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Sample records for satellite control laboratory

  1. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...

  2. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements....

  3. Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Conti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions will involve satellites with great autonomy and stringent pointing precision, requiring of the Attitude Control Systems (ACS with better performance than before, which is function of the control algorithms implemented on board computers. The difficulties for developing experimental ACS test is to obtain zero gravity and torque free conditions similar to the SCA operate in space. However, prototypes for control algorithms experimental verification are fundamental for space mission success. This paper presents the parameters estimation such as inertia matrix and position of mass centre of a Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator (SACSS, using algorithms based on least square regression and least square recursive methods. Simulations have shown that both methods have estimated the system parameters with small error. However, the least square recursive methods have performance more adequate for the SACSS objectives. The SACSS platform model will be used to do experimental verification of fundamental aspects of the satellite attitude dynamics and design of different attitude control algorithm.

  4. Congestion control in satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Do Jun

    Due to exponential increases in internet traffic, Active Queue Management (AQM) has been heavily studied by numerous researchers. However, little is known about AQM in satellite networks. A microscopic examination of queueing behavior in satellite networks is conducted to identify problems with applying existing AQM methods. A new AQM method is proposed to overcome the problems and it is validated using a realistic emulation environment and a mathematical model. Three problems that were discovered during the research are discussed in this dissertation. The first problem is oscillatory queueing, which is caused by high buffering due to Performance Enhancing Proxy (PEP) in satellite networks where congestion control after the PEP buffering does not effectively control traffic senders. Existing AQMs that can solve this problem have tail drop queueing that results in consecutive packet drops (global synchronization). A new AQM method called Adaptive Virtual Queue Random Early Detection (AVQRED) is proposed to solve this problem. The second problem is unfair bandwidth sharing caused by inaccurate measurements of per-flow bandwidth usage. AVQRED is enhanced to accurately measure per-flow bandwidth usage to solve this problem without adding much complexity to the algorithm. The third problem is queueing instability caused by buffer flow control where TCP receive windows are adjusted to flow control traffic senders instead of dropping received packets during congestion. Although buffer flow control is quite attractive to satellite networks, queueing becomes unstable because accepting packets instead of dropping them aggravates the congestion level. Furthermore, buffer flow control has abrupt reductions in the TCP receive window size due to high PEP buffering causing more instability. AVQRED with packet drop is proposed to solve this problem. Networks with scarce bandwidth and high propagation delays can not afford to have an unstable AQM. In this research, three problems

  5. Satellite Spacecraft Charging Control Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    MAAG, private comunication (3) A. PAILLOUS, Mise au point de matdriaux combinant la qualitf de rdflecteurs solaires et une bonne conductibilit...AD-A087 675 OFFICE NATIONAL D’EUDES ET DE RECHERCHES AEROSPATIALE--ETC F/G 22/2 SATELLITE SPACECRAFT CHARGING CONTROL MATERIALS*(U) APR 80 8 BENAISSA...this problem of outgassing (6)* The composite is obtained by lamin- ating at 280 C the quartz fabric with a FEP film and an aluminum (6) A.E. EAGLES et

  6. Satellite Attitude Control Using Only Electromagnetic Actuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    of the work was on the class of periodic systems reflecting orbital motion of the satellite. In addition to a theoretical treatment, the thesis contains a large portion of application considerations. The controllers developed were implemented for the Danish Ørsted satellite. The control concept considered......The primary purpose of this work was to develop control laws for three axis stabilization of a magnetic actuated satellite. This was achieved by a combination of linear and nonlinear system theory. In order to reach this goal new theoretical results were produced in both fields. The focus...... was that interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and a magnetic field generated by a set of coils in the satellite can be used for actuation. Magnetic torquing was found attractive for generation of control torques on small satellites, since magnetic control systems are relatively lightweight, require low power...

  7. Satellite Formation Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hajovsky, Blake B

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the use of a linear quadratic terminal controller to reconfigure satellite formations using atmospheric drag actuated control while minimizing the loss of energy of the formation...

  8. Geo satellite attitude and orbit control: fixed orbit control thrasters

    OpenAIRE

    Ermoshkin, Yu; V. Raevsky; Urusov, V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the enhanced application ofhigh-economical electro-jet orbit control thrusters for geostationary satellites; in particular, generation of controlling moments to the benefit of satellite attitude determination and control subsystems in the course of orbit control maneuvers ongoing. The scheme with thrusters fixed on a satellite body is analyzed. Possible orbit control session procedures are proposed on the basis of controlling moments generation. Advantages and disadvantage...

  9. Digital frequency control of satellite frequency standards. [Defense Navigation Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    In the Frequency and Time Standard Development Program of the TIMATION System, a new miniaturized rubidium vapor frequency standard has been tested and analyzed for possible use on the TIMATION 3A launch, as part of the Defense Navigation Satellite Development Program. The design and construction of a digital frequency control was required to remotely control this rubidium vapor frequency standard as well as the quartz oscillator in current use. This control must be capable of accepting commands from a satellite telemetry system, verify that the correct commands have been sent and control the frequency to the requirements of the system. Several modifications must be performed to the rubidium vapor frequency standard to allow it to be compatible with the digital frequency control. These include the addition of a varactor to voltage tune the coarse range of the flywheel oscillator, and a modification to supply the C field current externally. The digital frequency control for the rubidium vapor frequency standard has been successfully tested in prototype form.

  10. Congestion control and routing over satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinhua

    Satellite networks and transmissions find their application in fields of computer communications, telephone communications, television broadcasting, transportation, space situational awareness systems and so on. This thesis mainly focuses on two networking issues affecting satellite networking: network congestion control and network routing optimization. Congestion, which leads to long queueing delays, packet losses or both, is a networking problem that has drawn the attention of many researchers. The goal of congestion control mechanisms is to ensure high bandwidth utilization while avoiding network congestion by regulating the rate at which traffic sources inject packets into a network. In this thesis, we propose a stable congestion controller using data-driven, safe switching control theory to improve the dynamic performance of satellite Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management (TCP/AQM) networks. First, the stable region of the Proportional-Integral (PI) parameters for a nominal model is explored. Then, a PI controller, whose parameters are adaptively tuned by switching among members of a given candidate set, using observed plant data, is presented and compared with some classical AQM policy examples, such as Random Early Detection (RED) and fixed PI control. A new cost detectable switching law with an interval cost function switching algorithm, which improves the performance and also saves the computational cost, is developed and compared with a law commonly used in the switching control literature. Finite-gain stability of the system is proved. A fuzzy logic PI controller is incorporated as a special candidate to achieve good performance at all nominal points with the available set of candidate controllers. Simulations are presented to validate the theory. An effocient routing algorithm plays a key role in optimizing network resources. In this thesis, we briefly analyze Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite networks, review the Cross Entropy (CE

  11. Laboratory Reference Spectroscopy of Icy Satellite Candidate Surface Materials (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J. B.; Jamieson, C. S.; Shirley, J. H.; Pitman, K. M.; Kariya, M.; Crandall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of our knowledge of icy satellite composition continues to be derived from ultraviolet, visible and infrared remote sensing observations. Interpretation of remote sensing observations relies on availability of laboratory reference spectra of candidate surface materials. These are compared directly to observations, or incorporated into models to generate synthetic spectra representing mixtures of the candidate materials. Spectral measurements for the study of icy satellites must be taken under appropriate conditions (cf. Dalton, 2010; also http://mos.seti.org/icyworldspectra.html for a database of compounds) of temperature (typically 50 to 150 K), pressure (from 10-9 to 10-3 Torr), viewing geometry, (i.e., reflectance), and optical depth (must manifest near infrared bands but avoid saturation in the mid-infrared fundamentals). The Planetary Ice Characterization Laboratory (PICL) is being developed at JPL to provide robust reference spectra for icy satellite surface materials. These include sulfate hydrates, hydrated and hydroxylated minerals, and both organic and inorganic volatile ices. Spectral measurements are performed using an Analytical Spectral Devices FR3 portable grating spectrometer from .35 to 2.5 microns, and a Thermo-Nicolet 6500 Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer from 1.25 to 20 microns. These are interfaced with the Basic Extraterrestrial Environment Simulation Testbed (BEEST), a vacuum chamber capable of pressures below 10-9 Torr with a closed loop liquid helium cryostat with custom heating element capable of temperatures from 30-800 Kelvins. To generate optical constants (real and imaginary index of refraction) for use in nonlinear mixing models (i.e., Hapke, 1981 and Shkuratov, 1999), samples are ground and sieved to six different size fractions or deposited at varying rates to provide a range of grain sizes for optical constants calculations based on subtractive Kramers-Kronig combined with Hapke forward modeling (Dalton and

  12. Analytical laboratory quality control charting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Ervin F.

    2001-06-11

    In life the importance of setting goals is stressed. The desired end result must be envisioned to chart a path and determine indicators to provide feedback on the process. Quality does not happen by accident but is achieved through a constant process of setting goals, process development, monitoring process indicators, fine tuning the process, and achieving results. These goals are to be focused and clearly measurable. In industry and life the setting of goals with clear process indicators is often difficult because of the variable end result and scarcity of measurements. Laboratories are fortunate in that they have a plethora of measurements with known or desired end results (controls) to monitor the process and give instantaneous feedback on quality. A key quality tool used by the laboratory to monitor and evaluate the lab processes is control charting. When properly utilized Quality Control (QC) Charts allow labs to be proactive in addressing problems rather than reactive. Several methods are available for control charting and some are listed in the references/information sources. The content for this paper is based on the control-charting program utilized at the Department of Energy's Fernald site. This control-charting program has specific areas of emphasis, simple charts, trend analyses, and effective follow-up.

  13. Self Growing Remote Controlled Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Cornel Samoila; Petrica Cotfas; Doru E Ursutiu

    2006-01-01

    In the last few years, focused on the collaboration with a team from Carinthia Tech Institute Villach -Austria, we have tried to develop a remote controlled laboratory in the Electronic Engineering field at the “Transilvania†University of Brasov. The main idea of this paper is to present the improvement of our LabVIEW Server, access control and service management. The work was concentrated to develop an interface for our server which provides the possibility to simultaneously connec...

  14. Rotation of an oblate satellite: Chaos control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolski, M.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: This paper investigates the chaotic rotation of an oblate satellite in the context of chaos control. Methods: A model of planar oscillations, described with the Beletskii equation, was investigated. The Hamiltonian formalism was utilized to employ a control method for suppressing chaos. Results: An additive control term, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the potential, is constructed. This allows not only for significantly diminished diffusion of the trajectory in the phase space, but turns the purely chaotic motion into strictly periodic motion.

  15. A standard satellite control reference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Constance

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a Satellite Control Reference Model that provides the basis for an approach to identify where standards would be beneficial in supporting space operations functions. The background and context for the development of the model and the approach are described. A process for using this reference model to trace top level interoperability directives to specific sets of engineering interface standards that must be implemented to meet these directives is discussed. Issues in developing a 'universal' reference model are also identified.

  16. Optimal control of electrodynamic tether satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert E.

    Low thrust propulsion systems offer a fuel-efficient means to maneuver satellites to new orbits, however they can only perform such maneuvers when they are continuously operated for a long time. Such long-term maneuvers occur over many orbital revolutions often rendering short time scale trajectory optimization methods ineffective. An approach to multirevolution, long time scale optimal control of an electrodynamic tether is investigated for a tethered satellite system in Low Earth Orbit with atmospheric drag. Control is assumed to be periodic over several orbits since under the assumptions of a nearly circular orbit, periodic control yields the only solution that significantly contributes to secular changes in the orbital parameters. The optimal control problem is constructed in such a way as to maneuver the satellite to a new orbit while minimizing a cost function subject to the constraints of the time-averaged equations of motion by controlling current in the tether. To accurately capture the tether orbital dynamics, libration is modeled and controlled over long time scales in a similar manner to the orbital states. Libration is addressed in two parts; equilibrium and stability analysis, and control. Libration equations of motion are derived and analyzed to provide equilibrium and stability criteria that define the constraints of the design. A new libration mean square state is introduced and constrained to maintain libration within an acceptable envelope throughout a given maneuver. Optimal control solutions are achieved using a pseudospectral method that maneuver an electrodynamic tether to new orbits over long time scales while managing librational motion using only current in a wire.

  17. Students Partner with Laboratory Staff to Modernize LES-9 Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    orbiting counterpart, a satellite model built by Minuteman Technical High School students and Laboratory staff hangs reminiscent of one of the...communications satellite was developed for the U.S. Air Force and designed to operate in coplanar, circular, inclined, and geosynchronous orbits . Royster...Laboratory’s first pioneering inventions, the Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES) family. Launched on 14 March 1976, LES-9 is the last in a series of

  18. Environmental testing philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories small satellite project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cap, J.S.; Rackley, N.G.

    1996-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is the system integrator on a small satellite project. Following the intent of the NASA GEVS document, an integrated test philosophy was formulated to certify the satellite for flight. The purpose of this paper is to present that philosophy.

  19. On-board congestion control for satellite packet switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Pong P.

    1991-01-01

    It is desirable to incorporate packet switching capability on-board for future communication satellites. Because of the statistical nature of packet communication, incoming traffic fluctuates and may cause congestion. Thus, it is necessary to incorporate a congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing to smooth and regulate the bursty traffic. Although there are extensive studies on congestion control for both baseband and broadband terrestrial networks, these schemes are not feasible for space based switching networks because of the unique characteristics of satellite link. Here, we propose a new congestion control method for on-board satellite packet switching. This scheme takes into consideration the long propagation delay in satellite link and takes advantage of the the satellite's broadcasting capability. It divides the control between the ground terminals and satellite, but distributes the primary responsibility to ground terminals and only requires minimal hardware resource on-board satellite.

  20. Relative tracking control of constellation satellites considering inter-satellite link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakoor, M.; Amozegary, F.; Bakhtiari, M.; Daneshjou, K.

    2017-11-01

    In this article, two main issues related to the large-scale relative motion of satellites in the constellation are investigated to establish the Inter Satellite Link (ISL) which means the dynamic and control problems. In the section related to dynamic problems, a detailed and effective analytical solution is initially provided for the problem of satellite relative motion considering perturbations. The direct geometric method utilizing spherical coordinates is employed to achieve this solution. The evaluation of simulation shows that the solution obtained from the geometric method calculates the relative motion of the satellite with high accuracy. Thus, the proposed analytical solution will be applicable and effective. In the section related to control problems, the relative tracking control system between two satellites will be designed in order to establish a communication link between the satellites utilizing analytical solution for relative motion of satellites with respect to the reference trajectory. Sliding mode control approach is employed to develop the relative tracking control system for body to body and payload to payload tracking control. Efficiency of sliding mode control approach is compared with PID and LQR controllers. Two types of payload to payload tracking control considering with and without payload degree of freedom are designed and suitable one for practical ISL applications is introduced. Also, Fuzzy controller is utilized to eliminate the control input in the sliding mode controller.

  1. 21 CFR 226.58 - Laboratory controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory controls. 226.58 Section 226.58 Food...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES Product Quality Control § 226.58... standards of identity, strength, quality, and purity. Laboratory controls shall include: (a) The...

  2. Modeling and control of a gravity gradient stabilised satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aage Skullestad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes attitude control, i.e., 3-axes stabilisation and pointing, of a proposed Norwegian small gravity gradient stabilized satellite to be launched into low earth orbit. Generally, a gravity gradient stabilised system has limited stability and pointing capabilities, and wheels and/or magnetic coils are added in order to improve the attitude control. The best attitude accuracy is achieved using wheels, which can give accuracies down to less than one degree, but wheels increase the complexity and cost of the satellite. Magnetic coils allow cheaper satellites, and are an attractive solution to small, inexpensive satellites in low earth orbits and may provide an attitude control accuracy of a few degrees. Scientific measurements often require accurate attitude control in one or two axes only. Combining wheel and coil control may, in these cases, provide the best solutions. The simulation results are based on a linearised mathematical model of the satellite.

  3. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  4. Satellite Attitude Control System Design considering the Fuel Slosh Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Gadelha de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the satellite attitude control system (ACS becomes more complex when the satellite structure has different type of components like, flexible solar panels, antennas, mechanical manipulators, and tanks with fuel. A crucial interaction can occur between the fuel slosh motion and the satellite rigid motion during translational and/or rotational manoeuvre since these interactions can change the satellite centre of mass position damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. Although, a well-designed controller can suppress such disturbances quickly, the controller error pointing may be limited by the minimum time necessary to suppress such disturbances thus affecting the satellite attitude acquisition. As a result, the design of the satellite controller needs to explore the limits between the conflicting requirements of performance and robustness. This paper investigates the effects of the interaction between the liquid motion (slosh and the satellite dynamics in order to predict what the damage to the controller performance and robustness is. The fuel slosh dynamics is modelled by a pendulum which parameters are identified using the Kalman filter technique. This information is used to design the satellite controller by the linear quadratic regulator (LQR and linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG methods to perform a planar manoeuvre assuming thrusters are actuators.

  5. A Robust Controller Structure for Pico-Satellite Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Martin Nygaard; Green, Martin; Kristensen, Mads

    This paper describes the development of a robust controller structure for use in pico-satellite missions. The structure relies on unknown disturbance estimation and use of robust control theory to implement a system that is robust to both unmodeled disturbances and parameter uncertainties. As one...... possible application, a satellite mission with the purpose of monitoring shipping routes for oil spills has been considered. However, it is the aim of the control structure to be widely applicable and adaptable for a vide variety of pico-satellite missions. The robust control structure has been evaluated...

  6. Sliding Mode Attitude Control for Magnetic Actuated Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1998-01-01

    control torques can only be generated perpendicular to the local geomagnetic field vector. This has been a serious obstacle for using magnetorquer based control for three-axis attitude control. This paper deals with three-axis stabilization of a low earth orbit satellite. The problem of controlling......Magnetic torquing is attractive as a control principle on small satellites. The actuation principle is to use the interaction between the earth's magnetic field and magnetic field generated by a coil set in the satellite. This control principle is inherently nonlinear, and difficult to use because...... the spacecraft attitude using only magnetic torquing is realized in the form of the sliding mode control. A three dimensional sliding manifold is proposed, and it is shown that the satellite motion on the sliding manifold is asymptotically stable...

  7. Quality Control in Clinical Laboratory Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    standards. Product Development Custom and OEM Research, Design & Development Bulk Manufacturing I Component Manufacturing I Custom Microorganism ...that controls were well within established parameters and calibrations were valid . The laboratories queried the analyzer manufacturer and expressed...experience includes 18 years in clinical laboratory medicine as well as three years as a research toxicologist. Maj. Cordy F. Herring Ill, USAF, MT

  8. An absolute calibration source for laboratory and satellite infrared spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoli, A R; Hickey, J R; Nelson, R E

    1967-07-01

    A compact blackbody source with an operating range of -40 degrees C to + 60 degrees C, utilizing thermoelectric heat pumping for uniform and stable temperature control, has been developed. The blackbody radiator (target) consists of a blackened honeycomb cavity array coupled to four matched, two-stage (cascade type) thermoelectric modules. This array, located within a temperature-regulated baffle system, produces a blackbody of high emissivity (>0.995) with small thermal gradients over the source area (65 cm(2)). Heat pumping of the target and baffles is controlled, independently, by two interference-free, proportional regulators which provide linear thermal control in both the heating and cooling modes of operation. Additional features of this blackbody source include excellent stability and rapid response to input temperature changes. Provisions are made for temperature monitoring at five locations on the target and at the center of each of the four baffle units. Performance characteristics and test results obtained in nonabsorbing atmospheres and under vacuum conditions are presented, as are the details of construction and operation.

  9. High Precision Control of Ship-Mounted Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohsen, Soltani; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2007-01-01

    The telecommunication on a modern merchandise ship is maintained by means of satellite communication. The task of the tracking system is to position the on-board antenna toward a chosen satellite. The control system is capable of rejecting the external disturbances which affect on the under...

  10. Improving Gram stain proficiency in hospital and satellite laboratories that do not have microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Street, Cassandra; Matlock, Margaret; Cole, Lisa; Brierre, Francoise

    2017-03-01

    Consolidation of laboratories has left many hospitals and satellite laboratories with minimal microbiologic testing. In many hospitals and satellite laboratories, Gram stains on primary specimens are still performed despite difficultly in maintaining proficiency. To maintain Gram stain proficiency at a community 450-bed hospital with an active emergency room we designed bimonthly challenges that require reporting Gram staining and morphology of different organisms. The challenges consist of five specimens prepared by the reference microbiology laboratory from cultures and primary specimens. Twenty to 23 medical laboratory scientists participate reading the challenges. Results from the challenges are discussed with each medical laboratory scientists. In addition, printed images from the challenges are presented at huddle to add microbiology knowledge. On the first three challenges, Gram staining was read correctly in 71%-77% of the time while morphology 53%-66%. In the last six challenges correct answers for Gram stain were 77%-99% while morphology 73%-96%. We observed statistically significant improvement when reading Gram stains by providing frequent challenges to medical laboratory scientists. The clinical importance of Gram stain results is emphasized during huddle presentations increasing knowledge and motivation to perform the test for patients.

  11. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  12. SATELLITE RADIO IN A REMOTE AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Nechaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote system of air traffic control with the use of channels of satellite communication systems while providing the desired protection level of information exchange is considered.

  13. Efficient mission control for the 48-satellite Globalstar Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dan

    1994-11-01

    The Globalstar system is being developed by Globalstar, Limited Partnership and will utilize 48 satellites in low earth orbit (See Figure 1) to create a world-wide mobile communications system consistent with Vice President Gore's vision of a Global Information Infrastructure. As a large long term commercial system developed by a newly formed organization, Globalstar provides an excellent opportunity to explore innovative solutions for highly efficient satellite command and control. Design and operational concepts being developed are unencumbered by existing physical and organizational infrastructures. This program really is 'starting with a clean sheet of paper'. Globalstar operations challenges can appear enormous. Clearly, assigning even a single person around the clock to monitor and control each satellite is excessive for Globalstar (it would require a staff of 200] . Even with only a single contact per orbit per satellite, data acquisitions will start or stop every 45 seconds] Although essentially identical, over time the satellites will develop their own 'personalities'and will re quire different data calibrations and levels of support. This paper discusses the Globalstar system and challenges and presents engineering concepts, system design decisions, and operations concepts which address the combined needs and concerns of satellite, ground system, and operations teams. Lessons from past missions have been applied, organizational barriers broken, partnerships formed across the mission segments, and new operations concepts developed for satellite constellation management. Control center requirements were then developed from the operations concepts.

  14. Control of satellite imaging formations in multi-body regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Kathleen C.; Millard, Lindsay D.

    2009-03-01

    Libration point orbits may be ideal locations for satellite imaging formations. Therefore, control of these arrays in multi-body regimes is critical. A continuous feedback control algorithm is developed that maintains a formation of satellites in motion that is bounded relative to a halo orbit. This algorithm is derived based on the dynamic characteristics of the phase space near periodic orbits in the circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP). By adjusting parameters of the control algorithm appropriately, satellites in the formation follow trajectories that are particularly advantageous to imaging arrays. Image reconstruction and coverage of the ( u, v) plane are simulated for interferometric satellite configurations, demonstrating potential applications of the algorithm and the resulting motion.

  15. A Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.; Sukumar, V.; Bhasin, P. S.; Arun Kumar, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme called "Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control of a Real Time Nonlinear System." The idea is based upon the fact that project-based learning motivates students to learn actively and to use their engineering skills acquired in their previous years of study. It also fosters initiative and focuses…

  16. Testing a Constrained MPC Controller in a Process Control Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis A.; Blankespoor, Wesley; Budman, Hector M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment performed by the fourth year chemical engineering students in the process control laboratory at the University of Waterloo. The objective of this experiment is to test the capabilities of a constrained Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to control the operation of a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger (DPHE) in real time.…

  17. MITRA Virtual laboratory for operative application of satellite time series for land degradation risk estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nole, Gabriele; Scorza, Francesco; Lanorte, Antonio; Manzi, Teresa; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    This paper aims to present the development of a tool to integrate time series from active and passive satellite sensors (such as of MODIS, Vegetation, Landsat, ASTER, COSMO, Sentinel) into a virtual laboratory to support studies on landscape and archaeological landscape, investigation on environmental changes, estimation and monitoring of natural and anthropogenic risks. The virtual laboratory is composed by both data and open source tools specifically developed for the above mentioned applications. Results obtained for investigations carried out using the implemented tools for monitoring land degradation issues and subtle changes ongoing on forestry and natural areas are herein presented. In detail MODIS, SPOT Vegetation and Landsat time series were analyzed comparing results of different statistical analyses and the results integrated with ancillary data and evaluated with field survey. The comparison of the outputs we obtained for the Basilicata Region from satellite data analyses and independent data sets clearly pointed out the reliability for the diverse change analyses we performed, at the pixel level, using MODIS, SPOT Vegetation and Landsat TM data. Next steps are going to be implemented to further advance the current Virtual Laboratory tools, by extending current facilities adding new computational algorithms and applying to other geographic regions. Acknowledgement This research was performed within the framework of the project PO FESR Basilicata 2007/2013 - Progetto di cooperazione internazionale MITRA "Remote Sensing tecnologies for Natural and Cultural heritage Degradation Monitoring for Preservation and valorization" funded by Basilicata Region Reference 1. A. Lanorte, R Lasaponara, M Lovallo, L Telesca 2014 Fisher-Shannon information plane analysis of SPOT/VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series to characterize vegetation recovery after fire disturbance International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and

  18. Precision tethered satellite attitude control. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft possess unique dynamic characteristics which make them advantageous for certain classes of experiments. One use for which tethers are particularly well suited is to provide an isolated platform for spaceborne observatories. The advantages of tethering a pointing platform 1 or 2 km from a space shuttle or space station are that, compared to placing the observatory on the parent spacecraft, vibrational disturbances are attenuated and contamination is eliminated. In practice, all satellites have some requirement on the attitude control of the spacecraft, and tethered satellites are no exception. It has previously been shown that conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are insufficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. This is due mainly to the relatively large force applied by the tether to the spacecraft. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use this tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. A demonstration of this attitude control technique on an astrophysical pointing platform has been proposed for a space shuttle flight test project and is referred to as the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment (KITE).

  19. ACTS TDMA network control. [Advanced Communication Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, T.; Campanella, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents basic network control concepts for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) System. Two experimental systems, called the low-burst-rate and high-burst-rate systems, along with ACTS ground system features, are described. The network control issues addressed include frame structures, acquisition and synchronization procedures, coordinated station burst-time plan and satellite-time plan changes, on-board clock control based on ground drift measurements, rain fade control by means of adaptive forward-error-correction (FEC) coding and transmit power augmentation, and reassignment of channel capacities on demand. The NASA ground system, which includes a primary station, diversity station, and master control station, is also described.

  20. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice..., 2013 Vol. 78 No. 206. This new meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply...

  1. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government and DoD contractors...

  2. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products...

  3. Satellite technology and the control of parasitic diseases in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential application of these techniques in the surveillance, control and prevention of parasitic diseases in Africa is explored in this write-up. Keywords: surveillance, parasitic diseases, satellite techniques, remote sensing, Geographical Information System (GIS), Global Positioning Sytem (GPS), human and robotic, ...

  4. [The network of official medicines control laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, K-H; Wanko, R

    2014-10-01

    Licensing, control and surveillance by competent authorities is the basis for ensuring efficacy, safety and quality of medicines in Europe. The control of the quality of medicines by national control laboratories, known as Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) is an essential step in this process; it encompasses controls before and after granting a marketing authorisation. For certain groups of biomedical medicines (vaccines for human and veterinary use, medicines derived from human plasma) even each batch is controlled before it can be placed on the market. As single OMCLs would not be able to cope with their task, given the large number and diversity of medicines, in 1994 the OMCL network was founded upon initiative of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare, in close collaboration with the Commission of the European Union. Currently 68 OMCLs from 39 countries are part of the network. Prerequisite for the smooth operation of the OMCL network is the harmonisation of the quality management system of the individual OMCLs, based on the ISO 17025 standard, internal guidelines and the European Pharmacopoeia. Compliance with these standards is checked through regular audits, thus creating the basis for mutual recognition of test results. The collaboration in the OMCL network for the surveillance of the medicines market, the official control authority batch release and the fight against counterfeiting and illegal medicines enables OMCLs to keep pace with the developments in the field of medicines and to control the broad spectrum of medicines. In the 20 years since its start, the OMCL network has become a European success story.

  5. Domain Specific Languages for Efficient Satellite Control Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Andreas; Beet, Martin

    2016-08-01

    We present the motivation and an approach for the efficient development of satellite control software (flight software, onboard software) based on domain specific languages. Significant technological advances in the field of language workbenches have enabled us to develop extensions to the C programming language specific to the needs of satellite flight software. The approach is very promising as it combines the flexibility and efficiency of the C language with high-level abstractions known from modeling-tools and allows for additional adaptation specific to the space domain.

  6. Tuning RED parameters in satellite networks using control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Mukundan; Durresi, Arjan; Chellappan, Sriram; Ozbay, Hitay; Jain, Raj

    2003-08-01

    Congestion in the Internet results in wasted bandwidth and also stands in the way of guaranteeing QoS. The effect of congestion is multiplied many fold in Satellite networks, where the resources are very expensive. Thus congestion control has a special significance in the performance of Satellite networks. In today's Internet, congestion control is implemented mostly using some form of the de facto standard, RED. But tuning of parameters in RED has been a major problem throughout. Achieving high throughput with corresponding low delays is the main goal in parameter setting. It is also desired to keep the oscillations in the queue low to reduce jitter, so that the QoS guarantees can be improved. In this paper, we use a previously linearized fluid flow model of TCP-RED to study the performance and stability of the Queue in the router. We use classical control tools like Tracking Error minimization and Delay Margin to study the performance, stability of the system. We use the above-mentioned tools to provide guidelines for setting the parameters in RED, such that the throughput, delay and jitter of the system are optimized. Thus we provide guidelines for optimizing satellite IP networks. We apply our results exclusively for optimizing the performance of satellite networks, where the effects of congestion are much pronounced and need for optimization is much important. We use ns simulator to validate our results to support our analysis.

  7. Automatic charge control system for satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, B. M.; Cohen, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    The SCATHA and the ATS-5 and 6 spacecraft provided insights to the problem of spacecraft charging at geosychronous altitudes. Reduction of the levels of both absolute and differential charging was indicated, by the emission of low energy neutral plasma. It is appropriate to complete the transition from experimental results to the development of a system that will sense the state-of-charge of a spacecraft, and, when a predetermined threshold is reached, will respond automatically to reduce it. A development program was initiated utilizing sensors comparable to the proton electrostatic analyzer, the surface potential monitor, and the transient pulse monitor that flew in SCATHA, and combine these outputs through a microprocessor controller to operate a rapid-start, low energy plasma source.

  8. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iacob

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents practical laboratories for teaching purpose in Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA systems. A SCADA system is described in terms of architecture, process interfaces, functionality, and application development facilities. These concepts are implemented on an integrated automation system, particularly for digital control of electric drives with a distributed peripheral, i.e., Totally Integrated Automation with Democase from Siemens. Using this system, a wide range of applications can be designed, implemented and tested. A practical labs set is presented to introduce gradually the main SCADA elements, and finally to develop an application to control an induction motor in interlocked manual/automatic mode, with touch-screen Human Machine Interface (HMI. The system employs industrial busses like PROFIBus and industrial Ethernet. The SCADA system also shows trends, alarms, motor frequency and automatic sequence of motor speed profile.

  9. Attitude Control of a Satellite by using Digital Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adirelle C. Santana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article has discussed the development of a three-axis attitude digital controller for an artificial satellite using a digital signal processor. The main motivation of this study is the attitude control system of the satellite Multi-Mission Platform, developed by the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research for application in different sort of missions. The controller design was based on the theory of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator, synthesized from the linearized model of the motion of the satellite, i.e., the kinematics and dynamics of attitude. The attitude actuators considered in this study are pairs of cold gas jets powered by a pulse width/pulse frequency modulator. In the first stage of the project development, a system controller for continuous time was studied with the aim of testing the adequacy of the adopted control. The next steps had included an analysis of discretization techniques, the setting time of sampling rate, and the testing of the digital version of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian Regulator controller in the MATLAB/SIMULINK. To fulfill the study, the controller was implemented in a digital signal processor, specifically the Blackfin BF537 from Analog Devices, along with the pulse width/pulse frequency modulator. The validation tests used a scheme of co-simulation, where the model of the satellite was simulated in MATLAB/SIMULINK, while the controller and modulator were processed in the digital signal processor with a tool called Processor-In-the-Loop, which acted as a data communication link between both environments.function and required time to achieve a given mission accuracy are determined, and results are provided as illustration.

  10. External quality control for embryology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Jose Antonio; Ruiz de Assín, Rafael; Gonzalvo, Maria Carmen; Clavero, Ana; Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Vergara, Francisco; Martínez, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Participation in external quality control (EQC) programmes is recommended by various scientific societies. Results from an EQC programme for embryology laboratories are presented. This 5-year programme consisted of the annual delivery of (i) materials to test toxicity and (ii) a DVD/CD-ROM with images of zygotes and embryos on days 2 and 3, on the basis of which the participants were asked to judge the embryo quality and to take a clinical decision. A high degree of agreement was considered achieved when over 75% of the laboratories produced similar classifications. With respect to the materials analysed, the specificity was 68% and the sensitivity was 83%. Concerning embryo classification, the proportion of embryos on which a high degree of agreement was achieved increased during this period from 35% to 55%. No improvement was observed in the degree of agreement on the clinical decision to be taken. Day-3 embryos produced a higher degree of agreement (58%) than did day-2 embryos (32%) (Pembryology laboratories. Copyright (c) 2009 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pathology Laboratories and Infection Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory health care workers are vulnerable to infection with the Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs while receiving, handling and disposing biological samples. Ideally the infrastructure of the lab should be according to the best practices like good ventilation, room pressure differential, lighting, space adequacy, hand hygiene facilities, personal protective equipments, biological safety cabinets etc. Disinfection of the environment, and specific precautions with sharps and microbial cultures should follow the protocols and policies of the Infection Prevention and Control Practices (IPAC. If Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Legionella pneumophila are expected, diagnostic tests should be performed in a bio-safety level 3 facilities (for agents which may cause serious or potentially lethal disease in healthy adults after inhalation. Laboratory access should be limited only to people working in it.Along with the advent of new technologies and advanced treatment we are now facing problems with the dreadful HAIs with Antimicrobial Resistant Organisms (AROs which is taking a pandemic form. According to WHO, hundreds of millions of patients develop HAI every year worldwide and as many as 1.4 million occur each day in hospitals alone. The principal goals for hospital IPAC programs are to protect the patient, protect the health care worker (HCW, visitors, and other persons in the health environment, and to accomplish the previous goals in a cost-effective manner like hand hygiene, surveillance, training of the HCWs, initiating awareness programs and making Best Practices and Guidelines to be followed by everyone in the hospital.The initiation for the best practices in the Pathology Laboratories can be either Sporadic or Organizational. Sporadic initiation is when the laboratories make their own IPAC policies. It has been seen that in few centres these policies have been conceptualized but not materialized. Organizational initiation is much more

  12. Drag-Free Control and Drag Force Recovery of Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh N.; Conklin, John W.

    2017-01-01

    -free control systems for passive satellites. In both cases, the test mass position, GPS tracking data, and commanded actuation, either thrust or suspension system, can be analyzed to estimate the 3-axis drag forces acting on the satellite. The data produces the most precise maps of upper atmospheric drag forces and with additional information, detailed models that describe the dynamics of the upper atmosphere and its impact on all satellites that orbit the Earth. This paper highlights the history, applications, design, laboratory technology development and highly detailed simulation results of each control system.

  13. The evolution of satellite-monitored radio tags for large whales: One laboratory's experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Bruce; Mesecar, Roderick; Lagerquist, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    Despite several centuries of whaling and directed research, there are only a few whale stocks whose year-round whereabouts are reasonably well known. For the vast majority of depleted populations, the link between seasonal feeding and breeding concentrations remains unknown. This lack of information on range, seasonal distribution, stock structure, and migration routes makes it difficult to design and implement effective conservation measures to promote recovery. The use of such information would have been valuable to develop stock-specific quotas for whaling, but now it may be even more important for recovery of depleted stocks and identifying anthropogenic threats throughout a depleted stock's range. Building upon the preliminary findings of Discovery tags and more recent photo identification studies, satellite-monitored radio tags are now providing range and seasonal distribution information for many stocks of depleted large whales. These parameters are important to better estimate population abundance, characterize habitats, identify threats to recovery, and design effective protection measures when needed. This paper traces one laboratory's experience with the development of satellite-monitored radio tag technology for large whales, including attachment mechanisms and delivery systems, in the hope that others will profit from our successes and our mistakes. Selected examples are used to demonstrate how such tags contribute to new insights about whales' habitats, migrations, behaviour, and management.

  14. SIDRA instrument for measurements of particle fluxes at satellite altitudes. Laboratory prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, O. V.; Prieto, M.; Kurbatov, E. V.; Sanchez, S.; Timakova, T. G.; Spassky, A. V.; Dubina, V. N.; Parra, P.

    2013-01-01

    The design concept and first set of results are presented for electronic modules of a laboratory prototype of the small-size satellite instrument SIDRA intended for measurements of charged particle fluxes in outer space. The working prototype consists of a detector assembly based on high-purity silicon and fast scintillation detectors, modules of analogue and digital processing, and a secondary power supply module. The first results are discussed of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the instrument with the use of the GEANT4 toolkit and of measurements of the main parameters of charge-sensitive pre-amplifiers, shapers, and peak detectors. Results of calibration measurements with the use of radioactive sources and beams of accelerated charged particles are presented.

  15. V-SIPAL - A VIRTUAL LABORATORY FOR SATELLITE IMAGE PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Buddhiraju

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a virtual laboratory for the Satellite Image Processing and Analysis (v-SIPAL being developed at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay is described. v-SIPAL comprises a set of experiments that are normally carried out by students learning digital processing and analysis of satellite images using commercial software. Currently, the experiments that are available on the server include Image Viewer, Image Contrast Enhancement, Image Smoothing, Edge Enhancement, Principal Component Transform, Texture Analysis by Co-occurrence Matrix method, Image Indices, Color Coordinate Transforms, Fourier Analysis, Mathematical Morphology, Unsupervised Image Classification, Supervised Image Classification and Accuracy Assessment. The virtual laboratory includes a theory module for each option of every experiment, a description of the procedure to perform each experiment, the menu to choose and perform the experiment, a module on interpretation of results when performed with a given image and pre-specified options, bibliography, links to useful internet resources and user-feedback. The user can upload his/her own images for performing the experiments and can also reuse outputs of one experiment in another experiment where applicable. Some of the other experiments currently under development include georeferencing of images, data fusion, feature evaluation by divergence andJ-M distance, image compression, wavelet image analysis and change detection. Additions to the theory module include self-assessment quizzes, audio-video clips on selected concepts, and a discussion of elements of visual image interpretation. V-SIPAL is at the satge of internal evaluation within IIT Bombay and will soon be open to selected educational institutions in India for evaluation.

  16. AUTOMATION OF THE SYSTEM OF INTERNAL LABORATORY QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Z. Stetsyuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quality control system base d on the principles of standardi zation of all phases of laboratory testing and analysis of internal laboratory quality control and external quality assessment. For the detection accuracy of the results of laboratory tests, carried out internally between the laboratory and laboratory quality control. Under internal laboratory quality control we understand measurement results of each analysis in each anal ytical series rendered directly in the lab every day. The purpose of internal laboratory control - identifying and eliminating unacceptable deviations from standard perfor mance test in the laboratory, i.e. identifying and eliminating harmful analytical errors. The solutions to these problems by implementing automated systems - software that allows you to optimize analytical laboratory research stage of the procedure by automatically creating process control charts was shown.

  17. Autonomous Attitude Determination and Control System for the Ørsted Satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Wisniewski, Rafal; Blanke, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system.......The Ørsted Satellite mission imposes comparatively high requirements on autonomy of the attitude control system....

  18. Laboratory tests of sludge-control additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatnall, R.E. [MIC Associates, Inc., Chadds Ford, PA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Laboratory {open_quotes}jar{close_quotes} tests compared eleven different fuel oil and diesel fuel sludge-control additives. Factors studied included (1) ability to disperse and prevent buildup of sludge deposits on surfaces, (2) ability to protect steel from corrosion, (3) ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of bacteria, and (4) ability to disperse water. Results varied greatly, and it was found that many commercial products do not do what they claim. It is concluded that fuel retailers should not believe manufacturers` claims for their additive products, but rather should test such products themselves to be sure that the benefits of treatment are real. A simplified form of the procedure used here is proposed as one way for dealers to do such testing.

  19. Analog neural network control method proposed for use in a backup satellite control mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors propose to use an analog neural network controller implemented in hardware, independent of the active control system, for use in a satellite backup control mode. The controller uses coarse sun sensor inputs. The field of view of the sensors activate the neural controller, creating an analog dead band with respect to the direction of the sun on each axis. This network controls the orientation of the vehicle toward the sunlight to ensure adequate power for the system. The attitude of the spacecraft is stabilized with respect to the ambient magnetic field on orbit. This paper develops a model of the controller using real-time coarse sun sensor data and a dynamic model of a prototype system based on a satellite system. The simulation results and the feasibility of this control method for use in a satellite backup control mode are discussed.

  20. Infection control in the dental laboratory

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is the responsibility of the dentist to make sure that all items sent to the dental laboratory are cleaned and disinfected. ... accidental lesions in the skin of the laboratory technician. 2. Instruments in the dental laboratory which ... Chlorhexidine 0.5% in 70% alcohol. Iodophors. From literature (14). Exposure time. 20 minutes.

  1. Predictive onboard flow control in packet switching satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobinsky, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    We outline two alternate approaches to predicting the onset of congestion in a packet switching satellite, and argue that predictive, rather than reactive, flow control is necessary for the efficient operation of such a system. The first method discussed is based on standard, statistical techniques which are used to periodically calculate a probability of near-term congestion based on arrival rate statistics. If this probability exceeds a present threshold, the satellite would transmit a rate-reduction signal to all active ground stations. The second method discussed would utilize a neural network to periodically predict the occurrence of buffer overflow based on input data which would include, in addition to arrival rates, the distributions of packet lengths, source addresses, and destination addresses.

  2. Predictive onboard flow control for packet switching satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    We outline two alternate approaches to predicting the onset of congestion in a packet switching satellite, and argue that predictive, rather than reactive, flow control is necessary for the efficient operation of such a system. The first method discussed is based on standard, statistical techniques which are used to periodically calculate a probability of near-term congestion based on arrival rate statistics. If this probability exceeds a present threshold, the satellite would transmit a rate-reduction signal to all active ground stations. The second method discussed would utilize a neural network to periodically predict the occurrence of buffer overflow based on input data which would include, in addition to arrival rates, the distributions of packet lengths, source addresses, and destination addresses.

  3. A Comparative Study of Actuator Configurations for Satellite Attitude Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Kristiansen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a controllability study of different actuator configurations consisting of magnetic torquers, reaction wheels and a gravity boom is presented. The theoretical analysis is performed with use of controllability gramians, and simulation results with the different configurations are presented and compared regarding settling time and power consumption to substantiate the theoretical analysis. A reference model is also introduced to show how the power consumption can he lowered to the same magnitude as when magnetic torquers are used, without degrading the satellite response significantly.

  4. Utilizing expert systems for satellite monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft analysts in the spacecraft control center for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite are currently utilizing a fault-isolation expert system developed to assist in the isolation and correction of faults in the communications link. This system, the communication link expert assistance resource (CLEAR), monitors real time spacecraft and ground systems performance parameters in search of configuration discrepancies and communications link problems. If such a discrepancy or problem is isolated, CLEAR alerts the analyst and provides advice on how to resolve the problem swiftly and effectively. The CLEAR system is the first real time expert system to be used in the operational environment of a satellite control center at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Clear has not only demonstrated the utility and potential of an expert system in the demanding environment of a satellite control center, but also has revealed many of the pitfalls and deficiencies of development of expert systems. One of the lessons learned from this and other initial expert system projects is that prototypes can often be developed quite rapidly, but operational expert systems require considerable effort. Development is generally a slow, tedious process that typically requires the special skills of trained programmers. Due to the success of CLEAR and several other systems in the control center domain, a large number of expert systems will certainly be developed to support control center operations during the early 1990's. To facilitate the development of these systems, a project was initiated to develop an integrated, domain-specific tool, the generic spacecraft analyst assistent (GenSAA), that alows the spacecraft analysts to rapidly create simple expert systems themselves. By providing a highly graphical point-and-select method of system development, GenSAA allows the analyst to utilize and/or modify previously developed rule bases and system components; thus, facilitating

  5. P78-2 (SCATHA) satellite thermal balance test, a laboratory test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, R. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Space simulation test programs can be carried out with a high probability of being troublefree with a competent staff, a well-maintained test facility and attention to interfaces; however, full-up thermal balance tests using the solar simulator, temperature control of infrared sources, the gimbal, a large number of thermocouples, and other requirements for a high fidelity thermal balance are still a challenge. The P78-2 (Scatha) satellite was successfully tested with one interruption and a four-day abbreviated retest to verify a modification. This was accomplished in spite of the new test crew, a facility beset with several operational problems, and marginal interface control. These problems were addressed with very good results. Subsequent tests have been highly successful.

  6. A planning approach to monitor and control the satellite cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kini N. Gopalakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many satellites in space that revolve round the Earth. Increase in the number of satellites leads to the importance of monitoring satellites for collision detection and avoidance. Collision of satellites can occur if their orbits intersect each other. In order to detect collision and to avoid the collision of satellites, the relative distance between any two satellites needs to be calculated as they revolve. As an objective to calculate the distance between any two satellites, parallel computation is required in order to detect collision. Our paper shows the prediction of collision possibilities between any two satellites and proposes at parallelizing the relative distance and position computation for a satellite of interest and its neighboring satellites.

  7. Guidance, Navigation, and Control System for Maneuverable Pico-Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pico-satellites are an emerging new class of spacecraft. Maneuverable pico-satellites require active guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) systems to perform...

  8. Description of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey P.; Rallo, Rosemary A.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory facility for the study of control laws for large flexible spacecraft is described. The facility fulfills the requirements of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) design challenge for laboratory experiments, which will allow slew maneuvers and pointing operations. The structural apparatus is described in detail sufficient for modelling purposes. The sensor and actuator types and characteristics are described so that identification and control algorithms may be designed. The control implementation computer and real-time subroutines are also described.

  9. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Fire Safety and Fire Control in the Chemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbraham, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses fire safety and fire control in the chemistry laboratory. The combustion process, extinguishing equipment, extinguisher maintenance and location, and fire safety and practices are included. (HM)

  10. The Early Development of Satellite Characterization Capabilities at the Air Force Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, J.; Kissell, K.

    This presentation overviews the development of optical Space Object Identification (SOI) techniques at the Air Force laboratories during the two-decade "pre-operational" period prior to 1980 when the Groundbased Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) sensors were deployed. Beginning with the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the United States Air Force has actively pursued the development and application of optical sensor technology for the detection, tracking, and characterization of artificial satellites. Until the mid-1980s, these activities were primarily conducted within Air Force research and development laboratories which supplied data to the operational components on a contributing basis. This presentation traces the early evolution of the optical space surveillance technologies from the early experimental sensors that led to the current generation of operationally deployed and research systems. The contributions of the participating Air Force organizations and facilities will be reviewed with special emphasis on the development of technologies for the characterization of spacecraft using optical signatures and imagery. The presentation will include descriptions and photographs of the early facilities and instrumentation, and examples of the SOI collection and analysis techniques employed. In this early period, computer support was limited so all aspects of space surveillance relied heavily on manual interaction. Many military, government, educational, and contractor agencies supported the development of instrumentation and analysis techniques. This overview focuses mainly on the role played by Air Force System Command and Office of Aerospace Research, and the closely related activities at the Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The omission of other agencies from this review reflects the limitations of this presentation, not the significance of their contributions.

  11. Reliable Control of Ship-mounted Satellite Tracking Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    Motorized antenna is a key element in overseas satellite telecommunication. The control system directs the on-board antenna toward a chosen satellitewhile the high sea waves disturb the antenna. Certain faults (communication system malfunction or signal blocking) cause interruption...... in the communication connection resulting in loss of the tracking functionality, and instability of theantenna. In this brief, a fault tolerant control (FTC) system is proposed for thesatellite tracking antenna. The FTC system maintains the tracking functionality by employing proper control strategy. A...... robust fault diagnosis system is designed to supervise the FTC system. The employed fault diagnosis solution is able to estimate the faults for a class of nonlinear systems acting under external disturbances. Effectiveness of the method is verified through implementation and test on an antenna system....

  12. Novel architecture for data management and control for small satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, G.; Fossati, D.; Turri, M.

