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Sample records for sarcolemma

  1. In Vivo Microscopy Reveals Extensive Embedding of Capillaries within the Sarcolemma of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, Brian; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Dao, Lam; Bakalar, Matthew; French, Stephanie; Chess, David J.; Taylor, Joni L.; Picard, Martin; Aponte, Angel; Daniels, Mathew P.; Esfahani, Shervin; Cushman, Samuel; Balaban, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide insight into mitochondrial function in vivo, we evaluated the 3D spatial relationship between capillaries, mitochondria, and muscle fibers in live mice. Methods 3D volumes of in vivo murine Tibialis anterior muscles were imaged by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). Muscle fiber type, mitochondrial distribution, number of capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were assessed. The role of myoglobin-facilitated diffusion was examined in myoglobin knockout mice. Distribution of GLUT4 was also evaluated in the context of the capillary and mitochondrial network. Results MPM revealed that 43.6 ± 3.3% of oxidative fiber capillaries had ≥ 50% of their circumference embedded in a groove in the sarcolemma, in vivo. Embedded capillaries were tightly associated with dense mitochondrial populations lateral to capillary grooves and nearly absent below the groove. Mitochondrial distribution, number of embedded capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were proportional to fiber oxidative capacity and unaffected by myoglobin knockout. GLUT4 did not preferentially localize to embedded capillaries. Conclusions Embedding capillaries in the sarcolemma may provide a regulatory mechanism to optimize delivery of oxygen to heterogeneous groups of muscle fibers. We hypothesize that mitochondria locate to paravascular regions due to myofibril voids created by embedded capillaries, not to enhance the delivery of oxygen to the mitochondria. PMID:25279425

  2. Contractions but not AICAR increase FABPpm content in rat muscle sarcolemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Albers, Peter; Luiken, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein expression, measured in lysates with western blotting, by either stimulus. AMPK thr172 and ERK1/2 thr202/204 phosphorylation were significantly increased with muscle contractions (P ...In the present study, it was investigated whether acute muscle contractions in rat skeletal muscle increased the protein content of FABPpm in the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the effect of AICAR stimulation on FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein content in sarcolemma of rat skeletal muscle was evaluated....... METHODS: Male wistar rats (150 g) were anesthetized and either subjected to in situ electrically induced contractions (hindlimb muscles: 20 min, 10-20 V, 200 ms trains, 100 Hz) or stimulated with the pharmacological activator of AMPK, AICAR. To investigate changes in the content of FABPpm and FAT/CD36...

  3. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G.

    1991-01-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine [ 3 H]-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca 2+ and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca 2+ -containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37 degree C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37 degree C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca 2+ to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca 2+ and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4 degree C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca 2+

  4. Specific binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin to sarcolemma of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, K; Kawai, M

    1997-08-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) binding was studied in 83 patients with various neuromuscular disorders. UEA I labelled endomysial capillaries and endothelial cells of perimysial blood vessels in all the examined muscles. There was no UEA I binding to muscle fibres except for all (9) cases of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV), 1 of 5 cases of inclusion body myositis and 1 of 36 cases of inflammatory myopathies. The UEA I binding was completely eliminated by preincubation of UEA I solution with L-fucose. Using electron microscopy, the UEA I binding was localized to sarcolemma and intrasarco-plasmic membranous organelles other than mitochondria. Myosatellite cells were not labelled. These findings revealed the existence of fucosylated proteins or lipids in a subset of skeletal muscles suffering from DMRV. Biochemical identification of the fucosylated substance and further detailed study on subcellular localization of UEA I binding may yield important clues to the unknown pathogenesis of DMRV.

  5. FAT/CD36 is localized in sarcolemma and in vesicle-like structures in subsarcolemma regions but not in mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Mogensen, Martin; Prats, Clara

    2010-01-01

    was performed on single muscle fibers dissected from soleus muscle of lean and obese Zucker rats and from the vastus lateralis muscle from humans. Co-staining against FAT/CD36 and MitoNEET clearly show that FAT/CD36 is highly present in sarcolemma and it also associates with some vesicle-like intracellular...

  6. The delayed rectifier potassium conductance in the sarcolemma and the transverse tubular system membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranco, Marino; Quinonez, Marbella

