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Sample records for sarcolemma

  1. [Sarcolemma tissue of prepubertal concealed penis: pathological characterization and clinical implication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Tao; Yang, Xing-Hai

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the histopathological characteristics and clinical implication of sarcolemma tissue in prepubertal concealed penis. After measurement of the penile length, 10 prepubertal children with congenital concealed penis underwent modified Devine's operation (treatment group), and another 10 normal prepubertal children received circumcision (control group). The anatomic features of the penile sarcolemma tissue was observed intraoperatively, and its fibrosis was evaluated by Masson trichrome staining. The penile length of the treatment group was significantly shorter than that of the control group preoperatively ([1.49 +/- 0.17 ] cm vs [4.26 +/- 0.23 ] cm, P penis, and the key to its management is drastic removal of all the fibrous sarcolemma tissue.

  2. Contractions but not AICAR increase FABPpm content in rat muscle sarcolemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Albers, Peter; Luiken, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, it was investigated whether acute muscle contractions in rat skeletal muscle increased the protein content of FABPpm in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the effect of AICAR stimulation on FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein content in sarcolemma of rat skeletal muscle was evaluated...

  3. Re-evaluation of sarcolemma injury and muscle swelling in human skeletal muscles after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Liu, Jing-Xia; Carlsson, Lena; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Stål, Per S

    2013-01-01

    The results regarding the effects of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on muscle tissue are often conflicting and the aetiology of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) induced by eccentric exercise is still unclear. This study aimed to re-evaluate the paradigm of muscular alterations with regard to muscle sarcolemma integrity and fibre swelling in human muscles after voluntary eccentric exercise leading to DOMS. Ten young males performed eccentric exercise by downstairs running. Biopsies from the soleus muscle were obtained from 6 non-exercising controls, 4 exercised subjects within 1 hour and 6 exercised subjects at 2-3 days and 7-8 days after the exercise. Muscle fibre sarcolemma integrity, infiltration of inflammatory cells and changes in fibre size and fibre phenotype composition as well as capillary supply were examined with specific antibodies using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Although all exercised subjects experienced DOMS which peaked between 1.5 to 2.5 days post exercise, no significant sarcolemma injury or inflammation was detected in any post exercise group. The results do not support the prevailing hypothesis that eccentric exercise causes an initial sarcolemma injury which leads to subsequent inflammation after eccentric exercise. The fibre size was 24% larger at 7-8 days than at 2-3 days post exercise (pmuscle is not directly associated with the symptom of DOMS.

  4. Re-evaluation of sarcolemma injury and muscle swelling in human skeletal muscles after eccentric exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Guo Yu

    Full Text Available The results regarding the effects of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on muscle tissue are often conflicting and the aetiology of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS induced by eccentric exercise is still unclear. This study aimed to re-evaluate the paradigm of muscular alterations with regard to muscle sarcolemma integrity and fibre swelling in human muscles after voluntary eccentric exercise leading to DOMS. Ten young males performed eccentric exercise by downstairs running. Biopsies from the soleus muscle were obtained from 6 non-exercising controls, 4 exercised subjects within 1 hour and 6 exercised subjects at 2-3 days and 7-8 days after the exercise. Muscle fibre sarcolemma integrity, infiltration of inflammatory cells and changes in fibre size and fibre phenotype composition as well as capillary supply were examined with specific antibodies using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Although all exercised subjects experienced DOMS which peaked between 1.5 to 2.5 days post exercise, no significant sarcolemma injury or inflammation was detected in any post exercise group. The results do not support the prevailing hypothesis that eccentric exercise causes an initial sarcolemma injury which leads to subsequent inflammation after eccentric exercise. The fibre size was 24% larger at 7-8 days than at 2-3 days post exercise (p<0.05. In contrast, the value of capillary number per fibre area tended to decrease from 2-3 days to 7-8 days post exercise (lower in 5 of the 6 subjects at 7-8 days than at 2-3 days; p<0.05. Thus, the increased fibre size at 7-8 days post exercise was interpreted to reflect fibre swelling. Because the fibre swelling did not appear at the time that DOMS peaked (between 1.5 to 2.5 days post exercise, we concluded that fibre swelling in the soleus muscle is not directly associated with the symptom of DOMS.

  5. Expression of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex at the skeletal muscle sarcolemma in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

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    Lei ZHAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Eccentric exercise or high tension exercise could cause damage to skeletal muscle structure, resulting in deficiency of dystrophin and secondary loss of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC from the sarcolemma, which indicated that down-regulation of dystrophin was one of the key points of skeletal muscle injury from eccentric exercise. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by mutations of DMD gene, resulting in the absence of dystrophin, which means that skeletal muscles of DMD patients after birth are in the natural state of actual path of force transmission which carried high tension from eccentric exercise. This paper investigated systematically whether expression of DGC is associated with progressive muscle weakness in natural history of DMD, and analyzed the expression of DGC at the sarcolemma of 197 confirmed DMD cases (9 days-12 years old.  Methods  The expression of α- and β-dystroglycan (DG, α-, β-, γ- and δ-sarcoglycan (SG and syntrophin at the sarcolemma of DMD patients was analyzed by immunofluorescent staining.  Results  The study showed that there was no relationship between lack of proteins and progressive muscle weakness with increasing age, although expression of α- and β-DG, α-, β-, γ- and δ-SG and syntrophin at the sarcolemma at different stages of 197 DMD patients (9 days-12 years old had different degrees of deficiency.  Conclusions  Deficiency of DGC may occur before birth and DMD patients were recommended to avoid further damage to skeletal muscles from eccentric exercise and high-resistance movement in activities of daily life and rehabilitation training. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.006

  6. In Vivo Microscopy Reveals Extensive Embedding of Capillaries within the Sarcolemma of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, Brian; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Dao, Lam; Bakalar, Matthew; French, Stephanie; Chess, David J.; Taylor, Joni L.; Picard, Martin; Aponte, Angel; Daniels, Mathew P.; Esfahani, Shervin; Cushman, Samuel; Balaban, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide insight into mitochondrial function in vivo, we evaluated the 3D spatial relationship between capillaries, mitochondria, and muscle fibers in live mice. Methods 3D volumes of in vivo murine Tibialis anterior muscles were imaged by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). Muscle fiber type, mitochondrial distribution, number of capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were assessed. The role of myoglobin-facilitated diffusion was examined in myoglobin knockout mice. Distribution of GLUT4 was also evaluated in the context of the capillary and mitochondrial network. Results MPM revealed that 43.6 ± 3.3% of oxidative fiber capillaries had ≥ 50% of their circumference embedded in a groove in the sarcolemma, in vivo. Embedded capillaries were tightly associated with dense mitochondrial populations lateral to capillary grooves and nearly absent below the groove. Mitochondrial distribution, number of embedded capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were proportional to fiber oxidative capacity and unaffected by myoglobin knockout. GLUT4 did not preferentially localize to embedded capillaries. Conclusions Embedding capillaries in the sarcolemma may provide a regulatory mechanism to optimize delivery of oxygen to heterogeneous groups of muscle fibers. We hypothesize that mitochondria locate to paravascular regions due to myofibril voids created by embedded capillaries, not to enhance the delivery of oxygen to the mitochondria. PMID:25279425

  7. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G. (Servizio di Endocrinologia, Milano, (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine ({sup 3}H)-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37{degree}C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37{degree}C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4{degree}C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca{sup 2}{sup +}.

  8. Disuse of rat muscle in vivo reduces protein kinase C activity controlling the sarcolemma chloride conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, Sabata; Desaphy, Jean-François; Liantonio, Antonella; De Luca, Annamaria; Zarrilli, Antonia; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Procino, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Muscle disuse produced by hindlimb unloading (HU) induces severe atrophy and slow-to-fast fibre type transition of the slow-twitch soleus muscle (Sol). After 2 weeks HU, the resting ClC-1 chloride conductance (gCl) of sarcolemma, which controls muscle excitability, increases in Sol toward a value typical of the fast-twitch EDL muscle. After 3 days of HU, the gCl increases as well before initiation of fibre type transition. Since ClC-1 channels are acutely silenced by PKC-dependent phosphorylation, we studied the modulation of gCl by PKC and serine–threonine phosphatase in Sol during HU, using a number of pharmacological tools. We show that a fraction of ClC-1 channels of control Sol are maintained in an inactive state by PKC basal activity, which contributes to the lower gCl in control Sol compared to EDL. After 14 days of HU, PKC/phosphatase manipulation produces effects on Sol gCl that corroborate the partial slow-to-fast transition. After 3 days of HU, the early increase of gCl in Sol is entirely attributable to a reduction of PKC activity and/or activation of phosphatase, maintaining ClC-1 channels in a fully active state. Accordingly, we found that HU reduces expression of PKCα, ɛ, and θ isoenzymes in Sol and EDL muscles and reduces total PKC activity. Moreover, we show that the rheobase current is increased in Sol muscle fibres as soon as after 3 days of HU, most probably in relation to the increased gCl. In conclusion, Sol muscle disuse is characterized by a rapid reduction of PKC activity, which reduces muscle excitability and is likely to contribute to disuse-induced muscle impairment. PMID:17855757

  9. Specific binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin to sarcolemma of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, K; Kawai, M

    1997-08-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) binding was studied in 83 patients with various neuromuscular disorders. UEA I labelled endomysial capillaries and endothelial cells of perimysial blood vessels in all the examined muscles. There was no UEA I binding to muscle fibres except for all (9) cases of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV), 1 of 5 cases of inclusion body myositis and 1 of 36 cases of inflammatory myopathies. The UEA I binding was completely eliminated by preincubation of UEA I solution with L-fucose. Using electron microscopy, the UEA I binding was localized to sarcolemma and intrasarco-plasmic membranous organelles other than mitochondria. Myosatellite cells were not labelled. These findings revealed the existence of fucosylated proteins or lipids in a subset of skeletal muscles suffering from DMRV. Biochemical identification of the fucosylated substance and further detailed study on subcellular localization of UEA I binding may yield important clues to the unknown pathogenesis of DMRV.

  10. The Na conductance in the sarcolemma and the transverse tubular system membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranco, Marino

    2011-01-01

    Na (and Li) currents and fluorescence transients were recorded simultaneously under voltage-clamp conditions from mouse flexor digitorum brevis fibers stained with the potentiometric dye di-8-ANEPPS to investigate the distribution of Na channels between the surface and transverse tubular system (TTS) membranes. In fibers rendered electrically passive, voltage pulses resulted in step-like fluorescence changes that were used to calibrate the dye response. The effects of Na channel activation on the TTS voltage were investigated using Li, instead of Na, because di-8-ANEPPS transients show anomalies in the presence of the latter. Na and Li inward currents (INa, ILi; using half of the physiological ion concentration) showed very steep voltage dependences, with no reversal for depolarizations beyond the calculated equilibrium potential, suggesting that most of the current originates from a noncontrolled membrane compartment. Maximum peak ILi was ∼30% smaller than for INa, suggesting a Li-blocking effect. ILi activation resulted in the appearance of overshoots in otherwise step-like di-8-ANEPPS transients. Overshoots had comparable durations and voltage dependence as those of ILi. Simultaneously measured maximal overshoot and peak ILi were 54 ± 5% and 773 ± 53 µA/cm2, respectively. Radial cable model simulations predicted the properties of ILi and di-8-ANEPPS transients when TTS access resistances of 10–20 Ωcm2, and TTS-to-surface Na permeability density ratios in the range of 40:60 to 70:30, were used. Formamide-based osmotic shock resulted in incomplete detubulation. However, results from a subpopulation of treated fibers (low capacitance) provide confirmatory evidence that a significant proportion of ILi, and the overshoot in the optical signals, arises from the TTS in normal fibers. The quantitative evaluation of the distribution of Na channels between the sarcolemma and the TTS membranes, as provided here, is crucial for the understanding of the radial and

  11. Two saturable recognition sites for (-) [125I]iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine binding on purified cardiac sarcolemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausleithner, V; Freissmuth, M; Schütz, W

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of (-) [125]iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)-adenosine [( 125I]HPIA) binding to purified sarcolemmal preparations of guinea pig and bovine hearts revealed two classes of binding sites when unlabeled iodo-HPIA (100 mumol/l) was used as non-specific binding marker. In the presence of 1 mmol/l theophylline, however, only the high affinity component was detected. Adenosine receptor agonists caused biphasic displacement of [125I]HPIA binding, with a high affinity potency rank order typical of interaction with A1-adenosine receptors. Biphasic competition curves were also observed with 8-phenyltheophylline and isobutylmethylxanthine, whereas the theophylline curve was monophasic up to 1 mmol/l. In brain membranes, specific binding of [125I]HPIA as well as of [3H]PIA was further reduced when unlabeled iodo-HPIA replaces theophylline as the non-specific binding marker. These results suggest the presence of two [125I]HPIA binding sites on cardiac sarcolemma and brain membranes, but receptor function can only be ascribed to the high affinity sites. The low affinity site probably represents an artefact, which is often observed when non-specific binding is defined with the unlabeled counterpart or a structurally related ligand of the radioligand used.

  12. Two saturable recognition sites for (-) (125I)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine binding on purified cardiac sarcolemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausleithner, V.; Freissmuth, M.; Schuetz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of (-) (125)iodo-N6-(4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)-adenosine (( /sup 125/I)HPIA) binding to purified sarcolemmal preparations of guinea pig and bovine hearts revealed two classes of binding sites when unlabeled iodo-HPIA (100 mumol/l) was used as non-specific binding marker. In the presence of 1 mmol/l theophylline, however, only the high affinity component was detected. Adenosine receptor agonists caused biphasic displacement of (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding, with a high affinity potency rank order typical of interaction with A1-adenosine receptors. Biphasic competition curves were also observed with 8-phenyltheophylline and isobutylmethylxanthine, whereas the theophylline curve was monophasic up to 1 mmol/l. In brain membranes, specific binding of (/sup 125/I)HPIA as well as of (/sup 3/H)PIA was further reduced when unlabeled iodo-HPIA replaces theophylline as the non-specific binding marker. These results suggest the presence of two (/sup 125/I)HPIA binding sites on cardiac sarcolemma and brain membranes, but receptor function can only be ascribed to the high affinity sites. The low affinity site probably represents an artefact, which is often observed when non-specific binding is defined with the unlabeled counterpart or a structurally related ligand of the radioligand used.

  13. Localization of the DMDL gene-encoded dystrophin-related protein using a panel of nineteen monoclonal antibodies: presence at neuromuscular junctions, in the sarcolemma of dystrophic skeletal muscle, in vascular and other smooth muscles, and in proliferating brain cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T M; Ellis, J M; Love, D R; Davies, K E; Gatter, K C; Dickson, G; Morris, G E

    1991-12-01

    mAbs have been raised against different epitopes on the protein product of the DMDL gene, which is an autosomal homologue of the X-linked DMD gene for dystrophin. These antibodies provide direct evidence that DMDL protein is localized near acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions in normal and mdx mouse intercostal muscle. The primary location in tissues other than skeletal muscle is smooth muscle, especially in the vascular system, which may account for the wide tissue distribution previously demonstrated by Western blotting. The DMDL protein was undetectable in the nonjunctional sarcolemma of normal human muscle, but was observed in nonjunctional sarcolemma of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, where dystrophin itself is absent or greatly reduced. The expression of DMDL protein is not restricted to smooth and skeletal muscle, however, since relatively large amounts are present in transformed brain cell lines of both glial and Schwann cell origin. This contrasts with the low levels of DMDL protein in adult brain tissue.

  14. Effects of γ-irradiation on Na,K-ATPase in cardiac sarcolemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mézešová, L; Vlkovičová, J; Kaločayová, B; Jendruchová, V; Barančík, M; Fülöp, M; Slezák, J; Babál, P; Janega, P; Vrbjar, N

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies showed that adverse effect of ionizing radiation on the cardiovascular system is beside other factors mostly mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which deplete antioxidant stores. One of the structures highly sensitive to radicals is the Na,K-ATPase the main system responsible for extrusion of superfluous Na(+) out of the cell which utilizes the energy derived from ATP. The aim of present study was the investigation of functional properties of cardiac Na,K-ATPase in 20-week-old male rats 6 weeks after γ-irradiation by a dose 25 Gy (IR). Irradiation induced decrease of systolic blood pressure from 133 in controls to 85 mmHg in IR group together with hypertrophy of right ventricle (RV) and hypotrophy of left ventricle (LV). When activating the cardiac Na,K-ATPase with substrate, its activity was lower in IR in the whole concentration range of ATP. Evaluation of kinetic parameters revealed a decrease of the maximum velocity (V max) by 40 % with no changes in the value of Michaelis-Menten constant (K m). During activation with Na(+), we observed a decrease of the enzyme activity in hearts from IR at all tested Na(+) concentrations. The value of V max decreased by 38 %, and the concentration of Na(+) that gives half maximal reaction velocity (K Na) increased by 62 %. This impairment in the affinity of the Na(+)-binding site together with decreased number of active Na,K-ATPase molecules, as indicated by lowered V max values, are probably responsible for the deteriorated efflux of the excessive Na(+) from the intracellular space in hearts of irradiated rats.

  15. Temperature dependence of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma in the ventricle of catfish (Clarias gariepinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sabry Abu-Amra

    2015-10-01

    The sarcolemmal Ca2+ contribution of activator Ca2+ was greater at a test temperature of 30 °C as assessed by verapamil. Whereas the SR-Ca2+ contribution was higher at 20 and 30 °C and a frequency rate of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz as assessed by caffeine and adrenaline, respectively. Bradykinin potentiating factor (BPF7 which was isolated from jelly fish (Cassiopea andromeda decreased the cardiac force developed at a frequency rate of 0.2 Hz and a temperature of 20 °C, whereas it increased the force developed at frequency rates of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz at 30 °C. These results indicate that BPF7 may act like verapamil in reducing the cardiac force through blocking the sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels at low temperature and like adrenaline in an increase of the cardiac force developed at warm temperature and the high frequency rate through stimulation of SR-Ca2+ activator. Therefore, this study indicates that the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx and the SR-Ca2+ release contributors of activator Ca2+ for cardiac force development in the catfish heart were significantly greater at warm temperature and at the pacing frequency rates of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz as assessed by verapamil, adrenaline, caffeine and BPF7. However, the relative contribution of the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx in the development of cardiac force in the catfish heart was greater than that of SR-Ca2+ release.

  16. The dystrophin-related protein, utrophin, is expressed on the sarcolemma of regenerating human skeletal muscle fibres in dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, T R; Man, N T; Morris, G E; Davies, K E

    1992-01-01

    Utrophin is the 400 kDa protein product of an autosomal homologue (DMDL) of the dystrophin gene. In normal skeletal muscle, utrophin is expressed in vascular smooth muscle, endothelium and nerves but not in mature muscle fibres except at the neuromuscular junction. We have examined the expression of utrophin in a wide range of human skeletal muscle diseases using monoclonal antibodies against three C-terminal epitopes. Utrophin is consistently expressed in all basophilic, regenerating fibres irrespective of the underlying disease or expression of dystrophin. It is also found in regenerating fibres from a normal volunteer. In Duchenne and Becker dystrophies, as well as in dermatomyositis, sarcolemmal staining for utrophin is also seen in larger fibres which are not obviously regenerating. These studies do not support the idea that utrophin occupies membrane attachment sites only when dystrophin is absent or reduced, but would be consistent with utrophin expression as part of an activated foetal programme during regeneration.

  17. Localization of the DMDL gene-encoded dystrophin-related protein using a panel of nineteen monoclonal antibodies: presence at neuromuscular junctions, in the sarcolemma of dystrophic skeletal muscle, in vascular and other smooth muscles, and in proliferating brain cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    mAbs have been raised against different epitopes on the protein product of the DMDL gene, which is an autosomal homologue of the X-linked DMD gene for dystrophin. These antibodies provide direct evidence that DMDL protein is localized near acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions in normal and mdx mouse intercostal muscle. The primary location in tissues other than skeletal muscle is smooth muscle, especially in the vascular system, which may account for the wide tissue distribution...

  18. Transversal Stiffness and Beta-Actin and Alpha-Actinin-4 Content of the M. Soleus Fibers in the Conditions of a 3-Day Reloading after 14-Day Gravitational Unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Ogneva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to analyze the structural changes in different parts of the sarcolemma and contractile apparatus of muscle fibers by measuring their transversal stiffness by atomic force microscopy in a three-day reloading after a 14-day gravity disuse, which was carried out by hind-limbs suspension. The object of the study was the soleus muscle of the Wistar rat. It was shown that after 14 days of disuse, there was a reduction of transversal stiffness of all points of the sarcolemma and contractile apparatus. Readaptation for 3 days leads to complete recovery of the values of the transversal stiffness of the sarcolemma and to partial value recovery of the contractile apparatus. The changes in transversal stiffness of sarcolemma correlate with beta-actin and alpha-actinin-4 in membrane protein fractions.

  19. Excitability of the T-tubular system in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O B; Ørtenblad, Niels; Lamb, G D

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous exercise causes an increase in extracellular [K(+)] and intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)](i)) of working muscles, which may reduce sarcolemma excitability. The excitability of the sarcolemma is, however, to some extent protected by a concomitant increase in the activity of muscle Na...... frequency stimulation. It is concluded that a reduction in the chemical gradient for K(+), as takes place during intensive exercise, may depress T-tubular function, but that a concomitant exercise-induced increase in [Na(+)](i) protects T-tubular function by stimulating the Na(+)-K(+) pump....

  20. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  1. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-11-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  2. Myosatellite cells in muscle of growing carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koumans, J.T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Myosatellite cells are small spindle shaped myogenic cells situated between the sarcolemma and the basal lamina that surrounds every muscle fibre. Based on information from mammals and birds, myosatellite cells are considered to play an important role in postlarval muscle growth in fish.

  3. Alpha-adrenergic receptors in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattigan, S; Appleby, G J; Edwards, S J

    1986-01-01

    Sarcolemma-enriched preparations from muscles rich in slow oxidative red fibres contained specific binding sites for the alpha 1 antagonist, prazosin (e.g. soleus Kd 0.13 nM, Bmax 29 fmol/mg protein). Binding sites for prazosin were almost absent from white muscle. Displacement of prazosin bindin...

  4. Cardiovascular Topics The effect of anthracyclines on myocardial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-02-01

    Feb 1, 1999 ... tion impede the return of myocytes to the resting state, and therefore decrease diastolic compliance.1O Anthracyclines also interfere with calcium homeostasis by injuring the mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma. These events lead to death of the myocyte, which is replaced by fibrosis ...

  5. Crucial role for LKB1 to AMPKalpha2 axis in the regulation of CD36-mediated long-chain fatty acid uptake into cardiomyocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habets, Daphna D. J.; Coumans, Will A.; El Hasnaoui, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced contractile activity increases cardiac long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) uptake via translocation of CD36 to the sarcolemma, similarly to increase in glucose uptake via GLUT4 translocation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is assumed to mediate contraction-induced LCFA utilization. However...

  6. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...... disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response....

  7. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  8. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Ahmad S.; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  9. Na+-K+ pump location and translocation during muscle contraction  in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Juel, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    the translocation. Electrical stimulation and biotin labeling of rat muscle revealed a 40% and 18% increase in the amounts of the Na+-K+ pump a2 subunit and caveolin-3 (Cav-3), respectively, in the sarcolemma. Exercise induced a 36% and 19% increase in the relative amounts of the a2 subunit and Cav-3, respectively...

  10. Attenuated muscle regeneration is a key factor in dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Yen-Hui; Hornsey, Mark A; Klinge, Lars

    2009-01-01

    with the sarcolemma dysferlin is also involved in the release of chemotactic agents. Reduced neutrophil recruitment results in incomplete cycles of regeneration in dysferlinopathy which combines with the membrane repair deficit to ultimately trigger dystrophic pathology. This study reveals a novel pathomechanism...

  11. Subcellular trafficking of the substrate transporters GLUT4 and CD36 in cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, L.K.M.; Schwenk, R.W.; Ouwens, D.M.; Diamant, M.; Glatz, J.F.C.; Luiken, J.J.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes use glucose as well as fatty acids for ATP production. These substrates are transported into the cell by glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and the fatty acid transporter CD36. Besides being located at the sarcolemma, GLUT4 and CD36 are stored in intracellular compartments. Raised plasma

  12. [Enzymatic properties in muscle membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursky, M D; Grigoryeva, V A

    1975-01-01

    A study in the enzymatic properties of muscle membranes established that sarcolemma of the rabbit skeletal muscles contains the Ca2+-ATPase system which does not require Mg2+ for manifestation of ions activity. By some kinetic properties it differs from ATPase of myosin. The complex Ca-ATP2+ is a substrate of Ca2+-ATPase. Ions of a series of bivalent metals inhibit the latter as well as the passive transport of Ca2+, that may evidence for a definite relation of Ca2+-ATPase with Ca+2 transport in skeletal muscles. Acetyl cholinesterase and AMP-aminohydrolase are strongly bound with the sarcolemma. The sarcolemma structural organization is shown to play a certain role in manifestation of their activity. On the basis of the data obtained when studying the activity in the ATPase systems and dynamics of formation and decay of the intermediate phosphorylated product in the microsomal fraction of cow and rabbit myometrium certain peculiarities are established for the active mechanisms of Ca2+ transport in smooth muscles. A problem is under discussion on the possible active participation of sarcolemma in regulation of Ca2+ concentration in the smooth muscle cells. Two ATPase systems, Mg2+-dependent and Mg2+-dependent Ca2+ activated are found in nuclei; the role of lipids of the skeletal muscles in manifestation of their activity is studied. AMP-amino hydrolase properties are characterized for different areas of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum membranes. The model of E-avitaminous muscular distrophy was used to show disturbances in the structure of sarcolemma and membranes of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum which are accompanied by changes in their ATPase and Ca2+-transporting properties.

  13. Denervation and high-fat diet reduce insulin signaling in T-tubules in skeletal muscle of living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M; Ploug, Thorkil; Ai, Hua

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates muscle glucose transport by translocation of GLUT4 to sarcolemma and T-tubules. Despite muscle glucose uptake playing a major role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the temporal and spatial changes in insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation during these co......OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates muscle glucose transport by translocation of GLUT4 to sarcolemma and T-tubules. Despite muscle glucose uptake playing a major role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the temporal and spatial changes in insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation during......, anesthetized mice either muscle denervated or high-fat fed. T-tubules were visualized with sulforhodamine B dye. In incubated muscle, glucose transport was measured by 2-deoxy-D-[(3)H]-glucose uptake, and functional detubulation was carried out by osmotic shock. Muscle fibers were immunostained for insulin...

  14. Large GLUT4 vesicles are stationary while locally and reversibly depleted during transient insulin stimulation of skeletal muscle of living mice: imaging analysis of GLUT4-enhanced green fluorescent protein vesicle dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M M; Galbo, Henrik; Brandauer, Josef

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates glucose transport in skeletal muscle by GLUT4 translocation from intracellular compartments to sarcolemma and t-tubules. We studied in living animals the recruitment of GLUT4 vesicles in more detail than previously done and, for the first time, analyzed the steady......-state recycling and subsequent re-internalization of GLUT4 on an insulin bolus. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A confocal imaging technique was used in GLUT4-enhanced green fluorescent protein-transfected superficial muscle fibers in living mice. RESULTS: During the first 30 min of insulin stimulation, very few...... superficially or deeply located GLUT4 storage vesicles (>1 microm) moved in toto. Rather, big vesicles were stationary in their original position at sarcolemma or t-tubules and were locally depleted of GLUT4 by budding off of smaller vesicles. Photobleaching experiments revealed that during initial...

  15. Dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression in skeletal muscle from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawajiri, Masakazu; Mitsui, Takao; Kawai, Hisaomi [Univ. of Tokushima (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    The precise localization and semiquantitative correlation of dystrophin, utrophin and {beta}-dystroglycan expression on the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle cells obtained from patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was studied using three types of double immunofluorescence. Staining intensity was measured using a confocal laser microscope. Each of these proteins was identified at the same locus on the sarcolemma. The staining intensities of dystrophin and utrophin were approximately reciprocal at sarcolemmal sites where dystrophin expression was obviously observed. The staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan was strong in areas where dystrophin staining was also strong and utrophin expression was weak. Quantitative analysis revealed that the staining intensity of {beta}-dystroglycan minus that of dystrophin approximated the staining intensity of utrophin, indicating that the sum of dystrophin and utrophin expression corresponds to that of {beta}-dystroglycan. These results suggest that utrophin may compensate for dystrophin deficiency found in BMD by binding to {beta}-dystroglycan. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Subcellular localization of the delayed rectifier K(+) channels KCNQ1 and ERG1 in the rat heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Møller, Morten; Knaus, Hans-Günther

    2003-01-01

    In the heart, several K(+) channels are responsible for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential, including transient outward and delayed rectifier K(+) currents. In the present study, the cellular and subcellular localization of the two delayed rectifier K(+) channels, KCNQ1 and ether......-a-go-go-related gene-1 (ERG1), was investigated in the adult rat heart. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of atrial and ventricular cells revealed that whereas KCNQ1 labeling was detected in both the peripheral sarcolemma and a structure transversing the myocytes, ERG1 immunoreactivity was confined to the latter....... Immunoelectron microscopy of atrial and ventricular myocytes showed that the ERG1 channel was primarily expressed in the transverse tubular system and its entrance, whereas KCNQ1 was detected in both the peripheral sarcolemma and in the T tubules. Thus, whereas ERG1 displays a very restricted subcellular...

  17. [Investigation and analysis of chloride channels distribution over the surface and T-tubule membranes of frog skeletal muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubasov, I V; Arutiunian, R S

    2012-09-01

    Two types of muscle fibre integral currents (T1T and T2T) were recorded using narrow-tipped extracellular pipettes in isolated sartorius muscles of frog, Rana temporaria. T1T and T2T responses presumably were generated by currents originating in the muscle fibers sarcolemma (M-band region) or both sarcolemma and T-system (Z-line region), respectively, and differently responded to the selective blockade of C1C chloride channels with anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-AC). Eva- luation of the role of prolongation of T1T responses in generation of multiple peaks of the second phase (Na current) of T2T integral currents in muscle fibers are discussed.

  18. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  19. Differential translocation of the fatty acid transporter, FAT/CD36, and the glucose transporter, GLUT4, coordinates changes in cardiac substrate metabolism during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Lisa C; Pates, Katharine M; Atherton, Helen J; Cole, Mark A; Ball, Daniel R; Evans, Rhys D; Glatz, Jan F; Luiken, Joost J; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran

    2013-09-01

    Fatty acid and glucose transporters translocate between the sarcolemma and intracellular compartments to regulate substrate metabolism acutely. We hypothesised that during ischemia fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) would translocate away from the sarcolemma to limit fatty acid uptake when fatty acid oxidation is inhibited. Wistar rat hearts were perfused during preischemia, low-flow ischemia, and reperfusion, using (3)H-substrates for measurement of metabolic rates, followed by metabolomic analysis and subcellular fractionation. During ischemia, there was a 32% decrease in sarcolemmal FAT/CD36 accompanied by a 95% decrease in fatty acid oxidation rates, with no change in intramyocardial lipids. Concomitantly, the sarcolemmal content of the glucose transporter, GLUT4, increased by 90% during ischemia, associated with an 86% increase in glycolytic rates, 45% decrease in glycogen content, and a 3-fold increase in phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase. Following reperfusion, decreased sarcolemmal FAT/CD36 persisted, but fatty acid oxidation rates returned to preischemic levels, resulting in a 35% decrease in myocardial triglyceride content. Elevated sarcolemmal GLUT4 persisted during reperfusion; in contrast, glycolytic rates decreased to 30% of preischemic rates, accompanied by a 5-fold increase in intracellular citrate levels and restoration of glycogen content. During ischemia, FAT/CD36 moved away from the sarcolemma as GLUT4 moved toward the sarcolemma, associated with a shift from fatty acid oxidation to glycolysis, while intramyocardial lipid accumulation was prevented. This relocation was maintained during reperfusion, which was associated with replenishing glycogen stores as a priority, occurring at the expense of glycolysis and mediated by an increase in citrate levels.

  20. Insulin and Contraction-induced GLUT4 Traffic in Muscle: Insights from a Novel Imaging Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lauritzen, Hans P.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and contraction-mediated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) trafficking have different kinetics in mature skeletal muscle. Intravital imaging indicates that insulin-stimulated GLUT4 trafficking differs between t-tubules and sarcolemma. In contrast, contraction-induced GLUT4 trafficking does not differ between membrane surfaces. This distinction is likely due to differences in the underlying signaling pathways regulating GLUT4 vesicle depletion, GLUT4 membrane fusion and GLUT4 re-internaliz...

  1. Syncytin-1 in differentiating human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregard, Bolette; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Myoblasts fuse to form myotubes, which mature into skeletal muscle fibres. Recent studies indicate that an endogenous retroviral fusion gene, syncytin-1, is important for myoblast fusions in man. We have now expanded these data by examining the immunolocalization of syncytin in human myoblasts...... fusions. Thus, syncytin is involved in human myoblast fusions and is localized in areas of contact between fusing cells. Moreover, syncytin and caveolin-3 might interact at the level of the sarcolemma....

