blank microspheres, and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.18-0.32) and 0.23 (95% CI: 0.15-0.33) in eyes treated with GDNF microspheres. These differences were statistically significant (P eyes...... injected with GDNF microspheres compared to eyes injected with blank microspheres. In eyes injected with GDNF microspheres the ganglion cell count was 9.5/field (s.e.m.: 2.1, n = 8), in eyes injected with blank microspheres it was 3.5/field (s.e.m.: 1.2, n = 7). This difference was statistically...

  1. THE ROLE OF SATELLITE CELLS IN CRUSH INJURY OF RAT SKELETON MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DilekBURUKOĞLU

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The crush type of injury in rat skeletal muscle is often used in tissue degeneration and regeneration. After crush injury muscle tissue begins to regenerate. In this process, it is accepted that satellite cells play an important role which are very sensitive to muscle injury. The aim of this microscopic study was to examine role of satellite cells in muscle regeneration in crush injury. This research was done the department of Histology&Embryology in Eskişehir Osmangazi University in 2008. Ethic approval of this study has been received. During the study, the whole essential and ethics conditionshave been done. In the study 36 Spraque-Dawley rats were used. The rats were separated into 5 groups as test and control groups. Crush type of injury has been applied on muscles of right hind extremitiesof testing group rats by applying 3.5 kg of weight for 6 hours. In according to testing periods rats were anaesthetized intraperitoneally with ketamine 30mg/kg + xylazine 10mg/kg and sacrificied 3, 7, 14 and 21-day intervals. After crush injury, increased satellite cells were particularly observed on day 7. Alsosignificant increased of satellite cells and regenerated myofibrils were detected on day 14. However, satellite cells were seen on day-21 were similar to control group. In crush injuries, number of satellitecells were markedly increased and actively involved into regeneration process of the skeleton muscle.

  2. SOX7 Is Required for Muscle Satellite Cell Development and Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashida F. Rajgara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cells are skeletal-muscle-specific stem cells that are activated by injury to proliferate, differentiate, and fuse to enable repair. SOX7, a member of the SRY-related HMG-box family of transcription factors is expressed in quiescent satellite cells. To elucidate SOX7 function in skeletal muscle, we knocked down Sox7 expression in embryonic stem cells and primary myoblasts and generated a conditional knockout mouse in which Sox7 is excised in PAX3+ cells. Loss of Sox7 in embryonic stem cells reduced Pax3 and Pax7 expression. In vivo, conditional knockdown of Sox7 reduced the satellite cell population from birth, reduced myofiber caliber, and impaired regeneration after acute injury. Although Sox7-deficient primary myoblasts differentiated normally, impaired myoblast fusion and increased sensitivity to apoptosis in culture and in vivo were observed. Taken together, these results indicate that SOX7 is dispensable for myogenesis but is necessary to promote satellite cell development and survival.

  3. MASTR directs MyoD-dependent satellite cell differentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Johnson, Aaron N.; Creemers, Esther E.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In response to skeletal muscle injury, satellite cells, which function as a myogenic stem cell population, become activated, expand through proliferation, and ultimately fuse with each other and with damaged myofibers to promote muscle regeneration. Here, we show that members of the Myocardin family

  4. Development of Space Qualified Microlens Arrays for Solar Cells Used on Satellite Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk Keser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The power system, one of the main systems of satellite, provides energy required for the satellite. Solar cells are also the most used energy source in the power system. The third generation multi-junction solar cells are known as the ones with highest performance. One of the methods to increase the performance of the solar cells is anti-reflective surface coatings with the Micro Lens Array-MLA. It's expected that satellite technologies has high power efficiency and low mass. The space environment has many effects like atomic oxygen, radiation and thermal cycles. Researches for increasing the solar cells performance shows that MLA coated solar cell has increased light absorption performance and less cell heating with very low additional mass. However, it is established that few studies on MLA coatings of solar cells are not applicable on space platforms. In this study, the process of development of MLA which is convenient to space power systems is investigated in a methodological way. In this context, a method which is developed based on MLA coatings of multi-junction solar cells for satellite power systems is presented.

  5. Pax7-Positive Cells/Satellite Cells in Human Extraocular Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Mona; Tjust, Anton E; Pedrosa Domellöf, Fatima

    2015-09-01

    We quantified and investigated the distribution of Pax7-positive cells/satellite cells (SCs) in the human extraocular muscles (EOMs). An immunofluorescence multiple-marker method simultaneously combining two SC markers (Pax7, NCAM), detection of the basement membrane (laminin) and cell nuclei (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole [DAPI]), was used on the anterior, middle, and posterior portions of EOMs from five healthy donors. Pax7-positive cell and SC content, myonuclear content, myofiber cross-sectional area, and myonuclear domain were analyzed in single cross-sections. Between 3915 and 13,536 myofibers per muscle cross-section and myofibers from the entire EOM cross-section were analyzed for quantification of Pax7-positive cells per myofiber (Pax7/F). The number of Pax7/F in the human EOMs varies along the length of the muscle with twice as high Pax7/F in the anterior part of the EOMs, but within the range of what has been previously reported for normal adult limb muscles. Furthermore, there are Pax7-positive cells in positions other than the classical SC position and the myonuclear domain size of adult EOMs is noticeably smaller than that previously reported for other adult skeletal muscles. Previous data on differences in Pax7-positive cell/SC abundance between EOMs and limb muscles must be reconsidered and the characteristics of different Pax7-positive cell populations further investigated. Higher numbers of Pax7-positive cells in the anterior portion of the EOMs may have a bearing for strabismus surgery involving sectioning of the muscle fibers.