    1995-12-01

    The paper introduces an innovative architecture for the on-board units that are responsible to provide the data interface, control and processing capability normally allocated in separated electronics boxes in the data handling subsystem of the space system. A new solution for the attitude control of the space vehicle has been studied and developed and the utilization of this technological growth, in particular that concerns the GPS receiver, is matter for novel architecture. This new approach also involves in general the small satellite ground segment product as matter of a dedicated development approach. Small and medium satellites are considered an attractive solution for the low cost scientific experimentation, communication or remote sensing satellites. The functional and performance capability of the studied on-board units and ground segment are assessed in tight conjunction with the evolution of the European and the USA market. The design of these units has to be based on few and simple driving requirements, directly derived from the new modified scenario: (1) The limited budgets available for space system. (2) The quick mission data return, i.e., low development time by specific and tailored system development tools. The quick availability of data to scientists/user is requested without jeopardizing the maximum and guaranteed scientific or commercial return. The proposed system is then given thinking to an architecture based on a high degree of modularity (and reuse of existing library of modules) thus allowing to keep down costs and to speed up the time to market. The design ground rules are so established in order to cope with the following performance: (1) capability to adapt with few impacts the system interfaces, in particular for attitude sensors and actuators that are tightly mission dependent; (2) easy adaptation of on board computational performances and memory capacity (including mass memory storage capability); (3) definition of a hierarchical

  13. Satellite myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Roger L.; Hall, David

    2008-01-01

    Richard Corfield's article “Sputnik's legacy” (October 2007 pp23-27) states that the satellite on board the US Vanguard rocket, which exploded during launch on 6 December 1957 two months after Sputnik's successful take-off, was “a hastily put together contraption of wires and circuitry designed only to send a radio signal back to Earth”. In fact, the Vanguard satellite was developed over a period of several years and put together carefully using the best techniques and equipment available at the time - such as transistors from Bell Laboratories/Western Electric. The satellite contained not one but two transmitters, in which the crystal-controlled oscillators had been designed to measure both the temperature of the satellite shell and of the internal package.

  14. Tracking Control Design Using Sliding Mode Techniques for Satellite Formation Flying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Chu Lim

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Satellite formation flying is currently an active area of research in the aerospace engineering. So it has been researched by various authors. In this study, a tracking controller using sliding mode techniques was designed to control a satellite for the satellite formation flying. In general, Hill's equations are used to describe the relative motion of the follower satellite with respect to the leader satellite. However the modified Hill's equations considering the J_2 perturbation were used for the design of sliding mode controller. The extended Kalman filter was applied to estimate the state vector based on the measurements of relative distance and velocity between two satellites. The simulation results show that the follower satellite tracks the desired trajectory well by thruster operations based on the sliding mode control law.

  15. A QoS-Oriented Congestion Control Mechanism for Satellite Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Heyu Liu; Fuchun Sun

    2014-01-01

    The sharply increasing amount of data, which are transferred by the satellite network, requires the satellite network to provide quality-of-service (QoS). However, the upsurge in the data flow leads to the network congestion, impeding its ability to offer QoS. Congestion control mechanisms, deployed in the ground networks, have been thoroughly studied. But those deployed in the satellite networks have not been studied yet. As satellite networks are now important supplements to the ground back...

  16. Quality control for laboratory diagnosis for hand, foot and mouth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The laboratory investigation plays important role in such process. Aim: However, an important forgotten issue is on the quality control. This mini-review focuses on this specific issue. Materials and Methods: Literature review is done. Result: The available details on quality control of laboratory investigation in hand, food and ...

  17. A Study of Linear vs. Nonlinear Control Techniques for the Reconfiguration of Satellite Formations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irvin, David

    2001-01-01

    This thesis investigates several linear and nonlinear feedback control methods for satellite formation reconfigurations and compares them to a near optimal open loop, discrete-time, impulsive maneuver...

  18. Consensus of satellite cluster flight using an energy-matching optimal control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianjun; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Bo

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents an optimal control method for consensus of satellite cluster flight under a kind of energy matching condition. Firstly, the relation between energy matching and satellite periodically bounded relative motion is analyzed, and the satellite energy matching principle is applied to configure the initial conditions. Then, period-delayed errors are adopted as state variables to establish the period-delayed errors dynamics models of a single satellite and the cluster. Next a novel satellite cluster feedback control protocol with coupling gain is designed, so that the satellite cluster periodically bounded relative motion consensus problem (period-delayed errors state consensus problem) is transformed to the stability of a set of matrices with the same low dimension. Based on the consensus region theory in the research of multi-agent system consensus issues, the coupling gain can be obtained to satisfy the requirement of consensus region and decouple the satellite cluster information topology and the feedback control gain matrix, which can be determined by Linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal method. This method can realize the consensus of satellite cluster period-delayed errors, leading to the consistency of semi-major axes (SMA) and the energy-matching of satellite cluster. Then satellites can emerge the global coordinative cluster behavior. Finally the feasibility and effectiveness of the present energy-matching optimal consensus for satellite cluster flight is verified through numerical simulations.

  19. Satellite Terminal Quality of Service Management with AQM Control

    OpenAIRE

    Delpoux, Romain; Berthou, Pascal; Gouaisbaut, Frédéric; Labit, Yann

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The standardization of a Return Channel via Satellite (DVB-RCS) and the satellite community effor ts in term of interoperability over the last few years are expected to play, in a near future, a decisive role in Next Generation Networks (NGNs) through the integration of Satellite networks as an alternative to terrestrial networks like DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) in low terrestrial in-frastructure areas. Fur thermore, the advance of distributed multimedia applications...

  20. Design of a velocity and position control laboratory servo system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Michael A.

    1987-09-01

    In support of a course in automatic control theory, a velocity and position control laboratory servo system was designed for use in laboratory exercises. The system is constructed using a commercially available DC motor and power amplifier, which are interfaced to a student control panel. All system changes and measurements are conducted with the control panel. The system can be operated open or closed loop, in a position or velocity control mode, and has several adjustable compensators incorporated in the signal path. This thesis provides detailed construction, wiring, and system testing steps, along with the required scale drawings, necessary to perform the hardware integration. A set of laboratory procedures, example laboratory reports, and advanced servo control problems are included for instructional purposes.

  1. Guidance and adaptive-robust attitude & orbit control of a small information satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, Ye.; Butyrin, S.; Somov, S.; Somova, T.; Testoyedov, N.; Rayevsky, V.; Titov, G.; Yakimov, Ye.; Ovchinnikov, A.; Mathylenko, M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a small information satellite which may be placed on an orbit with altitude from 600 up to 1000 km. The satellite attitude and orbit control system contains a strap-down inertial navigation system, cluster of four reaction wheels, magnetic driver and a correcting engine unit with eight electro-reaction engines. We study problems on design of algorithms for spatial guidance, in-flight identification and adaptive-robust control of the satellite motion on sun-synchronous orbit.

  2. Quality control of parasitology stool examination in Tabriz clinical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahram Khademvatan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of quality control program was to make doctors and laboratory personnel trust in laboratory results and consequently increasing confidence in laboratory achievements. The quality assurance means raising the level of quality in all tests that lead to raising the level of work efficiency and laboratories including minimum expense for society and minimum time for lab personnel. This study aimed to assess and determine the accuracy and precision of results in Tabriz medical diagnostic laboratories. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 790 stool samples were selected randomly and tested by standard methods.Student t- test, SPSS software and sensitivity and accuracy formulas were used for data analysis. Results: The sensitivity was 62%, 22% and 8% with 95% confidence intervals for worm's eggs, protozoan cysts and trophozoite detection respectively. Conclusion: To elevate quality assurance in clinical diagnostic laboratory, monitoring and check of the laboratories by standard methods continually should be done.

  3. Onboard Supervisor for the Ørsted Satellite Attitude Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S.A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Blanke, M.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing operational requirements for onboard autonomy in satellite control systems necessitates structural methods that support the design of a complete and reliable supervisory system.......The increasing operational requirements for onboard autonomy in satellite control systems necessitates structural methods that support the design of a complete and reliable supervisory system....

  4. Environmental Testing Philosophy for a Sandia National Laboratories' Small Satellite Project - A Retrospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAP,JEROME S.

    2000-08-24

    Sandia has recently completed the flight certification test series for the Multi-Spectral Thermal Imaging satellite (MTI), which is a small satellite for which Sandia was the system integrator. A paper was presented at the 16th Aerospace Testing Seminar discussing plans for performing the structural dynamics certification program for that satellite. The testing philosophy was originally based on a combination of system level vibroacoustic tests and component level shock and vibration tests. However, the plans evolved to include computational analyses using both Finite Element Analysis and Statistical Energy Analysis techniques. This paper outlines the final certification process and discuss lessons learned including both things that went well and things that should/could have been done differently.

  5. ATM Quality of Service Tests for Digitized Video Using ATM Over Satellite: Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Brooks, David E.; Frantz, Brian D.

    1997-01-01

    A digitized video application was used to help determine minimum quality of service parameters for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) over satellite. For these tests, binomially distributed and other errors were digitally inserted in an intermediate frequency link via a satellite modem and a commercial gaussian noise generator. In this paper, the relation- ship between the ATM cell error and cell loss parameter specifications is discussed with regard to this application. In addition, the video-encoding algorithms, test configurations, and results are presented in detail.

  6. ATM Quality of Service Parameters at 45 Mbps Using a Satellite Emulator: Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of 45-Mbps DS3 intermediate-frequency loopback measurements of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) quality of service parameters (cell error ratio and cell loss ratio) are presented. These tests, which were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of satellite-ATM interoperability research, represent initial efforts to quantify the minimum parameters for stringent ATM applications, such as MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 video transmission. Portions of these results were originally presented to the International Telecommunications Union's ITU-R Working Party 4B in February 1996 in support of their Draft Preliminary Recommendation on the Transmission of ATM Traffic via Satellite.

  7. Miniature Reaction Wheel for Small Satellite Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of this project is to design, develop, demonstrate, and deliver a miniature, high torque, low-vibration reaction wheel for use on small satellites....

  8. Model predictive control of attitude maneuver of a geostationary flexible satellite based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    TayyebTaher, M.; Esmaeilzadeh, S. Majid

    2017-07-01

    This article presents an application of Model Predictive Controller (MPC) to the attitude control of a geostationary flexible satellite. SIMO model has been used for the geostationary satellite, using the Lagrange equations. Flexibility is also included in the modelling equations. The state space equations are expressed in order to simplify the controller. Naturally there is no specific tuning rule to find the best parameters of an MPC controller which fits the desired controller. Being an intelligence method for optimizing problem, Genetic Algorithm has been used for optimizing the performance of MPC controller by tuning the controller parameter due to minimum rise time, settling time, overshoot of the target point of the flexible structure and its mode shape amplitudes to make large attitude maneuvers possible. The model included geosynchronous orbit environment and geostationary satellite parameters. The simulation results of the flexible satellite with attitude maneuver shows the efficiency of proposed optimization method in comparison with LQR optimal controller.

  9. Planetary geodetic control using satellite imaging. [equations for determination of control points from surface television-imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, T. C.

    1979-01-01

    A new data type for planetary geodetic control using natural satellite imaging is presented. Spacecraft images of natural satellites against the planet give a direct tie between inertial space and surface features surrounding the satellite image. This technique is expected to offer a factor of 3-10 improvement in accuracy over present geodetic reduction for Mars. A specific example using Viking imaging of Phobos against Mars is given.

  10. Infection control in Dental Laboratories: A survey of Nigerian dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Transmission of infection may occur in laboratory oral healthcare setting with undermined infection control. Objective: To assess infection control knowledge and confidence in protecting self from occupational acquisition of HIV infection among Nigerian dental technology students. Methods: This ...

  11. Quality control for diagnostic oral microbiology laboratories in European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Smith

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Participation in diagnostic microbiology internal and external quality control (QC processes is good laboratory practice and an essential component of a quality management system. However, no QC scheme for diagnostic oral microbiology existed until 2009 when the Clinical Oral Microbiology (COMB Network was created. At the European Oral Microbiology Workshop in 2008, 12 laboratories processing clinical oral microbiological samples were identified. All these were recruited to participate into the study and six laboratories from six European countries completed both the online survey and the first QC round. Three additional laboratories participated in the second round. Based on the survey, European oral microbiology laboratories process a significant (mean per laboratory 4,135 number of diagnostic samples from the oral cavity annually. A majority of the laboratories did not participate in any internal or external QC programme and nearly half of the laboratories did not have standard operating procedures for the tests they performed. In both QC rounds, there was a large variation in the results, interpretation and reporting of antibiotic susceptibility testing among the laboratories. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate the need for harmonisation of laboratory processing methods and interpretation of results for oral microbiology specimens. The QC rounds highlighted the value of external QC in evaluating the efficacy and safety of processes, materials and methods used in the laboratory. The use of standardised methods is also a prerequisite for multi-centre epidemiological studies that can provide important information on emerging microbes and trends in anti-microbial susceptibility for empirical prescribing in oro-facial infections.

  12. Real time control of satellite tracking station operation for millimeter wave experiments and associated data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, S. R.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Real time control, data collection, and data reduction of an earth-satellite millimeter wave system are discussed. Experiment control and data processing requirements are considered with attention to signal data acquisition, weather data acquisition, support and control functions, task classifications, the fundamental data acquisition procedure, and the computer-experiment interface. The general analysis is applied to a description of the Communications Technology Satellite system and its hardware.

  13. Testing command and control of the satellites in formation flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Popan; Gheorghe, Gh. Ion; Gabriel, Todoran

    2013-10-01

    The topics covered in the paper are mechatronic systems for determining the distance between the satellites and the design of the displacement system on air cushion table for satellites testing. INCDMTM has the capability to approach the collaboration within European Programms (ESA) of human exploration of outer space through mechatronic systems and accessories for telescopes, mechatronics systems used by the launchers, sensors and mechatronic systems for the robotic exploration programs of atmosphere and Mars. This research has a strong development component of industrial competitiveness many of the results of space research have direct applicability in industrial fabrication.

  14. Experiment definition phase shuttle laboratory LDRL-10.6 experiment. [using a molniya satellite and ground communication links

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The acquisition and tracking links of shuttle to molniya satellite and shuttle to ground are established. Link parameters and tolerance are analyzed. A 10-micromillimeter optomechanical subsystem brassboard model was designed and measured for optical properties and weight optimization. The design incorporates an afocal rotating Gregorian telescope in a two-gimbal berylium structure with beam steering control mechanisms. Parameters for both the optomechanical subsystem and spaceborne terminals are included.

  15. MEDSAT - A remote sensing satellite for malaria early warning and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, John; Slawski, James; Stottlemeyer, Bret; De La Sierra, Ruben; Daida, Jason; Wood, Byron; Lawless, James

    1992-01-01

    A remote sensing, medical satellite (MEDSAT) aids in the control of carrier (vector) borne disease. The prototype design is a light satellite to test for control of malaria. The design features a 340-kg satellite with visual/IR and SAR sensors in a low inclination orbit observing a number of worldwide test sites. The approach is to use four-band visual/IR and dual-polarized L-band SAR images obtained from MEDSAT in concert with in-situ data to estimate the temporal and spatial variations of malaria risk. This allows public health resources to focus on the most vulnerable areas at the appropriate time. It is concluded that a light-satellite design for a MEDSAT satellite with a Pegasus launch is feasible.

  16. Decoupling congestion control and error control mechanisms in TCP and evaluating their performance over broadband satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Gu, Xuemai

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to better evaluate the performance of TCP over broadband satellite networks. We decouple the most crucial parts of TCP that impact its performance in broadband satellite environments, namely congestion control and error control mechanisms. And then we re-design these two function blocks and make them become two individual parts. With these re-designed modules, we have investigated the interactions between various currently existing TCP congestion control and error control schemes, as well as their impact on TCP performance over a geostationary broadband satellite link with long propagation delay and high bit error rate. Simulation results have shown that some combinations of different congestion control and error control mechanisms can waste satellite link bandwidth with large numbers of retransmission packets and unnecessary retransmission packets. And the modified TCP NewReno implementation can avoid high amount of retransmissions and unnecessary retransmissions.

  17. Audit of controls over Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory subcontractor expenditures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-22

    In January 1989 the Department of Energy contracted with Universities Research Association, Inc. to design, construct, manage, operate, and maintain the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. Through Fiscal Year 1992, costs for subcontractor goods and services accounted for about 75 percent of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory expenditures. The Office of Inspector General evaluated the adequacy of controls in place to ensure that subcontractor costs were reasonable, as required by the contract. The following conclusions were drawn from the audit. The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory did not consistently exercise prudent business judgment in making subcontractor expenditures. As a result, $60 million in expenditures already made and $128 million planned with commercial subcontractors were, in the authors opinion, unnecessary, excessive, or represented uncontrolled growth. The audit also found inadequate justifications, accountability, and cost controls over $143 million in expenditures made and $47 million planned with other Department of Energy laboratories. Improvements were needed in subcontract administration and internal controls, including appropriate audit coverage of the subcontracts. In addition, Department of Energy guidance concerning procurement actions between the laboratories needed to be established.

  18. Practical solution for control of the pre-analytical phase in decentralized clinical laboratories for meeting the requirements of the medical laboratory accreditation standard DIN EN ISO 15189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacata, Vladimir; Jahns-Streubel, Gerlinde; Baldus, Mirjana; Wood, William Graham

    2007-01-01

    This report was written in response to the article by Wood published recently in this journal. It describes a practical solution to the problems of controlling the pre-analytical phase in the clinical diagnostic laboratory. As an indicator of quality in the pre-analytical phase of sample processing, a target analyte was chosen which is sensitive to delay in centrifugation and/or analysis. The results of analyses of the samples sent by satellite medical practitioners were compared with those from an on-site hospital laboratory with a controllable optimized pre-analytical phase. The aim of the comparison was: (a) to identify those medical practices whose mean/median sample values significantly deviate from those of the control situation in the hospital laboratory due to the possible problems in the pre-analytical phase; (b) to aid these laboratories in the process of rectifying these problems. A Microsoft Excel-based Pre-Analytical Survey tool (PAS tool) has been developed which addresses the above mentioned problems. It has been tested on serum potassium which is known to be sensitive to delay and/or irregularities in sample treatment. The PAS tool has been shown to be one possibility for improving the quality of the analyses by identifying the sources of problems within the pre-analytical phase, thus allowing them to be rectified. Additionally, the PAS tool has an educational value and can also be adopted for use in other decentralized laboratories.

  19. An automated hematology laboratory with computer-controlled robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, L W; Nguyen, D T; Sheridan, B L; Strul, M; Bailey, K; Bak, A

    1995-01-01

    A highly automated hematology laboratory environment is described that has conveyance systems to move bar-coded specimens from one station ("workcell") to another, robotic handling devices to load and unload hematology analyzers, and a hematology workstation. Computer systems monitor the process and equipment, track the specimen, manage inventory, and interpret patient results. When a specimen arrives at the laboratory, the bar-code determines which workcell the specimen should go to for testing. Each specimen is handled individually and in real-time. Hematology specimens are routed to a workcell of Coulter STKS analyzers where complete blood counts with five-part leukocyte differentials are performed under full robotic control. The entire process is managed by a real-time Windows-based process control system that interacts with a networked laboratory information system. The hematology workstation is being evaluated for interpretive results reporting and to determine follow-up testing.

  20. [Infection control team (ICT) in cooperation with microbiology laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Mitsuhiro

    2012-10-01

    Infection control as a medical safety measure is an important issue in all medical facilities. In order to tackle this measure, cooperation between the infection control team (ICT) and microbiological laboratory is indispensable. Multiple drug-resistant bacteria have shifted from Gram-positive bacteria to Gram-negative bacilli within the last ten years. There are also a variety of bacilli, complicating the examination method and test results further. Therefore, cooperation between the ICT and microbiological laboratory has become important to understand examination results and to use them. In order to maintain functional cooperation, explanatory and communicative ability between the microbiological laboratory and ICT is required every day. Such positive information exchange will develop into efficient and functional ICT activity.

  1. AUTOMATED REMOTE MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE LABORATORY EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Freyman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the hardware and software implementation of automated remote management system of laboratory equipment for studying fundamentals of electronics and circuit technology. This system gives the possibility to create the virtual model of a real stand. The original software has enabled to compare information from the memory of microcontroller keeping in laboratory stands with etalon model, and reveal discrepancies of set connections and template data. Graphical interface allows for operation control of students and correction of studying process. Automation of configuring and the following checking procedures has accelerated the work and decreased error frequency, made it possible to improve the quality of learning, increase efficiency of laboratory researches and control accuracy, intensify the check procedure and use self-checking in case of independent execution of tasks.

  2. Internet-Based Laboratory Activities Designed for Studying the Sun with Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    1998-12-01

    Yohkoh Public Outreach Project (YPOP) is a collaborative industry, university, and K-16 project bringing fascinating and dynamic images of the Sun to the public in real-time. Partners have developed an extensive public access and educational WWW site containing more than 100 pages of vibrant images with current information that focuses on movies of the X-ray output of our Sun taken by the Yohkoh Satellite. More than 5 Gb of images and movies are available on the WWW site from the Yohkoh satellite, a joint project of the Institute for Space and Astronautical Sciences (ISAS) and NASA. Using a movie theater motif, the site was created by teams working at Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA in the Solar and Astrophysics Research Group, the Montana State University Solar Physics Research Group, and the Montana State University Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research Group with funding from the NASA Learning Technology Project (LTP) program (NASA LTP SK30G4410R). The Yohkoh Movie Theater Internet Site is found at URL: http://www.lmsal.com/YPOP/ and mirrored at URL: http://solar.physics.montana.edu/YPOP/. In addition to being able to request automated movies for any dates in a 5 Gb on-line database, the user can view automatically updated daily images and movies of our Sun over the last 72 hours. Master science teachers working with the NASA funded Yohkoh Public Outreach Project have developed nine technology-based on-line lessons for K-16 classrooms. These interdisciplinary science, mathematics, and technology lessons integrate Internet resources, real-time images of the Sun, and extensive NASA image databases. Instructors are able to freely access each of the classroom-ready activities. The activities require students to use scientific inquiry skills and manage electronic information to solve problems consistent with the emphasis of the NRC National Science Education Standards.

  3. Drag-Free Motion Control of Satellite for High-Precision Gravity Field Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Bent Lindvig; Blanke, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    High precision mapping of the geoid and the Earth's gravity field are of importance to a wide range of ongoing studies in areas like ocean circulation, solid Earth physics and ice sheet dynamics. Using a satellite in orbit around the Earth gives the opportunity to map the Earth's gravity field in 3...... dimensions with much better accuracy and spatial resolution than ever accomplished. To reach the desired quality of measurements, the satellite must fly in a low Earth orbit where disturbances from atmospheric drag and the Earth's magnetic field will perturb the satellite's motion. These effects...... will compromise measurement accuracy, unless they are accurately compensated by on-board thrusters. The paper concerns the design of a control system to performing such delicate drag compensation. A six degrees-of-freedom model for the satellite is developed with the model including dynamics of the satellite...

  4. Asymptotic stability of a satellite with electrodynamic attitude control in the orbital frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, A. Yu.; Tikhonov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    A satellite in a circular near-Earth orbit is under consideration. The three-axis stabilization of the satellite in the orbital coordinate system with the use of electrodynamic attitude control system is studied. No constraints are imposed on the Earth's magnetic field approximation. The gravity gradient disturbing torque acting on the satellite attitude dynamics is taken into account as the largest disturbing torque. With the use of the Lyapunov direct method, conditions under which electrodynamic control solves the problem are obtained. The restrictions on the control parameter values for which one can guarantee the asymptotic stability of the programmed satellite motion are found and represented in an explicit form. Comparison of the results of numerical simulation and analytical investigation demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. A Flexible and Configurable Architecture for Automatic Control Remote Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalúz, Martin; García-Zubía, Javier; Fikar, Miroslav; Cirka, Luboš

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach in hardware and software architecture design for implementation of remote laboratories for automatic control. In our contribution, we show the solution with flexible connectivity at back-end, providing features of multipurpose usage with different types of experimental devices, and fully configurable…

  6. Millikan's Oil-Drop Experiment as a Remotely Controlled Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Bodo; Grober, Sebastian; Vetter, Martin; Jodl, Hans-Jorg

    2012-01-01

    The Millikan oil-drop experiment, to determine the elementary electrical charge e and the quantization of charge Q = n [middle dot] e, is an essential experiment in physics teaching but it is hardly performed in class for several reasons. Therefore, we offer this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL). We describe the interactivity…

  7. Quality control for diagnostic oral microbiology laboratories in European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rautemaa-Richardson, R.; van der Reijden, W.A.; Dahlen, G.; Smith, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Participation in diagnostic microbiology internal and external quality control (QC) processes is good laboratory practice and an essential component of a quality management system. However, no QC scheme for diagnostic oral microbiology existed until 2009 when the Clinical Oral Microbiology (COMB)

  8. Quality control for laboratory diagnosis for hand, foot and mouth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral infection that is an important disease in paediatric ... diagnosis of this disease is important for disease control. The laboratory investigation plays important role in such ... investigation such as complete blood count (CBC) is reported to be a basic useful clue for diagnosis.

  9. Orbit Control of Fly-around Satellite with Highly Eccentric Orbit Using Solar Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-gang, Hou; Chang-yin, Zhao; Ming-jiang, Zhang; Rong-yu, Sun

    2017-01-01

    The method of controlling highly eccentric accompanying flight orbit using the solar wing is proposed in this paper. The formation is maintained by controlling the orbit of the accompanying satellite (follower). The accompanying satellite rotates around its inertial principal axis with a constant angular velocity. The control on the accompanying satellite is divided into the in-plane control and out-of-plane control. The in-plane control is superior to the out-of-plane control. The out-of-plane control force is applied when the in-plane error is eliminated or the in-plane control force can not be supplied due to some geometrical factors. By the sliding mode control method, the magnitude and direction of the control force required by the in-plane orbit control are calculated. Then accordingly, the expression of the solar wing orientation with respect to the satellite body in the control process is derived, so that by adjusting the orientation of the solar wing, the required control force can be obtained. Finally, the verification on this method is performed by numerical simulations, including the orbit adjustment, error elimination, and the orbit maintenance. It is shown that this method can keep the error less than 5 m, and it is feasible for the space formation flight.

  10. Experiential learning in control systems laboratories and engineering project management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Rebecca Marie

    Experiential learning is a process by which a student creates knowledge through the insights gained from an experience. Kolb's model of experiential learning is a cycle of four modes: (1) concrete experience, (2) reflective observation, (3) abstract conceptualization, and (4) active experimentation. His model is used in each of the three studies presented in this dissertation. Laboratories are a popular way to apply the experiential learning modes in STEM courses. Laboratory kits allow students to take home laboratory equipment to complete experiments on their own time. Although students like laboratory kits, no previous studies compared student learning outcomes on assignments using laboratory kits with existing laboratory equipment. In this study, we examined the similarities and differences between the experiences of students who used a portable laboratory kit and students who used the traditional equipment. During the 2014- 2015 academic year, we conducted a quasi-experiment to compare students' achievement of learning outcomes and their experiences in the instructional laboratory for an introductory control systems course. Half of the laboratory sections in each semester used the existing equipment, while the other sections used a new kit. We collected both quantitative data and qualitative data. We did not identify any major differences in the student experience based on the equipment they used. Course objectives, like research objectives and product requirements, help provide clarity and direction for faculty and students. Unfortunately, course and laboratory objectives are not always clearly stated. Without a clear set of objectives, it can be hard to design a learning experience and determine whether students are achieving the intended outcomes of the course or laboratory. In this study, I identified a common set of laboratory objectives, concepts, and components of a laboratory apparatus for undergraduate control systems laboratories. During the summer of

  11. An optimum magnetic control torque generation of a momentum bias satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Suhadis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison study of magnetic attitude control torque generation performance of a momentum bias satellite operated in Low Earth Orbit (LEO with various orbit inclinations. The satellite is equipped with two magnetic torquers that are placed along the +x and +y axes where magnetic control torque is generated when these magnetic torquers couple with the geomagnetic fields and its vector direction is perpendicular to both the magnetic fields. The control algorithm was structured using a proportional (P controller for satellite attitudes/nutation control and a proportional-integral (PI controller for managing the excess angular momentum on the momentum wheel. The structured control algorithm is simulated for 23°, 53° and 83° orbit inclinations and the generated attitude torque performances are compared to see how the variation of the satellite orbit affects the satellite's attitude torque generation as the magnitude and direction of the geomagnetic fields vary with respect to the altitude and latitude while the magnitude and direction of the magnetic fields generated by the magnetic torquers vary with respect to the orbital motion. Results from simulation show that the higher orbit inclination generates optimum magnetic attitude control torque. Note that this work is the extension of the previous work published in The International Journal of Multiphysics [1].

  12. Linear Time Varying Approach to Satellite Attitude Control Using only Electromagnetic Actuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    2000-01-01

    , lightweight, and power efficient actuators is therefore crucial and viable. This paper discusser linear attitude control strategies for a low earth orbit satellite actuated by a set of mutually perpendicular electromagnetic coils. The principle is to use the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field......, nevertheless, a solution of the riccati equation gives an excellent frame for investigations provided in this paper. An observation that geomagnetic field changes approximately periodically when satellite is on a near polar orbit is used throughout this paper. Three types of attitude controllers are proposed......Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technological improvemant of micro-electronics. Required pointing accuracy of small, inexpensive satellites is often relatively loose, within a couple of degrees. Application of cheap...

  13. Active control rotor model testing at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the model helicopter rotor tests currently in progress at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory is presented. The tests are designed to provide data for rotor dynamic modeling for use with active control system design. The model rotor to be used incoporates the capability for Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control through the use of a standard swashplate on a three bladed hub. Sample results from the first series of tests are presented, along with the methodology used for state and parameter identification. Finally, pending experiments and possible research directions using this model and test facility are outlined.

  14. High Accuracy Attitude Control System Design for Satellite with Flexible Appendages

    OpenAIRE

    Wenya Zhou; Haixu Wang; Zhengwei Ruan; Zhigang Wu; Enmei Wang

    2014-01-01

    In order to realize the high accuracy attitude control of satellite with flexible appendages, attitude control system consisting of the controller and structural filter was designed. When the low order vibration frequency of flexible appendages is approximating the bandwidth of attitude control system, the vibration signal will enter the control system through measurement device to bring impact on the accuracy or even the stability. In order to reduce the impact of vibration of appendages on ...

  15. Low Thrust Relative Motion Control of Satellite Formations in Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prioroc, Claudiu-Lucian; Mikkola, Seppo

    The problem of placing and controlling a formation of satellites on a Halo orbit is studied. The Earth-Sun circular restricted three body problem is considered. A family of artificial Halo orbits with the same periods, around the L 1 and L 2 Lagrange points in the Earth-Sun system is found using the pseudo-arc-length continuation method. The orbits are used are reference trajectories for satellites to track. The problem of orbit stability, bounding and controlling the relative motion by means of nonlinear control is addressed.

  16. Attitude-Tracking Control with Path Planning for Agile Satellite Using Double-Gimbal Control Moment Gyros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiling Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the issue of rapid attitude maneuver control of agile satellite, this paper presents an attitude-tracking control algorithm with path planning based on the improved genetic algorithm, adaptive backstepping control as well as sliding mode control. The satellite applies double gimbal control moment gyro as actuator and is subjected to the external disturbance and uncertain inertia properties. Firstly, considering the comprehensive mathematical model of the agile satellite and the double gimbal control moment gyro, an improved genetic algorithm is proposed to solve the attitude path-planning problem. The goal is to find an energy optimal path which satisfies certain maneuverability under the constraints of the input saturation, actuator saturation, slew rate limit and singularity measurement limit. Then, the adaptive backstepping control and sliding mode control are adopted in the design of the attitude-tracking controller to track accurately the desired path comprised of the satellite attitude quaternion and velocity. Finally, simulation results indicate the robustness and good tracking performance of the derived controller as well as its ability to avert the singularity of double gimbal control moment gyro.

  17. The Advanced Controls Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knee, H.E.; White, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is conducting research that will lead to advanced, automated control of new liquid-metal-reactor (LMR) nuclear power plants. Although this program of research (entitled the Advanced Controls Program'') is focused on LMR technology, it will be capable of providing control design, test, and qualification capability for other advanced reactor designs (e.g., the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs), while also benefiting existing nuclear plants. The Program will also have applicability to complex, non-nuclear process control environments (e.g., petrochemical, aerospace, etc.). The Advanced Controls Program will support capabilities throughout the entire plant design life cycle, i.e., from the initial interactive first-principle dynamic model development for the process, systems, components, and instruments through advanced control room qualification. The current program involves five principal areas of research activities: (1) demonstrations of advanced control system designs, (2) development of an advanced controls design environment, (3) development of advanced control strategies, (4) research and development (R D) in human-system integration for advanced control system designs, and (5) testing and validation of advanced control system designs. Discussion of the research in these five areas forms the basis of this paper. Also included is a description of the research directions of the program. 8 refs.

  18. Linear Time Varying Approach to Satellite Attitude Control Using only Electromagnetic Actuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    1997-01-01

    , lightweight, and power efficient actuators is therefore crucial and viable. This paper discusses linear attitude control strategies for a low earth orbit satellite actuated by a set of mutually perpendicular electromagnetic coils. The principle is to use the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field...... systems is limited, nevertheless, a solution of the Riccati equation gives an excellent frame for investigations provided in this paper. An observation that geomagnetic field changes approximately periodically when a satellite is on a near polar orbit is used throughout this paper. Three types of attitude......Recently small satellite missions have gained considerable interest due to low-cost launch opportunities and technological improvement of micro-electronics. Required pointing accuracy of small, inexpensive satellites is often relatively loose, within a couple of degrees. Application of cheap...

  19. Spectrum management considerations of adaptive power control in satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitz, P.; Sullivan, T.

    1983-01-01

    Adaptive power control concepts for the compensation of rain attenuation are considered for uplinks and downlinks. The performance of example power-controlled and fixed-EIRP uplinks is compared in terms of C/Ns and C/Is. Provisional conclusions are drawn with regard to the efficacy of uplink and downlink power control orbit/spectrum utilization efficiency.

  20. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  1. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ze

    2017-02-23

    This article investigates the dynamic topology control problemof satellite cluster networks (SCNs) in Earth observation (EO) missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs). The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites' relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT) strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime.

  2. Satellite Surveillance of Nuclear Plant, Assisting IAEA Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileikowsky, Curt

    1997-01-01

    One of the great problems for world society today is what to do with the 100 000 tons of spent fuel — produced by 400 power reactors in over 30 nations — that contain 1000 tons of civilian plutonium and that will double in volume over the next 10 to 15 years. That future amount of civilian plutonium represents material for 400 000 nuclear bombs: simple ones, relatively easily made, ideal for terrorists, of the strength of 10-70% of the Hiroshima bomb. Because of this risk, spent fuel has to be safeguarded for 10 000 years. The most straightforward way to eliminate the need for safeguarding spent fuel would be to burn it. That could best be done with an accelerator-driven subcritical reactor, i.e. one that cannot function without the assistance of a 1-2.5 GeV proton accelerator supplying the lacking neutrons and which therefore makes for an extremely safe plant that cannot run amok (as Chernobyl did for example). 100 of such plant could burn all the plutonium produced by the 400 present-type reactors in the world and simultaneously produce profitable electric power. But such a scheme requires proof that the accelerators could not themselves be used for producing nuclear bomb material. That utterly important task for world society could be significantly supported by the new commercial high resolution observation satellites.

  3. Satellite Relative Motion Control for MIT’s SPHERES Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    described by Kepler shown through the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. These effects are ignored for a number of reasons. Air drag does affect SPHERES...Ogata, K., Modern Control Engineering , Prentice Hall, Boston, 5th ed., 2010. 37. Nise, N. S., Control Systems Engineering , John Wiley & Sons, Inc...Control Systems , John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1997. 194 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704–0188 The public reporting burden

  4. A Multimedia Visual Feedback in the Web-controlled Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Turan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents development work related to create WWW based remote control laboratory for teaching Applied Photonics. In order to minimize the cost at the end-user domain, simple WWW browser with fundamental plug-in (Java applets, HTML Pages and LabWindows applets to support the remote control and video transmission functionality of the remote control is proposed. As for telepresence and monitoring of device actions, a simple type zooming web-camera is connected to the hosting multimedia PC via the USB port. The web-camera assists in visual feedback of the system and presents the feeling of telepresence for the end-user (student. USB web-cameras are normally efficient and the presence of another video server is not necessary in this case, thanks to LabWindows.

  5. Dual Fine Tracking Control of a Satellite Laser Communication Uplink

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noble, Louis A

    2006-01-01

    A dual fine tracking control system (FTCS) is developed for a single aperture optical communication receiver to compensate for high frequency disturbances affecting tracking of two incident laser communication beams...

  6. MIMO active vibration control of magnetically suspended flywheels for satellite IPAC service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junyoung

    Theory and simulation results have demonstrated that four, variable speed flywheels could potentially provide the energy storage and attitude control functions of existing batteries and control moment gyros (CMGs) on a satellite. Past modeling and control algorithms were based on the assumption of rigidity in the flywheel's bearings and the satellite structure. This dissertation provides simulation results and theory which eliminates this assumption utilizing control algorithms for active vibration control (AVC), flywheel shaft levitation and integrated power transfer and attitude control (IPAC) that are effective even with low stiffness active magnetic bearings (AMB), and flexible satellite appendages. The flywheel AVC and levitation tasks are provided by a multi input multi output (MIMO) control law that enhances stability by reducing the dependence of the forward and backward gyroscopic poles with changes in flywheel speed. The control law is shown to be effective even for (1) Large polar to transverse inertia ratios which increases the stored energy density while causing the poles to become more speed dependent and, (2) Low bandwidth controllers shaped to suppress high frequency noise. These two main tasks could be successfully achieved by MIMO (Gyroscopic) control algorithm, which is unique approach. The vibration control mass (VCM) is designed to reduce the vibrations of flexible appendages of the satellite. During IPAC maneuver, the oscillation of flywheel spin speeds, torque motions and satellite appendages are significantly reduced compared without VCM. Several different properties are demonstrated to obtain optimal VCM. Notch, band-pass and low-pass filters are implemented in the AMB system to reduce and cancel high frequency, dynamic bearing forces and motor torques due to flywheel mass imbalance. The transmitted forces and torques to satellite are considerably decreased in the present of both notch and band-pass filter stages. Successful IPAC simulation

  7. Intelligent command and control systems for satellite ground operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The Georgia Tech portion of the Intelligent Control Center project includes several complementary activities. Two major activities entail thesis level research; the other activities are either support activities or preliminary explorations (e.g., task analyses) to support the research. The first research activity is the development of principles for the design of active interfaces to support monitoring during real-time supports. It is well known that as the operator's task becomes less active, i.e., more monitoring and less active control, there is concern that the operator will be less involved and less able to rapidly identify anomalous or failure situations. The research project to design active monitoring interfaces is an attempt to remediate this undesirable side-effect of increasingly automated control systems that still depend ultimately on operator supervision. The second research activity is the exploration of the use of case-based reasoning as a way to accumulate operator experience and make it available in computational form.

  8. Autonomous Pointing Control of a Large Satellite Antenna Subject to Parametric Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunan; Liu, Yufei; Radice, Gianmarco; Tan, Shujun

    2017-03-10

    With the development of satellite mobile communications, large antennas are now widely used. The precise pointing of the antenna's optical axis is essential for many space missions. This paper addresses the challenging problem of high-precision autonomous pointing control of a large satellite antenna. The pointing dynamics are firstly proposed. The proportional-derivative feedback and structural filter to perform pointing maneuvers and suppress antenna vibrations are then presented. An adaptive controller to estimate actual system frequencies in the presence of modal parameters uncertainty is proposed. In order to reduce periodic errors, the modified controllers, which include the proposed adaptive controller and an active disturbance rejection filter, are then developed. The system stability and robustness are analyzed and discussed in the frequency domain. Numerical results are finally provided, and the results have demonstrated that the proposed controllers have good autonomy and robustness.

  9. Autonomous Pointing Control of a Large Satellite Antenna Subject to Parametric Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunan Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of satellite mobile communications, large antennas are now widely used. The precise pointing of the antenna’s optical axis is essential for many space missions. This paper addresses the challenging problem of high-precision autonomous pointing control of a large satellite antenna. The pointing dynamics are firstly proposed. The proportional–derivative feedback and structural filter to perform pointing maneuvers and suppress antenna vibrations are then presented. An adaptive controller to estimate actual system frequencies in the presence of modal parameters uncertainty is proposed. In order to reduce periodic errors, the modified controllers, which include the proposed adaptive controller and an active disturbance rejection filter, are then developed. The system stability and robustness are analyzed and discussed in the frequency domain. Numerical results are finally provided, and the results have demonstrated that the proposed controllers have good autonomy and robustness.

  10. A Piecewise Affine Hybrid Systems Approach to Fault Tolerant Satellite Formation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Bak, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a procedure for modelling satellite formations   including failure dynamics as a piecewise-affine hybrid system is   shown. The formulation enables recently developed methods and tools   for control and analysis of piecewise-affine systems to be applied   leading to synthesis of fau...

  11. Two hybrid ARQ error control schemes for near Earth satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S.

    1986-01-01

    Two hybrid Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) error control schemes are proposed for NASA near Earth satellite communications. Both schemes are adaptive in nature, and employ cascaded codes to achieve both high reliability and throughput efficiency for high data rate file transfer.

  12. Distributed Drives Monitoring and Control: A Laboratory Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini Sreejeth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory setup of distributed drives system comprising a three-phase induction motor (IM drive and a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM drive is modeled, designed, and developed for the monitoring and control of the individual drives. The integrated operation of IM and PMSM drives system has been analyzed under different operating conditions, and their performance has been monitored through supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA system. The necessary SCADA graphical user interface (GUI has also been created for the display of drive parameters. The performances of IM and PMSM under parametric variations are predicted through sensitivity analysis. An integrated operation of the drives is demonstrated through experimental and simulation results.

  13. Modeling and path-following control of a vector-driven stratospheric satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zewei; Chen, Tian; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The stratospheric satellite driven by steady prevailing winds in the stratosphere must be controlled in its longitudinal excursion to keep a latitudinal orbital flight. In a reliable and high-precision control system, an available system model must come first. In this paper, we study the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) modeling and path-following problem of a novel stratospheric satellite which consists of a high-altitude helium balloon, a truss and two vector-motor-driven propellers. To keep a latitudinal flight orbit, an algorithm for accurate latitudinal path following is proposed based on the theories of vector field and sliding mode control. Moreover, a forward velocity controller is added to the control algorithm to maintain a constant velocity. Finally, a series of open-loop control simulations are completed to verify the effectiveness of the model in the performance of the stratospheric satellite dynamics, and path-following control simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm.

  14. Dynamics and chaos control of asymmetric gyrostat satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanov, V. S.; Yudintsev, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    The motion of a free gyrostat consisting of a platform with a triaxial ellipsoid of inertia and a rotor with a slight asymmetry with respect to the axis of rotation is considered. Dimensionless equations of motion for a system with perturbations caused by the small asymmetries of the rotor are written in Andoyer-Deprit variables. These perturbations result in a chaotic layer in the separatrix vicinity. Heteroclinic and homoclinic trajectories are written in analytical form for gyrostats with different ratios of their moments of inertia. These trajectories are used to construct a modified Melnikov function, and to produce control that eliminates separatrix chaos. The Poincare sections and Melnikov function are constructed via numerical modeling that demonstrates the effectiveness of control.

  15. Quality Assurance and Control in Laboratory using Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. S.; Moon, J. H.; Sun, G. M.; Kim, S. H.; Baek, S. Y.; Lim, J. M.; Kim, H. R

    2007-01-15

    In accordance with the increment of international trade associated with the worldwide globalization, the importance of quality assurance and control for the commodity produced from one's own country has been stressed. ISO (International Organization for Standards) defines quality control as 'the operational techniques and activities that are used to fulfill the requirements for quality'. Since 1996, the HANARO research reactor in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been operated thereafter initial critical operation on April 1995. Neutron activation analysis system and applied techniques which is one of a nuclear analytical technologies using reactor neutrons has been developed for user's supporting and the establishment of the quality system for a measurement and analysis, testing and inspection was implemented successfully. On the basis of the qualified NAA system, the test and measurement of more than 1500 samples which is requested from 30 organizations including industrial companies, universities and institutes carried out in NAA laboratory annually. Moreover, as the goal of mutual recognition agreement (MRA) which can be removed a technical barrier in international trade, the objectivity and the confidence of analytical quality in NAA laboratory became established through the installation of international accreditation system by implementing analytical quality system in accordance with international standards in 2001. The aim of the report was to summarize the technical management of introduction, methods and the results for a quality control and assurance which should be performed in NAA technique using the HANARO research reactor. The report will help building up effective quality control strategy in the future.

  16. Attitude guidance and control of the navigation satellites at passage of singular orbit sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateev, Alexey; Vassilyev, Alexander; Somov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    The solar-terrestrial reference frame is applied during a navigation satellite flight using onboard measured units of directions on the Sun and Earth, which are beginning in the satellite (Object) mass center. The angle between these units traditionally is named as the angle SOE (Sun - Object - Earth). We consider problems of attitude guidance and control at the spacecraft operation on specific parts of the orbit (singular orbit sites) at following values of the SOE angles — close to 0 deg (small SOE angles) and close to 180 deg (large SOE angles) with a view to minimizing the impact of solar pressure forces on the SC mass center motion.

  17. Satellite Dynamics and Control in a Quaternion Formulation (2nd edition)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Larsen, Martin Birkelund

    This lecture note treats modelling and attitude control design using a quaternion description of attitude for a rigid body in space. Dynamics and kinematics of a satellite is formulated as a non-linear model from Euler’s moment equations and a description of kinematics using the attitude quaternion...... to represent rotation. A general linearised model is derived such that the user can specify an arbitrary point of operation in angular velocity and wheel angular momentum, specifying the a inertia matrix for a rigid satellite. A set of Simulink® models that simulate the satellite’s nonlinear behaviour...

  18. 3-Axis magnetic control: flight results of the TANGO satellite in the PRISMA mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasset, C.; Noteborn, R.; Bodin, P.; Larsson, R.; Jakobsson, B.

    2013-09-01

    PRISMA implements guidance, navigation and control strategies for advanced formation flying and rendezvous experiments. The project is funded by the Swedish National Space Board and run by OHB-Sweden in close cooperation with DLR, CNES and the Danish Technical University. The PRISMA test bed consists of a fully manoeuvrable MANGO satellite as well as a 3-axis controlled TANGO satellite without any Δ V capability. PRISMA was launched on the 15th of June 2010 on board DNEPR. The TANGO spacecraft is the reference satellite for the experiments performed by MANGO, either with a "cooperative" or "non-cooperative" behaviour. Small, light and low-cost were the keywords for the TANGO design. The attitude determination is based on Sun sensors and magnetometers, and the active attitude control uses magnetic torque rods only. In order to perform the attitude manoeuvres required to fulfil the mission objectives, using any additional gravity gradient boom to passively stabilize the spacecraft was not allowed. After a two-month commissioning phase, TANGO separated from MANGO on the 11th of August 2010. All operational modes have been successfully tested, and the pointing performance in flight is in accordance with expectations. The robust Sun Acquisition mode reduced the initial tip-off rate and placed TANGO into a safe attitude in TANGO points its GPS antenna towards zenith with sufficient accuracy to track as many GPS satellites as MANGO. At the same time, it points its solar panel towards the Sun, and all payload equipments can be switched on without any restriction. This paper gives an overview of the TANGO Attitude Control System design. It then presents the flight results in the different operating modes. Finally, it highlights the key elements at the origin of the successful 3-axis magnetic control strategy on the TANGO satellite.

  19. Design of an Adaptive-Neural Network Attitude Controller of a Satellite using Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ajorkar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is developed based on neural network for a satellite using four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. Then, an attitude control based on feedback linearization control has been designed and uncertainties in the moment of inertia matrix and disturbances torque have been considered. In order to eliminate the effect of these uncertainties, a multilayer neural network with back-propagation law is designed. In this structure, the parameters of the moment of inertia matrix and external disturbances are estimated and used in feedback linearization control law. Finally, the performance of the designed attitude controller is investigated by several simulations.

  20. Adaptive FTC based on Control Allocation and Fault Accommodation for Satellite Reaction Wheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Blanke, Mogens; Castaldi, P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an active fault tolerant control scheme to cope with faults or failures affecting the flywheel spin rate sensors or satellite reaction wheel motors. The active fault tolerant control system consists of a fault detection and diagnosis module along with a control allocation...... estimation filters, which do not need a priori information about the internal model of the signal to be estimated. The adaptive control allocation and sensor fault accommodation can handle both temporal faults and failures. Simulation results illustrate the convincing fault correction and attitude control...

  1. 78 FR 33441 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories, LTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Caraco Pharmaceutical..., 78 FR 12101, Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Ltd., 270 Prospect Plains Road, Cranbury, New Jersey... registration of Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Ltd., to import the basic class of controlled substance is...

  2. Speed Control Based on ESO for the Pitching Axis of Satellite Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BingYou Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pitching axis is the main axis of a satellite camera and is used to control the pitch posture of satellite cameras. A control strategy based on extended state observer (ESO is designed to obtain a fast response speed and highly accurate pitching axis control system and eliminate disturbances during the adjustment of pitch posture. First, a sufficient condition of stabilization for ESO is obtained by analyzing the steady-state error of the system under step input. Parameter tuning and disturbance compensation are performed by ESO. Second, the ESO of speed loop is designed by the speed equation of the pitching axis of satellite cameras. The ESO parameters are obtained by pole assignment. By ESO, the original state variable observes the motor angular speed and the extended state variable observes the load torque. Therefore, the external load disturbances of the control system are estimated in real time. Finally, simulation experiments are performed for the system on the cases of nonload starting, adding external disturbances on the system suddenly, and the load of system changing suddenly. Simulation results show that the control strategy based on ESO has better stability, adaptability, and robustness than the PI control strategy.