  2. Distribution and localization of vinculin-talin-integrin system and dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in human skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemical study using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Amato, A; Tarone, G; Vita, G; Monici, M C; Magaudda, L; Brancaccio, M; Sidoti, A; Trimarchi, F; Favaloro, A; Cutroneo, G

    2003-01-01

    The vinculin-talin-integrin system and the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are two protein systems with structural and signaling functions, allowing interaction between muscle fibers and extracellular matrix. Although numerous studies have been conducted on these systems, their localization and distribution patterns along the nonjunctional sarcolemma are not clear. On this basis, we carried out an indirect immunofluorescence study on the vastus lateralis muscle of human adults not affected by neuromuscular diseases to better define these patterns. Our results showed that all tested proteins of the two systems have a costameric distribution; all tested proteins of the two systems colocalize with each other (about 90-95% of the cases); only alpha-sarcoglycan in a few cases (about 6%) does not colocalize with other proteins; in about 9-10% of the cases, dystrophin and beta-dystroglycan colocalize partially with other proteins; all tested proteins can be localized in different fibers, both in the region of the sarcolemma over I or A bands. The colocalization between the vinculin-talin-integrin and DGC systems may imply their functional interaction involving the structural aspect, by providing a stronger adhesion between sarcolemma and extracellular matrix in well-defined regions of the muscle fiber. Besides, their colocalization may suggest the existence of a mechanism of mutual modulation of the transmitted signals. This reciprocal control may determine, in different conditions, the prevalence of one system over another with a consequent transmission of different messages to the sarcolemma-associated cytoskeleton. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Sarcoglycans in human skeletal muscle and human cardiac muscle: a confocal laser scanning microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Trimarchi, F; Rizzo, G; Bramanti, P; Bruschetta, D; Fugazzotto, D; Cinelli, M P; Soscia, A; Santoro, G; Favaloro, A

    2003-01-01

    Sarcoglycans are a subcomplex of transmembrane proteins which are part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. They are expressed in the skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the sarcoglycan subcomplex in skeletal and cardiac muscle, the manner of the distribution and localization of these proteins along the nonjunctional sarcolemma is not clear. We therefore carried out an indirect immunofluorescence study on surgical biopsies of normal human skeletal muscle and of healthy human atrial myocardium biopsies of patients affected by valvulopathy. Our results indicate that, in skeletal muscle, sarcoglycans have a costameric distribution and all colocalize with each other. Only in a few cases did the alpha-sarcoglycan not colocalize with other sarcoglycans. In addition, these glycoproteins can be localized in different fibers either in the regions of the sarcolemma over band I or band A. In cardiac muscle, our results show a costameric distribution of all proteins examined and, unlike in skeletal muscle, they show a constant colocalization of all sarcoglycans with each other, along with a consistent localization of these proteins in the region of the sarcolemma over band I. In our opinion, this situation seems to confirm the hypothesis of a correlation between the region of the sarcolemma occupied by costameric proteins and the metabolic type, fast or slow, of the muscular fibers. These data, besides opening a new line of research in understanding interactions between the sarcoglycans and other transmembrane proteins, could also be extended to skeletal and cardiac muscles affected by neuromuscular and cardiovascular pathologies to understand possible structural alterations. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Imaging of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle of living mice shows major role of T-tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M M; Ploug, Thorkil; Prats, Clara

    2006-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose transport in skeletal muscle by glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma and membrane invaginations, the t-tubules. Although muscle glucose uptake plays a key role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the dynamics of GLUT4 translocation and the signal......Insulin stimulates glucose transport in skeletal muscle by glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma and membrane invaginations, the t-tubules. Although muscle glucose uptake plays a key role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the dynamics of GLUT4 translocation...... of a fluorescent dye after intravenous injection shows that this delay is similar to the time needed for insulin diffusion into the t-tubule system. Correspondingly, immunostaining of muscle fibers shows that insulin receptors are present throughout the t-tubule system. Finally, PIP(3) production, an early event...... in insulin signaling, progresses slowly along the t-tubules with a 10-min delay between maximal PIP(3) production at sarcolemma compared with deep t-tubules following the appearance of dye-labeled insulin. Our findings in living mice indicate a major role of the t-tubules in insulin signaling in skeletal...

  5. Mechanical load induces sarcoplasmic wounding and FGF release in differentiated human skeletal muscle cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The transduction mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for converting a mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response are unclear. In this study we have used a mechanically active tissue culture model of differentiated human skeletal muscle cells to investigate the relationship between mechanical load, sarcolemma wounding, fibroblast growth factor release, and skeletal muscle cell growth. Using the Flexcell Strain Unit we demonstrate that as mechanical load increases, so too does the amount of sarcolemma wounding. A similar relationship was also observed between the level of mechanical load inflicted on the cells and the amount of bFGF (FGF2) released into the surrounding medium. In addition, we demonstrate that the muscle cell growth response induced by chronic mechanical loading in culture can be inhibited by the presence of an antibody capable of neutralizing the biological activity of FGF. This study provides direct evidence that mechanically induced, sarcolemma wound-mediated FGF release is an important autocrine mechanism for transducing the stimulus of mechanical load into a skeletal muscle growth response.

  6. Sarcoglycan and integrin localization in normal human skeletal muscle: a confocal laser scanning microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Anastasi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been performed on the sarcoglycan subcomplex and a7B and b1D integrins, but their distribution and localization patterns along the non-junctional sarcolemma are still not clear. We have carried out an indirect immunofluorescence study on surgical biopsies of normal human skeletal muscle, performing double localization reactions with antibodies to sarcoglycans, integrins and sarcomeric actin. Our results indicate that the tested proteins colocalize with each other. In a few cases, a-sarcoglycan does not colocalize with the other sarcoglycans and integrins. We also demonstrated, by employing antibodies to all the tested proteins, that these proteins can be localized to regions of the sarcolemma corresponding either to the I-band or Aband. Our results seem to confirm the hypothesis of a correlation between the region of the sarcolemma occupied by costameric proteins and the metabolic type (fast or slow of muscle fibers. On this basis, we suggest that slow fibers are characterized by localization of costameric proteins to Ibands, while fast fibers are characterized by localization of costameric proteins to A-bands. The results open a new line of research in understanding interactions between the components of the DGC and vinculin-talin-integrin complexes in the context of different fiber types. Moreover, the same results may be extended to skeletal muscle fibers affected by neuromuscular diseases to detect possible structural alterations.

  7. Sarcoglycan subcomplex in normal and pathological human muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Rizzo, G; Favaloro, A

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoglycans are a sub-complex of transmembrane proteins which are part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC). They are expressed above all in the skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the sarcoglycan sub-complex in skeletal and cardiac muscle, the manner of distribution and localization of these proteins along the non-junctional sarcolemma is still not clear. Furthermore, there are unclear data about the actual role of sarcoglycans in human skeletal muscle affected by sarcoglycanopathies. In our studies on human skeletal muscle, normal and pathological, we determined the localization, distribution and interaction of these glycoproteins. Our results, on normal human skeletal muscle, showed that the sarcoglycans can be localized both in the region of the sarcolemma over the I band and over the A band, hypothesizing a correlation between regions of the sarcolemma occupied by costameres and the metabolic type of the fibers (slow and fast). Our data on skeletal muscle affected by sarcoglycanopathy confirmed the hypothesis of a bidirectional signaling between sarcoglycans and integrins and the interaction of filamin2 with both sarcoglycans and integrins. In addition, we have recently demonstrated, in smooth muscle, the presence of alpha-SG, in contrast with data of other Authors. Finally, we analyzed the association between contractile activity and quantitative correlation between alpha- and epsilon-SG, in order to better define the arrangement of sarcoglycan subcomplex.

  8. Sarcoglycan and integrin localization in normal human skeletal muscle: a confocal laser scanning microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Rizzo, G; Arco, A; Santoro, G; Bramanti, P; Vitetta, A G; Pisani, A; Trimarchi, F; Favaloro, A

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on the sarcoglycan sub-complex and a7B and b1D integrins, but their distribution and localization patterns along the non-junctional sarcolemma are still not clear. We have carried out an indirect immunofluorescence study on surgical biopsies of normal human skeletal muscle, performing double localization reactions with antibodies to sarcoglycans, integrins and sarcomeric actin. Our results indicate that the tested proteins colocalize with each other. In a few cases, a-sarcoglycan does not colocalize with the other sarcoglycans and integrins. We also demonstrated, by employing antibodies to all the tested proteins, that these proteins can be localized to regions of the sarcolemma corresponding either to the I-band or A-band. Our results seem to confirm the hypothesis of a correlation between the region of the sarcolemma occupied by costameric proteins and the metabolic type (fast or slow) of muscle fibers. On this basis, we suggest that slow fibers are characterized by localization of costameric proteins to I-bands, while fast fibers are characterized by localization of costameric proteins to A-bands. The results open a new line of research in understanding interactions between the components of the DGC and vinculin-talin-integrin complexes in the context of different fiber types. Moreover, the same results may be extended to skeletal muscle fibers affected by neuromuscular diseases to detect possible structural alterations.

  9. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2015-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan 'rescue' of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Disruption of action potential and calcium signaling properties in malformed myofibers from dystrophin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Pratt, Stephen J P; Garcia-Pelagio, Karla P; Schneider, Martin F; Lovering, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and severe muscular dystrophy, is caused by the absence of dystrophin. Muscle weakness and fragility (i.e., increased susceptibility to damage) are presumably due to structural instability of the myofiber cytoskeleton, but recent studies suggest that the increased presence of malformed/branched myofibers in dystrophic muscle may also play a role. We have previously studied myofiber morphology in healthy wild-type (WT) and dystrophic (MDX) skeletal muscle. Here, we examined myofiber excitability using high-speed confocal microscopy and the voltage-sensitive indicator di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS) to assess the action potential (AP) properties. We also examined AP-induced Ca2+ transients using high-speed confocal microscopy with rhod-2, and assessed sarcolemma fragility using elastimetry. AP recordings showed an increased width and time to peak in malformed MDX myofibers compared to normal myofibers from both WT and MDX, but no significant change in AP amplitude. Malformed MDX myofibers also exhibited reduced AP-induced Ca2+ transients, with a further Ca2+ transient reduction in the branches of malformed MDX myofibers. Mechanical studies indicated an increased sarcolemma deformability and instability in malformed MDX myofibers. The data suggest that malformed myofibers are functionally different from myofibers with normal morphology. The differences seen in AP properties and Ca2+ signals suggest changes in excitability and remodeling of the global Ca2+ signal, both of which could underlie reported weakness in dystrophic muscle. The biomechanical changes in the sarcolemma support the notion that malformed myofibers are more susceptible to damage. The high prevalence of malformed myofibers in dystrophic muscle may contribute to the progressive strength loss and fragility seen in dystrophic muscles. PMID:25907787

  11. Excitation-contraction coupling and mechano-sensitivity in denervated skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Francini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy can be defined as a wasting or decrease in muscle mass and muscle force generation owing lack of use, ageing, injury or disease. Thus, the etiology of atrophy can be different. Atrophy in denervated muscle is a consequence of two factors: 1 the complete lack of motoneuron activity inducing the deficiency of neurotransmitter release and 2 the muscles disuse. The balance of the muscular functions depends on extra- and intra-muscular signals. In the balance are involved the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, local growth factors, Ca2+-dependent and independent intracellular signals, mechano-sensitivity and mechano-transduction that activate Ca2+-dependent signaling proteins and cytoskeleton- nucleus pathways to the nucleus, that regulate the gene expression. Moreover, retrograde signal from intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton to the sarcolemma are additional factors that regulate the muscle function. Proteolytic systems that operate in atrophic muscles progressively reduce the muscle protein content and so the sarcolemma, ECC and the force generation. In this review we will focus on the more relevant changes of the sarcolemma, excitation-contraction coupling, ECC and mechano-transduction evaluated by electrophysiological methods and observed from early- to long-term denervated skeletal muscles. This review put in particular evidence that long-term denervated muscle maintain a sub-population of fibers with ECC and contractile machinery able to be activated, albeit in lesser amounts, by electrical and mechanical stimulation. Accordingly, this provides a potential molecular explanation of the muscle recovery that occurs in response to rehabilitation strategy as transcutaneous electrical stimulation and passive stretching of denervated muscles, which wre developed as a result of empirical clinical observations.

  12. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Scott, Bryan L; Walker, Ashley E; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M; Thomas, Gail D; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-11-28

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived NO attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective-causing functional muscle ischemia-in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. We report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation is fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP (guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5A inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD.

  13. Inhibition of the expression of pathology in dystrophic mouse leg muscles by immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loermans, H; Wirtz, P

    1983-04-01

    Normal and dystrophic calf muscles of young mice of the Bar Harbor strain Re 129 were immobilized with the foot in an extended position. Two weeks after treatment the muscles were examined morphologically. Immobilization resulted in the inhibition of fibre necrosis and, consequently, of regeneration. In the contralateral leg these processes progressed unhampered and gave rise to typical dystrophic features. As a result of treatment there was some muscle fibre atrophy. The results clearly indicate that injury of muscle fibres is of a true "myogenic" nature, and that mechanical, i.e. contractive, activity is an important factor inducing damage to the sarcolemma of dystrophic muscle fibres.

  14. Acute kidney injury due to rhabdomyolysis after status epilepticus: Two pediatric case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Midhat Elmacı

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is defined as degeneration of skeletal muscle due to traumatic or non-traumatic causes. With the injury of sarcolemma, myocyte contents (myoglobin, enzymes and electrolytes leakage into the plasma and urine occurs. If rhabdomyolysis is not recognized and untreated, severe even fatal complications such as acute kidney injury (AKI, hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia, hypovolemia, muscle necrosis, cardiac arrythmias and compartment syndrome may occur. Status epilepticus is an uncommon cause of rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. We report here two pediatric patients, who developed myoglobinuria and AKI due to status epilepticus. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 517-520

  15. Rac1 governs exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle through regulation of GLUT4 translocation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Laurent, Ida; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    % in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles, respectively, in muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout (mKO) mice compared to wildtype littermates. By developing an assay to quantify endogenous GLUT4 translocation, we observed that GLUT4 content at the sarcolemma in response to exercise was reduced in Rac1 m......KO muscle. Our findings implicate Rac1 as a regulatory element critical for controlling glucose uptake during exercise via regulation of GLUT4 translocation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Exercise induced capillary growth in human skeletal muscle and the dynamics of VEGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    , these VEGF containing vesicles are redistributed towards the sarcolemma where the contents are secreted into the extracellular fluid. VEGF mRNA expression is increased primarily after exercise, which allows for a more rapid replenishment of VEGF stores lost through secretion during exercise. Future studies...... in the muscle interstitium, acts on VEGF receptors on the capillary endothelium and thereby stimulates angiogenic processes. A primary source of muscle interstitial VEGF during exercise is the skeletal muscle fibers which contain large stores of VEGF within vesicles. We propose that, during muscle activity...

  17. Localization of nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ulrik; Lopez-Figueroa, M.; Hellsten, Ylva

    1996-01-01

    The present study investigated the cellular localization of the neuronal type I and endothelial type III nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle. Type I NO synthase immunoreactivity was found in the sarcolemma and the cytoplasm of all muscle fibres. Stronger immunoreactivity was expressed...... I NO synthase immunoreactivity and NADPH diaphorase activity. Type III NO synthase immunoreactivity was observed both in the endothelium of larger vessels and of microvessels. The results establish that human skeletal muscle expresses two different constitutive isoforms of NO synthase in different...... endothelium is consistent with a role for NO in the control of blood flow in human skeletal muscle....

  18. Reduction in dynamin-2 is implicated in ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dan; Xie, Duanyang; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Hong; Huang, Jian; Li, Changming; Liu, Yi; Lv, Fei; The, Erlinda; Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Tianyou; Wang, Shiyi; Chen, Jinjin; Pan, Lei; Yu, Zuoren; Liang, Dandan; Zhu, Weidong; Zhang, Yuzhen; Li, Li; Peng, Luying; Li, Jun; Chen, Yi-Han

    2014-10-01

    Ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias cause a large proportion of sudden cardiac deaths worldwide. The ischaemic arrhythmogenesis is primarily because of the dysfunction and adverse remodelling of sarcolemma ion channels. However, the potential regulators of sarcolemma ion channel turnover and function in ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias remains unknown. Our previous studies indicate that dynamin-2 (DNM2), a cardiac membrane-remodelling GTPase, modulates ion channels membrane trafficking in the cardiomyocytes. Here, we have found that DNM2 plays an important role in acute ischaemic arrhythmias. In rat ventricular tissues and primary cardiomyocytes subjected to acute ischaemic stress, the DNM2 protein and transcription levels were markedly down-regulated. This DNM2 reduction was coupled with severe ventricular arrhythmias. Moreover, we identified that the down-regulation of DNM2 within cardiomyocytes increases the action potential amplitude and prolongs the re-polarization duration by depressing the retrograde trafficking of Nav1.5 and Kir2.1 channels. These effects are likely to account for the DNM2 defect-induced arrhythmogenic potentials. These results suggest that DNM2, with its multi-ion channel targeting properties, could be a promising target for novel antiarrhythmic therapies. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Differential requirement for utrophin in the induced pluripotent stem cell correction of muscle versus fat in muscular dystrophy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Beck

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an incurable degenerative muscle disorder. We injected WT mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mdx and mdx∶utrophin mutant blastocysts, which are predisposed to develop DMD with an increasing degree of severity (mdx <<< mdx∶utrophin. In mdx chimeras, iPSC-dystrophin was supplied to the muscle sarcolemma to effect corrections at morphological and functional levels. Dystrobrevin was observed in dystrophin-positive and, at a lesser extent, utrophin-positive areas. In the mdx∶utrophin mutant chimeras, although iPSC-dystrophin was also supplied to the muscle sarcolemma, mice still displayed poor skeletal muscle histopathology, and negligible levels of dystrobrevin in dystrophin- and utrophin-negative areas. Not only dystrophin-expressing tissues are affected by iPSCs. Mdx and mdx∶utrophin mice have reduced fat/body weight ratio, but iPSC injection normalized this parameter in both mdx and mdx∶utrophin chimeras, despite the fact that utrophin was compromised in the mdx∶utrophin chimeric fat. The results suggest that the presence of utrophin is required for the iPSC-corrections in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the results highlight a potential (utrophin-independent non-cell autonomous role for iPSC-dystrophin in the corrections of non-muscle tissue like fat, which is intimately related to the muscle.

  20. Action potential propagation in transverse-axial tubular system is impaired in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacconi, Leonardo; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Lotti, Jacopo; Coppini, Raffaele; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M; Tesi, Chiara; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Poggesi, Corrado; Pavone, Francesco S

    2012-04-10

    The plasma membrane of cardiac myocytes presents complex invaginations known as the transverse-axial tubular system (TATS). Despite TATS's crucial role in excitation-contraction coupling and morphological alterations found in pathological settings, TATS's electrical activity has never been directly investigated in remodeled tubular networks. Here we develop an ultrafast random access multiphoton microscope that, in combination with a customly synthesized voltage-sensitive dye, is used to simultaneously measure action potentials (APs) at multiple sites within the sarcolemma with submillisecond temporal and submicrometer spatial resolution in real time. We find that the tight electrical coupling between different sarcolemmal domains is guaranteed only within an intact tubular system. In fact, acute detachment by osmotic shock of most tubules from the surface sarcolemma prevents AP propagation not only in the disconnected tubules, but also in some of the tubules that remain connected with the surface. This indicates that a structural disorganization of the tubular system worsens the electrical coupling between the TATS and the surface. The pathological implications of this finding are investigated in failing hearts. We find that AP propagation into the pathologically remodeled TATS frequently fails and may be followed by local spontaneous electrical activity. Our findings provide insight on the relationship between abnormal TATS and asynchronous calcium release, a major determinant of cardiac contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias.

  1. Impaired Translocation of GLUT4 Results in Insulin Resistance of Atrophic Soleus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats. PMID:25713812

  2. AAV-mediated intramuscular delivery of myotubularin corrects the myotubular myopathy phenotype in targeted murine muscle and suggests a function in plasma membrane homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buj-Bello, Anna; Fougerousse, Françoise; Schwab, Yannick; Messaddeq, Nadia; Spehner, Danièle; Pierson, Christopher R; Durand, Muriel; Kretz, Christine; Danos, Olivier; Douar, Anne-Marie; Beggs, Alan H; Schultz, Patrick; Montus, Marie; Denèfle, Patrice; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-15

    Myotubular myopathy (XLMTM, OMIM 310400) is a severe congenital muscular disease due to mutations in the myotubularin gene (MTM1) and characterized by the presence of small myofibers with frequent occurrence of central nuclei. Myotubularin is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoinositide phosphatase with a muscle-specific role in man and mouse that is poorly understood. No specific treatment exists to date for patients with myotubular myopathy. We have constructed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing myotubularin in order to test its therapeutic potential in a XLMTM mouse model. We show that a single intramuscular injection of this vector in symptomatic Mtm1-deficient mice ameliorates the pathological phenotype in the targeted muscle. Myotubularin replacement in mice largely corrects nuclei and mitochondria positioning in myofibers and leads to a strong increase in muscle volume and recovery of the contractile force. In addition, we used this AAV vector to overexpress myotubularin in wild-type skeletal muscle and get insight into its localization and function. We show that a substantial proportion of myotubularin associates with the sarcolemma and I band, including triads. Myotubularin overexpression in muscle induces the accumulation of packed membrane saccules and presence of vacuoles that contain markers of sarcolemma and T-tubules, suggesting that myotubularin is involved in plasma membrane homeostasis of myofibers. This study provides a proof-of-principle that local delivery of an AAV vector expressing myotubularin can improve the motor capacities of XLMTM muscle and represents a novel approach to study myotubularin function in skeletal muscle.

  3. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  4. Isolation and characterization of calcium binding glycoproteins of cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, M.; Fliegel, L.; Wlasichuk, K. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-04-05

    Two major Ca2(+)-binding glycoproteins Mr 120,000 and 100,000 were isolated from 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonic acid -solubilized bovine heart sarcolemma membrane. Peroxidase-conjugated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin lectins bind strongly to the isolated 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins. Treatment with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of the 120-kDa glycoprotein to a form migrating at about 97 kDa. Treatment of the 100-kDa band with endoglycosidase F produced form of about 80 kDa. Endoglycosidase H digestion removes only 5% of the mass of both glycoproteins. the carbohydrate structure of both glycoproteins, is therefore, predicted to be at least 75% complex structure and 25% high mannose or hybrid structure. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins are the major Ca2(+)-binding proteins in the sarcolemma membranes. Intact and endoglycosidase-treated glycoproteins bind 45Ca2+ as analyzed by a 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Using polyclonal antibodies, the 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins were identified in muscle plasma membranes (ventricles, atria, and uterus smooth muscle). They were, however, not present in non-muscle tissues such as pancreas, liver, and kidney. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins appear to be homologous molecules as judged by their similar V8 protease peptide maps, cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody, and other physicochemical properties.

  5. Becker Muscular Dystrophy-Like Myopathy Regarded as So-Called “Fatty Muscular Dystrophy” in a Pig: A Case Report and Its Diagnostic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; AIHARA, Naoyuki; MIZUTANI, Hiroshi; KOUSAKA, Shinichi; NAGAFUCHI, Tsuneyuki; OCHIAI, Mariko; OCHIAI, Kazuhiko; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; FURUOKA, Hidefumi; ASAI, Tetsuo; OISHI, Koji

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a case of human Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)-like myopathy that was characterized by the declined stainability of dystrophin at sarcolemma in a pig and the immunostaining for dystrophin on the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The present case was found in a meat inspection center. The pig looked appeared healthy at the ante-mortem inspection. Muscular abnormalities were detected after carcass dressing as pale, discolored skeletal muscles with prominent fat infiltrations and considered so-called “fatty muscular dystrophy”. Microscopic examination revealed following characteristics: diffused fat infiltration into the skeletal muscle and degeneration and regeneration of the remaining skeletal muscle fibers. Any lesions that were suspected of neurogenic atrophy, traumatic muscular degeneration, glycogen storage disease or other porcine muscular disorders were not observed. The immunostaining for dystrophin was conducted and confirmed to be applicable on FFPE porcine muscular tissues and revealed diminished stainability of dystrophin at the sarcolemma in the present case. Based on the histological observations and immunostaining results, the present case was diagnosed with BMD-like myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormality in a pig. Although the genetic properties were not clear, the present BMD-like myopathy implied the occurrence of dystrophinopathy in pigs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural case of myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormalities in a pig. PMID:24162004

  6. High levels of sarcospan are well tolerated and act as a sarcolemmal stabilizer to address skeletal muscle and pulmonary dysfunction in DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Elizabeth M; Marshall, Jamie L; Ma, Eva; Nguyen, Thien M; Hong, Grace; Lam, Jessica S; Spencer, Melissa J; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2016-12-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle weakness, ultimately leading to early mortality in affected teenagers and young adults. Previous work from our lab has shown that a small transmembrane protein called sarcospan (SSPN) can enhance the recruitment of adhesion complex proteins to the cell surface. When human SSPN is expressed at three-fold levels in mdx mice, this increase in adhesion complex abundance improves muscle membrane stability, preventing many of the histopathological changes associated with DMD. However, expressing higher levels of human SSPN (ten-fold transgenic expression) causes a severe degenerative muscle phenotype in wild-type mice. Since SSPN-mediated stabilization of the sarcolemma represents a promising therapeutic strategy in DMD, it is important to determine whether SSPN can be introduced at high levels without toxicity. Here, we show that mouse SSPN (mSSPN) can be overexpressed at 30-fold levels in wild-type mice with no deleterious effects. In mdx mice, mSSPN overexpression improves dystrophic pathology and sarcolemmal stability. We show that these mice exhibit increased resistance to eccentric contraction-induced damage and reduced fatigue following exercise. mSSPN overexpression improved pulmonary function and reduced dystrophic histopathology in the diaphragm. Together, these results demonstrate that SSPN overexpression is well tolerated in mdx mice and improves sarcolemma defects that underlie skeletal muscle and pulmonary dysfunction in DMD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Role of phospholipase A2 in the induction of drip loss in porcine muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kristian A; Young, Jette F; Theil, Peter

    2007-01-01

    . Morphological studies of porcine muscle showed that at 4 h post-mortem, gaps had formed between muscle fibers and that the sarcolemma membrane borders appeared blurred. At the same time iPLA2-VIA protein levels were increased inside muscle fibers and at the sarcolemma. iPLA2-VIA mRNA abundance in samples from...... different breeds of pigs with variations in drip loss revealed no clear correlation between drip loss level and iPLA2-VIA expression. Together, these data indicate that during the post-mortem period, iPLA2-VIA expression and activity is increased at the muscle fiber membranes. PLA2 activity may affect......The role of phospholipase A2 in the induction of drip loss from pig muscle has been investigated. In samples from porcine M. longissimus dorsi, total PLA2 activity as well as mRNA and protein levels of the group VIA iPLA2 (iPLA2-VIA) increased during the initial 4 h post-mortem period...

  8. Dystrophin-deficiency increases the susceptibility to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shiwei; Kulle, Bettina; Hosseini, Mehdi; Schlüter, Gregor; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Wojnowski, Leszek; Schmidt, Albrecht

    2007-10-01

    The clinical use of doxorubicin (DOX) and other anthracyclines is limited by a dosage-dependent cardiotoxicity, which can lead to cardiomyopathy. The role of the individual genetic makeup in this disorder is poorly understood. Alterations in genes encoding cardiac cytoskeleton or sarcolemma proteins may increase the susceptibility to doxorubicin-related cardiotoxicity. Female dystrophin-deficient mice (MDX) and age-matched wild-type mice underwent chronic treatment with doxorubicin. Cardiac function and tissue damage were assessed by echocardiography and histopathology, respectively. Gene expression changes were investigated using microarrays. DOX treatment resulted in mortality, cardiac insufficiency, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis. These alterations were more pronounced in DOX-treated MDX mice than in DOX-treated wild-type mice. Changes in gene expression were more numerous in MDX mice, including genes involved in cell adhesion, oxidative stress, cytoskeleton organization, inflammatory and immune response and cell death. Dystrophin deficiency facilitates the development and progression of doxorubicin-induced cardiac injury. The underlying mechanisms may involve changes in cell adhesion, in cytoskeleton, as well as in inflammatory and immune responses. Genetic variants of cytoskeletal proteins in humans may affect the individual susceptibility to doxorubicin. Cardiotoxic drugs may accelerate the manifestation of pre-clinical cardiomyopathies caused by deficiencies in cytoskeletal or sarcolemma proteins.

  9. Sarcospan Regulates Cardiac Isoproterenol Response and Prevents Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy-Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatiyar, Michelle S; Marshall, Jamie L; Nguyen, Reginald T; Jordan, Maria C; Richardson, Vanitra A; Roos, Kenneth P; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2015-12-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal cardiac and skeletal muscle disease resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. We have previously demonstrated that a dystrophin-associated protein, sarcospan (SSPN), ameliorated Duchenne muscular dystrophy skeletal muscle degeneration by activating compensatory pathways that regulate muscle cell adhesion (laminin-binding) to the extracellular matrix. Conversely, loss of SSPN destabilized skeletal muscle adhesion, hampered muscle regeneration, and reduced force properties. Given the importance of SSPN to skeletal muscle, we investigated the consequences of SSPN ablation in cardiac muscle and determined whether overexpression of SSPN into mdx mice ameliorates cardiac disease symptoms associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy. SSPN-null mice exhibited cardiac enlargement, exacerbated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and increased fibrosis in response to β-adrenergic challenge (isoproterenol; 0.8 mg/day per 2 weeks). Biochemical analysis of SSPN-null cardiac muscle revealed reduced sarcolemma localization of many proteins with a known role in cardiomyopathy pathogenesis: dystrophin, the sarcoglycans (α-, δ-, and γ-subunits), and β1D integrin. Transgenic overexpression of SSPN in Duchenne muscular dystrophy mice (mdx(TG)) improved cardiomyofiber cell adhesion, sarcolemma integrity, cardiac functional parameters, as well as increased expression of compensatory transmembrane proteins that mediate attachment to the extracellular matrix. SSPN regulates sarcolemmal expression of laminin-binding complexes that are critical to cardiac muscle function and protects against transient and chronic injury, including inherited cardiomyopathy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Membrane repair of human skeletal muscle cells requires Annexin-A5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeille, Romain; Bouvet, Flora; Tan, Sisareuth; Croissant, Coralie; Gounou, Céline; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Brisson, Alain R; Bouter, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Defect in membrane repair contributes to the development of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi myopathy. In healthy skeletal muscle, unraveling membrane repair mechanisms requires to establish an exhaustive list of the components of the resealing machinery. Here we show that human myotubes rendered deficient for Annexin-A5 (AnxA5) suffer from a severe defect in membrane resealing. This defect is rescued by the addition of recombinant AnxA5 while an AnxA5 mutant, which is unable to form 2D protein arrays, has no effect. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we show that AnxA5 binds to the edges of the torn membrane, as early as a few seconds after sarcolemma injury, where it probably self-assembles into 2D arrays. In addition, we observed that membrane resealing is associated with the presence of a cluster of lipid vesicles at the wounded site. AnxA5 is present at the surface of these vesicles and may thus participate in plugging the cell membrane disruption. Finally, we show that AnxA5 behaves similarly in myotubes from a muscle cell line established from a patient suffering from LGMD2B, a myopathy due to dysferlin mutations, which indicates that trafficking of AnxA5 during sarcolemma damage is independent of the presence of dysferlin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impaired Translocation of GLUT4 Results in Insulin Resistance of Atrophic Soleus Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Tao Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  12. Impaired translocation of GLUT4 results in insulin resistance of atrophic soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  13. Membrane-stabilizing copolymers confer marked protection to dystrophic skeletal muscle in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne M Houang

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal disease of striated muscle deterioration. A unique therapeutic approach for DMD is the use of synthetic membrane stabilizers to protect the fragile dystrophic sarcolemma against contraction-induced mechanical stress. Block copolymer-based membrane stabilizer poloxamer 188 (P188 has been shown to protect the dystrophic myocardium. In comparison, the ability of synthetic membrane stabilizers to protect fragile DMD skeletal muscles has been less clear. Because cardiac and skeletal muscles have distinct structural and functional features, including differences in the mechanism of activation, variance in sarcolemma phospholipid composition, and differences in the magnitude and types of forces generated, we speculated that optimized membrane stabilization could be inherently different. Our objective here is to use principles of pharmacodynamics to evaluate membrane stabilization therapy for DMD skeletal muscles. Results show a dramatic differential effect of membrane stabilization by optimization of pharmacodynamic-guided route of poloxamer delivery. Data show that subcutaneous P188 delivery, but not intravascular or intraperitoneal routes, conferred significant protection to dystrophic limb skeletal muscles undergoing mechanical stress in vivo. In addition, structure-function examination of synthetic membrane stabilizers further underscores the importance of copolymer composition, molecular weight, and dosage in optimization of poloxamer pharmacodynamics in vivo.

  14. Potassium-induced contractures in crab (Callinectes danae) muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Cardoso, J H; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1984-01-01

    The contractures induced by 20-200 mM [K+]o in single crab muscle fibers were resolved into two components. The first component, consisting of single twitches or brief tetanic contractions, was associated with electrogenic membrane responses. The second occurred after spiking subsided with an amplitude that increased linearly with the [K+]o between 20 and 90 mM. The amplitude and time course of the contractures elicited by a given [K+]o differed markedly between different fibers. Contracture reproducibility of a single fiber was best when 90 mM [K+]o was used. The K-induced contractures were abolished after brief (3 min) exposure of the fibers to a calcium-free solution and were greatly depressed by 8 mM procaine. The data suggest that the contractures require both Ca2+-influx across the sarcolemma and release of Ca2+ stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  16. Muscle interstitial potassium kinetics during intense exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Mohr, Magni; Pedersen, Lasse Dannemann

    2003-01-01

    Interstitial K+ ([K+]i) was measured in human skeletal muscle by microdialysis during exhaustive leg exercise, with (AL) and without (L) previous intense arm exercise. In addition, the reproducibility of the [K+]i determinations was examined. Possible microdialysis-induced rupture of the sarcolemma...... was assessed by measurement of carnosine in the dialysate, because carnosine is only expected to be found intracellularly. Changes in [K+]i could be reproduced, when exhaustive leg exercise was performed on two different days, with a between-day difference of approximately 0.5 mM at rest and 1.5 m......M at exhaustion. The time to exhaustion was shorter in AL than in L (2.7 +/- 0.3 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.3 min; P exhaustion (11.9 +/- 0.5 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.6 mM; P...

  17. Gastric emptying, small intestinal transit and fecal output in dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Serio, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which results from deficiency in dystrophin, a sarcolemma protein of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle, is characterized by progressive striated muscle degeneration, but various gastrointestinal clinical manifestations have been observed. The aim was to evaluate the possible impact of the dystrophin loss on the gastrointestinal propulsion in mdx mice (animal model for DMD). The gastric emptying of a carboxymethyl cellulose/phenol red dye non-nutrient meal was not significantly different at 20 min from gavaging between wild-type and mdx mice. The intestinal transit and the fecal output were significantly decreased in mdx versus normal animals, although the length of the intestine was similar in both animals. The present results provide evidence for motor intestinal alterations in mdx mice in in vivo conditions.