  6. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for molecules associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studzinski Diane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines secreted by immune cells and activated glia play central roles in both the pathogenesis of and protection from damage to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods We have used gene array analysis to identify the initial direct effects of cytokines on CNS glia by comparing changes in early gene expression in CNS glial cultures treated for 6 hours with cytokines typical of those secreted by Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M. Results In two previous papers, we summarized effects of these cytokines on immune-related molecules, and on neural and glial related proteins, including neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins. In this paper, we present the effects of the cytokines on molecules involved in metabolism, signaling and regulatory mechanisms in CNS glia. Many of the changes in gene expression were similar to those seen in ischemic preconditioning and in early inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, related to ion homeostasis, mitochondrial function, neurotransmission, vitamin D metabolism and a variety of transcription factors and signaling pathways. Among the most prominent changes, all three cytokine mixtures markedly downregulated the dopamine D3 receptor, while Th1 and Th2 cytokines downregulated neuropeptide Y receptor 5. An unexpected finding was the large number of changes related to lipid metabolism, including several suggesting a switch from diacylglycerol to phosphatidyl inositol mediated signaling pathways. Using QRT-PCR we validated the results for regulation of genes for iNOS, arginase and P glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 seen at 6 hours with microarray. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures differentially regulated gene expression related to metabolism and signaling that may play roles in the pathogenesis of MS, most notably with regard to mitochondrial function and neurotransmitter

  7. Glial biology in learning and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, R Douglas; Araque, Alfonso; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Lim, Soo-Siang; Lynch, Gary; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Nedergaard, Maiken; Perez, Ray; Sejnowski, Terrence; Wake, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Neurons are exquisitely specialized for rapid electrical transmission of signals, but some properties of glial cells, which do not communicate with electrical impulses, are well suited for participating in complex cognitive functions requiring broad spatial integration and long-term temporal regulation. Astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes all have biological properties that could influence learning and cognition. Myelination by oligodendrocytes increases conduction velocity, affecting spike timing and oscillations in neuronal activity. Astrocytes can modulate synaptic transmission and may couple multiple neurons and synapses into functional assemblies. Microglia can remove synapses in an activity-dependent manner altering neural networks. Incorporating glia into a bicellular mechanism of nervous system function may help answer long-standing questions concerning the cellular mechanisms of learning and cognition. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pericytes in the myovascular niche promote post-natal myofiber growth and satellite cell quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostallari, Enis; Baba-Amer, Yasmine; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Ngoh, Pamela; Relaix, Frederic; Lafuste, Peggy; Gherardi, Romain K

    2015-04-01

    The satellite cells, which serve as adult muscle stem cells, are both located beneath myofiber basement membranes and closely associated with capillary endothelial cells. We observed that 90% of capillaries were associated with pericytes in adult mouse and human muscle. During post-natal growth, newly formed vessels with their neuroglial 2 proteoglycan (NG2)-positive pericytes became progressively associated with the post-natal muscle stem cells, as myofibers increased in size and satellite cells entered into quiescence. In vitro, human muscle-derived pericytes promoted myogenic cell differentiation through insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and myogenic cell quiescence through angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1). Diphtheria toxin-induced ablation of muscle pericytes in growing mice led both to myofiber hypotrophy and to impaired establishment of stem cells quiescence. Similar effects were observed following conditional in vivo deletion of pericyte Igf1 and Angpt1 genes, respectively. Our data therefore demonstrate that, by promoting post-natal myogenesis and stem cell quiescence, pericytes play a key role in the microvascular niche of satellite cells. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of solar cells for potential space satellite power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The evaluation focused on the following subjects: (1) the relative merits of alternative solar cell materials, based on performance and availability, (2) the best manufacturing methods for various solar cell options and the effects of extremely large production volumes on their ultimate costs and operational characteristics, (3) the areas of uncertainty in achieving large solar cell production volumes, (4) the effects of concentration ratios on solar array mass and system performance, (5) the factors influencing solar cell life in the radiation environment during transport to and in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) the merits of conducting solar cell manufacturing operations in space.

  11. The many glia of a tiny nematode: studying glial diversity using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeracka, Karolina; Heiman, Maxwell G

    2015-01-01

    Glia constitute a major, understudied population of cells in the nervous system. Currently, it is appreciated that these cells exhibit vast morphological, functional, and molecular diversity, but our understanding of glial biology is limited. Some key unanswered questions include how glial diversity is generated during development and what functions distinct glial subtypes serve in the mature nervous system. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains a defined set of glia, which have clear morphological and molecular differences, and thus provides a simplified model for understanding glial diversity. In addition, recent experiments suggest that the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of glial diversity in C. elegans are conserved with those in mammals. In this review, we summarize the surprising diversity of glial subtypes present in this simple organism, and highlight current thinking about what roles they perform in the nervous system. We emphasize how genetic approaches may be used to identify the mechanistic origins of glial diversity, which is key to understanding how glia function in health and disease. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [TRANSPLANTATION OF NEURAL STEM CELLS INDUCED BY ALL-TRANS- RETINOIC ACID COMBINED WITH GLIAL CELL LINE DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR AND CHONDROITINASE ABC FOR REPAIRING SPINAL CORD INJURY OF RATS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yehui; Zhong, Dejun; Kang, Min; Yao, Shuaihui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Yongtao