    2012-01-01

    A two-microelectrode voltage clamp and optical measurements of membrane potential changes at the transverse tubular system (TTS) were used to characterize delayed rectifier K currents (IKV) in murine muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric dye di-8-ANEPPS. In intact fibers, IKV displays the canonical hallmarks of KV channels: voltage-dependent delayed activation and decay in time. The voltage dependence of the peak conductance (gKV) was only accounted for by double Boltzmann fits, suggesting at least two channel contributions to IKV. Osmotically treated fibers showed significant disconnection of the TTS and displayed smaller IKV, but with similar voltage dependence and time decays to intact fibers. This suggests that inactivation may be responsible for most of the decay in IKV records. A two-channel model that faithfully simulates IKV records in osmotically treated fibers comprises a low threshold and steeply voltage-dependent channel (channel A), which contributes ∼31% of gKV, and a more abundant high threshold channel (channel B), with shallower voltage dependence. Significant expression of the IKV1.4 and IKV3.4 channels was demonstrated by immunoblotting. Rectangular depolarizing pulses elicited step-like di-8-ANEPPS transients in intact fibers rendered electrically passive. In contrast, activation of IKV resulted in time- and voltage-dependent attenuations in optical transients that coincided in time with the peaks of IKV records. Normalized peak attenuations showed the same voltage dependence as peak IKV plots. A radial cable model including channels A and B and K diffusion in the TTS was used to simulate IKV and average TTS voltage changes. Model predictions and experimental data were compared to determine what fraction of gKV in the TTS accounted simultaneously for the electrical and optical data. Best predictions suggest that KV channels are approximately equally distributed in the sarcolemma and TTS membranes; under these conditions, >70% of IKV

  7. The influence of respiratory acid-base changes on muscle performance and excitability of the sarcolemma during strenuous intermittent hand grip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, M; Shushakov, V; Maassen, N

    2012-02-01

    Acidification has been reported to provide protective effects on force production in vitro. Thus, in this study, we tested if respiratory acid-base changes influence muscle function and excitability in vivo. Nine subjects performed strenuous, intermittent hand grip exercises (10 cycles of 15 s of work/45 s of rest) under respiratory acidosis by CO(2) rebreathing, alkalosis by hyperventilation, or control. The Pco(2), pH, K(+) concentration ([K(+)]), and Na(+) concentration were measured in venous and arterialized blood. Compound action potentials (M-wave) were elicited to examine the excitability of the sarcolemma. The surface electromyogram (EMG) was recorded to estimate the central drive to the muscle. The lowest venous pH during the exercise period was 7.24 ± 0.03 in controls, 7.31 ± 0.05 with alkalosis, and 7.17 ± 0.04 with acidosis (P alkalosis, and, after the second cycle, it was smaller with acidosis than with the control condition (P Respiratory alkalosis stabilized the M-wave area without influencing performance. Thus, we did not find a direct link between performance and alteration of excitability of the sarcolemma due to changes in pH in vivo.

  8. Ultra-structural time-course study in the C. elegans model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy highlights a crucial role for sarcomere-anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity in the earliest steps of the muscle degeneration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouilly, Nicolas; Lecroisey, Claire; Martin, Edwige; Pierson, Laura; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Qadota, Hiroshi; Labouesse, Michel; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Mounier, Nicole; Gieseler, Kathrin

    2015-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. In spite of great advances in the design of curative treatments, most patients currently receive palliative therapies with steroid molecules such as prednisone or deflazacort thought to act through their immunosuppressive properties. These molecules only slightly slow down the progression of the disease and lead to severe side effects. Fundamental research is still needed to reveal the mechanisms involved in the disease that could be exploited as therapeutic targets. By studying a Caenorhabditis elegans model for DMD, we show here that dystrophin-dependent muscle degeneration is likely to be cell autonomous and affects the muscle cells the most involved in locomotion. We demonstrate that muscle degeneration is dependent on exercise and force production. Exhaustive studies by electron microscopy allowed establishing for the first time the chronology of subcellular events occurring during the entire process of muscle degeneration. This chronology highlighted the crucial role for dystrophin in stabilizing sarcomeric anchoring structures and the sarcolemma. Our results suggest that the disruption of sarcomeric anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity, observed at the onset of the muscle degeneration process, triggers subcellular consequences that lead to muscle cell death. An ultra-structural analysis of muscle biopsies from DMD patients suggested that the chronology of subcellular events established in C. elegans models the pathogenesis in human. Finally, we found that the loss of sarcolemma integrity was greatly reduced after prednisone treatment suggesting a role for this molecule in plasma membrane stabilization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Temperature dependence of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma in the ventricle of catfish (Clarias gariepinus

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    El-Sabry Abu-Amra

    2015-10-01

    The sarcolemmal Ca2+ contribution of activator Ca2+ was greater at a test temperature of 30 °C as assessed by verapamil. Whereas the SR-Ca2+ contribution was higher at 20 and 30 °C and a frequency rate of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz as assessed by caffeine and adrenaline, respectively. Bradykinin potentiating factor (BPF7 which was isolated from jelly fish (Cassiopea andromeda decreased the cardiac force developed at a frequency rate of 0.2 Hz and a temperature of 20 °C, whereas it increased the force developed at frequency rates of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz at 30 °C. These results indicate that BPF7 may act like verapamil in reducing the cardiac force through blocking the sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels at low temperature and like adrenaline in an increase of the cardiac force developed at warm temperature and the high frequency rate through stimulation of SR-Ca2+ activator. Therefore, this study indicates that the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx and the SR-Ca2+ release contributors of activator Ca2+ for cardiac force development in the catfish heart were significantly greater at warm temperature and at the pacing frequency rates of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz as assessed by verapamil, adrenaline, caffeine and BPF7. However, the relative contribution of the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx in the development of cardiac force in the catfish heart was greater than that of SR-Ca2+ release.