  18. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alejandro Cisterna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors, TRPV2 channels were demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically prevented in denervated muscles deficient in connexins 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned none selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., BDNF, agrin/Lrp4/MuSK and acetylcholine are among the possible perpetrators of repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  19. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. © 2013 FEBS.

  20. Distribution of a major connective tissue protein, fibronectin, in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, S; Vaheri, A

    1978-04-01

    Fibronectin is a major surface-associated glycoprotein of cultured fibroblasts and it is also present in human plasma. Antiserum specific for human fibronectin was used to study the distribution of fibronectin in normal adult human tissues. The protein was detected (a) characteristically in various basement membranes including capillary walls: (b) around individual smooth muscle cells and in the sarcolemma of striated muscle fibers; and (c) in the stroma of lymphatic tissue and as thin fibers in loose connective tissue. The distribution of fibronectin was distinct from that of collagen and elastic fibers, but was very similar to reticulin, as demonstrated by conventional histological staining. The results indicate that fibronectin is a major component of connective tissue matrix. The distribution also indicates that most types of adherent cells abut fibronectin-containing structures. This supports the possible role of fibronectin in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in tissues.

  1. Erythropoietin receptor in human skeletal muscle and the effects of acute and long-term injections with recombinant human erythropoietin on the skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva; Jensen, Mie B. F.

    2008-01-01

    The presence and potential physiological role of the erythropoietin receptor (Epo-R) were examined in human skeletal muscle. In this study we demonstrate that Epo-R is present in the endothelium, smooth muscle cells, and in fractions of the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. To study...... the potential effects of Epo in human skeletal muscle, two separate studies were conducted: one to study the acute effects of a single Epo injection on skeletal muscle gene expression and plasma hormones and another to study the effects of long-term (14 wk) Epo treatment on skeletal muscle structure. Subjects....... In conclusion, the Epo-R is present in the vasculature and myocytes in human skeletal muscle, suggesting a role in both cell types. In accordance, a single injection of Epo regulates myoglobin, MRF-4, and transferrin receptor mRNA levels. However, in contrast to our hypothesis, prolonged Epo administration had...

  2. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian; Baum, Linda G.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  3. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  4. [Devine's technique with free skin grafting for concealed penis with prepuce deficit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Yao-Ting; Shen, Zhi-Jie; Li, Du-Jian; Gu, Wei; Huang, Ru-Qiang

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of Devine's technique with free skin grafting in the treatment of concealed penis with prepuce deficit. This study included 7 children with concealed penis, aged 6 - 15 (mean 8.6) years, 6 of them treated by circumcision previously. All the patients underwent Devine's operation to resect the inelasticity sarcolemma and lengthen the penis. The length of prepuce deficit ranged from 2 to 4 cm. Intermediate split thickness skin grafts of the corresponding length were taken from the femoribus internus to wrap up the tunica albuginea penis, followed by the procedures of saturation, encapsulation and fixation. Surgery time ranged from 70 to 120 minutes, averaging 90.5 minutes. The penis was prolonged about 2 - 4 cm after surgery. A 6-month follow-up revealed desirable penile appearance and normal penile erection. Devine's technique with free skin grafting from the femoribus internus is an ideal treatment for concealed penis with prepuce deficit.

  5. Insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid binding protein trafficking at the plasma membrane in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Serup, Annette Karen; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate lipid-induced regulation of lipid binding proteins in human skeletal muscle and the impact hereof on insulin sensitivity. Eleven healthy male subjects underwent a 3-day hyper-caloric and high-fat diet regime. Muscle biopsies were taken before......-regulated by increased fatty acid availability. This suggests a time dependency in the up-regulation of FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein during high availability of plasma fatty acids. Furthermore, we did not detect FATP1 and FATP4 protein in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from human skeletal muscle. In conclusion......, this study shows that a short-term lipid-load increases mRNA content of key lipid handling proteins in human muscle. However, decreased insulin sensitivity after high-fat diet is not accompanied with relocation of FAT/CD36 or FABPpm protein to the sarcolemma. Finally, FATP1 and FATP4 protein could...

  6. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Miragoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart.

  7. Growth hormone plus resistance exercise attenuate structural changes in rat myotendinous junctions resulting from chronic unloading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Curzi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Myotendinous junctions (MTJs are specialized sites on the muscle surface where forces generated by myofibrils are transmitted across the sarcolemma to the extracellular matrix. At the ultrastructural level, the interface between the sarcolemma and extracellular matrix is highly folded and interdigitated at these junctions. In this study, the effect of exercise and growth hormone (GH treatments on the changes in MTJ structure that occur during muscle unloading, has been analyzed. Twenty hypophysectomized rats were assigned randomly to one of five groups: ambulatory control, hindlimb unloaded, hindlimb unloaded plus exercise (3 daily bouts of 10 climbs up a ladder with 50% body wt attached to the tail, hindlimb unloaded plus GH (2 daily injections of 1 mg/kg body wt, i.p., and hindlimb unloaded plus exercise plus GH. MTJs of the plantaris muscle were analyzed by electron microscopy and the contact between muscle and tendon was evaluated using an IL/B ratio, where B is the base and IL is the interface length of MTJ’s digit-like processes. After 10 days of unloading, the mean IL/B ratio was significantly lower in unloaded (3.92, unloaded plus exercise (4.18, and unloaded plus GH (5.25 groups than in the ambulatory control (6.39 group. On the opposite, the mean IL/B ratio in the group treated with both exercise and GH (7.3 was similar to control. These findings indicate that the interaction between exercise and GH treatments attenuates the changes in MTJ structure that result from chronic unloading and thus can be used as a countermeasure to these adaptations.

  8. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester M Den Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term 3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated 3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated 3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (3 or sunflower oil (9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered 3-PUFAs. Plasma of 3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of 3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, 3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than 9 myocytes. In the 9 myocytes, but not in the 3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated 3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered 3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac 3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term 3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  9. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Arnaud; Rousseau, Joël; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2017-03-17

    Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adult human muscle, but laminin subunit alpha 1 (LAMA1) gene is expressed only during embryogenesis. We thus developed an alternative method to laminin-111 protein repeated administration by inducing expression of the endogenous mouse Lama1 gene. This was done with the CRSPR/Cas9 system, i.e., by targeting the Lama1 promoter with one or several gRNAs and a dCas9 coupled with the VP160 transcription activation domain. Lama1 mRNA (qRT-PCR) and proteins (immunohistochemistry and western blot) were not detected in the control C2C12 myoblasts and in control muscles. However, significant expression was observed in cells transfected and in mouse muscles electroporated with plasmids coding for dCas9-VP160 and a gRNA. Larger synergic increases were observed by using two or three gRNAs. The increased Lama1 expression did not modify the expression of the α7 and β1 integrins. Increased expression of Lama1 by the CRISPR/Cas9 system will have to be further investigated by systemic delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 components to verify whether this could be a treatment for several myopathies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sub-cellular Electrical Heterogeneity Revealed by Loose Patch Recording Reflects Differential Localization of Sarcolemmal Ion Channels in Intact Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Kubasov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac action potential (AP is commonly recoded as an integral signal from isolated myocytes or ensembles of myocytes (with intracellular microelectrodes and extracellular macroelectrodes, respectively. These signals, however, do not provide a direct measure of activity of ion channels and transporters located in two major compartments of a cardiac myocyte: surface sarcolemma and the T-tubule system, which differentially contribute to impulse propagation and excitation-contraction (EC coupling. In the present study we investigated electrical properties of myocytes within perfused intact rat heart employing loose patch recording with narrow-tip (2 μm diameter extracellular electrodes. Using this approach, we demonstrated two distinct types of electric signals with distinct waveforms (single peak and multi-peak AP; AP1 and AP2, respectively during intrinsic pacemaker activity. These two types of waveforms depend on the position of the electrode tip on the myocyte surface. Such heterogeneity of electrical signals was lost when electrodes of larger pipette diameter were used (5 or 10 μm, which indicates that the electric signal was assessed from a region of <5 μm. Importantly, both pharmacological and mathematical simulation based on transverse (T-tubular distribution suggested that while the AP1 and the initial peak of AP2 are predominantly attributable to the fast, inward Na+ current in myocyte's surface sarcolemma, the late components of AP2 are likely representative of currents associated with L-type Ca2+ channel and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX currents which are predominantly located in T-tubules. Thus, loose patch recording with narrow-tip pipette provides a valuable tool for studying cardiac electric activity on the subcellular level in the intact heart.

  11. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Ruijter, Hester M; Verkerk, Arie O; Coronel, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs) reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long-term ω3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating ω3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated ω3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating ω3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated ω3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (ω3) or sunflower oil (ω9, as control) for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered ω3-PUFAs. Plasma of ω3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and isolated myocytes of ω3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, ω3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than ω9 myocytes. In the ω9 myocytes, but not in the ω3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA + DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated ω3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered ω3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac ω3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term ω3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  12. Spectrin-like Repeats 11–15 of Human Dystrophin Show Adaptations to a Lipidic Environment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkis, Joe; Hubert, Jean-François; Legrand, Baptiste; Robert, Estelle; Chéron, Angélique; Jardin, Julien; Hitti, Eric; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Vié, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Dystrophin is essential to skeletal muscle function and confers resistance to the sarcolemma by interacting with cytoskeleton and membrane. In the present work, we characterized the behavior of dystrophin 11–15 (DYS R11–15), five spectrin-like repeats from the central domain of human dystrophin, with lipids. DYS R11–15 displays an amphiphilic character at the liquid/air interface while maintaining its secondary α-helical structure. The interaction of DYS R11–15 with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) depends on the lipid nature, which is not the case with large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs). In addition, switching from anionic SUVs to anionic LUVs suggests the lipid packing as a crucial factor for the interaction of protein and lipid. The monolayer model and the modulation of surface pressure aim to mimic the muscle at work (i.e. dynamic changes of muscle membrane during contraction and relaxation) (high and low surface pressure). Strikingly, the lateral pressure modifies the protein organization. Increasing the lateral pressure leads the proteins to be organized in a regular network. Nevertheless, a different protein conformation after its binding to monolayer is revealed by trypsin proteolysis. Label-free quantification by nano-LC/MS/MS allowed identification of the helices in repeats 12 and 13 involved in the interaction with anionic SUVs. These results, combined with our previous studies, indicate that DYS R11–15 constitutes the only part of dystrophin that interacts with anionic as well as zwitterionic lipids and adapts its interaction and organization depending on lipid packing and lipid nature. We provide strong experimental evidence for a physiological role of the central domain of dystrophin in sarcolemma scaffolding through modulation of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:21712383

  13. Super-resolution scanning patch clamp reveals clustering of functional ion channels in adult ventricular myocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Anamika; Lin, Xianming; Novak, Pavel; Mehta, Kinneri; Korchev, Yuri; Delmar, Mario; Gorelik, Julia

    2013-04-12

    Compartmentation of ion channels on the cardiomyocyte surface is important for electric propagation and electromechanical coupling. The specialized T-tubule and costameric structures facilitate spatial coupling of various ion channels and receptors. Existing methods such as immunofluorescence and patch clamp techniques are limited in their ability to localize functional ion channels. As such, a correlation between channel protein location and channel function remains incomplete. To validate a method that permits routine imaging of the topography of a live cardiomyocyte and study clustering of functional ion channels from a specific microdomain. We used scanning ion conductance microscopy and conventional cell-attached patch clamp with a software modification that allows controlled increase of pipette tip diameter. The sharp nanopipette used for topography scan was modified into a larger patch pipette that could be positioned with nanoscale precision to a specific site of interest (crest, groove, or T-tubules of cardiomyocytes) and sealed to the membrane for cell-attached recording of ion channels. Using this method, we significantly increased the probability of detecting activity of L-type calcium channels in the T-tubules of ventricular cardiomyocytes. We also demonstrated that active sodium channels do not distribute homogenously on the sarcolemma instead, they segregate into clusters of various densities, most crowded in the crest region, that are surrounded by areas virtually free of functional sodium channels. Our new method substantially increases the throughput of recording location-specific functional ion channels on the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma, thereby allowing characterization of ion channels in relation to the microdomain where they reside.

  14. Diacylglycerol kinase-zeta localization in skeletal muscle is regulated by phosphorylation and interaction with syntrophins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovici, Hanan; Hogan, Angela B; Obagi, Christopher; Topham, Matthew K; Gee, Stephen H

    2003-11-01

    Syntrophins are scaffolding proteins that link signaling molecules to dystrophin and the cytoskeleton. We previously reported that syntrophins interact with diacylglycerol kinase-zeta (DGK-zeta), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid. Here, we show syntrophins and DGK-zeta form a complex in skeletal muscle whose translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane is regulated by protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of the DGK-zeta MARCKS domain. DGK-zeta mutants that do not bind syntrophins were mislocalized, and an activated mutant of this sort induced atypical changes in the actin cytoskeleton, indicating syntrophins are important for localizing DGK-zeta and regulating its activity. Consistent with a role in actin organization, DGK-zeta and syntrophins were colocalized with filamentous (F)-actin and Rac in lamellipodia and ruffles. Moreover, extracellular signal-related kinase-dependent phosphorylation of DGK-zeta regulated its association with the cytoskeleton. In adult muscle, DGK-zeta was colocalized with syntrophins on the sarcolemma and was concentrated at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), whereas in type IIB fibers it was found exclusively at NMJs. DGK-zeta was reduced at the sarcolemma of dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse myofibers but was specifically retained at NMJs, indicating that dystrophin is important for the sarcolemmal but not synaptic localization of DGK-zeta. Together, our findings suggest syntrophins localize DGK-zeta signaling complexes at specialized domains of muscle cells, which may be critical for the proper control of lipid-signaling pathways regulating actin organization. In dystrophic muscle, mislocalized DGK-zeta may cause abnormal cytoskeletal changes that contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  15. Skeletal muscle expression of the adhesion-GPCR CD97: CD97 deletion induces an abnormal structure of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum but does not impair skeletal muscle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Zyryanova

    Full Text Available CD97 is a widely expressed adhesion class G-protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR. Here, we investigated the presence of CD97 in normal and malignant human skeletal muscle as well as the ultrastructural and functional consequences of CD97 deficiency in mice. In normal human skeletal muscle, CD97 was expressed at the peripheral sarcolemma of all myofibers, as revealed by immunostaining of tissue sections and surface labeling of single myocytes using flow cytometry. In muscle cross-sections, an intracellular polygonal, honeycomb-like CD97-staining pattern, typical for molecules located in the T-tubule or sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR, was additionally found. CD97 co-localized with SR Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA, a constituent of the longitudinal SR, but not with the receptors for dihydropyridine (DHPR or ryanodine (RYR, located in the T-tubule and terminal SR, respectively. Intracellular expression of CD97 was higher in slow-twitch compared to most fast-twitch myofibers. In rhabdomyosarcomas, CD97 was strongly upregulated and in part more N-glycosylated compared to normal skeletal muscle. All tumors were strongly CD97-positive, independent of the underlying histological subtype, suggesting high sensitivity of CD97 for this tumor. Ultrastructural analysis of murine skeletal myofibers confirmed the location of CD97 in the SR. CD97 knock-out mice had a dilated SR, resulting in a partial increase in triad diameter yet not affecting the T-tubule, sarcomeric, and mitochondrial structure. Despite these obvious ultrastructural changes, intracellular Ca2+ release from single myofibers, force generation and fatigability of isolated soleus muscles, and wheel-running capacity of mice were not affected by the lack of CD97. We conclude that CD97 is located in the SR and at the peripheral sarcolemma of human and murine skeletal muscle, where its absence affects the structure of the SR without impairing skeletal muscle function.

  16. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  17. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini, E-mail: ekaterini.kordeli@inserm.fr

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  18. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and vinculin-talin-integrin system in human adult cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Gaeta, Roberto; Di Mauro, Debora; Arco, Alba; Consolo, Angela; Santoro, Giuseppe; Trimarchi, Fabio; Favaloro, Angelo

    2009-02-01

    Costameres were identified, for the first time, in skeletal and cardiac muscle, as regions associated with the sarcolemma, consisting of densely clustered patches of vinculin; they have many characteristics common to the cell-extracellular matrix-type of adherens junctions. Costameres are considered 'proteic machinery' and they appear to comprise two protein complexes, the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) and the vinculin-talin-integrin system. In comparison to skeletal muscle, few studies have focused on cardiac muscle regarding these two complexes, and study is generally relative to dystrophin or to cardiac diseases, such as cardiomyopathies. However, insufficient data are available on these proteins in healthy human cardiomyocytes. For this reason, we performed an immunohistochemical study using human cardiac muscle fibers, in order to define the real distribution and the spatial relationship between the proteins in these two complexes. Our data showed a real costameric distribution of DGC and of the vinculin-talin-integrin system; all tested proteins were present in T-tubule and in intercalated disks. Moreover, our data demonstrated that all tested proteins of DGC colocalized with each other, as all tested components of the vinculin-talin-integrin system, and that all tested proteins of DGC colocalized with all tested proteins of the vinculin-talin-integrin system. Finally, all tested proteins of the two complexes were localized in the region of the sarcolemma over the I band, in 100% of our observations. The present study, for the first time, analyzed the majority of proteins of DGC and of the vinculin-talin-integrin system in cardiac muscle fibers, and it confirmed that DGC and the vinculin-talin-integrin system have a role in the transduction of mechanical force to the extracellular matrix. Finally it attributed a key role in the regulation of action potential duration to cardiac myocytes.

  19. Fatty acid transport proteins chronically relocate to the transverse-tubules in muscle from obese Zucker rats but are resistant to further insulin-induced translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanyk, Leslie E; Bonen, Arend; Dyck, David J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that FA transport proteins are located within the t-tubule fraction of rodent muscle, and that insulin stimulation causes their translocation to this membrane fraction. Chronic relocation of the FA transport protein FAT/CD36 to the sarcolemma is observed in obese rodents and humans, and correlates with intramuscular lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. It is not known whether in an obese, insulin resistant state FA transporters also chronically relocate to the t-tubules. Furthermore, it is not known whether the insulin-stimulated translocation of the various FA transport proteins to the t-tubules is impaired in insulin resistance. Sarcolemmal and t-tubule membrane fractions were isolated via differential centrifugation from muscles of lean and obese female Zucker rats during basal or insulin stimulated conditions. FA transport proteins were measured via western blot on both membrane fractions. Our results demonstrate that in muscle from insulin resistant Zucker rats, FAT/CD36, FABPpm and FATP1 are all increased on the t-tubules in the basal state (+72%, +120%, and +69%, respectively), potentially contributing to the accumulation of intramuscular lipids. Insulin failed to increase the content of the FA transport proteins on either the t-tubule or sarcolemma above the elevated basal levels, analogous to the well characterized impairment of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to both membrane domains in obesity. FA transport proteins chronically relocate to the t-tubule domain in insulin resistant muscle, potentially contributing to lipid accumulation. Further translocation of the FA transport proteins to this domain during insulin stimulation, however, is impaired. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of detubulation on force and kinetics of cardiac muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Sacconi, Leonardo; Tosi, Benedetta; Zhang, Mei Luo; Wang, Guo Liang; de Vries, Ewout; Hoppenbrouwers, Ernst; Pavone, Francesco; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado; ter Keurs, Henk E D J

    2014-06-01

    Action potential-driven Ca(2+) currents from the transverse tubules (t-tubules) trigger synchronous Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes. Loss of t-tubules has been reported in cardiac diseases, including heart failure, but the effect of uncoupling t-tubules from the sarcolemma on cardiac muscle mechanics remains largely unknown. We dissected intact rat right ventricular trabeculae and compared force, sarcomere length, and intracellular Ca(2+) in control trabeculae with trabeculae in which the t-tubules were uncoupled from the plasma membrane by formamide-induced osmotic shock (detubulation). We verified disconnection of a consistent fraction of t-tubules from the sarcolemma by two-photon fluorescence imaging of FM4-64-labeled membranes and by the absence of tubular action potential, which was recorded by random access multiphoton microscopy in combination with a voltage-sensitive dye (Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA). Detubulation reduced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of Ca(2+) transients, leading to slower kinetics of force generation and relaxation and reduced twitch tension (1 Hz, 30°C, 1.5 mM [Ca(2+)]o). No mechanical changes were observed in rat left atrial trabeculae after formamide shock, consistent with the lack of t-tubules in rodent atrial myocytes. Detubulation diminished the rate-dependent increase of Ca(2+)-transient amplitude and twitch force. However, maximal twitch tension at high [Ca(2+)]o or in post-rest potentiated beats was unaffected, although contraction kinetics were slower. The ryanodine receptor (RyR)2 Ca-sensitizing agent caffeine (200 µM), which increases the velocity of transverse Ca(2+) release propagation in detubulated cardiomyocytes, rescued the depressed contractile force and the slower twitch kinetics of detubulated trabeculae, with negligible effects in controls. We conclude that partial loss of t-tubules leads to myocardial contractile abnormalities that can be rescued by enhancing and accelerating the

  1. [The action of nitrite-anions and hydrogen peroxide on surface properties of the smooth muscle plasmatic membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylovych, Iu V; Karakhim, S O

    2008-01-01

    In the presence of vesicular preparations of sarcolemma (near 70% reverse cytoplasmic sideways inward) fluorescence of ANS--1-(fenilamino)-8-naftylamine--rises more than 10 times. In the conditions of increase of concentration of sodium nitrite and hydrogen peroxide from 1 to 5 microM the probe fluorescence diminishes. Extinguishing of ANS fluorescence under the action of nitrite anions can be explained by chemical modification of the positively charged superficial groups (amino- and sulfhydrile). It will result in the decrease of amounts of local "+"-charges on a membrane, proper decrease of fastening ANS with a membrane and fluorescence extinguishing. H2O2 is able to oxidize superficial -SH-groups which carry a partial positive charge. Consequently a decrease of general amount of fixed "+" charges on a membrane, diminishing of ANS fastening with sarcolemma and the proper fluorescence extinguishing takes place. Probed and calculated by the method "ion beats" superficial closeness of charges of vesicular preparations makes 2.3 +/- 0.1 mC/m2. At the action of 50 microM sodium nitrite and hydrogen peroxide it diminishes to 2.0 +/- 0.1 mC/m2 and 1.7 +/- 0.07 mC/m2 accordingly. The less effective action of NaNO2 can be determined by the influence of Na+ on the superficial field of membrane. With the purpose to confirm the previous suppositions we used the method of laser-correlation spectroscopy, that registered the mean value of hydrodynamic diameter (GD) of vesicules and their division by sizes. Middle GD makes in control 327 +/- 16 nm, and GD which is most often met in population--291 +/- 11 nm. Adding of nitrite anions to the system in a growing concentration results in the substantial decline of GD of both all the membrane population and of plasma vesicules. Analogous results are obtained in the case of H2O2. In the presence of specific modifiers of sulfhydrile- and aminogroup of membrane surface (DTT and TNBS) the decline of GD under the action of nitrite anions

  2. Risk of Myopathy in Patients in Therapy with Statins: Identification of Biological Markers in a Pilot Study.

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    Camerino, Giulia M; Musumeci, Olimpia; Conte, Elena; Musaraj, Kejla; Fonzino, Adriano; Barca, Emanuele; Marino, Marco; Rodolico, Carmelo; Tricarico, Domenico; Camerino, Claudia; Carratù, Maria R; Desaphy, Jean-François; De Luca, Annamaria; Toscano, Antonio; Pierno, Sabata

    2017-01-01

    Statin therapy may induce skeletal muscle damage ranging from myalgia to severe rhabdomyolysis. Our previous preclinical studies showed that statin treatment in rats involves the reduction of skeletal muscle ClC-1 chloride channel expression and related chloride conductance (gCl). An increase of the activity of protein kinase C theta (PKC theta) isoform, able to inactivate ClC-1, may contribute to destabilize sarcolemma excitability. These effects can be detrimental for muscle function leading to drug-induced myopathy. Our goal is to study the causes of statin-induced muscle side effects in patients at the aim to identify biological markers useful to prevent and counteract statin-induced muscle damage. We examined 10 patients, who experienced myalgia and hyper-CK-emia after starting statin therapy compared to 9 non-myopathic subjects not using lipid-lowering drugs. Western Blot (WB) analysis showed a 40% reduction of ClC-1 protein and increased expression of phosphorylated PKC in muscle biopsies of statin-treated patients with respect to untreated subjects, independently from their age and statin type. Real-time PCR analysis showed that despite reduction of the protein, the ClC-1 mRNA was not significantly changed, suggesting post-transcriptional modification. The mRNA expression of a series of genes was also evaluated. MuRF-1 was increased in accord with muscle atrophy, MEF-2, calcineurin (CN) and GLUT-4 transporter were reduced, suggesting altered transcription, alteration of glucose homeostasis and energy deficit. Accordingly, the phosphorylated form of AMPK, measured by WB, was increased, suggesting cytoprotective process activation. In parallel, mRNA expression of Notch-1, involved in muscle cell proliferation, was highly expressed in statin-treated patients, indicating active regeneration. Also, PGC-1-alpha and isocitrate-dehydrogenase increased expression together with increased activity of mitochondrial citrate-synthase, measured by spectrophotometric assay

  3. Stochastic modelling of cardiac cell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, Elizabeth; Walker, Cameron; O'Sullivan, Michael; Rajagopal, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Anatomically realistic and biophysically based computational models of the heart have provided valuable insights into cardiac function in health and disease. Nevertheless, these models typically use a "black-box" approach to describe the cellular level processes that underlie the heart beat. We are developing techniques to stochastically generate three-dimensional models of mammalian ventricular myocytes that exhibit salient characteristics of the spatial organisation of key cellular organelles in cardiac cell excitation and contraction. Such anatomically detailed models will facilitate a deeper understanding of cardiac function at multiple scales. This paper presents an important first step towards understanding and modelling the spatial distribution of two key organelles in cardiac cell contraction - myofibrils and mitochondria. The sarcolemma, myofibrils and mitochondria were segmented from transmission electron micrographs of ventricular cells from a healthy wistar rat. The centroids of the myofibrils and mitochondria were calculated, and various spatial statistical techniques for characterising the centroid distribution and inter-point interactions were investigated and implemented using the R spatstat package. Techniques for modelling the observed spatial patterns were also investigated, and preliminary results indicate that the Strauss Hard-core model best captures the interaction observed. We intend to confirm these results with larger sample of cells.

  4. The IQ Motif is Crucial for Ca v 1.1 Function

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    Katarina Stroffekova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+-dependent modulation via calmodulin, with consensus CaM-binding IQ motif playing a key role, has been documented for most high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. The skeletal muscle Cav1.1 also exhibits Ca2+-/CaM-dependent modulation. Here, whole-cell Ca2+ current, Ca2+ transient, and maximal, immobilization-resistant charge movement (Qmax recordings were obtained from cultured mouse myotubes, to test a role of IQ motif in function of Cav1.1. The effect of introducing mutation (IQ to AA of IQ motif into Cav1.1 was examined. In dysgenic myotubes expressing YFP-Cav1.1AA, neither Ca2+ currents nor evoked Ca2+ transients were detectable. The loss of Ca2+ current and excitation-contraction coupling did not appear to be a consequence of defective trafficking to the sarcolemma. The Qmax in dysgenic myotubes expressing YFP-Cav1.1AA was similar to that of normal myotubes. These findings suggest that the IQ motif of the Cav1.1 may be an unrecognized site of structural and functional coupling between DHPR and RyR.

  5. The IQ motif is crucial for Cav1.1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroffekova, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent modulation via calmodulin, with consensus CaM-binding IQ motif playing a key role, has been documented for most high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The skeletal muscle Ca(v)1.1 also exhibits Ca(2+)-/CaM-dependent modulation. Here, whole-cell Ca(2+) current, Ca(2+) transient, and maximal, immobilization-resistant charge movement (Q(max)) recordings were obtained from cultured mouse myotubes, to test a role of IQ motif in function of Ca(v)1.1. The effect of introducing mutation (IQ to AA) of IQ motif into Ca(v)1.1 was examined. In dysgenic myotubes expressing YFP-Ca(v)1.1(AA), neither Ca(2+) currents nor evoked Ca(2+) transients were detectable. The loss of Ca(2+) current and excitation-contraction coupling did not appear to be a consequence of defective trafficking to the sarcolemma. The Q(max) in dysgenic myotubes expressing YFP-Ca(v)1.1(AA) was similar to that of normal myotubes. These findings suggest that the IQ motif of the Ca(v)1.1 may be an unrecognized site of structural and functional coupling between DHPR and RyR.

  6. Activation of fast skeletal muscle: contributions of studies on skinned fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, E W

    1981-01-01

    The membrane potential of vertebrate twitch fibers closely controls Ca fluxes between intracellular compartments, which in turn control contraction. Recent work on intracellular Ca movement is reviewed in the general context of current efforts to synthesize physiological, biochemical, and structural observations on the contractile mechanism and its regulation, emphasizing the increasing role of functionally skinned fibers in this synthesis. Skinned fiber preparations, with removed or disrupted sarcolemma, bridge the gap between properties of isolated subsystems and their constrained operation in the intact fiber. Recent studies indicate that the surface action potential propagates along the transverse tubules, but not the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), which appears to be a distinct intracellular compartment. Voltage-dependent charge movements in the transverse tubules probably control Ca flux across the SR membranes. Current questions concern the mechanism of the signal that bridges the junctional gap between the two membrane systems, the mechanism and properties of the activated Ca efflux to the myofilament space, and the operation of the Ca pump of the SR during activation. New methods applied to intact fibers, cut fibers, skinned fibers, and subcellular systems are yielding the kind of information needed for a complete description of these central steps in excitation-contraction coupling and of Ca regulation of the myofilaments.

  7. Decrease of contractile properties and transversal stiffness of single fibers in human soleus after 7-day “dry” immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I. V.; Ponomareva, E. V.; Kartashkina, N. L.; Altaeva, E. G.; Fokina, N. M.; Kurushin, V. A.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2011-05-01

    The simulation model of "dry" immersion was used to evaluate the effects of plantar mechanical stimulation (PMS) and high frequency electromyostimulation (EMS) on the mechanical properties of human soleus fibers under the conditions of gravitational unloading. We examined contractile properties of single fibers by means of tensometry, transversal stiffness of sarcolemma and different areas of the contractile apparatus by means of atomic force microscopy. It was shown that there is a reduction of transversal stiffness in single muscle fibers under hypogravitational conditions. Application of different countermeasures could compensate this effect. Meanwhile pneumostimulation and electro stimulation act in quite different way. Therefore, pneumostimulation seems to be more effective. The data obtained can be considered as the evidence of the fact that such countermeasures as PMS and electromyostimulation influence on muscle fibers in quite different ways and PMS efficiency is likely to be higher. On the basis of our experimental data on transverse stiffness of mechanotransductional nodes and the contractile apparatus, we can assume that support stimulation allows prevention of destructive processes in muscle fibers. Electrostimulation seems to stimulate contractile activity only without suppression of impairment of the fiber mechanical properties.

  8. Sarcolemmal blebs and osmotic fragility as correlates of irreversible ischemic injury in preconditioned isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, S C; Shivell, L C; Ganote, C E

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis that irreversible ischemic injury is related to sub-sarcolemmal blebbing and an inherent osmotic fragility of the blebs was tested by subjecting isolated control and ischemically preconditioned (IPC) or calyculin A (CalA)-pretreated (protected) rabbit cardiomyocytes to ischemic pelleting followed by resuspension in 340, 170 or 85 mosmol medium containing trypan blue. At time points from 0-240 min, osmotic fragility was assessed by the percentage of trypan blue permeable cells. Membrane blebs were visualized with India ink preparations. Bleb formation, following acute hypo-osmotic swelling, developed by 75 min and increased with longer periods of ischemia. Osmotic fragility developed only after 75 min. Cells resuspended in 340 mosmol media did not form blebs and largely retained the ability to exclude trypan blue, even after 240 min ischemia. Although the latent tendency for osmotic blebbing preceded the development of osmotic fragility, most osmotically fragile cells became permeable without evident sarcolemmal bleb formation. The onset of osmotic fragility was delayed in protected cells, but protection did not reduce the bleb formation. It is concluded that blebbing and osmotic fragility are independent manifestations of ischemic injury. The principal locus of irreversible ischemic injury and the protection provided by IPC may lie within the sarcolemma rather than at sarcolemmal attachments to underlying adherens junctions.

  9. Proteomic analysis of the dysferlin protein complex unveils its importance for sarcolemmal maintenance and integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine de Morrée

    Full Text Available Dysferlin is critical for repair of muscle membranes after damage. Mutations in dysferlin lead to a progressive muscular dystrophy. Recent studies suggest additional roles for dysferlin. We set out to study dysferlin's protein-protein interactions to obtain comprehensive knowledge of dysferlin functionalities in a myogenic context. We developed a robust and reproducible method to isolate dysferlin protein complexes from cells and tissue. We analyzed the composition of these complexes in cultured myoblasts, myotubes and skeletal muscle tissue by mass spectrometry and subsequently inferred potential protein functions through bioinformatics analyses. Our data confirm previously reported interactions and support a function for dysferlin as a vesicle trafficking protein. In addition novel potential functionalities were uncovered, including phagocytosis and focal adhesion. Our data reveal that the dysferlin protein complex has a dynamic composition as a function of myogenic differentiation. We provide additional experimental evidence and show dysferlin localization to, and interaction with the focal adhesion protein vinculin at the sarcolemma. Finally, our studies reveal evidence for cross-talk between dysferlin and its protein family member myoferlin. Together our analyses show that dysferlin is not only a membrane repair protein but also important for muscle membrane maintenance and integrity.

  10. Alpha 7 integrin preserves the function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle in dystrophin-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Burkin, Dean J; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-11-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) and the α7β1-integrin complex are two independent protein complexes that link the extracellular matrix with the cytoskeleton in muscle cells. These associations stabilize the sarcolemma during force transmission. Loss of either one of these complexes leads to muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin is a major component of the DGC. Its absence results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Because α7-integrin overexpression has been shown to ameliorate muscle histopathology in mouse models of DMD, we hypothesize that the α7β1-integrin complex can help preserve muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated muscle force, elasticity, and the viscous property of the extensor digitorum longus muscle in 19-day-old normal BL6, dystrophin-null mdx4cv, α7-integrin-null, and dystrophin/α7-integrin double knockout mice. While nominal changes were found in single knockout mice, contractility and passive properties were significantly compromised in α7-integrin double knockout mice. Our results suggest that DGC and α7β1-integrin complexes may compensate each other to maintain normal skeletal muscle function. α7β1-Integrin upregulation may hold promise to treat not only histological, but also physiological, defects in DMD.