    2015-08-01

    To observe the effect of transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) induced by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) combined with glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) on the neurological functional recovery of injured spinal cord in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Sixty adult SD female rats, weighing 200-250 g, were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 12): sham operation group (group A), SCI model group (group B), NSCs+GDNF treatment group (group C), NSCs+ChABC treatment group (group D), and NSCs+GDNF+ChABC treatment group (group E). T10 segmental transversal injury model of the spinal cord was established except group A. NSCs induced by ATRA and marked with BrdU were injected into the site of injury at 8 days after operation in groups C-E. Groups C-E were treated with GDNF, ChABC, and GDNF+ChABC respectively at 8-14 days after operation; and group A and B were treated with the same amount of saline solution. Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) score and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) test were used to study the functional improvement at 1 day before remodeling, 7 days after remodeling, and at 1, 2, 5, and 8 weeks after transplantation. Immunofluorescence staining and HE staining were performed to observe the cells survival and differentiation in the spinal cord. Five mouse died but another rats were added. At each time point after modeling, BBB score of groups B, C, D, and E was significantly lower than that of group A, and SEP latent period was significantly longer than that of group A (P transplantation (P > 0.05). BBB score of groups C, D, and E was significantly higher than that of group B, and SEP latent period was significantly shorter than that of group B at 2, 5, and 8 weeks after transplantation (P spinal cord and regular arrangement of cells in group A; there were incomplete vascular morphology, irregular arrangement of cells, scar, and cysts in group B; there were obvious cell hyperplasia and smaller cysts in groups C

  13. A New Outlook on Mental Illnesses: Glial Involvement Beyond the Glue

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Maha

    2015-12-16

    Mental illnesses have long been perceived as the exclusive consequence of abnormalities in neuronal functioning. Until recently, the role of glial cells in the pathophysiology of mental diseases has largely been overlooked. However recently, multiple lines of evidence suggest more diverse and significant functions of glia with behavior-altering effects. The newly ascribed roles of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia have led to their examination in brain pathology and mental illnesses. Indeed, abnormalities in glial function, structure and density have been observed in postmortem brain studies of subjects diagnosed with mental illnesses. In this review, we discuss the newly identified functions of glia and highlight the findings of glial abnormalities in psychiatric disorders. We discuss these preclinical and clinical findings implicating the involvement of glial cells in mental illnesses with the perspective that these cells may represent a new target for treatment.

  14. Peripheral administration of the selective inhibitor of soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) XPro®1595 attenuates nigral cell loss and glial activation in 6-OHDA hemiparkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnum, Christopher J; Chen, Xi; Chung, Jaegwon; Chang, Jianjun; Williams, Martha; Grigoryan, Nelly; Tesi, Raymond J; Tansey, Malú G

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex multi-system age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Targeting the ongoing neuroinflammation in PD patients is one strategy postulated to slow down or halt disease progression. Proof-of-concept studies from our group demonstrated that selective inhibition of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (solTNF) by intranigral delivery of dominant negative TNF (DN-TNF) inhibitors reduced neuroinflammation and nigral dopamine (DA) neuron loss in endotoxin and neurotoxin rat models of nigral degeneration. As a next step toward human clinical trials, we aimed to determine the extent to which peripherally administered DN-TNF inhibitor XPro®1595 could: i) cross the blood-brain-barrier in therapeutically relevant concentrations, ii) attenuate neuroinflammation (microglia and astrocyte), and iii) mitigate loss of nigral DA neurons in rats receiving a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) striatal lesion. Rats received unilateral 6-OHDA (20 μg into the right striatum). Three or 14 days after lesion, rats were dosed with XPro®1595 (10 mg/kg in saline, subcutaneous) every third day for 35 days. Forelimb asymmetry was used to assess motor deficits after the lesion; brains were harvested 35 days after the lesion for analysis of XPro®1595 levels, glial activation and nigral DA neuron number. Peripheral subcutaneous dosing of XPro®1595 achieved plasma levels of 1-8 microgram/mL and CSF levels of 1-6 ng/mL depending on the time the rats were killed after final XPro®1595 injection. Irrespective of start date, XPro®1595 significantly reduced microglia and astrocyte number in SNpc whereas loss of nigral DA neurons was attenuated when drug was started 3, but not 14 days after the 6-OHDA lesion. Our data suggest that systemically administered XPro®1595 may have disease-modifying potential in PD patients where inflammation is part of their pathology.