  3. Microrelief-Controlled Overland Flow Generation: Laboratory and Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface microrelief affects overland flow generation and the related hydrologic processes. However, such influences vary depending on other factors such as rainfall characteristics, soil properties, and initial soil moisture conditions. Thus, in-depth research is needed to better understand and evaluate the combined effects of these factors on overland flow dynamics. The objective of this experimental study was to examine how surface microrelief, in conjunction with the factors of rainfall, soil, and initial moisture conditions, impacts overland flow generation and runoff processes in both laboratory and field settings. A series of overland flow experiments were conducted for rough and smooth surfaces that represented distinct microtopographic characteristics and the experimental data were analyzed and compared. Across different soil types and initial moisture conditions, both laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that a rough soil surface experienced a delayed initiation of runoff and featured a stepwise threshold flow pattern due to the microrelief-controlled puddle filling-spilling-merging dynamics. It was found from the field experiments that a smooth plot surface was more responsive to rainfall variations especially during an initial rainfall event. However, enhanced capability of overland flow generation and faster puddle connectivity of a rough field plot occurred during the subsequent rain events.

  4. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  5. A satellite digital controller or 'play that PID tune again, Sam'. [Position, Integral, Derivative feedback control algorithm for design strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem discussed is to design a digital controller for a typical satellite. The controlled plant is considered to be a rigid body acting in a plane. The controller is assumed to be a digital computer which, when combined with the proposed control algorithm, can be represented as a sampled-data system. The objective is to present a design strategy and technique for selecting numerical values for the control gains (assuming position, integral, and derivative feedback) and the sample rate. The technique is based on the parameter plane method and requires that the system be amenable to z-transform analysis.

  6. MOAO LQG control for CANARY: theory and first laboratory results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivo, G.; Kulcsár, C.; Raynaud, H.-F.; Conan, J.-M.; Gendron, É.; Vidal, F.

    2011-09-01

    Single Conjugated Adaptive Optics (SCAO) is a proven technique used in order to correct the effect of atmospheric turbulence and vibrations of the WaveFront (WF). The corrected field of view (FoV) is however limited by the anisoplanetism effect. Many concepts of Wide Field AO (WFAO) systems are under development, especially for the design of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) instruments. Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) is one of these WFAO concepts that is particularly suited to high redshifts galaxies observations in very wide FoV. The E-ELT instrument EAGLE will use this approach. CANARY is the on-sky pathfinder for MOAO. It obtained the first compensated images on Natural Guide Stars (NGSs) at the William Herschel Telescope in September 2010. The control and performance optimization of such complex system are a key issue. Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control is an appealing strategy that provides optimal control for an explicit minimum variance performance criterion. It also provides a unified formalism that allows accounting for specific multi WF Sensing (WFS) channels, both for Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) and NGSs, and for various disturbance sources (turbulence, vibrations). Furthermore, preliminary simulation results suggest that performance can be significantly improved with tomographic LQG control compared to MMSE static reconstruction. Our objective is to obtain a first on-sky demonstration of tomographic LQG control during CANARY Phase B, featuring LGS and NGS WFS. We show how the specific MOAO CANARY configuration can be embedded in a state-space framework. The state-space model includes: stochastic auto regressive models of order 2 for the turbulent phase in each layer and for vibrations affecting the telescope; LGS and NGS measurement equations; DM model and delays in the loop. Model identification and off-line calculations necessary for a robust on-sky operation are discussed. First laboratory results and on-sky test plan for the coming observing

  7. Bipartite graph-based control flow checking for COTS-based small satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Honghao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Single event upset (SEU effect, caused by highly energized particles in aerospace, threatens the reliability and security of small satellites composed of commercial-off-the-shelves (COTS. SEU-induced control flow errors (CFEs may cause unpredictable behavior or crashes of COTS-based small satellites. This paper proposes a generic software-based control flow checking technique (CFC and bipartite graph-based control flow checking (BGCFC. To simplify the types of illegal branches, it transforms the conventional control flow graph into the equivalent bipartite graph. It checks the legality of control flow at runtime by comparing a global signature with the expected value and introduces consecutive IDs and bitmaps to reduce the time and memory overhead. Theoretical analysis shows that BGCFC can detect all types of inter-node CFEs with constant time and memory overhead. Practical tests verify the result of theoretical analysis. Compared with previous techniques, BGCFC achieves the highest error detection rate, lower time and memory overhead; the composite result in evaluation factor shows that BGCFC is the most effective one among all these techniques. The results in both theory and practice verify the applicability of BGCFC for COTS-based small satellites.

  8. Geostationary satellites collocation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hengnian

    2014-01-01

    Geostationary Satellites Collocation aims to find solutions for deploying a safe and reliable collocation control. Focusing on the orbital perturbation analysis, the mathematical foundations for orbit and control of the geostationary satellite are summarized. The mathematical and physical principle of orbital maneuver and collocation strategies for multi geostationary satellites sharing with the same dead band is also stressed. Moreover, the book presents some applications using the above algorithms and mathematical models to help readers master the corrective method for planning station keeping maneuvers. Engineers and scientists in the fields of aerospace technology and space science can benefit from this book. Hengnian Li is the Deputy Director of State Key Laboratory of Astronautic Dynamics, China.

  9. Optimizing the Attitude Control of Small Satellite Constellations for Rapid Response Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) such as formation flight and constellations, are being recognized as important solutions to increase measurement samples over space and time. Given the increasingly accurate attitude control systems emerging in the commercial market, small spacecraft now have the ability to slew and point within few minutes of notice. In spite of hardware development in CubeSats at the payload (e.g. NASA InVEST) and subsystems (e.g. Blue Canyon Technologies), software development for tradespace analysis in constellation design (e.g. Goddard's TAT-C), planning and scheduling development in single spacecraft (e.g. GEO-CAPE) and aerial flight path optimizations for UAVs (e.g. NASA Sensor Web), there is a gap in open-source, open-access software tools for planning and scheduling distributed satellite operations in terms of pointing and observing targets. This paper will demonstrate results from a tool being developed for scheduling pointing operations of narrow field-of-view (FOV) sensors over mission lifetime to maximize metrics such as global coverage and revisit statistics. Past research has shown the need for at least fourteen satellites to cover the Earth globally everyday using a LandSat-like sensor. Increasing the FOV three times reduces the need to four satellites, however adds image distortion and BRDF complexities to the observed reflectance. If narrow FOV sensors on a small satellite constellation were commanded using robust algorithms to slew their sensor dynamically, they would be able to coordinately cover the global landmass much faster without compensating for spatial resolution or BRDF effects. Our algorithm to optimize constellation satellite pointing is based on a dynamic programming approach under the constraints of orbital mechanics and existing attitude control systems for small satellites. As a case study for our algorithm, we minimize the time required to cover the 17000 Landsat images with maximum signal to noise ratio fall

  10. Attitude Control Synthesis for Small Satellites Using Gradient Method. Part II Linear Equations, Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian CHELARU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to continue paper [5] which presented the nonlinear equations of the movement for small satellite, this paper presents some aspects regarding the synthesis of the attitude control. Afterthe movement equation linearization, the stability and command matrixes will be established and by using the gradient methods controller we will obtain them. Two attitude control cases will beanalysed: the reaction wheels and the micro thrusters. The results will be used in the project European Space Moon Orbit - ESMO, founded by the European Space Agency in which the POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest is involved.

  11. Wildland fire management. Volume 2: Wildland fire control 1985-1995. [satellite information system for California fire problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveker, D. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary design of a satellite plus computer earth resources information system is proposed for potential uses in fire prevention and control in the wildland fire community. Suggested are satellite characteristics, sensor characteristics, discrimination algorithms, data communication techniques, data processing requirements, display characteristics, and costs in achieving the integrated wildland fire information system.

  12. Introducing Quality Control in the Chemistry Teaching Laboratory Using Control Charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schazmann, Benjamin; Regan, Fiona; Ross, Mary; Diamond, Dermot; Paull, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Quality control (QC) measures are less prevalent in teaching laboratories than commercial settings possibly owing to a lack of commercial incentives or teaching resources. This article focuses on the use of QC assessment in the analytical techniques of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) at…

  13. Attitude Control of a Satellite Simulator Using Reaction Wheels and a PID Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    the orienta- tion of various satellite hardware components. Solar arrays are oriented toward the sun, thermal radiators are pointed at deep space, and...rotation b viscous damping of armature Ke electromotive force ( emf ) constant Ra armature resistance ( )ai s ( )w st t e m a K K K J s b R

  14. Control code for laboratory adaptive optics teaching system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Moonseob; Luder, Ryan; Sanchez, Lucas; Hart, Michael

    2017-09-01

    By sensing and compensating wavefront aberration, adaptive optics (AO) systems have proven themselves crucial in large astronomical telescopes, retinal imaging, and holographic coherent imaging. Commercial AO systems for laboratory use are now available in the market. One such is the ThorLabs AO kit built around a Boston Micromachines deformable mirror. However, there are limitations in applying these systems to research and pedagogical projects since the software is written with limited flexibility. In this paper, we describe a MATLAB-based software suite to interface with the ThorLabs AO kit by using the MATLAB Engine API and Visual Studio. The software is designed to offer complete access to the wavefront sensor data, through the various levels of processing, to the command signals to the deformable mirror and fast steering mirror. In this way, through a MATLAB GUI, an operator can experiment with every aspect of the AO system's functioning. This is particularly valuable for tests of new control algorithms as well as to support student engagement in an academic environment. We plan to make the code freely available to the community.

  15. The Quality Control Program for Industrial Hygiene Laboratories in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Dong; Chung, Eun Kyo; Kim, Kiwoong

    2017-09-01

    In 1992, the quality control program was introduced in Republic of Korea to improve the reliability of the work environment monitoring, which was introduced in the 1980s. The commission entrusted by the Ministry of Employment and Labor, the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute has conducted the program for industrial hygiene laboratories including designated monitoring institutions and spontaneously participating agencies. The number of institutions that participated in the program has increased from 30 to 161. The initial conformance ratio in the participants was 43% (organic solvents) and 52% (metals). Thereafter, the conformance ratio increased rapidly and it has remained in a stable state at more than 89% since 1996. As subject materials, 13 kinds of organic solvents and 7 kinds of metals were used. To improve the capability of measurement and analysis of private institutions, educational courses were conducted annually. An assessment at the actual sites of participants was additionally introduced into the program in 2013. Thus, the program turned into a system that administrates the overall process of participants. For the future, the scope of target materials will be extended through additional items. Thus, the reliability of the results of the work environment monitoring is expected to increase accordingly.

  16. High Accuracy Attitude Control System Design for Satellite with Flexible Appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the high accuracy attitude control of satellite with flexible appendages, attitude control system consisting of the controller and structural filter was designed. When the low order vibration frequency of flexible appendages is approximating the bandwidth of attitude control system, the vibration signal will enter the control system through measurement device to bring impact on the accuracy or even the stability. In order to reduce the impact of vibration of appendages on the attitude control system, the structural filter is designed in terms of rejecting the vibration of flexible appendages. Considering the potential problem of in-orbit frequency variation of the flexible appendages, the design method for the adaptive notch filter is proposed based on the in-orbit identification technology. Finally, the simulation results are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design techniques.

  17. Micro-Satellite Configuration of Discoid and Asymmetrical, Gyroless with Thrusters Three-Axis Robust Control and Stability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The center of mass of the micro-satellite can offset due to fuel consumption in the course of propulsion, with the interference of external orbital environment such as gravity gradient torque and solar radiation torque. If the structural shape is discoid and asymmetrical, the attitude control may be difficult. The only solution is to design a robust controller, so that the attitude pointing of the satellite can meet the mission requirements with the interference of internal parameter perturbation and external disturbance. Meanwhile, in order to reduce the weight and manufacturing cost of satellite, in the design of satellite attitude angular rate determination, the project used unscented kalman filter (UKF algorithm, coarse sun sensor (CSS and earth horizon sensor (EHS as measurement components to obtain the satellite attitude without rate gyro.

  18. A semi-physical simulation platform of attitude determination and control system for satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjin Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A semi-physical simulation platform for attitude determination and control system is proposed to verify the attitude estimator and controller on ground. A simulation target, a host PC, many attitude sensors, and actuators compose the simulation platform. The simulation target is composed of a central processing unit board with VxWorks operating system and many input/output boards connected via Compact Peripheral Component Interconnect bus. The executable programs in target are automatically generated from the simulation models in Simulink based on Real-Time Workshop of MATLAB. A three-axes gyroscope, a three-axes magnetometer, a sun sensor, a star tracer, three flywheels, and a Global Positioning System receiver are connected to the simulation target, which formulates the attitude control cycle of a satellite. The simulation models of the attitude determination and control system are described in detail. Finally, the semi-physical simulation platform is used to demonstrate the availability and rationality of the control scheme of a micro-satellite. Comparing the results between the numerical simulation in Simulink and the semi-physical simulation, the semi-physical simulation platform is available and the control scheme successfully achieves three-axes stabilization.

  19. Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (OOREOS) Satellite: Radiation Exposure in LEO and Supporting Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioda, Andrew Lige; Cook, Amanda Marie; Quinn, Richard C.; Elsaesser, Andreas; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Ricca,Alessandra; Jones, Nykola C.; Hoffman, Soren; Ricco,Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We will present the results from the exposure of the metalloporphyrin iron tetraphenylporphyrin chloride (FeTPPCI), anthraufin (C(sub 14)H(sub 8)(O sub 4) (Anth) and Isoviolanthrene (C(sub 34H sub 18) (IVA) to the outher space environment, measured in situ aboard the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses nanosatellite. The compounds were exposed for a period of 17 months (3700 hours of direct solar exposure) including broad-spectrum solar radiation (approx. 122 nm to the near infrared). The organic films are enclosed in hermetically sealed sample cells that contain one of four astrobiologically relevant microenvironments. Transmission spectra (200-1000 nm) were recorded for each film, at first daily and subsequently every 15 days, along with a solar spectrum and the dark response of the detector array. In addition to analysis via UV-Vis spectroscopy, the laboratory controls were also monitored via infrared and far-UV spectroscopy. The results presented will include the finding that the FeTPPCI and IVA organic films in contact with a humid headspace gas (0.8-2.3%) exhibit faster degradation times, upon irradiation, in comparison with identical films under dry headspaces gases, whereas the Anth thin film exhibited a higher degree of photostability. In the companion laboratory experiments, simulated solar exposure of FeTPI films in contact with either Ar or CO(sub -2):O(sub -2):Ar (10:0.01:1000) headspace gas results in growth of a band in the films infrared spectra at 1961 cm(sup 1). Our assignment of this new spectral feature and the corresponding rational will be presented. The relevance of O/OREOS findings to planetary science, biomarker research, and the photostability of organic materials in astrobiologically relevant environments will also be discussed.

  20. Analysis of Location Accuracy without Ground Control Points of Optical Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Renxiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two photography modes in optical satellite photogrammetry, including global continuous coverage and local area coverage, and each photography mode has its own characteristics about application and way to realize location accuracy without ground control points (GCPs. In this paper, the location accuracy without GCPs of typical satellite is introduced, and the key technical in bundle adjustment is described. Finally, the simulation experments are performed about location accuracy without GCPs using forward intersection and bundle adjustment. The results are shown: the attitude accuracy of exterior orientation elements is key factor to affect the location accuracy without GCPs, while the image resolution has little effect. When attitude accuracy of exterior orientation elements exceeds 0.5, the location accuracy without GCPs using bundle adjustment with 5 m resolution is better than it using forward intersection with 0.5 m resolution.

  1. Space Satellite Dynamics with Applications to Sunlight Pressure Attitude Control. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    A research program into three aspects of space satellite dynamics was carried out. First, a four-dimensional space-time formulation of Newtonian mechanics is developed. This theory allows a new physical interpretation of the conservation theorems of mechanics first derived rigorously by Noether. Second, a new concept for estimating the three angles which specify the orientation in space of a rigid body is presented. Two separate methods for implementing this concept are discussed, one based on direction cosines, the other on quaternions. Two examples are discussed: constant orientation in space, and constant rate of change of the three angles with time. Third, two synchronous equatorial orbit communication satellite designs which use sunlight pressure to control their attitude are analyzed. Each design is equipped with large reflecting surfaces, called solar sails, which can be canted in different directions to generate torques to correct pointing errors.

  2. Detumbling control for kinematically redundant space manipulator post-grasping a rotational satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Luo, Jianjun; Yuan, Jianping; Walter, Ulrich

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish a detumbling strategy and a coordination control scheme for a kinematically redundant space manipulator post-grasping a rotational satellite. First, the dynamics of the kinematically redundant space robot after grasping the target is presented, which lays the foundation for the coordination controller design. Subsequently, optimal detumbling and motion planning strategy for the post-capture phase is proposed based on the quartic Bézier curves and adaptive differential evolution (DE) algorithm subject to the specific constraints. Both detumbling time and control torques are taken into account for the generation of the optimal detumbling strategy. Furthermore, a coordination control scheme is presented to track the designed reference path while regulating the attitude of the chaser to a desired value, which successfully dumps the initial angular velocity of the rotational satellite and controls the base attitude synchronously. Simulation results are presented for detumbling a target with rotational motion using a 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) redundant space manipulator, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Verification of the karst flow model under laboratory controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Andric, Ivo; Malenica, Luka; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are very important groundwater resources around the world as well as in coastal part of Croatia. They consist of extremely complex structure defining by slow and laminar porous medium and small fissures and usually fast turbulent conduits/karst channels. Except simple lumped hydrological models that ignore high karst heterogeneity, full hydraulic (distributive) models have been developed exclusively by conventional finite element and finite volume elements considering complete karst heterogeneity structure that improves our understanding of complex processes in karst. Groundwater flow modeling in complex karst aquifers are faced by many difficulties such as a lack of heterogeneity knowledge (especially conduits), resolution of different spatial/temporal scales, connectivity between matrix and conduits, setting of appropriate boundary conditions and many others. Particular problem of karst flow modeling is verification of distributive models under real aquifer conditions due to lack of above-mentioned information. Therefore, we will show here possibility to verify karst flow models under the laboratory controlled conditions. Special 3-D karst flow model (5.6*2.6*2 m) consists of concrete construction, rainfall platform, 74 piezometers, 2 reservoirs and other supply equipment. Model is filled by fine sand (3-D porous matrix) and drainage plastic pipes (1-D conduits). This model enables knowledge of full heterogeneity structure including position of different sand layers as well as conduits location and geometry. Moreover, we know geometry of conduits perforation that enable analysis of interaction between matrix and conduits. In addition, pressure and precipitation distribution and discharge flow rates from both phases can be measured very accurately. These possibilities are not present in real sites what this model makes much more useful for karst flow modeling. Many experiments were performed under different controlled conditions such as different

  4. Geometric Positioning for Satellite Imagery without Ground Control Points by Exploiting Repeated Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of space technology and the performance of remote sensors, high-resolution satellites are continuously launched by countries around the world. Due to high efficiency, large coverage and not being limited by the spatial regulation, satellite imagery becomes one of the important means to acquire geospatial information. This paper explores geometric processing using satellite imagery without ground control points (GCPs. The outcome of spatial triangulation is introduced for geo-positioning as repeated observation. Results from combining block adjustment with non-oriented new images indicate the feasibility of geometric positioning with the repeated observation. GCPs are a must when high accuracy is demanded in conventional block adjustment; the accuracy of direct georeferencing with repeated observation without GCPs is superior to conventional forward intersection and even approximate to conventional block adjustment with GCPs. The conclusion is drawn that taking the existing oriented imagery as repeated observation enhances the effective utilization of previous spatial triangulation achievement, which makes the breakthrough for repeated observation to improve accuracy by increasing the base-height ratio and redundant observation. Georeferencing tests using data from multiple sensors and platforms with the repeated observation will be carried out in the follow-up research.

  5. Uncooled micro-earth sensor for micro-satellite attitude control: Earth remote sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourniols, J.-Y.; Soto-Romero, G.; Bony, F.; Vergnenègre, C.; Simonne, J.-J.; Esteve, D.; Albukerque, J.

    2017-11-01

    MEMS technology now makes possible to produce active microdevices combining detection, signal processing, and data storage with accuracy and compactness. In view of their characteristics, it can be expected that such microsensors will be used extensively in space applications dedicated to micro and nano satellites. For this purpose, a specific investigation dealing with the complete development of a micro-earth sensor used for attitude control of Low Earth Orbit satellites is under realization and test. Based on an infrared uncooled 320x240 microbolometer the experimental characterization of the final active system consists of three microsensors linear arrays of 240 pixels of the same technology, radialy spaced at 120°, watching and receiving earth IR radiations. The transition between excited and non excited pixels will determine the IR image of the Earth/Space transition hidden in IR atmosphere response. Specific on-chip algorithms have been implemented to extract the transition and compute the attitude satellite position in roll and pitch. The complete physical system modeling of one linear 240 pixels array including earth models, optic characteristics, microbolometer behavioral models, mixed analog/digital electronics and associated algorithms is consistent (at +/-8% ) with the breadboard measurements.

  6. Geometric Positioning for Satellite Imagery without Ground Control Points by Exploiting Repeated Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenling; Wu, Xiaoliang; Yan, Li; Xu, Zhenliang

    2017-01-26

    With the development of space technology and the performance of remote sensors, high-resolution satellites are continuously launched by countries around the world. Due to high efficiency, large coverage and not being limited by the spatial regulation, satellite imagery becomes one of the important means to acquire geospatial information. This paper explores geometric processing using satellite imagery without ground control points (GCPs). The outcome of spatial triangulation is introduced for geo-positioning as repeated observation. Results from combining block adjustment with non-oriented new images indicate the feasibility of geometric positioning with the repeated observation. GCPs are a must when high accuracy is demanded in conventional block adjustment; the accuracy of direct georeferencing with repeated observation without GCPs is superior to conventional forward intersection and even approximate to conventional block adjustment with GCPs. The conclusion is drawn that taking the existing oriented imagery as repeated observation enhances the effective utilization of previous spatial triangulation achievement, which makes the breakthrough for repeated observation to improve accuracy by increasing the base-height ratio and redundant observation. Georeferencing tests using data from multiple sensors and platforms with the repeated observation will be carried out in the follow-up research.

  7. 21 CFR 111.315 - What are the requirements for laboratory control processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURING, PACKAGING, LABELING, OR HOLDING OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control... processes? You must establish and follow laboratory control processes that are reviewed and approved by... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for laboratory control...

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of mini-satellite respinup by weak internal controllable torques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somov, Yevgeny, E-mail: e-somov@mail.ru [Samara State Technical University, Department for Guidance, Navigation and Control, 244 Molodogvardeyskaya Str., Samara 443100 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    Contemporary space engineering advanced new problem before theoretical mechanics and motion control theory: a spacecraft directed respinup by the weak restricted control internal forces. The paper presents some results on this problem, which is very actual for energy supply of information mini-satellites (for communication, geodesy, radio- and opto-electronic observation of the Earth et al.) with electro-reaction plasma thrusters and gyro moment cluster based on the reaction wheels or the control moment gyros. The solution achieved is based on the methods for synthesis of nonlinear robust control and on rigorous analytical proof for the required spacecraft rotation stability by Lyapunov function method. These results were verified by a computer simulation of strongly nonlinear oscillatory processes at respinuping of a flexible spacecraft.

  9. A dynamics and control algorithm for low Earth orbit precision formation flying satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, Jesse Koovik

    An innovative dynamics and control algorithm is developed for a dual-nanosatellite formation flying mission. The principal function of this algorithm is to use regular GPS state measurements to determine the controlled satellite's tracking error from a set of reference trajectories in the local-vertical/local-horizontal reference frame. A linear state-feedback control law---designed using a linear quadratic regulator method---calculates the optimal thrusts necessary to correct this error and communicates the thrust directions to the attitude control system and the thrust durations to the propulsion system. The control system is developed to minimize the conflicting metrics of tracking error and DeltaV requirements. To reconfigure the formation, an optimization algorithm is designed using the analytical solution to the state-space equation and the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire state transition matrix to solve for dual-thrust reconfiguration maneuvers. The resulting trajectories require low DeltaV, use finite-time thrusts and are accurate in a fully nonlinear orbital environment. This algorithm will be used to control the CanX-4&5 formation flying demonstration mission. In addition, an iterative method which numerically generates quasi periodic trajectories for a satellite formation is presented. This novel technique utilizes a shooting approach to the Newton method to close the relative deputy trajectory over a specific number of orbits, then fits the actual perturbed motion of the deputy with a Fourier series to enforce periodicity. This process is applied to two well-known satellite formations: a projected circular orbit and a J2-invariant formation. Compared to conventional formations, these resulting quasi-periodic trajectories require a dramatically lower control effort to maintain and could therefore be used to extend DeltaV-limited formation flying missions. Finally, an analytical study of the stability of the formation flying algorithm is conducted. To facilitate

  10. Control of the Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, L. A.; Levay, M.; Gilbreth, C. W.; Finch, M. L.; Bentley, R. D.; Firth, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite consists of two largely independent instruments: the Flat Crystal Spectrometer, a highly collimated scanning spectrometer mounted on a raster platform, and the Bent Crystal Spectrometer, a broadly collimated spectrometer providing high time-resolution (128 ms) spectra for the study of rapidly evolving phenomena. Each instrument is controlled by a microcomputer system built around an RCA 1802 microprocessor. This paper presents a discussion of the motivation for using a microprocessor in this application, and the design concepts that were implemented. The effectiveness of the approach as seen after several months of operation will also be discussed.

  11. Phase Change Material for Temperature Control of Imager or Sounder on GOES Type Satellites in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses phase change material (PCM) in the scan cavity of an imager or sounder on satellites in geostationary orbit (GEO) to maintain the telescope temperature stable. When sunlight enters the scan aperture, solar heating causes the PCM to melt. When sunlight stops entering the scan aperture, the PCM releases the thermal energy stored to keep the components in the telescope warm. It has no moving parts or bimetallic springs. It reduces heater power required to make up the heat lost by radiation to space through the aperture. It is an attractive thermal control option to a radiator with a louver and a sunshade.

  12. Tether dynamics and control results for tethered satellite system's initial flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Flanders, Howard

    The recent Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1) mission has provided a wealth of data concerning the dynamics of tethered systems in space and has demonstrated the effectiveness of operational techniques designed to control these dynamics. In this paper, we review control techniques developed for managing tether dynamics, and discuss the results of using these techniques for the Tethered Satellite System's maiden flight on STS-46. In particular, the flight results of controlling libration dynamics, string dynamics, and slack tether are presented. These results show that tether dynamics can be safely managed. The overall stability of the system was found to be surprisingly good even at relatively short tether lengths. In fact, the system operated in passive mode at a tether length of 256 meters for over 9 hours. Only monitoring of the system was required during this time. Although flight anomalies prevented the planned deployment to 20 km, the extended operations at shorter tether lengths have proven the viability of using tethers in space. These results should prove invaluable in preparing for future missions with tethered objects in space.

  13. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the dynamic topology control problemof satellite cluster networks (SCNs in Earth observation (EO missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs. The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites’ relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime.

  14. Quality control, data documentation and reporting in the laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The implementation of a quality assurance program, will give confidence in the validity of the results produced by a laboratory. Moreover, efficient documentation of lab data and adoption of the recommended strategy in presenting research reports will make for enhanced professionalism and help to gain competitive edge.

  15. Internet-of-things in remote-controlled laboratories

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlodlo, N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the South African education landscape, some of the schools have well-resourced science laboratories, while others are under- resourced. This has impacted on the quality of science education in under-resourced schools, resulting in a lower pass...

  16. Fault diagnosis in satellite attitude control systems using artificial neural networkk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayodele I., Olanipekun

    The nonlinear behavior exhibited by altitude control system processes and also the presence of external constraints on the operating conditions causes hitch in the dynamics of system processes. This research work proposes a fault detection/tolerant prediction in an altitude control system. This is done through the artificial neural network fault detection by deploying the neural network approach. A fault detection and isolation module is developed in the actuator system of the Altitude Control System, thereby achieving the goal of this thesis. This can be done by two basic classification stages: Neural Residual Generator (Neural Observer)- This stage is responsible for generating residual errors that can reflect the real behavior of the entire process as against its normal conditions. Adaptive Neural Classifier - This stage is responsible for managing the isolation task of the fault detected by evaluating the generated residual errors from the neural estimator which gives detailed information about faults detected e.g., fault location and time. These two stages can be implemented by executing the tasks listed below: 1. Study and develop a generic three axis stabilized altitude control model based on the reaction wheels. This is established with three separate PD controllers designed for each reaction wheel of the satellite axis using the Matlab - SIMULINK. 2. Develop a dynamic neural network residual generator based on Dynamic Multilayer Perceptron Network (DMLP) which is then applied to the reaction wheel model designed commonly called the actuator in the altitude control system of a satellite 3. Develop a neural network adaptive classifier based on the Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) model which is used for the isolation concept. The advantages of the proposed dynamic neural network and neural adaptive classifier approach are showcased.

  17. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) Network Control Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coney, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the network control function for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) very small aperture terminal (VSAT) full mesh network. This includes control of all operational activities such as acquisition, synchronization, timing and rain fade compensation as well as control of all communications activities such as on-demand integrated services (voice, video, and date) connects and disconnects Operations control is provided by an in-band orderwire carried in the baseboard processor (BBP) control burst, the orderwire burst, the reference burst, and the uplink traffic burst. Communication services are provided by demand assigned multiple access (DAMA) protocols. The ACTS implementation of DAMA protocols ensures both on-demand and integrated voice, video and data services. Communications services control is also provided by the in-band orderwire but uses only the reference burst and the uplink traffic burst. The performance of the ACTS network control functions have been successfully tested during on-orbit checkout and in various VSAT networks in day to day operations. This paper discusses the network operations and services control performance.

  18. Semi-active Attitude Control and Off-line Attitude Determination for the SSETI-Express Student Micro-satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) for the SSETI-Express micro-satellite mission. The mission is an educational project involving 14 universities and the European Space Agency (ESA). The satellite has been designed and built, by students......, over a period of only 18 months. This paper emphasises on the trade-offs required to build an operational ADCS system within such a rapidly developing project....

  19. Semi-active Attitude Control and Off-line Attitude Determination for the SEETI-Express Student Micro-satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars

    This paper concerns the development of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) for the SSETI-Express micro-satellite mission. The mission is an educational project involving 14 universities and the European Space Agency (ESA). The satellite has been designed and built, by students......, over a period of only 18 months. This paper emphasises on the trade-offs required to build an operational ADCS system within such a rapidly developing project....

  20. 78 FR 49546 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Wildlife Laboratories Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... HCI) (9056), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule I. The company plans to import... Wildlife Laboratories Inc. to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with the public... effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Wildlife Laboratories Inc. to ensure that the company's...

  1. Controlling mercury spills in laboratories with a thermometer exchange program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLouth, Lawrence D.

    2002-03-25

    This paper presents a case for replacing mercury thermometers with their organic-liquid-filled counterparts. A review of liquid-in glass-thermometers is given. In addition, a brief summary of mercury's health effects and exposure limits is presented. Spill cleanup methods and some lessons learned from our experience are offered as well. Finally, an overview of the mercury thermometer exchange program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is presented.

  2. Quality control of culture media in a microbiology laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Basu S; Pal A; Desai P

    2005-01-01

    The nature of reporting of a microbiology laboratory depends upon the quality of the culture media used. Quality of media directly affects the observations and inferences drawn from the cultural characteristics of microorganisms. Checking of different parameters of media such as growth supporting characteristics, physical characteristics, gel strength and batch contamination can help to assess their quality. There are different methods to check all these parameters systematically. The meticul...

  3. Assessment for Operator Confidence in Automated Space Situational Awareness and Satellite Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, J.; Voshell, M.; Sliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    The United States is highly dependent on space resources to support military, government, commercial, and research activities. Satellites operate at great distances, observation capacity is limited, and operator actions and observations can be significantly delayed. Safe operations require support systems that provide situational understanding, enhance decision making, and facilitate collaboration between human operators and system automation both in-the-loop, and on-the-loop. Joint cognitive systems engineering (JCSE) provides a rich set of methods for analyzing and informing the design of complex systems that include both human decision-makers and autonomous elements as coordinating teammates. While, JCSE-based systems can enhance a system analysts' understanding of both existing and new system processes, JCSE activities typically occur outside of traditional systems engineering (SE) methods, providing sparse guidance about how systems should be implemented. In contrast, the Joint Director's Laboratory (JDL) information fusion model and extensions, such as the Dual Node Network (DNN) technical architecture, provide the means to divide and conquer such engineering and implementation complexity, but are loosely coupled to specialized organizational contexts and needs. We previously describe how Dual Node Decision Wheels (DNDW) extend the DNN to integrate JCSE analysis and design with the practicalities of system engineering and implementation using the DNN. Insights from Rasmussen's JCSE Decision Ladders align system implementation with organizational structures and processes. In the current work, we present a novel approach to assessing system performance based on patterns occurring in operational decisions that are documented by JCSE processes as traces in a decision ladder. In this way, system assessment is closely tied not just to system design, but the design of the joint cognitive system that includes human operators, decision-makers, information systems, and

  4. Guidance, Navigation, and Control System for Maneuverable Pico-Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A compact, low-power GN&C system is essential to the success of pico-satellite Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). Austin Satellite Design (ASD)...

  5. On-board closed-loop congestion control for satellite based packet switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Pong P.; Ivancic, William D.; Kim, Heechul

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently investigating a satellite architecture that incorporates on-board packet switching capability. Because of the statistical nature of packet switching, arrival traffic may fluctuate and thus it is necessary to integrate congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing unit. This study focuses on the closed-loop reactive control. We investigate the impact of the long propagation delay on the performance and propose a scheme to overcome the problem. The scheme uses a global feedback signal to regulate the packet arrival rate of ground stations. In this scheme, the satellite continuously broadcasts the status of its output buffer and the ground stations respond by selectively discarding packets or by tagging the excessive packets as low-priority. The two schemes are evaluated by theoretical queuing analysis and simulation. The former is used to analyze the simplified model and to determine the basic trends and bounds, and the later is used to assess the performance of a more realistic system and to evaluate the effectiveness of more sophisticated control schemes. The results show that the long propagation delay makes the closed-loop congestion control less responsive. The broadcasted information can only be used to extract statistical information. The discarding scheme needs carefully-chosen status information and reduction function, and normally requires a significant amount of ground discarding to reduce the on-board packet loss probability. The tagging scheme is more effective since it tolerates more uncertainties and allows a larger margin of error in status information. It can protect the high-priority packets from excessive loss and fully utilize the downlink bandwidth at the same time.

  6. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of general analytical factors in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Freeman, Kathy P; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Vap, Linda M; Getzy, Karen M; Evans, Ellen W; Harr, Kendal E

    2010-09-01

    Owing to lack of governmental regulation of veterinary laboratory performance, veterinarians ideally should demonstrate a commitment to self-monitoring and regulation of laboratory performance from within the profession. In response to member concerns about quality management in veterinary laboratories, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) formed a Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards (QAS) committee in 1996. This committee recently published updated and peer-reviewed Quality Assurance Guidelines on the ASVCP website. The Quality Assurance Guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports on 1) general analytic factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons, 2) hematology and hemostasis, and 3) clinical chemistry, endocrine assessment, and urinalysis. This report documents recommendations for control of general analytical factors within veterinary clinical laboratories and is based on section 2.1 (Analytical Factors Important In Veterinary Clinical Pathology, General) of the newly revised ASVCP QAS Guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimum guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing. It is hoped that these guidelines will provide a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. ©2010 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. A Network of Automatic Control Web-Based Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hector; Sanchez Moreno, J.; Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, F. A.; Torres, Fernando; Dormido, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an innovative project in the context of remote experimentation applied to control engineering education. Specifically, the authors describe their experience regarding the analysis, design, development, and exploitation of web-based technologies within the scope of automatic control. This work is part of an inter-university…

  8. A Process Dynamics and Control Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Jordan L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a process control experiment. The apparatus includes a three-vessel glass flow system with a variable flow configuration, means for feeding dye solution controlled by a stepper-motor driven valve, and a flow spectrophotometer. Students use impulse response data and nonlinear regression to estimate three parameters of a model…

  9. Operational use of environmental satellite remote sensing and satellite communications technology for global food security and locust control by FAO: The ARTEMIS and DIANA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielkema, J. U.; Snijders, F. L.

    Since August 1988, after a development period of 3 years, the FAO Remote Sensing Centre has been operating the Africa Real Time Environmental Monitoring Information System (ARTEMIS) in support of the Global Information and Early Warning System on Food and Agriculture and the Desert Locust Plague Prevention Programme of FAO. The ARTEMIS system was implemented by FAO in close co-operation with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, U.S.A.; the National Aerospace Laboratory of The Netherlands and the University of Reading, U.K. ARTEMIS is a highly automated data acquisition, pre- and thematic processing, production and archiving system for real-time precipitation assessment and near real-time vegetation condition monitoring of Africa, the Near East and Southwest Asia, based on hourly Meteosat thermal infrared and NOAA AVHRR data. The vegetation condition assessment capability is currently being expanded to include the rest of Asia and Latin America. ARTEMIS data products, generated by the system on a 10-day and monthly basis, are currently used operationally by a variety of users at FAO Headquarters and by regional and national food security early warning systems in sixteen Eastern and Southern African countries. The ARTEMIS system plays an important role in the generation and archiving of global satellite derived environmental data sets for use by FAO and other organizations with global monitoring and assessment mandates. An extensive ARTEMIS rainfall estimation calibration programme, covering Sahelian countries as well as Eastern and Southern Africa, has been developed in co-operation with the University of Reading, U.K. and regional FAO field projects. This programme was started in 1990 and will continue through 1995 to obtain statistically valid regression parameters for homogeneous climatic zones to allow automated translation of satellite derived cold cloud duration data into quantities of estimated rainfall. Jointly with the European Space Agency, FAO Has been

  10. Quality of Control of Clinical-Biochemical Laboratories – Serbian Case

    OpenAIRE

    Vinko Peric; Dusan Jaric; Sonja Ketin; Admira Konicanin; Rade Biocanin

    2014-01-01

    In the last 20 years in medical laboratories, numerous activities regarding quality and accreditation system were taken. Approach to this problem in European countries is different, so the task of the Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4) to help the efforts to harmonize this issue. External quality control in clinical-chemical laboratories imposed the need for the implementation of quality management system. »Good laboratory practic...

  11. Control and robotics remote laboratory for engineering education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Pačnik

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The new tools for education of engineering emerged and one of the most promising is a remote rapid control prototyping (RRCP, which is very useful also for control and robotics development in industry and in education. Examples of introductory remote control and simple robotics courses with integrated hands on experiments are presented in the paper. The aim of integration of remote hands on experiments into control and/or robotics course is to minimize the gap between the theory and practice to teach students the use of RRCP and to decrease the education costs. Developed RRCP experiments are based on MATLAB/Simulink, xPC target, custom developed embedded target

  12. The Individualized Quality Control Plan - Coming Soon to Clinical Microbiology Laboratories Everywhere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nancy

    2015-11-15

    As of January 1, 2016, microbiology laboratories can choose to adopt a new quality control option, the Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP), under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA). This voluntary approach increases flexibility for meeting regulatory requirements and provides laboratories the opportunity to customize QC for their testing in their unique environments and by their testing personnel. IQCP is an all-inclusive approach to quality based on risk management to address potential errors in the total testing process. It includes three main steps, (1) performing a risk assessment, (2) developing a QC plan, and (3) monitoring the plan through quality assessment. Resources are available from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Society for Microbiology, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and accrediting organizations, such as the College of American Pathologists and Joint Commission, to assist microbiology laboratories implementing IQCP.

  13. Quality Control of Boar Sperm Processing : Implications from European AI Centres and Two Spermatology Reference Laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riesenbeck, A; Schulze, M; Rüdiger, K; Henning, H; Waberski, D

    In recent years, increased automatization has resulted in a higher efficiency of boar semen processing in AI laboratories. Sophisticated laboratory management and efficient quality control programmes are needed for current tendencies in major pork-producing countries to reduce the sperm number per

  14. Web Environment for Programming and Control of a Mobile Robot in a Remote Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Lopes, Maísa Soares; Gomes, Iago Pacheco; Trindade, Roque M. P.; da Silva, Alzira F.; de C. Lima, Antonio C.

    2017-01-01

    Remote robotics laboratories have been successfully used for engineering education. However, few of them use mobile robots to to teach computer science. This article describes a mobile robot Control and Programming Environment (CPE) and its pedagogical applications. The system comprises a remote laboratory for robotics, an online programming tool,…

  15. An Educational Laboratory for Digital Control and Rapid Prototyping of Power Electronic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Saeedifard, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a new educational power electronics laboratory that was developed primarily to reinforce experimentally the fundamental concepts presented in a power electronics course. The developed laboratory combines theoretical design, simulation studies, digital control, fabrication, and verification of power-electronic circuits based on…

  16. Feasibility of microminiature satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Ryouichi

    1991-07-01

    A conceptual study is conducted on technical problems and system design techniques to accomplish higher performance microminiature satellites by smaller systems. Applications of microminiature satellite technology to practical satellite mission are mentioned. Concepts of microminiature satellites, measures to miniaturize satellites, and micro-miniaturization technologies for communication and data processing, electric solar power paddle, attitude and orbit control, structure, thermal control, propulsion, and instrumentation systems are outlined. Examples of miniaturizing satellite missions such as planet exploration, low-altitude communication networks, space positioning system, low-altitude earth observation mission, clustered satellites, tethered satellites, and timely observation are described. Satellite miniaturizing technology can also be used to launch systems by lasers, and superconductive linear catapults (space escalator). It is pointed out that keys to promote satellite miniaturization are electronics, precision machining, raw material, electric power source technologies, and system design technology to integrate those technologies.

  17. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Using Multiple Navigation Signals as Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX is a remote control method that permits synchronization between a ground station atomic clock and Japanese quasi-zenith satellite system (QZSS crystal oscillators. To realize the RESSOX of the QZSS, the utilization of navigation signals of QZSS for feedback control is an important issue. Since QZSS transmits seven navigation signals (L1C/A, L1CP, L1CD, L2CM, L2CL, L5Q, and L5I, all combinations of these signals should be evaluated. First, the RESSOX algorithm will be introduced. Next, experimental performance will be demonstrated. If only a single signal is available, ionospheric delay should be input from external measurements. If multiple frequency signals are available, any combination, except for L2 and L5, gives good performance with synchronization error being within two nanoseconds that of RESSOX. The combination of L1CD and L5Q gives the best synchronization performance (synchronization error within 1.14 ns. Finally, in the discussion, comparisons of long-duration performance, computer simulation, and sampling number used in feedback control are considered. Although experimental results do not correspond to the simulation results, the tendencies are similar. For the overlapping Allan deviation of long duration, the stability of 1.23×10−14 at 100,160 s is obtained.

  18. 78 FR 12101 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories, LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Caraco Pharmaceutical... November 22, 2012, Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Ltd., 270 Prospect Plains Road, Cranbury, New Jersey...

  19. ERROR-CONTROL CODING OF ADS-B MESSAGES FOR IRIDIUM SATELLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For modelling of ADS-B messages transmitting on the base of low-orbit satellite constellation Іrіdіum the model of a communication channel “Aircraft - Satellite - Ground Station” was built using MATLAB Sіmulіnk. This model allowed to investigate dependences of the Bit Error Rate on a type of  signal coding/decoding, ratio Eb/N0 and satellite repeater gain

  20. Commanding and Controlling Satellite Clusters (IEEE Intelligent Systems, November/December 2000)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zetocha, Paul; Self, Lance; Wainwright, Ross; Burns, Rich; Brito, Margarita; Surka, Derek

    2000-01-01

    .... Recently, various organizations have begun to explore how distributed clusters of cooperating satellites can replace their larger monolithic counterparts to reduce overall costs, enhance mission...

  1. Sunway Medical Laboratory Quality Control Plans Based on Six Sigma, Risk Management and Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairaman, Jamuna; Sakiman, Zarinah; Li, Lee Suan

    2017-03-01

    Sunway Medical Centre (SunMed) implemented Six Sigma, measurement uncertainty, and risk management after the CLSI EP23 Individualized Quality Control Plan approach. Despite the differences in all three approaches, each implementation was beneficial to the laboratory, and none was in conflict with another approach. A synthesis of these approaches, built on a solid foundation of quality control planning, can help build a strong quality management system for the entire laboratory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Flexible System Integration and Advanced Hierarchical Control Architectures in the Microgrid Research Laboratory of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Hernández, Adriana Carolina Luna; Diaz, Enrique Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the system integration and hierarchical control implementation in an inverter-based microgrid research laboratory (MGRL) in Aalborg University, Denmark. MGRL aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The structure of the laboratory...... system supervision, advanced secondary and tertiary management are realized in a microgrid central controller. The software and hardware schemes are described. Several example case studies are introduced and performed in order to achieve power quality regulation, energy management and flywheel energy...

  3. Model-based fuzzy control solutions for a laboratory Antilock Braking System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precup, Radu-Emil; Spataru, Sergiu; Rǎdac, Mircea-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives two original model-based fuzzy control solutions dedicated to the longitudinal slip control of Antilock Braking System laboratory equipment. The parallel distributed compensation leads to linear matrix inequalities which guarantee the global stability of the fuzzy control systems...

  4. Digitally gain controlled linear high voltage amplifier for laboratory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçum, C.

    2011-08-01

    The design of a digitally gain controlled high-voltage non-inverting bipolar linear amplifier is presented. This cost efficient and relatively simple circuit has stable operation range from dc to 90 kHz under the load of 10 kΩ and 39 pF. The amplifier can swing up to 360 Vpp under these conditions and it has 2.5 μs rise time. The gain can be changed by the aid of JFETs. The amplifiers have been realized using a combination of operational amplifiers and high-voltage discrete bipolar junction transistors. The circuit details and performance characteristics are discussed.

  5. Combines Attitude Control and Energy Storage for Small Satellites using Variable Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-24

    the EC-45 are listed in Table 7.4(a) while an image of this motor is shown in Figure 7.1(a). The shear contrast in size of the EC-16 and EC-45...Spacecraft Attitude and Orbit Control Systems, 1997, pp. 221–228. [6] Hebner, R., B. J. and Walls , A., “Flywheel Batteries Come Around Again,” IEEE...Achieve- ments,” Powerpoint Presentation. [136] Lappas, V., Ooisthuizen, P., Madle, P., Cowie, L., Yuksel, G., and Fertin, D., “De- sign, Analysis

  6. Satellite transmission of oceanographic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.; Desai, R.G.P.; DeSa, E.J.

    Oceanographic data collected on a research vessel has been transmitted to a shore laboratory using the INMARSAT maritime satellite The system configuration used, consisted of Satellite Communication Terminals interfaced to desk top computers...

  7. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control Systems Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control systems architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 x 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control systems architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an offset of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  8. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control System Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica (Technical Monitor); Moore, Chris (Technical Monitor); Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control system architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control system architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an o.set of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  9. Srf controls satellite cell fusion through the maintenance of actin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianarison-Huetz, Voahangy; Papaefthymiou, Aikaterini; Herledan, Gaëlle; Noviello, Chiara; Faradova, Ulduz; Collard, Laura; Pincini, Alessandra; Schol, Emilie; Decaux, Jean François; Maire, Pascal; Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia

    2017-12-21

    Satellite cells (SCs) are adult muscle stem cells that are mobilized when muscle homeostasis is perturbed. Here, we show that serum response factor (Srf) is needed for optimal SC-mediated hypertrophic growth. We identified Srf as a master regulator of SC fusion required in both fusion partners, whereas it was dispensable for SC proliferation and differentiation. We show that SC-specific Srf deletion leads to impaired actin cytoskeleton and report the existence of finger-like actin-based protrusions at fusion sites in vertebrates that were notoriously absent in fusion-defective myoblasts lacking Srf. Restoration of a polymerized actin network by overexpression of an α-actin isoform in Srf mutant SCs rescued their fusion with a control cell in vitro and in vivo and reestablished overload-induced muscle growth. These findings demonstrate the importance of Srf in controlling the organization of actin cytoskeleton and actin-based protrusions for myoblast fusion in mammals and its requirement to achieve efficient hypertrophic myofiber growth. © 2018 Randrianarison-Huetz et al.

  10. Developing a Novel USB-PLC Controller for a Mechatronics Cloud Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jye Shyr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the development and implementation of a novel Universal Serial Bus (USB-Programmable Logic Controller (PLC, called a USB-PLC controller, for a mechatronics cloud laboratory. The aim of a mechatronics cloud laboratory is to provide state of the art research quality equipment to students, allowing them to conduct hands-on experiments via the Internet. One objective of the cloud laboratory is to not only provide equipment for conducting set experiments, but also to provide a means for students to access research equipment in order to conduct individual research experiments. The proposed controller for these cloud laboratory experiments has been chosen in order to expose the students to as many different engineering and technology disciplines as possible.

  11. Using Transmission Control Protocol in the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Satellite Communication Experiment - the Next Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, E.

    1998-01-01

    Ths paper describes a future Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) test which was planned as a part of the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Satellite Communications Experiment. The TCP test portion of the Trans-Pacific High Definition Video Satellite Communications Experiment intends to examine the correlation between the underlying assumptions of come TCP algorithms and the performance shortfalls observed when the algorithms are used in a stellite-based environment, and to make experimental changes to existing TCP variants to study the effects of the modifications.