  11. Laminin-111 protein therapy prevents muscle disease in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Jachinta E; Gurpur, Praveen B; Burkin, Dean J

    2009-05-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. Loss of dystrophin results in reduced sarcolemmal integrity and increased susceptibility to muscle damage. The alpha(7)beta(1)-integrin is a laminin-binding protein up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of DMD patients and in the mdx mouse model. Transgenic overexpression of the alpha(7)-integrin alleviates muscle disease in dystrophic mice, making this gene a target for pharmacological intervention. Studies suggest laminin may regulate alpha(7)-integrin expression. To test this hypothesis, mouse and human myoblasts were treated with laminin and assayed for alpha(7)-integrin expression. We show that laminin-111 (alpha(1), beta(1), gamma(1)), which is expressed during embryonic development but absent in normal or dystrophic skeletal muscle, increased alpha(7)-integrin expression in mouse and DMD patient myoblasts. Injection of laminin-111 protein into the mdx mouse model of DMD increased expression of alpha(7)-integrin, stabilized the sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscle from exercised-induced damage. These findings demonstrate that laminin-111 is a highly potent therapeutic agent for the mdx mouse model of DMD and represents a paradigm for the systemic delivery of extracellular matrix proteins as therapies for genetic diseases.

  12. Dystrophin and utrophin expression require sarcospan: loss of α7 integrin exacerbates a newly discovered muscle phenotype in sarcospan-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L; Chou, Eric; Oh, Jennifer; Kwok, Allan; Burkin, Dean J; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2012-10-15

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a core component of the major adhesion complexes in skeletal muscle, the dystrophin- and utrophin (Utr)-glycoprotein complexes (DGC and UGC). We performed a rigorous analysis of SSPN-null mice and discovered that loss of SSPN decreased DGC and UGC abundance, leading to impaired laminin-binding activity and susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced injury in skeletal muscle. We show that loss of SSPN increased levels of α7β1 integrin. To genetically test whether integrin compensates for the loss of DGC and UGC function in SSPN-nulls, we generated mice lacking both SSPN and α7 integrin (DKO, double knockout). Muscle regeneration, sarcolemma integrity and fibrosis were exacerbated in DKO mice and were remarkably similar to muscle from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, suggesting that secondary loss of integrin contributes significantly to pathogenesis. Expression of the DGC and UGC, laminin binding and Akt signaling were negatively impacted in DKO muscle, resulting in severely diminished specific force properties. We demonstrate that SSPN is a necessary component of dystrophin and Utr function and that SSPN modulation of integrin signaling is required for extracellular matrix attachment and muscle force development.

  13. SOX9 overexpression plays a potential role in idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengdong; Yan, Nan; Liu, Liying; Cao, Donghua; Gao, Ming; Lin, Changkun; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-03-01

    The collagen, type IX, alpha 1 (COL9A1) gene was previously identified as a candidate gene for idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus (ICTEV), a congenital lower limb deformity in humans. In the present study, increased expression levels of COL9A1 were identified in the abductor hallucis muscle of ICTEV patients compared with those in control samples. The COL9A1 gene is regulated by SRY (sex‑determining region Y)‑box 9 (SOX9). Immunofluorescence analysis of SOX9 and COL9A1 proteins identified colocalization to the sarcolemma, endomysium and muscle membrane in muscle samples of ICTEV. No mutations in the exons and promoters of SOX9 were detected in blood samples of 84 ICTEV patients by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. mRNA and protein expression levels of SOX9 were detected by real‑time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively and were found to be significantly higher in ICTEV muscle samples compared with those in control samples. Based on present observations, we hypothesize that overexpression of the SOX9 gene may play a role in the genetic etiology of ICTEV.

  14. Hearts of dystonia musculorum mice display normal morphological and histological features but show signs of cardiac stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G Boyer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dystonin is a giant cytoskeletal protein belonging to the plakin protein family and is believed to crosslink the major filament systems in contractile cells. Previous work has demonstrated skeletal muscle defects in dystonin-deficient dystonia musculorum (dt mice. In this study, we show that the dystonin muscle isoform is localized at the Z-disc, the H zone, the sarcolemma and intercalated discs in cardiac tissue. Based on this localization pattern, we tested whether dystonin-deficiency leads to structural defects in cardiac muscle. Desmin intermediate filament, microfilament, and microtubule subcellular organization appeared normal in dt hearts. Nevertheless, increased transcript levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF, 66% beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC, 95% and decreased levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump isoform 2A (SERCA2a, 26%, all signs of cardiac muscle stress, were noted in dt hearts. Hearts from two-week old dt mice were assessed for the presence of morphological and histological alterations. Heart to body weight ratios as well as left ventricular wall thickness and left chamber volume measurements were similar between dt and wild-type control mice. Hearts from dt mice also displayed no signs of fibrosis or calcification. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the intricate structure of the sarcomere by situating dystonin in cardiac muscle fibers and suggest that dystonin does not significantly influence the structural organization of cardiac muscle fibers during early postnatal development.

  15. Does exercise-induced muscle damage play a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2012-05-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) occurs primarily from the performance of unaccustomed exercise, and its severity is modulated by the type, intensity, and duration of training. Although concentric and isometric actions contribute to EIMD, the greatest damage to muscle tissue is seen with eccentric exercise, where muscles are forcibly lengthened. Damage can be specific to just a few macromolecules of tissue or result in large tears in the sarcolemma, basal lamina, and supportive connective tissue, and inducing injury to contractile elements and the cytoskeleton. Although EIMD can have detrimental short-term effects on markers of performance and pain, it has been hypothesized that the associated skeletal muscle inflammation and increased protein turnover are necessary for long-term hypertrophic adaptations. A theoretical basis for this belief has been proposed, whereby the structural changes associated with EIMD influence gene expression, resulting in a strengthening of the tissue and thus protection of the muscle against further injury. Other researchers, however, have questioned this hypothesis, noting that hypertrophy can occur in the relative absence of muscle damage. Therefore, the purpose of this article will be twofold: (a) to extensively review the literature and attempt to determine what, if any, role EIMD plays in promoting skeletal muscle hypertrophy and (b) to make applicable recommendations for resistance training program design.

  16. Cucumispora ornata n. sp. (Fungi: Microsporidia) infecting invasive 'demon shrimp' (Dikerogammarus haemobaphes) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Jamie; Dunn, Alison M; Stebbing, Paul D; Ross, Stuart H; Kerr, Rose C; Stentiford, Grant D

    2015-06-01

    Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, the 'demon shrimp', is an amphipod native to the Ponto-Caspian region. This species invaded the UK in 2012 and has become widely established. Dikerogammarus haemobaphes has the potential to introduce non-native pathogens into the UK, creating a potential threat to native fauna. This study describes a novel species of microsporidian parasite infecting 72.8% of invasive D. haemobaphes located in the River Trent, UK. The microsporidium infection was systemic throughout the host; mainly targeting the sarcolemma of muscle tissues. Electron microscopy revealed this parasite to be diplokaryotic and have 7-9 turns of the polar filament. The microsporidium is placed into the 'Cucumispora' genus based on host histopathology, fine detail parasite ultrastructure, a highly similar life-cycle and SSU rDNA sequence phylogeny. Using this data this novel microsporidian species is named Cucumispora ornata, where 'ornata' refers to the external beading present on the mature spore stage of this organism. Alongside a taxonomic discussion, the presence of a novel Cucumispora sp. in the United Kingdom is discussed and related to the potential control of invasive Dikerogammarus spp. in the UK and the health of native species which may come into contact with this parasite. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of doxorubicin on cardiac muscle subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazis, Andreas N; Morton, Aaron B; Hall, Stephanie E; Smuder, Ashley J

    2017-05-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective chemotherapeutic used in the treatment of a broad spectrum of malignancies. However, clinical use of DOX is highly limited by cumulative and irreversible cardiomyopathy that occurs following DOX treatment. The pathogenesis of DOX-induced cardiac muscle dysfunction is complex. However, it has been proposed that the etiology of this myopathy is related to mitochondrial dysfunction, as a result of the dose-dependent increase in the mitochondrial accumulation of DOX. In this regard, cardiac muscle possesses two morphologically distinct populations of mitochondria. Subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria are localized just below the sarcolemma, whereas intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria are found between myofibrils. Mitochondria in both regions exhibit subtle differences in biochemical properties, giving rise to differences in respiration, lipid composition, enzyme activities and protein synthesis rates. Based on the heterogeneity of SS and IMF mitochondria, we hypothesized that acute DOX administration would have distinct effects on each cardiac mitochondrial subfraction. Therefore, we isolated SS and IMF mitochondria from the hearts of female Sprague-Dawley rats 48h after administration of DOX. Our results demonstrate that while SS mitochondria appear to accumulate greater amounts of DOX, IMF mitochondria demonstrate a greater apoptotic and autophagic response to DOX exposure. Thus, the divergent protein composition and function of the SS and IMF cardiac mitochondria result in differential responses to DOX, with IMF mitochondria appearing more susceptible to damage after DOX treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Eccentric Exercise to Enhance Neuromuscular Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; Lepley, Adam S; Onate, James A; Grooms, Dustin R

    Neuromuscular alterations are a major causal factor of primary and secondary injuries. Though injury prevention programs have experienced some success, rates of injuries have not declined, and after injury, individuals often return to activity with functionality below clinical recommendations. Considering alternative therapies to the conventional concentric exercise approach, such as one that can target neuromuscular injury risk and postinjury alterations, may provide for more effective injury prevention and rehabilitation protocols. Peer-reviewed sources available on the Web of Science and MEDLINE databases from 2000 through 2016 were gathered using searches associated with the keywords eccentric exercise, injury prevention, and neuromuscular control. Eccentric exercise will reduce injury risk by targeting specific neural and morphologic alterations that precipitate neuromuscular dysfunction. Clinical review. Level 4. Neuromuscular control is influenced by alterations in muscle morphology and neural activity. Eccentric exercise beneficially modifies several underlying factors of muscle morphology (fiber typing, cross-sectional area, working range, and pennation angle), and emerging evidence indicates that eccentric exercise is also beneficial to peripheral and central neural activity (alpha motorneuron recruitment/firing, sarcolemma activity, corticospinal excitability, and brain activation). There is mounting evidence that eccentric exercise is not only a therapeutic intervention influencing muscle morphology but also targets unique alterations in neuromuscular control, influencing injury risk.

  19. Contractions induced by sodium withdrawal in crab (Callinectes danae) muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, A C; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1983-05-01

    A study was made of the effects of Na removal on the resting tension of single muscle fibres of the crab Callinectes danae. Reduction of [Na]o (replacement with Li, Tris or choline) below a threshold value, typical for each fibre, induced spontaneous, local contractions randomly dispersed along the fibres; this was followed by propagated contractile waves and tension oscillations. Sustained contractures were occasionally seen at threshold [Na]o and were consistently observed when [Na]o was further reduced. The Na withdrawal contractions depended on [Ca]o and were abolished in Ca-free media; they were restored within seconds after the addition of Ca (3-12 mM) or Sr (15-25 mM), but not Ba (10-100 mM), to the media. Caffeine (0.2-1.0 mM) facilitated, whereas La (2-5 mM), procaine (1 mM) or lidocaine (10 mM) inhibited the Na-withdrawal contractions. It is concluded that increased Ca influx across the sarcolemma and release of stored Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum are involved in the contractions induced by Na-deficient solutions in crab fibres.

  20. Organic preservation of fossil musculature with ultracellular detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria; Orr, Patrick J; Kearns, Stuart L; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver-Mollá, Enrique

    2010-02-07

    The very labile (decay-prone), non-biomineralized, tissues of organisms are rarely fossilized. Occurrences thereof are invaluable supplements to a body fossil record dominated by biomineralized tissues, which alone are extremely unrepresentative of diversity in modern and ancient ecosystems. Fossil examples of extremely labile tissues (e.g. muscle) that exhibit a high degree of morphological fidelity are almost invariably replicated by inorganic compounds such as calcium phosphate. There is no consensus as to whether such tissues can be preserved with similar morphological fidelity as organic remains, except when enclosed inside amber. Here, we report fossilized musculature from an approximately 18 Myr old salamander from lacustrine sediments of Ribesalbes, Spain. The muscle is preserved organically, in three dimensions, and with the highest fidelity of morphological preservation yet documented from the fossil record. Preserved ultrastructural details include myofilaments, endomysium, layering within the sarcolemma, and endomysial circulatory vessels infilled with blood. Slight differences between the fossil tissues and their counterparts in extant amphibians reflect limited degradation during fossilization. Our results provide unequivocal evidence that high-fidelity organic preservation of extremely labile tissues is not only feasible, but likely to be common. This is supported by the discovery of similarly preserved tissues in the Eocene Grube Messel biota.

  1. Mechanotransduction in cardiac hypertrophy and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert C; Zanella, Fabian; Omens, Jeffrey H; Sheikh, Farah

    2015-04-10

    Cardiac muscle cells have an intrinsic ability to sense and respond to mechanical load through a process known as mechanotransduction. In the heart, this process involves the conversion of mechanical stimuli into biochemical events that induce changes in myocardial structure and function. Mechanotransduction and its downstream effects function initially as adaptive responses that serve as compensatory mechanisms during adaptation to the initial load. However, under prolonged and abnormal loading conditions, the remodeling processes can become maladaptive, leading to altered physiological function and the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction are far from being fully elucidated, human and mouse genetic studies have highlighted various cytoskeletal and sarcolemmal structures in cardiac myocytes as the likely candidates for load transducers, based on their link to signaling molecules and architectural components important in disease pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent developments that have uncovered specific protein complexes linked to mechanotransduction and mechanotransmission within the sarcomere, the intercalated disc, and at the sarcolemma. The protein structures acting as mechanotransducers are the first step in the process that drives physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling, as well as the transition to heart failure, and may provide better insights into mechanisms driving mechanotransduction-based diseases. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Bp-13 PLA2: Purification and Neuromuscular Activity of a New Asp49 Toxin Isolated from Bothrops pauloensis Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Sucasaca-Monzón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new PLA2 (Bp-13 was purified from Bothrops pauloensis snake venom after a single chromatographic step of RP-HPLC on μ-Bondapak C-18. Amino acid analysis showed a high content of hydrophobic and basic amino acids and 14 half-cysteine residues. The N-terminal sequence showed a high degree of homology with basic Asp49 PLA2 myotoxins from other Bothrops venoms. Bp-13 showed allosteric enzymatic behavior and maximal activity at pH 8.1, 36°–45°C. Full Bp-13 PLA2 activity required Ca2+; its PLA2 activity was inhibited by Mg2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, and Cd2+ in the presence and absence of 1 mM Ca2+. In the mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND preparation, the time for 50% paralysis was concentration-dependent (P0.05. The main effect of this new Asp49 PLA2 of Bothrops pauloensis venom is on muscle fiber sarcolemma, with avian preparation being less responsive than rodent preparation. The study enhances biochemical and pharmacological characterization of B. pauloensis venom.

  3. Purkinje fibers after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Gómez-Heras, Soledad; Álvarez-Ayuso, Lourdes; Torralba Arranz, Amalia; Fernández-García, Héctor

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion on Purkinje fibers, comparing them with the adjacent cardiomyocytes. In a model of heterotopic heart transplantation in pigs, the donor heart was subjected to 2 hours of ischemia (n=9), preserved in cold saline, and subjected to 24 hours of ischemia with preservation in Wisconsin solution, alone (n=6), or with an additive consisting of calcium (n=4), Nicorandil (n=6) or Trolox (n=7). After 2 hours of reperfusion, we evaluated the recovery of cardiac electrical activity and took samples of ventricular myocardium for morphological study. The prolonged ischemia significantly affected atrial automaticity and A-V conduction in all the groups subjected to 24 hours of ischemia, as compared to 2 hours. There were no significant differences among the groups that underwent prolonged ischemia. Changes in the electrical activity did not correlate with the morphological changes. In the Purkinje fibers, ischemia-reperfusion produced a marked decrease in the glycogen content in all the groups. In the gap junctions the immunolabeling of connexin-43 decreased significantly, adopting a dispersed distribution, and staining the sarcolemma adjacent to the connective tissue. These changes were less marked in the group preserved exclusively with Wisconsin solution, despite the prolonged ischemia. The addition of other substances did not improve the altered morphology. In all the groups, the injury appeared to be more prominent in the Purkinje fibers than in the neighboring cardiomyocytes, indicating the greater susceptibility of the former to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  4. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

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    Kaumudi Konkay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC. Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E, enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC with laminin α 2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α 2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α 2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones.

  5. Hyperthermia, dehydration, and osmotic stress: unconventional sources of exercise-induced reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle A; Clanton, Thomas L; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-15

    Evidence of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is observed in the circulation during exercise in humans. This is exacerbated at elevated body temperatures and attenuated when normal exercise-induced body temperature elevations are suppressed. Why ROS production during exercise is temperature dependent is entirely unknown. This review covers the human exercise studies to date that provide evidence that oxidant and antioxidant changes observed in the blood during exercise are dependent on temperature and fluid balance. We then address possible mechanisms linking exercise with these variables that include shear stress, effects of hemoconcentration, and signaling pathways involving muscle osmoregulation. Since pathways of muscle osmoregulation are rarely discussed in this context, we provide a brief review of what is currently known and unknown about muscle osmoregulation and how it may be linked to oxidant production in exercise and hyperthermia. Both the circulation and the exercising muscle fibers become concentrated with osmolytes during exercise in the heat, resulting in a competition for available water across the muscle sarcolemma and other tissues. We conclude that though multiple mechanisms may be responsible for the changes in oxidant/antioxidant balance in the blood during exercise, a strong case can be made that a significant component of ROS produced during some forms of exercise reflect requirements of adapting to osmotic challenges, hyperthermia challenges, and loss of circulating fluid volume. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Bernatchez, Pascal, E-mail: pbernatc@mail.ubc.ca [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  7. Genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy act on sarcolemmal resealing and recovery from injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Capote, Joanna; Ohiri, Joyce C; Warner, James L; Vo, Andy H; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Spencer, Melissa J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2017-10-01

    Genetic disruption of the dystrophin complex produces muscular dystrophy characterized by a fragile muscle plasma membrane leading to excessive muscle degeneration. Two genetic modifiers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy implicate the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway, osteopontin encoded by the SPP1 gene and latent TGFβ binding protein 4 (LTBP4). We now evaluated the functional effect of these modifiers in the context of muscle injury and repair to elucidate their mechanisms of action. We found that excess osteopontin exacerbated sarcolemmal injury, and correspondingly, that loss of osteopontin reduced injury extent both in isolated myofibers and in muscle in vivo. We found that ablation of osteopontin was associated with reduced expression of TGFβ and TGFβ-associated pathways. We identified that increased TGFβ resulted in reduced expression of Anxa1 and Anxa6, genes encoding key components of the muscle sarcolemma resealing process. Genetic manipulation of Ltbp4 in dystrophic muscle also directly modulated sarcolemmal resealing, and Ltbp4 alleles acted in concert with Anxa6, a distinct modifier of muscular dystrophy. These data provide a model in which a feed forward loop of TGFβ and osteopontin directly impacts the capacity of muscle to recover from injury, and identifies an intersection of genetic modifiers on muscular dystrophy.

  8. Absence of Dystrophin Disrupts Skeletal Muscle Signaling: Roles of Ca2+, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Nitric Oxide in the Development of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G.; Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Froehner, Stanley C.

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin is a long rod-shaped protein that connects the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton to a complex of proteins in the surface membrane (dystrophin protein complex, DPC), with further connections via laminin to other extracellular matrix proteins. Initially considered a structural complex that protected the sarcolemma from mechanical damage, the DPC is now known to serve as a scaffold for numerous signaling proteins. Absence or reduced expression of dystrophin or many of the DPC components cause the muscular dystrophies, a group of inherited diseases in which repeated bouts of muscle damage lead to atrophy and fibrosis, and eventually muscle degeneration. The normal function of dystrophin is poorly defined. In its absence a complex series of changes occur with multiple muscle proteins showing reduced or increased expression or being modified in various ways. In this review, we will consider the various proteins whose expression and function is changed in muscular dystrophies, focusing on Ca2+-permeable channels, nitric oxide synthase, NADPH oxidase, and caveolins. Excessive Ca2+ entry, increased membrane permeability, disordered caveolar function, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are early changes in the disease, and the hypotheses for these phenomena will be critically considered. The aim of the review is to define the early damage pathways in muscular dystrophy which might be appropriate targets for therapy designed to minimize the muscle degeneration and slow the progression of the disease. PMID:26676145

  9. Functional voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in muscle fibers of the platyhelminth Dugesia tigrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, Peter; Day, Timothy A

    2003-03-01

    The presence and function of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels were examined in individual muscle fibers freshly dispersed from the triclad turbellarian Dugesia tigrina. Individual muscle fibers contracted in response to elevated extracellular K(+) in a concentration-dependent fashion. These depolarization-induced contractions were blocked by extracellular Co(2+) (2.5 mM), suggesting that they were dependent on depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx across the sarcolemma. A voltage-gated inward current was apparent in whole cell recordings when the outward K(+) current was abolished by replacement of intracellular K(+) by Cs(+). This inward current was amplified with increasing concentration (

  10. Immunofluorescence microscopy to assess enzymes controlling nitric oxide availability and microvascular blood flow in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shepherd, Sam O; Shaw, Christopher S; Achten, Juul; Costa, Matthew L; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2012-10-01

    The net production of NO by the muscle microvascular endothelium is a key regulator of muscle microvascular blood flow. Here, we describe the development of a method to quantify the protein content and phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS content and eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation) and NAD(P)H oxidase expression. Human muscle cryosections were stained using antibodies targeting eNOS, p-eNOS ser(1177) and NOX2 in combination with markers of the endothelium and the sarcolemma. Quantitation was achieved by analyzing fluorescence intensity within the area stained positive for the microvascular endothelium. Analysis was performed in duplicate and repeated five times to investigate CV. In addition, eight healthy males (age 21 ± 1 year, BMI 24.4 ± 1.0 kg/m(2)) completed one hour of cycling exercise at ~65%VO(2max) . Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis before and immediately after exercise and analyzed using the new methods. The CV of all methods was between 6.5 and 9.5%. Acute exercise increased eNOS serine(1177) phosphorylation (fold change 1.29 ± 0.05, p < 0.05). These novel methodologies will allow direct investigations of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the microvascular responses to insulin and exercise, the impairments that occur in sedentary, obese and elderly individuals and the effect of lifestyle interventions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Early dystrophin loss is coincident with the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Fernanda P; Dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Silva, Carlos A; Machado, Juliano; Kettelhut, Isis do Carmo; Ramos, Simone G; Baruffi, Marcelo Dias; Salgado, Helio C; Prado, Cibele M

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, one of the most important risk factors for heart failure (HF). Despite the importance of cardiac hypertrophy as a risk factor for the development of HF, not all hypertrophied hearts will ultimately fail. Alterations of cytoskeletal and sarcolemma-associated proteins are considered markers cardiac remodeling during HF. Dystrophin provides mechanical stability to the plasma membrane through its interactions with the actin cytoskeleton and, indirectly, to extracellular matrix proteins. This study was undertaken to evaluate dystrophin and calpain-1 in the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to HF. Wistar rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction and killed at 30, 60 and 90 days post surgery (dps). Cardiac function and blood pressure were evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blotting and immunofluorescence performed for dystrophin, calpain-1, alpha-fodrin and calpastatin. Statistical analyses were performed and considered significant when pcardiac disease. We showed that decreased expression of dystrophin and increased expression of calpains are coincident and could work as possible therapeutic targets to prevent heart failure as a consequence of cardiac hypertrophy.

  12. Matrix attachment regions included in a bicistronic vector enhances and stabilizes follistatin gene expressions in both transgenic cells and transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming HU,Jing GUO,Chunling BAI,Zhuying WEI,Li GAO,Tingmao HU,Shorgan BOU,Guangpeng LI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, follistatin (FST gene expression vectors with either a bicistronic gene transfer cassette alone, or a bicistron gene cassette carrying a matrix attachment region (MAR were constructed and transfected to bovine fetal fibroblasts. Evaluations of both the integration and expression of exogenous FST indicated that the pMAR-CAG-FST-IRES-AcGFP1-polyA-MAR (pMAR-FST vector had higher capacity to form monoclonal transgenic cells than the vector without MAR, though transient transfection and integration efficiency were similar with either construct. Remarkably, protein expression in transgenic cells with the pMAR-FST vector was significantly higher than that from the bicistronic vector. Exogenous FST was expressed in all of the pMAR-FST transgenic mice at F0, F1 and F2. Total muscle growth in F0 mice was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, with larger muscles in fore and hind limbs of transgenic mice. pMAR-FST transgenic mice were also found with more evenly distributed muscle bundles and thinner spaces between sarcolemma, which suggests a correlation between transgene expression-associated muscle development and the trend of muscle growth. In conclusion, a pMAR-FST vector, which excluded the resistant genes and frame structure, enhances and stabilizes FST gene expressions in both transfected cells and transgenic mice.

  13. Exercise-induced capillary growth in human skeletal muscle and the dynamics of VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoier, Birgitte; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-05-01

    In skeletal muscle, growth of capillaries is an important adaptation to exercise training that secures adequate diffusion capacity for oxygen and nutrients even at high-intensity exercise when increases in muscle blood flow are profound. Mechanical forces present during muscle activity, such as shear stress and passive stretch, lead to cellular signaling, enhanced expression of angiogenic factors, and initiation of capillary growth. The most central angiogenic factor in skeletal muscle capillary growth is VEGF. During muscle contraction, VEGF increases in the muscle interstitium, acts on VEGF receptors on the capillary endothelium, and thereby stimulates angiogenic processes. A primary source of muscle interstitial VEGF during exercise is the skeletal muscle fibers which contain large stores of VEGF within vesicles. We propose that, during muscle activity, these VEGF-containing vesicles are redistributed toward the sarcolemma where the contents are secreted into the extracellular fluid. VEGF mRNA expression is increased primarily after exercise, which allows for a more rapid replenishment of VEGF stores lost through secretion during exercise. Future studies should focus on elucidating mechanisms and regulation of VEGF secretion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Absence of Dystrophin Disrupts Skeletal Muscle Signaling: Roles of Ca2+, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Nitric Oxide in the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Froehner, Stanley C

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin is a long rod-shaped protein that connects the subsarcolemmal cytoskeleton to a complex of proteins in the surface membrane (dystrophin protein complex, DPC), with further connections via laminin to other extracellular matrix proteins. Initially considered a structural complex that protected the sarcolemma from mechanical damage, the DPC is now known to serve as a scaffold for numerous signaling proteins. Absence or reduced expression of dystrophin or many of the DPC components cause the muscular dystrophies, a group of inherited diseases in which repeated bouts of muscle damage lead to atrophy and fibrosis, and eventually muscle degeneration. The normal function of dystrophin is poorly defined. In its absence a complex series of changes occur with multiple muscle proteins showing reduced or increased expression or being modified in various ways. In this review, we will consider the various proteins whose expression and function is changed in muscular dystrophies, focusing on Ca(2+)-permeable channels, nitric oxide synthase, NADPH oxidase, and caveolins. Excessive Ca(2+) entry, increased membrane permeability, disordered caveolar function, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are early changes in the disease, and the hypotheses for these phenomena will be critically considered. The aim of the review is to define the early damage pathways in muscular dystrophy which might be appropriate targets for therapy designed to minimize the muscle degeneration and slow the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Fetal muscle-derived cells can repair dystrophic muscles in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auda-Boucher, Gwenola; Rouaud, Thierry; Lafoux, Aude; Levitsky, Dmitri; Huchet-Cadiou, Corinne; Feron, Marie; Guevel, Laetitia; Talon, Sophie; Fontaine-Pérus, Josiane; Gardahaut, Marie-France

    2007-03-10

    We have previously reported that CD34(+) cells purified from mouse fetal muscles can differentiate into skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo when injected into muscle tissue of dystrophic mdx mice. In this study, we investigate the ability of such donor cells to restore dystrophin expression, and to improve the functional muscle capacity of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of mdx mice. For this purpose green fluorescent-positive fetal GFP(+)/CD34(+) cells or desmin(+)/(-)LacZ/CD34(+) cells were transplanted into irradiated or non-irradiated mdx EDL muscle. Donor fetal muscle-derived cells predominantly fused with existing fibers. Indeed more than 50% of the myofibers of the host EDL contained donor nuclei delivering dystrophin along 80-90% of the length of their sarcolemma. The presence of significant amounts of dystrophin (about 60-70% of that found in a control wild-type mouse muscle) was confirmed by Western blot analyses. Dystrophin expression also outcompeted that of utrophin, as revealed by a spatial shift in the distribution of utrophin. At 1 month post-transplant, the recipient muscle appeared to have greater resistance to fatigue than control mdx EDL muscle during repeated maximal contractions.

  16. Intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated Sertoli cells restores muscle morphology and performance in dystrophic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappalupi, Sara; Luca, Giovanni; Mancuso, Francesca; Madaro, Luca; Fallarino, Francesca; Nicoletti, Carmine; Calvitti, Mario; Arato, Iva; Falabella, Giulia; Salvadori, Laura; Di Meo, Antonio; Bufalari, Antonello; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Calafiore, Riccardo; Donato, Rosario; Sorci, Guglielmo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration leading to impaired locomotion, respiratory failure and premature death. In DMD patients, inflammatory events secondary to dystrophin mutation play a major role in the progression of the pathology. Sertoli cells (SeC) have been largely used to protect xenogeneic engraftments or induce trophic effects thanks to their ability to secrete trophic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory factors. Here we have purified SeC from specific pathogen-free (SPF)-certified neonatal pigs, and embedded them into clinical grade alginate microcapsules. We show that a single intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated SPF SeC (SeC-MC) in an experimental model of DMD can rescue muscle morphology and performance in the absence of pharmacologic immunosuppressive treatments. Once i.p. injected, SeC-MC act as a drug delivery system that modulates the inflammatory response in muscle tissue, and upregulates the expression of the dystrophin paralogue, utrophin in muscles through systemic release of heregulin-β1, thus promoting sarcolemma stability. Analyses performed five months after single injection show high biocompatibility and long-term efficacy of SeC-MC. Our results might open new avenues for the treatment of patients with DMD and related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-05

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The mechanism for the promotion of tenderness in meat during the post-mortem process: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, A; Yeates, N T

    1978-01-01

    The post-mortem changes in the chemical composition and structure of striated muscle have been reviewed on the basis of various concepts that emerged from the studies of different investigators to explain the course of tenderization of meat during aging. These concepts include the changes in the sarcoplasmic proteins, myofibrillar proteins (such as complete dissociation of actomyosin, partial dissociation of actomyosin, cleavage of disulfide linkages, depolymerization of F-actin filaments, cleavage of myosin filaments, disorganization of Z-bands and the troponin-tropomyosin complex), sarcolemma, connective tissue elements (collagen fibrils, ground substance), and the protein-ion relationship of the muscle cells (more strictly, syncytia). The experimental evidence for and against each of the views is discussed critically in the light of certain fundamentals of biophysical chemistry and biochemistry. Finally, an alternative hypothesis has been presented based on the differential effect of the post-mortem formation of lactic acid (H+ ion concentration) on the intra- and extracellular components of muscle and the possible role of lysosomal cathepsins. Consequently, a series of biophysical, biochemical, and ultrastructural changes seem to account for the mechanism by which meat becomes tender during the aging process.

  19. Activity and expression of nitric oxide synthase in pork skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yu-pin; Zhang, Wan-gang; Fu, Qing-quan; Liu, Nian; Zhou, Guang-hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biochemical changes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in pork skeletal muscles during postmortem storage. Longissimus thoracis (LT), psoas major (PM) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles of pork were removed immediately after slaughter and stored under vacuum condition at 4°C for 0, 1 and 3d. Results showed that all three muscles exhibited NOS activity until 1d while SM muscle retained NOS activity after 3d of storage. The content of nNOS in SM muscle was stable across 3d of storage while decreased intensity of nNOS was detected at 1 and 3d of aging in PM and LT muscles due to the degradation of calpain. Immunostaining showed that nNOS was located at not only sarcolemma but also cytoplasm at 0 and 1d of storage. Our data suggest that postmortem muscles possess NOS activity and nNOS expression depends on muscle type. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Exercise and muscular dystrophy: implications and analysis of effects on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabei, Matthew S; Martindale, Joshua M; Townsend, DeWayne; Metzger, Joseph M

    2011-07-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous collection of progressive, inherited diseases of muscle weakness and degeneration. Although these diseases can vary widely in their etiology and presentation, nearly all muscular dystrophies cause exercise intolerance to some degree. Here, we focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common form of muscular dystrophy, as a paradigm for the effects of muscle disease on exercise capacity. First described in the mid-1800s, DMD is a rapidly progressive and lethal muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-associated cytoskeletal protein, the loss of which causes numerous cellular defects including mechanical instability of the sarcolemma, increased influx of extracellular calcium, and cell signaling defects. Here, we discuss the physiological basis for exercise intolerance in DMD, focusing on the molecular and cellular defects caused by loss of dystrophin and how these manifest as organ-level dysfunction and reduced exercise capacity. The main focus of this article is the defects present in dystrophin-deficient striated muscle. However, discussion regarding the effects of dystrophin loss on other tissues, including vascular smooth muscle is also included. Collectively, the goal of this article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic basis for exercise intolerance in DMD, which may serve as an archetype for other muscular dystrophies and diseases of muscle wasting. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  1. [DNA vaccine encoding Streptococcus mutans surface protein protected gnotobiotic rats from caries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan; Peng, Zhixiang; Guo, Jihua; Jia, Rong; Chen, Zhi

    2002-01-01

    Protein of Streptococcus mutans is considered as one of the virulence factors due to its ability to mediate the initial attachment of Streptococcus mutans to tooth surface. In this study, an anticaries DNA vaccine pCIA-P was used to immunize rats. The expression of PAc in different tissues in vivo, specific immune response and protection effects against dental caries were observed. Plasmid pCIA-P was injected into rats by two different routs: intramuscular injection (i.m.) and targeted salivary gland immunization (TSG). Immunohistochemistry technique was used to detect the expression of PAc. Gnotobiotic rats were vaccinated with pCIA-P by three different approaches: TSG, intramuscular injection and buccal mucosal injection (i.o.). The specific immune responses were evaluated by ELISA and their anticaries effects were evaluated by Keyes caries scores. PAc was expressed in the sarcoplasm and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and submandibular glands, especially strongly positive in duct regions. The levels of serum specific anti-PAc IgG and salivary specific anti-PAc IgA in TSG immunization and buccal mucosal immunization group were significantly higher than those of other groups. The Keyes caries scores of those two groups were significantly lower than those of other groups. The plasmid pCIA-P could provoke specific immune responses as a novel immunogen. Mucosal immunization with pCIA-P appears to be an effective genetic immunization method against dental caries.