  10. Differential effect of r-56865 on ouabain binding to isolated sarcolemma and intact atrial tissue of guinea-pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEERS, C; SCHEUFLER, E; WILHELM, D; WERMELSKIRCHEN, D; WILFFERT, B; Peters, Thies

    1 R 56865 (N-[1-[4-(4-fluorophenoxy)-butyl]-4-piperidinyl]-N-methyl-2-benzolamine) is a compound known to antagonize cardiac glycoside intoxication. Therefore, the effect of the compound on ouabain binding to intact cardiac tissue as well as cardiac membrane preparations was investigated. 2 The

  11. Excitability of the T-tubular system in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O B; Ørtenblad, Niels; Lamb, G D

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous exercise causes an increase in extracellular [K(+)] and intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)](i)) of working muscles, which may reduce sarcolemma excitability. The excitability of the sarcolemma is, however, to some extent protected by a concomitant increase in the activity of muscle Na(+)-K(+) ...

  12. Transversal stiffness and beta-actin and alpha-actinin-4 content of the M. soleus fibers in the conditions of a 3-day reloading after 14-day gravitational unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to analyze the structural changes in different parts of the sarcolemma and contractile apparatus of muscle fibers by measuring their transversal stiffness by atomic force microscopy in a three-day reloading after a 14-day gravity disuse, which was carried out by hind-limbs suspension. The object of the study was the soleus muscle of the Wistar rat. It was shown that after 14 days of disuse, there was a reduction of transversal stiffness of all points of the sarcolemma and contractile apparatus. Readaptation for 3 days leads to complete recovery of the values of the transversal stiffness of the sarcolemma and to partial value recovery of the contractile apparatus. The changes in transversal stiffness of sarcolemma correlate with beta-actin and alpha-actinin-4 in membrane protein fractions.

  13. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160

    OpenAIRE

    Perrin, Arnaud; Rousseau, Jo?l; Tremblay, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adul...

  14. The fine structure of sheep myocardial cells; sarcolemmal invaginations and the transverse tubular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIMPSON, F O; OERTELIS, S J

    1962-01-01

    An electron microscope study of sheep myocardial cells has demonstrated the presence of a transverse tubular system, apparently forming a network across the cell at each Z band level. The walls of these tubules resemble the sarcolemma in consisting of two dense layers-plasma membrane and basement menbrane; continuity of the tubule walls with the sarcolemma can be seen when longitudinal sections of a cell are obtained between two subsarcolemmal myofibrils and at the same time perpendicular to the cell surface. The demonstration of communication between the lumen of the transverse tubular system and the extracellular space appears to be more definite in this study than in any work hitherto published. It provides anatomical evidence of a possible direct pathway for transmission of the activating impulse from the sarcolemma to the myofibril Z bands.

  15. Alpha-adrenergic receptors in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattigan, S; Appleby, G J; Edwards, S J

    1986-01-01

    Sarcolemma-enriched preparations from muscles rich in slow oxidative red fibres contained specific binding sites for the alpha 1 antagonist, prazosin (e.g. soleus Kd 0.13 nM, Bmax 29 fmol/mg protein). Binding sites for prazosin were almost absent from white muscle. Displacement of prazosin bindin...... adrenergic receptors are present on the sarcolemma of slow oxidative red fibres of rat skeletal muscle. The presence provides the mechanistic basis for apparent alpha-adrenergic effects to increase glucose and oxygen uptake in perfused rat hindquarter....

  16. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  17. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  18. Denervation and high-fat diet reduce insulin signaling in T-tubules in skeletal muscle of living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M; Ploug, Thorkil; Ai, Hua

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates muscle glucose transport by translocation of GLUT4 to sarcolemma and T-tubules. Despite muscle glucose uptake playing a major role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the temporal and spatial changes in insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation during these co...

  19. Localization of nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ulrik; Lopez-Figueroa, M.; Hellsten, Ylva

    1996-01-01

    The present study investigated the cellular localization of the neuronal type I and endothelial type III nitric oxide synthase in human skeletal muscle. Type I NO synthase immunoreactivity was found in the sarcolemma and the cytoplasm of all muscle fibres. Stronger immunoreactivity was expressed...

  20. Dissociation between lactate and proton exchange in muscle during intense exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Juel, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva

    1997-01-01

    1. Transport of lactate, H+ and fluid across muscle sarcolemma was studied in contracting muscles under varying blood acid-base conditions. 2. Subjects performed two-legged submaximal knee-extensor exercise for 29-35 min consisting of warming up for 5 min followed by 10 min of leg exercise (L1...

  1. Na+-K+ pump location and translocation during muscle contraction  in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Juel, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    the translocation. Electrical stimulation and biotin labeling of rat muscle revealed a 40% and 18% increase in the amounts of the Na+-K+ pump a2 subunit and caveolin-3 (Cav-3), respectively, in the sarcolemma. Exercise induced a 36% and 19% increase in the relative amounts of the a2 subunit and Cav-3, respectively...