  12. Differentiation of changes in serum homeostasis of laboratory animals after spaceflight on board of the BION-M1 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karganov, Mikhail; Sychev, Vladimir; Shenkman, Boris S.; Arkhipova, Elena; Alchinova, Irina; Medvedeva, Ulia

    Our objective was to determine the criteria of sensitivity to the major spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) on the basis of the data on changes in serum homeostasis in mice exposed to microgravity at the submagnetospheric orbit. The material was obtained from C57bl mice that spent 30 days at an altitude of 470 km and the animals used in ground experiments (tail suspension test, irradiation). The sera of the experimental and control animals were analyzed by the method of laser correlation spectroscopy (LCS) allowing evaluation of the contribution of particles in the biological fluid into the light scattering. For multicomponent samples, the analysis yields a curve with several peaks. Comparison of the areas under the curve provides information on changes in the relative contribution of particles of different sizes to light scattering (Karganov et al., 2012). We obtained and analyzed LCS data characterizing changes in the serum homeostasis in mice after exposure during spaceflight and vivarium experiments, and in 8 days after spacecraft landing. Microgravity was simulated by tail suspension of the animals (8 experimental and 8 controls) for 4 weeks. Another animal group was exposed to gamma-radiation (0.05 Gy) on a cesium irradiator (4 experimental and 9 controls), which presumably corresponds to the total dose received by the mouse during one-month spaceflight. The serum from suspended mice differed from control serum samples in the zone of small particles - 8.42 nm (panimals on the day of irradiation demonstrated similar contribution of small particles (from 0 to 20 nm) to serum light scattering. Great contribution to serum light scattering of large particles 166-223 nm in irradiated mice on the day of irradiation and 20-91-nm particles in suspended mice is worthy of note. The effect of irradiation was observed on LC-histograms of mice exposed to microgravity on the submagnetospheric orbit (5 experimental and 9 controls), but the changes were less

  13. Autonomous Satellite Command and Control Through the World Wide Web. Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The Automated Space System Experimental Testbed (ASSET) system is a simple yet comprehensive real-world operations network being developed. Phase 3 of the ASSET Project was January-December 1997 and is the subject of this report. This phase permitted SSDL and its project partners to expand the ASSET system in a variety of ways. These added capabilities included the advancement of ground station capabilities, the adaptation of spacecraft on-board software, and the expansion of capabilities of the ASSET management algorithms. Specific goals of Phase 3 were: (1) Extend Web-based goal-level commanding for both the payload PI and the spacecraft engineer. (2) Support prioritized handling of multiple (PIs) Principle Investigators as well as associated payload experimenters. (3) Expand the number and types of experiments supported by the ASSET system and its associated spacecraft. (4) Implement more advanced resource management, modeling and fault management capabilities that integrate the space and ground segments of the space system hardware. (5) Implement a beacon monitoring test. (6) Implement an experimental blackboard controller for space system management. (7) Further define typical ground station developments required for Internet-based remote control and for full system automation of the PI-to-spacecraft link. Each of those goals are examined. Significant sections of this report were also published as a conference paper. Several publications produced in support of this grant are included as attachments. Titles include: 1) Experimental Initiatives in Space System Operations; 2) The ASSET Client Interface: Balancing High Level Specification with Low Level Control; 3) Specifying Spacecraft Operations At The Product/Service Level; 4) The Design of a Highly Configurable, Reusable Operating System for Testbed Satellites; 5) Automated Health Operations For The Sapphire Spacecraft; 6) Engineering Data Summaries for Space Missions; and 7) Experiments In Automated Health

  14. Design of Satellite Attitude Control Algorithm Based on the SDRE Method Using Gas Jets and Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz C. G. de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental attitude control algorithm design using prototypes can minimize space mission costs by reducing the number of errors transmitted to the next phase of the project. The Space Mechanics and Control Division (DMC of INPE is constructing a 3D simulator to supply the conditions for implementing and testing satellite control hardware and software. Satellite large angle maneuver makes the plant highly nonlinear and if the parameters of the system are not well determined, the plant can also present some level of uncertainty. As a result, controller designed by a linear control technique can have its performance and robustness degraded. In this paper the standard LQR linear controller and the SDRE controller associated with an SDRE filter are applied to design a controller for a nonlinear plant. The plant is similar to the DMC 3D satellite simulator where the unstructured uncertainties of the system are represented by process and measurements noise. In the sequel the State-Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE method is used to design and test an attitude control algorithm based on gas jets and reaction wheel torques to perform large angle maneuver in three axes. The SDRE controller design takes into account the effects of the plant nonlinearities and system noise which represents uncertainty. The SDRE controller performance and robustness are tested during the transition phase from angular velocity reductions to normal mode of operation with stringent pointing accuracy using a switching control algorithm based on minimum system energy. This work serves to validate the numerical simulator model and to verify the functionality of the control algorithm designed by the SDRE method.

  15. Air quality control in the ART laboratory is a major determinant of IVF success

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves, Sandro C; Bento, Fabiola C.

    2015-01-01

    A recently published article described how a fertility center in the United States implemented air quality control to newly designed in vitro fertilization (IVF) laboratory.1 A highly-efficient air filtration was achieved by installing a centered system supplying filtered air to the IVF laboratory and related critical areas, combining air particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) filtration. As a consequence, live birth rates were increased by improvements in air quality. This article h...

  16. Intelligent tutoring and aiding in satellite ground control. Ph.D. Thesis - Georgia Inst. of Tech., 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Rose W.; Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    In supervisory control systems such as satellite ground control, there is a need for human-centered automation where the focus is to understand and enhance the human-system interaction experience in the complex task environment. Operator support in the form of off-line intelligent tutoring and on-line intelligent aiding is one approach towards this effort. The tutor/aid paradigm is proposed here as a design approach that integrates the two aspects of operator support in one system for technically oriented adults in complex domains. This paper also presents GT-VITA, a proof-of-concept graphical, interactive, intelligent tutoring system that is a first attempt to illustrate the tutoring aspect of the tutor/aid paradigm in the domain of satellite ground control. Evaluation on GT-VITA is conducted with NASA personnel with very positive results. GT-VITA is presented being fielded as it is at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  17. Electronic laboratory system reduces errors in National Tuberculosis Program: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, J A; Shin, S S; Yale, G; Suarez, C; Asencios, L; Contreras, C; Rodriguez, P; Kim, J; Cegielski, P; Fraser, H S F

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of the e-Chasqui laboratory information system in reducing reporting errors compared to the current paper system. Cluster randomized controlled trial in 76 health centers (HCs) between 2004 and 2008. Baseline data were collected every 4 months for 12 months. HCs were then randomly assigned to intervention (e-Chasqui) or control (paper). Further data were collected for the same months the following year. Comparisons were made between intervention and control HCs, and before and after the intervention. Intervention HCs had respectively 82% and 87% fewer errors in reporting results for drug susceptibility tests (2.1% vs. 11.9%, P = 0.001, OR 0.17, 95%CI 0.09-0.31) and cultures (2.0% vs. 15.1%, P Chasqui users sent on average three electronic error reports per week to the laboratories. e-Chasqui reduced the number of missing laboratory results at point-of-care health centers. Clinical users confirmed viewing electronic results not available on paper. Reporting errors to the laboratory using e-Chasqui promoted continuous quality improvement. The e-Chasqui laboratory information system is an important part of laboratory infrastructure improvements to support multidrug-resistant tuberculosis care in Peru.

  18. On the Use of Controlled Radiation Pressure to Send a Satellite to a Graveyard Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, J. B.; Sanchez, D. M.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Smirnov, G. V.

    2017-10-01

    A very important topic in modern astrodynamics is the removal of satellites from their orbits, after the end of their missions. In this work, we propose the use of the solar radiation pressure to change the orbital energy of a satellite, to remove it from the operational region to a graveyard orbit. A mechanism for changing the area-to-mass ratio of the satellite and/or its reflectivity coefficient is used to accomplish this task. We derive an analytical model to find the maximum eccentricity achieved during the removal trajectory, for different initial conditions for the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node. After that, the best trajectories, i.e., trajectories with low eccentricity, are integrated using a numerical model. These low eccentricity trajectories are important because satellites with disposal orbits with low eccentricity pose a lower risk of crossing the operational region during the de-orbiting.

  19. Flexible Low Cost Avionics for NanoSatellite Launch Vehicle Control and GPS Metric Tracking Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems LLC (Tyvak) will develop nano-launch vehicle avionics solutions based on the latest commercial electronics products...

  20. Satellite broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D.; Rainger, P.; Harvey, R. V.; Jennings, A.

    Questions related to direct broadcasting satellites are addressed with attention given to celestial mechanics, synchronous orbits, propagation, international plans, domestic installation, related laws and system costs. The role of the World Administrative Planning Conference (WARC) organization is discussed and contrasted with that of the regional administrative radio conference. Topics related to the field of law include coverage and overspill, regulation and control, copyrights and international organizations. Alternative ways of estimating direct broadcasting system costs are presented with consideration given to satellite costs as a function of mass, launch costs and system costs as a function of power.

  1. HEXIM1 controls satellite cell expansion after injury to regulate skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Peng; Chen, Kang; Huang, Bihui; Liu, Min; Cui, Miao; Rozenberg, Inna; Chaqour, Brahim; Pan, Xiaoyue; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.

    2012-01-01

    The native capacity of adult skeletal muscles to regenerate is vital to the recovery from physical injuries and dystrophic diseases. Currently, the development of therapeutic interventions has been hindered by the complex regulatory network underlying the process of muscle regeneration. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury, we identified hexamethylene bisacetamide inducible 1 (HEXIM1, also referred to as CLP-1), the inhibitory component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, as a pivotal regulator of skeletal muscle regeneration. Hexim1-haplodeficient muscles exhibited greater mass and preserved function compared with those of WT muscles after injury, as a result of enhanced expansion of satellite cells. Transplanted Hexim1-haplodeficient satellite cells expanded and improved muscle regeneration more effectively than WT satellite cells. Conversely, HEXIM1 overexpression restrained satellite cell proliferation and impeded muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, dissociation of HEXIM1 from P-TEFb and subsequent activation of P-TEFb are required for satellite cell proliferation and the prevention of early myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest a crucial role for the HEXIM1/P-TEFb pathway in the regulation of satellite cell–mediated muscle regeneration and identify HEXIM1 as a potential therapeutic target for degenerative muscular diseases. PMID:23023707

  2. APPLICATION OF A PLC TO A LABORATORY COMPRESSOR WORKSHOP CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech GÓRA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a control system of air compressors in a university laboratory is presented. The control system, which is built using the Astraada RCC972 and the GE 90-20 drivers, is an extension of the two states’ inputs and outputs of Astraada. To visualize the work stand, the PC computer class and the Proficy Machine Edition (ME View software were applied. Selected results from the tests of the built control system are presented.

  3. Quality of Control of Clinical-Biochemical Laboratories – Serbian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Peric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years in medical laboratories, numerous activities regarding quality and accreditation system were taken. Approach to this problem in European countries is different, so the task of the Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 to help the efforts to harmonize this issue. External quality control in clinical-chemical laboratories imposed the need for the implementation of quality management system. »Good laboratory practice« and its principles were adopted by nominated bodies, both international and national. In the beginning, the standard ISO 9001 was applied for certification and for accreditation EN 45001 and ISO Guide 25, which are prepared for testing and calibration laboratories. Standard ISO 17025 is the successor of the previous documents and for now it is a reference for mentioned laboratories. Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 made an amendment of the requirements for medical laboratories, which this standard describes. Standard draft ISO 15189 was adopted on February 2003 as a final version with requirements for medical laboratories.

  4. RPAS ADS-B AND TRAJECTORY CONTROL DATA TRANSMISSION VIA SATELLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Grekhov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a model of the satellite communication channel for an remotely piloted air system with adaptive modulation and orthogonal frequency division of channels; 2 to calculate the channel parameters with Rayleigh fading and various types of satellite transponder nonlinearity; 3 analyze the effect of fading and the type of nonlinearity on the parameters of the satellite communication channel. Method: MATLAB Simulink software was used to simulate the channel operation. Results: For the first time, based on the IEEE 802.16d standard, a realistic model of the satellite communication channel of an unmanned aerial vehicle was developed, which is used to estimate the channel parameters. The created model takes into account the Rayleigh fading in the downlink and the nonlinearity of the satellite transponder amplifier. Dependences of the signal-to-noise ratio in the terrestrial receiver on the signal-to-noise ratio in the downlink for various types of modulation (BPSK, QPSK, 16QAM, 64QAM and data transmission rates are obtained. The nonlinearity of satellite amplifiers was analyzed on the basis of a linear model, a cubic polynomial model, a hyperbolic tangential model, the Gorbani model, and the Rapp model. The results for the cubic polynomial model and the hyperbolic tangential model are similar to the linear model, but differ significantly from the Gorbani model and the Rapp model. For the Gorbani and Rapp models, very low values of the signal-to-noise ratio in the receiver are observed. Conclusion: The proposed approach can be considered as a method of estimating the parameters of the satellite communication channel of an unmanned aerial vehicle with fading. It is shown how the type of modulation varies depending on the level of the signal-to-noise ratio and the type of fading. The developed model allows to predict the operation of the channel with Rayleigh fading and can be useful for the design of communication systems.

  5. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  6. Application of Genetic Control with Adaptive Scaling Scheme to Signal Acquisition in Global Navigation Satellite System Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a genetic-based control scheme that not only utilizes evolutionary characteristics to find the signal acquisition parameters, but also employs an adaptive scheme to control the search space and avoid the genetic control converging to local optimal value so as to acquire the desired signal precisely and rapidly. Simulations and experiment results show that the proposed method can improve the precision of signal parameters and take less signal acquisition time than traditional serial search methods for global navigation satellite system (GNSS signals.

  7. Prevention and Control of Antimicrobial Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: The Microbiology Laboratory Rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Alexandra S.; Couto, Isabel; Toscano, Cristina; Gonçalves, Elsa; Póvoa, Pedro; Viveiros, Miguel; Lapão, Luís V.

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, each year, more than four milion patients acquire a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) and almost 40 thousand die as a direct consequence of it. Regardless of many stategies to prevent and control HAIs, they remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a significant economic impact: a recent estimate places it at the ten billion dollars/year. The control of HAIs requires a prompt and efficient identification of the etiological agent and a rapid communication with the clinician. The Microbiology Laboratory has a significant role in the prevention and control of these infections and is a key element of any Infection Control Program. The work of the Microbiology Laboratory covers microbial isolation and identification, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, epidemiological surveillance and outbreak detection, education, and report of quality assured results. In this paper we address the role and importance of the Microbiology Laboratory in the prevention and control of HAI and in Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and how it can be leveraged when combined with the use of information systems. Additionally, we critically review some challenges that the Microbiology Laboratory has to deal with, including the selection of analytic methods and the proper use of communication channels with other healthcare services. PMID:27375577

  8. Importance of implementing an analytical quality control system in a core laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Garcia, F; Garcia-Codesal, M F; Caro-Narros, M R; Contreras-SanFeliciano, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the clinical laboratory is to provide useful information for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of disease. The laboratory should ensure the quality of extra-analytical and analytical process, based on set criteria. To do this, it develops and implements a system of internal quality control, designed to detect errors, and compare its data with other laboratories, through external quality control. In this way it has a tool to detect the fulfillment of the objectives set, and in case of errors, allowing corrective actions to be made, and ensure the reliability of the results. This article sets out to describe the design and implementation of an internal quality control protocol, as well as its periodical assessment intervals (6 months) to determine compliance with pre-determined specifications (Stockholm Consensus(1)). A total of 40 biochemical and 15 immunochemical methods were evaluated using three different control materials. Next, a standard operation procedure was planned to develop a system of internal quality control that included calculating the error of the analytical process, setting quality specifications, and verifying compliance. The quality control data were then statistically depicted as means, standard deviations, and coefficients of variation, as well as systematic, random, and total errors. The quality specifications were then fixed and the operational rules to apply in the analytical process were calculated. Finally, our data were compared with those of other laboratories through an external quality assurance program. The development of an analytical quality control system is a highly structured process. This should be designed to detect errors that compromise the stability of the analytical process. The laboratory should review its quality indicators, systematic, random and total error at regular intervals, in order to ensure that they are meeting pre-determined specifications, and if not, apply the appropriate corrective actions

  9. Developing an Affordable and Portable Control Systems Laboratory Kit with a Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Reck

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Instructional laboratories are common in engineering programs. Instructional laboratories should evolve with technology and support the changes in higher education, like the increased popularity of online courses. In this study, an affordable and portable laboratory kit was designed to replace the expensive on-campus equipment for two control systems courses. The complete kit costs under $135 and weighs under 0.68 kilograms. It is comprised of off-the-shelf components (e.g., Raspberry Pi, DC motor and 3D printed parts. The kit has two different configurations. The first (base configuration is a DC motor system with a position and speed sensor. The second configuration adds a Furuta inverted pendulum attachment with another position sensor. These configurations replicate most of the student learning outcomes for the two control systems courses for which they were designed.

  10. Robust Fault-Tolerant Control for Satellite Attitude Stabilization Based on Active Disturbance Rejection Approach with Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a robust fault-tolerant control algorithm for satellite stabilization based on active disturbance rejection approach with artificial bee colony algorithm. The actuating mechanism of attitude control system consists of three working reaction flywheels and one spare reaction flywheel. The speed measurement of reaction flywheel is adopted for fault detection. If any reaction flywheel fault is detected, the corresponding fault flywheel is isolated and the spare reaction flywheel is activated to counteract the fault effect and ensure that the satellite is working safely and reliably. The active disturbance rejection approach is employed to design the controller, which handles input information with tracking differentiator, estimates system uncertainties with extended state observer, and generates control variables by state feedback and compensation. The designed active disturbance rejection controller is robust to both internal dynamics and external disturbances. The bandwidth parameter of extended state observer is optimized by the artificial bee colony algorithm so as to improve the performance of attitude control system. A series of simulation experiment results demonstrate the performance superiorities of the proposed robust fault-tolerant control algorithm.

  11. Robust output tracking control of a laboratory helicopter for automatic landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Lu, Geng; Zhong, Yisheng

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, robust output tracking control problem of a laboratory helicopter for automatic landing in high seas is investigated. The motion of the helicopter is required to synchronise with that of an oscillating platform, e.g. the deck of a vessel subject to wave-induced motions. A robust linear time-invariant output feedback controller consisting of a nominal controller and a robust compensator is designed. The robust compensator is introduced to restrain the influences of parametric uncertainties, nonlinearities and external disturbances. It is shown that robust stability and robust tracking property can be achieved simultaneously. Experimental results on the laboratory helicopter for automatic landing demonstrate the effectiveness of the designed control approach.

  12. Investigation on Superior Performance by Fractional Controller for Cart-Servo Laboratory Set-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameya Anil Kesarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an investigation is made on the superiority of fractional PID controller (PI^alpha D^beta over conventional PID for the cart-servo laboratory set-up. The designed controllers are optimum in the sense of Integral Absolute Error (IAE and Integral Square Error (ISE. The paper contributes in three aspects: 1 Acquiring nonlinear mathematical model for the cart-servo laboratory set-up, 2 Designing fractional and integer order PID for minimizing IAE, ISE, 3 Analyzing the performance of designed controllers for simulated plant model as well as real plant. The results show a significantly superior performance by PI^alpha D^beta as compared to the conventional PID controller.

  13. ASTM E-2369 TMF: Inter Laboratory Study (ILS) on Strain Controlled Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Testing

    OpenAIRE

    RIPPLINGER Stefan; HAEHNER Peter; BRUCHHAUSEN MATTHIAS; DE HAAN Fredericus; AUSTIN TIMOTHY

    2016-01-01

    The document presents the results of the tests conducted at the JRC Petten site, under the frame of the Inter Laboratory Study (ILS) on Thermomechanical Fatigue (ASTM E-2368). The primary purpose of this study is to provide a precision and bias statement to be included in the revision of ASTM E-2368, Standard Practice for Strain Controlled Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Testing.

  14. Quantification of protein-derived thiols during atmosphere-controlled brewing in laboratory scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murmann, Anne Nordmark; Andersen, Preben; Mauch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    An atmosphere-controlled brewing system was built to study thiol oxidation during brewing in laboratory scale under conditions with limited oxygen exposure. Quantification of free and total thiols and protein showed that thiols were lost during wort boiling possibly owing to protein precipitation...

  15. Could laboratory-based notification improve the control of foodborne illness in New Zealand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Greg; Whittaker, Robyn; Boyle, Kerry; Morris, Arthur J; Upton, Arlo; Calder, Lester

    2002-05-24

    To estimate the completeness and timeliness of notifications of seven potentially foodborne diseases in Auckland. The diseases audited were shigellosis, salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, yersiniosis, listeriosis, hepatitis A and verocytotoxigenic (VTEC) E. coli infections. Hospital and community laboratory-confirmed cases for the calendar year 2000 were audited against those notified to the Auckland Regional Public Health Service. Cases were matched on disease, name, date of birth, gender and National Health Index number. There were 3182 laboratory-confirmed cases of the seven diseases identified of which 77% had been notified to the Auckland Regional Public Health Service. The proportion of laboratory-confirmed cases notified ranged from a 65% for hepatitis A to 100% for VTEC infection. The median delay between laboratory confirmation and practitioner notification was two days. Notification of all laboratory-confirmed cases would have resulted in an estimated 145 additional investigations in the year 2000. A change to laboratory-based notification could improve public health investigation and control of foodborne disease in New Zealand.

  16. Motion control system of MAX IV Laboratory soft x-ray beamlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjöblom, Peter, E-mail: peter.sjoblom@maxlab.lu.se; Lindberg, Mirjam, E-mail: mirjam.lindberg@maxlab.lu.se; Forsberg, Johan, E-mail: johan.forsberg@maxlab.lu.se; Persson, Andreas G., E-mail: andreas-g.persson@maxlab.lu.se; Urpelainen, Samuli, E-mail: samuli.urpelainen@maxlab.lu.se; Såthe, Conny, E-mail: conny.sathe@maxlab.lu.se [MAX IV Laboratory, Photongatan 2, 225 92 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-07-27

    At the MAX IV Laboratory, five new soft x-ray beamlines are under development. The first is Species and it will be used to develop and set the standard of the control system, which will be common across the facility. All motion axes at MAX IV will be motorized using stepper motors steered by the IcePAP motion controller and a mixture of absolute and incremental encoders following a predefined coordinate system. The control system software is built in Tango and uses the Python-based Sardana framework. The user controls the entire beamline through a synoptic overview and Sardana is used to run the scans.

  17. Description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, C. T.; Groom, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory model is presented. The AMCD is a momentum exchange device which is under development as an advanced control effector for spacecraft attitude control systems. The digital computer simulation of this device incorporates the following models: six degree of freedom rigid body dynamics; rim warp; controller dynamics; nonlinear distributed element axial bearings; as well as power driver and power supply current limits. An annotated FORTRAN IV source code listing of the computer program is included.

  18. Quality control at the Regional Centre of Nuclear Sciences chemical dosimetry laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vivianne L.B. de; Melo, Roberto T. de; Silva, Danubia B. da; Pedroza, Eryka H.; Rodrigues, Kelia R.G.; Cunha, Manuela S. da; Figueiredo, Marcela D.C. de [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Aristides, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rtmelo@cnen.gov.b [Hospital de Cancer de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Standards for accreditation of laboratories as in ISO 9001 in section: 4.11 require inspection, measuring and equipment testing; likewise, IEC 17025: 2005 in section: 5.5.2 requires the equipment to be calibrated or verified before being put into use. In our laboratory, quality control is often accomplished by standards set done by the laboratory scientists themselves; however, at present, Hellma secondary calibration standards (4026 - Holmium oxide - Filters: F0, F2, F3, F4 and filter didymium - F7) have been used in order to verify if errors in the laboratory have been close to the 1-2% margin. Control graphs were made by using the results of synthetically prepared standards and standardized spectral calibration certificates. The set of secondary calibration standards permits to check the accuracy of the spectrophotometers used in research for both the absorbance in the visible spectrum (at 440, 465, 546, 590 and 635 nm wavelengths) and for the wavelengths (270, 280, 300, 320 nm) of the ultraviolet light. Filters (F0, F2, F3, F4 and F7) are stable and do not suffer the influence of temperature (the influence is negligible), the F0 filter was being used as a blank. The purpose is to verify whether the spectrometer needs adjustments, an important procedure to check absorbance stability, baseline flatness, slit width accuracy and stray radiation. The calibration tests are performed annually in our laboratory and recalibration of Hellma secondary standards is recommended every two years. The results show that the Chemical Dosimetry Laboratory in CRCN has a calibrated spectrophotometer and their synthetic standards for Fricke dosimetry could be used as an alternative method for testing the proficiency and competence of calibration laboratories in accordance with the regulations and standards. (author)

  19. Anti-Satellite Weapons, Arms Control Options, and the Military Use of Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    projects, the Apollo- Soyuz Test Project, and the Soviet Salyut/ Soyuz -T/Progress program). Orbital rendezvous would also be necessary for the...AC3PC103 missions. Tests resumed, following a four-year hiatus, only three months after a Chinese satellite first returned a capsule to earth. Soviet

  20. ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN FOR A RIGID-FLEXIBLE SATELLITE USING THE H-INFINITY METHOD WITH PARAMETRIC UNCERTAINTY

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Alain Giacobini de; Souza, Luiz Carlos Gadelha de

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the Attitude Control System (ACS) design for a rigid-flexible satellite with two vibrations mode, using the H infinity method considering the parametric uncertainty over the mass matrix. Usually the mathematic model obtained from the linearization and/or reduction of the rigid flexible model loses information about the flexible dynamical behavior and introduces some uncertainty. As a result, the ACS performance can be degraded when controlling large angle maneuvers. One wa...

  1. An integrated user-oriented laboratory for verification of digital flight control systems: Features and capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, P.; Doane, D.; Saito, J.

    1982-01-01

    A Digital Flight Control Systems Verification Laboratory (DFCSVL) has been established at NASA Ames Research Center. This report describes the major elements of the laboratory, the research activities that can be supported in the area of verification and validation of digital flight control systems (DFCS), and the operating scenarios within which these activities can be carried out. The DFCSVL consists of a palletized dual-dual flight-control system linked to a dedicated PDP-11/60 processor. Major software support programs are hosted in a remotely located UNIVAC 1100 accessible from the PDP-11/60 through a modem link. Important features of the DFCSVL include extensive hardware and software fault insertion capabilities, a real-time closed loop environment to exercise the DFCS, an integrated set of software verification tools, and a user-oriented interface to all the resources and capabilities.

  2. Factoring quality laboratory diagnosis into the malaria control agenda for sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoo, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Recent progress in malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa has been achieved primarily through provision of insecticide-treated nets, indoor residual spraying, and antimalarial drugs. Although these interventions are important, proper case identification and accurate measurement of their impact depend on quality diagnostic testing. Current availability of diagnostic testing for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa is inadequate to support disease management, prevention programs, and surveillance needs. Challenges faced include a dearth of skilled workforce, inadequate health systems infrastructure, and lack of political will. A coordinated approach to providing pre-service clinical and laboratory training together with systems that support a scale-up of laboratory services could provide means not only for effective malaria case management but also, management of non-malaria febrile illnesses, disease surveillance, and accurate control program evaluation. A synthesis of the challenges faced in ensuring quality malaria testing and how to include this information in the malaria control and elimination agenda are presented.

  3. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A. Frank

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability.

  4. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jared A.; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  5. Implementation of Software Tools for Hybrid Control Rooms in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Berntsson, Olof [Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); McDonald, Robert [Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fitzgerald, Kirk [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) and Idaho National Laboratory have designed, implemented, tested and installed a functioning prototype of a set of large screen overview and procedure support displays for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (GPWR) simulator in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Human Systems Simulation Laboratory. The overview display is based on IFE’s extensive experiences with large screen overview displays in the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLAB), and presents the main control room indicators on a combined three-screen display. The procedure support displays are designed and implemented to provide a compact but still comprehensive overview of the relevant process measurements and indicators to support operators' good situational awareness during the performance of various types of procedures and plant conditions.

  6. Experiments in advanced control concepts for space robotics - An overview of the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, M. G.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H. L.; Morse, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is actively developing and experimentally testing advanced robot control strategies for space robotic applications. Early experiments focused on control of very lightweight one-link manipulators and other flexible structures. The results are being extended to position and force control of mini-manipulators attached to flexible manipulators and multilink manipulators with flexible drive trains. Experimental results show that end-point sensing and careful dynamic modeling or adaptive control are key to the success of these control strategies. Free-flying space robot simulators that operate on an air cushion table have been built to test control strategies in which the dynamics of the base of the robot and the payload are important.

  7. Flexible software architecture for user-interface and machine control in laboratory automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutunian, E B; Meldrum, D R; Friedman, N A; Moody, S E

    1998-10-01

    We describe a modular, layered software architecture for automated laboratory instruments. The design consists of a sophisticated user interface, a machine controller and multiple individual hardware subsystems, each interacting through a client-server architecture built entirely on top of open Internet standards. In our implementation, the user-interface components are built as Java applets that are downloaded from a server integrated into the machine controller. The user-interface client can thereby provide laboratory personnel with a familiar environment for experiment design through a standard World Wide Web browser. Data management and security are seamlessly integrated at the machine-controller layer using QNX, a real-time operating system. This layer also controls hardware subsystems through a second client-server interface. This architecture has proven flexible and relatively easy to implement and allows users to operate laboratory automation instruments remotely through an Internet connection. The software architecture was implemented and demonstrated on the Acapella, an automated fluid-sample-processing system that is under development at the University of Washington.

  8. Application of indices Cp and Cpk to improve quality control capability in clinical biochemistry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Ming

    2014-04-30

    The traditional criteria for acceptability of analytic quality may not be objective in clinical laboratories. To establish quality control procedures intended to enhance Westgard multi-rules for improving the quality of clinical biochemistry tests, we applied the Cp and Cpk quality-control indices to monitor tolerance fitting and systematic variation of clinical biochemistry test results. Daily quality-control data of a large Taiwanese hospital in 2009 were analyzed. The test items were selected based on an Olympus biochemistry machine and included serum albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, cholesterol, glucose and potassium levels. Cp and Cpk values were calculated for normal and abnormal levels, respectively. The tolerance range was estimated with data from 50 laboratories using the same instruments and reagents. The results showed a monthly trend of variation for the five items under investigation. The index values of glucose were lower than those of the other items, and their values were usually <2. In contrast to the Cp value for cholesterol, Cpk of cholesterol was lower than 2, indicating a systematic error that should be further investigated. This finding suggests a degree of variation or failure to meet specifications that should be corrected. The study indicated that Cp and Cpk could be applied not only for monitoring variations in quality control, but also for revealing inter-laboratory qualitycontrol capability differences.

  9. The leverage effect on wealth distribution in a controllable laboratory stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenge; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Wealth distribution has always been an important issue in our economic and social life, since it affects the harmony and stabilization of the society. Under the background of widely used financial tools to raise leverage these years, we studied the leverage effect on wealth distribution of a population in a controllable laboratory market in which we have conducted several human experiments, and drawn the conclusion that higher leverage leads to a higher Gini coefficient in the market. A higher Gini coefficient means the wealth distribution among a population becomes more unequal. This is a result of the ascending risk with growing leverage level in the market plus the diversified trading abilities and risk preference of the participants. This work sheds light on the effects of leverage and its related regulations, especially its impact on wealth distribution. It also shows the capability of the method of controllable laboratory markets which could be helpful in several fields of study such as economics, econophysics and sociology.

  10. The Leverage Effect on Wealth Distribution in a Controllable Laboratory Stock Market

    OpenAIRE

    Chenge Zhu; Guang Yang; Kenan An; Jiping Huang

    2014-01-01

    Wealth distribution has always been an important issue in our economic and social life, since it affects the harmony and stabilization of the society. Under the background of widely used financial tools to raise leverage these years, we studied the leverage effect on wealth distribution of a population in a controllable laboratory market in which we have conducted several human experiments, and drawn the conclusion that higher leverage leads to a higher Gini coefficient in the market. A highe...

  11. Control of Fuel Microorganisms with Magnetic Devices: Laboratory Investigation with Hormoconis Resinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Aircraft Materials Technical Memorandum 408 CONTROL OF FUEL MICROORGANISMS WITH MAGNETIC DEVICES: LABORATORY INN, ESTIGATION WITH HORMOCONIS RESINAE ... RESINAE by G.G. McVEA R.K. SOLLY SUMMARY Automotive diesel fuel inoculated with the fungus, Hornoconis resinae , wascirculated through a magnetic device...HORMOCONIS resinae (often known by its previous name of Cladosporium resinae ) forms mats of slimy mycelia matter, which has a very high propensity to

  12. Robotic control of the seven-degree-of-freedom NASA laboratory telerobotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, R. V.; Euler, J. A.; Magness, R. B.; Babcock, S. M.; Herndon, J. N.

    1989-01-01

    A computationally efficient robotic control scheme for the NASA Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) is presented. This scheme utilizes the redundancy of the seven-degree-of-freedom LTM to avoid joint limits and singularities. An analysis to determine singular configurations is presented. Performance criteria are determined based on the joint limits and singularity analysis. The control scheme is developed in the framework of resolved rate control using the gradient projection method, and it does not require the generalized inverse of the Jacobian. An efficient formulation for determining the joint velocities of the LTM is obtained. This control scheme is well suited for real-time implementation, which is essential if the end-effector trajectory is continuously modified based on sensory feedback. Implementation of this scheme on a Motorola 68020 VME bus-based controller of the LTM is in progress. Simulation results demonstrating the redundancy utilization in the robotic mode are presented.

  13. Estimate of the control threshold value in the problem on a time-optimal satellite attitude transition maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshmin, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The time-optimal problem is considered for a nonlinear Lagrangian system with one degree of freedom. The system is controlled by a force bounded in absolute value, and all noncontrol forces are potential.We study the properties of optimal synthesis on the phase cylinder and indicate the conditions under which it has the simplest structure, namely, involves at most one switching for any initial conditions. The approach is used to specify the structure of the well-known solution in the classical problem on the time-optimal satellite attitude transition maneuver in the orbit plane.

  14. [Control of cross-contamination in dental prostheses laboratories in Galicia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Rodríguez, I; Gómez Suárez, R; Estany-Gestal, A; Mora Bermúdez, M J; Varela-Centelles, P; Santana Mora, U

    2018-02-21

    Dental laboratories are a potential source of cross-contamination. This study aims to assess its control in Galicia. Voluntary random telephone interviews resulted in 149 completed questionnaires. The variables are described by percentages or means and standard deviations. A bivariate analysis was undertaken using the Chi square test. Participants were mostly middle-age (mean=45.7, SD=9.8) males (68.5%) with 20.8 (SD=10.5) years of professional experience in middle-size urban (58.4%) laboratories, who identified a higher risk when receiving items from the clinic (80.6%). Most technicians (57.7%) have a written protocol. Many (55.0%), significantly older males, do not check for item disinfection. Most technicians use gloves (62.4%) particularly younger staff at larger laboratories. Fifty-five point seven percent had been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Only 22.0% of technicians reported receiving training in cross-contamination control. Identified cross-infection control practices are below standards, and lack of training and protocols are a matter for concern.

  15. Report: EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory Should Improve Its Computer Room Security Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0847, September 21, 2012.Our review of the security posture and in-place environmental controls of EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory computer room disclosed an array of security and environmental control deficiencies.

  16. Evaluation of controls for the assurance of quality data in a radiochemistry laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, J.S. [Radiological and Environmental Sciences Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The paper describes the controls implemented by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) to secure data quality. A description of the analytical instrumentation and methodology employed by RESL is provided. The results of the intercomparison program with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are provided to demonstrate traceability to a primary source. A description of the methods and techniques used to ensure quality control on a daily basis is given. The techniques used to evaluate the sources of uncertainty are reviewed and specific examples cited. The intercomparison programs operated by RESL are discussed.

  17. Role of the clinical microbiology laboratory in infection control - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J

    2001-01-01

    Clinical microbiology laboratories in Denmark are located in hospitals and staffed by clinical microbiologists who are clinically trained medical doctors. Each county has its own clinical microbiology unit, serving a population of 0.3-0.6 million. The responsibilities of clinical microbiology unit...... for standardization and documentation of quality. Currently a national standard for infection control is being prepared. It consists of a main standard defining requirements for the management system and 12 subsidiary standards defining requirements for specific areas of infection control. Adoption of the standard...

  18. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control review panel and related activities, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Two major tests of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) engineering and flight units were conducted to demonstrate the functionality of the hardware and software. Deficiencies in the hardware/software integration tests (HSIT) led to a recommendation for more testing to be performed. Selected problem areas of tether dynamics were analyzed, including verification of the severity of skip rope oscillations, verification or comparison runs to explore dynamic phenomena observed in other simulations, and data generation runs to explore the performance of the time domain and frequency domain skip rope observers.

  19. A Cooperative Multi-Satellite Mission for Controlled Active Debris Removal from Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-07

    area for components and structural fragments surviving reentry shall not exceed 1 in 10,000.” Bon- nal et al. [13] quantify the risks presented by...engine survive reentry. The resulting casualty area and kinetic energy at impact for the propellant tank are 10.15 m2 and 25.9 kJ, and for the engine...support complex het- erogeneous multi-satellite mission design. From the authors experience in formation flying mission design [59], [60], [61], [62

  20. Precision of laboratory methods based on protein solubility in quality control of heat treated feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palić Dragan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of feedstuffs used as raw materials in feed industry contain anti-nutritional factors that negatively influence their quality. One of them is soybean, which is, prior to oil extraction, referred to as full-fat soybean (FFSB. Anti-nutritional factors in raw FFSB can be destroyed by moderate heating, but both over- and under heat processing limits the availability of soybean amino acids. Among laboratory procedures that are available for assessing the degree of FFSB heat treatment, two methods, i.e. Protein dispersibility index (PDI and protein solubility in potassium hydroxide (PSKOH, are based on protein solubility, which was claimed to be the most reliable indicator of the degree of FFSB heat treatment. This paper presents the results of an inter-laboratory study conducted to establish precision of the PDI and PSKOH methods by determining their reproducibility limits. Five samples of FFSB were heat-treated at temperatures between 110 and 164 °C and analyzed by six laboratories for PDI and PSKOH. Established reproducibility limit for PDI method of 8.87 index units found in this study appeared to be too wide, indicating a low precision of this method. PSKOH method produced very good reproducibility limit of 8.56% and could be recommended as a preferred method for FFSB quality control in feed laboratories.

  1. Development of hemoglobin typing control materials for laboratory investigation of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornprasert, Sakorn; Tookjai, Monthathip; Punyamung, Manoo; Pongpunyayuen, Panida; Jaiping, Kanokwan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the hemoglobin (Hb) typing control materials for laboratory investigation of thalassemia with low (1.8%-3.2%) and high (4%-6%) levels of HbA2 are available but there are no Hb typing quality control materials for analysis of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies which are highly prevalent in South-East Asian countries. The main aim of the present study was to develop the lyophilized Hb typing control materials for laboratory investigation of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies that are commonly found in South-East Asia. Erythrocytes of blood samples containing Hb Bart's, HbH, HbE, HbF, Hb Constant Spring (CS), Hb Hope, and Hb Q-Thailand were washed and dialysed with 0.85% saline solution. The erythrocytes were then lysed in 5% sucrose solution. The lyophilized Hb typing control materials were prepared by using a freeze drying (lyophilization) method. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of lyophilized Hb was performed after the storage at -20 °C for 1 year and also after reconstitution and storage at 4 or -20 °C for 30 days. In addition, the Hb analysis was compared between the three different methods of HPLC, low pressure liquid chromatography (LPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Following a year of storage at -20 °C, the HPLC chromatograms of lyophilized Hb typing control materials showed similar patterns to the equivalent fresh whole blood. The stability of reconstituted Hb typing control materials was also observed through 30 days after reconstitution and storage at -20 °C. Moreover, the Hb typing control materials could be analyzed by three methods, HPLC, LPLC and CE. Even a degraded peak of HbCS was found on CE electropherogram. The lyophilized Hb typing control materials could be developed and used as control materials for investigation of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies.

  2. Laboratory capacity for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease in Eastern Africa: implications for the progressive control pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accurate diagnosis is pertinent to any disease control programme. If Eastern Africa is to work towards control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) using the Progressive Control Pathway for FMD (PCP-FMD) as a tool, then the capacity of national reference laboratories (NRLs) mandated......%) participated in proficiency testing for FMD. Four (31%) laboratories had no quality management systems (QMS) in place and where QMS existed it was still deficient, thus, none of the laboratories had achieved accreditation for FMD diagnosis. Conclusions: This study indicates that FMD diagnostic capacity...... to diagnose FMD should match this task. This study assessed the laboratory capacity of 14 NRLs of the Eastern Africa Region Laboratory Network member countries using a semi-structured questionnaire and retrospective data from the World Reference Laboratory for FMD annual reports and Genbank (R) through...

  3. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  4. Clinical and Laboratory Factors Associated with Severe Dengue: A Case-Control Study of Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Mayumi Duarte; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; Gonin, Michelle Luiza; Brasil, Patrícia

    2017-10-20

    More than half of the hospitalizations because of dengue in Brazil occurred in children <15 years of age in 2007 and 2008, an unexpected change in the epidemiological pattern. We sought to determine clinical and laboratory parameters associated with severity. A case-control study was conducted in three pediatric hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 233 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients were included: 69 cases and 164 controls. Specific clinical and laboratory factors were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Lethargy [adjusted odds ratio (ORa): 9.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.08-27.12], dyspnea (ORa: 8.24, 95% CI: 3.27-20.72) and abdominal pain (ORa: 6.78, 95% CI: 1.44-31.84) were independently associated with severe dengue in children. Lethargy and dyspnea presented as early as 72 and 48 h, respectively, before shock. Abdominal pain and lethargy confirmed their role as warning signs, which along with dyspnea might be helpful in identifying cases progressing to severe dengue.

  5. Aripiprazole Suppression of Drinking in a Clinical Laboratory Paradigm: Influence of Impulsivity and Self-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Raymond F; Schacht, Joseph P; Voronin, Konstantin E; Randall, Patrick K

    2017-07-01

    Aspects of impulsivity have been implicated in the development, or maintenance, of alcohol use disorder (AUD). The brain dopamine system is implicated in both reward processing/memory (typically subcortical) and in brain inhibitory control mechanisms (typically cortical). Using a validated clinical laboratory paradigm, the dopamine/serotonin "stabilizing" drug, aripiprazole was evaluated in non-treatment-seeking AUD individuals based on their level of impulsivity/self-control. Ninety-nine individuals (77% male; mean age 27; 7.5 drinks per day; 83% heavy drinking days) meeting DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence were randomized to aripiprazole (N = 47 evaluable) or placebo (N = 48 evaluable) based on their Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) score (above or below 68). Aripiprazole, or similar placebo, was titrated to 15 mg over 8 days. Drinking was recorded over 6 days under natural conditions. On Day 8, after 1 day of required abstinence, individuals participated in a bar laboratory paradigm that included a priming drink (breath alcohol concentration [BAC] target 0.02 to 0.03 g/dl) and free-choice consumption of up to 8 drinks (max BAC 0.1 g/dl) in exchange for a "bar credit" of $2 per drink (max $16). End points were drinks per day under natural conditions and drinks consumed in the bar laboratory after the priming drink. There was no significant main effect of aripiprazole or interaction with BIS-11 score during the natural drinking period. However, there was a main effect of aripiprazole on bar laboratory drinking (p = 0.04) and aripiprazole reduced the total number of drinks consumed more among individuals with low self-control (p = 0.034) and increased latency to consume those drinks (p = 0.045) more among those with high impulsivity. Relative to placebo, aripiprazole caused more side effects and increased alcohol-induced sedation, but neither significantly influenced its interaction with impulsivity/self-control scores on drinking. This

  6. [Proposed recommendations for the practical use of internal quality controls (IQC) in a medical biology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoli, Jean-Marc; Szymanowicz, Anton

    2011-01-01

    We propose a set of recommendations and practices to optimize the use of quality control of medical biology examinations. The fundamentals are reviewed: definition of a series of analysis, IQC at one or more level, Westgard alert rules and rejection, practical remedial actions to take for the technician, corrective and preventive actions to be implemented by the biologist. We have also formalized three flowcharts to guide the technician in their daily practice to ensure analytical quality of investigations carried out. These decision trees are the result of the experience submitted by an accredited and professional laboratory attentive to the ongoing improvement of IQC. This article can provide useful assistance to biologists for accreditation but also aims to foster collaboration reliable medical biology laboratory at the appropriate management of patients.

  7. [South-South cooperation to strengthen the medicines control laboratories of the Caribbean community (CARICOM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, José María; Castro, José Luis; Luque, María Celina; Spinetto, Marta; Saidón, Patricia; Fitzgerald, James

    2016-05-01

    Objective To describe the benefits obtained through South-South and triangular cooperation as a potential tool for strengthening medicine quality control in official medicines control laboratories (OMCLs) of the Region of the Americas. Methods Descriptive study of the project for strengthening drug quality control in OMCLs of the Caribbean community (CARICOM). Results Staff members of Argentina's National Administration for Drugs, Food, and Medical Technology (ANMAT) provided training to professionals from Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. The project was funded by the Argentine Fund for South-South and Triangular Cooperation (FO.AR) and coordinated by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Documents on good laboratory practice (GLP) developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pan American Network for Drug Regulatory Harmonization (PANDRH) were reviewed, and the area of physical and chemical controls was strengthened, primarily for drugs to treat tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS, all of which are strategically important to those countries. Conclusion This type of collaboration makes it possible to share experiences, optimize resources, harmonize procedures and regulations, and strengthen human resource capacities. In addition, it is a valuable tool for reducing asymmetries in various areas among the different countries of our Region.

  8. New Equipment Training Center-Satellite Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Satellite Facility is a 24-hour on-site military satellite transmission and downlink capability to Southwest Asia and all other military OCONUS and CONUS...

  9. Hardware and Software Interfacing at New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Distributed Control Using Pychron and RemoteControlServer.cs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, W. C.; Ross, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    We developed a system for interfacing existing hardware and software to two new Thermo Scientific Argus VI mass spectrometers and three Photon Machines Fusions laser systems at New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory. NMGRL's upgrade to the new analytical equipment required the design and implementation of a software ecosystem that allows seamless communication between various software and hardware components. Based on past experience and initial testing we choose to pursue a "Fully Distributed Control" model. In this model, hardware is compartmentalized and controlled by customized software running on individual computers. Each computer is connected to a Local Area Network (LAN) facilitating inter-process communication using TCP or UDP Internet Protocols. Two other options for interfacing are 1) Single Control, in which all hardware is controlled by a single application on a single computer and 2), Partial Distributed Control, in which the mass spectrometer is controlled directly by Thermo Scientific's Qtegra and all other hardware is controlled by a separate application. The "Fully Distributed Control" model offers the most efficient use of software resources, leveraging our in-house laboratory software with proprietary third-party applications, such as Qtegra and Mass Spec. Two software products resulted from our efforts. 1) Pychron, a configurable and extensible package for hardware control, data acquisition and preprocessing, and 2) RemoteControlServer.cs, a C# script for Thermo's Qtegra software that implements a TCP/UDP command server. Pychron is written in python and uses standard well-established libraries such as, Numpy, Scipy, and Enthought ETS. Pychron is flexible and extensible, encouraging experimentation and rapid development of new features. A project page for Pychron is located at http://code.google.com/p/arlab, featuring an issue tracker and a Version Control System (Mercurial). RemoteControlServer.cs is a simple socket server that listens

  10. Phase Change Material for Temperature Control of Imager or Sounder on GOES Type Satellites in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    An imager or sounder on satellites, such as the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), in geostationary orbit (GEO) has a scan mirror and motor in the scan cavity. The GEO orbit is 24 hours long. During part of the orbit, direct sunlight enters the scan aperture and adds heat to components in the scan cavity. Solar heating also increases the scan motor temperature. Overheating of the scan motor could reduce its reliability. For GOES-N to P, a radiator with a thermal louver rejects the solar heat absorbed to keep the scan cavity cool. A sunshield shields the radiator/louver from the Sun. This innovation uses phase change material (PCM) in the scan cavity to maintain the temperature stability of the scan mirror and motor. When sunlight enters the scan aperture, solar heating causes the PCM to melt. When sunlight stops entering the scan aperture, the PCM releases the thermal energy stored to keep the components in the scan cavity warm. It reduces the heater power required to make up the heat lost by radiation to space through the aperture. This is a major advantage when compared to a radiator/ louver. PCM is compact because it has a high solid-to-liquid enthalpy. Also, it could be spread out in the scan cavity. This is another advantage. Paraffin wax is a good PCM candidate, with high solid-to-liquid enthalpy, which is about 225 kJ/kg. For GOES-N to P, a radiator with a louver rejects the solar heat that enters the aperture to keep the scan cavity cool. For the remainder of the orbit, sunlight does not enter the scan aperture. However, the radiator/louver continues radiating heat to space because the louver effective emittance is about 0.12, even if the louver is fully closed. This requires makeup heater power to maintain the temperature within the stability range.

  11. Development of a Laboratory for Improving Communication between Air Traffic Controllers and Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    Runway incursions and other surface incidents are known to be significant threats to aviation safety and efficiency. Though the number of near mid-air collisions in U.S. air space has remained unchanged during the last five years, the number of runway incursions has increased and they are almost all due to human error. The three most common factors contributing to air traffic controller and pilot error in airport operations include two that involve failed auditory communication. This project addressed the problems of auditory communication in air traffic control from an acoustical standpoint, by establishing an acoustics laboratory designed for this purpose and initiating research into selected topics that show promise for improving voice communications between air traffic controllers and pilots.

  12. 21 CFR 111.110 - What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for laboratory operations associated with the production and process control system? 111.110 Section 111.110 Food... OPERATIONS FOR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control...