  2. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Riquelme

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7, a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7 production, in wild type (wt and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7, which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  3. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana C. M. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs. We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  4. Antioxidant treatment of hindlimb-unloaded mouse counteracts fiber type transition but not atrophy of disused muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Digennaro, Claudio; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Camerino, Giulia M; Ricciuti, Patrizia; Brocca, Lorenza; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Bottinelli, Roberto; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress was proposed as a trigger of muscle impairment in various muscle diseases. The hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rodent is a model of disuse inducing atrophy and slow-to-fast transition of postural muscles. Here, mice unloaded for 14 days were chronically treated with the selective antioxidant trolox. After HU, atrophy was more pronounced in the slow-twitch soleus muscle (Sol) than in the fast-twitch gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles, and was absent in extensor digitorum longus muscle. In accord with the phenotype transition, HU Sol showed a reduced expression of myosin heavy chain type 2A (MHC-2A) and increase in MHC-2X and MHC-2B isoforms. In parallel, HU Sol displayed an increased sarcolemma chloride conductance related to an increased expression of ClC-1 channels, changes in excitability parameters, a positive shift of the mechanical threshold, and a decrease of the resting cytosolic calcium concentration. Moreover, the level of lipoperoxidation increased proportionally to the degree of atrophy of each muscle type. As expected, trolox treatment fully prevented oxidative stress in HU mice. Atrophy was not prevented but the drug significantly attenuated Sol phenotypic transition and excitability changes. Trolox treatment had no effect on control mice. These results suggest possible benefits of antioxidants in protecting muscle against disuse. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) modulates the ClC-1 chloride channel activity and skeletal muscle phenotype: a biophysical and gene expression study in mouse models lacking the PKCθ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Bouchè, Marina; De Bellis, Michela; Cannone, Maria; Liantonio, Antonella; Musaraj, Kejla; Romano, Rossella; Smeriglio, Piera; Madaro, Luca; Giustino, Arcangela; De Luca, Annamaria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte; Pierno, Sabata

    2014-12-01

    In skeletal muscle, the resting chloride conductance (gCl), due to the ClC-1 chloride channel, controls the sarcolemma electrical stability. Indeed, loss-of-function mutations in ClC-1 gene are responsible of myotonia congenita. The ClC-1 channel can be phosphorylated and inactivated by protein kinases C (PKC), but the relative contribution of each PKC isoforms is unknown. Here, we investigated on the role of PKCθ in the regulation of ClC-1 channel expression and activity in fast- and slow-twitch muscles of mouse models lacking PKCθ. Electrophysiological studies showed an increase of gCl in the PKCθ-null mice with respect to wild type. Muscle excitability was reduced accordingly. However, the expression of the ClC-1 channel, evaluated by qRT-PCR, was not modified in PKCθ-null muscles suggesting that PKCθ affects the ClC-1 activity. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that although PKCθ appreciably modulates gCl, other isoforms are still active and concur to this role. The modification of gCl in PKCθ-null muscles has caused adaptation of the expression of phenotype-specific genes, such as calcineurin and myocyte enhancer factor-2, supporting the role of PKCθ also in the settings of muscle phenotype. Importantly, the lack of PKCθ has prevented the aging-related reduction of gCl, suggesting that its modulation may represent a new strategy to contrast the aging process.

  6. Gentamicin treatment in exercised mdx mice: Identification of dystrophin-sensitive pathways and evaluation of efficacy in work-loaded dystrophic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annamaria; Nico, Beatrice; Rolland, Jean-François; Cozzoli, Anna; Burdi, Rosa; Mangieri, Domenica; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Liantonio, Antonella; Cippone, Valentina; De Bellis, Michela; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2008-11-01

    Aminoglycosides force read through of premature stop codon mutations and introduce new mutation-specific gene-corrective strategies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A chronic treatment with gentamicin (32 mg/kg/daily i.p., 8-12 weeks) was performed in exercised mdx mice with the dual aim to clarify the dependence on dystrophin of the functional, biochemical and histological alterations present in dystrophic muscle and to verify the long term efficiency of small molecule gene-corrective strategies in work-loaded dystrophic muscle. The treatment counteracted the exercise-induced impairment of in vivo forelimb strength after 6-8 weeks. We observed an increase in dystrophin expression level in all the fibers, although lower than that observed in normal fibers, and found a concomitant recovery of aquaporin-4 at sarcolemma. A significant reduction in centronucleated fibers, in the area of necrosis and in the percentage of nuclear factor-kB-positive nuclei was observed in gastrocnemious muscle of treated animals. Plasma creatine kinase was reduced by 70%. Ex vivo, gentamicin restored membrane ionic conductance in mdx diaphragm and limb muscle fibers. No effects were observed on the altered calcium homeostasis and sarcolemmal calcium permeability, detected by electrophysiological and microspectrofluorimetric approaches. Thus, the maintenance of a partial level of dystrophin is sufficient to reinforce sarcolemmal stability, reducing leakiness, inflammation and fiber damage, while correction of altered calcium homeostasis needs greater expression of dystrophin or direct interventions on the channels involved.

  7. The 2013 German-Russian BION-M1 Joint Flight Project: Skeletal Muscle and Neuromuscular Changes in Mice Housed for 30 Days in a Biosatellite on Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blottner, Dieter; Shenkman, Boris; Salanova, Michele

    Exposure to microgravity results in various structural, biochemical and molecular changes of the skeletal neuromuscular system. The BION Joint Flight Proposal between the Charité Berlin Center of Space Medicine (www.zwmb.de) in Berlin, and the Institute of Biomedical Problem (IMBP) in Moscow, provided an exciting opportunity for a more detailed analysis of neuromuscular changes in mice (C57/bl6) exposed to real microgravity housed for 30 days in a BION M1 biosatellite on orbit. The mice from the BION flight group (n=5) were compared to three different on-ground control groups (Flight control, BION-ground and Vivarium, each n=5 mice). We started to analyse various skeletal muscles from the hind limbs or trunk. Apart from routine structural and biochemical analysis (fiber size and type distribution, slow/fastMyHC) we test the hypothesis for the presence of a microgravity-induced sarcolemma-cytosolic protein shift of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and partial loss in neuromuscular synapse scaffold protein (Homer) immunoexpression known to be prone to disuse in mice or humans (hind limb unloading, bed rest) as previously shown (Sandonà D et al., PLoS One, 2012, Salanova M et al., FASEB J, 2011). National Sponsors: Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) via the German AeroSpace Board, DLR e.V., Bonn-Oberkassel, Germany (#50WB1121); Contract RAS-IMBP/Charité Berlin # Bion-M1/2013

  8. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  9. Human Satellite Cell Isolation and Xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Steven M; Tamaki, Stanley; Xu, Xiaoti; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells are mononucleated cells of the skeletal muscle lineage that exist beneath the basal lamina juxtaposed to the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. It is widely accepted that satellite cells mediate skeletal muscle regeneration. Within the satellite cell pool of adult muscle are skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also called satellite stem cells, which fulfill criteria of tissue stem cells: They proliferate and their progeny either occupies the adult MuSC niche during self-renewal or differentiates to regenerate mature muscle fibers. Here, we describe robust methods for the isolation of enriched populations of human satellite cells containing MuSCs from fresh human muscle, utilizing mechanical and enzymatic dissociation and purification by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We also describe a process for xenotransplantation of human satellite cells into mouse muscle by injection into irradiated, immunodeficient, mouse leg muscle with concurrent notexin or bupivacaine muscle injury to increase engraftment efficiency. The engraftment of human MuSCs and the formation of human muscle can then be analyzed by histological and immunofluorescence staining, or subjected to in vivo experimentation.

  10. Soleus muscle in glycosylation-deficient muscular dystrophy is protected from contraction-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumerson, Jessica D; Kabaeva, Zhyldyz T; Davis, Carol S; Faulkner, John A; Michele, Daniel E

    2010-12-01

    The glycosylation of dystroglycan is required for its function as a high-affinity laminin receptor, and loss of dystroglycan glycosylation results in congenital muscular dystrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional defects in slow- and fast-twitch muscles of glycosylation-deficient Large(myd) mice. While a partial alteration in glycosylation of dystroglycan in heterozygous Large(myd/+) mice was not sufficient to alter muscle function, homozygous Large(myd/myd) mice demonstrated a marked reduction in specific force in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Although EDL muscles from Large(myd/myd) mice were highly susceptible to lengthening contraction-induced injury, Large(myd/myd) soleus muscles surprisingly showed no greater force deficit compared with wild-type soleus muscles even after five lengthening contractions. Despite no increased susceptibility to injury, Large(myd/myd) soleus muscles showed loss of dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity and dystrophic pathology. Interestingly, we show that soleus muscles have a markedly higher sarcolemma expression of β(1)-containing integrins compared with EDL and gastrocnemius muscles. Therefore, we conclude that β(1)-containing integrins play an important role as matrix receptors in protecting muscles containing slow-twitch fibers from contraction-induced injury in the absence of dystroglycan function, and that contraction-induced injury appears to be a separable phenotype from the dystrophic pathology of muscular dystrophy.

  11. Effect of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Current knowledge and questions remaining concerning the effects of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle is reviewed. The most dramatic of these effects is muscle atrophy, which has been noted in cases of muscles fixed at or below their resting length. Immobilization is also accompanied by a substantial decrease in motoneuronal discharges, which results in the conversion of slow-twitch muscle to muscle with fast-twitch characteristics. Sarcolemma effects include no change or a decrease in resting membrane potential, the appearance of extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors, and no change in acetylcholinesterase activity. Evidence of changes in motoneuron after hyperpolarization characteristics suggests that the muscle inactivity is responsible for neuronal changes, rather than vice versa. The rate of protein loss from atrophying muscles is determined solely by the first-order rate constant for degradation. Various other biochemical and functional changes have been noted, including decreased insulin responsiveness and protein synthesis. The model of limb immobilization may also be useful for related studies of muscle adaptation.

  12. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-jiang Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  13. Long-term skeletal muscle protection after gene transfer in a mouse model of LGMD-2D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacak, Christina A; Walter, Glenn A; Gaidosh, Gabe; Bryant, Nathan; Lewis, Melissa A; Germain, Sean; Mah, Cathryn S; Campbell, Kevin P; Byrne, Barry J

    2007-10-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) describes a group of inherited diseases resulting from mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in maintaining skeletal muscle membrane stability. LGMD type-2D is caused by mutations in alpha-sarcoglycan (sgca). Here we describe muscle-specific gene delivery of the human sgca gene into dystrophic muscle using an adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1) capsid and creatine kinase promoter. Delivery of this construct to adult sgca(-/-) mice resulted in localization of the sarcoglycan complex to the sarcolemma and a reduction in muscle fiber damage. Sgca expression prevented disease progression as observed in vivo by T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confirmed in vitro by decreased Evan's blue dye accumulation. The ability of recombinant AAV-mediated gene delivery to restore normal muscle mechanical properties in sgca(-/-) mice was verified by in vitro force mechanics on isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, with a decrease in passive resistance to stretch as compared with untreated controls. In summary, AAV/AAV-sgca gene transfer provides long-term muscle protection from LGMD and can be non-invasively evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. [MHC class I antigens, CD4 and CD8 expressions in polymyositis and dermatomyositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Carla Renata; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the frequencies of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigens, and CD4 and CD8 cells in skeletal muscle in polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). This was a retrospective study of 34 PM cases, 8 DM cases, and 29 control patients with non-inflammatory myopathies. MHC-I antigens were expressed in the sarcolemma and/or sarcoplasm in 79.4% of PM cases, 62.5% of DM cases, and 27.6% of controls (CD4 expression was observed in 76.5%, 75%, and 13.8%, respectively). There was a high suspicion of PM/DM (mainly PM) in patients in whom MHC-I antigens and CD4 were co-expressed. In 14.3% of PM/DM cases, we observed MHC-I antigens expression alone, without inflammatory cells. MCH-I antigens expression and CD4 positivity might add to strong diagnostic suspicion of PM/DM. No cellular infiltration was observed in 14.3% of such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary study on sarcoglycan sub-complex in rat cerebral and cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermiglio, Giovanna; Runci, Michele; Scibilia, Antonino; Biasini, Fiammetta; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    The sarcoglycan sub-complex is a protein system which plays a key role in sarcolemma stabilization during muscle activity. Although numerous studies have been conducted on this system, there are few data about its localization in non-muscular tissues. On this basis we carried out an indirect immunofluorescence study on normal rat cerebral and cerebellar cortex. In particular, we carried out single localization reactions to analyze if these proteins are present in brain and double localization reactions between sarcoglycans and either SMI-32 or GFAP to verify if they are expressed both in neurons and glial cells. We found that all tested sarcoglycans are present both in cerebral and cerebellar cortex and that they are expressed both in neurons and glial cells. The typical staining pattern of all sarcoglycans is represented by "spot-like" fluorescence, with spots of 0.5-2 microm average diameter laid out mainly around the soma of the cells. The main difference about sarcoglycans expression between cerebral and cerebellar cortex is that in the cerebellar cortex the sarcoglycans positivity is detectable only in an area which is likely to correspond to Purkinje cells layer. The presence of sarcoglycans in cerebral and cerebellar cortex and their disposition mainly around the soma of the cells suggest a role of these proteins in cellular signalling and in regulating postsynaptic receptor assembly mainly in axo-somatic synapses.

  16. Sarcoglycan immunoreactivity is lacking in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, C; Santoro, G; Impellizzeri, P; Manganaro, A; Cutroneo, G; Trimarchi, E; Antonuccio, P; Anastasi, G; Zuccarello, B

    2007-01-01

    The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) is a large multisubunit complex that plays a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and physiology of muscle fibers. Dystrophin has been reported to be absent in the pyloric muscle of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) patients. The present study was designed to investigate the other two patterns of DGC (dystroglycan and sarcoglycan complexes) in normal pyloric muscle and their possible modifications in IHPS patients. Ten pyloric muscle biopsies were obtained from babies operated for IHPS and five control pylorus biopsy taken at autopsy from cases without gastrointestinal disease. The DGC sub-complexes (beta-dystroglican and beta, delta- sarcoglycans) were localized immunohistochemically using specific monoclonal antibodies. The results were evaluated using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Positive immunolocalization of the two DGC sub complexes was demonstrated in the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the pyloric region of control patients. Similarly, a positive immune expression of beta-dystroglican was observed in the pyloric SMCs of IHPS patients. On the other hand a negative immunoreaction for sarcoglycans was recorded within the full thickness of the pyloric SMCs of these patients. The absence of sarcoglycans within the hypertrophied pyloric muscle may be a predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of IHPS since it could alter the normal physiology of SMCs through the modifications of structural integrity of sarcolemma and signaling between the extracellular and intracellular compartment.

  17. Role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor in Akt2-mediated plasma membrane translocation of GLUT4 in insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Naoto; Nihata, Yuma; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Aiba, Atsu; Satoh, Takaya

    2014-11-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 plays a key role in insulin-promoted glucose uptake mediated by the GLUT4 glucose transporter in skeletal muscle. Our recent studies have demonstrated that the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt2 is critically involved in insulin-dependent Rac1 activation. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation and GLUT4 translocation in mouse skeletal muscle and cultured myocytes. Constitutively activated FLJ00068 induced GLUT4 translocation in a Rac1-dependent and Akt2-independent manner in L6 myocytes. On the other hand, knockdown of FLJ00068 significantly reduced constitutively activated Akt2-triggered GLUT4 translocation. Furthermore, Rac1 activation and GLUT4 translocation induced by constitutively activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase were inhibited by knockdown of FLJ00068. In mouse gastrocnemius muscle, constitutively activated FLJ00068 actually induced GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma. GLUT4 translocation by constitutively activated FLJ00068 was totally abolished in rac1 knockout mouse gastrocnemius muscle. Additionally, we were successful in detecting the activation of Rac1 following the expression of constitutively activated FLJ00068 in gastrocnemius muscle by immunofluorescence microscopy using an activation-specific probe. Collectively, these results strongly support the notion that FLJ00068 regulates Rac1 downstream of Akt2, leading to the stimulation of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fatty acid transport and transporters in muscle are critically regulated by Akt2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati S; Luiken, Joost J F P; Snook, Laelie A; Han, Xiao Xia; Holloway, Graham P; Glatz, Jan F C; Bonen, Arend

    2015-09-14

    Muscle contains various fatty acid transporters (CD36, FABPpm, FATP1, FATP4). Physiological stimuli (insulin, contraction) induce the translocation of all four transporters to the sarcolemma to enhance fatty acid uptake similarly to glucose uptake stimulation via glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) translocation. Akt2 mediates insulin-induced, but not contraction-induced, GLUT4 translocation, but its role in muscle fatty acid transporter translocation is unknown. In muscle from Akt2-knockout mice, we observed that Akt2 is critically involved in both insulin-induced and contraction-induced fatty acid transport and translocation of fatty acid translocase/CD36 (CD36) and FATP1, but not of translocation of fatty acid-binding protein (FABPpm) and FATP4. Instead, Akt2 mediates intracellular retention of both latter transporters. Collectively, our observations reveal novel complexities in signaling mechanisms regulating the translocation of fatty acid transporters in muscle. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The short-term influence of catecholamines on acid-base balance of rat soleus muscle in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguenin, F

    1984-07-01

    The short-term influence of catecholamines on surface pH (pHs) and intracellular pH (pHi) of superficial muscle fibres has been investigated in rat soleus in vitro using single-barrelled and double-barrelled glass micro-electrodes. pHs means the pH recorded at the surface of a muscle fibre. All measurements were performed in high-Ca2+ (10 mM) Ringer's solutions. Adrenaline caused an intracellular and surface acidification which increased with concentration in the range 6 X 10(-9)-6 X 10(-6) M. The effect was inhibited by propranolol (10(-5)M) but not by phentolamine (1.5 X 10(-7) M). Noradrenaline and isoproterenol (6 X 10(-6) M) also acidified the intracellular fluid. The relative effect of catecholamines on steady-state pHi was: adrenaline = isoproterenol greater than noradrenaline. Adrenaline (6 X 10(-9)-6 X 10(-6) M) did not accelerate pHi recovery following intracellular acid-loading by NH+4 or CO2. It is concluded that activation of beta-adrenoceptors by catecholamines causes an early intracellular acidosis presumably by enhancing synthesis of metabolic acids. The surface acidification seems at least partly due to non-ionic permeation of sarcolemma by metabolic acids, secondarily inducing accumulation of H+ ions at the cell surface.

  20. Contractions induced by a calcium-triggered release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of single skinned cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiato, A; Fabiato, F

    1975-08-01

    1. Fragments of single cardiac cells were obtained by homogenization of ventricular tissue from adult rats. Remaining pieces of sacrolemma were removed by micro-dissection. Tension was recorded from the ends of the skinned (sarcolemma-free) cells with a photodiode force transducer. 2. In the presence of a strong buffering of the free [Ca2+] with 4-0 mM total EGTA, a tonic tension was obtained that increased according to t sigmoid curve when the free ([Ca2+] was increased from 10(-6-75)M to 10(-5-0)M. This curve was not modified by the destruction of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by the detergent Brij 58. Therefore, the tonic tension corresponded to the direct effect of the free [Ca2+] present in the buffer on the myofilaments. 3. In the presence of a slight buffering of the free [Ca2+] with 0-050 mM total EGTA, cyclic contractions were observed that were attributed to cyclic releases and re-sequestrations of Ca2+ by the SR. The absence of effect of azide and ruthenium red on the cyclic contractions obtained at a free [Ca2+] lower than 10(-6-50)M demonstrated that the mitochondria played no role in the triggering of these contractions. 4. Cyclic contractions were induced by a slight variation of free [Ca2+] in the buffer from 10(-7-65)M to 10(-7-40)M. Their amplitude at 10(-7-40)M free Ca2+ was equal to the tonic tension developed by a free [Ca2+] 20 times higher applied to the myofilaments when the SR was destroyed by detergent or functionally inhibited by high total [EGTA]. It was concluded that these cyclic contractions corresponded to a Ca2+-triggered release of Ca2+ from the SR. 5. The cyclic contractions were induced by the filling of the SR with Ca2+ to a critical level at which it released a fraction of the Ca2+ it contained. Each contraction was followed by a re-sequestration of Ca2+, the kinetics of which conditioned the duration of the cycles. 6. The amplitude of the cyclic contractions increased when the free [Ca2+] that triggered them was increased

  1. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  2. Chronic Lead Exposure Increases Blood Pressure and Myocardial Contractility in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioresi, Mirian; Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson Brás; Vescovi, Marcos Vinícius A.; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cardiovascular effects of lead exposure, emphasising its direct action on myocardial contractility. Male Wistar rats were sorted randomly into two groups: control (Ct) and treatment with 100 ppm of lead (Pb) in the drinking water. Blood pressure (BP) was measured weekly. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were anaesthetised and haemodynamic parameters and contractility of the left ventricular papillary muscles were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were properly stored for further biochemical investigations. Statistical analyses were considered to be significant at plead concentrations in the blood reached approximately 13 µg/dL, while the bone was the site of the highest deposition of this metal. BP in the Pb-treated group was higher from the first week of lead exposure and remained at the same level over the next four weeks. Haemodynamic evaluations revealed increases in systolic (Ct: 96±3.79 vs. Pb: 116±1.37 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (Ct: 60±2.93 vs. Pb: 70±3.38 mmHg), left ventricular systolic pressure (Ct: 104±5.85 vs. Pb: 120±2.51 mmHg) and heart rate (Ct: 307±10 vs. Pb: 348±16 bpm). Lead treatment did not alter the force and time derivatives of the force of left ventricular papillary muscles that were contracting isometrically. However, our results are suggestive of changes in the kinetics of calcium (Ca++) in cardiomyocytes increased transarcolemmal Ca++ influx, low Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high extrusion by the sarcolemma. Altogether, these results show that despite the increased Ca++ influx that was induced by lead exposure, the myocytes had regulatory mechanisms that prevented increases in force, as evidenced in vivo by the increased systolic ventricular pressure. PMID:24841481

  3. Effects of menthol on circular smooth muscle of human colon: analysis of the mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Antonella; Liotta, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-10-05

    Menthol is the major constituent of peppermint oil, an herbal preparation commonly used to treat nausea, spasms during colonoscopy and irritable bowel disease. The mechanism responsible for its spasmolytic action remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by menthol on the human distal colon mechanical activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of action. The spontaneous or evoked-contractions of the circular smooth muscle were recorded using vertical organ bath. Menthol (0.1 mM-30 mM) reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. The inhibitory effect was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine (1 μM), a transient receptor potential-melastatin8 channel antagonist, or tetrodotoxin (1 μM), a neural blocker, or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase, or tetraethylammonium (10 mM), a blocker of potassium (K+)-channels. On the contrary, nifedipine (3 nM), a voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, significantly reduced the inhibitory menthol actions. Menthol also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the contractile responses caused by exogenous application of Ca2+ (75-375 μM) in a Ca2+-free solution, or induced by potassium chloride (KCl; 40 mM). Moreover menthol (1-3 mM) strongly reduced the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked atropine-sensitive contractions and the carbachol-contractile responses. The present results suggest that menthol induces spasmolytic effects in human colon circular muscle inhibiting directly the gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility, through the block of Ca2+ influx through sarcolemma L-type Ca2+ channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dietary Flaxseed Mitigates Impaired Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: in Vivo, in Vitro and in Silico Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Felicia; Costa, Alessandra; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Rocchi, Marco Bruno Luigi; Rudov, Alexander; Coletti, Dario; Minieri, Marilena; Di Nardo, Paolo; Teodori, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diets enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been shown to exert a positive impact on muscle diseases. Flaxseed is one of the richest sources of n-3 PUFA acid α-linolenic acid (ALA). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of flaxseed and ALA in models of skeletal muscle degeneration characterized by high levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF). Methods: The in vivo studies were carried out on dystrophic hamsters affected by muscle damage associated with high TNF plasma levels and fed with a long-term 30% flaxseed-supplemented diet. Differentiating C2C12 myoblasts treated with TNF and challenged with ALA represented the in vitro model. Skeletal muscle morphology was scrutinized by applying the Principal Component Analysis statistical method. Apoptosis, inflammation and myogenesis were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Finally, an in silico analysis was carried out to predict the possible pathways underlying the effects of n-3 PUFAs. Results: The flaxseed-enriched diet protected the dystrophic muscle from apoptosis and preserved muscle myogenesis by increasing the myogenin and alpha myosin heavy chain. Moreover, it restored the normal expression pattern of caveolin-3 thereby allowing protein retention at the sarcolemma. ALA reduced TNF-induced apoptosis in differentiating myoblasts and prevented the TNF-induced inhibition of myogenesis, as demonstrated by the increased expression of myogenin, myosin heavy chain and caveolin-3, while promoting myotube fusion. The in silico investigation revealed that FAK pathways may play a central role in the protective effects of ALA on myogenesis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that flaxseed may exert potent beneficial effects by preserving skeletal muscle regeneration and homeostasis partly through an ALA-mediated action. Thus, dietary flaxseed and ALA may serve as a useful strategy for treating patients with muscle dystrophies. PMID:26941581

  5. Mechanical isolation, and measurement of force and myoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] in fully intact single skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Arthur J; Westerblad, Håkan

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical dissection of single intact mammalian skeletal muscle fibers permits real-time measurement of intracellular properties and contractile function of living fibers. A major advantage of mechanical over enzymatic fiber dissociation is that single fibers can be isolated with their tendons remaining attached, which allows contractile forces (in the normal expected range of 300-450 kN/m(2)) to be measured during electrical stimulation. Furthermore, the sarcolemma of single fibers remains fully intact after mechanical dissection, and hence the living fibers can be studied with intact intracellular milieu and normal function and metabolic properties, as well as ionic control. Given that Ca(2+) is the principal regulator of the contractile force, measurements of myoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) can be used to further delineate the intrinsic mechanisms underlying changes in skeletal muscle function. [Ca(2+)]i measurements are most commonly performed in intact single fibers using ratiometric fluorescent indicators such as indo-1 or fura-2. These Ca(2+) indicators are introduced into the fiber by pressure injection or by using the membrane-permeable indo-1 AM, and [Ca(2+)]i is measured by calculating a ratio of the fluorescence at specific wavelengths emitted for the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound forms of the dye. We describe here the procedures for mechanical dissection, and for force and [Ca(2+)]i measurement in intact single fibers from mouse flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle, which is the most commonly used muscle in studies using intact single fibers. This technique can also be used to isolate intact single fibers from various muscles and from various species. As an alternative to Ca(2+) indicators, single fibers can also be loaded with fluorescent indicators to measure, for instance, reactive oxygen species, pH, and [Mg(2+)], or they can be injected with proteins to change functional properties. The entire protocol, from dissection to the start of an

  6. Cytoskeleton, L-type Ca2+ and stretch activated channels in injured skeletal muscle

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    Fabio Francini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The extra-sarcomeric cytoskeleton (actin microfilaments and anchoring proteins is involved in maintaining the sarco-membrane stiffness and integrity and in turn the mechanical stability and function of the intra- and sub-sarcoplasmic proteins. Accordingly, it regulates Ca2+ entry through the L-type Ca2+ channels and the mechano-sensitivity of the stretch activated channels (SACs. Moreover, being intra-sarcomeric cytoskeleton bound to costameric proteins and other proteins of the sarcoplasma by intermediate filaments, as desmin, it integrates the properties of the sarcolemma with the skeletal muscle fibres contraction. The aim of this research was to compare the cytoskeleton, SACs and the ECC alterations in two different types of injured skeletal muscle fibres: by muscle denervation and mechanical overload (eccentric contraction. Experiments on denervation were made in isolated Soleus muscle of male Wistar rats; forced eccentric-contraction (EC injury was achieved in Extensor Digitorum Longus muscles of Swiss mice. The method employed conventional intracellular recording with microelectrodes inserted in a single fibre of an isolated skeletal muscle bundle. The state of cytoskeleton was evaluated by recording SAC currents and by evaluating the resting membrane potential (RMP value determined in current-clamp mode. The results demonstrated that in both injured skeletal muscle conditions the functionality of L-type Ca2+ current, ICa, was affected. In parallel, muscle fibres showed an increase of the resting membrane permeability and of the SAC current. These issues, together with a more depolarized RMP are an index of altered cytoskeleton. In conclusion, we found a symilar alteration of ICa, SAC and cytoskeleton in both injured skeletal muscle conditions.

  7. New insights into the relationship between mIGF-1-induced hypertrophy and Ca2+ handling in differentiated satellite cells.

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    Simone Guarnieri

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration involves the activation of satellite cells, is regulated at the genetic and epigenetic levels, and is strongly influenced by gene activation and environmental conditions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the overexpression of mIGF-1 can modify functional features of satellite cells during the differentiation process, particularly in relation to modifications of intracellular Ca2+ handling. Satellite cells were isolated from wild-type and MLC/mIGF-1 transgenic mice. The cells were differentiated in vitro, and morphological analyses, intracellular Ca2+ measurements, and ionic current recordings were performed. mIGF-1 overexpression accelerates satellite cell differentiation and promotes myotube hypertrophy. In addition, mIGF-1 overexpression-induced potentiation of myogenesis triggers both quantitative and qualitative changes to the control of intracellular Ca2+ handling. In particular, the differentiated MLC/mIGF-1 transgenic myotubes have reduced velocity and amplitude of intracellular Ca2+ increases after stimulation with caffeine, KCl and acetylcholine. This appears to be due, at least in part, to changes in the physico-chemical state of the sarcolemma (increased membrane lipid oxidation, increased output currents and to increased expression of dihydropyridine voltage-operated Ca2+ channels. Interestingly, extracellular ATP and GTP evoke intracellular Ca2+ mobilization to greater extents in the MLC/mIGF-1 transgenic satellite cells, compared to the wild-type cells. These data suggest that these MLC/mIGF-1 transgenic satellite cells are more sensitive to trophic stimuli, which can potentiate the effects of mIGF-1 on the myogenic programme.

  8. PTRH2 gene mutation causes progressive congenital skeletal muscle pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Jinger; Kaindl, Angela M; Jijiwa, Mayumi; de la Vega, Michelle; Hu, Hao; Griffiths, Genevieve S; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Barraza, Pamela; Cruz, Vivian; Van Ry, Pam; Ramos, Joe W; Burkin, Dean J; Matter, Michelle L

    2017-04-15

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 (PTRH2) regulates integrin-mediated pro-survival and apoptotic signaling. PTRH2 is critical in muscle development and regulates myogenic differentiation. In humans a biallelic mutation in the PTRH2 gene causes infantile-onset multisystem disease with progressive muscle weakness. We report here that the Ptrh2 knockout mouse model recapitulates the progressive congenital muscle pathology observed in patients. Ptrh2 null mice demonstrate multiple degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers, increased central nuclei, elevated creatine kinase activity and endomysial fibrosis. This progressive muscle pathology resembles the muscular dystrophy phenotype in humans and mice lacking the α7 integrin. We demonstrate that in normal muscle Ptrh2 associates in a complex with the α7β1 integrin at the sarcolemma and Ptrh2 expression is decreased in α7 integrin null muscle. Furthermore, Ptrh2 expression is altered in skeletal muscle of classical congenital muscular dystrophy mouse models. Ptrh2 levels were up-regulated in dystrophin deficient mdx muscle, which correlates with the elevated levels of the α7β1 integrin observed in mdx muscle and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Similar to the α7 integrin, Ptrh2 expression was decreased in laminin-α2 dyW null gastrocnemius muscle. Our data establishes a PTRH2 mutation as a novel driver of congenital muscle degeneration and identifies a potential novel target to treat muscle myopathies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. SU9516 Increases α7β1 Integrin and Ameliorates Disease Progression in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Apurva; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Tarchione, Ashley R; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Heredia, Dante J; Nunes, Andreia M; Duan, Suzann; Brewer, Paul D; Van Ry, Tyler; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W; Dulcey, Andrés E; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z; Hu, Xin; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan; Burkin, Dean J

    2017-06-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a complete loss of the dystrophin protein. Dystrophin is a critical component of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC), which links laminin in the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton within myofibers and provides resistance to shear stresses during muscle activity. Loss of dystrophin in DMD patients results in a fragile sarcolemma prone to contraction-induced muscle damage. The α7β1 integrin is a laminin receptor protein complex in skeletal and cardiac muscle and a major modifier of disease progression in DMD. In a muscle cell-based screen for α7 integrin transcriptional enhancers, we identified a small molecule, SU9516, that promoted increased α7β1 integrin expression. Here we show that SU9516 leads to increased α7B integrin in murine C2C12 and human DMD patient myogenic cell lines. Oral administration of SU9516 in the mdx mouse model of DMD increased α7β1 integrin in skeletal muscle, ameliorated pathology, and improved muscle function. We show that these improvements are mediated through SU9516 inhibitory actions on the p65-NF-κB pro-inflammatory and Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase (SPAK)/OSR1 signaling pathways. This study identifies a first in-class α7 integrin-enhancing small-molecule compound with potential for the treatment of DMD. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise promotes alpha7 integrin gene transcription and protection of skeletal muscle.