  15. Neuronal Subtype and Satellite Cell Tropism Are Determinants of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virulence in Human Dorsal Root Ganglia Xenografts In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Zerboni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV, a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella during primary infection. VZV reactivation from neuronal latency may cause herpes zoster, post herpetic neuralgia (PHN and other neurologic syndromes. To investigate VZV neuropathogenesis, we developed a model using human dorsal root ganglia (DRG xenografts in immunodeficient (SCID mice. The SCID DRG model provides an opportunity to examine characteristics of VZV infection that occur in the context of the specialized architecture of DRG, in which nerve cell bodies are ensheathed by satellite glial cells (SGC which support neuronal homeostasis. We hypothesized that VZV exhibits neuron-subtype specific tropism and that VZV tropism for SGC contributes to VZV-related ganglionopathy. Based on quantitative analyses of viral and cell protein expression in DRG tissue sections, we demonstrated that, whereas DRG neurons had an immature neuronal phenotype prior to implantation, subtype heterogeneity was observed within 20 weeks and SGC retained the capacity to maintain neuronal homeostasis longterm. Profiling VZV protein expression in DRG neurons showed that VZV enters peripherin+ nociceptive and RT97+ mechanoreceptive neurons by both axonal transport and contiguous spread from SGC, but replication in RT97+ neurons is blocked. Restriction occurs even when the SGC surrounding the neuronal cell body were infected and after entry and ORF61 expression, but before IE62 or IE63 protein expression. Notably, although contiguous VZV spread with loss of SGC support would be predicted to affect survival of both nociceptive and mechanoreceptive neurons, RT97+ neurons showed selective loss relative to peripherin+ neurons at later times in DRG infection. Profiling cell factors that were upregulated in VZV-infected DRG indicated that VZV infection induced marked pro-inflammatory responses, as well as proteins of the interferon pathway and neuroprotective responses. These neuropathologic changes

  16. Assessment of Glial Scar, Tissue Sparing, Behavioral Recovery and Axonal Regeneration following Acute Transplantation of Genetically Modified Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamedshina, Yana O; Garanina, Ekaterina E; Masgutova, Galina A; Galieva, Luisa R; Sanatova, Elvira R; Chelyshev, Yurii A; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the potential for protective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MCs) genetically modified with the VEGF and GNDF genes on contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. An adenoviral vector was constructed for targeted delivery of VEGF and GDNF to UCB-MCs. Using a rat contusion SCI model we examined the efficacy of the construct on tissue sparing, glial scar severity, the extent of axonal regeneration, recovery of motor function, and analyzed the expression of the recombinant genes VEGF and GNDF in vitro and in vivo. Transplantation of UCB-MCs transduced with adenoviral vectors expressing VEGF and GDNF at the site of SCI induced tissue sparing, behavioral recovery and axonal regeneration comparing to the other constructs tested. The adenovirus encoding VEGF and GDNF for transduction of UCB-MCs was shown to be an effective and stable vehicle for these cells in vivo following the transplantation into the contused spinal cord. Our results show that a gene delivery using UCB-MCs-expressing VEGF and GNDF genes improved both structural and functional parameters after SCI. Further histological and behavioral studies, especially at later time points, in animals with SCI after transplantation of genetically modified UCB-MCs (overexpressing VEGF and GDNF genes) will provide additional insight into therapeutic potential of such cells.

  17. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cell Activation Following Cutaneous Burn in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    cultures of SJL/J and BALB/C skeletal muscle. Exp Cell Res 1994;211(1):99–107. [37] Yablonka-Reuveni Z, Rivera AJ. Temporal expression of regulatory...precursor cells. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2004;287(6):C1753–62. [41] Yasuhara S, Perez ME, Kanakubo E, Yasuhara Y, Shin YS, Kaneki M, Fujita T, Martyn JA...Yasuhara S, Kanakubo E, Perez ME, Kaneki M, Fujita T, Okamoto T, Martyn JA. The 1999 Moyer award, Burn injury induces skeletal muscle apoptosis and

  18. The expression pattern of PKCtheta in satellite cells of normal and regenerating muscle in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokugawa, Seiji; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hirata, Miyuki; Oda, Ryo; Morisaki, Shinsuke; Yasuhara, Masahiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2009-06-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme in regulating a variety of cellular functions. PKCtheta is the most abundant PKC isoform expressed in skeletal muscle. However, the functional role of PKCtheta linked to muscle regeneration has not yet been identified. Using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, we investigated the expression patterns of PKCtheta in normal and regenerating tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in the rat. The amount of PKCtheta mRNA in the muscle increased from the 4th to 6th post-surgical day. Immunofluorescence revealed PKCtheta protein in quiescent satellite cells identified by c-Met. PKCtheta immunoreactivity was not observed in many proliferating satellite cells by labeling with BrdU in the regenerating muscle. At 4, 6 and 10 days postsurgery, PKCtheta immunoreactivity was observed in half the differentiating satellite cells labeling with myogenin. After 4 and 6 days, the localization of PKCtheta coincided with those of Pax7 and TGF-beta. Thus, PKCtheta may play an important role in inhibiting differentiation and maintaining the quiescent satellite cells in muscle regeneration.

  19. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  20. Reduced satellite cell numbers with spinal cord injury and aging in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdijk, L.B.; Dirks, M.L.; Snijders, T.; Prompers, J.J.; Beelen, M.; Jonkers, R.A.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Loon, L.J. van

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Both sarcopenia and spinal cord injury (SCI) are characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Despite obvious similarities in atrophy between both models, differences in muscle fiber size and satellite cell content may exist on a muscle fiber type-specific level.

  1. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the astrocyte intermediate filament system in diseases of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, Elly M.; Pekny, Milos

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the hallmark intermediate filament (IF; also known as nanofilament) protein in astrocytes, a main type of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Astrocytes have a range of control and homeostatic functions in health and disease. Astrocytes assume a

  2. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the astrocyte intermediate filament system in diseases of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, E.M.; Pekny, M.