  13. Full impact of laboratory information system requires direct use by clinical staff: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Joaquín A; Shin, Sonya; Contreras, Carmen; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Asencios, Luis; Kim, Jihoon; Rodriguez, Pablo; Cegielski, Peter; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the time to communicate laboratory results to health centers (HCs) between the e-Chasqui web-based information system and the pre-existing paper-based system. Cluster randomized controlled trial in 78 HCs in Peru. In the intervention group, 12 HCs had web access to results via e-Chasqui (point-of-care HCs) and forwarded results to 17 peripheral HCs. In the control group, 22 point-of-care HCs received paper results directly and forwarded them to 27 peripheral HCs. Baseline data were collected for 15 months. Post-randomization data were collected for at least 2 years. Comparisons were made between intervention and control groups, stratified by point-of-care versus peripheral HCs. For point-of-care HCs, the intervention group took less time to receive drug susceptibility tests (DSTs) (median 9 vs 16 days, p60 days to arrive (pChasqui information system had reduced communication times and fewer results with delays of >2 months. Peripheral HCs had no benefits from the system. This suggests that health establishments should have point-of-care access to reap the benefits of electronic laboratory reporting.

  14. Effectiveness of IV Cannulation Skills Laboratory Training and Its Transfer into Clinical Practice: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Frederike Lund; Jobst-Hendrik Schultz; Imad Maatouk; Markus Krautter; Andreas Möltner; Anne Werner; Peter Weyrich; Jana Jünger; Christoph Nikendei

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of skills laboratory training is widely recognized. Yet, the transfer of procedural skills acquired in skills laboratories into clinical practice has rarely been investigated. We conducted a prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial to evaluate, if students having trained intravenous (IV) cannulation in a skills laboratory are rated as more professional regarding technical and communication skills compared to students who underwent bedside teaching ...

  15. An international quality control programme for PRISM chemiluminescent immunoassays in blood service and blood product laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S; Dimech, W; Kiely, P; Smeh, K; Francis, B; Karakaltsas, M; Dax, E M

    2009-11-01

    Laboratories screening for blood-borne virus infections in blood and blood products are required by international standards and guidelines to ensure that their testing processes remain within control. An effective means of ensuring this aim is through participation in a quality control programme. Analyses of results from a quality control (QC) programme conducted for the Abbott PRISM (PRISM) assays are reported. Laboratories participating in the National Serology Reference Laboratory, Australia's PRISM QC programme were provided with aliquots of a multimarker QC sample which were tested regularly in each PRISM subchannel. Test results were submitted to a single database using an Internet-based QC monitoring system, EDCNet. The QC test results submitted between 15 October 2001 and 5 March 2006 for each PRISM instrument and each lot of PRISM reagent were analysed to determine the imprecision and bias in each test system. A total of 157,404 test results from approximately 47,000 test runs submitted into the EDCNet database were analysed. Six batches of the multimarker QC samples were tested in 454 PRISM reagent lots. The coefficient of variation of QC sample test results ranged from 9.17 to 15.83%, 8.29 to 9.44%, 10.50 to 15.38% and 7.05 to 10.32% when tested in the PRISM anti-hepatitis C virus, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anti-human T-cell lymphotrophic virus and hepatitis B surface antigen assays, respectively. Analysis of QC test results reported from testing in the anti-HTLV assay detected one lot of reagent (10572HN00) which was identified to be an outlier using Tukey's filter. Analysis of test results of an external QC sample can be used as a statistical process control through ongoing measurement of imprecision. When laboratories test the same QC sample in the same assay and submit test results to a single database, the results can be compared and a measure of bias can be calculated. The resulting QC programme can offer detection of unexpected variation

  16. Laboratory evalution of a translocation double heterozygote for genetic control of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, D K; Curtis, C F; Soni, V K

    1978-07-01

    Two pure translocation homozygote stocks, T1/T1 and T3/T3, were used to produce a double translocation heterozygote system designated T1/T3, employing T1/T1 as the male and T3/T3 as the female parent. The double heterozygote showed 73 % sterility when mated to wild females. Tests on mating competitiveness, recombination frequency in the differential segment, insemination rate and inheritance of sterility after release, for four generations in laboratory cages, have been carried out to evaluate the efficiency of this strain as an agent for a population control programme.

  17. Internal Quality Control Practices in Coagulation Laboratories: recommendations based on a patterns-of-practice survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, A; Aslan, B; Raby, A; Moffat, K A; Selby, R; Padmore, R

    2015-12-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) procedures are crucial for ensuring accurate patient test results. The IQMH Centre for Proficiency Testing conducted a web-based survey to gather information on the current IQC practices in coagulation testing. A questionnaire was distributed to 174 Ontario laboratories licensed to perform prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). All laboratories reported using two levels of commercial QC (CQC); 12% incorporate pooled patient plasma into their IQC program; >68% run CQC at the beginning of each shift; 56% following maintenance, with reagent changes, during a shift, or with every repeat sample; 6% only run CQC at the beginning of the day and 25% when the instruments have been idle for a defined period of time. IQC run frequency was determined by manufacturer recommendations (71%) but also influenced by the stability of test (27%), clinical impact of an incorrect test result (25%), and sample's batch number (10%). IQC was monitored using preset limits based on standard deviation (66%), precision goals (46%), or allowable performance limits (36%). 95% use multirules. Failure actions include repeating the IQC (90%) and reporting patient results; if repeat passes, 42% perform repeat analysis of all patient samples from last acceptable IQC. Variability exists in coagulation IQC practices among Ontario clinical laboratories. The recommendations presented here would be useful in encouraging standardized IQC practices. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Hazardous-Drums Project: A Multiweek Laboratory Exercise for General Chemistry Involving Environmental, Quality Control, and Cost Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David; Widanski, Bozena

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to "real-world" hazardous waste management issues chemists face. The students are required to define an analytical problem, choose a laboratory analysis method, investigate cost factors, consider quality-control issues, interpret the meaning of results, and provide management…

  19. Laboratory and Field Evaluations of Two Bacillus thuringiensis Formulations, Novodor and Raven, for Control of Cottonwood Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Coyle; Joel D. McMillin; Steven C. Krause; Elwood R. Hart

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine the efficacy of two Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner formulations, Novodor and Raven, for controlling cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). In laboratory bioassays, larvae or adults were added to petri dishes containing ...

  20. Satellite assisted aerosol correlation in a sequestered CO2 leakage controlled site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.; Nakaema, Walter M.; de Medeiros, José A. G.; Moreira, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. For such task a mimetic sequestration site has been deployed in Florianopolis, Brazil, in order to verify the performance of monitoring plataforms to detect and quantify leakages of ground injected CO2, namely a Cavity Ring Down System (CRDS) - Los Gatos Research - an Eddy Covariance System (Campbell Scientific and Irgason) and meteorological tower for wind, humidity, precipitation and temperature monitoring onsite. The measurement strategy for detecting CO2 leakages can be very challenging since environmental and phytogenic influence can be very severe and play a role on determining if the values measured are unambiguous or not. One external factor to be considered is the amount of incoming solar radiation which will be the driving force for the whole experimental setup and following this reasoning the amount of aerosols in the atmospheric column can be a determinant factor influencing the experimental results. Thus the investigation of measured fluxes CO2 and its concentration with the aforementioned experimental instruments and their correlation with the aerosol data should be taken into account by means of satellite borne systems dedicated to measure aerosol vertical distribution and its optical properties, in this study we have selected CALIPSO and MODIS instrumentation to help on deriving the aerosol properties and CO2 measurements.

  1. Satellite reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloor, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    The potential of the observation equipment in remote sensing satellites is described. United States meteorology, land use and oceanography satellites and the major US Earth observation programs are listed. Imaging satellite systems are described such as: visible light and near infrared, thermal IR window, and microwave window. It is concluded that a geometrical resolution between 10 and 40 m can be expected. In order to reduce the data flow from the satellite system the input side of the system (the object-sensor interaction) has to be known. Satellites with synthetic aperture radar are increasingly important, but satellites can never fully replace observations with aircraft and drones.

  2. Experimenting from a distance-determination of speed of light by a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeber, S; Vetter, M; Eckert, B; Jodl, H-J [Department of Physics, University of Technology Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)], E-mail: eckert@physik.uni-kl.de

    2010-05-15

    The speed of light is an essential topic in the teaching of physics at school and at university, either with respect to the type of experiment or of course with respect to its genuine inherent importance. In reality, the various available experiments are hardly ever performed in class for many reasons. Therefore, we offer this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL). An RCL is a real experiment setup at location A which can be controlled via the Internet by a user at a distant location B. It allows several actions like in the hands-on experiment and delivers convincing results. Finally, we present experiences of the use of the RCL, describe the added value of this experiment as an RCL and give hints for implementing the RCL in teaching.

  3. The leverage effect on wealth distribution in a controllable laboratory stock market.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenge Zhu

    Full Text Available Wealth distribution has always been an important issue in our economic and social life, since it affects the harmony and stabilization of the society. Under the background of widely used financial tools to raise leverage these years, we studied the leverage effect on wealth distribution of a population in a controllable laboratory market in which we have conducted several human experiments, and drawn the conclusion that higher leverage leads to a higher Gini coefficient in the market. A higher Gini coefficient means the wealth distribution among a population becomes more unequal. This is a result of the ascending risk with growing leverage level in the market plus the diversified trading abilities and risk preference of the participants. This work sheds light on the effects of leverage and its related regulations, especially its impact on wealth distribution. It also shows the capability of the method of controllable laboratory markets which could be helpful in several fields of study such as economics, econophysics and sociology.

  4. [Importance of quality control of baciloscopy in laboratories that perform diagnosis of tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiñas, Misleidis; García, Grechen; Rosarys Martínez, María; Díaz, Raúl; Mederos, Lilian M

    2016-06-01

    Baciloscopy is the primary tool for pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis, being this technique the most used internationally in the search for infectious cases. Quality control is the process of the rechecking smears by a highly qualified observer. To evaluate and highlight the importance of quality control of smear microscopy in the Provincial Laboratories diagnosticians of Tuberculosis in Cuba. This study was conducted at the National Reference Laboratory and Research in Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Mycobacteria in the Institute of Tropical Medicine "Pedro Kouri", Havana, Cuba, Were evaluated 2676 smears received from January 2013 to December 2014, from Provincial Centers of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Microbiology of Cuba, including the special municipality Isla de la Juventud. 2,664 (99.5%) were concordant smears, the correlation obtained for the positive smears were 96.5% and 99.8% for negative. Were identified12 reading errors: 7 (3.5%) false positive and 5 (0.2%) false negatives. Slides were classified with adequate quality of smears in 2039 (76.2%), showed difficulties in realizing the extension in 1464 (54.7%) and staining were adequate in 2343 (87.6%). The kappa index was 0.9674. Although there was good agreement between observations it is recommended to improve the quality of extended, maintain staff training program that performs this activity, like regular supervision by specialists, to further improve the quality of diagnosis.

  5. The manned space-laboratories control centre - MSCC. Operational functions and its implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogl, H.; Kehr, J.; Wlaka, M.

    This paper describes the functions of the MSCC during the operations of the Columbus Attached Laboratory and the Free Flying Laboratory as part of the In-Orbit-Infrastructure Ground Segment. For the Attached Laboratory, MSCC payload operations coordination for European experiments within the Attached Laboratory and elsewhere on the Space Station Freedom will be explained. The Free Flying Laboratory will be operated and maintained exclusively from the MSCC during its 30 years lifetime. Several operational scenarios will demonstrate the role of the MSCC during routine - and servicing operations: of main importance are the servicing activities of the Attached Laboratory and the Free Flyer at the Space Station as well as servicing of the Free Flyer by the European Space Plane Hermes. The MSCC will have complex operational-, communications-and management interfaces with the IOI Ground Segment, the Space Station User community and with the international partners. Columbus User Support Centres will be established in many European member states, which have to be coordinated by the MSCC to ensure the proper reception of the scientific data and to provide them with quick access to their experiments in space. For operations planning and execution of experiments in the Attached Laboratory, a close cooperation with the Space Station control authorities in the USA will be established. The paper will show the development of the MSCC being initially used for the upcoming Spacelab Mission D-2 (MSCC Phase-1) and later upgraded to a Columbus dedicated control centre (MSCC Phase-2). For the initial construction phase the establishing of MSCC requirements, the philosophie used for the definition of the 'basic infrastructure' and key features of the installed facilities will be addressed. Resulting from Columbus and D-2 requirements, the sizing of the building with respect to controlrooms, conference rooms, office spare and simulation high-bay areas will be discussed. The defined 'basic

  6. Design of an active helicopter control experiment at the Princeton Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraffa, Andrew M.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to develop an active control technique for reducing helicopter vibrations stemming from the main rotor system, a helicopter model was designed and tested at the Princeton Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory (PRDL). A description of this facility, including its latest data acquisition upgrade, are given. The design procedures for the test model and its Froude scaled rotor system are also discussed. The approach for performing active control is based on the idea that rotor states can be identified by instrumenting the rotor blades. Using this knowledge, Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) pitch input commands may be used to impact on rotor dynamics in such a way as to reduce rotor vibrations. Discussed here is an instrumentation configuration utilizing miniature accelerometers to measure and estimate first and second out-of-plane bending mode positions and velocities. To verify this technique, the model was tested, and resulting data were used to estimate rotor states as well as flap and bending coefficients, procedures for which are discussed. Overall results show that a cost- and time-effective method for building a useful test model for future active control experiments was developed. With some fine-tuning or slight adjustments in sensor configuration, prospects for obtaining good state estimates look promising.

  7. Laboratory Study on Biological Control of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae by Entomopathogenic Indigenous Fungi (Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abdigoudarzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical control method using different acaricides as spray, dipping solution or pour-on is routinely used for controlling ticks. Biological control agents are favorable due to their safety for animals and environment. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are well known for controlling ticks. In this study, two Iranian indigenous strains of B. bassiana (B. bassiana 5197 and B. bassiana Evin were selected and grown on specific me­dia. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of two Iranian Ixodidae members (H. anatolicum anatolicum Koch 1844, and H. marginatum Koch 1844 by dipping method.Methods: Two Iranian strains of Beauveria bassiana (Beauveria bassiana 5197 and Beauveria bassiana Evin were selected and were grown successfully on specific media. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of Iranian Ixodidae members such as, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and H. marginatum by dipping method (these ticks were grown up at laboratory conditions during 2002 up to 2003 and still it is continued .Results: There was no effect of strain 5197 on mortality or fecundity rates for ticks. There was acute phase sign of paralysis in test group after dipping ticks in suspension made from Evin strain of B. bassiana. In addition, the test groups were totally died after four months, but the control groups survived for six months.Conclusion: High concentration of fungal spores is needed for inducing fungal infection. Additional study using different strains and fungi on Iranian ticks is proposed. 

  8. Developing the sediment and erosion control laboratory to become a hands-on training and education center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Sedimentation and Erosion Control (SEC) Laboratory has an established reputation as a renowned soil erosion research facility in the United States since its inception in 1990. During the past two decades, the lab has expanded its original perform...

  9. A data-driven approach to identify controls on global fire activity from satellite and climate observations (SOFIA V1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Matthias; Dorigo, Wouter; Lasslop, Gitta; Teubner, Irene; Chuvieco, Emilio; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation fires affect human infrastructures, ecosystems, global vegetation distribution, and atmospheric composition. However, the climatic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors that control global fire activity in vegetation are only poorly understood, and in various complexities and formulations are represented in global process-oriented vegetation-fire models. Data-driven model approaches such as machine learning algorithms have successfully been used to identify and better understand controlling factors for fire activity. However, such machine learning models cannot be easily adapted or even implemented within process-oriented global vegetation-fire models. To overcome this gap between machine learning-based approaches and process-oriented global fire models, we introduce a new flexible data-driven fire modelling approach here (Satellite Observations to predict FIre Activity, SOFIA approach version 1). SOFIA models can use several predictor variables and functional relationships to estimate burned area that can be easily adapted with more complex process-oriented vegetation-fire models. We created an ensemble of SOFIA models to test the importance of several predictor variables. SOFIA models result in the highest performance in predicting burned area if they account for a direct restriction of fire activity under wet conditions and if they include a land cover-dependent restriction or allowance of fire activity by vegetation density and biomass. The use of vegetation optical depth data from microwave satellite observations, a proxy for vegetation biomass and water content, reaches higher model performance than commonly used vegetation variables from optical sensors. We further analyse spatial patterns of the sensitivity between anthropogenic, climate, and vegetation predictor variables and burned area. We finally discuss how multiple observational datasets on climate, hydrological, vegetation, and socioeconomic variables together with data

  10. A data-driven approach to identify controls on global fire activity from satellite and climate observations (SOFIA V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Forkel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation fires affect human infrastructures, ecosystems, global vegetation distribution, and atmospheric composition. However, the climatic, environmental, and socioeconomic factors that control global fire activity in vegetation are only poorly understood, and in various complexities and formulations are represented in global process-oriented vegetation-fire models. Data-driven model approaches such as machine learning algorithms have successfully been used to identify and better understand controlling factors for fire activity. However, such machine learning models cannot be easily adapted or even implemented within process-oriented global vegetation-fire models. To overcome this gap between machine learning-based approaches and process-oriented global fire models, we introduce a new flexible data-driven fire modelling approach here (Satellite Observations to predict FIre Activity, SOFIA approach version 1. SOFIA models can use several predictor variables and functional relationships to estimate burned area that can be easily adapted with more complex process-oriented vegetation-fire models. We created an ensemble of SOFIA models to test the importance of several predictor variables. SOFIA models result in the highest performance in predicting burned area if they account for a direct restriction of fire activity under wet conditions and if they include a land cover-dependent restriction or allowance of fire activity by vegetation density and biomass. The use of vegetation optical depth data from microwave satellite observations, a proxy for vegetation biomass and water content, reaches higher model performance than commonly used vegetation variables from optical sensors. We further analyse spatial patterns of the sensitivity between anthropogenic, climate, and vegetation predictor variables and burned area. We finally discuss how multiple observational datasets on climate, hydrological, vegetation, and socioeconomic variables together with

  11. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  12. Laboratory capacity for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease in Eastern Africa: implications for the progressive control pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namatovu, Alice; Wekesa, Sabenzia Nabalayo; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Accurate diagnosis is pertinent to any disease control programme. If Eastern Africa is to work towards control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) using the Progressive Control Pathway for FMD (PCP-FMD) as a tool, then the capacity of national reference laboratories (NRLs) mandated to dia...

  13. Attitude control system of the Delfi-n3Xt satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, J.; Choukroun, D.

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development of the attitude control algorithms that will be implemented on board of the Delfi-n3xt nanosatellite, which is to be launched in 2013. One of the mission objectives is to demonstrate Sun pointing and three axis stabilization. The attitude control modes and

  14. Blossom Point Satellite Tracking and Command Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Blossom Point Satellite Command and Tracking Facility (BP) provides engineering and operational support to several complex space systems for the Navy...

  15. Transferring brain-computer interfaces beyond the laboratory: successful application control for motor-disabled users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeb, Robert; Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Biasiucci, Andrea; Tavella, Michele; Creatura, Marco; Molina, Alberto; Al-Khodairy, Abdul; Carlson, Tom; Millán, José D R

    2013-10-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are no longer only used by healthy participants under controlled conditions in laboratory environments, but also by patients and end-users, controlling applications in their homes or clinics, without the BCI experts around. But are the technology and the field mature enough for this? Especially the successful operation of applications - like text entry systems or assistive mobility devices such as tele-presence robots - requires a good level of BCI control. How much training is needed to achieve such a level? Is it possible to train naïve end-users in 10 days to successfully control such applications? In this work, we report our experiences of training 24 motor-disabled participants at rehabilitation clinics or at the end-users' homes, without BCI experts present. We also share the lessons that we have learned through transferring BCI technologies from the lab to the user's home or clinics. The most important outcome is that 50% of the participants achieved good BCI performance and could successfully control the applications (tele-presence robot and text-entry system). In the case of the tele-presence robot the participants achieved an average performance ratio of 0.87 (max. 0.97) and for the text entry application a mean of 0.93 (max. 1.0). The lessons learned and the gathered user feedback range from pure BCI problems (technical and handling), to common communication issues among the different people involved, and issues encountered while controlling the applications. The points raised in this paper are very widely applicable and we anticipate that they might be faced similarly by other groups, if they move on to bringing the BCI technology to the end-user, to home environments and towards application prototype control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical control of Loxosceles intermedia (Araneae: Sicariidae) with pyrethroids: field and laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Silva, M A; Duque, J E L; Ramires, E N; Andrade, C F S; Marques-da-Silva, E; Marques, F A; Delay, C E; Fontana, J D; Silva, A C S; Fraguas, G M

    2010-02-01

    Bites from the recluse or brown spiders (genus Loxosceles) can cause necrotic lesions and systemic effects in humans throughout the world. In the state of Paraná, Brazil, loxoscelism is considered a serious public health problem, and Loxosceles intermedia Mello-Leitão (Araneae: Sicariidae) is associated with the majority of reported accidents. In the present research we evaluated the susceptibility of L. intermedia to pyrethroid insecticides currently used for the control of spiders in both field and laboratory conditions. In laboratory tests, the most active pesticides in descending order were microencapsulated lambda-cyhalothrin (LC50 = 0.023 mg/kg), nonmicroencapsulated lambda-cyhalothrin (LC50 = 0.047 mg/kg), deltamethrin (LC50 = 0.26 mg/kg), and cypermethrin (LC50 = 1.38 mg/kg). Cockroaches, Phoetalia circumvagans (Burmeister) (n = 30), killed with microencapsulated lambdacyalothrin, were offered to the spiders. L. intermedia fed on 63.3% of the dead cockroaches during the first 6 h of experiment; none of the spiders died during the subsequent 15 d. Microencapsulated lambdacyalothrin was chosen for application in two contiguous houses. The mean volume applied was 22.8 mg (AI)/m2. Dead spiders were found during all the inspections up to 60 d after the initial application. In total, 297 dead spiders were collected; 65.7% in the attic shared by the two homes, 10.8% inside the house that had most cracks and crevices sealed and 23.6% in the control house. The use of lambda-cyhalothrin-based products for L. intermedia control is discussed.

  17. [Inside quality control for whole blood preservation performed at blood transfusion compatibility testing laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Ma, Chun-Ya; Feng, Qian; Chen, Xin; Guan, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Lin-Feng; Lin, Zi-Lin; Pan, Ji-Chun; Zhang, Ting; Luo, Qun; Wang, De-Qing

    2010-06-01

    This study was aimed to establish the technique for preparation and storage of internal quality control pro-ducts by using existing blood sample resources of blood transfusion compatibility testing laboratory. 24 healthy blood donors with group A and RhD-positive were randomly selected, and 4 ml venous blood from these donors were collected, respectively. Based on the use of anticoagulant type, whether to add red blood cell preservation solution and the samples stored at room temperature for 1 or 2 hours daily, 24 specimens were randomly divided into 8 groups by using factorial design methodology. All samples in tube with cap were stored at 4 degrees C, and placed at room temperature for 1 or 2 hours daily. ABO, RhD blood group (recorded on the agglutination strength of the forward and reverse typing), IgM anti-B antibody titer, and free hemoglobin concentration in the supernatant for all samples were detected at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 days of products preservation. The results indicated that the red blood cell damage from the group used anticoagulants ACD-B and added the MAP red blood cell preservation solution and placed at room temperature 1 hour daily (recorded as A2B2C1 group) was kept minimal, and FHb concentration and FHb increments at each time point were the lowest (p 0.05). In conclusion, blood transfusion compatibility testing laboratory can use A2B2C1 program established by this study to prepare relatively stable modified whole blood internal quality control products in the existing conditions, which can be effectively preserved and meet the requirements of internal quality control for blood transfusion compatibility testing.

  18. High-throughput sorting of mosquito larvae for laboratory studies and for future vector control interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marois Eric

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito transgenesis offers new promises for the genetic control of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever. Genetic control strategies require the release of large number of male mosquitoes into field populations, whether they are based on the use of sterile males (sterile insect technique, SIT or on introducing genetic traits conferring refractoriness to disease transmission (population replacement. However, the current absence of high-throughput techniques for sorting different mosquito populations impairs the application of these control measures. Methods A method was developed to generate large mosquito populations of the desired sex and genotype. This method combines flow cytometry and the use of Anopheles gambiae transgenic lines that differentially express fluorescent markers in males and females. Results Fluorescence-assisted sorting allowed single-step isolation of homozygous transgenic mosquitoes from a mixed population. This method was also used to select wild-type males only with high efficiency and accuracy, a highly desirable tool for genetic control strategies where the release of transgenic individuals may be problematic. Importantly, sorted males showed normal mating ability compared to their unsorted brothers. Conclusions The developed method will greatly facilitate both laboratory studies of mosquito vectorial capacity requiring high-throughput approaches and future field interventions in the fight against infectious disease vectors.

  19. Finite-Time Control for Attitude Tracking Maneuver of Rigid Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finite-time control for attitude tracking maneuver of a rigid spacecraft is investigated. External disturbance, unknown inertia parameters are addressed. As stepping stone, a sliding mode controller is designed. It requires the upper bound of the lumped uncertainty including disturbance and inertia matrix. However, this upper bound may not be easily obtained. Therefore, an adaptive sliding mode control law is then proposed to release that drawback. Adaptive technique is applied to estimate that bound. It is proved that the closed-loop attitude tracking system is finite-time stable. The tracking errors of the attitude and the angular velocity are asymptotically stabilized. Moreover, the upper bound on the lumped uncertainty can be exactly estimated in finite time. The attitude tracking performance with application of the control scheme is evaluated through a numerical example.

  20. Demonstration of a Plug and Play Approach to Satellite Thermal Control System Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mainstream is proposing a methodology to reduce the development time and cost, and improve the reliability of future thermal control systems for the next decade of...

  1. The cooling control system for focal plane assembly of astronomical satellite camera based on TEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqing; Du, Yunfei; Gao, Wei; Li, Baopeng; Fan, Xuewu; Yang, Wengang

    2017-02-01

    The dark current noise existing in the CCD of the astronomical observation camera has a serious influence on its working performance, reducing the working temperature of CCD can suppress the influence of dark current effectively. By analyzing the relationship between the CCD chip and the dark current noise, the optimum working temperature of the red band CCD focal plane is identified as -75°. According to the refrigeration temperature, a cooling control system for focal plane based on a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) was designed. It is required that the system can achieve high precision temperature control for the target. In the cooling control system, the 80C32 microcontroller was used as its systematic core processor. The advanced PID control algorithm is adopted to control the temperature of the top end of TEC. The bottom end of the TEC setting a constant value according to the target temperature used to assist the upper TEC to control the temperature. The experimental results show that the cooling system satisfies the requirements of the focal plane for the astronomical observation camera, it can reach the working temperature of -75° and the accuracy of ±2°.

  2. Evaluating the relative clinical efficiency of family medicine satellite clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, James E; Bernard, Matthew; Adamson, Steve; Naessens, James; Furst, Joseph; Angstman, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the impact of decentralization in family medicine clinic services by comparing utilization of services in 3 satellite clinics to utilization patterns of patients served at the hub clinic. It was expected that a hub clinic would be more efficient than satellite clinics because of tighter administrative control and economies of scale. Stable chronically ill patients were used as a homogeneous tracer condition in a secondary analysis of 12 months of archival data. Three types of service use were analyzed: laboratory visits, x-ray visits, and visits to specialists. Among 1,410 stable chronically ill family medicine patients, 303 (21.5%) had 10 more laboratory visits, 222 (15.7%) had 2 or more x-ray visits, and 617 (43.8 %) had 2 or more visits to a specialist. Patients at one of the satellite clinics had greater odds of receiving 2 or more x-rays but lower odds of receiving 10 or more laboratory visits, in comparison with the hub clinic. Patients at the other 2 satellite clinics did not differ from hub patients for any type of service use. Overall, stable chronically ill patients were treated with approximately equal clinical efficiency in our satellite clinics. Some differences in efficiency may occur in some clinics, but these appear to be idiosyncratic rather than due to clinic size or distance from central control.

  3. Laboratory and field evaluation of Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae for controlling subterranean termites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A. [South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou (China). College of Natural Resources and Environment; Ahmed, S. [South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Agricultural Entomology; Shahid, M., E-mail: solvia_aah@yahoo.co [University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2011-03-15

    The efficacy of the Metarhizium anisopliae strain ARSEF 6911 was determined in the laboratory and field against two sugarcane pests, Microtermes obesi Holmgren and Odontotermes obesus Rambur (Termitidae: Isoptera). The susceptibility of both termite species to different conidial suspensions (1 x 10{sup 10}, 1 x 10{sup 8}, 1 x 10{sup 6} and 1 x 10{sup 4} conidia/ml) was determined in laboratory. All conidial suspensions were able to induce mortality. Termite mortality caused by the fungal suspensions was dose dependent. There were no significant differences in the LT{sub 50} values between species. Field evaluation of M. anisopliae alone or in combination with diesel oil and thyamethoxam was carried out in two growing seasons (autumn 2005 and spring 2006) at two sites located in Punjab, Pakistan. Dipping the sugarcane setts in these suspensions was tried to determine their effects on germination and percentage of bud damage to sugarcane setts. All treatments significantly reduced termite infestation compared to the untreated control. The combined treatment of M. anisopliae and diesel oil significantly reduced insect damage by attaining higher germination > 55% and lower bud damage < 5.50% at both sites in both seasons. The results suggest that the application of M. anisopliae and diesel oil in combination might be a useful treatment option for the management of termites in sugarcane. (author)

  4. A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke P; Long, Jeremy D

    2015-01-01

    Experimental mesocosm studies of rocky shore and estuarine intertidal systems may benefit from the application of natural tide cycles to better replicate variation in immersion time, water depth, and attendant fluctuations in abiotic and edaphic conditions. Here we describe a stand-alone microcontroller tide prediction open-source software program, coupled with a mechanical tidal elevation control system, which allows continuous adjustment of aquarium water depths in synchrony with local tide cycles. We used this system to monitor the growth of Spartina foliosa marsh cordgrass and scale insect herbivores at three simulated shore elevations in laboratory mesocosms. Plant growth decreased with increasing shore elevation, while scale insect population growth on the plants was not strongly affected by immersion time. This system shows promise for a range of laboratory mesocosm studies where natural tide cycling could impact organism performance or behavior, while the tide prediction system could additionally be utilized in field experiments where treatments need to be applied at certain stages of the tide cycle.

  5. Examination of the interpersonal model of loss of control eating in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Lisa M; Crosby, Ross D; Grammer, Anne Claire; Shomaker, Lauren B; Vannucci, Anna; Burke, Natasha L; Stojek, Monika; Brady, Sheila M; Kozlosky, Merel; Reynolds, James C; Yanovski, Jack A; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2017-07-01

    The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that interpersonal problems lead to negative affect, which in turn contributes to the onset and/or persistence of LOC eating. Despite preliminary support, there are no data examining the construct validity of the interpersonal model of LOC eating using temporally sensitive reports of social stress, distinct negative affective states, and laboratory energy intake. 117 healthy adolescent girls (BMI: 75th-97th %ile) were recruited for a prevention trial targeting excess weight gain in adolescent girls who reported LOC eating. Prior to the intervention, participants completed questionnaires of recent social stress and consumed lunch from a multi-item laboratory test meal. Immediately before the test meal, participants completed a questionnaire of five negative affective states (anger, confusion, depression, fatigue, anxiety). Bootstrapping mediation models were conducted to evaluate pre-meal negative affect states as explanatory mediators of the association between recent social stress and palatable (desserts and snack-type) food intake. All analyses adjusted for age, race, pubertal stage, height, fat mass percentage, and lean mass. Pre-meal state anxiety was a significant mediator for recent social stress and palatable food intake (ps.05). Pre-meal anxiety appears to be the salient mood state for the interpersonal model among adolescent girls with LOC eating. Interventions that focus on improving both social functioning and anxiety may prove most effective at preventing and/or ameliorating disordered eating and obesity in these adolescents. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke P. Miller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental mesocosm studies of rocky shore and estuarine intertidal systems may benefit from the application of natural tide cycles to better replicate variation in immersion time, water depth, and attendant fluctuations in abiotic and edaphic conditions. Here we describe a stand-alone microcontroller tide prediction open-source software program, coupled with a mechanical tidal elevation control system, which allows continuous adjustment of aquarium water depths in synchrony with local tide cycles. We used this system to monitor the growth of Spartina foliosa marsh cordgrass and scale insect herbivores at three simulated shore elevations in laboratory mesocosms. Plant growth decreased with increasing shore elevation, while scale insect population growth on the plants was not strongly affected by immersion time. This system shows promise for a range of laboratory mesocosm studies where natural tide cycling could impact organism performance or behavior, while the tide prediction system could additionally be utilized in field experiments where treatments need to be applied at certain stages of the tide cycle.

  7. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors for urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn-Christie, Rebekah G; Flatland, Bente; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Szladovits, Balazs; Harr, Kendal E; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Knoll, Joyce S; Wamsley, Heather L; Freeman, Kathy P

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and documents recommendations for control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors related to urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.2 (clinical chemistry), 1.3 and 2.5 (urinalysis), 1.4 and 2.6 (cytology), and 3 (postanalytical factors important in veterinary clinical pathology) of these guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Variability in the mechanisms controlling Southern Ocean phytoplankton bloom phenology in an ocean model and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Tyler; Long, Matthew C.; Kavanaugh, Maria T.; Lindsay, Keith; Doney, Scott C.

    2017-05-01

    A coupled global numerical simulation (conducted with the Community Earth System Model) is used in conjunction with satellite remote sensing observations to examine the role of top-down (grazing pressure) and bottom-up (light, nutrients) controls on marine phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean. Phytoplankton seasonal phenology is evaluated in the context of the recently proposed "disturbance-recovery" hypothesis relative to more traditional, exclusively "bottom-up" frameworks. All blooms occur when phytoplankton division rates exceed loss rates to permit sustained net population growth; however, the nature of this decoupling period varies regionally in Community Earth System Model. Regional case studies illustrate how unique pathways allow blooms to emerge despite very poor division rates or very strong grazing rates. In the Subantarctic, southeast Pacific small spring blooms initiate early cooccurring with deep mixing and low division rates, consistent with the disturbance-recovery hypothesis. Similar systematics are present in the Subantarctic, southwest Atlantic during the spring but are eclipsed by a subsequent, larger summer bloom that is coincident with shallow mixing and the annual maximum in division rates, consistent with a bottom-up, light limited framework. In the model simulation, increased iron stress prevents a similar summer bloom in the southeast Pacific. In the simulated Antarctic zone (70°S-65°S) seasonal sea ice acts as a dominant phytoplankton-zooplankton decoupling agent, triggering a delayed but substantial bloom as ice recedes. Satellite ocean color remote sensing and ocean physical reanalysis products do not precisely match model-predicted phenology, but observed patterns do indicate regional variability in mechanism across the Atlantic and Pacific.

  9. An experiment towards characterizing seahorse sound in a laboratory controlled environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A; Sreepada, R.A; Chakraborty, B.; Fernandes, W.A; Srivastava, R.; Kuncolienker, D.S.; Gawde, G.

    N a t i o n a l C o n f e r e n c e o n E l e c t r o n i c T e c h n o l o g i e s 1 5 t h & 1 6 t h A p r i l 2 K 1 1 | 138 An Experiment towards Characterizing Seahorse Sound in a Laboratory Controlled Environment Arvind K. Saran1, R... in it, with seahorse in it during feeding. Department of Electronics and Telecommunication-Goa College of Engineering, Farmagudi-Goa. N a t i o n a l C o n f e r e n c e o n E l e c t r o n i c T e c h n o l o g i e s 1 5 t h & 1 6 t h A p r i l...

  10. Model-based beam control for illumination of remote objects, part II: laboratory testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David; Chandler, Susan M.; Lukesh, Gordon W.; Sjogren, Jon

    2004-10-01

    When a laser beam propagates through the atmosphere, it is subject to corrupting influences including mechanical vibrations, turbulence and tracker limitations. As a result, pointing errors can occur, causing loss of energy or signal at the target. Nukove Scientific Consulting has developed algorithms to estimate these pointing errors from the statistics of the return photons from the target. To prove the feasibility of this approach for real-time estimation, an analysis tool called RHINO was developed by Nukove. Associated with this effort, New Mexico State University developed a laboratory testbed, the ultimate objective being to test the estimation algorithms under controlled conditions and to stream data into RHINO to prove the feasibility of real-time operation. The present paper outlines the description of this testbed and the results obtained through RHINO when the testbed was used to test the estimation approach.

  11. Multiple Satellite Trajectory Optimization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendy Jr, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    This thesis develops and validates a satellite trajectory optimization model. A summary is given of the general mathematical principles of dynamic optimal control to minimize fuel consumed or transfer time...

  12. Infinite-dimensional approach to system identification of Space Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, S. A.; Lee, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The identification of a unique set of system parameters in large space structures poses a significant new problem in control technology. Presented is an infinite-dimensional identification scheme to determine system parameters in large flexible structures in space. The method retains the distributed nature of the structure throughout the development of the algorithm and a finite-element approximation is used only to implement the algorithm. This approach eliminates many problems associated with model truncation used in other methods of identification. The identification is formulated in Hilbert space and an optimal control technique is used to minimize weighted least squares of error between the actual and the model data. A variational approach is used to solve the problem. A costate equation, gradients of parameter variations and conditions for optimal estimates are obtained. Computer simulation studies are conducted using a shuttle-attached antenna configuration, more popularly known as the Space Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) as an example. Numerical results show a close match between the estimated and true values of the parameters.

  13. Evaluation and modeling of autonomous attitude thrust control for the Geostation Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcey, W.; Minnie, C. R.; Defazio, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 experienced a series of orbital perturbations from autonomous attitude control thrusting before perigee raising maneuvers. These perturbations influenced differential correction orbital state solutions determined by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS). The maneuvers induced significant variations in the converged state vector for solutions using increasingly longer tracking data spans. These solutions were used for planning perigee maneuvers as well as initial estimates for orbit solutions used to evaluate the effectiveness of the perigee raising maneuvers. This paper discusses models for the incorporation of attitude thrust effects into the orbit determination process. Results from definitive attitude solutions are modeled as impulsive thrusts in orbit determination solutions created for GOES-8 mission support. Due to the attitude orientation of GOES-8, analysis results are presented that attempt to absorb the effects of attitude thrusting by including a solution for the coefficient of reflectivity, C(R). Models to represent the attitude maneuvers are tested against orbit determination solutions generated during real-time support of the GOES-8 mission. The modeling techniques discussed in this investigation offer benefits to the remaining missions in the GOES NEXT series. Similar missions with large autonomous attitude control thrusting, such as the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft and the INTELSAT series, may also benefit from these results.

  14. Attitude and vibration control of a satellite containing flexible solar arrays by using reaction wheels, and piezoelectric transducers as sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Ijar M.; Rade, Domingos A.; Goes, Luiz C. S.; de Paula Sales, Thiago

    2017-10-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to provide insight into control-structure interaction for satellites comprising flexible appendages and internal moving components. The physical model considered herein aiming to attend such purpose is a rigid-flexible satellite consisting of a rigid platform containing two rotating flexible solar panels. The solar panels rotation is assumed to be in a sun-synchronous configuration mode. The panels contain surface-bonded piezoelectric patches that can be used either as sensors for the elastic displacements or as actuators to counteract the vibration motion. It is assumed that in the normal mode operation the satellite platform points towards the Earth while the solar arrays rotate so as to follow the Sun. The vehicle moves in a low Earth polar orbit. The technique used to obtain the mathematical model combines the Lagrangian formulation with the Finite Elements Method used to describe the dynamics of the solar panel. The gravity-gradient torque as well as the torque due to the interaction of the Earth magnetic field and the satellite internal residual magnetic moment is included as environmental perturbations. The actuators are three reaction wheels for attitude control and piezoelectric actuators to control the flexible motion of the solar arrays. Computer simulations are performed using the MATLAB® software package. The following on-orbit satellite operating configurations are object of analysis: i) Satellite pointing towards the Earth (Earth acquisition maneuver) by considering the initial conditions in the elastic displacement equal to zero, aiming the assessment of the flexible modes excitation by the referred maneuver; ii) the satellite pointing towards the Earth with the assumption of an initial condition different from zero for the flexible motion such that the attitude alterations are checked against the elastic motion disturbance; and iii) attitude acquisition accomplished by taking into account initial conditions

  15. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  16. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  17. Laboratory Assessment of Select Methods of Corrosion Control and Repair in Reinforced Concrete Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Pritzl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen reinforced concrete laboratory test specimens were used to evaluate a number of corrosion control (CoC procedures to prolong the life of patch repairs in corrosion-damaged reinforced concrete. These specimens included layered mixed-in chlorides to represent chloride contamination due to deicing salts. All specimens were exposed to accelerated corrosion testing for three months, subjected to patch repairs with various treatments, and further subjected to additional three months of exposure to accelerated corrosion. The use of thermal sprayed zinc, galvanic embedded anodes, epoxy/polyurethane coating, acrylic coating, and an epoxy patch repair material was evaluated individually or in combination. The specimens were assessed with respect to corrosion currents (estimated mass loss, chloride ingress, surface rust staining, and corrosion of the reinforcing steel observed after dissection. Results indicated that when used in patch repair applications, the embedded galvanic anode with top surface coating, galvanic thermal sprayed zinc, and galvanic thermal sprayed zinc with surface coating were more effective in controlling corrosion than the other treatments tested.

  18. Centriolar satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollenaere, Maxim A X; Mailand, Niels; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    , emerging evidence points to these structures as important hubs for dynamic, multi-faceted regulation in response to a variety of cues. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the roles of centriolar satellites in regulating centrosome functions, ciliogenesis, and neurogenesis. We also...... highlight newly discovered regulatory mechanisms targeting centriolar satellites and their functional status, and we discuss how defects in centriolar satellite components are intimately linked to a wide spectrum of human diseases....

  19. Fine-grained policy control in U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) multimodal signatures database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kelly; Grueneberg, Keith; Wood, David; Calo, Seraphin

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Multimodal Signatures Database (MMSDB) consists of a number of colocated relational databases representing a collection of data from various sensors. Role-based access to this data is granted to external organizations such as DoD contractors and other government agencies through a client Web portal. In the current MMSDB system, access control is only at the database and firewall level. In order to offer finer grained security, changes to existing user profile schemas and authentication mechanisms are usually needed. In this paper, we describe a software middleware architecture and implementation that allows fine-grained access control to the MMSDB at a dataset, table, and row level. Result sets from MMSDB queries issued in the client portal are filtered with the use of a policy enforcement proxy, with minimal changes to the existing client software and database. Before resulting data is returned to the client, policies are evaluated to determine if the user or role is authorized to access the data. Policies can be authored to filter data at the row, table or column level of a result set. The system uses various technologies developed in the International Technology Alliance in Network and Information Science (ITA) for policy-controlled information sharing and dissemination1. Use of the Policy Management Library provides a mechanism for the management and evaluation of policies to support finer grained access to the data in the MMSDB system. The GaianDB is a policy-enabled, federated database that acts as a proxy between the client application and the MMSDB system.

  20. Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 took this photo of Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles) away. The photo shows that Phoebe is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) in diameter, about twice the size of Earth-based measurements; and dark, with five percent reflectivity -- much darker than any other Saturnian satellite. That, and information from Earth-based observations, indicates Phoebe is almost certainly a captured asteroid, and did not form in the original Saturn nebula as Saturn's other satellites did. Phoebe is the only Saturnian satellite that does not always show the same face to Saturn: Its orbital period is 550 days. Its rotation period (length of day), determined from Voyager 2 observations, is nine to ten hours. Other ground-based observations that indicate that Phoebe is a captured asteroid: It orbits Saturn in the ecliptic plane (the plane in which Earth and most other planets orbit the Sun), rather than in Saturn's equatorial plane as the other Saturn satellites do. And Phoebe's orbit is retrograde -- in the direction opposite to that of the other satellites. Voyager is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  1. Autonomous Satellite Command and Control through the World Wide Web: Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert

    1998-01-01

    management, modeling and fault management capabilities that integrate the space and ground segments of the space system hardware; (5) Implement a beacon monitoring test; (6) Implement an experimental blackboard controller for space system management; (7) Further define typical ground station developments required for Internet-based remote control and for full system automation of the PI-to-spacecraft link. Each of those goals is examined in the next section. Significant sections of this report were also published as a conference paper.

  2. Calibrations and evaluation of the control program at the National Laboratory during 1995; Kalibrerings- och normalieverksamheten vid riksmaetplatsen under 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindborg, J.E.; Gullberg, O.; Kylloenen, J.E.; Samuelson, G.

    1996-07-01

    The Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) is a National Laboratory for the dosimetric quantities kerma, absorbed dose and dose equivalent. The activity is based on established routines for how calibrations should be made and a control and a calibration program for the used standards. This report gives a brief summary of the calibrations performed during 1995 and a more detailed description and analysis of the control program during this year. To summarize all the controls and calibrations of standards made during the year makes it easier to draw conclusions about the long term stability and possible malfunctions. Therefore, this summary makes an important part of the quality assurance program at the National Laboratory. 10 figs, 24 tabs.

  3. A controlled laboratory comparison of 4 topical skin creams moisturizing capability on human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel L; Chakravarthy, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    This study compares human skin capacitance (moisture) readings after the application of 4 different, commercially available, topical skin creams. Twenty-one subjects (15 women and 6 men) aged 49.38 ± 11.02) years (mean ± SD) participated. This study was conducted in a climate-controlled laboratory on healthy human subjects. Randomized experimental study comparing 4 topical skin creams for their effect on human skin capacitance (moisture). Subject forearm skin was conditioned for 7 days prior to testing by washing with a standard soap and application of no other products. Each subject was marked with 5 test sites on the forearms. Sites on the volar surface of each subject's forearms were randomly assigned for application of 1 of 4 product pairs, consisting of a cleanser and a topical skin cream or a control site. A Corneometer was used to measure skin capacitance. Each site on the arms was cleaned and dried, tested again for moisture content, subjected to topical skin cream application, and finally tested again for moisture content. Changes were measured by subtracting the capacitance readings at baseline from values measured following topical skin cream application for each test site. The mean change in capacitance was 13.9 for product 1, 10.3 for product 3, 8.7 for product 2, 1.6 for product 4, and 0.8 for the control site. The mean capacitance change in sites treated with product 1 (13.9 ± 8.0, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than all others. There was no difference between the change in capacitance of product 2 (mean = 8.7, SD = 4.9) and product 3 (10.3 ± 7.1) t(20) = 1.081, P = .293, nor between product 4 (1.6 ± 3.9) and the control site (0.3, ± 2.2) t(20) = 0.779, P = .445. The capacitance change of products 2 and 3 was greater than that of product 4 and the control site. Commercially available topical skin creams vary in their impact on human skin capacitance. In this study, sites tested with product 1 had a greater skin capacitance reading than

  4. Laboratory capacity for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease in Eastern Africa: implications for the progressive control pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis is pertinent to any disease control programme. If Eastern Africa is to work towards control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) using the Progressive Control Pathway for FMD (PCP-FMD) as a tool, then the capacity of national reference laboratories (NRLs) mandated to diagnose FMD should match this task. This study assessed the laboratory capacity of 14 NRLs of the Eastern Africa Region Laboratory Network member countries using a semi-structured questionnaire and retrospective data from the World Reference Laboratory for FMD annual reports and Genbank® through National Centre for Biotechnology Information for the period 2006–2010. Results The questionnaire response rate was 13/14 (93%). Twelve out of the 13 countries/regions had experienced at least one outbreak in the relevant five year period. Only two countries (Ethiopia and Kenya) had laboratories at biosecurity level 3 and only three (Ethiopia, Kenya and Sudan) had identified FMD virus serotypes for all reported outbreaks. Based on their own country/region assessment, 12/13 of these countries /regions were below stage 3 of the PCP-FMD. Quarantine (77%) and vaccination (54%) were the major FMD control strategies employed. The majority (12/13) of the NRLs used serological techniques to diagnose FMD, seven used antigen ELISA and three of these (25%) also used molecular techniques which were the tests most frequently requested from collaborating laboratories by the majority (69%) of the NRLs. Only 4/13 (31%) participated in proficiency testing for FMD. Four (31%) laboratories had no quality management systems (QMS) in place and where QMS existed it was still deficient, thus, none of the laboratories had achieved accreditation for FMD diagnosis. Conclusions This study indicates that FMD diagnostic capacity in Eastern Africa is still inadequate and largely depends on antigen and antibody ELISAs techniques undertaken by the NRLs. Hence, for the region to progress on the PCP-FMD, there is

  5. [Approval of ISO/IEC 17025 and quality control of laboratory testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Asakura, Hiroshi; Machii, Kenji; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2010-01-01

    First section of Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) was approved by ISO/IEC 17025 as a laboratory having an appropriate laboratory testing technique. NIHS is the first national laboratory approved by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS has also been accepted the appropriate technique and facility for the BSL3 level pathogens by ISO/IEC 17025. NIHS is necessary to take an external audit almost every year. This approval is renewed every 4 years.