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    Boppart, Marni D; Volker, Sonja E; Alexander, Nicole; Burkin, Dean J; Kaufman, Stephen J

    2008-11-01

    The alpha7beta1 integrin is increased in skeletal muscle in response to injury-producing exercise, and transgenic overexpression of this integrin in mice protects against exercise-induced muscle damage. The present study investigates whether the increase in the alpha7beta1 integrin observed in wild-type mice in response to exercise is due to transcriptional regulation and examines whether mobilization of the integrin at the myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a key determinant in its protection against damage. A single bout of downhill running exercise selectively increased transcription of the alpha7 integrin gene in 5-wk-old wild-type mice 3 h postexercise, and an increased alpha7 chain was detected in muscle sarcolemma adjacent to tendinous tissue immediately following exercise. The alpha7B, but not alpha7A isoform, was found concentrated and colocalized with tenascin-C in muscle fibers lining the MTJ. To further validate the importance of the integrin in the protection against muscle damage following exercise, muscle injury was quantified in alpha7(-/-) mice. Muscle damage was extensive in alpha7(-/-) mice in response to both a single and repeated bouts of exercise and was largely restricted to areas of high MTJ concentration and high mechanical force near the Achilles tendon. These results suggest that exercise-induced muscle injury selectively increases transcription of the alpha7 integrin gene and promotes a rapid change in the alpha7beta integrin at the MTJ. These combined molecular and cellular alterations are likely responsible for integrin-mediated attenuation of exercise-induced muscle damage.

  11. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

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    Merwe, Celia van der, E-mail: celiavdm@sun.ac.za [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Loos, Ben [Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Swart, Chrisna [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Kinnear, Craig [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology and the DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical TB Research, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Henning, Franclo [Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Merwe, Lize van der [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Department of Statistics, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town (South Africa); Pillay, Komala [National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) Histopathology Laboratory, Red Cross Children’s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Muller, Nolan [Division of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Zaharie, Dan [Neuropathology Unit, Division of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Engelbrecht, Lize [Cell Imaging Unit, Central Analytical Facility, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Carr, Jonathan [Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  12. The myogenic electric organ of Sternopygus macrurus: a non-contractile tissue with a skeletal muscle transcriptome

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    Matthew Pinch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In most electric fish species, the electric organ (EO derives from striated muscle cells that suppress many muscle properties. In the gymnotiform Sternopygus macrurus, mature electrocytes, the current-producing cells of the EO, do not contain sarcomeres, yet they continue to make some cytoskeletal and sarcomeric proteins and the muscle transcription factors (MTFs that induce their expression. In order to more comprehensively examine the transcriptional regulation of genes associated with the formation and maintenance of the contractile sarcomere complex, results from expression analysis using qRT-PCR were informed by deep RNA sequencing of transcriptomes and miRNA compositions of muscle and EO tissues from adult S. macrurus. Our data show that: (1 components associated with the homeostasis of the sarcomere and sarcomere-sarcolemma linkage were transcribed in EO at levels similar to those in muscle; (2 MTF families associated with activation of the skeletal muscle program were not differentially expressed between these tissues; and (3 a set of microRNAs that are implicated in regulation of the muscle phenotype are enriched in EO. These data support the development of a unique and highly specialized non-contractile electrogenic cell that emerges from a striated phenotype and further differentiates with little modification in its transcript composition. This comprehensive analysis of parallel mRNA and miRNA profiles is not only a foundation for functional studies aimed at identifying mechanisms underlying the transcription-independent myogenic program in S. macrurus EO, but also has important implications to many vertebrate cell types that independently activate or suppress specific features of the skeletal muscle program.

  13. Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Javad; Berry, Deborah L; Sanjari, Salar; Razvi, Mohammed; Brown, Kristy; Hathout, Yetrib; Vertes, Akos; Dadgar, Sherry; Hoffman, Eric P

    2011-03-01

    Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) in human genomic sequence often show a high degree of evolutionary conservation, yet have little or no tissue EST or protein data suggestive of protein product function. The encoded proteins may have highly restricted expression in specialized cells, subcellular specializations, and/or narrow windows during development. One such highly specialized and minute subcellular compartment is the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), where motorneurons contact muscle fibers. The electric Torpedo ray has evolved to expand the NMJ structure to the size of a large organ (electroplax organ), and we hypothesized that Torpedo electroplax proteins would be candidates for human ESTs expressed at the human NMJ. A total of 9719 primary electroplax cDNA clones were sequenced. We identified 44 human ORFs showing high (>63%) amino acid identity to Torpedo electroplax transcripts with enrichment for mRNA splicing motifs (SH2 and pre-mRNA splicing domains), an observation potentially important for the strict nuclear domains maintained by myonuclei underlying the NMJ. We generated antibodies against two uncharacterized human genes (C19orf29 [Drosophila cactin] and C15orf24) and showed that these were indeed expressed at the murine NMJ. Cactin, a member of the Rel transcription factor family in Drosophila, localized to the postsynaptic cytosol of the NMJ and nuclear membrane. C15orf24 protein localized to the murine postsynaptic sarcolemma. We show a novel approach towards identifying proteins expressed at a subcellular specialization using evolutionary diversity of organ function and cross-species mapping. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunolocalization of KATP channel subunits in mouse and rat cardiac myocytes and the coronary vasculature

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    Nakamura Tomoe Y

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrophysiological data suggest that cardiac KATP channels consist of Kir6.2 and SUR2A subunits, but the distribution of these (and other KATP channel subunits is poorly defined. We examined the localization of each of the KATP channel subunits in the mouse and rat heart. Results Immunohistochemistry of cardiac cryosections demonstrate Kir6.1 protein to be expressed in ventricular myocytes, as well as in the smooth muscle and endothelial cells of coronary resistance vessels. Endothelial capillaries also stained positive for Kir6.1 protein. Kir6.2 protein expression was found predominantly in ventricular myocytes and also in endothelial cells, but not in smooth muscle cells. SUR1 subunits are strongly expressed at the sarcolemmal surface of ventricular myocytes (but not in the coronary vasculature, whereas SUR2 protein was found to be localized predominantly in cardiac myocytes and coronary vessels (mostly in smaller vessels. Immunocytochemistry of isolated ventricular myocytes shows co-localization of Kir6.2 and SUR2 proteins in a striated sarcomeric pattern, suggesting t-tubular expression of these proteins. Both Kir6.1 and SUR1 subunits were found to express strongly at the sarcolemma. The role(s of these subunits in cardiomyocytes remain to be defined and may require a reassessment of the molecular nature of ventricular KATP channels. Conclusions Collectively, our data demonstrate unique cellular and subcellular KATP channel subunit expression patterns in the heart. These results suggest distinct roles for KATP channel subunits in diverse cardiac structures.

  15. Ventricular performance and Na+-K+ ATPase activity are reduced early and late after myocardial infarction in rats

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    I. Stefanon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction leads to compensatory ventricular remodeling. Disturbances in myocardial contractility depend on the active transport of Ca2+ and Na+, which are regulated by Na+-K+ ATPase. Inappropriate regulation of Na+-K+ ATPase activity leads to excessive loss of K+ and gain of Na+ by the cell. We determined the participation of Na+-K+ ATPase in ventricular performance early and late after myocardial infarction. Wistar rats (8-10 per group underwent left coronary artery ligation (infarcted, Inf or sham-operation (Sham. Ventricular performance was measured at 3 and 30 days after surgery using the Langendorff technique. Left ventricular systolic pressure was obtained under different ventricular diastolic pressures and increased extracellular Ca2+ concentrations (Ca2+e and after low and high ouabain concentrations. The baseline coronary perfusion pressure increased 3 days after myocardial infarction and normalized by 30 days (Sham 3 = 88 ± 6; Inf 3 = 130 ± 9; Inf 30 = 92 ± 7 mmHg; P < 0.05. The inotropic response to Ca2+e and ouabain was reduced at 3 and 30 days after myocardial infarction (Ca2+ = 1.25 mM; Sham 3 = 70 ± 3; Inf 3 = 45 ± 2; Inf 30 = 29 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05, while the Frank-Starling mechanism was preserved. At 3 and 30 days after myocardial infarction, ventricular Na+-K+ ATPase activity and contractility were reduced. This Na+-K+ ATPase hypoactivity may modify the Na+, K+ and Ca2+ transport across the sarcolemma resulting in ventricular dysfunction.

  16. SYNTHETIC STRANDS OF CARDIAC MUSCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Joyce E.; Lieberman, Melvyn; Roggeveen, Anne E.; Kirk, R. Gary

    1972-01-01

    Spontaneously active bundles of cardiac muscle (synthetic strands) were prepared from isolated cells of 11–13-day old embryonic chick hearts which were disaggregated with trypsin. Linear orientation of the cells was obtained by plating them on agar-coated culture dishes in which either grooves were cut in the agar film or a thin line of palladium was deposited over the agar. The influence of cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions was observed with time lapse cinematography and the formation of the synthetic strand was shown to involve both random and guided cell movements, enlargement of aggregates by accretion and coalescence, and the compact linear arrangement of cells along paths of preferential adhesion. Electron microscope investigations of these strands showed that a dispersed population of heart cells organized into an inner core of muscle cells and an outer sheath of fibroblast-like cells. The muscle cells contained well-developed, but widely spaced myofibrils, a developing sarcoplasmic reticulum associated in part with the myofibrils and in part with the sarcolemma, an abundance of nonmembrane bound ribosomes and glycogen, and a prominent Golgi complex. Numerous specialized contacts were observed between the muscle cells in the strand, e.g., fasciae adherentes, desmosomes, and nexuses. A distinct type of muscle cell characterized by its pale appearance was regularly observed in the strand and was noted to be similar to Purkinje cells described in the adult avian conduction system and in developing chick myocardium. The present findings were compared with other observations of the developing myocardium, in situ, and it was concluded that, by a number or criteria, the muscle cells of the strand were differentiating normally and suitably organized for electrophysiological studies. PMID:4656702

  17. Synthetic strands of cardiac muscle. Formation and ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, J E; Liebeman, M; Roggeveen, A E; Kirk, R G

    1972-12-01

    Spontaneously active bundles of cardiac muscle (synthetic strands) were prepared from isolated cells of 11-13-day old embryonic chick hearts which were disaggregated with trypsin. Linear orientation of the cells was obtained by plating them on agar-coated culture dishes in which either grooves were cut in the agar film or a thin line of palladium was deposited over the agar. The influence of cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions was observed with time lapse cinematography and the formation of the synthetic strand was shown to involve both random and guided cell movements, enlargement of aggregates by accretion and coalescence, and the compact linear arrangement of cells along paths of preferential adhesion. Electron microscope investigations of these strands showed that a dispersed population of heart cells organized into an inner core of muscle cells and an outer sheath of fibroblast-like cells. The muscle cells contained well-developed, but widely spaced myofibrils, a developing sarcoplasmic reticulum associated in part with the myofibrils and in part with the sarcolemma, an abundance of nonmembrane bound ribosomes and glycogen, and a prominent Golgi complex. Numerous specialized contacts were observed between the muscle cells in the strand, e.g., fasciae adherentes, desmosomes, and nexuses. A distinct type of muscle cell characterized by its pale appearance was regularly observed in the strand and was noted to be similar to Purkinje cells described in the adult avian conduction system and in developing chick myocardium. The present findings were compared with other observations of the developing myocardium, in situ, and it was concluded that, by a number or criteria, the muscle cells of the strand were differentiating normally and suitably organized for electrophysiological studies.

  18. Progressive muscular dystrophy--Duchenne type. Controversies of the kinesitherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo Leitão, A V; Duro, L A; de Andrade Penque, G M

    1995-01-01

    The authors carried out a study of children with progressive muscular dystrophy of Duchenne type (DMD), giving special attention to physiatrical follow-up, having in mind that the practice of exercises has been debated very much in the specialized literature. The goal of this study is to try to settle the limits for the utilization of kinesitherapy which should be applied only in specific situations, such as: after skeletal muscular trauma or when the respiratory system is at risk. In this situation the physiatrical procedure would be to restrict physical activity, with early use of wheelchairs and the exclusion of the use of orthoses for orthostatism. DMD, at present, has been considered a result of duplication (60%), deletion (5 to 6%) or point mutations at gen Xp21 (Zatz, 1994), that codifies a protein called Dystrophin (Hoffman et al., 1987). Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal sarcolemmic protein that constitutes about .002% of the total protein of the muscle, present in skeletal fibers concentrated in muscle tendinous joints, which supplies mechanical reinforcement to the surface of the membrane during stretching and shortening physical activity. This protein is absent in DMD cases, wherefore, the sarcolemma undergoes a segmentary necrosis losing its contractile property during eccentric and concentric physical activity. The importance of physiatrical follow-up for DMD patients is to avoid deformities and tendon shortening, to ameliorate the patient's quality of life, to provide respiratory assistance and general counseling to members of the patient's family. The objective of this study is to try to clarify the risks and possibilities of kinesitherapy applied to DMD cases.

  19. Progressive muscular dystrophy: Duchenne type. Controversies of the kinesitherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valéria de Araujo Leitão

    Full Text Available The authors carried out a study of children with progressive muscular dystrophy of Duchenne type (DMD, giving special attention to physiatrical follow-up, having in mind that the practice of exercises has been debated very much in the specialized literature. The goal of this study is to try to settle the limits for the utilization of kinesitherapy which should be applied only in specific situations, such as: after skeletal muscular trauma or when the respiratory system is at risk. In this situation the physiatrical procedure would be to restrict physical activity, with early use of wheelchairs and the exclusion of the use of orthoses for orthostatism. DMD, at present, has been considered a result of duplication (60%, deletion (5 to 6% or point mutations at gen Xp21 (Zatz, 1994, that codifies a protein called Dystrophin ( Hoffman et al., 1987. Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal sarcolemmic protein that constitutes about .002% of the total protein of the muscle, present in skeletal fibers concentrated in muscle tendinous joints, which supplies mechanical reinforcement to the surface of the membrane during stretching and shortening physical activity. This protein is absent in DMD cases, wherefore, the sarcolemma undergoes a segmentary necrosis losing its contractile property during eccentric and concentric physical activity. The importance of physiatrical follow-up for DMD patients is to avoid deformities and tendon shortening, to ameliorate the patient's quality of life, to provide respiratory assistance and general couseling to members of the patient's family. The objective of this study is to try to clarify the risks and possibilities of kinesitherapy applied to DMD cases.

  20. Dystrophin: The dead calm of a dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, Dariusz C

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited muscle disease leading to severe disability and death of young men. Current interventions are palliative as no treatment improves the long-term outcome. Therefore, new therapeutic modalities with translational potential are urgently needed and abnormalities downstream from the absence of dystrophin are realistic targets. It has been shown that DMD mutations alter extracellular ATP (eATP) signaling via P2RX7 purinoceptor upregulation, which leads to autophagic death of dystrophic muscle cells. Furthermore, the eATP-P2RX7 axis contributes to DMD pathology by stimulating harmful inflammatory responses. We demonstrated recently that genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of P2RX7 in the mdx mouse model of DMD produced functional attenuation of both muscle and non-muscle symptoms, establishing this receptor as an attractive therapeutic target. Central to the argument presented here, this purinergic phenotype affects dystrophic myoblasts. Muscle cells were believed not to be affected at this stage of differentiation, as they do not produce detectable dystrophin protein. Our findings contradict the central hypothesis stating that aberrant dystrophin expression is inconsequential in myoblasts and the DMD pathology results from effects such as sarcolemma fragility, due to the absence of dystrophin, in differentiated myofibres. However, we discuss here the evidence that, already in myogenic cells, DMD mutations produce a plethora of abnormalities, including in cell proliferation, differentiation, energy metabolism, Ca(2+) homeostasis and death, leading to impaired muscle regeneration. We hope that this discussion may bring to light further results that will help re-evaluating the established belief. Clearly, understanding how DMD mutations alter such a range of functions in myogenic cells is vital for developing effective therapies.

  1. Investigating the role of uncoupling of Troponin I phosphorylation from changes in myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity in the pathogenesis of Cardiomyopathy

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    Andrew Easton Messer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Contraction in the mammalian heart is controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration as it is in all striated muscle, but the heart has an additional signalling system that comes into play to increase heart rate and cardiac output during exercise or stress. β-adrenergic stimulation of heart muscle cells leads to release of cyclic-AMP and the activation of protein kinase A which phosphorylates key proteins in the sarcolemma, sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile apparatus. Troponin I (TnI and Myosin Binding Protein C (MyBP-C are the prime targets in the myofilaments. TnI phosphorylation lowers myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity and increases the speed of Ca2+-dissociation and relaxation (lusitropic effect.Recent studies have shown that this relationship between Ca2+-sensitivity and TnI phosphorylation may be unstable. In familial cardiomyopathies, both dilated and hypertrophic (DCM and HCM, a mutation in one of the proteins of the thin filament often results in the loss of the relationship (uncoupling and blunting of the lusitropic response. For familial dilated cardiomyopathy in thin filament proteins it has been proposed that this uncoupling is causative of the phenotype. Uncoupling has also been found in human heart tissue from patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy as a secondary effect. Recently, it has been found that Ca2+-sensitizing drugs can promote uncoupling, whilst one Ca2+-desensitising drug Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate (EGCG can reverse uncoupling.We will discuss recent findings about the role of uncoupling in the development of cardiomyopathies and the molecular mechanism of the process.

  2. Muscle Structure Influences Utrophin Expression in mdx Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Glen B.; Combs, Ariana C.; Odom, Guy L.; Bloch, Robert J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To examine the influence of muscle structure on the pathogenesis of DMD we generated mdx4cv:desmin double knockout (dko) mice. The dko male mice died of apparent cardiorespiratory failure at a median age of 76 days compared to 609 days for the desmin−/− mice. An ∼2.5 fold increase in utrophin expression in the dko skeletal muscles prevented necrosis in ∼91% of 1a, 2a and 2d/x fiber-types. In contrast, utrophin expression was reduced in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of the dko fast 2b fibers leading to increased membrane fragility and dystrophic pathology. Despite lacking extrasynaptic utrophin, the dko fast 2b fibers were less dystrophic than the mdx4cv fast 2b fibers suggesting utrophin-independent mechanisms were also contributing to the reduced dystrophic pathology. We found no overt change in the regenerative capacity of muscle stem cells when comparing the wild-type, desmin−/−, mdx4cv and dko gastrocnemius muscles injured with notexin. Utrophin could form costameric striations with α-sarcomeric actin in the dko to maintain the integrity of the membrane, but the lack of restoration of the NODS (nNOS, α-dystrobrevin 1 and 2, α1-syntrophin) complex and desmin coincided with profound changes to the sarcomere alignment in the diaphragm, deposition of collagen between the myofibers, and impaired diaphragm function. We conclude that the dko mice may provide new insights into the structural mechanisms that influence endogenous utrophin expression that are pertinent for developing a therapy for DMD. PMID:24922526

  3. AQP4-dependent water transport plays a functional role in exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaptations.

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    Davide Basco

    Full Text Available In this study we assess the functional role of Aquaporin-4 (AQP4 in the skeletal muscle by analyzing whether physical activity modulates AQP4 expression and whether the absence of AQP4 has an effect on osmotic behavior, muscle contractile properties, and physical activity. To this purpose, rats and mice were trained on the treadmill for 10 (D10 and 30 (D30 days and tested with exercise to exhaustion, and muscles were used for immunoblotting, RT-PCR, and fiber-type distribution analysis. Taking advantage of the AQP4 KO murine model, functional analysis of AQP4 was performed on dissected muscle fibers and sarcolemma vesicles. Moreover, WT and AQP4 KO mice were subjected to both voluntary and forced activity. Rat fast-twitch muscles showed a twofold increase in AQP4 protein in D10 and D30 rats compared to sedentary rats. Such increase positively correlated with the animal performance, since highest level of AQP4 protein was found in high runner rats. Interestingly, no shift in muscle fiber composition nor an increase in AQP4-positive fibers was found. Furthermore, no changes in AQP4 mRNA after exercise were detected, suggesting that post-translational events are likely to be responsible for AQP4 modulation. Experiments performed on AQP4 KO mice revealed a strong impairment in osmotic responses as well as in forced and voluntary activities compared to WT mice, even though force development amplitude and contractile properties were unvaried. Our findings definitively demonstrate the physiological role of AQP4 in supporting muscle contractile activity and metabolic changes that occur in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during prolonged exercise.

  4. Simulation of Ca2+-activated Cl- current of cardiomyocytes in rabbit pulmonary vein: implications of subsarcolemmal Ca2+ dynamics.

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    Leem, Chae Hun; Kim, Won Tae; Ha, Jeong Mi; Lee, Yoon Jin; Seong, Hyeon Chan; Choe, Han; Jang, Yeon Jin; Youm, Jae Boum; Earm, Yung E

    2006-05-15

    In recent studies, we recorded transiently activated outward currents by the application of three-step voltage pulses to induce a reverse mode of Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX). We found that these currents were mediated by a Ca2+-activated Cl- current. Based on the recent reports describing the atrial Ca2+ transients, the Ca2+ transient at the subsarcolemmal space was initiated and then diffused into the cytosolic space. Because the myocardium in the pulmonary vein is an extension of the atrium, the Ca2+-activated Cl- current may reflect the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ dynamics. We tried to predict the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ dynamics by simulating these current traces. According to recent reports on the geometry of atrial myocytes, we assumed that there were three compartments of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR): a network SR, a junctional SR and a central SR. Based on these structures, we also divided the cytosolic space into three compartments: the junctional, subsarcolemmal and cytosolic spaces. Geometry information and cellular capacitance suggested that there were essentially no T-tubules in these cells. The basic physical data, such as the compartmental volumes, the diffusion coefficients and the stability coefficients of the Ca2+ buffers, were obtained from the literature. In the simulation, we incorporated the NCX, the L-type Ca2+ channel, the rapid activating outward rectifier K+ channel, the Na+-K+ pump, the SR Ca2+-pump, the ryanodine receptor, the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel and the dynamics of Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. In these conditions, we could successfully reconstruct the Ca2+-activated Cl- currents. The simulation allowed estimation of the Ca2+ dynamics of each compartment and the distribution of the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel and the NCX in the sarcolemma on the junctional or subsarcolemmal space.

  5. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  6. Popeye domain containing 1 (Popdc1/Bves is a caveolae-associated protein involved in ischemia tolerance.

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    Yifat Alcalay

    Full Text Available Popeye domain containing1 (Popdc1, also named Bves, is an evolutionary conserved membrane protein. Despite its high expression level in the heart little is known about its membrane localization and cardiac functions. The study examined the hypothesis that Popdc1 might be associated with the caveolae and play a role in myocardial ischemia tolerance. To address these issues, we analyzed hearts and cardiomyocytes of wild type and Popdc1-null mice. Immunoconfocal microscopy revealed co-localization of Popdc1 with caveolin3 in the sarcolemma, intercalated discs and T-tubules and with costameric vinculin. Popdc1 was co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin3 from cardiomyocytes and from transfected COS7 cells and was co-sedimented with caveolin3 in equilibrium density gradients. Caveolae disruption by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R abolished the cellular co-localization of Popdc1 with caveolin3 and modified their density co-sedimentation. The caveolin3-rich fractions of Popdc1-null hearts redistributed to fractions of lower buoyant density. Electron microscopy showed a statistically significant 70% reduction in caveolae number and a 12% increase in the average diameter of the remaining caveolae in the mutant hearts. In accordance with these changes, Popdc1-null cardiomyocytes displayed impaired [Ca(+2]i transients, increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and no pharmacologic preconditioning. In addition, induction of I/R injury to Langendorff-perfused hearts indicated a significantly lower functional recovery in the mutant compared with wild type hearts while their infarct size was larger. No improvement in functional recovery was observed in Popdc1-null hearts following ischemic preconditioning. The results indicate that Popdc1 is a caveolae-associated protein important for the preservation of caveolae structural and functional integrity and for heart protection.

  7. Cardiac Stim1 Silencing Impairs Adaptive Hypertrophy and Promotes Heart Failure Through Inactivation of mTORC2/Akt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, Ludovic; Oh, Jae Gyun; Cacheux, Marine; Lee, Ahyoung; Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; Matasic, Daniel S; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Kho, Changwon; Pavoine, Catherine; Hajjar, Roger J; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-04-12

    Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is a dynamic calcium signal transducer implicated in hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes. STIM1 is thought to act as an initiator of cardiac hypertrophic response at the level of the sarcolemma, but the pathways underpinning this effect have not been examined. To determine the mechanistic role of STIM1 in cardiac hypertrophy and during the transition to heart failure, we manipulated STIM1 expression in mice cardiomyocytes by using in vivo gene delivery of specific short hairpin RNAs. In 3 different models, we found that Stim1 silencing prevents the development of pressure overload-induced hypertrophy but also reverses preestablished cardiac hypertrophy. Reduction in STIM1 expression promoted a rapid transition to heart failure. We further showed that Stim1 silencing resulted in enhanced activity of the antihypertrophic and proapoptotic GSK-3β molecule. Pharmacological inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 was sufficient to reverse the cardiac phenotype observed after Stim1 silencing. At the level of ventricular myocytes, Stim1 silencing or inhibition abrogated the capacity for phosphorylation of Akt(S473), a hydrophobic motif of Akt that is directly phosphorylated by mTOR complex 2. We found that Stim1 silencing directly impaired mTOR complex 2 kinase activity, which was supported by a direct interaction between STIM1 and Rictor, a specific component of mTOR complex 2. These data support a model whereby STIM1 is critical to deactivate a key negative regulator of cardiac hypertrophy. In cardiomyocytes, STIM1 acts by tuning Akt kinase activity through activation of mTOR complex 2, which further results in repression of GSK-3β activity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. The presence of a protein activator of sarcolemmal polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C in cardiac cytosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quist, E.E.; Kriewaldt, S.D.; Powell, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth (USA))

    1989-01-01

    To study polyphosphoinositide phospholipase (PL) C, isolated sarcolemmal membranes were preincubated with Mg({sup 32}P)-ATP to label phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). After washing, PLC activity was determined by measuring the release of {sup 32}P-labeled inositol diphosphate (IP{sub 2}) and/or inositol trisphospate (IP{sub 3}) from membrane PIP and PIP{sub 2} during incubation at 25{degree}C and pH 7.4. Increasing concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} (0-100 {mu}M) increased IP{sub 2} by 100% over the 0 Ca{sup 2+} control levels. Ca{sup 2+} dependent PLC hydrolyzed both PIP and PIP{sub 2} with apparent D{sub A}'s of approximately 0.5 and 70 {mu}M. Addition of dialyzed cytosol further increased IP{sub 2} release by 250% without affecting the K{sub A}'s for Ca{sup 2+} activation. The cytosolic activator was partially purified by DEAE Sephacel chromatography was heat labile and sensitive to trypsin pretreatment identifying it as a protein. In contrast, 10 mM NaF increased the Ca{sup 2+} affinity for PLC 2-fold. These results show that cardiac sarcolemma possess a membrane bound Ca{sup 2+} dependent PLC activity which is regulated by a cytosolic protein activator and a G protein. The cytosolic activator would potentially amplify the amount of sarcolemmal polyphosphoinositides hydrolyzed by PLC in response to muscarinic receptor activation by acetylcholine. In addition, activation of PLC by NaF or other G protein activators could result from increasing the Ca{sup 2+} affinity of PLC to physiological intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels.

  9. Quantitative changes in focal adhesion kinase and its inhibitor, FRNK, drive load-dependent expression of costamere components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klossner, Stephan; Li, Ruowei; Ruoss, Severin; Durieux, Anne-Cécile; Flück, Martin

    2013-09-15

    Costameres are mechanosensory sites of focal adhesion in the sarcolemma that reinforce the muscle-fiber composite and provide an anchor for myofibrillogenesis. We hypothesized that elevated content of the integrin-associated regulator of costamere turnover in culture, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), drives changes in costamere component content in antigravity muscle in a load-dependent way in correspondence with altered muscle weight. The content of FAK in soleus muscle being phosphorylated at autoregulatory tyrosine 397 (FAK-pY397) was increased after 20 s of stretch. FAK-pY397 content remained elevated after 24 h of stretch-overload due to upregulated FAK content. Overexpression of FAK in soleus muscle fibers by means of gene electrotransfer increased the β1-integrin (+56%) and meta-vinculin (+88%) content. α7-Integrin (P = 0.46) and γ-vinculin (P = 0.18) content was not altered after FAK overexpression. Co-overexpression of the FAK inhibitor FAK-related nonkinase (FRNK) reduced FAK-pY397 content by 33% and increased the percentage of fast-type fibers that arose in connection with hybrid fibers with gene transfer. Transplantation experiments confirmed the association of FRNK expression with slow-to-fast fiber transformation. Seven days of unloading blunted the elevation of FAK-pY397, β1-integrin, and meta-vinculin content with FAK overexpression, and this was reversed by 1 day of reloading. The results highlight that the expression of components for costameric attachment sites of myofibrils is under load- and fiber type-related control via FAK and its inhibitor FRNK.

  10. L-arginine supplementation protects exercise performance and structural integrity of muscle fibers after a single bout of eccentric exercise in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia N Lomonosova

    Full Text Available Eccentric exercise is known to disrupt sarcolemmal integrity and induce damage of skeletal muscle fibers. We hypothesized that L-arginine (L-Arg; nitric oxide synthase (NOS substrate supplementation prior to a single bout of eccentric exercise would diminish exercise-induced damage. In addition, we used N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; NOS inhibitor to clarify the role of native NOS activity in the development of exercise-induced muscle damage. Rats were divided into four groups: non-treated control (C, downhill running with (RA or without (R L-Arg supplementation and downhill running with L-NAME supplementation (RN. Twenty four hours following eccentric exercise seven rats in each group were sacrificed and soleus muscles were dissected and frozen for further analysis. The remaining seven rats in each group were subjected to the exercise performance test. Our experiments showed that L-Arg supplementation prior to a single bout of eccentric exercise improved subsequent exercise performance capacity tests in RA rats when compared with R, RN and C rats by 37%, 27% and 13%, respectively. This outcome is mediated by L-Arg protection against post-exercise damage of sarcolemma (2.26- and 0.87-fold less than R and RN groups, respectively, reduced numbers of damaged muscle fibers indicated by the reduced loss of desmin content in the muscle (15% and 25% less than R and RN groups, respectively, and diminished µ-calpain mRNA up-regulation (42% and 30% less than R and RN groups, respectively. In conclusion, our study indicates that L-Arg supplementation prior to a single bout of eccentric exercise alleviates muscle fiber damage and preserves exercise performance capacity.

  11. Loss of T-tubules and other changes to surface topography in ventricular myocytes from failing human and rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Alexander R; MacLeod, Ken T; Zhang, Yanjun; Garcia, Edwin; Kanda, Gaelle Kikonda; Lab, Max J; Korchev, Yuri E; Harding, Sian E; Gorelik, Julia

    2009-04-21

    T-tubular invaginations of the sarcolemma of ventricular cardiomyocytes contain junctional structures functionally coupling L-type calcium channels to the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channels (the ryanodine receptors), and therefore their configuration controls the gain of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR). Studies primarily in rodent myocardium have shown the importance of T-tubular structures for calcium transient kinetics and have linked T-tubule disruption to delayed CICR. However, there is disagreement as to the nature of T-tubule changes in human heart failure. We studied isolated ventricular myocytes from patients with ischemic heart disease, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and determined T-tubule structure with either the fluorescent membrane dye di-8-ANNEPs or the scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM). The SICM uses a scanning pipette to produce a topographic representation of the surface of the live cell by a non-optical method. We have also compared ventricular myocytes from a rat model of chronic heart failure after myocardial infarction. T-tubule loss, shown by both ANNEPs staining and SICM imaging, was pronounced in human myocytes from all etiologies of disease. SICM imaging showed additional changes in surface structure, with flattening and loss of Z-groove definition common to all etiologies. Rat myocytes from the chronic heart failure model also showed both T-tubule and Z-groove loss, as well as increased spark frequency and greater spark amplitude. This study confirms the loss of T-tubules as part of the phenotypic change in the failing human myocyte, but it also shows that this is part of a wider spectrum of alterations in surface morphology.