  2. Development of the zebrafish myoseptum with emphasis on the myotendinous junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Benjamin; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Pagnon-Minot, Aurélie; Ruggiero, Florence; Le Guellec, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    Zebrafish myosepta connect two adjacent muscle cells and transmit muscular forces to axial structures during swimming via the myotendinous junction (MTJ). The MTJ establishes transmembrane linkages system consisting of extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) surrounding the basement membrane, cytoskeletal elements anchored to sarcolema, and all intermediate proteins that link ECM to actin filaments. Using a series of zebrafish specimens aged between 24 h post-fertilization and 2 years old, the present paper describes at the transmission electron microscope level the development of extracellular and intracellular elements of the MTJ. The transverse myoseptum development starts during the segmentation period by deposition of sparse and loosely organized collagen fibrils. During the hatching period, a link between actin filaments and sarcolemma is established. The basal lamina underlining sarcolemma is well differentiated. Later, collagen fibrils display an orthogonal orientation and fibroblast-like cells invade the myoseptal stroma. A dense network of collagen fibrils is progressively formed that both anchor myoseptal fibroblasts and sarcolemmal basement membrane. The differentiation of a functional MTJ is achieved when sarcolemma interacts with both cytoskeletal filaments and extracellular components. This solid structural link between contractile apparatus and ECM leads to sarcolemma deformations resulting in the formation of regular invaginations, and allows force transmission during muscle contraction. This paper presents the first ultrastructural atlas of the zebrafish MTJ development, which represents an useful tool to analyse the mechanisms of the myotendinous system formation and their disruption in muscle disorders.

  3. Dynamic Changes in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Structure in Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Vega

    2011-01-01

    sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and the sarcolemma where Ca2+ release is activated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the SR is a structurally inert organelle in ventricular myocytes. Our data suggest that rather than being static, the SR undergoes frequent dynamic structural changes. SR boutons expressing functional ryanodine receptors moved throughout the cell, approaching or moving away from the sarcolemma of ventricular myocytes. These changes in SR structure occurred in the absence of changes in [Ca2+] during EC coupling. Microtubules and the molecular motors dynein and kinesin 1(Kif5b were important regulators of SR motility. These findings support a model in which the SR is a motile organelle capable of molecular motor protein-driven structural changes.

  4. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchwalow, Igor B.; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim; Punkt, Karla

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma

  5. Caveolae regulation of mechanosensitive channel function in myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Huang

    Full Text Available Mutations that lead to muscular dystrophy often create deficiencies in cytoskeletal support of the muscle sarcolemma causing hyperactive mechanosensitive cation channel (MSC activity and elevated intracellular Ca(2+. Caveolae are cholesterol-rich microdomains that form mechanically deformable invaginations of the sarcolemma. Mutations to caveolin-3, the main scaffolding protein of caveolae in muscle, cause Limbe-Girdle muscular dystrophy. Using genetic and acute chemical perturbations of developing myotubes we investigated whether caveolae are functionally linked to MSCs. MSC sensitivity was assayed using suction application to patches and probe-induced indentation during whole-cell recordings. Membrane mechanical stress in patches was monitored using patch capacitance/impedance. Cholesterol depletion disrupted caveolae and caused a large increase in MSC current. It also decreased the membrane mechanical relaxation time, likely reflecting cytoskeleton dissociation from the bilayer. Reduction of Cav3 expression with miRNA also increased MSC current and decreased patch relaxation time. In contrast Cav3 overexpression produced a small decrease in MSC currents. To acutely and specifically inhibit Cav3 interactions, we made a chimeric peptide containing the antennapedia membrane translocation domain and the Cav3 scaffolding domain (A-CSD3. A-CSD3 action was time dependent initially producing a mild Ca(2+ leak and increased MSC current, while longer exposures decreased MSC currents coinciding with increased patch stiffening. Images of GFP labeled Cav3 in patches showed that Cav3 doesn't enter the pipette, showing patch composition differed from the cell surface. However, disruption via cholesterol depletion caused Cav3 to become uniformly distributed over the sarcolemma and Cav3 appearance in the patch dome. The whole-cell indentation currents elicited under the different caveolae modifying conditions mirror the patch response supporting the role of

  6. Syncytin-1 in differentiating human myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregard, Bolette; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Schulz, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Myoblasts fuse to form myotubes, which mature into skeletal muscle fibres. Recent studies indicate that an endogenous retroviral fusion gene, syncytin-1, is important for myoblast fusions in man. We have now expanded these data by examining the immunolocalization of syncytin in human myoblasts...... fusions. Thus, syncytin is involved in human myoblast fusions and is localized in areas of contact between fusing cells. Moreover, syncytin and caveolin-3 might interact at the level of the sarcolemma....