    2015-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the hallmark intermediate filament (IF; also known as nanofilament) protein in astrocytes, a main type of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Astrocytes have a range of control and homeostatic functions in health and disease. Astrocytes assume a

  3. Ionotropic ATP receptors in neuronal-glial communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Pankratov, Yuri

    2011-04-01

    In the central nervous system ATP is released from both neurones and astroglial cells acting as a homo- and heterocellular neurotransmitter. Glial cells express numerous purinoceptors of both ionotropic (P2X) and metabotropic (P2Y) varieties. Astroglial P2X receptors can be activated by ongoing synaptic transmission and can mediate fast local signalling through elevation in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and Na(+) concentrations. These ionic signals can be translated into various physiological messages by numerous pathways, including release of gliotransmitters, metabolic support of neurones and regulation of activity of postsynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors. Ionotropic purinoceptors represent a novel pathway of glia-driven modulation of synaptic signalling that involves the release of ATP from neurones and astrocytes followed by activation of P2X receptors which can regulate synaptic activity by variety of mechanisms expressed in both neuronal and glial compartments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Injury-induced ctgfa directs glial bridging and spinal cord regeneration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokalled, Mayssa H; Patra, Chinmoy; Dickson, Amy L; Endo, Toyokazu; Stainier, Didier Y R; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-11-04

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish efficiently regenerate functional nervous system tissue after major spinal cord injury. Whereas glial scarring presents a roadblock for mammalian spinal cord repair, glial cells in zebrafish form a bridge across severed spinal cord tissue and facilitate regeneration. We performed a genome-wide profiling screen for secreted factors that are up-regulated during zebrafish spinal cord regeneration. We found that connective tissue growth factor a (ctgfa) is induced in and around glial cells that participate in initial bridging events. Mutations in ctgfa disrupted spinal cord repair, and transgenic ctgfa overexpression or local delivery of human CTGF recombinant protein accelerated bridging and functional regeneration. Our study reveals that CTGF is necessary and sufficient to stimulate glial bridging and natural spinal cord regeneration. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the influence of these drugs on muscle satellite cells is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a local NSAID infusion on satellite cells after unaccustomed eccentric...... exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... cells (CD68(+) or CD16(+) cells) was not significantly increased in either of the legs 8 days after exercise and was unaffected by the NSAID. The main finding in the present study was that the NSAID infusion for 7.5 h during the exercise day suppressed the exercise-induced increase in the number...

  6. Glial kon/NG2 gene network for central nervous system repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Losada-Perez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The glial regenerative response to central nervous system (CNS injury, although limited, can be harnessed to promote regeneration and repair. Injury provokes the proliferation of ensheathing glial cells, which can differentiate to remyelinate axons, and partially restore function. This response is evolutionarily conserved, strongly implying an underlying genetic mechanism. In mammals, it is elicited by NG2 glia, but most often newly generated cells fail to differentiate. Thus an important goal had been to find out how to promote glial differentiation following the proliferative response. A gene network involving Notch and prospero (pros controls the balance between glial proliferation and differentiation in flies and mice, and promotes CNS repair at least in fruit-flies. A key missing link had been how to relate the function of NG2 to this gene network. Recent findings by Losada-Perez et al., published in JCB, demonstrated that the Drosophila NG2 homologue kon-tiki (kon is functionally linked to Notch and pros in glia. By engaging in two feedback loops with Notch and Pros, in response to injury, Kon can regulate both glial cell number and glial shape homeostasis, essential for repair. Drosophila offers powerful genetics to unravel the control of stem and progenitor cells for regeneration and repair.

  7. Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through satellite cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Somik [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Yin, Hongshan [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Third Affiliated Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang 050051, Hebei (China); Nam, Deokhwa [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Li, Yong [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ma, Ke, E-mail: kma@houstonmethodist.org [Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Circadian clock is an evolutionarily conserved timing mechanism governing diverse biological processes and the skeletal muscle possesses intrinsic functional clocks. Interestingly, although the essential clock transcription activator, Brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), participates in maintenance of muscle mass, little is known regarding its role in muscle growth and repair. In this report, we investigate the in vivo function of Bmal1 in skeletal muscle regeneration using two muscle injury models. Bmal1 is highly up-regulated by cardiotoxin injury, and its genetic ablation significantly impairs regeneration with markedly suppressed new myofiber formation and attenuated myogenic induction. A similarly defective regenerative response is observed in Bmal1-null mice as compared to wild-type controls upon freeze injury. Lack of satellite cell expansion accounts for the regeneration defect, as Bmal1{sup −/−} mice display significantly lower satellite cell number with nearly abolished induction of the satellite cell marker, Pax7. Furthermore, satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts devoid of Bmal1 display reduced growth and proliferation ex vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that Bmal1 is an integral component of the pro-myogenic response that is required for muscle repair. This mechanism may underlie its role in preserving adult muscle mass and could be targeted therapeutically to prevent muscle-wasting diseases. - Highlights: • Bmal1 is highly inducible by muscle injury and myogenic stimuli. • Genetic ablation of Bmal1 significantly impairs muscle regeneration. • Bmal1 promotes satellite cell expansion during muscle regeneration. • Bmal1-deficient primary myoblasts display attenuated growth and proliferation.

