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Sample records for sarva shiksha abhiyan

  1. Aid to Education: The Case of Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan in India and the Role of Development Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This case study of Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) in India, the largest basic education programme in the world, assesses the significance of foreign aid for achieving increased access to elementary education from 2002 to 2010, particularly for the most disadvantaged. It reviews the practical experience of India and its development partners in jointly…

  2. Processes and challenges of community mobilisation for latrine promotion under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan in rural Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, Parimita; Torondel, Belen; Jenkins, Marion W; Clasen, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2017-05-16

    Despite efforts to eradicate it, open defecation remains widely practiced in India, especially in rural areas. Between 2013 and 2014, 50 villages in one district of Odisha, India, received a sanitation programme under the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA - "Clean India Campaign"), the successor of India's Total Sanitation Campaign. This paper documents the strategies and processes of NBA community mobilisation for latrine promotion in these villages and assesses the strengths and limitations of the mobilisation activities. NBA's community mobilisation activities were observed and assessed against the programme's theory of change in 10 randomly selected programme villages from start to finish. Additional data was collected through review of documents, individual interviews (n = 80) and focus group discussions (n = 26) with staff of the implementing NGOs and community members. Our study revealed the lack of a consistent implementation strategy, lack of capacities and facilitation skills of NGO staff to implement sanitation programmes, political interference, challenges in accessing government financial incentives for latrine construction, and lack of clarity on the roles and responsibilities among government and NGO staff, leading to failure in translating government policies into sustainable actions. Social divisions and village dynamics related to gender and caste further constrained the effectiveness of mobilisation activities. Meetings were often dominated by male members of upper caste households, and excluded low caste community members and views of women. Community discussions revolved largely around the government's cash incentive for latrines. Activities aimed at creating demand for sanitation and use of latrines often resonated poorly with community members. An assessment by the implementers, 1 year after community mobilisation found 19% of households had a completed latrine across the 50 villages, a marginal increase of 7 percentage points over baseline. In

  3. Education of persons with intellectual disabilities in India Educación de las personas con discapacidad intelectual en India

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    L Govinda Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically in India, persons with disabilities enjoyed co-existence, though at different times, the treatment and attitudes were at variance. Out of all the types of disabilities, an intellectual disability poses greater challenges than the other types. The families of persons with intellectual disabilities do also have needs different from others, which cannot be segregated from the needs of children with intellectual disability. Specific legislations have been put in place to ensure empowerment of persons with disabilities. Through Rehabilitation Council of India, human resource development programs are standardized. The National Institute for the Mentally Handicapped has developed many service models and contributed toward human resource development and research. Many Non-Government Organizations have started special education and vocational training programs. National Trust, a statutory body, supports the individuals and families and seeks to protect those individuals having no parents. Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (Education for All, has special focus on education of children with disabilities. Vocational training centres have an obligation to develop eco-centric and commercially viable jobs. As per the National Policy, the Government of India envisages that every child with a disability should have access to appropriate preschool, primary and secondary level education by 2020.Históricamente en India las personas con discapacidades han disfrutado siempre de la coexistencia, si bien a veces el tratamiento y las actitudes podían contrastar. De entre todos los tipos de discapacidad, la intelectual es la que presenta los mayores desafíos. Las familias de las personas con discapacidad intelectual tienen asimismo necesidades distintas de las demás, inseparables de las necesidades de los niños con discapacidad intelectual. Se ha implementado legislación específica para asegurar el apoderamiento de las personas con discapacidades. Los programas

  4. Problems of Children with Special Needs (CWSNs in Assessing the Education: Role of Barrier Free Environment - A Case Study of India

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    D. Uma Devi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Education is envisaged as an important tool for the socio-economic and cultural development of an individual and acts as a catalyst for the pace of the development of the country. Keeping this in view, the Government of India has launched several programmes for the promotion of the education among the children as well as adults in the country. But, due to the malnutrition, superstitions, fluoride in the water, diseases like polio etc., natural calamities and other adverse conditions some children are becoming disabled. The place of the differently abled in the Indian society is lower when compared with the normal children as there is a notion that their disability is due to curse for the sins in the previous birth etc. and they were deprived in all spheres of life including education. To mainstream them on par with the normal population and to make them as partners of the pace of development of the country, the Government of India from time to time launched several programmes and started special schools. Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan is one of the programme implemented to create barrier free environment in the school and to promote inclusive education for the children with special needs (CWSN as one of the components. The present study was taken up in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India to find out the extent of accessibility of education to the CWSNs in normal schools. The study covered a sample of CWSNs (300, teachers (90, parents (150, heads of the schools (30, home based teachers (30 and tried to identify the problems of the CWSNs in accessing the education, problems of the teachers in tackling with the children, parents opinions towards the efforts of the schools in making education to be accessible to their CSWN.