  7. Modifying influence of incorporated 137Cs upon the mechanisms of adrenergic control over contractile myucard function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanok, L.M.; Bulanova, K.Ya.; Gerasimovich, N.V.; Sineleva, M.V.; Milyutin, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Incorporated 137 Cs (absorbed dose of 0.26 Gy) causes decrease of myocard's contractile function and intropic response to β-adrenagonists effect, isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and β-adrenoreceptors affinity. Adrenergic effects, mediated by α-adrenergic structures on heart contractile function, on the contrary, become stronger, that is due to the increase of the receptors' dencity on sarcolemma surface

  8. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  9. Role of dystroglycan in limiting contraction-induced injury to the sarcomeric cytoskeleton of mature skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Erik P; Turk, Rolf; Willer, Tobias; Beltrán, Daniel; Inamori, Kei-Ichiro; Peterson, Taylor A; Engle, Jeffrey; Prouty, Sally; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Saito, Fumiaki; Anderson, Mary E; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-09-27

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a highly expressed extracellular matrix receptor that is linked to the cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. DG is critical for the function of skeletal muscle, and muscle with primary defects in the expression and/or function of DG throughout development has many pathological features and a severe muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, reduction in DG at the sarcolemma is a common feature in muscle biopsies from patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. However, the consequence of disrupting DG in mature muscle is not known. Here, we investigated muscles of transgenic mice several months after genetic knockdown of DG at maturity. In our study, an increase in susceptibility to contraction-induced injury was the first pathological feature observed after the levels of DG at the sarcolemma were reduced. The contraction-induced injury was not accompanied by increased necrosis, excitation-contraction uncoupling, or fragility of the sarcolemma. Rather, disruption of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton was evident as reduced passive tension and decreased titin immunostaining. These results reveal a role for DG in maintaining the stability of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton during contraction and provide mechanistic insight into the cause of the reduction in strength that occurs in muscular dystrophy after lengthening contractions.

  10. Transversal stiffness of fibers and desmin content in leg muscles of rats under gravitational unloading of various durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research was the analysis of structural changes in various parts of the sarcolemma and contractile apparatus of muscle fibers by measuring their transversal stiffness by atomic force microscopy under gravitational unloading. Soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles of Wistar rats were the objects of the study. Gravitational unloading was carried out by antiorthostatic suspension of hindlimbs for 1, 3, 7, and 12 days. It was shown that the transversal stiffness of different parts of the contractile apparatus of soleus muscle fibers decreases during gravitational unloading in the relaxed, calcium-activated, and rigor states, the fibers of the medial gastrocnemius show no changes, whereas the transversal stiffness of tibialis anterior muscle increases. Thus the transversal stiffness of the sarcolemma in the relaxed state is reduced in all muscles, which may be due to the direct action of gravity as an external mechanical factor that can influence the tension on a membrane. The change of sarcolemma stiffness in activated fibers, which is due probably to the transfer of tension from the contractile apparatus, correlates with the dynamics of changes in the content of desmin.

  11. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A.; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J.; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I.; Scott, Bryan L.; Walker, Ashley E.; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V.; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M.; Thomas, Gail D.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin’s rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived nitric oxide (NO) attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective—causing functional muscle ischemia—in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. Here, we report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase (PDE5A) inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD. PMID:23197572

  12. Ischemia- and agonist-induced changes in α- and β-adrenergic receptor traffic in guinea pig hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisel, A.S.; Motulsky, H.J.; Ziegler, M.G.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques and subcellular fraction to assess whether changes in expression of myocardial α 1 - and β-adrenergic receptors are mediated by a redistribution of receptors between various membrane fractions. Three fractions were prepared from the left ventricles of guinea pigs that underwent either 1 h of ischemia or injection of epinephrine a crude membrane, a purified sarcolemma, and a light vesicle fraction. In control animals α 1 -adrenergic receptors ([ 3 H]prazosin binding) in light vesicles was only 25% of the total α 1 -receptor density found in sarcolemmal and light vesicle fractions as compared with 50% for β-adrenergic receptors ([ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol binding sites). Although ischemia was associated with a 53% decrease in the number of light vesicle β-adrenergic receptors and a 42% increase in the number of sarcolemma β-receptors there was no change in the number of light vesicle α 1 -receptors, even though the number of sarcolemmal α 1 -receptors increased 34%. Epinephrine treatment promoted internalization of β-adrenergic receptors. These results indicate that α 1 and β 1 -adrenergic receptors may undergo a different cellular itinerary in guinea pig myocardium. Agonist and ischemia-induced changes in surface β-receptors, but not α 1 -receptors, appear to result from entry and exit of receptors from an intracellular pool that can be isolated in a light vesicle fraction. Changes in expression of α 1 -adrenergic receptors may represent changes in the properties of receptors found in the sarcolemma or in a membrane fraction other than the light vesicle fraction that they have isolated