  8. Homocysteine Induces Glial Reactivity in Adult Rat Astrocyte Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Aline; Bellaver, Bruna; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Santos, Camila Leite; Nonose, Yasmine; Kolling, Janaina; Dos Santos, Tiago M; de Assis, Adriano M; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wyse, Angela T S

    2017-03-02

    Astrocytes are dynamic glial cells associated to neurotransmitter systems, metabolic functions, antioxidant defense, and inflammatory response, maintaining the brain homeostasis. Elevated concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) are involved in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. In line with this, our hypothesis was that Hcy could promote glial reactivity in a model of cortical primary astrocyte cultures from adult Wistar rats. Thus, cortical astrocytes were incubated with different concentrations of Hcy (10, 30, and 100 μM) during 24 h. After the treatment, we analyzed cell viability, morphological parameters, antioxidant defenses, and inflammatory response. Hcy did not induce any alteration in cell viability; however, it was able to induce cytoskeleton rearrangement. The treatment with Hcy also promoted a significant decrease in the activities of Na(+), K(+) ATPase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), as well as in the glutathione (GSH) content. Additionally, Hcy induced an increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In an attempt to elucidate the putative mechanisms involved in the Hcy-induced glial reactivity, we measured the nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) transcriptional activity and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, which were activated and inhibited by Hcy, respectively. In summary, our findings provide important evidences that Hcy modulates critical astrocyte parameters from adult rats, which might be associated to the aging process.

  9. Ectopic development of skeletal muscle induced by subcutaneous transplant of rat satellite cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Fukushima

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the ectopic development of the rat skeletal muscle originated from transplanted satellite cells. Satellite cells (10(6 cells obtained from hindlimb muscles of newborn female 2BAW Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously into the dorsal area of adult male rats. After 3, 7, and 14 days, the transplanted tissues (N = 4-5 were processed for histochemical analysis of peripheral nerves, inactive X-chromosome and acetylcholinesterase. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs were also labeled with tetramethylrhodamine-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The development of ectopic muscles was successful in 86% of the implantation sites. By day 3, the transplanted cells were organized as multinucleated fibers containing multiple clusters of nAChRs (N = 2-4, resembling those from non-innervated cultured skeletal muscle fibers. After 7 days, the transplanted cells appeared as a highly vascularized tissue formed by bundles of fibers containing peripheral nuclei. The presence of X chromatin body indicated that subcutaneously developed fibers originated from female donor satellite cells. Differently from the extensor digitorum longus muscle of adult male rat (87.9 ± 1.0 µm; N = 213, the diameter of ectopic fibers (59.1 µm; N = 213 did not obey a Gaussian distribution and had a higher coefficient of variation. After 7 and 14 days, the organization of the nAChR clusters was similar to that of clusters from adult innervated extensor digitorum longus muscle. These findings indicate the histocompatibility of rats from 2BAW colony and that satellite cells transplanted into the subcutaneous space of adult animals are able to develop and fuse to form differentiated skeletal muscle fibers.

  10. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  11. Domoic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mainly Mediated by the AMPA/KA Receptor: Comparison between Immature and Mature Primary Cultures of Neurons and Glial Cells from Rat Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena T. Hogberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid (DomA is a naturally occurring shellfish toxin that can induce brain damage in mammalians. Neonates have shown increased sensitivity to DomA-induced toxicity, and prenatal exposure has been associated with e.g. decreased brain GABA levels, and increased glutamate levels. Here, we evaluated DomA-induced toxicity in immature and mature primary cultures of neurons and glial cells from rat cerebellum by measuring the mRNA levels of selected genes. Moreover, we assessed if the induced toxicity was mediated by the activation of the AMPA/KA and/or the NMDA receptor. The expression of all studied neuronal markers was affected after DomA exposure in both immature and mature cultures. However, the mature cultures seemed to be more sensitive to the treatment, as the effects were observed at lower concentrations and at earlier time points than for the immature cultures. The DomA effects were completely prevented by the antagonist of the AMPA/KA receptor (NBQX, while the antagonist of the NMDA receptor (APV partly blocked the DomA-induced effects. Interestingly, the DomA-induced effect was also partly prevented by the neurotransmitter GABA. DomA exposure also affected the mRNA levels of the astrocytic markers in mature cultures. These DomA-induced effects were reduced by the addition of NBQX, APV, and GABA.

  12. Subretinal Glial Membranes in Eyes With Geographic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Malia M; McLeod, D Scott; Bhutto, Imran A; Grebe, Rhonda; Duffy, Maeve; Lutty, Gerard A

    2017-03-01

    Müller cells create the external limiting membrane (ELM) by forming junctions with photoreceptor cells. This study evaluated the relationship between focal photoreceptors and RPE loss in geographic atrophy (GA) and Müller cell extension into the subretinal space. Human donor eyes with no retinal disease or geographic atrophy (GA) were fixed and the eye cups imaged. The retinal posterior pole was stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; astrocytes and activated Müller cells) and vimentin (Müller cells) while the submacular choroids were labeled with Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin lectin (blood vessels). Choroids and retinas were imaged using a Zeiss 710 confocal microscope. Additional eyes were cryopreserved or processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to better visualize the Müller cells. Vimentin staining of aged control retinas (n = 4) revealed a panretinal cobblestone-like ELM. While this pattern was also observed in the GA retinas (n = 7), each also had a distinct area in which vimentin+ and vimentin+/GFAP+ processes created a subretinal membrane. Subretinal glial membranes closely matched areas of RPE atrophy in the gross photos. Choroidal vascular loss was also evident in these atrophic areas. Smaller glial projections were noted, which correlated with drusen in gross photos. The presence of glia in the subretinal space was confirmed by TEM and cross cross-section immunohistochemistry. In eyes with GA, subretinal Müller cell membranes present in areas of RPE atrophy may be a Müller cell attempt to replace the ELM. These membranes could interfere with treatments such as stem cell therapy.