  6. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  7. Supporting Development of Satellite's Guidance Navigation and Control Software: A Product Line Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David; Stark, Michael; Leake, Stephen; White, Michael; Morisio, Maurizio; Travassos, Guilherme H.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch (FSB) is developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Flight Software (FSW) product line. The demand for increasingly more complex flight software in less time while maintaining the same level of quality has motivated us to look for better FSW development strategies. The GNC FSW product line has been planned to address the core GNC FSW functionality very similar on many recent low/near Earth missions in the last ten years. Unfortunately these missions have not accomplished significant drops in development cost since a systematic approach towards reuse has not been adopted. In addition, new demands are continually being placed upon the FSW which means the FSB must become more adept at providing GNC FSW functionality's core so it can accommodate additional requirements. These domain features together with engineering concepts are influencing the specification, description and evaluation of FSW product line. Domain engineering is the foundation for emerging product line software development approaches. A product line is 'A family of products designed to take advantage of their common aspects and predicted variabilities'. In our product line approach, domain engineering includes the engineering activities needed to produce reusable artifacts for a domain. Application engineering refers to developing an application in the domain starting from reusable artifacts. The focus of this paper is regarding the software process, lessons learned and on how the GNC FSW product line manages variability. Existing domain engineering approaches do not enforce any specific notation for domain analysis or commonality and variability analysis. Usually, natural language text is the preferred tool. The advantage is the flexibility and adapt ability of natural language. However, one has to be ready to accept also its well-known drawbacks, such as ambiguity, inconsistency, and contradictions. While most domain analysis

  8. Controls on slow-moving landslides revealed by satellite and airborne InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerger, Alexander L.; Fielding, Eric J.

    2017-04-01

    Landslides display a wide variety of behaviors ranging from slow persistent motion to rapid acceleration and catastrophic failure. Given the variety of possible behaviors, improvements to our understanding of landslide mechanics are critical for accurate predictions of landslide dynamics. To better constrain the mechanisms that control landslide motion, we use recent SAR data collected by Copernicus Sentinel-1A/B, NASA UAVSAR, JAXA ALOS-2, and DLR TerraSAR-X to quantify the time-dependent kinematics of over 200 slow-moving landslides in the Central and Northern California Coast Ranges. These landslides are ideally suited for InSAR investigations due to their size (up to 5 km in length and 0.5 km in width), persistent downslope motion with low velocities (m/yr), and sparse vegetation. We quantify the seasonal and multi-year changes in velocity driven by changes in precipitation and find that landslide velocity varies over both timescales. Over seasonal timescales, each landslide displays a period of acceleration that occurs within weeks of the onset of seasonal rainfall suggesting that motion is governed by precipitation-induced changes in pore-water pressure. We also examine the effects of multi-year climate variations (i.e., recent historic California drought and the possible wet period that began in late 2016) on the activity of landslides. We find that the drought has led to a decrease in annual displacement over the past several years and predict that a resurgence in annual displacement will occur with an increase in annual rainfall. Lastly, we use UAVSAR data acquired at 4 different look directions to quantify 3D surface displacement of multiple landslides and invert for their subsurface geometry (i.e. basal slip surface) using recently developed 3D mass conservation techniques. The application of NASA's UAVSAR data represents a major advance from previous InSAR studies on landslides in this region and provides one of the first 3D dataset that contains

  9. Routine internal- and external-quality control data in clinical laboratories for estimating measurement and diagnostic uncertainty using GUM principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Bertil; Ossowicki, Haakan; Rienitz, Olaf; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare laboratories are increasingly joining into larger laboratory organizations encompassing several physical laboratories. This caters for important new opportunities for re-defining the concept of a 'laboratory' to encompass all laboratories and measurement methods measuring the same measurand for a population of patients. In order to make measurement results, comparable bias should be minimized or eliminated and measurement uncertainty properly evaluated for all methods used for a particular patient population. The measurement as well as diagnostic uncertainty can be evaluated from internal and external quality control results using GUM principles. In this paper the uncertainty evaluations are described in detail using only two main components, within-laboratory reproducibility and uncertainty of the bias component according to a Nordtest guideline. The evaluation is exemplified for the determination of creatinine in serum for a conglomerate of laboratories both expressed in absolute units (μmol/L) and relative (%). An expanded measurement uncertainty of 12 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 120 μmol/L and of 10% associated with concentrations above 120 μmol/L was estimated. The diagnostic uncertainty encompasses both measurement uncertainty and biological variation, and can be estimated for a single value and for a difference. This diagnostic uncertainty for the difference for two samples from the same patient was determined to be 14 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 100 μmol/L and 14 % associated with concentrations above 100 μmol/L.

  10. Ventilation Requirements for Control of Occupancy Odor and Tobacco Smoke Odor: Laboratory Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Isseroff, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leaderere, B. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lipsitt, E. D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Huey, R. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perlman, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bergland, L. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dunn, J. D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1981-04-01

    A sensitive chemical analysis of the air in a building will characteristically reveal a large number of organic substances, many at concentrations too low to have discernible biological impact. If the concentrations of the chemicals increase, the first sign of their presence may occur via the sense of smell. The air may become odorous. In the general absence of any better or faster indicator, smell will serve as the principal means to decide whether the air in a room is acceptable. Accordingly, this modality has long figured directly or indirectly in the choice of ventilation rates. The cost of ventilation, on the average more than 25% of the operating cost of a building, increases proportionally with the cost of energy and therefore provides a strong incentive to search for energy efficiency. A previous report reviewed the literature relevant to odor perception, odor control, and ventilation (1). The report highlighted prospects for research that might point to ways to achieve both acceptable air quality and energy efficiency in ventilation. The present report provides an account of laboratory research stimulated by that review. The report focuses on ventilation requirements for occupancy odor (Part l) and tobacco smoke odor (Part 2), and offers some preliminary observations on how filtration may aid ventilation (Part 3).

  11. [Life tables of Blattella germanica (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) under laboratory conditions and their importance for its control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, L; Marquetti, M C; Gutiérrez, A; Navarro, A

    1997-01-01

    A study of the life tables of Blatella germanica (L.) 1767 was conducted under laboratory conditions. 3 treatments were used a according to the number of individuals in each breeding flask (A = 9 flasks with 20-25 individuals, B = 17 flasks with 30-35 individuals, and C = 30 flasks with a newly hatched nymph each). The main parameters of the population growth were calculated by the TABVID software . The respective values for treatments A and B were the following: net reproduction rate (Ro 2.23 and 2.37), natural increase finite rate (lambda = 1.06), natural increase intrinsic rate (r = 0.06), and mean generational time (T = 13.89 and 15.64). The behaviour of the survival probability by age, the fertility rate, and the mortality rate were graphically registered. Life expectancy for treatment C was 16.47 and the survival rate for this treatment was represented by a graph. Graphics of the growth curve of this species and of the survival rate for treatments A and B were shown. The latter was concave, which means that mortality is higher during the young stages. This study provides esential cuantitative basic date that allow to carry out a more efficient control if fight is directed to the period where the highest natural mortality was found, that is, at the step from nymph 6 to adult in treatments A and B.

  12. The Use of a Satellite Communications System for Command and Control of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Surrogate Unmanned Aerial System Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Charles T.; Jones, Frank; Hutchinson, Brian; Joyce, Claude; Nelson, Skip; Melum, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has transformed a Cirrus Design SR22 general aviation (GA) aircraft into an Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Surrogate research aircraft which has served for several years as a platform for unmanned systems research and development. The aircraft is manned with a Safety Pilot and a Research Systems Operator (RSO) that allows for flight operations almost any-where in the national airspace system (NAS) without the need for a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA). The UAS Surrogate can be remotely controlled from a modular, transportable ground control station (GCS) like a true UAS. Ground control of the aircraft is accomplished by the use of data links that allow the two-way passage of the required data to control the aircraft and provide the GCS with situational awareness. The original UAS Surrogate data-link system was composed of redundant very high frequency (VHF) data radio modems with a maximum range of approximately 40 nautical miles. A new requirement was developed to extend this range beyond visual range (BVR). This new requirement led to the development of a satellite communications system that provided the means to command and control the UAS Surrogate at ranges beyond the limits of the VHF data links. The system makes use of the Globalstar low earth orbit (LEO) satellite communications system. This paper will provide details of the development, implementation, and flight testing of the satellite data communications system on the UAS Surrogate research aircraft.

  13. Hydrologic control on the root growth of Salix cuttings at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau', Valentina; Calliari, Baptiste; Perona, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Riparian plant roots contribute to the ecosystem functioning and, to a certain extent, also directly affect fluvial morphodynamics, e.g. by influencing sediment transport via mechanical stabilization and trapping. There is much both scientific and engineering interest in understanding the complex interactions among riparian vegetation and river processes. For example, to investigate plant resilience to uprooting by flow, one should quantify the probability that riparian plants may be uprooted during specific flooding event. Laboratory flume experiments are of some help to this regard, but are often limited to use grass (e.g., Avena and Medicago sativa) as vegetation replicate with a number of limitations due to fundamental scaling problems. Hence, the use of small-scale real plants grown undisturbed in the actual sediment and within a reasonable time frame would be particularly helpful to obtain more realistic flume experiments. The aim of this work is to develop and tune an experimental technique to control the growth of the root vertical density distribution of small-scale Salix cuttings of different sizes and lengths. This is obtained by controlling the position of the saturated water table in the sedimentary bed according to the sediment size distribution and the cutting length. Measurements in the rhizosphere are performed by scanning and analysing the whole below-ground biomass by means of the root analysis software WinRhizo, from which root morphology statistics and the empirical vertical density distribution are obtained. The model of Tron et al. (2015) for the vertical density distribution of the below-ground biomass is used to show that experimental conditions that allow to develop the desired root density distribution can be fairly well predicted. This augments enormously the flexibility and the applicability of the proposed methodology in view of using such plants for novel flow erosion experiments. Tron, S., Perona, P., Gorla, L., Schwarz, M., Laio, F

  14. Laboratory characterization of the structural properties controlling dynamical gas transport in Mars-analog soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Mellon, Michael T.

    2008-10-01

    Dynamical transport of gases within the martian regolith controls many climatic processes, and is particularly important in the deposition and/or mobilization of shallow ground ice, as well as exchange of other volatiles between the martian regolith and atmosphere. A variety of theoretical studies have addressed issues related to ground ice dynamics on Mars and in the terrestrial analog environment of the Antarctic Dry Valleys. These theoretical studies have drawn on a limited set of empirical measurements to constrain the structural parameters controlling gas diffusion and flow in soils. Here, we investigate five groups of Mars-analog soils: glass spheres, JSC Mars-1, aeolian dune sand, Antarctic Dry Valley soils, and arctic loess. We present laboratory measurements of the structural properties most relevant to gas transport in these soils: porosity, tortuosity, permeability, bulk and intrinsic densities, grain-size distribution, pore-size distribution and BET surface area. Our results bear directly both on the appropriateness of assumptions made in theoretical studies and on current outstanding issues in the study of shallow ground ice on Mars and in the Dry Valleys. Specifically, we find that (1) measured values of tortuosity are lower than values commonly assumed for Mars by a factor of two to three; (2) diffusive loss of ground ice on Mars can likely proceed up to four times faster than predicted by theoretical studies; (3) soil permeabilities are sufficiently high that flushing of the soil column by bulk flow of atmospheric gases may further speed loss or deposition of shallow ground ice; (4) the pore volume in some Mars-analog soils is sufficiently high to explain high volumetric ice abundances inferred from Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer data as simple pore ice; and (5) measured properties of soils collected in Beacon Valley, Antarctica agree well with assumptions made in theoretical studies and are consistent with rapid loss of ground ice in the

  15. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John; Kamhawi, Hani; Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort to mature an iodine propulsion system while reducing risk and increasing fidelity of a technology demonstration mission concept. 1 The FY 2014 tasks include investments leveraged throughout NASA, from multiple mission directorates, as a partnership with NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), a NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Technology Investment Project, and an Air Force partnership. Propulsion technology is often a critical enabling technology for space missions. NASA is investing in technologies to enable high value missions with very small and low-cost spacecraft, even CubeSats. However, these small spacecraft currently lack any appreciable propulsion capability. CubeSats are typically deployed and drift without any ability to transfer to higher value orbits, perform orbit maintenance, or deorbit. However, the iodine Hall system can allow the spacecraft to transfer into a higher value science orbit. The iodine satellite (iSAT) will be able to achieve a (Delta)V of >500 m/s with 1,300 s. The iSAT spacecraft, illustrated in figure 1, is currently a 12U CubeSat. The spacecraft chassis will be constructed from aluminum with a finish to prevent iodine-driven corrosion. The iSAT spacecraft includes full three-axis control using wheels, magnetic torque rods, inertial management unit, and a suite of sensors and optics. The spacecraft will leverage heat generated by spacecraft components and radiators for a passive thermal control system.

  16. Satellite Communications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Satellite Communications. Arthur C Clarke wrote a seminal paper in 1945 in wireless world. Use three satellites in geo-synchronous orbit to enable intercontinental communications. System could be realised in '50 to 100 years'

  17. Controlled laboratory experiments and modeling of vegetative filter strips with shallow water tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Garey A.; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Purvis, Rebecca A.

    2018-01-01

    Natural or planted vegetation at the edge of fields or adjacent to streams, also known as vegetative filter strips (VFS), are commonly used as an environmental mitigation practice for runoff pollution and agrochemical spray drift. The VFS position in lowlands near water bodies often implies the presence of a seasonal shallow water table (WT). In spite of its potential importance, there is limited experimental work that systematically studies the effect of shallow WTs on VFS efficacy. Previous research recently coupled a new physically based algorithm describing infiltration into soils bounded by a water table into the VFS numerical overland flow and transport model, VFSMOD, to simulate VFS dynamics under shallow WT conditions. In this study, we tested the performance of the model against laboratory mesoscale data under controlled conditions. A laboratory soil box (1.0 m wide, 2.0 m long, and 0.7 m deep) was used to simulate a VFS and quantify the influence of shallow WTs on runoff. Experiments included planted Bermuda grass on repacked silt loam and sandy loam soils. A series of experiments were performed including a free drainage case (no WT) and a static shallow water table (0.3-0.4 m below ground surface). For each soil type, this research first calibrated VFSMOD to the observed outflow hydrograph for the free drainage experiments to parameterize the soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters, and then evaluated the model based on outflow hydrographs for the shallow WT experiments. This research used several statistical metrics and a new approach based on hypothesis testing of the Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (NSE) to evaluate model performance. The new VFSMOD routines successfully simulated the outflow hydrographs under both free drainage and shallow WT conditions. Statistical metrics considered the model performance valid with greater than 99.5% probability across all scenarios. This research also simulated the shallow water table experiments with

  18. Iodine Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  19. Bioactivity of Cabralea canjerana (Vell. Mart. (Meliaceae in the control of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera, Bruchidae in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisonéia Smaniotto

    2010-04-01

    and 1%, were added. The results in the laboratory showed 100% efficiency of the crude extract (concentration 1%, followed by the hexanic fraction (concentration 1% with 84.2%. The ethyl acetate, chloroformic fractions and essential oil showed lower efficiency in the control of Acanthoscelides obtectus.

  20. Controlled Synthesis of Nanomaterials at the Undergraduate Laboratory: Cu(OH)[subscript 2] and CuO Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Anderson G. M.; Rodrigues, Thenner S.; Parussulo, Andre´ L. A.; Candido, Eduardo G.; Geonmonond, Rafael S.; Brito, Hermi F.; Toma, Henrique E.; Camargo, Pedro H. C.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate-level laboratory experiments that involve the synthesis of nanomaterials with well-defined/controlled shapes are very attractive under the umbrella of nanotechnology education. Herein we describe a low-cost and facile experiment for the synthesis of Cu(OH)[subscript 2] and CuO nanowires comprising three main parts: (i) synthesis of…

  1. Emulation-Based Virtual Laboratories: A Low-Cost Alternative to Physical Experiments in Control Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G. C.; Medioli, A. M.; Sher, W.; Vlacic, L. B.; Welsh, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues the case for emulation-based virtual laboratories in control engineering education. It demonstrates that such emulation experiments can give students an industrially relevant educational experience at relatively low cost. The paper also describes a particular emulation-based system that has been developed with the aim of giving…

  2. A Low-Cost Computer-Controlled Arduino-Based Educational Laboratory System for Teaching the Fundamentals of Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadou, K.; Yiasemides, K.; Trougkakos, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, fully computer-controlled, Arduino-based, educational laboratory (SolarInsight) to be used in undergraduate university courses concerned with electrical engineering and physics. The major goal of the system is to provide students with the necessary instrumentation, software tools and methodology in order to learn fundamental…

  3. An Interactive Computer-Aided Instructional Strategy and Assessment Methods for System Identification and Adaptive Control Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Necdet Sinan; Eker, Ilyas

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a set of real-time interactive experiments that address system identification and model reference adaptive control (MRAC) techniques. In constructing laboratory experiments that contribute to efficient teaching, experimental design and instructional strategy are crucial, but a process for doing this has yet to be defined. This…

  4. Laboratory markers of disease severity in Plasmodium knowlesi infection: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willmann Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium knowlesi malaria causes severe disease in up to 10% of cases in Malaysian Borneo and has a mortality rate of 1 - 2%. However, laboratory markers with the ability to identify patients at risk of developing complications have not yet been assessed as they have for other species of Plasmodium. Methods A case control study was undertaken in two hospitals in Sarikei and Sibu, Malaysian Borneo. One hundred and ten patients with uncomplicated (n = 93 and severe (n = 17 P. knowlesi malaria were studied. Standardized pigment-containing neutrophil (PCN count, parasite density and platelet counts were determined and analysed by logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results The PCN count was strongly associated with risk of disease severity. Patients with high parasite density (≥ 35,000/μl or with thrombocytopaenia (≤ 45,000/μl were also more likely to develop complications (odds ratio (OR = 9.93 and OR = 5.27, respectively. The PCN count yielded the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC estimate among all markers of severity (AUC = 0.8561, 95% confidence interval: 0.7328, 0.9794. However, the difference between all parameter AUC estimates was not statistically significant (Wald test, p = 0.73. Conclusion Counting PCN is labour-intensive and not superior in predicting severity over parasitaemia and platelet counts. Parasite and platelet counts are simpler tests with an acceptable degree of precision. Any adult patient diagnosed with P. knowlesi malaria and having a parasite count ≥35,000/μl or ≥1% or a platelet count ≤45,000/μl can be regarded at risk of developing complications and should be managed according to current WHO guidelines for the treatment of severe malaria.

  5. European external quality control study on the competence of laboratories to recognize rare sequence variants resulting in unusual genotyping results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márki-Zay, János; Klein, Christoph L; Gancberg, David; Schimmel, Heinz G; Dux, László

    2009-04-01

    Depending on the method used, rare sequence variants adjacent to the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of interest may cause unusual or erroneous genotyping results. Because such rare variants are known for many genes commonly tested in diagnostic laboratories, we organized a proficiency study to assess their influence on the accuracy of reported laboratory results. Four external quality control materials were processed and sent to 283 laboratories through 3 EQA organizers for analysis of the prothrombin 20210G>A mutation. Two of these quality control materials contained sequence variants introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. One hundred eighty-nine laboratories participated in the study. When samples gave a usual result with the method applied, the error rate was 5.1%. Detailed analysis showed that more than 70% of the failures were reported from only 9 laboratories. Allele-specific amplification-based PCR had a much higher error rate than other methods (18.3% vs 2.9%). The variants 20209C>T and [20175T>G; 20179_20180delAC] resulted in unusual genotyping results in 67 and 85 laboratories, respectively. Eighty-three (54.6%) of these unusual results were not recognized, 32 (21.1%) were attributed to technical issues, and only 37 (24.3%) were recognized as another sequence variant. Our findings revealed that some of the participating laboratories were not able to recognize and correctly interpret unusual genotyping results caused by rare SNPs. Our study indicates that the majority of the failures could be avoided by improved training and careful selection and validation of the methods applied.

  6. Satellite Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    The field of satellite communications represents the world's largest space industry. Those who are interested in space need to understand the fundamentals of satellite communications, its technology, operation, business, economic, and regulatory aspects. This book explains all this along with key insights into the field's future growth trends and current strategic challenges. Fundamentals of Satellite Communications is a concise book that gives all of the key facts and figures as well as a strategic view of where this dynamic industry is going. Author Joseph N. Pelton, PhD, former Dean of the International Space University and former Director of Strategic Policy at Intelstat, presents a r

  7. 77 FR 50163 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Cody Laboratories, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... physical security systems, verification of the company's compliance with state and local laws, and a review... 16263, Cody Laboratories, Inc., 601 Yellowstone Avenue, Cody, Wyoming 82414, made application by letter...

  8. The basis of clinical tribalism, hierarchy and stereotyping: a laboratory-controlled teamwork experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Clay-Williams, Robyn; Vecellio, Elia; Marks, Danielle; Hooper, Tamara; Westbrook, Mary; Westbrook, Johanna; Blakely, Brette; Ludlow, Kristiana

    2016-07-29

    To examine the basis of multidisciplinary teamwork. In real-world healthcare settings, clinicians often cluster in profession-based tribal silos, form hierarchies and exhibit stereotypical behaviours. It is not clear whether these social structures are more a product of inherent characteristics of the individuals or groups comprising the professions, or attributable to a greater extent to workplace factors. Controlled laboratory environment with well-appointed, quiet rooms and video and audio equipment. Clinical professionals (n=133) divided into 35 groups of doctors, nurses and allied health professions, or mixed professions. Participants engaged in one of three team tasks, and their performance was video-recorded and assessed. Primary: teamwork performance. Secondary, pre-experimental: a bank of personality questionnaires designed to assess participants' individual differences. Postexperimental: the 16-item Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) to measure teamwork skills; this was self-assessed by participants and also by external raters. In addition, external, arm's length blinded observations of the videotapes were conducted. At baseline, there were few significant differences between the professions in collective orientation, most of the personality factors, Machiavellianism and conservatism. Teams generally functioned well, with effective relationships, and exhibited little by way of discernible tribal or hierarchical behaviours, and no obvious differences between groups (F (3, 31)=0.94, p=0.43). Once clinicians are taken out of the workplace and put in controlled settings, tribalism, hierarchical and stereotype behaviours largely dissolve. It is unwise therefore to attribute these factors to fundamental sociological or psychological differences between individuals in the professions, or aggregated group differences. Workplace cultures are more likely to be influential in shaping such behaviours. The results underscore the importance of culture and

  9. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Top space experts from around the world have collaborated to produce this comprehensive, authoritative, and clearly illustrated reference guide to the fast growing, multi-billion dollar field of satellite applications and space communications. This handbook, done under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, addresses not only system technologies but also examines market dynamics, technical standards and regulatory constraints. The handbook is a completely multi-disciplinary reference book that covers, in an in-depth fashion, the fields of satellite telecommunications, Earth observation, remote sensing, satellite navigation, geographical information systems, and geosynchronous meteorological systems. It covers current practices and designs as well as advanced concepts and future systems. It provides a comparative analysis of the common technologies and design elements for satellite application bus structures, thermal controls, power systems, stabilization techniques, telemetry, com...

  10. Development of a speech-based dialogue system for report dictation and machine control in the endoscopic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, B; Gergely, J; Toth, G; Pronai, L; Zagoni, T; Papik, K; Tulassay, Z

    2000-01-01

    Reporting and machine control based on speech technology can enhance work efficiency in the gastrointestinal endoscopy laboratory. The status and activation of endoscopy laboratory equipment were described as a multivariate parameter and function system. Speech recognition, text evaluation and action definition engines were installed. Special programs were developed for the grammatical analysis of command sentences, and a rule-based expert system for the definition of machine answers. A speech backup engine provides feedback to the user. Techniques were applied based on the "Hidden Markov" model of discrete word, user-independent speech recognition and on phoneme-based speech synthesis. Speech samples were collected from three male low-tone investigators. The dictation module and machine control modules were incorporated in a personal computer (PC) simulation program. Altogether 100 unidentified patient records were analyzed. The sentences were grouped according to keywords, which indicate the main topics of a gastrointestinal endoscopy report. They were: "endoscope", "esophagus", "cardia", "fundus", "corpus", "antrum", "pylorus", "bulbus", and "postbulbar section", in addition to the major pathological findings: "erosion", "ulceration", and "malignancy". "Biopsy" and "diagnosis" were also included. We implemented wireless speech communication control commands for equipment including an endoscopy unit, video, monitor, printer, and PC. The recognition rate was 95%. Speech technology may soon become an integrated part of our daily routine in the endoscopy laboratory. A central speech and laboratory computer could be the most efficient alternative to having separate speech recognition units in all items of equipment.

  11. National Survey on Internal Quality Control for HbA(1c) Analytical Instruments in 331 Hospital Laboratories of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; Fei, Yang; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The narrow gap of HbA1 value of mass fraction between "normal" (quality control (IQC) practice for HbA(1c) in China and find out the most appropriate quality specifications. Data of IQC for HbA(1c) in 331 institutions participating in the national proficiency testing (PT) programs in China were evaluated using four levels of quality specifications, and the percentages of laboratories meeting the quality requirement were calculated to find out the most appropriate quality specifications for control materials of HbA(1c) in China. The IQC data varied vastly among 331 clinical laboratories in China. The measurement of control materials covered a wide range from 4.52% to 12.24% (inter-quartile range) and there were significant differences among the CVs of different methods, including LPLC, CE-HPLC, AC-HPLC, immunoturbidimetry, and others. Among the four main methods, CE-HPLC and AC-HPLC achieved a better precision. As we can see, the performance of laboratories for HbA(1c) has yet to be improved. Clinical laboratories in China should improve their performance with a stricter imprecision criteria.

  12. Satellite Geomagnetism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Stolle, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Earth’s magnetic field from space began more than 50 years ago. A continuous monitoring of the field using low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites, however, started only in 1999, and three satellites have taken highprecision measurements of the geomagnetic field during the past decade....... The unprecedented time-space coverage of their data opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding, and exploring Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite constellation Swarm will ensure continuity of such measurement and provide enhanced possibilities to improve our...... ability to characterize and understand the many sources that contribute to Earth’s magnetic field. In this review, we summarize investigations of Earth’s interior and environment that have been possible through the analysis of high-precision magnetic field observations taken by LEO satellites....

  13. Legendrian satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Etnyre, John; Vértesi, Vera

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study Legendrian knots in the knot types of satellite knots. In particular, we classify Legendrian Whitehead patterns and learn a great deal about Legendrian braided patterns. We also show how the classification of Legendrian patterns can lead to a classification of the associated satellite knots if the companion knot is Legendrian simple and uniformly thick. This leads to new Legendrian and transverse classification results for knots in the 3-sphere with its standard contact...

  14. Scientific Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    igniters, and restrictors, can provide dozens of precision bursts of thrust upon command. Solid-rocket throttling ( vernier -thrusting) is more difficult...Here is a very straightforward micromete - oroid detector. A particle penetrates a pressurized vessel, usually a cylinder; the gas inside escapes; and a...The first Explorer satellites carried wire grids. The Micromete - oroid Satellite series used 46 cards, like those sketched in figure 11-85. Explorer

  15. Boomerang Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbrock, Andrew; Minton, David A.

    2017-10-01

    We recently reported that the orbital architecture of the Martian environment allows for material in orbit around the planet to ``cycle'' between orbiting the planet as a ring, or as coherent satellites. Here we generalize our previous analysis to examine several factors that determine whether satellites accreting at the edge of planetary rings will cycle. In order for the orbiting material to cycle, tidal evolution must decrease the semi-major axis of any accreting satellites. In some systems, the density of the ring/satellite material, the surface mass density of the ring, the tidal parameters of the system, and the rotation rate of the primary body contribute to a competition between resonant ring torques and tidal dissipation that prevent this from occurring, either permanently or temporarily. Analyzing these criteria, we examine various bodies in our solar system (such as Saturn, Uranus, and Eris) to identify systems where cycling may occur. We find that a ring-satellite cycle may give rise to the current Uranian ring-satellite system, and suggest that Miranda may have formed from an early, more massive Uranian ring.

  16. Insights into organic carbon oxidation potential during fluvial transport from controlled laboratory and natural field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Dellinger, Mathieu; Golombek, Nina; Hilton, Robert G.; Hovius, Niels; Sachse, Dirk; Turowski, Jens M.; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wittmann, Hella

    2017-04-01

    Over geologic timescales, the exchange of organic carbon (OC) between the atmosphere, biosphere and geosphere is thought to be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, and hence global climate. The carbon fluxes from the oxidation of rock-derived OC (a CO2 source) and erosion and transport of biospheric OC (a potential CO2 sink) during fluvial transit are approximately the same order of magnitude or larger than those from silicate weathering (France-Lanord and Derry, 1997; Bouchez et al., 2010). Despite field data showing oxidation of OC moving downstream in lowland rivers, it is unclear if losses occur primarily during active fluvial transport within the river, where OC is in continual motion within an aerated environment, or during longer periods when OC is temporarily stored in river floodplains which may be anoxic. This represents a major knowledge gap, as the unknown location of OC oxidation (i.e., river vs. floodplain) limits our ability to develop process-based models that can be employed to predict OC losses, constrain carbon budgets, and unravel links between climate, tectonics, and erosion. To fill this gap, we investigated the potential for OC oxidation in both controlled laboratory experiments and a simplified field setting. We consider both rock-derived and biospheric OC. Our experiments simulated fluvial transport without floodplain storage, allowing mixtures of OC-rich and siliciclastic sediment to be transported for distances of 1000 km in annular flumes while making time-series measurements of OC concentration in both the solid (POC) and dissolved (DOC) loads, as well as measurements of rhenium concentration, which serves as a proxy for the oxidation of rock-derived OC. These transport experiments were compared to static, control experiments where water and sediment in the same proportion were placed in still water. Initial results for transport of OC-rich soil show similar behavior between the transport and static

  17. Hardware Development of a Laboratory-Scale Microgrid Phase 2: Operation and Control of a Two-Inverter Microgrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illindala, M. S.; Piagi, P.; Zhang, H.; Venkataramanan, G.; Lasseter, R. H.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the second year of a three-year project to develop control software for microsource distributed generation systems. In this phase, a laboratory-scale microgrid was expanded to include: (1) Two emulated distributed resources; (2) Static switchgear to allow rapid disconnection and reconnection; (3) Electronic synchronizing circuitry to enable transient-free grid interconnection; (4) Control software for dynamically varying the frequency and voltage controller structures; and (5) Power measurement instrumentation for capturing transient waveforms at the interconnect during switching events.

  18. CO2 Insulation for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Karlmann, Paul; Anderson, Kevin; Novak, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is sending a large (>850 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars in 2011. The rover's primary power source is a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) that generates roughly 2000 W of heat, which is converted to approximately 110 W of electrical power for use by the rover electronics, science instruments, and mechanism-actuators. The large rover size and extreme thermal environments (cold and hot) for which the rover is designed for led to a sophisticated thermal control system to keep it within allowable temperature limits. The pre-existing Martian atmosphere of low thermal conductivity CO2 gas (8 Torr) is used to thermally protect the rover and its components from the extremely cold Martian environment (temperatures as low as -130 deg C). Conventional vacuum based insulation like Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) is not effective in a gaseous atmosphere, so engineered gaps between the warm rover internal components and the cold rover external structure were employed to implement this thermal isolation. Large gaps would lead to more thermal isolation, but would also require more of the precious volume available within the rover. Therefore, a balance of the degree of thermal isolation achieved vs. the volume of rover utilized is required to reach an acceptable design. The temperature differences between the controlled components and the rover structure vary from location to location so each gap has to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to arrive at an optimal thickness. For every configuration and temperature difference, there is a critical thickness below which the heat transfer mechanism is dominated by simple gaseous thermal conduction. For larger gaps, the mechanism is dominated by natural convection. In general, convection leads to a poorer level of thermal isolation as compared to conduction. All these considerations play important roles in the

  19. Translational Behavior Analysis: From Laboratory Science in Stimulus Control to Intervention with Persons with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvane, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout its history, laboratory research in the experimental analysis of behavior has been successful in elucidating and clarifying basic learning principles and processes in both humans and nonhumans. In parallel, applied behavior analysis has shown how fundamental behavior-analytic principles and procedures can be employed to promote…

  20. Field and Laboratory Evaluations of Insecticides for Southern Pine Beetle Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton L. Hastings; Jack E. Coster; [Editors

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of laboratory screenings and field studies of insecticides for use against the southern pine beetle. Preventive as webas remedial efficacywere observed, along with phytotoxicity to pine and understory hardwood species, effects of insecticides on soil microbial and mesofaunal populations, and degradation of insecticides by selected soil microbes.

  1. Computer Based Learning in an Undergraduate Physics Laboratory: Interfacing and Instrument Control Using Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, J. S.; Glover, P. M.; Moseley, W.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe the recent changes to the curriculum of the second year practical laboratory course in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham. In particular, we describe how Matlab has been implemented as a teaching tool and discuss both its pedagogical advantages and disadvantages in teaching undergraduate…

  2. The role of OIE aquatic standards and OIE Reference Laboratories in aquatic animal disease prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernoth, E M

    2008-04-01

    The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) develops normative documents relating to rules that Member Countries and Territories can use to protect themselves from diseases without setting up unjustified sanitary barriers. For aquatic animal disease, the Aquatic Animal Health Code and the Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals are prepared by the Aquatic Animal Health Standards Commission, with the assistance of internationally renowned experts, the other Specialist Commissions of the OIE, and in consultation with OIE Members. The role of these standards in aquatic animal disease prevention and control is described in detail. There are currently 27 OIE Reference Laboratories and one Collaborating Centre for aquatic animal diseases, providing a network of expertise in aquatic animal health. These laboratories play a key role in aquatic animal disease prevention and control through providing diagnostic services and expert advice that is particularly useful in emergency situations.

  3. OH reactivity and potential SOA yields from volatile organic compounds and other trace gases measured in controlled laboratory biomass burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. B. Gilman; C. Warneke; W. C. Kuster; P. D. Goldan; P. R. Veres; J. M. Roberts; J. A. de Gouw; I. R. Burling; R. J. Yokelson

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of instruments were used to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases (e.g., CO, CH4, NO2, etc.) emitted from controlled burns of various fuel types common to the Southeastern and Southwestern United States. These laboratory-based measurements were conducted in February 2009 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fire...

  4. The effect of a test ordering software intervention on the prescription of unnecessary laboratory tests - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carlos Manuel Silva; da Costa Teixeira, Andreia Sofia; de Azevedo, Luís Filipe Ribeiro; Sá, Luísa Maria Barbosa; Santos, Paulo Alexandre Azevedo Pereira; do Couto, Maria Luciana Gomes Domingues; da Costa Pereira, Altamiro Manuel Rodrigues; Hespanhol, Alberto Augusto Oliveira Pinto; da Costa Santos, Cristina Maria Nogueira

    2017-02-20

    The way software for electronic health records and laboratory tests ordering systems are designed may influence physicians' prescription. A randomised controlled trial was performed to measure the impact of a diagnostic and laboratory tests ordering system software modification. Participants were family physicians working and prescribing diagnostic and laboratory tests. The intervention group had a modified software with a basic shortcut menu changes, where some tests were withdrawn or added, and with the implementation of an evidence-based decision support based on United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations. This intervention group was compared with usual software (control group). The outcomes were the number of tests prescribed from those: withdrawn from the basic menu; added to the basic menu; marked with green dots (USPSTF's grade A and B); and marked with red dots (USPSTF's grade D). Comparing the monthly average number of tests prescribed before and after the software modification, from those tests that were withdrawn from the basic menu, the control group prescribed 33.8 tests per 100 consultations before and 30.8 after (p = 0075); the intervention group prescribed 31.3 before and 13.9 after (p menu, the intervention group prescribed a monthly average of 14.0 vs. 29.3 tests per 100 consultations in the control group (p menu of the diagnosis and laboratory tests ordering system had a significant impact and reduced unnecessary prescription of tests. The fact that it was not possible to perform the randomization at the family physicians' level, but only of the computer servers is a limitation of our study. Future research should assess the impact of different tests ordering systems during longer periods. ISRCTN45427977 , May 1st 2014 (retrospectively registered).

  5. Teaching Tool for a Control Systems Laboratory Using a Quadrotor as a Plant in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Subhan; Jaffery, Mujtaba Hussain; Hanif, Athar; Asif, Muhammad Rizwan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a MATLAB-based application to teach the guidance, navigation, and control concepts of a quadrotor to undergraduate students, using a graphical user interface (GUI) and 3-D animations. The Simulink quadrotor model is controlled by a proportional integral derivative controller and a linear quadratic regulator controller. The GUI…

  6. Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    resistant communications for high priority military ground, sea, and air assets. The system consists of four satellites in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit that...submarine terminals, and airborne terminals. The mission control segment controls satellites on orbit , monitors satellite health, and provides...Schriever Air Force Base (AFB). Due to the proprietary nature of the AEHF Space Satellite (on- orbit ) Segment, this segment is not considered core and the

  7. Methodologically controlled variations in laboratory and field pH measurements in waterlogged soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Matthiesen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We have tested the reliability and consistency of conventional pH measurements made on water-soil mixtures with respect to sieving, drying, ratio of water to soil, and time of shaking prior to measurement. The focus is on a waterlogged soil where the preservation potential of archaeological...... artefacts is critical. But the study includes agricultural and forest soils for comparison. At a waterlogged site, Laboratory results were compared with three different field methods: calomel pH probes inserted in the soil from pits, pH measurements of soil solution extracted from the soil, and pH profiles...... using a solid-state pH electrode pushed into the soil from the surface. Comparisons between in situ and laboratory methods revealed differences of more than 1 pH unit. The content of dissolved ions in soil solution and field observations of O2 and CO2 concentrations were used in the speciation model...

  8. The financial imperative of physicians to control demand of laboratory testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, R K J

    2012-02-01

    It is an integral component of doctor\\'s duty of care to understand the significant impact laboratory testing has on the expense an ultimate quality of healthcare patients receive, yet the costs of these tests are poorly perceived. Utilising semi-structured interviews and questionnaires, we assessed surgeon\\'s perceived costs of two commonly encountered clinical scenarios requiring out of hours laboratory testing. Of the 35 participants only 23.3% (n = 7) accurately estimated the overall cost. The most expensive test was "Type and Screen" at Euro 83, with 77.3% (n = 17) underestimating the cost. Non-consultant hospital doctors qualified for 3 years were more likely to underestimate on-call costs (p = 0.042). It is of utmost importance to improve the knowledge of all surgeons of the financial implications of investigations. Through education we can potentially reduce un-warranted costs and fulfill our duty of care in the most cost efficient manner.

  9. Design Considerations for the ORION Satellite: Structure, Propulsion and Attitude Control Subsystems for a Small, General Purpose Spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    accomplished that provides low cost access to space for many users. This chapter will outline the steps in the satelite design process ana specify...probalility of a meteoroid impact as a function of satelite cross sectional area. particle mass ’or size) and time. Figure 3-ia depicts tne rate of...18 shows the LANDSAT -D satellite configured box-like about an internal frame. Component shielding is provided by the individual equipment boxes. 2

  10. Inventory control program for laboratory equipment written in the C programming language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dishman, J.L.; Shipp, S.G.

    1986-10-01

    A property inventory package has been written in the C programming language to keep track of general laboratory equipment. All functions which would be expected for a master inventory database are available including add, delete, edit, and find. The package was developed on a Digital Equipment Corporation LSI 11/73 computer using the ULTRIX-11 operating system, and can be adapted for use on any UNIX based system, or any operating system with a C compiler.

  11. Study of satellite microminiaturization technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Hiroaki; Oomura, Katsutoshi

    1992-07-01

    The characteristics, objectives, and missions, such as those for message relaying, low orbit broadcasting, monitoring and warning, scientific observation and space environment monitoring, planet exploration, and technology development of microminiature satellites are outlined. An overview of the study of satellite microminiaturization technologies for communication, information processing, sensing for navigation and observation missions, power supply, actuators, structure and thermal control, and overall system is presented.

  12. Pre-Meal Affective State and Laboratory Test Meal Intake in Adolescent Girls with Loss of Control Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Hannallah, Louise; Field, Sara E.; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Stephens, Mark; Sbrocco, Tracy; Kozlosky, Merel; Reynolds, James; Yanovski, Jack A.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Loss of control eating confers risk for excess weight gain and exacerbated disordered eating. Affect theory proposes that loss of control eating is used to cope with negative mood states. Self-report data suggest that negative affect may contribute to the etiology of loss of control eating, but this theory has not been well-tested using laboratory paradigms. We examined associations between pre-meal affective states and intake during a laboratory test meal. One-hundred and ten adolescent girls with reported loss of control eating whose body mass index fell between the 85th and 97th percentile for age and sex completed state mood ratings prior to a test-meal. Results indicated that pre-meal state negative affect was associated with greater carbohydrate and less protein consumption, as well as greater snack and dessert and less fruit and dairy intake. All girls experienced significant decreases in negative affect from pre- to post- meal, but intake during the meal was unassociated with post-meal affect. In support of affect theory, negative affective states reported among girls with loss of control may be a driving factor for increased energy-dense food intake, which may play a role in excess weight gain. PMID:23603224

  13. Laboratory and field evaluations of two Bacillus thuringiensis formulations, Novodor and Raven, for control of cottonwood leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, D R; McMillin, J D; Krause, S C; Hart, E R

    2000-06-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine the efficacy of two Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner formulations, Novodor and Raven, for controlling cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). In laboratory bioassays, larvae or adults were added to petri dishes containing Populus x euramericana Guinier 'Eugenei' foliage that had been treated with distilled water (control) or one of the commercial Bt formulations at either high or low label rates. Survival was recorded on a 24-h basis, and leaf area consumed was measured at the conclusion of all trials. Significant differences from the control in mortality and leaf area consumption resulted in the Novodor and Raven treatments for all life stages tested; however, adults were better able to withstand the effects of B. thuringiensis toxins than were the immatures. Early- and late instar C. scripta populations were monitored in the field (1998 and 1999) after treatment with either water or various concentrations of one of the commercial Bt formulations. Significant mortality resulted with all concentrations and for all life stages tested compared with the control (tap water). The commercial formulations also were tested under plantation conditions as part of a long-term defoliation study. Both Novodor and Raven reduced cottonwood leaf beetle defoliation damage after a single application, giving high efficacy for control of cottonwood leaf beetle under the conditions and concentrations evaluated.

  14. Sensor Based Process Control (SBPC) Laboratories Directed Research and Development (LDRD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronosky, J.B.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the activities and results of an LDRD entitled Sensor Based Process Control. This research examined the needs of the plating industry for monitor and control capabilities with particular emphasis on water effluent from rinse baths. A personal computer-based monitor and control development system was used as a test bed.

  15. Small Sat Analysis Laboratory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop Small Satellite Analysis Laboratory (SatLab): A simulation-of-simulations framework to integrate component and engineering simulations into a single larger...

  16. Global telemedicine using INMARSAT satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhedkar, Dinkar; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Lambert Torres, Germano

    1990-06-01

    Departement of Electrical Engineering Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba Itajuba Minas Gerais Brazil This paper describes a " medical satellite network" for long distance diagnosis. The network proposed will be composed by mobile medical laboratories two transmission stations and a satellite system. This network will allow to link two hospitals for emergency expert medical consultations. INMARSAT satellite system is investigated and a tradeoff is made between a land based I ink and a satellitecommunication link. 1.

  17. Differences in the Gambling Behavior of Online and Non-online Student Gamblers in a Controlled Laboratory Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Kevin S; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2017-03-01

    Although research suggests that approximately 1 in 4 college students report having gambled online, few laboratory-based studies have been conducted enlisting online student gamblers. Moreover, it is unclear the extent to which differences in gambling behavior exist between online and non-online student gamblers. The current study examined if online gamblers would play more hands, commit more errors, and wager more credits than non-online student gamblers in a controlled, laboratory environment. Online (n = 19) and non-online (n = 26) student gamblers played video poker in three separate sessions and the number of hands played, errors committed, and credits wagered were recorded. Results showed that online student gamblers played more hands and committed more errors playing video poker than non-online student gamblers. The results from the current study extend previous research by suggesting that online gamblers engage in potentially more deleterious gambling behavior (e.g., playing more hands and committing more errors) than non-online gamblers. Additional research is needed to examine differences in the gambling behavior of online and non-online gamblers in a controlled, laboratory environment.

  18. A study of numerical methods of solution of the equations of motion of a controlled satellite under the influence of gravity gradient torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. F.; Mcwhorter, J. C.; Siddiqi, S. A.; Shanks, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical methods of integration of the equations of motion of a controlled satellite under the influence of gravity-gradient torque are considered. The results of computer experimentation using a number of Runge-Kutta, multi-step, and extrapolation methods for the numerical integration of this differential system are presented, and particularly efficient methods are noted. A large bibliography of numerical methods for initial value problems for ordinary differential equations is presented, and a compilation of Runge-Kutta and multistep formulas is given. Less common numerical integration techniques from the literature are noted for further consideration.

  19. A Review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guidelines for the Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Caterina M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review information regarding the current guidelines for the clinical laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease as set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to chiropractic physicians and to discuss the clinical utility of this testing. The CDC's website was reviewed to determine what their current recommendations are for the clinical laboratory testing of Lyme disease. The CDC's established guidelines recommend the use of a 2-tiered serologic testing algorithm for the evaluation of patients with suspected Lyme disease. This review provides doctors of chiropractic with information to remain current with the CDC's recommended guidelines for Lyme disease testing because patients may present to their office with the associated signs and symptoms of Lyme disease.

  20. Emphasizing interdisciplinarity of control in laboratory courses: illustration with the inverted pendulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Lottin, Jacques

    on the example of the inverted pendulum. Different aspects of control are studied throughout this paper : it is first stressed that constraints carried by engineering and industrial environment may have a significant impact when modelling a system. Then, the control structures used in this course are presented...

  1. Low Attentional Control and the Development of Intrusive Memories Following a Laboratory Stressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, Johan; de Jong, Peter J.; Wessel, Ineke

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether low attentional control set people at risk for experiencing undesirable intrusions. Participants completed measures of attentional control and neuroticism and subsequently watched an emotional film fragment. In the four days following the presentation of the fragment, half

  2. Motion Planning and Dynamic Control of the Nomad 200 Mobile Robot in a Laboratory Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Motion planning and control of a Nomad 200 mobile robot are studied in this thesis. The objective is to develop a motion planning and control...potential field algorithm is then combined with Dubin’s algorithm to incorporate orientation into motion planning . The combined algorithm is able to avoid

  3. Digital controller for the Wave Propagation Laboratory's VHF and UHF wind-profiling radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.

    1984-09-01

    Principles are described for operation of a digital system that is used to control the operations of a multiple beam stratospheric-tropospheric (ST) radar system. The digital system, referred to as the radar controller, contains the digital logic for generating the necessary pulse sequences for modulation of the radar transmitter, gating the radar's receiver channels, and sequencing the antenna beams. The radar controller also performs digital-to-analog conversion and coherent averaging of the receiver necessary for signal detection in ST radars. The radar controller is controlled internally by a Z80 microprocessor, and the entire system functions as a peripheral device to a host minicomputer. Block diagrams and detailed circuit schematics for all the custom designed electronics are included.

  4. [Action of extract and oil neem in the control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini, 1887) (Acari: Ixodidae) in laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio-Micheletti, Sônia Maria Forti; Dias, Nivia da Silva; Valente, Ellen Carine Neves; de Souza, Leilianne Alves; Lopes, Diego Olympio Peixoto; Dos Santos, Jakeline Maria

    2010-01-01

    Organic plant extracts and emulsified oil of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae) (neem) were studied to evaluate its effects in control of engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini, 1887) in the laboratory. Hexane and alcoholic organic extracts, 2% (weight/volume) were used in tests of immersion for 5 minutes, prepared with seeds, solubilized in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) to 1%. The experiment was entirely randomized, consisting of 6 treatments and 5 replicates, each represented by 5 ticks. Control groups consisted of untreated females. Based on the results of this work, we can indicate that the seed extract (hexanic fraction) and óleo emulsionável I¹ concentration to 2% have significant adjuvant potential to control the cattle tick, because, cause the mortality in the first days after the treatment and interfere in the reproduction, showing to be an alternative to acaricides normally used.