  12. Differential effects of dystrophin and utrophin gene transfer in immunocompetent muscular dystrophy (mdx) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, S; Guibinga, G H; Gilbert, R; Nalbantoglu, J; Massie, B; Karpati, G; Petrof, B J

    2000-09-08

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by defects in the gene encoding dystrophin. Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein, which together with its associated protein complex, helps to protect the sarcolemma from mechanical stresses associated with muscle contraction. Gene therapy efforts aimed at supplying a normal dystrophin gene to DMD muscles could be hampered by host immune system recognition of dystrophin as a "foreign" protein. In contrast, a closely related protein called utrophin is not foreign to DMD patients and is able to compensate for dystrophin deficiency when overexpressed throughout development in transgenic mice. However, the issue of which of the two candidate molecules is superior for DMD therapy has remained an open question. In this study, dystrophin and utrophin gene transfer effects on dystrophic muscle function were directly compared in the murine (mdx) model of DMD using E1/E3-deleted adenovirus vectors containing either a dystrophin (AdV-Dys) or a utrophin (AdV-Utr) transgene. In immunologically immature neonatal animals, AdV-Dys and AdV-Utr improved tibialis anterior muscle histopathology, force-generating capacity, and the ability to resist injury caused by high-stress contractions to an equivalent degree. By contrast, only AdV-Utr was able to achieve significant improvement in force generation and the ability to resist stress-induced injury in the soleus muscle of immunocompetent mature mdx animals. In addition, in mature mdx mice, there was significantly greater transgene persistence and reduced inflammation with utrophin compared to dystrophin gene transfer. We conclude that dystrophin and utrophin are largely equivalent in their intrinsic abilities to prevent the development of muscle necrosis and weakness when expressed in neonatal mdx animals with an immature immune system. However, because immunity against dystrophin places an important limitation on the efficacy of dystrophin gene replacement in an

  13. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Effects of pleiotrophin overexpression on mouse skeletal muscles in normal loading and in actual and simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; De Bellis, Michela; Cannone, Maria; Sblendorio, Valeriana; Conte, Elena; Mele, Antonietta; Tricarico, Domenico; Tavella, Sara; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Cancedda, Ranieri; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Ciciliot, Stefano; Germinario, Elena; Sandonà, Dorianna; Betto, Romeo; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a widespread cytokine involved in bone formation, neurite outgrowth, and angiogenesis. In skeletal muscle, PTN is upregulated during myogenesis, post-synaptic induction, and regeneration after crushing, but little is known regarding its effects on muscle function. Here, we describe the effects of PTN on the slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles in mice over-expressing PTN under the control of a bone promoter. The mice were maintained in normal loading or disuse condition, induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) for 14 days. Effects of exposition to near-zero gravity during a 3-months spaceflight (SF) into the Mice Drawer System are also reported. In normal loading, PTN overexpression had no effect on muscle fiber cross-sectional area, but shifted soleus muscle toward a slower phenotype, as shown by an increased number of oxidative type 1 fibers, and increased gene expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV and citrate synthase. The cytokine increased soleus and EDL capillary-to-fiber ratio. PTN overexpression did not prevent soleus muscle atrophy, slow-to-fast transition, and capillary regression induced by SF and HU. Nevertheless, PTN exerted various effects on sarcolemma ion channel expression/function and resting cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in soleus and EDL muscles, in normal loading and after HU. In conclusion, the results show very similar effects of HU and SF on mouse soleus muscle, including activation of specific gene programs. The EDL muscle is able to counterbalance this latter, probably by activating compensatory mechanisms. The numerous effects of PTN on muscle gene expression and functional parameters demonstrate the sensitivity of muscle fibers to the cytokine. Although little benefit was found in HU muscle disuse, PTN may emerge useful in various muscle diseases, because it exerts synergetic actions on muscle fibers and vessels, which could enforce oxidative metabolism and ameliorate muscle

  15. An olive oil-derived antioxidant mixture ameliorates the age-related decline of skeletal muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, Sabata; Tricarico, Domenico; Liantonio, Antonella; Mele, Antonietta; Digennaro, Claudio; Rolland, Jean-François; Bianco, Gianpatrizio; Villanova, Luciano; Merendino, Alessandro; Camerino, Giulia Maria; De Luca, Annamaria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2014-02-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle decline is characterized by the modification of sarcolemma ion channels important to sustain fiber excitability and to prevent metabolic dysfunction. Also, calcium homeostasis and contractile function are impaired. In the aim to understand whether these modifications are related to oxidative damage and can be reverted by antioxidant treatment, we examined the effects of in vivo treatment with an waste water polyphenolic mixture (LACHI MIX HT) supplied by LACHIFARMA S.r.l. Italy containing hydroxytirosol (HT), gallic acid, and homovanillic acid on the skeletal muscles of 27-month-old rats. After 6-week treatment, we found an improvement of chloride ClC-1 channel conductance, pivotal for membrane electrical stability, and of ATP-dependent potassium channel activity, important in coupling excitability with fiber metabolism. Both of them were analyzed using electrophysiological techniques. The treatment also restored the resting cytosolic calcium concentration, the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release, and the mechanical threshold for contraction, an index of excitation-contraction coupling mechanism. Muscle weight and blood creatine kinase levels were preserved in LACHI MIX HT-treated aged rats. The antioxidant activity of LACHI MIX HT was confirmed by the reduction of malondialdehyde levels in the brain of the LACHI MIX HT-treated aged rats. In comparison, the administration of purified HT was less effective on all the parameters studied. Although muscle function was not completely recovered, the present study provides evidence of the beneficial effects of LACHI MIX HT, a natural compound, to ameliorate skeletal muscle functional decline due to aging-associated oxidative stress.

  16. Statins and fenofibrate affect skeletal muscle chloride conductance in rats by differently impairing ClC-1 channel regulation and expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, S; Camerino, GM; Cippone, V; Rolland, J-F; Desaphy, J-F; De Luca, A; Liantonio, A; Bianco, G; Kunic, JD; George, AL; Camerino, D Conte

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Statins and fibrates can produce mild to life-threatening skeletal muscle damage. Resting chloride channel conductance (gCl), carried by the ClC-1 channel, is reduced in muscles of rats chronically treated with fluvastatin, atorvastatin or fenofibrate, along with increased resting cytosolic calcium in statin-treated rats. A high gCl, controlled by the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC), maintains sarcolemma electrical stability and its reduction alters muscle function. Here, we investigated how statins and fenofibrate impaired gCl. Experimental approach: In rats treated with fluvastatin, atorvastatin or fenofibrate, we examined the involvement of PKC in gCl reduction by the two intracellular microelectrodes technique and ClC-1 mRNA level by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Direct drug effects were tested by patch clamp analysis on human ClC-1 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Key results: Chelerythrine, a PKC inhibitor, applied in vitro on muscle dissected from atorvastatin-treated rats fully restored gCl, suggesting the involvement of this enzyme in statin action. Chelerythrine partially restored gCl in muscles from fluvastatin-treated rats but not in those from fenofibrate-treated rats, implying additional mechanisms for gCl impairment. Accordingly, a decrease of ClC-1 channel mRNA was found in both fluvastatin-and fenofibrate-treated rat muscles. Fenofibric acid, the in vivo metabolite of fenofibrate, but not fluvastatin, rapidly reduced chloride currents in HEK 293 cells. Conclusions and implications: Our data suggest multiple mechanisms underlie the effect of statins and fenofibrate on ClC-1 channel conductance. While statins promote Ca2+-mediated PKC activation, fenofibrate directly inhibits ClC-1 channels and both fluvastatin and fenofibrate impair expression of mRNA for ClC-1. PMID:19220292

  17. Organ Specificity in Hyperacute Rejection of Canine Heart and Kidney Allografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Osamu; Kondo, Yoshio; Kuramochi, Tsuneo; Grogan, James B.; Cockrell, John V.; Hardy, James D.

    1974-01-01

    To clarify the organ specific nature of hyperacute rejection, 14 puppies were presensitized by multiple skin grafts and spleen cell injections prior to receiving either a heart or kidney allograft from the respective donors. Of this group, 7 received orthotopic heart allografts and 7 received kidney allografts. All heart allografts were rejected between 3 and 28 hours, and all kidneys between 0 and 24 hours as judged by cessation of urine flow from the ureterostomies. In contrast, all 11 animals in a recent series of heart allografts in non-sensitized puppies survived the operation, and rejected between 7 and 17 days. There was a significant correlation in both groups between preoperative cytotoxic antibody titer in the recipient serum and graft survival time. The preoperative titers were all above 1:1,024 but were greatly reduced within 2 hours after transplantation. At the time of rejection, antibody could be eluted from the rejected organs. In contrast to the kidneys, in which 2 of 7 grafts ceased to function immediately after revascularization, all hearts resumed beating and functioned well for at least several hours. At autopsy, the myocardium was pale and edematous and histologically polymorphonuclear leukocytes were prevalent in and around the small vessels and among myofibers. Both IgG and IgM antibody was detected in sarcolemma of the myocardium and to a lesser extent in the intima and adventitia of the small vessels by the fluorescent antibody technique. Biopsies of the rejected kidneys showed polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, typical of hyperacute rejection. Marked fluorescence of IgG and IgM in the glomeruli and peritubular capillaries was observed. This study indicates that both organs rejected hyperacutely in our experimental model and participation of the preformed antibody in effecting this change was strongly suggested. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4600772

  18. Acute rhabdomyolysis

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    Pascale de Lonlay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis results from the rapid breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers, which leads to leakage of potentially toxic cellular contents into the systemic circulation. Acquired causes by direct injury to the sarcolemma are the most frequent. The inherited causes are: metabolic with failure of energy production, including mitochondrial fatty acid ß-oxidation defects, LPIN1 mutations, inborn errors of glycogenolysis and glycolysis, more rarely mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency, purine defects and peroxysomalα-Methylacyl-CoA-racemase defect (AMACR; dystrophinopathies and myopathies; calcic causes with RYR1 mutations; inflammatory with myositis. Irrespective of the cause of rhabdomyolysis, the pathophysiologic events follow a common pathway, the ATP depletion leading to an increased intracellular calcium concentration and necrosis. Most episodes of rhabdomyolysis are triggered by an environmental stress, mostly fever. This condition is associated with two events, elevated temperature and high circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. We describe here an example of rhabdomyolysis related to high temperature, aldolase deficiency, in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. Thermolability was enhanced in patient myoblasts compared to control. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines. Lipotoxicity may participate to myolysis. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a

  19. Attempting to Compensate for Reduced Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Protein with Nitrate Supplementation Cannot Overcome Metabolic Dysfunction but Rather Has Detrimental Effects in Dystrophin-Deficient mdx Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpani, Cara A; Trewin, Adam J; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Robinson, Ainsley; Goodman, Craig A; Nurgali, Kulmira; Betik, Andrew C; Stepto, Nigel; Hayes, Alan; McConell, Glenn K; Rybalka, Emma

    2017-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy arises from the loss of dystrophin and is characterized by calcium dysregulation, muscular atrophy, and metabolic dysfunction. The secondary reduction of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) from the sarcolemma reduces NO production and bioavailability. As NO modulates glucose uptake, metabolism, and mitochondrial bioenergetics, we investigated whether an 8-week nitrate supplementation regimen could overcome metabolic dysfunction in the mdx mouse. Dystrophin-positive control (C57BL/10) and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice were supplemented with sodium nitrate (85 mg/l) in drinking water. Following the supplementation period, extensor digitorum longus and soleus were excised and radioactive glucose uptake was measured at rest (basal) and during contraction. Gastrocnemius was excised and mitochondrial respiration was measured using the Oroboros Oxygraph. Tibialis anterior was analyzed immunohistochemically for the presence of dystrophin, nNOS, nitrotyrosine, IgG and CD45+ cells, and histologically to assess areas of damage and regeneration. Glucose uptake in the basal and contracting states was normal in unsupplemented mdx muscles but was reduced following nitrate supplementation in mdx muscles only. The mitochondrial utilization of substrates was also impaired in mdx gastrocnemius during phosphorylating and maximal uncoupled respiration, and nitrate could not improve respiration in mdx muscle. Although nitrate supplementation reduced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide emission, it induced mitochondrial uncoupling in red gastrocnemius, increased muscle fiber peroxynitrite (nitrotyrosine), and promoted skeletal muscle damage. Our novel data suggest that despite lower nNOS protein expression and likely lower NO production in mdx muscle, enhancing NO production with nitrate supplementation in these mice has detrimental effects on skeletal muscle. This may have important relevance for those with DMD.

  20. Sodium nitrate alleviates functional muscle ischaemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael D; Rosenberry, Ryan; Barresi, Rita; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Rader, Florian; Tang, Xiu; Mason, O'Neil; Schwartz, Avery; Stabler, Thomas; Shidban, Sarah; Mobaligh, Neigena; Hogan, Shomari; Elashoff, Robert; Allen, Jason D; Victor, Ronald G

    2015-12-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. BMD is caused by in-frame mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu (nNOSμ), which requires specific spectrin-like repeats (SR16/17) in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin for sarcolemmal targeting. When healthy skeletal muscle is exercised, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived nitric oxide (NO) attenuates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thus optimizing perfusion. In the mdx mouse model of dystrophinopathy, this protective mechanism (functional sympatholysis) is defective, resulting in functional muscle ischaemia. Treatment with a NO-donating non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) alleviates this ischaemia and improves the murine dystrophic phenotype. In the present study, we report that, in 13 men with BMD, sympatholysis is defective mainly in patients whose mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ, with the vasoconstrictor response measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) to reflex sympathetic activation. Then, in a single-arm, open-label trial in 11 BMD patients and a double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in six patients, we show that acute treatment with oral sodium nitrate, an inorganic NO donor without a NSIAD moiety, restores sympatholysis and improves post-exercise hyperaemia (Doppler ultrasound). By contrast, sodium nitrate improves neither sympatholysis, nor hyperaemia in healthy controls. Thus, a simple NO donor recapitulates the vasoregulatory actions of sarcolemmal nNOS in BMD patients, and constitutes a putative novel therapy for this disease. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  1. Effects of induced Na+/Ca2+ exchanger overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca2+ channels and junctophilin-2 in pressure-overloaded hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Satoshi; Katanosaka, Yuki

    2016-11-25

    The Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) is an essential Ca2+ efflux system in cardiomyocytes. Although NCX1 is distributed throughout the sarcolemma, a subpopulation of NCX1 is localized to transverse (T)-tubules. There is growing evidence that T-tubule disorganization is a causal event that shifts the transition from hypertrophy to heart failure (HF). However, the detailed molecular mechanisms have not been clarified. Previously, we showed that induced NCX1 expression in pressure-overloaded hearts attenuates defective excitation-contraction coupling and HF progression. Here, we examined the effects of induced NCX1 overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) and junctophilin-2 (JP2), a structural protein that connects the T-tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, in pressure-overloaded hearts. Quantitative analysis showed that the regularity of NCX1 localization was significantly decreased at 8 weeks after transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-surgery; however, T-tubule organization and the regularities of LTCC and JP2 immunofluorescent signals were maintained at this time point. These observations demonstrated that release of NCX1 from the T-tubule area occurred before the onset of T-tubule disorganization and LTCC and JP2 mislocalization. Moreover, induced NCX1 overexpression at 8 weeks post-TAC not only recovered NCX1 regularity but also prevented the decrease in LTCC and JP2 regularities at 16 weeks post-TAC. These results suggested that NCX1 may play an important role in the proper spatial distribution of LTCC and JP2 in T-tubules in the context of pressure-overloading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Myofiber HLA-DR expression is a distinctive biomarker for antisynthetase-associated myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouizerate, Jessie; De Antonio, Marie; Bassez, Guillaume; Gherardi, Romain K; Berenbaum, Francis; Guillevin, Loïc; Berezne, Alice; Valeyre, Dominique; Maisonobe, Thierry; Dubourg, Odile; Cosnes, Anne; Benveniste, Olivier; Authier, François Jérôme

    2014-10-23

    To assess the value of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen (HLA-DR) expression to distinguish anti-synthetase myopathy (ASM) from dermatomyositis (DM). Muscle biopsies from patients with ASM (n = 33), DM without anti-synthetase antibodies (ASAb) (n = 17), and normal muscle biopsy (n = 10) were first reviewed. ASAb included anti-Jo1 (26/33), anti-PL12 (4/33), anti-PL7 (2/33), and anti-EJ (1/33). Immunohistochemistry was performed for MHC-I/HLA-ABC, MHC-II/HLA-DR, membrane attack complex (C5b-9), neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)/CD56 expression, and inflammatory cell subsets. Twenty-four ASM and 12 DM patients from another center were added for HLA-DR evaluation. Ubiquitous myofiber HLA-ABC expression was equally observed in ASM and DM (93.9% vs 100%, NS). In contrast, myofiber HLA-DR expression was found in 27/33 (81.8%) ASM (anti-Jo1: 23/26, 88.5%; others: 5/7, 71.4%) vs 4/17 (23.5%) DM patients (p DR was perifascicular in ASM, a pattern not observed in DM. In addition, C5b-9 deposition was observed on sarcolemma of non-necrotic perifascicular fibers in ASM, while, in DM, C5b-9was mainly detected in endomysial capillaries. CD8 cells were more abundant in ASM than in DM (p DR expression correlated positively with the CD8+ cells infiltrates. Strictly similar observations were made in the confirmatory study. ASM is characterized by strong myofiber MHC-II/HLA-DR expression with a unique perifascicular pattern, not described so far. HLA-DR detection must be included for routine myopathological diagnosis of inflammatory/dysimmune myopathies. HLA-DR expression in ASM may indicate a specific immune mechanism, possibly involving IFNγ.

  3. Rac1 Activation Caused by Membrane Translocation of a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor in Akt2-Mediated Insulin Signaling in Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

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    Nobuyuki Takenaka

    Full Text Available Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT4, which is translocated to the plasma membrane following insulin stimulation. Several lines of evidence suggested that the protein kinase Akt2 plays a key role in this insulin action. The small GTPase Rac1 has also been implicated as a regulator of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, acting downstream of Akt2. However, the mechanisms whereby Akt2 regulates Rac1 activity remain obscure. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 has been identified as a direct regulator of Rac1 in Akt2-mediated signaling, but its characterization was performed mostly in cultured myoblasts. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FLJ00068 indeed acts downstream of Akt2 as a Rac1 regulator by using mouse skeletal muscle. Small interfering RNA knockdown of FLJ00068 markedly diminished GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma following insulin administration or ectopic expression of a constitutively activated mutant of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Akt2. Additionally, insulin and these constitutively activated mutants caused the activation of Rac1 as shown by immunofluorescent microscopy using a polypeptide probe specific to activated Rac1 in isolated gastrocnemius muscle fibers and frozen sections of gastrocnemius muscle. This Rac1 activation was also abrogated by FLJ00068 knockdown. Furthermore, we observed translocation of FLJ00068 to the cell periphery following insulin stimulation in cultured myoblasts. Localization of FLJ00068 in the plasma membrane in insulin-stimulated, but not unstimulated, myoblasts and mouse gastrocnemius muscle was further affirmed by subcellular fractionation and subsequent immunoblotting. Collectively, these results strongly support a critical role of FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation in mouse skeletal muscle insulin signaling.

  4. Heterogeneity of T-Tubules in Pig Hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadeberg, Hanne C; Bond, Richard C; Kong, Cherrie H T; Chanoit, Guillaume P; Ascione, Raimondo; Cannell, Mark B; James, Andrew F

    2016-01-01

    T-tubules are invaginations of the sarcolemma that play a key role in excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian cardiac myocytes. Although t-tubules were generally considered to be effectively absent in atrial myocytes, recent studies on atrial cells from larger mammals suggest that t-tubules may be more numerous than previously supposed. However, the degree of heterogeneity between cardiomyocytes in the extent of the t-tubule network remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the t-tubule network of pig atrial myocytes in comparison with ventricular tissue. Cardiac tissue was obtained from young female Landrace White pigs (45-75 kg, 5-6 months old). Cardiomyocytes were isolated by arterial perfusion with a collagenase-containing solution. Ca2+ transients were examined in field-stimulated isolated cells loaded with fluo-4-AM. Membranes of isolated cells were visualized using di-8-ANEPPS. T-tubules were visualized in fixed-frozen tissue sections stained with Alexa-Fluor 488-conjugated WGA. Binary images were obtained by application of a threshold and t-tubule density (TTD) calculated. A distance mapping approach was used to calculate half-distance to nearest t-tubule (HDTT). The spatio-temporal properties of the Ca2+ transient appeared to be consistent with the absence of functional t-tubules in isolated atrial myocytes. However, t-tubules could be identified in a sub-population of atrial cells in frozen sections. While all ventricular myocytes had TTD >3% (mean TTD = 6.94±0.395%, n = 24), this was true of just 5/22 atrial cells. Mean atrial TTD (2.35±0.457%, n = 22) was lower than ventricular TTD (P3% (1.65±0.06 μm, n = 5, Ppig cardiomyocytes in the extent of t-tubule network, which correlated with cell size.

  5. Integrins, muscle agrin and sarcoglycans during muscular inactivity conditions: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Santoro, G; Arco, A; Rizzo, G; Trommino, C; Bramanti, P; Soscia, L; Favaloro, A

    2006-01-01

    Sarcoglycans are transmembrane proteins that seem to be functionally and pathologically as important as dystrophin. Sarcoglycans cluster together to form a complex, which is localized in the cell membrane of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It has been proposed that the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) links the actin cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix and the proper maintenance of this connection is thought to be crucial to the mechanical stability of the sarcolemma. The integrins are a family of heterodimeric cell surface receptors which play a crucial role in cell adhesion including cell-matrix and intracellular interactions and therefore are involved in various biological phenomena, including cell migration, and differentiation tissue repair. Sarcoglycans and integrins play a mechanical and signaling role stabilizing the systems during cycles of contraction and relaxation. Several studies suggested the possibility that integrins might play a role in muscle agrin signalling. On these basis, we performed an immunohistochemical analyzing sarcoglycans, integrins and agrin, on human skeletal muscle affected by sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, in order to better define the correlation between these proteins and neurogenic atrophy due to peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed the existence of a cascade mechanism which provoke a loss of regulatory effects of muscle activity on costameres, due to loss of muscle and neural agrin. This cascade mechanism could determine a quantitative modification of transmembrane receptors and loss of alpha7B could be replaced and reinforced by enhanced expression of the alpha7A integrin to restore muscle fiber viability. Second, it is possible that the reduced cycles of contraction and relaxation of muscle fibers, during muscular atrophy, provoke a loss of mechanical stresses transmitted over cell surface receptors that physically couple the cytoskeleton to extracellular matrix. Consequently, these mechanical changes

  6. Can scanning near-field optical microscopy be compared with confocal laser scanning microscopy? A preliminary study on alpha-sarcoglycan and beta1D-integrin in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Pisani, A; Bruschetta, D; Milardi, D; Princi, P; Gucciardi, P G; Bramanti, P; Soscia, L; Favaloro, A

    2007-12-01

    The dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and the vinculin-talin-integrin system constitute, together a protein machinery, called costameres. The dystrophin-glycoprotein complex contains, among other proteins, also dystrophin and the sarcoglycans subcomplex, proteins playing a key role in the pathogenesis of many muscular dystrophies and linking the cytoplasmic myofibrillar contractile elements to the signal transducing molecules of the extracellular matrix, also providing structural support to the sarcolemma. The vinculin-talin-integrin system connects some components of the extracellular matrix with intermediate filaments of desmin, forming transverse bridges between Z and M lines. In our previous reports we always studied these systems by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In this paper we report on the first applications of optical near-field fluorescence microscopy to the spatial localization of alpha-sarcoglycan and beta1D-integrin in human skeletal muscle fibres in order to better compare and test the images obtained with conventional CLSM and with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). In addition, the analysis of the surface morphology, and the comparison with the fluorescence map is put forward and analyzed for the first time on human muscle fibres. In aperture-SNOM the sample is excited through the nanometre-scale aperture produced at the apex of an optical fibre after tapering and subsequent metal coating. The acquisition of the topography map, simultaneously to the optical signal, by SNOM, permits to exactly overlap the fluorescence images obtained from the two consecutive scans needed for the double localization. Besides, the differences between the topography and the optical spatial patterns permit to assess the absence of artefacts in the fluorescence maps. Although the SNOM represented a good method of analysis, this technique remains a complementary method to the CLSM and it can be accepted in order to confirm the hypothesis advanced by

  7. Morphofunctional compensation of masseter muscles in unilateral posterior crossbite patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cutroneo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral posterior crossbite is a widespread, asymmetric malocclusion characterized by an inverse relationship of the upper and lower buccal dental cusps, in the molar and premolar regions, on one side only of the dental arch. Patients with unilateral posterior crossbite exhibit an altered chewing cycles and the crossbite side masseter results to be less active with respect to the contralateral one. Few studies about morphological features of masticatory muscle in malocclusion disorders exist and most of these have been performed on animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate morphological and protein expression characteristics of masseter muscles in patients affected by unilateral posterior crossbite, by histological and immunofluorescence techniques. We have used antibody against PAX-7, marker of satellite cells, and against α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ε- and ζ-sarcoglycans which are transmembrane glycoproteins involved in sarcolemma stabilization. By statistical analysis we have evaluated differences in amount of myonucley between contralateral and ipsilateral side. Results have shown: i altered fibers morphology and atrophy of ipsilateral muscle if compared to the contralateral one; ii higher number of myonuclei and PAX-7 positive cells in contralateral side than ipsilateral one; iii higher pattern of fluorescence for all tested sarcoglycans in contralateral side than ipsilateral one. Results show that in unilateral posterior crossbite hypertrophic response of contralateral masseter and atrophic events in ipsilateral masseter take place; by that, in unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion masticatory muscles modify their morphology depending on the function. That could be relevant in understanding and healing of malocclusion disorders; in fact, the altered balance about structure and function between ipsilateral and contralateral muscles could, long-term, lead and/ or worsen skeletal asymmetries.

  8. Integrins, muscle agrin and sarcoglycans during muscular inactivity conditions: an immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Anastasi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoglycans are transmembrane proteins that seem to be functionally and pathologically as important as dystrophin. Sarcoglycans cluster together to form a complex, which is localized in the cell membrane of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It has been proposed that the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC links the actin cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix and the proper maintenance of this connection is thought to be crucial to the mechanical stability of the sarcolemma. The integrins are a family of heterodimeric cell surface receptors which play a crucial role in cell adhesion including cell-matrix and intracellular interactions and therefore are involved in various biological phenomena, including cell migration, and differentiation tissue repair. Sarcoglycans and integrins play a mechanical and signaling role stabilizing the systems during cycles of contraction and relaxation.Several studies suggested the possibility that integrins might play a role in muscle agrin signalling. On these basis, we performed an immunohistochemical analyzing sarcoglycans, integrins and agrin, on human skeletal muscle affected by sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, in order to better define the correlation between these proteins and neurogenic atrophy due to peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed the existence of a cascade mechanism which provoke a loss of regulatory effects of muscle activity on costameres, due to loss of muscle and neural agrin.This cascade mechanism could determine a quantitative modification of transmembrane receptors and loss of ?7B could be replaced and reinforced by enhanced expression of the ?7A integrin to restore muscle fiber viability. Second, it is possible that the reduced cycles of contraction and relaxation of muscle fibers, during muscular atrophy, provoke a loss of mechanical stresses transmitted over cell surface receptors that physically couple the cytoskeleton to extracellular matrix. Consequently, these mechanical

  9. Morphofunctional compensation of masseter muscles in unilateral posterior crossbite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, G; Vermiglio, G; Centofanti, A; Rizzo, G; Runci, M; Favaloro, A; Piancino, M G; Bracco, P; Ramieri, G; Bianchi, F; Speciale, F; Arco, A; Trimarchi, F

    2016-06-13

    Unilateral posterior crossbite is a widespread, asymmetric malocclusion characterized by an inverse relationship of the upper and lower buccal dental cusps, in the molar and premolar regions, on one side only of the dental arch. Patients with unilateral posterior crossbite exhibit an altered chewing cycles and the crossbite side masseter results to be less active with respect to the contralateral one. Few studies about morphological features of masticatory muscle in malocclusion disorders exist and most of these have been performed on animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate morphological and protein expression characteristics of masseter muscles in patients affected by unilateral posterior crossbite, by histological and immunofluorescence techniques. We have used antibody against PAX-7, marker of satellite cells, and against α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ε- and ζ-sarcoglycans which are transmembrane glycoproteins involved in sarcolemma stabilization. By statistical analysis we have evaluated differences in amount of myonucley between contralateral and ipsilateral side. Results have shown: i) altered fibers morphology and atrophy of ipsilateral muscle if compared to the contralateral one; ii) higher number of myonuclei and PAX-7 positive cells in contralateral side than ipsilateral one; iii) higher pattern of fluorescence for all tested sarcoglycans in contralateral side than ipsilateral one. Results show that in unilateral posterior crossbite hypertrophic response of contralateral masseter and atrophic events in ipsilateral masseter take place; by that, in unilateral posterior crossbite malocclusion masticatory muscles modify their morphology depending on the function. That could be relevant in understanding and healing of malocclusion disorders; in fact, the altered balance about structure and function between ipsilateral and contralateral muscles could, long-term, lead and/ or worsen skeletal asymmetries.

  10. Abnormal distribution of sarcoglycan subcomplex in colonic smooth muscle cells of aganglionic bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Salvatore; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Sinatra, Maria Teresa; Trimarchi, Fabio; Scarvaglieri, Silvia; Mallamace, Agostino; Arena, Francesco; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo

    2010-03-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HD) is a development disorder of the enteric nervous system in which the altered innervation explains the inability of the aganglionic segment to relax. Impairment of cytoskeleton in SMC of aganglionic bowel has been shown. Sarcoglycan subcomplex (SG) may support the development and maintenance of muscle cells. We examined the SG subunit expression in colonic aganglionic and ganglionic specimens obtained from patients with HD. Full-thickness bowel specimens were obtained from six patients with HD. Six normal colon specimens were used as controls. Immunofluorescent analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction evaluation were performed for alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta- and epsilon-SG. In control colon, the indirect immunofluorescence showed a strong staining pattern of beta- gamma- delta- and epsilon-SG while a weak positivity of alpha-SG was recorded. In aganglionic bowel, immunofluorescence intensity values documented a significant lack of epsilon-SG while an enhanced alpha-SG, coupled to a loss of epsilon-SG, was recorded in ganglionic bowel in HD-affected patients. Our observations underscore the assumption that non-neuronal elements of the colon might play a key role in the pathogenesis of HD and loss of epsilon-SG might critically alter the cytoskeleton in the aganglionic bowel segment. Up-regulation of alpha-SG is probably an acquired phenomenon to reinforce the sarcolemma and to perform a forceful contraction in dilated ganglionic HD-affected colon, related to chronic pseudo-obstruction, contributing to the intestinal dysmotility that persists in 20% of patients after resection of the aganglionic bowel.

  11. Sarcoglycan subcomplex expression in refluxing ureteral endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Salvatore; Favaloro, Angelo; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Consolo, Angela; Arena, Francesco; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Functional and structural lesions of ureteral endings seem to alter the active valve mechanism of the ureterovesical junction, causing vesicoureteral reflux. The interaction of the dystroglycan complex with components of the extracellular matrix may have an important role in force transmission and sarcolemma protection, and the sarcoglycan complex is an essential component of the muscle membrane located dystroglycan complex. We performed immunofluorescence and molecular analysis on the expression of sarcoglycan complex subunits. A total of 21 specimens of refluxing ureteral endings were obtained during ureteral reimplantation. Six ureteral ends obtained during organ explantation were used as controls. Immunohistochemical analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction evaluation were performed for alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon-sarcoglycan complex. The Spearman test revealed a significant positive correlation between alpha-sarcoglycan complex immunofluorescence intensity and grade of vesicoureteral reflux, while a negative correlation was recorded between epsilon-sarcoglycan complex immunofluorescence intensity and grade of vesicoureteral reflux. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated a significant grade related impairment of epsilon-sarcoglycan complex coupled with an increased expression of alpha-sarcoglycan complex. This observation suggests that the structural deficiency of the trigonal ureterovesical junction could cause a passive stretching of refluxing urine on the ureter, deranging the multimodular tensegrity architecture of the sarcoglycan subcomplex, or that the sarcoglycan complex could have a key role in the physiopathology of vesicoureteral reflux. In fact, the defect in any of the sarcoglycan complexes results in degeneration of membrane integrity and muscle fiber. An altered configuration of the sarcoglycan complex could explain the structural and functional changes in refluxing ureteral endings. Our observations underline the

  12. Rac1 governs exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle through regulation of GLUT4 translocation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylow, Lykke; Nielsen, Ida L; Kleinert, Maximilian; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Ploug, Thorkil; Schjerling, Peter; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira; Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2016-09-01

    Exercise increases skeletal muscle energy turnover and one of the important substrates for the working muscle is glucose taken up from the blood. The GTPase Rac1 can be activated by muscle contraction and has been found to be necessary for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, although its role in exercise-stimulated glucose uptake is unknown. We show that Rac1 regulates the translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in skeletal muscle during exercise. We find that Rac1 knockout mice display significantly reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle during exercise. Exercise increases skeletal muscle energy turnover and one of the important substrates for the working muscle is glucose taken up from the blood. Despite extensive efforts, the signalling mechanisms vital for glucose uptake during exercise are not yet fully understood, although the GTPase Rac1 is a candidate molecule. The present study investigated the role of Rac1 in muscle glucose uptake and substrate utilization during treadmill exercise in mice in vivo. Exercise-induced uptake of radiolabelled 2-deoxyglucose at 65% of maximum running capacity was blocked in soleus muscle and decreased by 80% and 60% in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles, respectively, in muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout (mKO) mice compared to wild-type littermates. By developing an assay to quantify endogenous GLUT4 translocation, we observed that GLUT4 content at the sarcolemma in response to exercise was reduced in Rac1 mKO muscle. Our findings implicate Rac1 as a regulatory element critical for controlling glucose uptake during exercise via regulation of GLUT4 translocation. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  13. Efficacy of amifostine in protection against doxorubicin-induced acute cardiotoxic effects in rats

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    Dragojević-Simić Viktorija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Amifostine (AMI is a broad-spectrum cytoprotector which protects against variety of radio- and chemotherapy-related toxicities without decreasing their antitumor action. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential protective effects of AMI against acute cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DOX in male Wistar rats. Methods. AMI (300 mg/kg ip was given 30 min before DOX (6 mg/kg and 10mg/kg b.w., iv. The evaluation of DOXinduced cardiotoxic effects, as well as cardioprotective efficacy of AMI was performed 48 h after their administration by determining serum activities of enzymes known to be markers of cardiac damage (creatine kinase - CK, aspartate aminotransferase - AST, lactate dehydrogenase - LDH, and its isoenzyme α-hydroxybutirate dehydrogenase - α- HBDH, as well as the histopathological and ultrastructural analysis of the heart tissue. Results. AMI successfully prevented a significant increase in serum activity of CK, AST, LDH and α-HBDH in animals treated with DOX in the dose of 6 mg/kg (121.14 ± 18.37 vs 167.70 ± 44.24; 771.42 ± 161.99 vs 1057.00 ± 300.00; 3230.00 ± 1031.73 vs 4243.10 ± 904.06; 202.57 ± 42.46 vs 294.90 ± 80.20 UI/l, respectively, and ameliorated DOX-induced structural damage of the rat myocardium. Pretreatment with AMI in rats given 10 mg/kg DOX reduced the cardiac damage score (CDS from 2.62 ± 0.51 to 1.62 ± 0.51, i.e. to the CDS value obtained with the lower dose of DOX (6 mg/kg. The ultrastructural analysis of the rat myocardium showed that AMI successfully protected the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes and reduced mitochondria damage induced by DOX given in the dose of 6 mg/kg. Besides, capillaries were less morphologically changed and apoptosis of endothelial cells was extremely rare in AMI-protected animals. AMI itself did not cause any prominent changes in the examined parameters in comparison with the control rats. Conclusion. AMI provided a significant protection against DOX

  14. Age-dependent chloride channel expression in skeletal muscle fibres of normal and HSALR myotonic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranco, Marino; Yu, Carl; Quiñonez, Marbella; Vergara, Julio L