  13. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  14. Excitation-contraction coupling and mechano-sensitivity in denervated skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Francini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy can be defined as a wasting or decrease in muscle mass and muscle force generation owing lack of use, ageing, injury or disease. Thus, the etiology of atrophy can be different. Atrophy in denervated muscle is a consequence of two factors: 1 the complete lack of motoneuron activity inducing the deficiency of neurotransmitter release and 2 the muscles disuse. The balance of the muscular functions depends on extra- and intra-muscular signals. In the balance are involved the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, local growth factors, Ca2+-dependent and independent intracellular signals, mechano-sensitivity and mechano-transduction that activate Ca2+-dependent signaling proteins and cytoskeleton- nucleus pathways to the nucleus, that regulate the gene expression. Moreover, retrograde signal from intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton to the sarcolemma are additional factors that regulate the muscle function. Proteolytic systems that operate in atrophic muscles progressively reduce the muscle protein content and so the sarcolemma, ECC and the force generation. In this review we will focus on the more relevant changes of the sarcolemma, excitation-contraction coupling, ECC and mechano-transduction evaluated by electrophysiological methods and observed from early- to long-term denervated skeletal muscles. This review put in particular evidence that long-term denervated muscle maintain a sub-population of fibers with ECC and contractile machinery able to be activated, albeit in lesser amounts, by electrical and mechanical stimulation. Accordingly, this provides a potential molecular explanation of the muscle recovery that occurs in response to rehabilitation strategy as transcutaneous electrical stimulation and passive stretching of denervated muscles, which wre developed as a result of empirical clinical observations.

  15. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Scott, Bryan L; Walker, Ashley E; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M; Thomas, Gail D; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-11-28

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived NO attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective-causing functional muscle ischemia-in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. We report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation is fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP (guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5A inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD.

  16. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  17. [Role of sialic acid loss in the myocardium in depressing the contractile function of the heart muscle during stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, F Z; Saulia, A I; Gudumak, V S

    1985-01-01

    Under conditions of stress a time-dependent decrease in content of sialic acids was found in adult rats; within 9 hrs of the animal immobilization the sialic acid content was decreased by 40% as compared with controls. At the same time, activities of trypsin and LDHI were increased in blood serum. The data obtained suggest that activation of proteases occurring during the stress led to increased hydrolysis of base components of glycocalyx and to impairment of the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma. These phenomena appear to be responsible for the post-stress deterioration of heart muscle contractile functions.

  18. Isolation, Culture, Functional Assays, and Immunofluorescence of Myofiber-Associated Satellite Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Thomas O; Gadek, Katherine E; Cadwallader, Adam B; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, regenerate and repair the functional contractile cells in adult skeletal muscle called myofibers. Satellite cells reside in a niche between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers. Isolating single myofibers and their associated satellite cells provides a culture system that partially mimics the in vivo environment. We describe methods for isolating and culturing intact individual myofibers and their associated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle. Following dissection and isolation of individual myofibers we provide protocols for myofiber transplantation, satellite cell transfection, immune detection of satellite cell antigens, and assays to examine satellite cell self-renewal and proliferation.

  19. Functional muscle ischemia in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Gail D.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) comprise a spectrum of devastating X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. DMD/BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle membrane and also targets other proteins to the sarcolemma. Among these is the muscle-specific isoform of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSµ) which binds spectrin-like repeats within dystrophin’s rod domain and the adaptor pro...

  20. Becker muscular dystrophy-like myopathy regarded as so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy" in a pig: a case report and its diagnostic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Aihara, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Kousaka, Shinichi; Nagafuchi, Tsuneyuki; Ochiai, Mariko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Asai, Tetsuo; Oishi, Koji

    2014-03-01

    We describe a case of human Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)-like myopathy that was characterized by the declined stainability of dystrophin at sarcolemma in a pig and the immunostaining for dystrophin on the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The present case was found in a meat inspection center. The pig looked appeared healthy at the ante-mortem inspection. Muscular abnormalities were detected after carcass dressing as pale, discolored skeletal muscles with prominent fat infiltrations and considered so-called "fatty muscular dystrophy". Microscopic examination revealed following characteristics: diffused fat infiltration into the skeletal muscle and degeneration and regeneration of the remaining skeletal muscle fibers. Any lesions that were suspected of neurogenic atrophy, traumatic muscular degeneration, glycogen storage disease or other porcine muscular disorders were not observed. The immunostaining for dystrophin was conducted and confirmed to be applicable on FFPE porcine muscular tissues and revealed diminished stainability of dystrophin at the sarcolemma in the present case. Based on the histological observations and immunostaining results, the present case was diagnosed with BMD-like myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormality in a pig. Although the genetic properties were not clear, the present BMD-like myopathy implied the occurrence of dystrophinopathy in pigs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural case of myopathy associated with dystrophin abnormalities in a pig.