  5. Cocaine behavioral economics: from the naturalistic environment to the controlled laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Mark K; Steinmiller, Caren L

    2014-08-01

    We previously observed that behavioral economic factors predict naturalistic heroin seeking behavior that correlates with opioid seeking in the experimental laboratory. The present study sought to replicate and extend these prior findings with regular cocaine users. Participants (N=83) completed a semi-structured interview to establish income-generating and cocaine-purchasing/use repertoire during the past month. Questions addressed sources/amounts of income and expenditures; price (money and time) per purchase; and frequency/amounts of cocaine purchased and consumed. Naturalistic cocaine purchasing and use patterns were: (1) analyzed as a function of income quartile, (2) perturbed by hypothetical changes in cost factors to assess changes in purchasing/use habits, and (3) correlated with experimental cocaine seeking. Income was positively related to naturalistic cocaine seeking/use pattern (i.e., income elastic), and behaviors were cost-efficient and sensitive to supply chain. Income was unrelated to proportional expenditure on cocaine (≈55%) but inversely related to food expenditure. In all hypothetical scenarios (changes in income or dealer, loss of income assistance from government or family/friends, and increasing arrest risk when purchasing), the high-income group reported they would continue to use more cocaine daily than other groups. Number of laboratory cocaine choices significantly correlated with cocaine purchase time (positively) and purity of cocaine (negatively) in the naturalistic setting. These results replicate and extend findings with regular heroin users, demonstrate the importance of income, cost-efficiency and supply-mindedness in cocaine seeking/use, and suggest that this interview-based approach has good external validity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Laboratory Studies on Weight Control and Prevention of Metabolic Syndrome by Green Tea1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudathip, Sae-tan; Grove, Kimberly A.; Lambert, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis, Theaceace) is the second most popular beverage in the world and has been extensively studied for its putative disease preventive effects. Green tea is characterized by the presence of a high concentrations of polyphenolic compounds known as catechins, with (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) being the most abundant and most well-studied. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a complex condition that is defined by the presence of elevated waist circumference, dysglycemia, elevated blood pressure, decrease serum high density lipoprotein-associated cholesterol, and increased serum triglycerides. Studies in both in vitro and laboratory animal models have examined the preventive effects of green tea and EGCG against the symptoms of MetS. Overall, the results of these studies have been promising and demonstrate that green tea and EGCG have preventive effects in both genetic and dietary models of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Various mechanisms have been proposed based on these studies and include: modulation of dietary fat absorption and metabolism, increased glucose utilization, decreased de novo lipogenesis, enhanced vascular responsiveness, and antioxidative effects. In the present review, we discuss the current state of the science with regard to laboratory studies on green tea and MetS. We attempt to critically evaluate the available data and point out areas for future research. Although there is a considerable amount of data available, questions remain in terms of the primary mechanism(s) of action, the dose-response relationships involved, and the best way to translate the results to human intervention studies. PMID:21193040

  7. Control of the Oriental Fruit Moth, Grapholita molesta, Using Entomopathogenic Nematodes in Laboratory and Fruit Bin Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, E; Lacey, L A; Guerra, N; Headrick, H L

    2006-03-01

    The oriental fruit moth (OFM), Grapholita molesta (Busck), which is among the most important insect pests of peaches and nectarines, has developed resistance to a wide range of insecticides. We investigated the ability of the entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser), S. feltiae (Filipjev), S. riobrave (Cabanillas et al.), and Heterorhabditis marelatus (Liu and Berry) to control OFM under laboratory and fruit bin conditions. At a dosage of 10 infective juveniles (IJ)/cm(2) in the laboratory, S. carpocapsae caused 63%, S. feltiae 87.8%, S. riobrave 75.6%, and H. marelatus 67.1% OFM mortality. All four nematode species caused significant OFM larval mortality in comparison to the nontreated controls. Steinernema feltiae was used for the bin assays due to the higher OFM mortality it caused than the other tested EPN species and to its ability to find OFM under cryptic environments. Diapausing cocooned OFM larvae in miniature fruit bins were susceptible to IJ of S. feltiae in infested corner supports and cardboard strips. Treatment of bins with suspensions of 10 or 25 S. feltiae IJ/ml water with wetting agent (Silwet L77) resulted in 33.3 to 59% and 77.7 to 81.6% OFM mortality in corner supports and cardboard strips, respectively. This paper presents new information on the use of EPN, specifically S. feltiae, as nonchemical means of OFM control.

  8. A Systematic Approach to Capacity Strengthening of Laboratory Systems for Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njelesani, Janet; Dacombe, Russell; Palmer, Tanith; Smith, Helen; Koudou, Benjamin; Bockarie, Moses; Bates, Imelda

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of capacity in laboratory systems is a major barrier to achieving the aims of the London Declaration (2012) on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). To counter this, capacity strengthening initiatives have been carried out in NTD laboratories worldwide. Many of these initiatives focus on individuals' skills or institutional processes and structures ignoring the crucial interactions between the laboratory and the wider national and international context. Furthermore, rigorous methods to assess these initiatives once they have been implemented are scarce. To address these gaps we developed a set of assessment and monitoring tools that can be used to determine the capacities required and achieved by laboratory systems at the individual, organizational, and national/international levels to support the control of NTDs. Methodology and principal findings We developed a set of qualitative and quantitative assessment and monitoring tools based on published evidence on optimal laboratory capacity. We implemented the tools with laboratory managers in Ghana, Malawi, Kenya, and Sri Lanka. Using the tools enabled us to identify strengths and gaps in the laboratory systems from the following perspectives: laboratory quality benchmarked against ISO 15189 standards, the potential for the laboratories to provide support to national and regional NTD control programmes, and the laboratory's position within relevant national and international networks and collaborations. Conclusion We have developed a set of mixed methods assessment and monitoring tools based on evidence derived from the components needed to strengthen the capacity of laboratory systems to control NTDs. Our tools help to systematically assess and monitor individual, organizational, and wider system level capacity of laboratory systems for NTD control and can be applied in different country contexts. PMID:24603407

  9. A systematic approach to capacity strengthening of laboratory systems for control of neglected tropical diseases in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi and Sri Lanka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Njelesani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of capacity in laboratory systems is a major barrier to achieving the aims of the London Declaration (2012 on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs. To counter this, capacity strengthening initiatives have been carried out in NTD laboratories worldwide. Many of these initiatives focus on individuals' skills or institutional processes and structures ignoring the crucial interactions between the laboratory and the wider national and international context. Furthermore, rigorous methods to assess these initiatives once they have been implemented are scarce. To address these gaps we developed a set of assessment and monitoring tools that can be used to determine the capacities required and achieved by laboratory systems at the individual, organizational, and national/international levels to support the control of NTDs.We developed a set of qualitative and quantitative assessment and monitoring tools based on published evidence on optimal laboratory capacity. We implemented the tools with laboratory managers in Ghana, Malawi, Kenya, and Sri Lanka. Using the tools enabled us to identify strengths and gaps in the laboratory systems from the following perspectives: laboratory quality benchmarked against ISO 15189 standards, the potential for the laboratories to provide support to national and regional NTD control programmes, and the laboratory's position within relevant national and international networks and collaborations.We have developed a set of mixed methods assessment and monitoring tools based on evidence derived from the components needed to strengthen the capacity of laboratory systems to control NTDs. Our tools help to systematically assess and monitor individual, organizational, and wider system level capacity of laboratory systems for NTD control and can be applied in different country contexts.

  10. Field Programmable Gate Array Control of Power Systems in Graduate Student Laboratories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Connor, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    ...) control of power electronics. Utilizing Mathworks(trademark) and XILINX(trademark) software to interface the FPGA with power converters, students gain experience with digital design, simulation, and hardware testing...

  11. Solar satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poher, C.

    1982-01-01

    A reference system design, projected costs, and the functional concepts of a satellite solar power system (SSPS) for converting sunlight falling on solar panels of a satellite in GEO to a multi-GW beam which could be received by a rectenna on earth are outlined. Electricity transmission by microwaves has been demonstrated, and a reference design system for supplying 5 GW dc to earth was devised. The system will use either monocrystalline Si or concentrator GaAs solar cells for energy collection in GEO. Development is still needed to improve the lifespan of the cells. Currently, the cell performance degrades 50 percent in efficiency after 7-8 yr in space. Each SSPS satellite would weigh either 34,000 tons (Si) or 51,000 tons (GaAs), thereby requiring the fabrication of a heavy lift launch vehicle or a single-stage-to-orbit transport in order to minimize launch costs. Costs for the solar panels have been estimated at $500/kW using the GaAs technology, with transport costs for materials to GEO being $40/kg.

  12. Laboratory process control using natural language commands from a personal computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Herbert A.; Mackin, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    PC software is described which provides flexible natural language process control capability with an IBM PC or compatible machine. Hardware requirements include the PC, and suitable hardware interfaces to all controlled devices. Software required includes the Microsoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS) operating system, a PC-based FORTRAN-77 compiler, and user-written device drivers. Instructions for use of the software are given as well as a description of an application of the system.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, Tonopah Test Range Fire Control Bunker (Building 09-51): Photographs and Written Historical and Descriptive Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Rebecca A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Corporate Archives and History Program

    2017-08-01

    The Fire Control Bunker (Building 09-51) is a contributing element to the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) Historic District. The SNL TTR Historic District played a significant role in U.S. Cold War history in the areas of stockpile surveillance and non-nuclear field testing of nuclear weapons design. The district covers approximately 179,200 acres and illustrates Cold War development testing of nuclear weapons components and systems. This report includes historical information, architectural information, sources of information, project information, maps, blueprints, and photographs.

  14. Effectiveness of IV cannulation skills laboratory training and its transfer into clinical practice: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederike Lund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of skills laboratory training is widely recognized. Yet, the transfer of procedural skills acquired in skills laboratories into clinical practice has rarely been investigated. We conducted a prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial to evaluate, if students having trained intravenous (IV cannulation in a skills laboratory are rated as more professional regarding technical and communication skills compared to students who underwent bedside teaching when assessed objectively by independent video assessors and subjectively by patients. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 84 volunteer first-year medical students were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Three drop-outs occurred. The intervention group (IG; n = 41 trained IV cannulation in a skills laboratory receiving instruction after Peyton's 'Four-Step Approach'. The control group (CG; n = 40 received a bedside teaching session with volunteer students acting as patients. Afterwards, performance of IV cannulation of both groups in a clinical setting with students acting as patients was video-recorded. Two independent, blinded video assessors scored students' performance using binary checklists (BC and the Integrated Procedural Protocol Instrument (IPPI. Patients assessed students' performance with the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT and a modified IPPI. IG required significantly shorter time needed for the performance on a patient (IG: 595.4 SD(188.1s; CG: 692.7 SD(247.8s; 95%CI 23.5 s to 45.1 s; p = 0.049 and completed significantly more single steps of the procedure correctly (IG: 64% SD(14 for BC items; CG: 53% SD(18; 95%CI 10.25% to 11.75%; p = 0.004. IG also scored significantly better on IPPI ratings (median: IG: 3.1; CG: 3.6; p = 0.015;. Rated by patients, students' performance and patient-physician communication did not significantly differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Transfer of IV cannulation-related skills acquired in a skills

  15. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

  16. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters. Part 4, Preliminary analysis of DWPF process laboratory capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter.

  17. Study of miniature and microminiature satellite technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kazuhisa

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the study on miniaturized satellite missions for the purpose of communication, broadcasting, earth observation, space environment utilization, global positioning, lunar exploration, solar-terrestrial science observation, and astronomical observation is presented. The results from examination of documents and periodicals of technologies expected to be usable for satellite miniaturization is outlined by subsystem, such as orbit and attitude control, electric power, communication, thermal control, and other subsystems. Technical measures for upgrading heat radiation and solar battery efficiencies, and antenna gain are proposed. The results of the study of super-miniature satellite system model (low orbit data relay satellite system for earth observation satellite to process many data) are outlined.

  18. Laboratory investigations on sorbents for control and reduction of acid emissions from atmospheric fluidised bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmal, D.; Ligtvoet, A.C.P.

    1991-06-10

    One of the main problems in the combustion of solid fuels is the formation and emission of sulfur-, nitrogen-, and halogen-based acidic gaseous compounds. In the framework of the TNO (Dutch organization for applied scientific research) research program on fluidized bed combustion of coal for industrial heat and electricity generation, laboratory investigations were carried out on the physical and chemical aspects of the removal of various acidic gas emissions. Attention is paid to acidic compounds that can be converted or removed by reaction at high temperatures with appropriate solid sorbents to be added at the installation. The acids investigated are SO{sub 2}, HCl, HF, and N{sub 2}O. Relatively simple methods were developed for sulfur dioxide to decrease the quantity of limestone needed for effective removal. The investigations on hydrochloric acid were directed towards the development of methods which can be easily incorporated in existing installations if in the future removal of these compounds should be required. For nitrous oxide, some orientating investigations were performed on the reaction with calcium cyanamide. The experiments showed that it is possible to use this compound to remove nitrous oxide. 20 figs., 7 tabs., 19 refs.

  19. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  20. Controlled laboratory challenge demonstrates substantial additive genetic variation in resistance to Streptococcus iniae in Nile tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus iniae is an etiologic agent of streptococcal disease in tilapia and is one of several Streptococcus spp. that negatively impact worldwide tilapia production. Methods for the prevention and control of S. iniae include vaccines, management strategies, and antibiotics. An alternative and ...

  1. CO[subscript 2] Rebreathing: An Undergraduate Laboratory to Study the Chemical Control of Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnik, N. J.; Turcotte, S. E.; Yuen, N. Y.; Iscoe, S.; Fisher, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    The Read CO[subscript]2 rebreathing method (Read DJ. "A clinical method for assessing the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide." "Australas Ann Med" 16: 20-32, 1967) provides a simple and reproducible approach for studying the chemical control of breathing. It has been widely used since the modifications made by Duffin and…

  2. Laboratory evaluation for a potential birth control diet for fruit fly sterilization insect technique (SIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A potential fruit fly steilizing diet was evaluated on fertility, mating, survival, and protein anaylsis for fruit fly species in Hawaii. Insects were continuously fed an agar diet with lufenuron(LFN) for an initial 7d after emergence and then switched to a control diet to simulate the actual field ...

  3. Quality control of JEOL JBX-9500FSZ e-beam lithography system in a multi-user laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Johansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    designed quality control procedure characterized using a scanning electron microscope. We inspect position accuracy, dynamic focus, and dynamic astigmatism, as well as single and multi-pixel lines in thin resist. Beam shape quality is inspected in the corners of the writing field at 6 different beam......Consistent results on an electron beam lithography instrument pose a major challenge in multi-user open-access nanofabrication laboratories. Calibration can be done using special and dedicated instruments, however, this is time consuming and expensive. We address this challenge by a carefully...... currents between 2 and 60 nA. We use positive-tone resist AR-P6200 (CSAR 62) from All Resist. With our quality control procedure, we routinely write 11 nm lines on a 40 nm pitch, and obtain a field stitching accuracy better than 3 nm and overlay accuracy less than 7 nm....

  4. A Validated High-Throughput Fluorometric Method for Determination of Omeprazole in Quality Control Laboratory via Charge Transfer Sensitized Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ashraf M; Ahmed, Sameh A

    2016-03-01

    A high-throughput 96-microwell plate fluorometric method was developed and validated to determine omeprazole (OMZ) in its dosage forms. The method was based on the charge-transfer (CT) sensitized fluorescence reaction of OMZ with 2, 3-dichloro-5, 6-dicyano-1, 4-benzoquinone (DDQ). This fluorescence reaction provided a new approach for simple, sensitive and selective determinations of OMZ in pharmaceutical preparations. In the present method, the fluorescence reaction was carried out in 96-microwell plates as reaction vessels in order to increase the automation of the methodology and the efficiency of its use in quality control laboratories. All factors affecting the fluorescence reaction were carefully studied and the conditions were optimized. The stoichiometry of the fluorescence reaction between OMZ and DDQ was determined and the reaction mechanism was suggested. Under the optimum conditions, the linear range was 100-6000 ng/ml with the lowest LOD of 33 ng/ml. Analytical performance of the proposed assay, in terms of accuracy and precision, was statistically validated and the results were satisfactory; RSD was <2.6 % and the accuracy was 98.6-101.6 %. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of OMZ in its dosage forms; the recovery values were 98.26-99.60 ± 0.95-2.22 %. The developed methodology may provide a safer, automated and economic tool for the analysis of OMZ in quality control laboratories.

  5. Study of Adversarial and Defensive Components in an Experimental Machinery Control Systems Laboratory Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    survey. Most organizations operating industrial automation and control systems have moved away from proprietary operating systems , which use individual...65 x Figure 43. WireShark packet capture—PLCScan request using Function Code 43 .........65 Figure 44. WireShark packet capture—Wago PLC ...search engine created by John Matherly, to locate systems accessible from the Internet by using meta-data stored in service banners [3]. It searches

  6. Chemical Control of Loxosceles intermedia (Araneae: Sicariidae) With Pyrethroids: Field and Laboratory Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro-Silva, MA; Duque, JEL; Ramires, EN; Andrade, CFS; E. Marques-da-Silva; Marques, FA; Delay, CE; Fontana, JD; Silva, ACS; Fraguas, GM

    2010-01-01

    Bites from the recluse or brown spiders (genus Loxosceles) can cause necrotic lesions and systemic effects in humans throughout the world. In the state of Parana, Brazil, loxoscelism is considered a serious public health problem, and Loxosceles intermedia Mello-Leitao (Araneae: Sicariidae) is associated with the majority of reported accidents. In the present research we evaluated the susceptibility of L. intermedia to pyrethroid insecticides currently used for the control of spiders in both f...

  7. A laboratory driving simulation for assessment of driving behavior in adults with ADHD: a controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleardi Megan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now estimated that attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD afflicts at least 4% of adults in the United States and is associated with high levels of morbidity and functional impairment. One key area of dysfunction associated with ADHD is impaired motor vehicle operation. Our goal was to examine the association between ADHD and specific driving outcomes in a sample of adults using a driving simulator. Methods Subjects were 20 adults with full DSM-IV ADHD and 21 controls without ADHD of equal gender distribution. However, the mean age of subjects with ADHD was somewhat older. All analyses were adjusted for age and gender. All subjects participated in a driving simulation that lasted for one hour and consisted of a short training period, a high stimulus segment and a low stimulus segment with two distinct monotonous periods. Results In the second monotonous period within the low stimulus environment, ADHD subjects were significantly more likely than controls to collide with an obstacle suddenly appearing from the periphery, adjusting for age and gender. Conclusion Adults with ADHD were more likely than controls to collide with an obstacle during a driving simulation suggesting that deficits in directed attention may underlie driving impairments in this population.

  8. Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system via satellite link technology for remote and isolated photovoltaic - diesel hybrid power system in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prastawa, A.; Akhmad, K.; Safari, S.A. [Renewable Energy Technology Assessment Div., Center for Energy Conversion and Conservation Technology, Indonesian Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2003-07-01

    Recently, the indonesian Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT), has successfully installed 14 units of photovoltaic - diesel hybrid power plants located in 6 and 8 remote locations in Central Celebes Province, and South Eastern Celebes Province respectively. The hybrid system is designed for an automatic operation, yet a continue data monitoring is required to ensure a proper and successful operation. The data of diesel operation hour, inverter operation status, and energy produced by solar photovoltaic, battery status, and delivered to consumer are to be obtained for further assessment of optimizing the system operation. However due to the remoteness of location, it would not be practicable to obtain such data continuously. Therefore in this concern a remote data communication technique has to be considered to overcome the distance. This paper discusses the utilization of satellite data communication link to achieve the remote data communication objective. This paper also describes the measurement of essential system parameter, as well as the remote data communication configuration and interfacing equipment. The remote communication involves the SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) operation via a service of a commercial satellite communication provider, which provides daily data of hybrid system performance. The data is collected at local data logger, and remotely downloaded from Jakarta. As a final remarks, in this paper revealed that the application of remote SCADA for remote photovoltaic - diesel hybrid system provide a major benefit in a continuous monitoring system, responsive system troubleshooting and more importantly cost effective operation and supervisory system. (orig.)

  9. Application of Sigma Metrics Analysis for the Assessment and Modification of Quality Control Program in the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory of a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sahar; Mustansar, Tazeen

    2017-03-01

    Sigma is a metric that quantifies the performance of a process as a rate of Defects-Per-Million opportunities. In clinical laboratories, sigma metric analysis is used to assess the performance of laboratory process system. Sigma metric is also used as a quality management strategy for a laboratory process to improve the quality by addressing the errors after identification. The aim of this study is to evaluate the errors in quality control of analytical phase of laboratory system by sigma metric. For this purpose sigma metric analysis was done for analytes using the internal and external quality control as quality indicators. Results of sigma metric analysis were used to identify the gaps and need for modification in the strategy of laboratory quality control procedure. Sigma metric was calculated for quality control program of ten clinical chemistry analytes including glucose, chloride, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, albumin, direct bilirubin, total bilirubin, protein and creatinine, at two control levels. To calculate the sigma metric imprecision and bias was calculated with internal and external quality control data, respectively. The minimum acceptable performance was considered as 3 sigma. Westgard sigma rules were applied to customize the quality control procedure. Sigma level was found acceptable (≥3) for glucose (L2), cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, direct bilirubin and creatinine at both levels of control. For rest of the analytes sigma metric was found quality control procedure. In this study application of sigma rules provided us the practical solution for improved and focused design of QC procedure.

  10. Effect of Individually Tailored Biopsychosocial Workplace Interventions on Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Stress Among Laboratory Technicians: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Schraefel, M C; Sjogaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent among laboratory technicians and work-related stress may aggravate the problem. This study investigated the effect of a multifaceted worksite intervention on pain and stress among laboratory technicians with chronic musculoskeletal pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA09)--Laboratory technicians" was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov prior to participant enrolment. The study was conducted at the head division of a large private pharmaceutical company's research and development department in Denmark. The study duration was March 2014 (baseline) to July 2014 (follow-up). Participants (n = 112) were allocated to receive either physical, cognitive, and mindfulness group-based training (PCMT group) or a reference group (REF) for 10 weeks at the worksite. PCMT consisted of 4 major elements: 1) resistance training individually tailored to the pain affected area, 2) motor control training, 3) mindfulness, and 4) cognitive and behavioral therapy/education. Participants of the REF group were encouraged to follow ongoing company health initiatives. The predefined primary outcome measure was pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) in average of the regions: neck, shoulder, lower and upper back, elbow, and hand at 10 week follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was stress assessed by Cohen´s perceived stress questionnaire. In addition, an explorative dose-response analysis was performed on the adherence to PCMT with pain and stress, respectively, as outcome measures. A significant (P change in pain with the number of physical-cognitive training sessions per week (-0.60 [95%CI -0.95 to -0.25]) and the number of mindfulness sessions (0.15 [95%CI 0.02 to 0.18]). No such associations were found with

  11. Ventilation requirements for control of occupancy odor and tobacco smoke odor: laboratory studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, W.S.; Isseroff, R.; Leaderer, B.P.; Lipsitt, E.D.; Huey, R.J.; Perlman, D.; Bergland, L.G.; Dunn, J.D.

    1981-04-01

    Experiments on occupancy odor addressed the question of why required ventilation rate per occupant increased progressively with increases in the number of persons in a space. In order to investigate ventilation requirements under approximately ideal conditions, we constructed an aluminum-lined environmental chamber with excellent control over environmental conditions and a ventilation system that provided rapid and uniform mixing of air. Psychophysical experiments on occupancy odor explored 47 different combinations of occupancy density, temperature and humidity, and ventilation rate. The experiments collected judgements both from visitors, who smelled air from the chamber only once every few minutes, and from occupants, who remained in the chamber for an hour at a time. The judgements of visitors revealed that occupancy odor increased only gradually over time and rarely reached very high or objectionable levels. Judgements of occupants also revealed rather minor dissatisfaction. Only during combinations of high temperature and humidity did objectionability become more than a minor issue to either group. Experiments on cigarette smoking explored rates of 4, 8, and 16 cigarettes per hour under various environmental conditions and with ventilation rates as high as 68 cfm (34 L.s/sup -1/) per occupant. As soon as occupants lit cigarettes in the chamber, the odor level increased dramatically. At ventilation rates far greater than necessary to control occupancy odor, the odor from cigarette smoking remained quite intense. In general, the odor proved impossible to control adequately even with a ventilation rate of 68 cfm (34 L.s/sup -1/) per occupant (4 occupants) and even when only one occupant smoked at a time. As in the case of occupancy odor, a combination of high temperature and humidity exacerbated the odor problem.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Intrusion Detection System (SCADA IDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jared Verba; Michael Milvich

    2008-05-01

    Current Intrusion Detection System (IDS) technology is not suited to be widely deployed inside a Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) environment. Anomaly- and signature-based IDS technologies have developed methods to cover information technology-based networks activity and protocols effectively. However, these IDS technologies do not include the fine protocol granularity required to ensure network security inside an environment with weak protocols lacking authentication and encryption. By implementing a more specific and more intelligent packet inspection mechanism, tailored traffic flow analysis, and unique packet tampering detection, IDS technology developed specifically for SCADA environments can be deployed with confidence in detecting malicious activity.

  13. Field and Laboratory Testing of Approaches to Smart Whole-House Mechanical Ventilation Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Eric [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Fenaughty, Karen [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, Danny [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Whole-house mechanical ventilation is a critical component to a comprehensive strategy for good indoor air quality (IAQ). However, due to lack of integration with standard heating and cooling systems, and perceptions from a portion of the homebuilding industry about risks related to increased energy use, increased cost, and decreased comfort, voluntary and code-required adoption varies amongst regions. Smart ventilation controls (SVC) balance energy consumption, comfort, and IAQ by optimizing mechanical ventilation operation to reduce the heating and/or cooling loads, improve management of indoor moisture, and maintain IAQ equivalence according to ASHRAE 62.2.

  14. Field and Laboratory Testing of Approaches to Smart Whole-House Mechanical Ventilation Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Eric; Fenaughty, Karen; Parker, Danny; Lubiner, Michael : Howard, Luke

    2018-01-29

    Whole-house mechanical ventilation is a critical component to a comprehensive strategy for good indoor air quality (IAQ). However, due to lack of integration with standard heating and cooling systems, and perceptions from a portion of the homebuilding industry about risks related to increased energy use, increased cost, and decreased comfort, voluntary and code-required adoption varies among regions. Smart ventilation controls (SVC) balance energy consumption, comfort, and IAQ by optimizing mechanical ventilation operation to reduce the heating and/or cooling loads, improve management of indoor moisture, and maintain IAQ equivalence according to ASHRAE 62.2.

  15. Stable and optimal fuzzy control of a laboratory Antilock Braking System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precup, Radu-Emil; Spataru, Sergiu; Petriu, Emil M.

    2010-01-01

    of the rules using the domains of the input variables, and doing the local linearization of the plant model. The original T-S FCs are designed by parallel distributed compensation to obtain the state feedback gain matrices in the consequents of the rules. Two T-S FCs are tuned by imposing relaxed stability...... conditions to the fuzzy control systems (FCSs) and the other two T-S FCs are tuned by the linear-quadratic regulator approach applied to each rule. Linear matrix inequalities are solved to guarantee the global stability of the FCSs. Real-time experimental results validate the original T-S FCs and design...

  16. Direct experience while eating: Laboratory outcomes among individuals with eating disorders versus healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elices, Matilde; Carmona, Cristina; Narváez, Vanessa; Seto, Victoria; Martin-Blanco, Ana; Pascual, Juan C; Soriano, José; Soler, Joaquim

    2017-12-01

    To compare individuals with eating disorders (EDs) to healthy controls (HCs) to assess for differences in direct engagement in the eating process. Participants (n=58) were asked to eat an orange slice. To assess the degree of direct engagement with the eating process, participants were asked to write down 10 thoughts about the experience of eating the orange slice. Next, the participants were instructed to classify the main focus of each thought as either experiential ("direct experience") or analytical ("thinking about"). A direct experience index (DEI) was computed by dividing the number of times that participants classified an experience as a "direct experience" (the numerator) by the total number of all observations (i.e., direct experience+thinking about). Participants also completed the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) to assess mindfulness facets and decentering, respectively. Compared to controls, participants in the EDs group presented significantly lower levels of direct experience during the eating task (EDs group: mean=43.54, SD=29.64; HCs group: mean=66.17, SD=22.23, p=0.03). Participants in the EDs group also scored significantly lower on other mindfulness-related variables. These findings suggest that engagement with the direct experience of eating is lower in individuals with EDs. Future research should investigate the role of mindfulness-based interventions to address direct experience while eating in individuals with EDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced Stirling Convertor Dual Convertor Controller Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Bell, Mark E.; Dolce, James L.; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center developed a nonnuclear representation of a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) consisting of a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), Dual Convertor Controller (DCC) EMs (engineering models) 2 and 3, and associated support equipment, which were tested in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The DCC was designed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to actively control a pair of ASCs. The first phase of testing included a Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), which was developed by JHU/APL and simulates the operation and electrical behavior of a pair of ASCs in real time via a combination of hardware and software. RSIL provides insight into the electrical interactions between a representative radioisotope power generator, its associated control schemes, and realistic electric system loads. The first phase of integration testing included the following spacecraft bus configurations: capacitive, battery, and super-capacitor. A load profile, created based on data from several missions, tested the RPS's and RSIL's ability to maintain operation during load demands above and below the power provided by the RPS. The integration testing also confirmed the DCC's ability to disconnect from the spacecraft when the bus voltage dipped below 22 volts or exceeded 36 volts. Once operation was verified with the DASCS, the tests were repeated with actual operating ASCs. The goal of this integration testing was to verify operation of the DCC when connected to a spacecraft and to verify the functionality of the newly designed RSIL. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  18. Estimates of Minimum Energy Requirements for Range-Controlled Return of a Nonlifting Satellite from a Circular Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Charlie M., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Existing expressions are used to obtain the minimum propellant fraction required for return from a circular orbit as a function of vacuum trajectory range. trajectory are matched to those of the atmospheric trajectory to obtain a complete return from orbit to earth. The results are restricted by the assumptions of (1) impulsive velocity change, (2) nearly circular transfer trajectory, ( 3) spherical earth, atmosphere, and gravitational field, (4) exponential atmospheric density variation with attitude, and (5) a nonrotating atmosphere. The solutions for the parameters of the vacuum Calculations are made t o determine the effects of longitudinal and lateral range on required propeUant fraction and reentry loading for a nonrotating earth and for several orbital altitudes. the single- and two-impulse method of return is made and the results indicate a "trade off" between propellant fraction required and landing- position accuracy. A comparison of An example of a return mission from a polar orbit is discussed where the initial deorbit point is the intersection of the North Pole horizon with the satellite orbit. Some effects of a rotating earth are also considered. It is found that, for each target-orbital-plane longitudinal difference, there exists a target latitude for which the required propellant fraction is a minimum.

  19. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center: Thirty years later

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.

    1990-08-01

    The ORNL Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC) handles requests for information and data on fusion processes, maintains a comprehensive bibliographical database, and publishes recommended atomic collision data in what have been popularly called Redbooks,'' to support the fusion community's current atomic and molecular data needs. A recent improvement in the efficiency and operation of the data center has been the addition of a customized database management system implemented on a personal computer system in 1988, and a desktop publishing station in 1989. This paper will describe the present scheme for handling numerical and bibliographic data and emphasize how they facilitate the mission of the CFADC. 1 ref.

  20. Content of children's loss of control eating episodes assessed by self-report and laboratory test meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theim, Kelly R; Wilfley, Denise E; Beach, Elizabeth; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Goldschmidt, Andrea B

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric loss of control (LOC) eating heightens risk for excessive weight gain and further disordered eating. Assessment of LOC typically involves self-report interview or laboratory test meal, although no study has concurrently examined data from both methods. We gathered eating episode data via interview (Child Eating Disorder Examination; ChEDE) and a laboratory test meal, among 22 overweight girls (aged 7-12 years) reporting LOC eating. Children consumed more energy during ChEDE episodes, although ChEDE and test meal episodes did not differ in macronutrient content. Episodes' correlation for amount consumed (grams) did not reach significance, p = .076. In exploratory analyses among the seven children reporting LOC during the test meal, episodes were significantly correlated for grams consumed. Findings provide preliminary data to suggest that semi-structured interviews accurately capture children's LOC episode quantity. Episodes did not qualitatively differ, although children reported consuming more energy during self-reported episodes. Replication is warranted in larger studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Content of children's loss of control eating episodes assessed by self-report and laboratory test meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theim, Kelly R.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Beach, Elizabeth; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Goldschmidt, Andrea B.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric loss of control (LOC) eating heightens risk for excessive weight gain and further disordered eating. Assessment of LOC typically involves self-report interview or laboratory test meal, although no study has concurrently examined data from both methods. We gathered eating episode data via interview (Child Eating Disorder Examination; ChEDE) and a laboratory test meal, among 22 overweight girls (aged 7-12 years) reporting LOC eating. Children consumed more energy during ChEDE episodes, although ChEDE and test meal episodes did not differ in macronutrient content. Episodes' correlation for amount consumed (grams) did not reach significance, p=.076. In exploratory analyses among the 7 children reporting LOC during the test meal, episodes were significantly correlated for grams consumed. Findings provide preliminary data to suggest that semi-structured interviews accurately capture children's LOC episode quantity. Episodes did not qualitatively differ, although children reported consuming more energy during self-reported episodes. Replication is warranted in larger studies. PMID:24019221

  2. Revealing the control of migratory fueling: An integrated approach combining laboratory and field studies in northern wheatears Oenanthe oenanthe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz BAIRLEIN,Volker DIERSCHKE, Julia DELINGAT, Cas EIKENAAR, Ivan MAGGINI, Marc BULTE, Heiko SCHMALJOHANN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Migratory birds rely on fueling prior to migratory flights. Fueling in migrants is controlled by intrinsic as well as extrinsic factors. From captive studies we have started understanding the internal mechanisms controlling bird migration. Field studies have demonstrated the effects of external factors, such as food availability, weather, competitors, parasites or diseases, on the stopover behavior of migrants. However, an integrated approach is still missing to study coherently how the innate migration program interacts with the varying environmental cues and to estimate the contribution of the innate migration program and the environment to realized migration. The northern wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe offers a unique opportunity for integrated studies. It breeds across almost the whole Holarctic with just a “gap” between eastern Canada and Alaska. All breeding populations overwinter in sub-Saharan Africa which makes the northern wheatear one of the most long-distant migratory songbirds with extraordinary long non-stop flights across oceans. It is a nocturnal migrant which travels without parental or social aid/guidance. Thus, young birds rely entirely on endogenous mechanisms of timing, route selection and fueling on their first outbound migration. By establishing indoor housing under controlled conditions the endogenous control mechanisms of northern wheatear migration could be revealed. At the same time, environmental factors controlling fueling could be investigated in the field. On migration wheatears occur in a variety of habitats with sparse vegetation where their stopover behavior could be quantitatively studied in the light of “optimal migration” theory by the use of remote balances, radio-tagging and even experimentally manipulated food availability. The present paper summarizes our approach to understand the control of migration in northern wheatears by combining field and laboratory studies at various spatial and temporal

  3. Oscillatory brain activity related to control mechanisms during laboratory-induced reactive aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike M Krämer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior is a common reaction in humans after an interpersonal provocation, but little is known about the underlying brain mechanisms. The present study analyzed oscillatory brain activity while participants were involved in an aggressive interaction to examine the neural processes subserving the associated decision and evaluation processes. Participants were selected from a larger sample because of their high scores in trait aggressiveness. We used a competitive reaction time task that induces aggressive behavior through provocation. Each trial is separated in a decision phase, during which the punishment for the opponent is set, and an outcome phase, during which the actual punishment is applied or received. We observed provocation-related differences during the decision phase in the theta band which differed depending on participants’ aggressive behavior: High provocation was associated with an increased frontal theta response in participants refraining from retaliation, but with reduced theta power in those who got back to the opponent. Moreover, more aggressive decisions after being punished were associated with a decrease of frontal theta power. Non-aggressive and aggressive participants differed also in their outcome-related response: Being punished led to an increased frontal theta power compared to win trials in the latter only, pointing to differences in evaluation processes associated with their different behavioral reactions. The data thus support previous evidence for a role of prefrontal areas in the control of reactive aggression and extend behavioral studies on associations between aggression or violence and impaired prefrontal functions.

  4. Analysis of Satellite and Airborne Imagery for Detection of Water Hyacinth and Other Invasive Floating Macrophytes and Tracking of Aquatic Weed Control Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Waterways of the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta have recently become infested with invasive aquatic weeds such as floating water hyacinth (Eichhoria crassipes) and water primrose (Ludwigia peploides). These invasive plants cause many negative impacts, including, but not limited to: the blocking of waterways for commercial shipping and boating; clogging of irrigation screens, pumps and canals; and degradation of biological habitat through shading. Zhang et al. (1997, Ecological Applications, 7(3), 1039-1053) used NASA Landsat satellite imagery together with field calibration measurements to map physical and biological processes within marshlands of the San Francisco Bay. Live green biomass (LGB) and related variables were correlated with a simple vegetation index ratio of red and near infra-red bands from Landsat images. More recently, the percent (water area) cover of water hyacinth plotted against estimated LGB of emergent aquatic vegetation in the Delta from September 2014 Landsat imagery showed an 80 percent overall accuracy. For the past two years, we have partnered with the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Plant Sciences, University of California at Davis to conduct new validation surveys of water hyacinth and water primrose coverage and LGB in Delta waterways. A plan is underway to transfer decision support tools developed at NASA's Ames Research Center based on Landsat satellite images to improve Delta-wide integrated management of floating aquatic weeds, while reducing chemical control costs. The main end-user for this application project will be the Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) of the California Department of Parks and Recreation, who has the responsibility for chemical control of water hyacinth in the Delta.

  5. Bioactivity of Cabralea canjerana (Vell. Mart. (Meliaceae in the control of Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera, Bruchidae in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisonéia Smaniotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The bioactivity of Cabralea canjerana (Vell. Mart, a common tree species in the western region of Santa Catarina, was tested with Acanthoscelides obtectus Say (Coleptera: Bruchidae, an important insect-pest that can cause damage to bean seeds. In the experiment, 10 adult insects were put onto Petry dishes lined with filter paper, to wich where was add aliquots of crude extract, hexanic, chloroformic, ethyl acetate fractions and essential oil of Cabralea canjerana leaves, concentrated in 10%, 5% and 1%, were added. The results in the laboratory showed 100% efficiency of the crude extract (concentration 1%, followed by the hexanic fraction (concentration 1% with 84.2%. The ethyl acetate, chloroformic fractions and essential oil showed lower efficiency in the control of Acanthoscelides obtectus.

  6. Wi-Fi and Satellite-Based Location Techniques for Intelligent Agricultural Machinery Controlled by a Human Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domagoj Drenjanac

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the new agricultural scenarios, the interaction between autonomous tractors and a human operator is important when they jointly perform a task. Obtaining and exchanging accurate localization information between autonomous tractors and the human operator, working as a team, is a critical to maintaining safety, synchronization, and efficiency during the execution of a mission. An advanced localization system for both entities involved in the joint work, i.e., the autonomous tractors and the human operator, provides a basis for meeting the task requirements. In this paper, different localization techniques for a human operator and an autonomous tractor in a field environment were tested. First, we compared the localization performances of two global navigation satellite systems’ (GNSS receivers carried by the human operator: (1 an internal GNSS receiver built into a handheld device; and (2 an external DGNSS receiver with centimeter-level accuracy. To investigate autonomous tractor localization, a real-time kinematic (RTK-based localization system installed on autonomous tractor developed for agricultural applications was evaluated. Finally, a hybrid localization approach, which combines distance estimates obtained using a wireless scheme with the position of an autonomous tractor obtained using an RTK-GNSS system, is proposed. The hybrid solution is intended for user localization in unstructured environments in which the GNSS signal is obstructed. The hybrid localization approach has two components: (1 a localization algorithm based on the received signal strength indication (RSSI from the wireless environment; and (2 the acquisition of the tractor RTK coordinates when the human operator is near the tractor. In five RSSI tests, the best result achieved was an average localization error of 4 m. In tests of real-time position correction between rows, RMS error of 2.4 cm demonstrated that the passes were straight, as was desired for the

  7. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  8. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  9. Effect of extracts of plants with insecticidal activity on the control of Microtheca ochroloma Stal (Col: Chrysomelidae in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Grendene Lima

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of plants with insecticidal activity were tested on the control of Microtheca ochroloma (Col.: Chrysomelidae, an important insect-pest of Brassicaceae, in the larval and adult phases. Two 3-day-old larvae, kept under laboratory conditions (25ºC temperature, 70% relative humidity and 14 hours of photophase, were placed in a glass tube with a leaf of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis previously treated with aqueous extracts (10% p/v of chinaberry leaf (Melia azedarach, chinaberry branch, and tobacco powder (Nicotiana tabacum. The same procedure was repeated in two assays with adult insects. In the first assay, all the previously-mentioned extracts were used, in addition to DalNeem (commercial product of Azadirachta indica. In the second, the insects were exposed to extracts of tabasco pepper fruits (Capsicum frutescens, Surinam cherry (Eugenia unifl ora, jambolan (Syzygium cuminii and eucalyptus leaves (Eucalyptus sp.. All the tests consisted of 10 insects per treatment, with five repetitions in the first test using adult insects and six repetitions in the others. Observations were made daily up to the fifth day, aiming to evaluate the mortality of the insects. All the tested extracts resulted in an effective control of the larvae of M. ochroloma. In relation to the adult insects, only the extracts of tobacco powder and DalNeem showed effective control.

  10. A low-cost computer-controlled Arduino-based educational laboratory system for teaching the fundamentals of photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadou, K.; Yiasemides, K.; Trougkakos, N.

    2012-11-01

    We present a low-cost, fully computer-controlled, Arduino-based, educational laboratory (SolarInsight) to be used in undergraduate university courses concerned with electrical engineering and physics. The major goal of the system is to provide students with the necessary instrumentation, software tools and methodology in order to learn fundamental concepts of semiconductor physics by exploring the process of an experimental physics inquiry. The system runs under the Windows operating system and is composed of a data acquisition/control board, a power supply and processing boards, sensing elements, a graphical user interface and data analysis software. The data acquisition/control board is based on the Arduino open source electronics prototyping platform. The graphical user interface and communication with the Arduino are developed in C# and C++ programming languages respectively, by using IDE Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Professional, which is freely available to students. Finally, the data analysis is performed by using the open source, object-oriented framework ROOT. Currently the system supports five teaching activities, each one corresponding to an independent tab in the user interface. SolarInsight has been partially developed in the context of a diploma thesis conducted within the Technological Educational Institute of Piraeus under the co-supervision of the Physics and Electronic Computer Systems departments’ academic staff.

  11. C2 of Next-Generation Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    government Cosmos satellite and a U.S. commercial Iridium satellite. Not only does this risk of collision threaten national space capabilities, but it...in January 2013 with the passage of the FY2013 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which included a long-awaited satellite export control...architectures • Guaranteed minimum number of launches • Export control reform • Jan. 02, 2013: Passage of FY2013 NDAA • Sec. 1262, “Removal of

  12. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  13. The Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. Shown from left to right in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, the Europa images in September 1996, and the Callisto images in November 1997.Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission

  14. Laboratory evaluation of extrinsic stain removal by a specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing and control technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Venda P; Kemp, James; Panagakos, Fotinos; Mateo, Luis R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to evaluate extrinsic stain removal from teeth by a specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing and control technologies, using the Triple Clean and the Sensitive refill brush heads, in comparison to a manual flat-trim toothbrush. Twelve (12) artificially stained bovine teeth were tested with each product. The percentage of stain removed by each product was calculated by taking the ratio of the amount of stain removed by brushing for 800 strokes to the total amount of stain removed by subsequent application of a dental prophylaxis. The stain was quantified by measuring the light reflected by the stained teeth with a spectrophotometer. Data were reported as L*, lightness of the stain, and as W*, a whiteness index comprising the lightness, hue, and chroma of reflected light. Statistical analyses were performed separately for the AL* and AW* scores. Comparisons of the toothbrushes with respect to baseline-adjusted deltaL* and deltaW* scores were performed using an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Post-ANCOVA pair-wise comparisons of the study toothbrushes were performed using Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. All statistical tests of hypotheses were two-sided, and employed a minimum level of significance of 0.05. The percentage of stain removed by the sonic powered toothbrush, using either the Triple Clean brush head or the Sensitive brush head under laboratory test conditions, is superior (p brush head, 49.01 for the power toothbrush with the Sensitive brush head, and 30.56 for the manual flat-trim toothbrush when calculated using deltaL* scores. The mean percentage of stain removed was 59.89 for the power toothbrush with the Triple Clean brush head, 46.83 for the power toothbrush with the Sensitive brush head, and 29.25 for the manual flat-trim toothbrush when calculated using deltaW* scores. This new specially engineered sonic powered toothbrush with unique sensing and control technologies

  15. Geostationary Satellite (GOES) Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visible and Infrared satellite imagery taken from radiometer instruments on SMS (ATS) and GOES satellites in geostationary orbit. These satellites produced...

  16. Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Kussmaul, Michael; Casciani, Michael; Brown, Gregory; Wiser, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Future NASA missions could include establishing Lunar or Martian base camps, exploring Jupiters moons and travelling beyond where generating power from sunlight may be limited. Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) provide a dependable power source for missions where inadequate sunlight or operational requirements make other power systems impractical. Over the past decade, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting the development of RPSs. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) utilized a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC). While flight development of the ASRG has been cancelled, much of the technology and hardware continued development and testing to guide future activities. Specifically, a controller for the convertor(s) is an integral part of a Stirling-based RPS. For the ASRG design, the controller maintains stable operation of the convertors, regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified direct current output voltage for the spacecraft, synchronizes the piston motion of the two convertors in order to minimize vibration as well as manage and maintain operation with a stable piston amplitude and hot end temperature. It not only provides power to the spacecraft but also must regulate convertor operation to avoid damage to internal components and maintain safe thermal conditions after fueling. Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies has designed, developed and tested an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit (ACU) to support this effort. GRC used the ACU EDU as part of its non-nuclear representation of a RPS which also consists of a pair of Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), and associated support equipment to perform a test in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The RSIL was designed and built to evaluate hardware utilizing RPS technology. The RSIL provides insight into the electrical

  17. Bilingual Language Switching in the Laboratory versus in the Wild: The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Adaptive Language Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2017-09-13

    For a bilingual human, every utterance requires a choice about which language to use. This choice is commonly regarded as part of general executive control, engaging prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices similarly to many types of effortful task switching. However, although language control within artificial switching paradigms has been heavily studied, the neurobiology of natural switching within socially cued situations has not been characterized. Additionally, although theoretical models address how language control mechanisms adapt to the distinct demands of different interactional contexts, these predictions have not been empirically tested. We used MEG (RRID: NIFINV:nlx_inv_090918) to investigate language switching in multiple contexts ranging from completely artificial to the comprehension of a fully natural bilingual conversation recorded "in the wild." Our results showed less anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex involvement for more natural switching. In production, voluntary switching did not engage the prefrontal cortex or elicit behavioral switch costs. In comprehension, while laboratory switches recruited executive control areas, fully natural switching within a conversation only engaged auditory cortices. Multivariate pattern analyses revealed that, in production, interlocutor identity was represented in a sustained fashion throughout the different stages of language planning until speech onset. In comprehension, however, a biphasic pattern was observed: interlocutor identity was first represented at the presentation of the interlocutor and then again at the presentation of the auditory word. In all, our findings underscore the importance of ecologically valid experimental paradigms and offer the first neurophysiological characterization of language control in a range of situations simulating real life to various degrees.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Bilingualism is an inherently social phenomenon, interactional context fully determining language

  18. National continuous surveys on internal quality control for HbA1c in 306 clinical laboratories of China from 2012 to 2016: Continual improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; He, Falin; Zhong, Kun; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Zhiguo

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the quality performance of clinical laboratories in China has been greatly improved and whether Internal Quality Control (IQC) practice of HbA1c has also been changed since National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) of China organized laboratories to report IQC data for HbA1c in 2012. Internal Quality Control information of 306 External Quality Assessment (EQA) participant laboratories which kept reporting IQC data in February from 2012 to 2016 were collected by Web-based EQA system. Then percentages of laboratories meeting four different imprecision specifications for current coefficient of variations (CVs) of HbA1c measurements were calculated. Finally, we comprehensively analyzed analytical systems and IQC practice of HbA1c measurements. The current CVs of HbA1c tests have decreased significantly from 2012 to 2016. And percentages of laboratories meeting four imprecision specifications for CVs all showed the increasing tendency year by year. As for analytical system, 52.1% (159/306) laboratories changed their systems with the change in principle of assay. And many laboratories began to use cation exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (CE-HPLC) instead of Immunoturbidimetry, because CE-HPLC owed a lower intra-laboratory CVs. The data of IQC practice, such as IQC rules and frequency, also showed significant variability among years with overall tendency of meeting requirements. The imprecision performance of HbA1c tests has been improved in these 5 years with the change in IQC practice, but it is still disappointing in China. Therefore, laboratories should actively find existing problems and take action to promote performance of HbA1c measurements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical and analytical factors for hematology for mammalian and nonmammalian species, hemostasis, and crossmatching in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vap, Linda M; Harr, Kendal E; Arnold, Jill E; Freeman, Kathleen P; Getzy, Karen; Lester, Sally; Friedrichs, Kristen R

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and provides recommendations for control of preanalytical and analytical factors related to hematology for mammalian and nonmammalian species, hemostasis testing, and crossmatching and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.3 (mammalian hematology), 1.2 and 2.4 (nonmammalian hematology), 1.5 and 2.7 (hemostasis testing), and 1.6 and 2.8 (crossmatching) of the complete guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  20. Feedback error learning control of magnetic satellites using type-2 fuzzy neural networks with elliptic membership functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanesar, Mojtaba Ahmadieh; Kayacan, Erdal; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Kaynak, Okyay

    2015-04-01

    A novel type-2 fuzzy membership function (MF) in the form of an ellipse has recently been proposed in literature, the parameters of which that represent uncertainties are de-coupled from its parameters that determine the center and the support. This property has enabled the proposers to make an analytical comparison of the noise rejection capabilities of type-1 fuzzy logic systems with its type-2 counterparts. In this paper, a sliding mode control theory-based learning algorithm is proposed for an interval type-2 fuzzy logic system which benefits from elliptic type-2 fuzzy MFs. The learning is based on the feedback error learning method and not only the stability of the learning is proved but also the stability of the overall system is shown by adding an additional component to the control scheme to ensure robustness. In order to test the efficiency and efficacy of the proposed learning and the control algorithm, the trajectory tracking problem of a magnetic rigid spacecraft is studied. The simulations results show that the proposed control algorithm gives better performance results in terms of a smaller steady state error and a faster transient response as compared to conventional control algorithms.

  1. Key performance indicators score (KPIs-score) based on clinical and laboratorial parameters can establish benchmarks for internal quality control in an ART program

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Jr, Jos? G.; Petersen, Claudia G. [UNESP; Mauri, Ana L; Vagnini, Laura D; Renzi, Adriana; Petersen, Bruna; Mattila, M.C.; Comar, Vanessa A.; Ricci, Juliana; Dieamant, Felipe; Oliveira, Jo?o Batista A; Baruffi, Ricardo L.R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective KPIs have been employed for internal quality control (IQC) in ART. However, clinical KPIs (C-KPIs) such as age, AMH and number of oocytes collected are never added to laboratory KPIs (L-KPIs), such as fertilization rate and morphological quality of the embryos for analysis, even though the final endpoint is the evaluation of clinical pregnancy rates. This paper analyzed if a KPIs-score strategy with clinical and laboratorial parameters could be used to establish benchmarks for IQC i...