  13. Sleep and immune function: glial contributions and consequences of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingiosi, Ashley M; Opp, Mark R; Krueger, James M

    2013-10-01

    The reciprocal interactions between sleep and immune function are well-studied. Insufficient sleep induces innate immune responses as evidenced by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in the brain and periphery. Conversely, immune challenges upregulate immunomodulator expression, which alters central nervous system-mediated processes and behaviors, including sleep. Recent studies indicate that glial cells, namely microglia and astrocytes, are active contributors to sleep and immune system interactions. Evidence suggests glial regulation of these interactions is mediated, in part, by adenosine and adenosine 5'-triphosphate actions at purinergic type 1 and type 2 receptors. Furthermore, microglia and astrocytes may modulate declines in sleep-wake behavior and immunity observed in aging. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. C-Phycocyanin protects against acute tributyltin chloride neurotoxicity by modulating glial cell activity along with its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory property: A comparative efficacy evaluation with N-acetyl cysteine in adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2015-08-05

    Spirulina is a widely used health supplement and is a dietary source of C-Phycocyanin (CPC), a potent anti-oxidant. We have previously reported the neurotoxic potential of tributyltin chloride (TBTC), an environmental pollutant and potent biocide. In this study, we have evaluated the protective efficacy of CPC against TBTC induced neurotoxicity. To evaluate the extent of neuroprotection offered by CPC, its efficacy was compared with the degree of protection offered by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (a well known neuroprotective drug, taken as a positive control). Male Wistar rats (28 day old) were administered with 20mg/kg TBTC (oral) and 50mg/kg CPC or 50mg/kg NAC (i.p.), alone or in combination, and various parameters were evaluated. These include blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage; redox parameters (ROS, GSH, redox pathway associated enzymes, oxidative stress markers); inflammatory, cellular, and stress markers; apoptotic proteins and in situ cell death assay (TUNEL). We observed increased CPC availability in cortical tissue following its administration. Although BBB associated proteins like claudin-5, p-glycoprotein and ZO-1 were restored, CPC/NAC failed to protect against TBTC induced overall BBB permeability (Evans blue extravasation). Both CPC and NAC remarkably reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. NAC effectively modulated redox pathway associated enzymes whereas CPC countered ROS levels efficiently. Interestingly, CPC and NAC were equivalently capable of reducing apoptotic markers, astroglial activation and cell death. This study illustrates the various pathways involved in CPC mediated neuroprotection against this environmental neurotoxicant and highlights its capability to modulate glial cell activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of turkey myogenic satellite cell migration by MicroRNAs miR-128 and miR-24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velleman, S G; Harding, R L

    2017-06-01

    Myogenic satellite cells are an adult stem cell responsible for all post-hatch muscle growth in poultry. As a stem cell population, satellite cells are highly heterogeneous, but the origin of this heterogeneity remains unclear. Heterogeneity is, in part, regulated by gene expression. One method of endogenous gene regulation that may contribute to heterogeneity is microRNAs (miRNAs). Two miRNAs previously shown to regulate poultry myogenic satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, miR-128 and miR-24, were studied to determine if they also affected satellite cell migration. Satellite cell migration is an essential step for both proliferation and differentiation. During proliferation, satellite cells will migrate and align to form new myofibers or donate their nuclei to existing myofibers leading to muscle fiber hypertrophy or regeneration. Transient transfection of miRNA specific mimics to each miRNA reduced migration of satellite cells following a cell culture scratch at 72 h of proliferation when the cultures were 90 to 100% confluent. However, only the migration in cells transfected with miR-24 mimics at 24 and 30 h following the scratch was significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) to around 70% of the distance migrated by controls. Alternately, transfection with inhibitors specific to miR-128 or miR-24 significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased migration between 147 and 252% compared to their controls between 24 and 48 h following the scratch. These data demonstrate that miR-128 and miR-24 play a role in myogenic satellite cell migration, which will impact muscle development and growth. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Changes in satellite cells in human skeletal muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crameri, Regina M; Langberg, Henning; Magnusson, Peter

    2004-01-01

    No studies to date have reported activation of satellite cells in vivo in human muscle after a single bout of high intensity exercise. In this investigation, eight individuals performed a single bout of high intensity exercise with one leg, the contralateral leg being the control. A significant...... increase in mononuclear cells staining for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) and fetal antigen 1 (FA1) were observed within the exercised human vastus lateralis muscle on days 4 and 8 post exercise. In addition, a significant increase in the concentration of the FA1 protein was determined...