  5. Students Grow Their Own Vegetables in School Yards

    OpenAIRE

    Vanitha Kommu

    2010-01-01

    The Centre for Environment Education (CEE), Andhra Pradesh State Cell, implemented the project ‘Student Amateurs in School Yard Agriculture (SASYA)’ with support from UNICEF Hyderabad and the Department of Education (Sarva Siksha Abhiyan) in 150 schools in the Medak district of Andhra Pradesh, India.  The Medak district is a semi-arid district with an average annual rainfall of 80 cm. Agricultural activities are dependent mainly on rainfall. The aim of the project was to provide chemical-free...

  6. Seismic waves and sources Ari Ben-Menahem and Sarva Jit Singh (Book review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, A.P. van den

    1984-01-01

    In recent years several excellent books on the subject of theoretical seismology have appeared on the market. This might be seen as an indication that seismology has finally become a full grown branch of physics since its foundations were laid, theoretically and empirically, in the 19th

  7. Students Grow Their Own Vegetables in School Yards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Kommu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Centre for Environment Education (CEE, Andhra Pradesh State Cell, implemented the project ‘Student Amateurs in School Yard Agriculture (SASYA’ with support from UNICEF Hyderabad and the Department of Education (Sarva Siksha Abhiyan in 150 schools in the Medak district of Andhra Pradesh, India.  The Medak district is a semi-arid district with an average annual rainfall of 80 cm. Agricultural activities are dependent mainly on rainfall. The aim of the project was to provide chemical-free, nutrient-rich vegetables to the children and to provide an opportunity to learn by doing. Schools were selected based on the available space, water, fence.  A small start-up kit was provided with a manual with guidelines, vegetable seeds and other requirements like sample bio-fertilizers, bio-pesticides and equipment like hand sprayers. A resource group was formed for every 10 schools with a teacher, the Mandal Educational Officer, and a field coordinator from a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO. The resource group was trained at the district level that acted as trainers for the other 9 schools of their mandal (administrative district and provided continuous support.The gardens were initiated with support from the village community who were part of the garden lay out plan, and operations like land preparation, and sowing.  Contributions from the villagers also came in the form of implements, farm yard manure and seeds. Gardens were maintained by the student committees formed for the purpose under guidance of teachers. Suggestions regarding the cultural operations were provided by the community, field coordinators and CEE. The produce was utilised for the mid-day meals served in the school. At times they were also shared by the community and teachers. Preparations (collection of seed from the garden and community were under progress for the next season. This project was implemented successfully in 136 schools where the students had benefited through

  8. District officials learn how to use the Atlas in local planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Murambadoro, M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available District Municipality environmental officers attending the 2011 SRRP training workshop were introduced to the South African Risk and Vulnerability Atlas (SARVA) as a vital tool for local planning and resilience. This workshop was aimed at raising...

  9. Geography students learn more about risk and vulnerability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Murambadoro, M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of the outreach programme the South African Risk and Vulnerability Atlas (SARVA) was introduced to geography students of the Society of South African Geographers Students. The students were attending their annual conference hosted...

  10. Thermoacoustical and Excess Properties of Binary Mixtures of Ethyl Butyrate with Methanol and Vinyl Acetate

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    Jagdish Prasad Shukla

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to portray the nature of interaction present in the mixture of ethyl butyrate with methanol and vinyl acetate by computing various thermodynamic parameters at 298.15 K. Excess thermodynamic properties correlated with Redlich–Kister polynomial equation reveals the extent of interaction present in the mixture. Acoustical relations giving the molecular radii of liquid mixtures suggest the change in structure with composition quite well. A comparative study of various empirical and semi-empirical relations such as Flory’s Statistical Theory, Goldsack and Sarvas, Sanchez theory etc. for predicting ultrasonic velocity of the mixtures with the experimental values have been done.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF RASASASTRA IN MEDIEVAL PERIOD*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harishankar