  1. Studying the role of dystrophin-associated proteins in influencing Becker muscular dystrophy disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergen, J C; Wokke, B H A; Hulsker, M A; Verschuuren, J J G M; Aartsma-Rus, A M

    2015-03-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy is characterized by a variable disease course. Many factors have been implicated to contribute to this diversity, among which the expression of several components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex. Together with dystrophin, most of these proteins anchor the muscle fiber cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix, thus protecting the muscle from contraction induced injury, while nNOS is primarily involved in inducing vasodilation during muscle contraction, enabling adequate muscle oxygenation. In the current study, we investigated the role of three components of the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex (beta-dystroglycan, gamma-sarcoglycan and nNOS) and the dystrophin homologue utrophin on disease severity in Becker patients. Strength measurements, data about disease course and fresh muscle biopsies of the anterior tibial muscle were obtained from 24 Becker patients aged 19 to 66. The designation of Becker muscular dystrophy in this study was based on the mutation and not on the clinical severity. Contrary to previous studies, we were unable to find a relationship between expression of nNOS, beta-dystroglycan and gamma-sarcoglycan at the sarcolemma and disease severity, as measured by muscle strength in five muscle groups and age at reaching several disease milestones. Unexpectedly, we found an inverse correlation between utrophin expression at the sarcolemma and age at reaching disease milestones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sarcospan Regulates Cardiac Isoproterenol Response and Prevents Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy-Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatiyar, Michelle S; Marshall, Jamie L; Nguyen, Reginald T; Jordan, Maria C; Richardson, Vanitra A; Roos, Kenneth P; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2015-12-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal cardiac and skeletal muscle disease resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. We have previously demonstrated that a dystrophin-associated protein, sarcospan (SSPN), ameliorated Duchenne muscular dystrophy skeletal muscle degeneration by activating compensatory pathways that regulate muscle cell adhesion (laminin-binding) to the extracellular matrix. Conversely, loss of SSPN destabilized skeletal muscle adhesion, hampered muscle regeneration, and reduced force properties. Given the importance of SSPN to skeletal muscle, we investigated the consequences of SSPN ablation in cardiac muscle and determined whether overexpression of SSPN into mdx mice ameliorates cardiac disease symptoms associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy. SSPN-null mice exhibited cardiac enlargement, exacerbated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and increased fibrosis in response to β-adrenergic challenge (isoproterenol; 0.8 mg/day per 2 weeks). Biochemical analysis of SSPN-null cardiac muscle revealed reduced sarcolemma localization of many proteins with a known role in cardiomyopathy pathogenesis: dystrophin, the sarcoglycans (α-, δ-, and γ-subunits), and β1D integrin. Transgenic overexpression of SSPN in Duchenne muscular dystrophy mice (mdx(TG)) improved cardiomyofiber cell adhesion, sarcolemma integrity, cardiac functional parameters, as well as increased expression of compensatory transmembrane proteins that mediate attachment to the extracellular matrix. SSPN regulates sarcolemmal expression of laminin-binding complexes that are critical to cardiac muscle function and protects against transient and chronic injury, including inherited cardiomyopathy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. High levels of sarcospan are well tolerated and act as a sarcolemmal stabilizer to address skeletal muscle and pulmonary dysfunction in DMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Elizabeth M.; Marshall, Jamie L.; Ma, Eva; Nguyen, Thien M.; Hong, Grace; Lam, Jessica S.; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle weakness, ultimately leading to early mortality in affected teenagers and young adults. Previous work from our lab has shown that a small transmembrane protein called sarcospan (SSPN) can enhance the recruitment of adhesion complex proteins to the cell surface. When human SSPN is expressed at three-fold levels in mdx mice, this increase in adhesion complex abundance improves muscle membrane stability, preventing many of the histopathological changes associated with DMD. However, expressing higher levels of human SSPN (ten-fold transgenic expression) causes a severe degenerative muscle phenotype in wild-type mice. Since SSPN-mediated stabilization of the sarcolemma represents a promising therapeutic strategy in DMD, it is important to determine whether SSPN can be introduced at high levels without toxicity. Here, we show that mouse SSPN (mSSPN) can be overexpressed at 30-fold levels in wild-type mice with no deleterious effects. In mdx mice, mSSPN overexpression improves dystrophic pathology and sarcolemmal stability. We show that these mice exhibit increased resistance to eccentric contraction-induced damage and reduced fatigue following exercise. mSSPN overexpression improved pulmonary function and reduced dystrophic histopathology in the diaphragm. Together, these results demonstrate that SSPN overexpression is well tolerated in mdx mice and improves sarcolemma defects that underlie skeletal muscle and pulmonary dysfunction in DMD. PMID:27798107

  4. Differential requirement for utrophin in the induced pluripotent stem cell correction of muscle versus fat in muscular dystrophy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Beck

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an incurable degenerative muscle disorder. We injected WT mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mdx and mdx∶utrophin mutant blastocysts, which are predisposed to develop DMD with an increasing degree of severity (mdx <<< mdx∶utrophin. In mdx chimeras, iPSC-dystrophin was supplied to the muscle sarcolemma to effect corrections at morphological and functional levels. Dystrobrevin was observed in dystrophin-positive and, at a lesser extent, utrophin-positive areas. In the mdx∶utrophin mutant chimeras, although iPSC-dystrophin was also supplied to the muscle sarcolemma, mice still displayed poor skeletal muscle histopathology, and negligible levels of dystrobrevin in dystrophin- and utrophin-negative areas. Not only dystrophin-expressing tissues are affected by iPSCs. Mdx and mdx∶utrophin mice have reduced fat/body weight ratio, but iPSC injection normalized this parameter in both mdx and mdx∶utrophin chimeras, despite the fact that utrophin was compromised in the mdx∶utrophin chimeric fat. The results suggest that the presence of utrophin is required for the iPSC-corrections in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the results highlight a potential (utrophin-independent non-cell autonomous role for iPSC-dystrophin in the corrections of non-muscle tissue like fat, which is intimately related to the muscle.