    2013-01-01

    We combine electrophysiological and optical techniques to investigate the role that the expression of chloride channels (ClC-1) plays on the age-dependent electrical properties of mammalian muscle fibres. To this end, we comparatively evaluate the magnitude and voltage dependence of chloride currents (ICl), as well as the resting resistance, in fibres isolated from control and human skeletal actin (HSA)LR mice (a model of myotonic dystrophy) of various ages. In control mice, the maximal peak chloride current ([peak-ICl]max) increases from −583 ± 126 to −956 ± 260 μA cm−2 (mean ± SD) between 3 and 6 weeks old. Instead, in 3-week-old HSALR mice, ICl are significantly smaller (−153 ± 33 μA cm−2) than in control mice, but after a long period of ∼14 weeks they reach statistically comparable values. Thus, the severe ClC-1 channelopathy in young HSALR animals is slowly reversed with aging. Frequency histograms of the maximal chloride conductance (gCl,max) in fibres of young HSALR animals are narrow and centred in low values; alternatively, those from older animals show broad distributions, centred at larger gCl,max values, compatible with mosaic expressions of ClC-1 channels. In fibres of both animal strains, optical data confirm the age-dependent increase in gCl, and additionally suggest that ClC-1 channels are evenly distributed between the sarcolemma and transverse tubular system membranes. Although gCl is significantly depressed in fibres of young HSALR mice, the resting membrane resistance (Rm) at −90 mV is only slightly larger than in control mice due to upregulation of a Rb-sensitive resting conductance (gK,IR). In adult animals, differences in Rm are negligible between fibres of both strains, and the contributions of gCl and gK,IR are less altered in HSALR animals. We surmise that while hyperexcitability in young HSALR mice can be readily explained on the basis of reduced gCl, myotonia in adult HSALR animals may be explained on the basis of a

  15. Immunohistochemical alterations of dystrophin in congenital muscular dystrophy Alterações imuno-hístoquímicas da distrofina na distrofia muscular congênita

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    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin distribution in the plasma muscle membrane using immunohystochemistry was studied in 22 children with congenital muscular dystrophy. The dystrophin was detected by immunofluorescence in muscle biopsy through a polyclonal antibody. All the cases had patchy interruptions of the fluorescence in the plasma membrane. A large patchy interruption of the sarcolemma was found in 17 cases, small interruption in 12, and a combination of large and small patchy discontinuity in 7. Small gaps around the fiber like a rosary were found in 15 cases. The frequency of these abnormalities ranged cases from: all fibers in 5 cases, frequent in 8, occasional in 5, and rare in 4. Five cases had total absence of immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the dystrophin expression is abnormal in this group of children and that this type of abnormalities can not be differentiated from early Becker muscular dystrophy nor childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy through immunohystochemistry alone.Foi estudada a distribuição da distrofina na membrana plasmática das fibras musculares em 22 crianças com distrofia muscular congênita, através de técnicas de imuno-histoquímica. A distrofina foi identificada nas biópsias musculares processadas a fresco, por técnicas de imunofluorescência utilizando anticorpos policlonais. Todos os casos tinham interrupções da imunofluorescência na membrana plasmática. Em 17 elas eram grandes, em 12 eram pequenas e em 7 eram de ambos os tipos. Fibras com interrupções pequenas e constantes, como um rosário, foram vistas em 15 casos. Essas anormalidades estavam presentes em todas as fibras em 5 casos, eram frequentes em 8, ocasionais em 5 e raras em 4. Cinco casos mostraram fibras sem distrofina. Esses dados sugerem que a expressão da distrofina é anormal nesse grupo de crianças. Essas anormalidades podem também ser encontradas em casos precoces de distrofia muscular de Becker e distrofia autoss

  16. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

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    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  17. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Sebastian; Ruebner, Matthias; Suhr, Frank; Konou, Thierry M; Tappe, Kim A; Toigo, Marco; Jung, Hans H; Henke, Christine; Steigleder, Ruth; Strissel, Pamela L; Huebner, Hanna; Beckmann, Matthias W; van der Keylen, Piet; Schoser, Benedikt; Schiffer, Thorsten; Frese, Laura; Bloch, Wilhelm; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV) envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs) occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human primary myoblast cell

  18. Dissociation of glucose tracer uptake and glucose transporter distribution in the regionally ischaemic isolated rat heart: application of a new autoradiographic technique

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    Southworth, Richard; Medina, Rodolfo A.; Garlick, Pamela B. [Department of Radiological Sciences, Guy' s, King' s and St Thomas' School of Medicine, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Dearling, Jason L.J.; Flynn, Aiden A.; Pedley, Barbara R. [Cancer Research UK Targeting and Imaging Group, Academic Department of Oncology, University College London, Royal Free Campus, London, NW3 2PF (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    Fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) and carbon-14 2-deoxyglucose ({sup 14}C-2-DG) are both widely used tracers of myocardial glucose uptake and phosphorylation. We have recently shown, using positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance, that ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R) causes differential changes in their uptake. We describe here the novel application of an autoradiographic technique allowing the investigation of this phenomenon at high resolution, using tracer concentrations of both analogues in the dual-perfused isolated rat heart. We also investigate the importance of glucose transporter (GLUT 1 and GLUT 4) distribution in governing the observed phosphorylated analogue accumulation. Hearts (n=5) were perfused with Krebs buffer for 40 min, made regionally zero-flow ischaemic for 40 min and reperfused for 60 min with Krebs containing tracer {sup 18}FDG (200 MBq) and tracer {sup 14}C-2-DG (0.37 MBq). Hearts were then frozen and five sections (10 {mu}m) were cut per heart, fixed and exposed on phosphor storage plates for 18 h (for {sup 18}FDG) and then for a further 9 days (for {sup 14}C-2-DG). Quantitative digital images of tracer accumulation were obtained using a phosphor plate reader. The protocol was repeated in a second group of hearts and GLUT 1 and GLUT 4 distribution analysed. Post-ischaemic accumulation of {sup 18}FDG-6-P was inhibited by 38.2%{+-}1.7% and {sup 14}C-DG-6-P by 19.0%{+-}2.2%, compared with control (P<0.05). After placing seven ''lines of interrogation'' across each heart section and analysing the phosphorylated tracer accumulation along them, a transmural gradient of both tracers was observed; this was highest at the endocardium and lowest at the epicardium. GLUT 4 translocated to the sarcolemma in the ischaemic/reperfused region (from 24%{+-}3% to 59%{+-}5%), while there was no cellular redistribution of GLUT 1. We conclude that since decreased phosphorylated tracer accumulation occurs

  19. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-06-06

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd-/-) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  20. Low-Level Laser Therapy (904 nm Counteracts Motor Deficit of Mice Hind Limb following Skeletal Muscle Injury Caused by Snakebite-Mimicking Intramuscular Venom Injection.

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    Willians Fernando Vieira

    Full Text Available Myotoxins present in Bothrops venom disrupt the sarcolemma of muscle fibers leading to the release of sarcoplasmic proteins and loss of muscle homeostasis. Myonecrosis and tissue anoxia induced by vascularization impairment can lead to amputation or motor functional deficit. The objective of this study was to investigate the dynamic behavior of motor function in mice subjected to injection of Bothrops jararacussu venom (Bjssu and exposed to low-level laser therapy (LLLT. Male Swiss mice received Bjssu injection (830 μg/kg into the medial portion of the right gastrocnemius muscle. Three hours later the injected region was irradiated with diode semiconductor Gallium Arsenide (GaAs- 904 nm, 4 J/cm² laser following by irradiation at 24, 48 and 72 hours. Saline injection (0.9% NaCl was used as control. Gait analysis was performed 24 hours before Bjssu injection and at every period post-Bjssu using CatWalk method. Data from spatiotemporal parameters Stand, Maximum Intensity, Swing, Swing Speed, Stride Length and Step Cycle were considered. The period of 3 hours post venom-induced injury was considered critical for all parameters evaluated in the right hindlimb. Differences (p<0.05 were concentrated in venom and venom + placebo laser groups during the 3 hours post-injury period, in which the values of stand of most animals were null. After this period, the gait characteristics were re-established for all parameters. The venom + laser group kept the values at 3 hours post-Bjssu equal to that at 24 hours before Bjssu injection indicating that the GaAs laser therapy improved spatially and temporally gait parameters at the critical injury period caused by Bjssu. This is the first study to analyze with cutting edge technology the gait functional deficits caused by snake envenoming and gait gains produced by GaAs laser irradiation. In this sense, the study fills a gap on the field of motor function after laser treatment following snake envenoming.

  1. Beta-synemin expression in cardiotoxin-injected rat skeletal muscle

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    Okamoto Koichi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-synemin was originally identified in humans as an α-dystrobrevin-binding protein through a yeast two-hybrid screen using an amino acid sequence derived from exons 1 through 16 of α-dystrobrevin, a region common to both α-dystrobrevin-1 and -2. α-Dystrobrevin-1 and -2 are both expressed in muscle and co-localization experiments have determined which isoform preferentially functions with β-synemin in vivo. The aim of our study is to show whether each α-dystrobrevin isoform has the same affinity for β-synemin or whether one of the isoforms preferentially functions with β-synemin in muscle. Methods The two α-dystrobrevin isoforms (-1 and -2 and β-synemin were localized in regenerating rat tibialis anterior muscle using immunoprecipitation, immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. Immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies for α-dystrobrevin and β-synemin were performed in regenerating muscle following cardiotoxin injection. Protein expression was then compared to that of developing rat muscle using immunoblot analysis. Results With an anti-α-dystrobrevin antibody, β-synemin co-immunoprecipitated with α-dystrobrevin whereas with an anti-β-synemin antibody, α-dystrobrevin-1 (rather than the -2 isoform preferentially co-immunoprecipitated with β-synemin. Immunohistochemical experiments show that β-synemin and α-dystrobrevin co-localize in rat skeletal muscle. In regenerating muscle, β-synemin is first expressed at the sarcolemma and in the cytoplasm at day 5 following cardiotoxin injection. Similarly, β-synemin and α-dystrobrevin-1 are detected by immunoblot analysis as weak bands by day 7. In contrast, immunoblot analysis shows that α-dystrobrevin-2 is expressed as early as 1 day post-injection in regenerating muscle. These results are similar to that of developing muscle. For example, in embryonic rats, immunoblot analysis shows that β-synemin and α-dystrobevin-1 are weakly expressed in

  2. Characterization of a multiprotein complex involved in excitation-transcription coupling of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Calderón, Manuel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Valladares, Denisse; Casas, Mariana; Toledo, Héctor; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Electrical activity regulates the expression of skeletal muscle genes by a process known as "excitation-transcription" (E-T) coupling. We have demonstrated that release of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) during depolarization activates membrane P2X/P2Y receptors, being the fundamental mediators between electrical stimulation, slow intracellular calcium transients, and gene expression. We propose that this signaling pathway would require the proper coordination between the voltage sensor (dihydropyridine receptor, DHPR), pannexin 1 channels (Panx1, ATP release conduit), nucleotide receptors, and other signaling molecules. The goal of this study was to assess protein-protein interactions within the E-T machinery and to look for novel constituents in order to characterize the signaling complex. Newborn derived myotubes, adult fibers, or triad fractions from rat or mouse skeletal muscles were used. Co-immunoprecipitation, 2D blue native SDS/PAGE, confocal microscopy z-axis reconstruction, and proximity ligation assays were combined to assess the physical proximity of the putative complex interactors. An L6 cell line overexpressing Panx1 (L6-Panx1) was developed to study the influence of some of the complex interactors in modulation of gene expression. Panx1, DHPR, P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R), and dystrophin co-immunoprecipitated in the different preparations assessed. 2D blue native SDS/PAGE showed that DHPR, Panx1, P2Y2R and caveolin-3 (Cav3) belong to the same multiprotein complex. We observed co-localization and protein-protein proximity between DHPR, Panx1, P2Y2R, and Cav3 in adult fibers and in the L6-Panx1 cell line. We found a very restricted location of Panx1 and Cav3 in a putative T-tubule zone near the sarcolemma, while DHPR was highly expressed all along the transverse (T)-tubule. By Panx1 overexpression, extracellular ATP levels were increased both at rest and after electrical stimulation. Basal mRNA levels of the early gene cfos and the oxidative metabolism

  3. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Frese

    Full Text Available Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human

  4. [Clinical and pathological features in children with progressive muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Quan; Qiang, Huan; Cao, Yu-Hong; Li, Qin-Long; Chen, Cai-Ping

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the clinical and pathological features of progressive muscular dystrophy (PMD) in children and to provide help for the early and accurate diagnosis of PMD. Retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 99 hospitalized children with PMD, including clinical manifestations, age of onset, family history, creatase, electromyogram (EMG) and pathological changes of muscles. Of the 99 children with PMD, the age of onset was 0.5-14.5 (4.7 ± 3.1) years. Eleven cases (11%) had a family history of PMD. Twenty-six (26%) were misdiagnosed as other diseases. All patients presented with muscle weakness when seeing the doctor, and 66 (67%) of them had muscle atrophy and/or hypertrophy. All patients had elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels. The 2-7-year-old group (n=51) had a mean CK level of 9965 ± 8876 U/L, and the 7-15-year-old group (n=48) had a mean CK level of 5110 ± 4498 U/L, with a significant difference between the two groups (Patrophy and hypertrophy of muscle fibers, hyaline degeneration and granular degeneration. Electron microscopy showed that muscle fibers were different in thickness, some atrophic or hypertrophic; muscle cell nuclei moved inwardly, myofilaments dissolved and disappeared mildly under the sarcolemma, there were scattered melting lesions within muscle fibers, the numbers of glycogen granules and mitochondria increased, mild hyperplasia and expansion of sarcoplasmic reticulum were seen, and a small number of muscle fibers had necrosis. Weakness of both lower extremities remains the main reason for PMD patients seeing the doctor. CK is the main laboratory indicator for diagnosis of PMD. PMD is mainly manifested as myogenic damage in the early stage and may be accompanied by neurogenic damage in the late stage, according to the EMG examination. With a high misdiagnosis rate, PMD may be misdiagnosed as many other diseases. Pathological examination under light microscope and electron microscope is the main means for confirming

  5. T-tubule remodelling disturbs localized β2-adrenergic signalling in rat ventricular myocytes during the progression of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobesberger, Sophie; Wright, Peter; Tokar, Sergiy; Bhargava, Anamika; Mansfield, Catherine; Glukhov, Alexey V; Poulet, Claire; Buzuk, Andrey; Monszpart, Aron; Sikkel, Markus; Harding, Sian E; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lyon, Alexander R; Gorelik, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Cardiomyocyte β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling is regulated by the receptors' subcellular location within transverse tubules (T-tubules), via interaction with structural and regulatory proteins, which form a signalosome. In chronic heart failure (HF), β2ARs redistribute from T-tubules to the cell surface, which disrupts functional signalosomes and leads to diffuse cAMP signalling. However, the functional consequences of structural changes upon β2AR-cAMP signalling during progression from hypertrophy to advanced HF are unknown. Rat left ventricular myocytes were isolated at 4-, 8-, and 16-week post-myocardial infarction (MI), β2ARs were stimulated either via whole-cell perfusion or locally through the nanopipette of the scanning ion conductance microscope. cAMP release was measured via a Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-based sensor Epac2-camps. Confocal imaging of di-8-ANNEPS-stained cells and immunoblotting were used to determine structural alterations. At 4-week post-MI, T-tubule regularity, density and junctophilin-2 (JPH2) expression were significantly decreased. The amplitude of local β2AR-mediated cAMP in T-tubules was reduced and cAMP diffused throughout the cytosol instead of being locally confined. This was accompanied by partial caveolin-3 (Cav-3) dissociation from the membrane. At 8-week post-MI, the β2AR-mediated cAMP response was observed at the T-tubules and the sarcolemma (crest). Finally, at 16-week post-MI, the whole cell β2AR-mediated cAMP signal was depressed due to adenylate cyclase dysfunction, while overall Cav-3 levels were significantly increased and a substantial portion of Cav-3 dissociated into the cytosol. Overexpression of JPH2 in failing cells in vitro or AAV9.SERCA2a gene therapy in vivo did not improve β2AR-mediated signal compartmentation or reduce cAMP diffusion. Although changes in T-tubule structure and β2AR-mediated cAMP signalling are significant even at 4-week post

  6. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of cardiomyopathies: a critical review of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, Mario

    2003-02-01

    Five years after the second report of the WHO/ISFC Task Force on the definition and classification of cardiomyopathies (CM), a critical review of the matter appears well-timed. The need for a correct definition of myocardial diseases is emphasized by considering them the result of a 'direct' injury due to different known and unknown causes and not a consequence of ischemic disease or of pressure and/or volume overload. This is in order to eliminate terms like ischemic CM, valvular CM, and hypertensive CM, which are a source of confusion. The concept of myocardial injury is also reviewed. This should not only include the structural/organic macroscopic injury, but also the subcellular, ultrastructural, and molecular damage (mostly of genetic origin) of the contracting element proteins, of citosol, sarcolemma and cell membrane ion channels. As the myocardium is a complex structure, made of common fibers and of specific conduction tissue, injury may be clinically identified either by ventricular function impairment or by bioelectric function defects, i.e. tachyarrhythmias and/or bradyarrhythmias, which sometimes are the unique manifestation of the disease (arrhythmogenic CM, in the strict sense). On the basis of the morpho-functional alterations, CMs may be classified as dilated CM (which could be better identified as hypokinetic CM, referring to the functional aspect, because the morphologic aspect is not always present), hypertrophic CM, restrictive CM, and arrhythmogenic CM (including not only arrhythmogenic right ventricular CM, but also other forms, like the so-called arrhythmias of the 'apparently' healthy heart, due to 'occult' myocardial injury). Moreover, these forms may present in association, like mixed CM (dilated-arrhythmogenic, dilated-hypertrophic, etc.). From an etiologic point of view, it is advisable to maintain the distinction between specific CM, due to a known cause, and primary or idiopathic CM, including, together with sporadic forms of an

  7. Sarcospan: a small protein with large potential for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purification of the proteins associated with dystrophin, the gene product responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, led to the discovery of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Sarcospan, a 25-kDa transmembrane protein, was the last component to be identified and its function in skeletal muscle has been elusive. This review will focus on progress over the last decade revealing that sarcospan is an important regulator of muscle cell adhesion, strength, and regeneration. Investigations using several transgenic mouse models demonstrate that overexpression of sarcospan in the mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy ameliorates pathology and restores muscle cell binding to laminin. Sarcospan improves cell surface expression of the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes as well as α7β1 integrin, which are the three major laminin-binding complexes in muscle. Utrophin and α7β1 integrin compensate for the loss of dystrophin and the finding that sarcospan increases their abundance at the extra-synaptic sarcolemma supports the use of sarcospan as a therapeutic target. Newly discovered phenotypes in sarcospan-deficient mice, including a reduction in specific force output and increased drop in force in the diaphragm muscle, result from decreased utrophin and dystrophin expression and further reveal sarcospan’s role in determining abundance of these complexes. Dystrophin protein levels and the specific force output of the diaphragm muscle are further reduced upon genetic removal of α7 integrin (Itga7) in SSPN-deficient mice, demonstrating that interactions between integrin and sarcospan are critical for maintenance of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and force production of the diaphragm muscle. Sarcospan is a major regulator of Akt signaling pathways and sarcospan-deficiency significantly impairs muscle regeneration, a process that is dependent on Akt activation. Intriguingly, sarcospan regulates glycosylation of a specific subpopulation of

  8. Dual response of the KATP channels to staurosporine: a novel role of SUR2B, SUR1 and Kir6.2 subunits in the regulation of the atrophy in different skeletal muscle phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Antonietta; Camerino, Giulia M; Calzolaro, Sara; Cannone, Maria; Conte, Diana; Tricarico, Domenico

    2014-09-15

    We investigated on the role of the genes encoding for the ATP-sensitive K(+)-channel (KATP) subunits (SUR1-2A/B, Kir6.2) in the atrophy induced "in vitro" by staurosporine (STS) in different skeletal muscle phenotypes of mouse. Patch-clamp and gene expression experiments showed that the expression/activity of the sarcolemma KATP channel subunits was higher in the fast-twitch than in the slow-twitch fibers. After 1 to 3h of incubation time, the STS (2.14×10(-6)M) treatment enhanced the expression/activity of the SUR2B, SUR1 and Kir6.2 subunit genes, but not SUR2A, in the slow-twitch muscle fibers, induced the caspase-3-9, Atrogin-1 and Murf-1 gene expression without affecting protein content. After 3 to 6h, the STS-related atrophy markedly down-regulated the SUR2B, SUR1 and Kir6.2 genes reducing the KATP currents and reduced the protein content/muscle weight ratio of the slow-twitch muscle by -36.4±6% (p<0.05). After 6 to 24h, no additional changes of the SUR1-2B and Kir6.2 gene expression and muscle protein were observed. In the fast-twitch muscles, STS mildly affected the atrophic genes and protein content, but potentiated the KATP currents down-regulating the Bnip-3 gene. Diazoxide (250-500×10(-6)M), a SUR1-2B/Kir6.2 channel opener, prevented the protein loss induced by STS in the slow-twitch muscle after 6h showing an EC50 of 1.35×10(-7)M and Emax of 75%, down-regulated the caspase-9 gene and enhanced the KATP currents. The enhanced expression/activity of the SUR2B, SUR1 and Kir6.2 genes are cytoprotective against STS-induced atrophy in the slow-twitch muscle; their reduced expression/activity is associated with proteolysis and atrophy in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-01-01

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd-/-) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  10. Extracellular Ca2+-induced force restoration in K+-depressed skeletal muscle of the mouse involves an elevation of [K+]i: implications for fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Simeon P; Leader, John P; Loiselle, Denis S; Higgins, Amanda; Lin, Wei; Renaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a Ca(2+)-K(+) interaction was a potential mechanism operating during fatigue with repeated tetani in isolated mouse muscles. Raising the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o) from 1.3 to 10 mM in K(+)-depressed slow-twitch soleus and/or fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles caused the following: 1) increase of intracellular K(+) activity by 20-60 mM (raised intracellular K(+) content, unchanged intracellular fluid volume), so that the K(+)-equilibrium potential increased by ∼10 mV and resting membrane potential repolarized by 5-10 mV; 2) large restoration of action potential amplitude (16-54 mV); 3) considerable recovery of excitable fibers (∼50% total); and 4) restoration of peak force with the peak tetanic force-extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)]o) relationship shifting rightward toward higher [K(+)]o. Double-sigmoid curve-fitting to fatigue profiles (125 Hz for 500 ms, every second for 100 s) showed that prior exposure to raised [K(+)]o (7 mM) increased, whereas lowered [K(+)]o (2 mM) decreased, the rate and extent of force loss during the late phase of fatigue (second sigmoid) in soleus, hence implying a K(+) dependence for late fatigue. Prior exposure to 10 mM [Ca(2+)]o slowed late fatigue in both muscle types, but was without effect on the extent of fatigue. These combined findings support our notion that a Ca(2+)-K(+) interaction is plausible during severe fatigue in both muscle types. We speculate that a diminished transsarcolemmal K(+) gradient and lowered [Ca(2+)]o contribute to late fatigue through reduced action potential amplitude and excitability. The raised [Ca(2+)]o-induced slowing of fatigue is likely to be mediated by a higher intracellular K(+) activity, which prolongs the time before stimulation-induced K(+) efflux depolarizes the sarcolemma sufficiently to interfere with action potentials. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Evaluation of sarcoglycans, vinculin-talin-integrin system and filamin2 in alpha- and gamma-sarcoglycanopathy: an immunohistochemical study.

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    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Trimarchi, Fabio; Santoro, Giuseppe; Bruschetta, Daniele; Bramanti, Placido; Pisani, Antonina; Favaloro, Angelo

    2004-12-01

    The sarcoglycan subcomplex (SGC) is a well-known system of interaction between extracellular matrix and sarcolemma-associated cytoskeleton in skeletal and cardiac muscle. The SGC is included in the DGC made up of sarcoplasmic subcomplex and a dystroglycan subcomplex. Recent developments in molecular genetics have demonstrated that the mutation of each single sarcoglycan gene, causes a series of recessive autosomal muscular dystrophies, dystrophin-positive, called sarcoglycanopathies or limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Our recent studies have demonstrated that costameres are a proteic machinery made up of DGC and vinculin-talin-integrin system, also revealing the colocalization of sarcoglycans and integrins in adult human skeletal muscle. These results may support the hypothesis of the existence of a bidirectional signalling between sarcoglycans and integrins in cultured L6 myocytes. The hypothesis of bidirectional signalling between sarcoglycans and integrins could be supported by the identification of a skeletal and cardiac muscle filamin2 as a gamma-sarcoglycan, delta-sarcoglycan and, hypothetically, beta1 integrin interacting protein. Our results, acquired with an immunofluorescence study on adult human skeletal muscle affected by LGMD type 2D and 2C, showed that in LGMD2D: a) alpha-sarcoglycan staining is severely reduced; b) the beta-gamma-delta-sarcoglycan subunit and all tested integrins staining are clearly detectable; c) filamin2 is normal and shows a costameric distribution. In LGMD2C: a) alpha-sarcoglycan staining is preserved; b) the beta-gamma-delta-sarcoglycan subunit staining is severely reduced; c) the alpha7B-integrin is slightly reduced and beta1D-integrin is severely reduced; d) filamin2 is severely reduced. Other tested proteins of the two systems show a normal staining pattern in both sarcoglycanopathies. Our study seems to confirm, for the first time on adult human skeletal muscle of subjects affected by LGMDs, the hypo-theses of: a) the

  12. Persistent muscle fiber regeneration in long term denervation. Past, present, future

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    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ravages of long term denervation there is structural and ultrastructural evidence for survival of muscle fibers in mammals, with some fibers surviving at least ten months in rodents and 3-6 years in humans. Further, in rodents there is evidence that muscle fibers may regenerate even after repeated damage in the absence of the nerve, and that this potential is maintained for several months after denervation. While in animal models permanently denervated muscle sooner or later loses the ability to contract, the muscles may maintain their size and ability to function if electrically stimulated soon after denervation. Whether in mammals, humans included, this is a result of persistent de novo formation of muscle fibers is an open issue we would like to explore in this review. During the past decade, we have studied muscle biopsies from the quadriceps muscle of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI patients suffering with Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a condition that fully and irreversibly disconnects skeletal muscle fibers from their damaged innervating motor neurons. We have demonstrated that human denervated muscle fibers survive years of denervation and can be rescued from severe atrophy by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES. Using immunohistochemistry with both non-stimulated and the h-bFES stimulated human muscle biopsies, we have observed the persistent presence of muscle fibers which are positive to labeling by an antibody which specifically recognizes the embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb. Relative to the total number of fibers present, only a small percentage of these MHCemb positive fibers are detected, suggesting that they are regenerating muscle fibers and not pre-existing myofibers re-expressing embryonic isoforms. Although embryonic isoforms of acetylcholine receptors are known to be re-expressed and to spread from the end-plate to the sarcolemma of muscle fibers in early phases of muscle denervation, we suggest

  13. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: a molecular and immunohistochemical approach Distrofia muscular de Duchenne e Becker: abordagem molecular e imuno-histoquímica

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    Aline Andrade Freund

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. We studied 106 patients with a diagnosis of probable DMD/BMD by analyzing 20 exons of the dystrophin gene in their blood and, in some of the cases, by immunohistochemical assays for dystrophin in muscle biopsies. In 71.7% of the patients, deletions were found in at least one of the exons; 68% of these deletions were in the hot-spot 3' region. Deletions were found in 81.5% of the DMD cases and in all the BMD cases. The cases without deletions, which included the only woman in the study with DMD, had dystrophin deficiency. The symptomatic female carriers had no deletions but had abnormal dystrophin distribution in the sarcolemma (discontinuous immunostains. The following diagnoses were made for the remaining cases without deletions with the aid of a muscle biopsy: spinal muscular atrophy, congenital myopathy; sarcoglycan deficiency and unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin analysis by immunohistochemistry continues to be the most specific method for diagnosis of DMD/BMD and should be used when no exon deletions are found in the dystrophin gene in the blood.As distrofias musculares de Duchenne (DMD e de Becker (DMB são doenças causadas por mutação no gene da distrofina. Foram estudados 106 casos com a suspeita diagnóstica de DMD/BMD com a analise de 20 exons do gene da distrofina no sangue e biópsia muscular com imuno-histoquímica para distrofina em alguns casos. Em 71,7% dos casos foi encontrada deleção em pelo menos um dos exons, sendo que 68% das deleções localizam-se na região 3' hot spot. Foram encontradas deleções em 81,5% dos DMD e em todos os BMD, sendo que os sem deleção tinham deficiência de distrofina, incluindo a mulher com DMD. As portadoras sintomáticas não tinham deleções mas anormalidades na distribuição da distrofina no sarcolema. Os outros casos sem deleção, com auxilio da

  14. Fatores de crescimento presentes no miocárdio de pacientes com cardiopatia chagásica crônica Growth factors in the myocardium of patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

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    Marcia Martins Reis

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, quantificamos fatores de crescimento em fragmentos de miocárdio de 19 cardiopatas chagásicos crônicos com insuficiência cardíaca congestiva, através da técnica da imunoperoxidase. Pesquisamos: antígenos de T. cruzi , fatores de crescimento (GM-CSF, TGF-beta1, PDGF-A e PDGF-B e células inflamatórias (CD4+, CD8+, CD20+ e CD68+. A razão média CD4+/CD8+ foi 0,6 ± 0,3. O número médio de macrófagos (CD68+ foi 5,9±3,1; de células intersticiais PDGF-A+ foi 7,5 ± 4,3; PDGF-B+ 2,9 ± 2,7, TGF-beta1+ 2,2 ± 1,9 e GM-CSF+ 2,3 ± 1,9. A marcação para PDGF-A foi geralmente intensa, ocorrendo também em endotélio, células musculares lisas e sarcolema; não houve correlação dessa positividade com a quantidade de células intersticiais positivas para os mesmos fatores. TGF-beta1 ocorreu em baixa expressão em 100% dos casos. Em conclusão, PDGF-A e B são, provavelmente, os fatores de crescimento mais relacionados às lesões proliferativas na cardiopatia chagásica crônica e, conseqüentemente, à fibrose. GM-CSF e TGF-beta1 estão pouco expressos. Não houve correlação estatisticamente significante entre os fatores de crescimento e a quantidade de parasita.In this work we quantified various growth factors in the myocardium of 19 patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy and heart failure, through the immunoperoxidase technique. We looked for T. cruzi antigens, growth factors (GM-CSF, TGF-beta1, PDGF-A and PDGF-B and inflammatory cells (CD4+, CD8+, CD20+ and CD68+. The mean ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes was 0.6 ± 0.3. The mean number of positive interstitial cells was 5.9 ± 3.1 for CD68+ (macrophages; 7.5 ± 4.3 for PDGF-A+; 2.9 ± 2.7 for PDGF-B+, 2.2 ± 1.9 for TGF-beta1+ and 2.3 ± 1.9 for GM-CSF+. The immunoreaction for PDGF-A was intense, occurring also in the endothelium, smooth muscle cells and the sarcolemma; there was no correlation between the number of positive interstitial cells and the

  15. Costameric proteins in human skeletal muscle during muscular inactivity.

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    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Santoro, Giuseppe; Arco, Alba; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Bramanti, Placido; Rinaldi, Carmen; Sidoti, Antonina; Amato, Aldo; Favaloro, Angelo

    2008-09-01

    Costameres are regions that are associated with the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibres and comprise proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and vinculin-talin-integrin system. Costameres play both a mechanical and a signalling role, transmitting force from the contractile apparatus to the extracellular matrix in order to stabilize skeletal muscle fibres during contraction and relaxation. Recently, it was shown that bidirectional signalling occurs between sarcoglycans and integrins, with muscle agrin potentially interacting with both types of protein to enable signal transmission. Although numerous studies have been carried out on skeletal muscle diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, recessive autosomal muscular dystrophies and other skeletal myopathies, insufficient data exist on the relationship between costameres and the pathology of the second motor nerve and between costameric proteins and muscle agrin in other conditions in which skeletal muscle atrophy occurs. Previously, we carried out a preliminary study on skeletal muscle from patients with sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, in which we analysed the distribution of sarcoglycans, integrins and agrin by immunostaining only. In the present study, we have examined the skeletal muscle fibres of ten patients with sensitive-motor polyneuropathy. We used immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase PCR to examine the distribution of vinculin, talin and dystrophin, in addition to that of those proteins previously studied. Our aim was to characterize in greater detail the distribution and expression of costameric proteins and muscle agrin during this disease. In addition, we used transmission electron microscopy to evaluate the structural damage of the muscle fibres. The results showed that immunostaining of alpha 7B-integrin, beta 1D-integrin and muscle agrin appeared to be severely reduced, or almost absent, in the muscle fibres of the diseased patients, whereas staining of alpha 7A

  16. Metabolic Responses to Weight Lifting

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    Arnold Nelson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Editor's Note, The ability to lift heavy loads while performing multiple repetitions is not only highly correlated with muscle mass or the total number actomyosin interactions, but also metabolic functions that includes substrate concentrations and by-product removal.  Muscles use adenosine triphosphate (ATP in at least three locations during exercise; to run the actomyosin interaction, operate sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps, and operate sarcolemma sodium and potassium pumps.  Weight lifting sessions are considered to be an intermittent activity that includes only a few second bursts of high force and/or velocity movements followed by rest periods of up to several minutes. Therefore, the anaerobic pathways such as the phosphagen and glycolytic systems are the initial pathways to respond due in part to the ability to match the increased rates of ATP depletion by increasing ATP production. After the initial resting ATP stores are used up, the phosphagen system starts contributing to ATP replenishment.  This system consists of reactions from the creatine kinase (CK pathway and the adenylate kinase (AK pathway.  However, the CK pathway can only work at max capacity for a short period for resting phosphocreatine (PCr concentrations are only about 4-6 times the amount of resting ATP stores.  Once the PCr concentrations are depleted, the AK reaction will begin by using two adenosine diphosphate (ADP to form one ATP and one adenosine monophosphate (AMP. Although ATP is produced in this pathway, this production of ATP does coincide with an increased concentration of AMP. This is problematic because increased AMP levels will in turn stimulate the adenylate deaminase reaction, which will produce ammonia (NH3. This conversion of AMP into NH3 will result in the muscle cell having a net loss of total adenine nucleotides available to resynthesize ATP.  Glycolysis is the next reaction in line, which increases its role in ATP replenishment as PCr