    1985-01-01

    The paper deals with the historical development of Rasasastra in Medieval period. Knowledge of Rasa has been in existence from the time immemorial. Exploration of natural resources for the benefit of human beings is the object of this therapy. It is a medical science recognized during vedic periods for the betterment of even Devas. Medieval period can be treated as a golden age for the development of this science. Looking at its aim and objects, methodology and therapeutics, it was recognized as a medical science with an independent philosophical background in 14th century, by Madhavacharya in his Sarva Darsana Samgraha. PMID:22557472

  12. PLC based Segregation of Scrap Material

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    Mangesh B. Nagapure

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describe segregation of scrap materials using automation system. With the growing population rate, the amount of waste being produced is also increasing at a very faster rate. It is also posing a very serious problem at the industrial and domestic level to manage the wastes being dumped everywhere as landfill waste. So, it is very crucial to have some system to manage waste automatically which is currently not there. Prime Minister Modi’s mission of Swaccha Bharat Abhiyan can also be successfully implemented by the proposed system. The paper proposes a novel method where the provision is given to separate out metal and nonmetal waste into respective bins by the sensing of different sensors incorporated along the conveyor belt. Pieces of glass, paper, wood and metallic materials are separated out from proposed work. Using the segregation, most of the metal and nonmetal components like paper, glass, plastic increases the economic value of the waste to its best. For every scrap separation system, a higher level of automation demands more and more accurate programming device. So, we are using programmable logic controller (PLC as main component

  13. Overweight and obesity among school-going children of Lucknow city

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    Rajaat Vohra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood obesity is increasingly being observed with changing lifestyles of families. The magnitude of overweight ranges from 9% to 27.5% and obesity ranges from 1% to 12.9% among Indian children. Objectives: The present study was undertaken to study the magnitude of overweight/obesity and its determinants among children in Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A list of government and private school was procured from Office of Basic Shiksha Adhikari. Three government and three private schools were selected by Simple Random Sampling. Students of 5th to 12th grades available at the time of study were included as study unit. Predesigned and pretested questionnaire was used to elicit the information on family characteristics and individual characteristics. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated. Children with BMI of 25 and above were considered overweight and children with BMI more than 30 were considered obese. Results: Overweight and obesity was found to be 4.17% and 0.73%, respectively; they together constitute 4.91% for overweight/obesity. The study revealed that the important correlates of overweight/obesity were father′s education, father′s occupation, class, children playing outdoor games for less than 30 min, and those consuming fast foods. Conclusions : Children of higher classes (above 8th standard belonging to higher socioeconomic group with less outdoor activities and consuming fast foods were more predisposed to overweight/obesity. As a preventive strategy, there is a need to apply health and nutritional education programs for inculcating healthy life styles, and incorporating more outdoor activities in Physical Education Department of school curriculum.

  14. Should India Use Commercially Produced Ready To Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF For Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM ?

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    radha holla

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, nearly 20 million children under five suffer from Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM, a condition which contributes to one million child deaths annually. In India 48% of children under five years of age are stunted and 43 percent are underweight; almost 8 million suffer from SAM. Malnutrition is not a new problem in India, nor is SAM. Several hospitals and non-government organizations are engaged in community-based management of malnutrition using locally produced/procured and locally processed foods along with intensive nutrition education. These programs enable parents to meet the nutritional requirements of their children with foods that are available at low cost. The Supreme Court of India has also directed the government to universalize the Integrated Child Development Scheme and provide one hot cooked meal to children under six years of age to supplement their nutrition. The blame for the increasing number of severely malnourish children can be laid at the door of policies that have destroyed poor people’s access to food. Nonetheless, there is urgent need to ensure that these children do not die; that they recover and maintain a healthy nutritional status. The current thinking – that a centrally produced and processed Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF should supplant the locally prepared indigenous foods in treatment of SAM – ignores the multiple causes of malnutrition and destroys the diversity of potential solutions based on locally available foods. This position paper has been drafted by Dr. Vandana Prasad, Radha Holla and Dr. Arun Gupta, members of the Working Group for Children Under Six – a joint effort of Jan Swasthya Abhiyan (People’s Health Movement – India and the Right to Food Campaign which been advocating for the last three years with the Indian government for decentralized and community-based strategies to combat and prevent malnutrition in children.