  17. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory...... factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth...... control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  18. Satellite cell response to erythropoietin treatment and endurance training in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoedt, Andrea; Christensen, Britt; Nellemann, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    KEY POINT: Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment may induce myogenic differentiation factor (MyoD) expression and prevent apoptosis in satellite cells (SCs) in murine and in vitro models. Endurance training stimulates SC proliferation in vivo in murine and human skeletal muscle. In the present study, we......-receptor interaction. Moreover, endurance training, but not Epo treatment, increases the SC content in type II myofibres, as well as the content of MyoD(+) SCs. Collectively, our results suggest that Epo treatment can regulate human SCs in vivo, supported by Epo receptor mRNA expression in human SCs. In effect, long......-term Epo treatment during disease conditions involving anaemia may impact SCs and warrants further investigation. Satellite cell (SC) proliferation is observed following erythropoitin treatment in vitro in murine myoblasts and endurance training in vivo in human skeletal muscle. The present study aimed...

  19. Glial Scar Borders Are Formed by Newly Proliferated, Elongated Astrocytes That Interact to Corral Inflammatory and Fibrotic Cells via STAT3-Dependent Mechanisms after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A.; Song, Bingbing; Levine, Jaclynn; Fernandez, Ana; Gray-Thompson, Zachary; Ao, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Astroglial scars surround damaged tissue after trauma, stroke, infection, or autoimmune inflammation in the CNS. They are essential for wound repair, but also interfere with axonal regrowth. A better understanding of the cellular mechanisms, regulation, and functions of astroglial scar formation is fundamental to developing safe interventions for many CNS disorders. We used wild-type and transgenic mice to quantify and dissect these parameters. Adjacent to crush spinal cord injury (SCI), reactive astrocytes exhibited heterogeneous phenotypes as regards proliferation, morphology, and chemistry, which all varied with distance from lesions. Mature scar borders at 14 d after SCI consisted primarily of newly proliferated astroglia with elongated cell processes that surrounded large and small clusters of inflammatory, fibrotic, and other cells. During scar formation from 5 to 14 d after SCI, cell processes deriving from different astroglia associated into overlapping bundles that quantifiably reoriented and organized into dense mesh-like arrangements. Selective deletion of STAT3 from astroglia quantifiably disrupted the organization of elongated astroglia into scar borders, and caused a failure of astroglia to surround inflammatory cells, resulting in increased spread of these cells and neuronal loss. In cocultures, wild-type astroglia spontaneously corralled inflammatory or fibromeningeal cells into segregated clusters, whereas STAT3-deficient astroglia failed to do so. These findings demonstrate heterogeneity of reactive astroglia and show that scar borders are formed by newly proliferated, elongated astroglia, which organize via STAT3-dependent mechanisms to corral inflammatory and fibrotic cells into discrete areas separated from adjacent tissue that contains viable neurons. PMID:23904622

  20. Molecular basis of the myogenic profile of aged human skeletal muscle satellite cells during differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Puglielli, Cristina; Mancinelli, Rosa; Beccafico, Sara; Fanò, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass, strength and function. Human muscle proteins are synthesized at a slower rate in the elderly than in young adults, leading to atrophy and muscle mass loss with a decline in the functional capability. Additionally, aging is accompanied by a decrease in the ability of muscle tissue to regenerate following injury or overuse due to the impairment of intervening satellite cells, in which we previously reported oxidative damage ...

  1. Diverse roles for the ror-family receptor tyrosine kinases in neurons and glial cells during development and repair of the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Mitsuharu; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-03

    The Ror-family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are involved critically in tissue genesis and organogenesis during development. In mammals, Ror1 and Ror2, members of the Ror-family RTKs, have been shown to mediate cell polarity, migration, proliferation, and differentiation through the activation of noncanonical Wnt signaling by acting as receptors or co-receptors for Wnt5a. Nematodes bearing mutations within the cam-1 gene, encoding a Ror2 ortholog, exhibit defects in various developmental processes of the nervous system, including neuronal cell migration, polarization, axonal extension, and synaptic transmission. In mice, Ror2 and/or Ror1 are also shown to play roles in regulating neurite extension, synapse formation, and synaptic transmission of hippocampal neurons, indicating that the Ror-family RTKs have evolutionarily conserved functions at least in part in neurons during development. Furthermore, Ror2 and/or Ror1 are expressed in neural stem/progenitor cells of the developing brain and in astrocytes of the adult brain after injury, and they play important roles in regulating cell proliferation under these different contexts. In this article, we overview recent advances in our understanding of the roles of the Ror-family RTKs in the development and repair of the nervous system and discuss their potential for therapeutic targets to neurodegenerative diseases. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemic injury in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury including cell swelling, increased free radical production, ...

  3. Cerebral glial tumors and human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection. More than a coincidental association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulignier, A; Mikol, J; Pialoux, G; Eliaszewicz, M; Thurel, C; Thiebaut, J B

    1994-07-15

    The authors describe the clinical and morphologic patterns in four patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed intracranial glial tumors. This retrospective study reports 70 patients at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy for an intracerebral space-occupying lesion. Of these patients, four had glial tumors: one astroblastoma, two astrocytomas, and one glioblastoma. Glial tumors probably arise from a complex interplay of factors; possibilities include the activation of a dominant oncogene or viral inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene by a viral promoter (like the tat protein), impairment of immune defenses (which facilitates the growth of astrocytomas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia), production of cellular growth factors, cytokines, possible infection of glial cells by HIV, and the potentiation of a coinfectious agent. These cases illustrate that glial tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain masses in HIV-1 infection, especially because specific treatment for these tumors is available. Moreover, t