  2. Short communication: Laboratory approach to the use of sulphur and kaolin as preventive control against Drosophila suzukii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Guerrero, S.; Molina, J.M.

    2016-11-01

    Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931) is an invasive pest from South East Asia that was detected for the first time in Southern Europe in 2008. This species can damage a wide range of soft-skinned fruits crops affecting ripening fruits and causing important economic losses. Since the exclusive use of chemical insecticides for controlling D. suzukii may prompt the appearance of resistance and environmental pollution, alternative methods compatible with sustainable management are required. In this study, commercial formulations of powdered sulphur and kaolin were tested as a preventive method applied to blueberry fruits under laboratory conditions. In no-choice assay, powdered sulphur had a significant effect on oviposition and adult emergency with reductions of 76% and 77%, respectively. In addition, sulphur displayed a significant toxicity on males and lethal effect with over 40% adult mortality seven days after exposure. The choice assay confirmed and improved the powdered sulphur effects, with reductions of 98% and 96% in oviposition and adult emergence, respectively. In contrast, kaolin produced no significant reduction in infestation and adult mortality during no-choice and choice assays. These outcomes suggest that preventive use of powdered sulphur could be considered for sustainable control of D. suzukii in some berry crops. (Author)

  3. A multi-laboratory evaluation of a clinically-validated incurred quality control material for analysis of allergens in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Phil E; Rigby, Neil M; Dainty, Jack R; Mackie, Alan R; Immer, Ulrike U; Rogers, Adrian; Titchener, Pauline; Shoji, Masahiro; Ryan, Anne; Mata, Luis; Brown, Helen; Holzhauser, Thomas; Dumont, Valery; Wykes, Jill A; Walker, Michael; Griffin, Jon; White, Jane; Taylor, Glenn; Popping, Bert; Crevel, René; Miguel, Sonia; Lutter, Petra; Gaskin, Ferdelie; Koerner, Terry B; Clarke, Dean; Sherlock, Robin; Flanagan, Andrew; Chan, Chun-Han; Mills, E N Clare

    2014-04-01

    A dessert matrix previously used for diagnosis of food allergies was incurred with pasteurised egg white or skimmed milk powder at 3, 6, 15 and 30 mg allergen protein per kg of dessert matrix and evaluated as a quality control material for allergen analysis in a multi-laboratory trial. Analysis was performed by immunoassay using five kits each for egg and milk (based on casein) and six 'other' milk kits (five based on β-lactoglobulin and one total milk). All kits detected allergen protein at the 3 mg kg(-1) level. Based on ISO criteria only one egg kit accurately determined egg protein at 3 mg kg(-1) (p=0.62) and one milk (casein) kit accurately determined milk at 6 (p=0.54) and 15 mg kg(-1) (p=0.83), against the target value. The milk "other" kits performed least well of all the kits assessed, giving the least precise analyses. The incurred dessert material had the characteristics required for a quality control material for allergen analysis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Short communication: Laboratory approach to the use of sulphur and kaolin as preventive control against Drosophila suzukii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Pérez-Guerrero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura, 1931 is an invasive pest from South East Asia that was detected for the first time in Southern Europe in 2008. This species can damage a wide range of soft-skinned fruits crops affecting ripening fruits and causing important economic losses. Since the exclusive use of chemical insecticides for controlling D. suzukii may prompt the appearance of resistance and environmental pollution, alternative methods compatible with sustainable management are required. In this study, commercial formulations of powdered sulphur and kaolin were tested as a preventive method applied to blueberry fruits under laboratory conditions. In no-choice assay, powdered sulphur had a significant effect on oviposition and adult emergency with reductions of 76% and 77%, respectively. In addition, sulphur displayed a significant toxicity on males and lethal effect with over 40% adult mortality seven days after exposure. The choice assay confirmed and improved the powdered sulphur effects, with reductions of 98% and 96% in oviposition and adult emergence, respectively. In contrast, kaolin produced no significant reduction in infestation and adult mortality during no-choice and choice assays. These outcomes suggest that preventive use of powdered sulphur could be considered for sustainable control of D. suzukii in some berry crops.

  5. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  6. European global navigation satellite launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    The European Space Agency launched its first Galileo satellite on 28 December 2005.When fully deployed, the Galileo system will provide a European global navigation alternative to the U.S. global positioning system (GPS) and the Russian global navigation satellite system (Glonass).The Galileo system will consist of 30 satellites (27 operational plus three active spare satellites) that are scheduled to be launched and fully operational by the end of 2008.The system will provide real-time positioning within one meter of accuracy and be fully inter-operable with the U.S. and Russian systems. However, unlike GPS and Glonass, Galileo will be under civilian rather than military control.

  7. Controle químico de Anastrepha fraterculus (Wied. (Diptera: Tephritidae em laboratório Chemical control of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wied. (Diptera: Tephritidae in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Lang Scoz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O efeito de quatro novos grupos químicos de inseticidas incluindo avermectina (benzoato de emamectina, éter piretróide (etofemprox, neoniconitnóide (imidacloprid, thiacloprid e thiamethoxan e naturalyte (spinosad foram avaliados em laboratório (25 ± 3ºC, umidade relativa de 70 ± 10% e fotofase de 12 horas, visando ao controle de adultos e ovos/larvas de Anastrepha fraterculus comparando-os com os fosforados fenthion e thrichlorphon. O benzoato de emamectina não foi eficiente no controle de adultos de A. fraterculus via contato e ingestão. O etofenprox, imidacloprid, spinosad e thiamethoxan foram eficientes no controle de adultos de A. fraterculus via contato e ingestão, proporcionando maior mortalidade via ingestão. Os novos inseticidas não provocaram mortalidade significativa de ovos/larvas de A. fraterculus localizados no interior de maçãs, enquanto que os fosforados fenthion e thrichlorphon resultaram em 100% de mortalidade das fases imaturas e adultos. Os novos inseticidas apresentam potencial para uso nas iscas tóxicas, substituindo os fosforados para o controle de adultos.The South American Fruit Fly, Anastrepha fraterculus is one of the most important pest of temperate fruit crops. The effect of four new inseticide groups to replace organophosphate compounds for A. fraterculus control was evaluated under laboratory conditions (25 ± 3ºC, relative humity of 70 ± 10% and 12:12 L:D. Emamectin benzoate, etofenprox, imidacloprid, spinosad, thiacloprid and thiamethoxan were evaluated to control adults by contact and ingestion and against eggs/larvae inside apple fruits compared with fenthion and thrichlorphon. Emamectin benzoate was not efficient to control adults of A. fraterculus by contact and ingestion. Etofenprox, imidacloprid, spinosad and thiamethoxan were efficient to control adults by contact and ingestion being more toxic by ingestion. No new insecticide controlled eggs/larvae inside apple fruit while organophosphate

  8. Analysis of the 2014 “APEC Blue” in Beijing Using More than One Decade of Satellite Observations: Lessons Learned from Radical Emission Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Meng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC Economic Leaders’ Meetings in Beijing, the Chinese government made significant efforts to clear Beijing’s sky. The emission control measures were very effective and the improved air quality during the APEC Meetings was called the “APEC Blue”. To monitor and estimate how these emission control measures affected air quality in Beijing and its five neighboring large cities (Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Tangshan, Jinan, and Qingdao, we compared and analyzed the satellite-retrieved Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT products of the pre-APEC (18–31 October, APEC (1–11 November, and post-APEC periods (11–31 November in 2002–2014 and daily PM2.5 measurements of the three periods in 2014 on the ground. Compared with the pre- and post-APEC periods, both ground and satellite observations indicated significantly reduced aerosol loading during the 2014 APEC period in Beijing and its surroundings, but with apparent spatial heterogeneity. For example, the peak value of PM2.5 in Beijing were around 100 µg∙m−3 during the APEC period, however, during the pre- and post-APEC periods, the peak values were up to 290 µg∙m−3. The following temporal correlation analysis of mean AOT values between Beijing and other five cities for the past thirteen years (2002–2014 indicated that the potential emission source regions strongly impacting air quality of Beijing were confined within central and southern Hebei as well as northern and southwestern Shandong, in correspondence with the spatial pattern of Digital Earth Model (DEM of the study region. In addition to stringent emission control measures, back trajectory analysis indicated that the relatively favorable regional transport pattern might also have contributed to the “APEC Blue” in Beijing. These results suggest that the “APEC Blue” is a temporarily regional phenomenon; a long-term improvement of air quality in Beijing is still challenging

  9. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) simulator development for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation development associated with the network models of both the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures is documented. The ISIS Network Model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communications satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete event simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters, and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  10. Self-control depletion and nicotine deprivation as precipitants of smoking cessation failure: A human laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Bryan W; MacQueen, David A; Marquinez, Nicole S; MacKillop, James; Bickel, Warren K; Brandon, Thomas H

    2017-04-01

    The need to understand potential precipitants of smoking relapse is exemplified by relapse rates as high as 95%. The Self-Control Strength model, which proposes that self-control is dependent upon limited resources and susceptible to fatigue, may offer insight into relapse processes. The current study tested the hypothesis that self-control depletion (SCD), produced from engagement in emotional suppression, would serve as a novel antecedent for cessation failure, as indexed by a validated laboratory analogue of smoking lapse and relapse. We also examined whether SCD effects interacted with those of a well-established relapse precipitant (i.e., nicotine deprivation). Craving and behavioral economic indices (delay discounting and demand) were tested as hypothesized mechanisms for increased cessation failure. Ultimately, a moderated mediation model was used to test nicotine deprivation as a hypothesized moderator of SCD effects. We used a 2 × 2 (12-hr deprivation vs. no deprivation; SCD vs. no SCD) factorial between-subjects design (N = 128 smokers). The primary hypothesis of the study was supported, as SCD increased lapse behavior (p = .04). Nicotine deprivation significantly increased craving, cigarette demand, delay discounting, and lapse behavior. No main effects were found for SCD on putative mediators (i.e., craving, demand, and discounting), but the SCD and deprivation manipulations interacted upon craving (p = .04). The moderated mediation model was significant. SCD was found to increase craving among nicotine deprived smokers, which mediated effects on lapse behavior. SCD appears to play an important role in smoking relapse and may be a viable target for intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Control of Acid Generation from Pyrite Oxidation in a Highly Reactive Natural Waste: A Laboratory Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory kinetic leach column (KLC tests were carried out to define the conditions required to control acid generation from a highly reactive, potentially acid-forming (PAF iron ore waste rock. It was found that lime addition (0.1 wt % blended plus either blending of silicates (25 wt % K-feldspar and 25 wt % chlorite, or addition of a non-acid forming (NAF top cover containing about 10% dolomite (PAF:NAF = 5:1 wt %, when watered/flushed with lime-saturated water, greatly reduced acid generation as compared to the control KLC (PAF alone, watered/flushed with Milli-Q water, but did not result in circum-neutral pH as required for pyrite surface passivation and effective acid and metalliferous drainage (AMD mitigation. In contrast, the combined use of these treatments—blended lime and silicates with an NAF cover and watering/flushing with lime-saturated water—resulted in leachate pH of 12 (up to 24 weeks. Mass balance calculations for Ca2+ and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses suggest that calcite or gypsum may have formed in the NAF-amended KLCs and lime with added silicate KLC. Although the combined approach in the form trialled here may not be practical or cost-effective, control of a highly reactive natural PAF waste by pyrite surface passivation appears to be possible, and an improved treatment methodology (e.g., slightly increased lime blending without the need for further lime watering/flushing could usefully be examined in the future.

  12. A recurrent neural-network-based sensor and actuator fault detection and isolation for nonlinear systems with application to the satellite's attitude control subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, H A; Khorasani, K; Tafazoli, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a robust fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme for a general class of nonlinear systems using a neural-network-based observer strategy. Both actuator and sensor faults are considered. The nonlinear system considered is subject to both state and sensor uncertainties and disturbances. Two recurrent neural networks are employed to identify general unknown actuator and sensor faults, respectively. The neural network weights are updated according to a modified backpropagation scheme. Unlike many previous methods developed in the literature, our proposed FDI scheme does not rely on availability of full state measurements. The stability of the overall FDI scheme in presence of unknown sensor and actuator faults as well as plant and sensor noise and uncertainties is shown by using the Lyapunov's direct method. The stability analysis developed requires no restrictive assumptions on the system and/or the FDI algorithm. Magnetorquer-type actuators and magnetometer-type sensors that are commonly employed in the attitude control subsystem (ACS) of low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites for attitude determination and control are considered in our case studies. The effectiveness and capabilities of our proposed fault diagnosis strategy are demonstrated and validated through extensive simulation studies.

  13. Predictive fault-tolerant control of an all-thruster satellite in 6-DOF motion via neural network model updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, M. M.; Assadian, N.

    2018-03-01

    The problem of controlling an all-thruster spacecraft in the coupled translational-rotational motion in presence of actuators fault and/or failure is investigated in this paper. The nonlinear model predictive control approach is used because of its ability to predict the future behavior of the system. The fault/failure of the thrusters changes the mapping between the commanded forces to the thrusters and actual force/torque generated by the thruster system. Thus, the basic six degree-of-freedom kinetic equations are separated from this mapping and a set of neural networks are trained off-line to learn the kinetic equations. Then, two neural networks are attached to these trained networks in order to learn the thruster commands to force/torque mappings on-line. Different off-nominal conditions are modeled so that neural networks can detect any failure and fault, including scale factor and misalignment of thrusters. A simple model of the spacecraft relative motion is used in MPC to decrease the computational burden. However, a precise model by the means of orbit propagation including different types of perturbation is utilized to evaluate the usefulness of the proposed approach in actual conditions. The numerical simulation shows that this method can successfully control the all-thruster spacecraft with ON-OFF thrusters in different combinations of thruster fault and/or failure.

  14. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral reduction in angular displacement of the lower extremity joints and reduced reach distances and FD of the COP path on the injured limb during performance of the SEBT. PMID:25811845

  15. ASPEC: Solar power satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The solar power satellite (SPS) will provide a clean, reliable source of energy for large-scale consumption. The system will use satellites in geostationary orbits around the Earth to capture the Sun's energy. The intercepted sunlight will be converted to laser beam energy that can be transmitted to the Earth's surface. Ground systems on the Earth will convert the transmissions from space into electric power. The preliminary design for the SPS consists of one satellite in orbit around the Earth transmitting energy to a single ground station. The SPS design uses multilayer solar cell technology arranged on a 20 km squared planar array to intercept sunlight and convert it to an electric voltage. Power conditioning devices then send the electricity to a laser, which transmits the power to the surface of the Earth. A ground station will convert the beam into electricity. Typically, a single SPS will supply 5 GW of power to the ground station. Due to the large mass of the SPS, about 41 million kg, construction in space is needed in order to keep the structural mass low. The orbit configuration for this design is to operate a single satellite in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The GEO allows the system to be positioned above a single receiving station and remain in sunlight 99 percent of the time. Construction will take place in low Earth orbit (LEO); array sections, 20 in total, will be sailed on solar wind out to the GEO location in 150 days. These individual transportation sections are referred to as solar sailing array panels (SSAP's). The primary truss elements used to support the array are composed of composite tubular members in a pentahedral arrangement. Smart segments consisting of passive and active damping devices will increase the control of dynamic SPS modes.

  16. Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural dynamic testing is performed to verify the survivability of a component or assembly when exposed to vibration stress screening, or a controlled simulation...

  17. Ionospheric tomography using the FORTE satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining ionospheric profile data via tomographic techniques has elicited considerable interest in recent years. The input data for the method is a set of total electron content measurements along intersecting lines of sight which form a grid. This can conveniently be provided by a fast-moving satellite with a VHF beacon which will generate the multiple paths needed for effective tomography. Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories will launch and operate the FORTE satellite for the US Department of Energy, with launch scheduled in 1995. FORTE will provide such a beacon. Additionally, wideband VHF receivers aboard the satellite will allow corraborative measurements of ionospheric profile parameters in some cases.

  18. Satellite system considerations for computer data transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. L.; Kaul, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Communications satellites will play a key role in the transmission of computer generated data through nationwide networks. This paper examines critical aspects of satellite system design as they relate to the computer data transfer task. In addition, it discusses the factors influencing the choice of error control technique, modulation scheme, multiple-access mode, and satellite beam configuration based on an evaluation of system requirements for a broad range of application areas including telemetry, terminal dialog, and bulk data transmission.

  19. Efficiency of vegetable extracts for the control of Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, in the laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Roberto de Mello Garcia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vulgarly known as “vaquinha”, Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 spread itself to the majority of Brazilian states, and it became distinguished as one of the most serious pests affecting beans and maize. The aim of this study was to evaluate the insecticidal activity of the crude watery extracts of nine vegetable species on “vaquinha” adults. The laboratory experiment was carried out in completely randomized delineation, with ten treatments and four repetitions. For such, a bottle was used, containing five insect specimens and a common bean leaf (Phaseolus vulgaris Linnaeus previously immersed in the extract, covered with a clipping of porous cloth and fixed by a rubber band. The evaluated variable was the number of surviving D. speciosa specimens. The treatments consisted of salvia (Salvia officinalis Linnaeus, cravo (Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb, moscada nut (Myristica fragans Houtt, cinamomo (Melia azedarach Linnaeus, timbo (Ateleia glazioveana Baill, eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora Hook, cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume, figueira (Ficus microcarpa Linnaeus f., rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis Linnaeus and control (distilled water alone. The evaluations of survival were carried out every 24 hours over a period of 10 days. For the live specimen number, two-way analysis of variance (10 extracts x 11 times after application was used. The averages were grouped by the Duncan test on the level of 5% of probability. The most efficient extracts were timbo, moscada nut and cinamomo, with efficiency percentages varying between 80.4% and 100%.

  20. Interactive Effects of Trait Self-Control and Stress Appraisals on Blood Pressure Responses to a Laboratory Stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daryl B; Wilson, Antonia E; Lawton, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Stress may play a role in explaining part of the conscientiousness-longevity relationship. Conscientiousness (C) is associated with the appraisals of stressors and its lower-order facets have been shown to differentially moderate the experience of stress in daily life. This study investigated whether the lower-order facet, self-control (SC), moderated the relationship between stress appraisals and blood pressure responses to a laboratory stressor. Ninety participants (selected from the upper and lower quartiles for C scores from a sample of 679 participants) were invited to complete the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were assessed throughout the stress task. Stress appraisals were assessed at baseline. Blood pressure responses to the MAST were similar in participants who scored high and low in SC. However, primary appraisals were negatively associated with BP reactivity and recovery in the high SC group but not in the low SC group. Moreover, SC was found to moderate the relationship between primary appraisals and SBP and DBP reactivity values, such that higher primary appraisals were associated with lower BP reactivity in individuals high in SC but not in those low in SC. In addition, lower SBP recovery values were observed in the high SC group compared to their low SC counterparts. These findings indicate that SC may influence health status by modifying the relationship between perceived demands and blood pressure. Moreover, having a greater stake in stressors may yield health benefits in the longer term for individuals high in SC.

  1. Trunk muscle activation levels during eight stabilization exercises used in the functional kinetics concept: A controlled laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsak, Brian; Wunsch, Rüdiger; Bernhart, Philipp; Gorgas, Anna-Maria; Bichler, Romana; Lampel, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    To ensure accurate implementation of stabilization exercises in rehabilitation, physical therapists need to understand the muscle activation patterns of prescribed exercise. Compare muscle activity during eight trunk and lumbar spine stabilization exercises of the Functional Kinetics concept by Klein-Vogelbach. A controlled laboratory study with a single-group repeated-measures design was utilized to analyze surface electromyographic intensities of 14 female and 6 male young healthy participants performing eight exercises. Data were captured from the rectus abdominis, external/internal oblique and lumbar paraspinalis. The normalized muscle activation levels (maximum voluntary isometric contraction, MVIC) for three repetitions during each exercise and muscle were analyzed. Side bridging (28 ± 20%MVIC) and advanced planking (29 ± 20%MVIC) reached the highest activity in the rectus abdominis. For external and internal oblique muscles, side bridging also showed the greatest activity of 99 ± 36%MVIC and 52 ± 25%MVIC, respectively. Apart from side bridging (52 ± 14%MVIC), the supine roll-out (31 ± 12%MVIC) and prone roll-out (31 ± 9%MVIC) showed the greatest activity for the paraspinalis. The advanced quadruped, seated back extension and flexion on chair/Swiss Ball, prone roll-out and advanced one-leg back bridging only yielded negligible muscle activities for the rectus abdominis (< 5%MVIC). Based on the data obtained, recommendations for selective trunk muscle activation during eight stabilization exercises were established, which will guide physical therapists in the development of exercises tailored to the needs of their patients.

  2. Gaseous elemental mercury emissions and CO(2) respiration rates in terrestrial soils under controlled aerobic and anaerobic laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Daniel; Faïn, Xavier; Berger, Carsen

    2010-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) levels in terrestrial soils are linked to the presence of organic carbon (C). Carbon pools are highly dynamic and subject to mineralization processes, but little is known about the fate of Hg during decomposition. This study evaluated relationships between gaseous Hg emissions from soils and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) respiration under controlled laboratory conditions to assess potential losses of Hg to the atmosphere during C mineralization. Results showed a linear correlation (r(2)=0.49) between Hg and CO(2) emissions in 41 soil samples, an effect unlikely to be caused by temperature, radiation, different Hg contents, or soil moisture. Stoichiometric comparisons of Hg/C ratios of emissions and underlying soil substrates suggest that 3% of soil Hg was subject to evasion. Even minute emissions of Hg upon mineralization, however, may be important on a global scale given the large Hg pools sequestered in terrestrial soils and C stocks. We induced changes in CO(2) respiration rates and observed Hg flux responses, including inducement of anaerobic conditions by changing chamber air supply from N(2)/O(2) (80% and 20%, respectively) to pure N(2). Unexpectedly, Hg emissions almost quadrupled after O(2) deprivation while oxidative mineralization (i.e., CO(2) emissions) was greatly reduced. This Hg flux response to anaerobic conditions was lacking when repeated with sterilized soils, possibly due to involvement of microbial reduction of Hg(2+) by anaerobes or indirect abiotic effects such as alterations in soil redox conditions. This study provides experimental evidence that Hg volatilization, and possibly Hg(2+) reduction, is related to O(2) availability in soils from two Sierra Nevada forests. If this result is confirmed in soils from other areas, the implication is that Hg volatilization from terrestrial soils is partially controlled by soil aeration and that low soil O(2) levels and possibly low soil redox potentials lead to increased Hg volatilization from

  3. Evaluation of laboratory-scale in situ capping sediments with purple parent rock to control the eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuejiao; Shi, Wenhao; Ni, Jiupai; Li, Zhenlun

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of controlling the eutrophication using purple parent rock to cap the sediments was evaluated in the laboratory scale. Sediments were collected from Sanxikou reservoir (China) in July 2013. Then, three types of purple parent rock (T 1 f, J 3 p, and J 2 s) which are distributed widely in southwest China were used to cap the sediments. Limestone and calcite were used as the contrast group, because they had been reported as effective controls on eutrophication. Then, they were incubated at 20 °C for 46 days. The results indicated that the application of purple parent rock as a barrier material can effectively inhibit the release of nutrient elements in sediments, and the inhibition rates of total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), ammonium (NH 4 -N), and nitrate (NO 3 -N) were much better than that of limestone and calcite. Among the three types of purple parent rock, J 3 p exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the release of nitrogen in sediments, and the inhibition efficiency of TN, NH 4 -N, and NO 3 -N was 59.7, 77.6, and 45.1%, respectively. As for T 1 f, it exhibited the best inhibitory effect on the release of TP in sediments with the inhibition rate of 94.4%. Whereas all these capping materials showed weak inhibition on release of organic matter in sediments, and the inhibition efficiencies were less than 20%. Moreover, these treatments could also cause distinct changes in the microbial community in sediments and overlying water, and the contents of TN and TP in all capping materials increased. All results demonstrated that purple parent rock could inhibit the release of nutrient in sediments through mechanical interception, physical adsorption, and chemical absorption as well as changing the microbial activity in the covering layer, sediments, or overlying water.

  4. Laboratory and field evaluation of entomopathogenic fungi for the control of amitraz-resistant and susceptible strains of Rhipicephalus decoloratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murigu, Mercy M; Nana, Paulin; Waruiru, Robert M; Nga'nga', Chege J; Ekesi, Sunday; Maniania, Nguya K

    2016-07-30

    Rhipicephalus decoloratus causes serious economic losses in cattle industry every year in East Africa. Biological control using entomopathogenic fungi is seen as a promising alternative to chemical acaricides being used for their control. The pathogenicity of Metarhizium anisopliae and of Beauveria bassiana isolates was tested in the laboratory against amitraz-resistant and amitraz-susceptible strains of R. decoloratus. Unfed larvae were sprayed with conidial suspensions of 1×10(9) conidia ml(-1). Fungal isolates were pathogenic to R. decoloratus larvae, causing mortality of between 10.0 and 100% and between 12.1 and 100% of amitraz-susceptible and amitraz-resistant strains, respectively. The LT50 values of selected fungal isolates varied between 2.6-4.2days in amitraz-susceptible strain and between 2.8-3.9days in amitraz-resistant strain. The LC50 values varied between 0.4±0.1 and 200.0±60×10(3) conidia ml(-1) and between 0.1±0.1 and 200.0±31.0×10(3) conidia ml(-1) in amitraz-susceptible and amitraz-resistant strains, respectively. Metarhizium anisopliae isolate ICIPE 7 outperformed the other isolates and was selected for compatibility study with amitraz and field trial. ICIPE 7 was compatible with amitraz. In the field, four treatments including control, ICIPE 7 alone, amitraz alone and ICIPE 7/amitraz were applied on cattle. All the treatments significantly reduced the number of ticks on all the sampling dates: day 7 (F3,8=3.917; P=0.0284), day 14 (F3,8=9.090; P=0.0275), day 21 (F3,8=37.971; P=0.0001) and day 28 (F3,8=8.170; P=0.0016) compared to the control. Results of the present study indicate that ICIPE 7 can be used for the management of amitraz-resistant strain of R. decoloratus. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Trends in communications satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Curtin, Denis J

    1979-01-01

    Trends in Communications Satellites offers a comprehensive look at trends and advances in satellite communications, including experimental ones such as NASA satellites and those jointly developed by France and Germany. The economic aspects of communications satellites are also examined. This book consists of 16 chapters and begins with a discussion on the fundamentals of electrical communications and their application to space communications, including spacecraft, earth stations, and orbit and wavelength utilization. The next section demonstrates how successful commercial satellite communicati

  6. The impact of laboratory characteristics on molecular detection of respiratory syncytial virus in a European multicentre quality control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerhoff, T. J.; MacKay, W. G.; Meijer, A.; Paget, W. J.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Kimpen, J. L. L.; Schellevis, F.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for detecting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was evaluated in 25 laboratories across Europe by an external quality assessment study. In addition, factors related to the diagnostic performance of laboratories were explored. The results of

  7. The impact of laboratory characteristics on molecular detection of respiratory syncytial virus in a European multicentre quality control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerhoff, T.J.; MacKay, W.G.; Meijer, A.; Paget, W.J.; Niesters, H.G.M.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; Schellevis, F.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for detecting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was evaluated in 25 laboratories across Europe by an external quality assessment study. In addition, factors related to the diagnostic performance of laboratories were explored. The results of

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of the Control of Microbial Fouling by Laboratory and Pilot-Scale Air-Stripping Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    mannitol mineral salts agar , starch agar (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI), nitrate broth (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI), Gram stain reagents...were lactose broth to test for coliforms, mannitol mineral salts1 3 agar to test 14 for azotobacter, starch agar , nitrate broth, nitrate reduction...nitrate reduction, no growth on mannitol mineral salts medium. Bacillus: Gram positive rods, central spore, motile, catalase positive. Azotobacter

  9. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  10. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  11. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  12. Laboratory controlled quantitative information about reduction in air pollution using the "Basa njengo Magogo" methodology and applicability to low-smoke fuels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Lukas J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available an experiment under controlled laboratory conditions to gather quantitative data on the reduction in particulate emissions associated with the Basa njengo Magogo method of lighting coal fires. CSIR was further contracted to assess whether the Basa njengo Magogo...

  13. A SIMPLE METHOD TO CONTROL THE MOISTURE CONTENT OF THE FERMENTING MEDIUM DURING LABORATORY-SCALE SOLID-STATE FERMENTATION EXPERIMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Borzani, W.; SALOMÃO,G. L.; Martins, J.C.; Alonso, V.

    1999-01-01

    When the moisture content of the fermenting medium significantly decreases during laboratory-scale solid-state fermentation tests, the quantity of water to be periodically added to the medium in order to control its moisture content may be evaluated from the water evaporation rate of the non-inoculated medium.

  14. A SIMPLE METHOD TO CONTROL THE MOISTURE CONTENT OF THE FERMENTING MEDIUM DURING LABORATORY-SCALE SOLID-STATE FERMENTATION EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. BORZANI

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available When the moisture content of the fermenting medium significantly decreases during laboratory-scale solid-state fermentation tests, the quantity of water to be periodically added to the medium in order to control its moisture content may be evaluated from the water evaporation rate of the non-inoculated medium.

  15. Satellite-based laser windsounder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.F.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Quick, C.R. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project`s primary objective is to determine the technical feasibility of using satellite-based laser wind sensing systems for detailed study of winds, aerosols, and particulates around and downstream of suspected proliferation facilities. Extensive interactions with the relevant operational organization resulted in enthusiastic support and useful guidance with respect to measurement requirements and priorities. Four candidate wind sensing techniques were evaluated, and the incoherent Doppler technique was selected. A small satellite concept design study was completed to identify the technical issues inherent in a proof-of-concept small satellite mission. Use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer instead of a Fabry-Perot would significantly simplify the optical train and could reduce weight, and possibly power, requirements with no loss of performance. A breadboard Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based system has been built to verify these predictions. Detailed plans were made for resolving other issues through construction and testing of a ground-based lidar system in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin, and through numerical lidar wind data assimilation studies.

  16. In-Space Internet-Based Communications for Space Science Platforms Using Commercial Satellite Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Fabian, Theodore P.; Griner, James H.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Richard, Alan M.

    1999-01-01

    The continuing technological advances in satellite communications and global networking have resulted in commercial systems that now can potentially provide capabilities for communications with space-based science platforms. This reduces the need for expensive government owned communications infrastructures to support space science missions while simultaneously making available better service to the end users. An interactive, high data rate Internet type connection through commercial space communications networks would enable authorized researchers anywhere to control space-based experiments in near real time and obtain experimental results immediately. A space based communications network architecture consisting of satellite constellations connecting orbiting space science platforms to ground users can be developed to provide this service. The unresolved technical issues presented by this scenario are the subject of research at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Assessment of network architectures, identification of required new or improved technologies, and investigation of data communications protocols are being performed through testbed and satellite experiments and laboratory simulations.

  17. Intra-laboratory quality control for chicken raw materials - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.12657

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Giron

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, food and water laboratories have aimed to improve their processes to meet market demands. In order to contribute to the efficacy and development of these processes, new methods must be sought, among which is intra-laboratory quality control. This research study portrays the use of this method in a food and water laboratory, in order to analyze the intra-laboratory statistical control of chicken raw materials. To that end, the methodology applied was: Exploratory data analysis; Cochran’s test, to assess the homogeneity of variances; Dixon’s Test, to verify whether the means are part of the same distribution; calculation of repeatability and reproducibility; calculation of the uncertainty of the mean; Snedecor’s F method, to compare the variances; and Dixon’s test, to compare laboratory variances. The analysis parameter analyzed in the studied raw material was the proficiency of technicians with regard to the accuracy of analyses of total coliform count in the raw materials prior to chilling. The final results showed low data variation around the mean, as well as significant reliability of the obtained results.  

  18. Handbook of satellite applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott; Camacho-Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of this ground breaking reference work was the most comprehensive reference source available about the key aspects of the satellite applications field. This updated second edition covers the technology, the markets, applications and regulations related to satellite telecommunications, broadcasting and networking—including civilian and military systems; precise satellite navigation and timing networks (i.e. GPS and others); remote sensing and meteorological satellite systems. Created under the auspices of the International Space University based in France, this brand new edition is now expanded to cover new innovative small satellite constellations, new commercial launching systems, innovation in military application satellites and their acquisition, updated appendices, a useful glossary and more.

  19. Satellite orbit predictor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  20. CSI flight experiment projects of the Naval Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shalom

    1993-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is involved in an active program of CSI flight experiments. The first CSI flight experiment of the Naval Research Laboratory, the Low Power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) dynamics experiment, has successfully measured vibrations of an orbiting satellite with a ground-based laser radar. The observations, made on January 7, 8 and 10, 1991, represent the first ever measurements of this type. In the tests, a narrowband heterodyne CO2 laser radar, operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, detected vibration induced differential-Doppler signatures of the LACE satellite. Power spectral densities of forced oscillations and modal frequencies and damping rates of free-damped vibrations were obtained and compared with finite element structural models of the LACE system. Another manifested flight experiment is the Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX) designed to demonstrate active and passive damping with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors and actuators. This experiment was developed under the management of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory with integration of the experiment at NRL. It is to ride as a secondary, or 'piggyback,' experiment on a future Navy satellite.

  1. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  2. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  3. Satellite Tags- Hawaii EEZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite tagging was implemented in 2013. Satellite tagging is conducted using a Dan Inject air rifle and deployment arrows designed by Wildlife Computers. Two...

  4. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Studies of factors that affect and controls the Excavation Damaged/Disturbed Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin; Baeckstroem, Ann; Quanhong Feng (AaF - Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Berglund, Johan (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Johansson, Malin; Mas Ivars, Diego (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden)); Olsson, Mats (SweBefo, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    A tunnel was developed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in 2003 purposely for a large in-situ rock mechanics experiment, the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE). The tunnel had a large height/width ratio with a circular floor, primarily to control the stress situation around the tunnel and concentrate the stresses under the floor. An extensive set of data for understanding the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) was collected within section 47 of the tunnel. It consist of the blast design, blast sequences, convergence measurements during excavation, geological mapping of tunnel and cores, 3D-laser scanning of the tunnel geometry etc. Furthermore, in 2006, ultrasonic measurements along eight boreholes were carried out in order to estimate the extent of the EDZ in the tunnel. The collection of all these different information provides an opportunity to evaluate the mechanical damages caused by the excavation work. The overall aim with this project is to give feed-back to future planning of tunnelling on issues of importance for requirements with respect to minimising the EDZ in crystalline rock from the drill and blast method. A combination of the mapped geological features (tunnel and cores) and the geometry of the blasted tunnel obtained from the 3D-laser scanning were used to build a 3D model of the geology with emphasis on the geometry of the natural fractures. The rock mechanic response to the tunnelling was evaluated in a numerical model including the as-built geometry in combination with the 3D model of the geology. The modelling of the rock mechanical processes of importance for the EDZ could be calibrated against actual measurements. From observed changes in the ultrasonic wave velocity along the boreholes it was found that the locations of the velocity changes corresponded well with the location of the mapped fractures in the drill cores. This indicates that EDZ can be detected using the ultrasonic method with high accuracy. Furthermore, the

  5. Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, D.; Hiser, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's (NPS) Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG) is designing and developing a small communications satellite for launch aboard the shuttle as a complex autonomous payload (CAP). The objectives of PANSAT are three-fold. First, PANSAT will provide an ideal educational tool for the officer students at NPS supporting Space Systems Engineering and Space Systems Operations with hands-on hardware development. Second, the satellite will provide digital store-and-forward communications, or packet radio, for the amateur radio community. The third objective is to provide a low-cost, space-based platform for small experiments. PANSAT will be launched from the shuttle at a nominal altitude of 200 n.m. and an inclination of at least 37 degrees. The satellite weight is 150 lbs. Since there is no attitude control, eight dipole whip antennas will be used to provide isotropic ground coverage for communications. FM digital communications will be used with up-link and down-link on a single frequency in the amateur band of 437.25 MHz. A maximum 50 kHz of bandwidth is envisioned for the satellite. The expected lifetime of the satellite is 1 1/2 to 2 years before atmospheric reentry. The PANSAT design consists of the following: communications subsystem (COMM); computer, or data processor and sequencer (DP&S); power subsystem; structure subsystem; and experiment payload.

  6. In vivo efficacy of the anthelmintic tribendimidine against the cestode Hymenolepis microstoma in a controlled laboratory trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulke, Daniel; Krücken, Jürgen; Welz, Claudia; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Harder, Achim

    2012-08-01

    Tribendimidine has been registered for the treatment of human soil transmitted helminthiases in China. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans it is an agonist of L-subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and therefore shares its mode of action with levamisole and pyrantel. Besides its broad spectrum of nematicidal efficacy, tribendimidine is efficacious against several trematodes and has been attributed to have anti-cestodal effects. However, there are few published data available for the latter. The efficacy of tribendimidine and its nematicidal metabolite deacylated amidantel against Hymenolepis microstoma were examined for their anti-cestodal potential. Doses of 50 and 100mg/kg body weight deacylated amidantel and 10, 25, 50, and 100mg/kg tribendimidine were administered orally on three consecutive days to mice experimentally infected with eight cysticercoids. Necropsy was performed and the worm burdens were determined one day after the last treatment. Furthermore, levamisole was used in combination with tribendimidine (100mg/kg levamisole plus 10 and 25mg/kg tribendimidine, respectively) and alone (50 and 100mg/kg) to investigate any possible interactions of the partner compounds against cestodes. Tribendimidine showed a very high efficacy at dosages of 50mg/kg or higher. Surprisingly, deacylated amidantel led to no reduction of the worm burden in any of the treatments. Combinations of levamisole with tribendimidine did not augment the effects of tribendimidine alone and as expected levamisole alone also showed no anti-cestodal activity. To our knowledge, this study shows for the first time activity of tribendimidine against a cestode in a controlled laboratory study. Due to the excellent cure rates observed here, multiple tribendimidine treatments might be considered as useful scheme for treatments of cestode, nematode and trematode infections although this would significantly increase both costs and management efforts. Moreover, the differences

  7. A statistical rain attenuation prediction model with application to the advanced communication technology satellite project. 3: A stochastic rain fade control algorithm for satellite link power via non linear Markow filtering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic and composite nature of propagation impairments that are incurred on Earth-space communications links at frequencies in and above 30/20 GHz Ka band, i.e., rain attenuation, cloud and/or clear air scintillation, etc., combined with the need to counter such degradations after the small link margins have been exceeded, necessitate the use of dynamic statistical identification and prediction processing of the fading signal in order to optimally estimate and predict the levels of each of the deleterious attenuation components. Such requirements are being met in NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project by the implementation of optimal processing schemes derived through the use of the Rain Attenuation Prediction Model and nonlinear Markov filtering theory.

  8. Issues in Satellite Packet Video Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    i.o . .. . . _ _: .. ,: -t - .. . ..:’, • ... . . . ... . . . j.. - . ". 4 ISSUES IN SATELLITE PACKET VIDEO COMMUNICATIO \\ For the transmitter: 1. Get...No. 4469. Ma. 1981. 4. Forgie. James W., ST- A Proposed Internet Stream Protocol, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory, IEN 119, September 1979. 5. Jam. A. K

  9. NOAA Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry Sea Level Rise Products: Global and regional sea level time series and trend maps for the major ocean basins and marginal seas, based on measurements from satellite radar altimeters, from 1992-12-17 to 2017-08-11 (NCEI Accession 0125535)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains global and regional mean sea level time series and trend maps calculated on a continual basis since December 1992 by Laboratory for...

  10. Use of prior manufacturer specifications with Bayesian logic eludes preliminary phase issues in quality control: an example in a hemostasis laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiamyrtzis, Panagiotis; Sobas, Frédéric; Négrier, Claude

    2015-07-01

    The present study seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of avoiding the preliminary phase, which is mandatory in all conventional approaches for internal quality control (IQC) management. Apart from savings on the resources consumed by the preliminary phase, the alternative approach described here is able to detect any analytic problems during the startup and provide a foundation for subsequent conventional assessment. A new dynamically updated predictive control chart (PCC) is used. Being Bayesian in concept, it utilizes available prior information. The manufacturer's prior quality control target value, the manufacturer's maximum acceptable interassay coefficient of variation value and the interassay standard deviation value defined during method validation in each laboratory, allow online IQC management. An Excel template, downloadable from journal website, allows easy implementation of this alternative approach in any laboratory. In the practical case of prothrombin percentage measurement, PCC gave no false alarms with respect to the 1ks rule (with same 5% false-alarm probability on a single control sample) during an overlap phase between two IQC batches. Moreover, PCCs were as effective as the 1ks rule in detecting increases in both random and systematic error after the minimal preliminary phase required by medical biology guidelines. PCCs can improve efficiency in medical biology laboratories.

  11. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  12. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  13. Quality assurance and quality control in light stable isotope laboratories: A case study of Rio Grande, Texas, water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2009-01-01

    New isotope laboratories can achieve the goal of reporting the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty for the same material analysed decades apart by (1) writing their own acceptance testing procedures and putting them into their mass spectrometric or laser-based isotope-ratio equipment procurement contract, (2) requiring a manufacturer to demonstrate acceptable performance using all sample ports provided with the instrumentation, (3) for each medium to be analysed, prepare two local reference materials substantially different in isotopic composition to encompass the range in isotopic composition expected in the laboratory and calibrated them with isotopic reference materials available from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (4) using the optimum storage containers (for water samples, sealing in glass ampoules that are sterilised after sealing is satisfactory), (5) interspersing among sample unknowns local laboratory isotopic reference materials daily (internationally distributed isotopic reference materials can be ordered at three-year intervals, and can be used for elemental analyser analyses and other analyses that consume less than 1 mg of material) - this process applies to H, C, N, O, and S isotope ratios, (6) calculating isotopic compositions of unknowns by normalising isotopic data to that of local reference materials, which have been calibrated to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials, (7) reporting results on scales normalised to internationally distributed isotopic reference materials (where they are available) and providing to sample submitters the isotopic compositions of internationally distributed isotopic reference materials of the same substance had they been analysed with unknowns, (8) providing an audit trail in the laboratory for analytical results - this trail commonly will be in electronic format and might include a laboratory

  14. COMMERCIALLY ORIENTED CLINICAL LABORATORIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHAPMAN, W M

    1964-04-01

    Out-of-state flat-rate mail order contract laboratories operating from states which have little or no legal control over them can do business in California without obedience to regulations that govern laboratories located within the state. The flat-rate contract principle under which some out-of-state laboratories operate is illegal in California. The use of such laboratories increases physician liability. Legislation for the control of these laboratories is difficult to construct, and laws which might result would be awkward to administer. The best remedy is for California physicians not to use an out-of-state laboratory offering contracts or conditions that it could not legally offer if it were located in California.

  15. Theory of geostationary satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Zee, Chong-Hung

    1989-01-01

    Geostationary or equatorial synchronous satellites are a daily reminder of our space efforts during the past two decades. The nightly television satellite weather picture, the intercontinental telecommunications of television transmissions and telephone conversations, and the establishrnent of educational programs in remote regions on Earth are constant reminders of the presence of these satellites. As used here, the term 'geo­ stationary' must be taken loosely because, in the long run, the satellites will not remain 'stationary' with respect to an Earth-fixed reference frame. This results from the fact that these satellites, as is true for all satellites, are incessantly subject to perturbations other than the central-body attraction of the Earth. Among the more predominant pertur­ bations are: the ellipticity of the Earth's equator, the Sun and Moon, and solar radiation pressure. Higher harmonics of the Earth's potential and tidal effects also influence satellite motion, but they are of second­ order whe...

  16. Meteorological satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Su-Yin

    2014-01-01

    “Meteorological Satellite Systems” is a primer on weather satellites and their Earth applications. This book reviews historic developments and recent technological advancements in GEO and polar orbiting meteorological satellites. It explores the evolution of these remote sensing technologies and their capabilities to monitor short- and long-term changes in weather patterns in response to climate change. Satellites developed by various countries, such as U.S. meteorological satellites, EUMETSAT, and Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Indian satellite platforms are reviewed. This book also discusses international efforts to coordinate meteorological remote sensing data collection and sharing. This title provides a ready and quick reference for information about meteorological satellites. It serves as a useful tool for a broad audience that includes students, academics, private consultants, engineers, scientists, and teachers.

  17. Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Charles-Andre; Ratke, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MSL-CETSOL and MICAST) are two investigations which supports research into metallurgical solidification, semiconductor crystal growth (Bridgman and zone melting), and measurement of thermo-physical properties of materials. This is a cooperative investigation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for accommodation and operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Research Summary: Materials Science Laboratory - Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) and Microstructure Formation in Casting of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions (MICAST) are two complementary investigations which will examine different growth patterns and evolution of microstructures during crystallization of metallic alloys in microgravity. The aim of these experiments is to deepen the quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in cast alloys by directional solidification.

  18. Electric propulsion for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael; Zhuang, Taisen; Shashurin, Alexey; Teel, George; Chiu, Dereck; Lukas, Joseph; Haque, Samudra; Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Propulsion is required for satellite motion in outer space. The displacement of a satellite in space, orbit transfer and its attitude control are the task of space propulsion, which is carried out by rocket engines. Electric propulsion uses electric energy to energize or accelerate the propellant. The electric propulsion, which uses electrical energy to accelerate propellant in the form of plasma, is known as plasma propulsion. Plasma propulsion utilizes the electric energy to first, ionize the propellant and then, deliver energy to the resulting plasma leading to plasma acceleration. Many types of plasma thrusters have been developed over last 50 years. The variety of these devices can be divided into three main categories dependent on the mechanism of acceleration: (i) electrothermal, (ii) electrostatic and (iii) electromagnetic. Recent trends in space exploration associate with the paradigm shift towards small and efficient satellites, or micro- and nano-satellites. A particular example of microthruster considered in this paper is the micro-cathode arc thruster (µCAT). The µCAT is based on vacuum arc discharge. Thrust is produced when the arc discharge erodes some of the cathode at high velocity and is accelerated out the nozzle by a Lorentz force. The thrust amount is controlled by varying the frequency of pulses with demonstrated range to date of 1-50 Hz producing thrust ranging from 1 µN to 0.05 mN.

  19. Development and inter-laboratory validation study of an improved new real-time PCR assay with internal control for detection and laboratory diagnosis of African swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tignon, Marylène; Gallardo, Carmina; Iscaro, Carmen; Hutet, Evelyne; Van der Stede, Yves; Kolbasov, Denis; De Mia, Gian Mario; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Bishop, Richard P; Arias, Marisa; Koenen, Frank

    2011-12-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rapid detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV), multiplexed for simultaneous detection of swine beta-actin as an endogenous control, has been developed and validated by four National Reference Laboratories of the European Union for African swine fever (ASF) including the European Union Reference Laboratory. Primers and a TaqMan(®) probe specific for ASFV were selected from conserved regions of the p72 gene. The limit of detection of the new real-time PCR assay is 5.7-57 copies of the ASFV genome. High accuracy, reproducibility and robustness of the PCR assay (CV ranging from 0.7 to 5.4%) were demonstrated both within and between laboratories using different real-time PCR equipments. The specificity of virus detection was validated using a panel of 44 isolates collected over many years in various geographical locations in Europe, Africa and America, including recent isolates from the Caucasus region, Sardinia, East and West Africa. Compared to the OIE-prescribed conventional and real-time PCR assays, the sensitivity of the new assay with internal control was improved, as demonstrated by testing 281 field samples collected in recent outbreaks and surveillance areas in Europe and Africa (170 samples) together with samples obtained through experimental infections (111 samples). This is particularly evident in the early days following experimental infection and during the course of the disease in pigs sub-clinically infected with strains of low virulence (from 35 up to 70dpi). The specificity of the assay was also confirmed on 150 samples from uninfected pigs and wild boar from ASF-free areas. Measured on the total of 431 tested samples, the positive deviation of the new assay reaches 21% or 26% compared to PCR and real-time PCR methods recommended by OIE. This improved and rigorously validated real-time PCR assay with internal control will provide a rapid, sensitive and reliable molecular tool for ASFV

  20. Reducing communication delays and improving quality of care with a tuberculosis laboratory information system in resource poor environments: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Joaquín A; Shin, Sonya S; Yagui, Martin; Contreras, Carmen; Cegielski, Peter; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Asencios, Luis; Bayona, Jaime; Kim, Jihoon; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2014-01-01

    Lost, delayed or incorrect laboratory results are associated with delays in initiating treatment. Delays in treatment for Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) can worsen patient outcomes and increase transmission. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a laboratory information system in reducing delays and the time for MDR-TB patients to culture convert (stop transmitting). 78 primary Health Centers (HCs) in Lima, Peru. Participants lived within the catchment area of participating HCs and had at least one MDR-TB risk factor. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial with baseline data. The intervention was the e-Chasqui web-based laboratory information system. Main outcome measures were: times to communicate a result; to start or change a patient's treatment; and for that patient to culture convert. 1671 patients were enrolled. Intervention HCs took significantly less time to receive drug susceptibility test (DST) (median 11 vs. 17 days, Hazard Ratio 0.67 [0.62-0.72]) and culture (5 vs. 8 days, 0.68 [0.65-0.72]) results. The time to treatment was not significantly different, but patients in intervention HCs took 16 days (20%) less time to culture convert (p = 0.047). The eChasqui system reduced the time to communicate results between laboratories and HCs and time to culture conversion. It is now used in over 259 HCs covering 4.1 million people. This is the first randomized controlled trial of a laboratory information system in a developing country for any disease and the only study worldwide to show clinical impact of such a system. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01201941.