  15. Demonetization to Digitalization: A Step Toward Progress

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    Harshita Bhatnagar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Journey from demonetization to digitalization is very hard hitting but not impossible. Recent demonetization in India on November 8, 2016, created lot of panic in the economy but also paved the way to digitalization. Cash crunch and availability of e-sources of transactions compelled many people to use electronic modes of payment. Credit cards, debit cards/RuPay card, USSD/UPI, Internet banking, mobile wallets like Oxigen, Paytm, Mobiwik, aadhar-enabled payment system, POS, and so on are few popular modes of electronic transaction, which are commonly used by the citizen. Digitalization will embrace higher transparency in monetary terms; low-cost maintenance; more convenience in use; and help in financial inclusion and weeding out black money and counterfeit money from the economy. But journey to a destination is always full of roadblocks, and similarly the journey of India toward a digital India is also full of hurdles like a huge illiteracy rate; low bandwidth; more unbanked areas; late adoption of technology; lack of full-time electricity; security concerns like hacking, cybercrime, and safety of personal details; and need for high investments. So, to defend the dream of a digital India, we have to develop well-defined strategies to coach people in using technology like focusing on customer education as well as employee education in technology by conducting workshops, presentations, enforcing strict cyber laws, use of local language, and developing user-friendly websites that leverage technology using the development of simple and smart digital tools, such as the use of a one-time password (OTP. The government has started Vittiya Sakharata Abhiyaan (VISAKA and outreach campaigns like DigiDhan Abhiyan and so on to encourage people to adopt digital tools. Overall demonetization is greasing the wheels of digitalization and transforming India into Digital India.

  16. "Uni katab meid ühele palju kahele vähe..." : [luuletused] / Jaan Kaplinski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaplinski, Jaan, 1941-

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. J. Kaplinski lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 93. Sisu: "Uni katab meid ühele palju kahele vähe..." = "Sleep covers us too much for one, too little for two..." ; "Olematus ulatub kõikjale ja olemasolu on täis rahu..." = "Non-being pervades everything and being is full of peace..." ; "See mis meid äratas..." = "What woke us..." ; "Seesama meri meis kõigis..." = "The same sea in us all..." ; Dana paramita ; "Ida ja Lääne vaheline piir rändab ikka, vahel itta, vahel läände..." = "The East-West border is always wandering..." ; "Pesu ei saa kunagi pestud..." = "The washing never gets home..." ; "Neli ja pool tonni sileesia sütt..." = "Four-and-a-half tons of Silesian coal..." ; "Ei teagi, kas ma tohin rääkida roheline..." = "I don't even know if I have the right to say "green"..." ; "Maailmu on nii palju kui liivateri mere ääres..." = "There are as many worlds as grains of sand on a beach..." ; "Viimane pilv läheb üle taeva läänest itta..." = "A last cloud goes over the sky from West to East..." ; "Taevas on pilves. Soe tuul tuleb hõlma alla..." = "The sky is overcast. The warm wind is creeping under your shirt..." ; "Mu tädi tundis neid hästi, mina ei tea..." = "My aunt knew them well, I know of them..." ; "Hommikul tutvustati mind president Mitterrandile..." = "In the morning, I was presented to President Mitterrand..." ; "Meri ei taha lainetada. Tuul ei taha puhuda..." = "The sea doesn't want to wave...".Poems written in English: "Om svabhavasuddhah sarva dharmah. No selfhood..." ; "My little boy..." ; "After many bitterly cold days..." ; "You can forget nature..." ; I walk facing East..." ; "A skier going south..."

  17. "Uni katab meid ühele palju kahele vähe..." : [luuletused] / Jaan Kaplinski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaplinski, Jaan, 1941-

    2001-01-01

    Tekst eesti ja inglise k. J. Kaplinski lühibiograafia eesti ja inglise k. lk. 93. Sisu: "Uni katab meid ühele palju kahele vähe..." = "Sleep covers us too much for one, too little for two..." ; "Olematus ulatub kõikjale ja olemasolu on täis rahu..." = "Non-being pervades everything and being is full of peace..." ; "See mis meid äratas..." = "What woke us..." ; "Seesama meri meis kõigis..." = "The same sea in us all..." ; Dana paramita ; "Ida ja Lääne vaheline piir rändab ikka, vahel itta, vahel läände..." = "The East-West border is always wandering..." ; "Pesu ei saa kunagi pestud..." = "The washing never gets home..." ; "Neli ja pool tonni sileesia sütt..." = "Four-and-a-half tons of Silesian coal..." ; "Ei teagi, kas ma tohin rääkida roheline..." = "I don't even know if I have the right to say "green"..." ; "Maailmu on nii palju kui liivateri mere ääres..." = "There are as many worlds as grains of sand on a beach..." ; "Viimane pilv läheb üle taeva läänest itta..." = "A last cloud goes over the sky from West to East..." ; "Taevas on pilves. Soe tuul tuleb hõlma alla..." = "The sky is overcast. The warm wind is creeping under your shirt..." ; "Mu tädi tundis neid hästi, mina ei tea..." = "My aunt knew them well, I know of them..." ; "Hommikul tutvustati mind president Mitterrandile..." = "In the morning, I was presented to President Mitterrand..." ; "Meri ei taha lainetada. Tuul ei taha puhuda..." = "The sea doesn't want to wave...".Poems written in English: "Om svabhavasuddhah sarva dharmah. No selfhood..." ; "My little boy..." ; "After many bitterly cold days..." ; "You can forget nature..." ; I walk facing East..." ; "A skier going south..."

  18. Determinants of utilization of services under MMJSSA scheme in Jharkhand ′Client Perspective′: A qualitative study in a low performing state of India

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    Sanjay K Rai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventing maternal death associated with pregnancy and child birth is one of the greatest challenges for India. Approximately 55,000 women die in India due to pregnancy- and childbirth- related conditions each year. Increasing the coverage of maternal and newborn interventions is essential if Millennium Development Goals (MDG 4 and 5 are to be reached. With a view to accelerate the reduction in maternal and neonatal mortality through institutional deliveries, Government of India initiated a scheme in 2005 called Janani Suraksha Yojna (JSY under its National Rural Health Mission (NRHM. In Jharkhand the scheme is called the Mukhya Mantri Janani Shishu Swasthya Abhiyan (MMJSSA. This paper focuses on community perspectives, for indentifying key areas that require improvement for proper implementation of the MMJSSA in Jharkhand. Qualitative research method was used to collect data through in-depth interviews (IDIs and focus group discussions (FGDs in six districts of Jharkhand- Gumla, West Singhbhum, Koderma, Deoghar, Garhwa, and Ranchi. Total 300 IDIs (24 IDIs each from mother given birth at home and institution respectively; two IDIs each with members of Village Health and Sanitation Committees (VHSC / Rogi Kalyan Samitis (RKS from each district and 24 FGDs (four FGDs were conducted from pools of husbands, mothers-in-law and fathers-in-law in each district were conducted. Although people indicated willingness for institutional deliveries (generally perceived to be safe deliveries, several barriers emerged as critical obstacles. These included poor infrastructure, lack of quality of care, difficulties while availing incentives, corruption in disbursement of incentives, behavior of the healthcare personnel and lack of information about MMJSSA. Poor (and expensive transport facilities and difficult terrain made geographical access difficult. The level of utilization of maternal healthcare among women in Jharkhand is low. There was an overwhelming

  19. Use of the isolated problem approach for multi-compartment BEM models of electro-magnetic source imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gencer, Nevzat G; Akalin-Acar, Zeynep [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Brain Research Laboratory, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-07-07

    The isolated problem approach (IPA) is a method used in the boundary element method (BEM) to overcome numerical inaccuracies caused by the high-conductivity difference in the skull and the brain tissues in the head. Haemaelaeinen and Sarvas (1989 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 36 165-71) described how the source terms can be updated to overcome these inaccuracies for a three-layer head model. Meijs et al (1989 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 36 1038-49) derived the integral equations for the general case where there are an arbitrary number of layers inside the skull. However, the IPA is used in the literature only for three-layer head models. Studies that use complex boundary element head models that investigate the inhomogeneities in the brain or model the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) do not make use of the IPA. In this study, the generalized formulation of the IPA for multi-layer models is presented in terms of integral equations. The discretized version of these equations are presented in two different forms. In a previous study (Akalin-Acar and Gencer 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 5011-28), we derived formulations to calculate the electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography transfer matrices assuming a single layer in the skull. In this study, the transfer matrix formulations are updated to incorporate the generalized IPA. The effects of the IPA are investigated on the accuracy of spherical and realistic models when the CSF layer and a tumour tissue are included in the model. It is observed that, in the spherical model, for a radial dipole 1 mm close to the brain surface, the relative difference measure (RDM*) drops from 1.88 to 0.03 when IPA is used. For the realistic model, the inclusion of the CSF layer does not change the field pattern significantly. However, the inclusion of an inhomogeneity changes the field pattern by 25% for a dipole oriented towards the inhomogeneity. The effect of the IPA is also investigated when there is an inhomogeneity in the brain. In addition