  5. Membrane-stabilizing copolymers confer marked protection to dystrophic skeletal muscle in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne M Houang

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal disease of striated muscle deterioration. A unique therapeutic approach for DMD is the use of synthetic membrane stabilizers to protect the fragile dystrophic sarcolemma against contraction-induced mechanical stress. Block copolymer-based membrane stabilizer poloxamer 188 (P188 has been shown to protect the dystrophic myocardium. In comparison, the ability of synthetic membrane stabilizers to protect fragile DMD skeletal muscles has been less clear. Because cardiac and skeletal muscles have distinct structural and functional features, including differences in the mechanism of activation, variance in sarcolemma phospholipid composition, and differences in the magnitude and types of forces generated, we speculated that optimized membrane stabilization could be inherently different. Our objective here is to use principles of pharmacodynamics to evaluate membrane stabilization therapy for DMD skeletal muscles. Results show a dramatic differential effect of membrane stabilization by optimization of pharmacodynamic-guided route of poloxamer delivery. Data show that subcutaneous P188 delivery, but not intravascular or intraperitoneal routes, conferred significant protection to dystrophic limb skeletal muscles undergoing mechanical stress in vivo. In addition, structure-function examination of synthetic membrane stabilizers further underscores the importance of copolymer composition, molecular weight, and dosage in optimization of poloxamer pharmacodynamics in vivo.

  6. Impaired translocation of GLUT4 results in insulin resistance of atrophic soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Song, Zhen; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Jiao, Bo; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  7. Impaired Translocation of GLUT4 Results in Insulin Resistance of Atrophic Soleus Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Tao Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not the atrophic skeletal muscle induces insulin resistance and its mechanisms are not resolved now. The antigravity soleus muscle showed a progressive atrophy in 1-week, 2-week, and 4-week tail-suspended rats. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp showed that the steady-state glucose infusion rate was lower in 4-week tail-suspended rats than that in the control rats. The glucose uptake rates under insulin- or contraction-stimulation were significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus muscle. The key protein expressions of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt on the insulin-dependent pathway and of AMPK, ERK, and p38 on the insulin-independent pathway were unchanged in unloaded soleus muscle. The unchanged phosphorylation of Akt and p38 suggested that the activity of two signal pathways was not altered in unloaded soleus muscle. The AS160 and GLUT4 expression on the common downstream pathway also was not changed in unloaded soleus muscle. But the GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma was inhibited during insulin stimulation in unloaded soleus muscle. The above results suggest that hindlimb unloading in tail-suspended rat induces atrophy in antigravity soleus muscle. The impaired GLUT4 translocation to sarcolemma under insulin stimulation may mediate insulin resistance in unloaded soleus muscle and further affect the insulin sensitivity of whole body in tail-suspended rats.

  8. Calcium release-dependent inactivation precedes formation of the tubular system in developing rat cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macková, Katarina; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Hoťka, Matej; Hoffmannová, Barbora; Zahradník, Ivan; Zahradníková, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    Developing cardiac myocytes undergo substantial structural and functional changes transforming the mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling from the embryonic form, based on calcium influx through sarcolemmal DHPR calcium channels, to the adult form, relying on local calcium release through RYR calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum stimulated by calcium influx. We characterized day-by-day the postnatal development of the structure of sarcolemma, using techniques of confocal fluorescence microscopy, and the development of the calcium current, measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp in isolated rat ventricular myocytes. We characterized the appearance and expansion of the t-tubule system and compared it with the appearance and progress of the calcium current inactivation induced by the release of calcium ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum as structural and functional measures of direct DHPR-RYR interaction. The release-dependent inactivation of calcium current preceded the development of the t-tubular system by several days, indicating formation of the first DHPR-RYR couplons at the surface sarcolemma and their later spreading close to contractile myofibrils with the growing t-tubules. Large variability of both of the measured parameters among individual myocytes indicates uneven maturation of myocytes within the growing myocardium.

  9. The equivalent circuit of single crab muscle fibers as determined by impedance measurements with intracellular electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, R S

    1967-07-01

    The input impedance of muscle fibers of the crab was determined with microelectrodes over the frequency range 1 cps to 10 kc/sec. Care was taken to analyze, reduce, and correct for capacitive artifact. One dimensional cable theory was used to determine the properties of the equivalent circuit of the membrane admittance, and the errors introduced by the neglect of the three dimensional spread of current are discussed. In seven fibers the equivalent circuit of an element of the membrane admittance must contain a DC path and two capacitances, each in series with a resistance. In two fibers, the element of membrane admittance could be described by one capacitance in parallel with a resistance. In several fibers there was evidence for a third very large capacitance. The values of the elements of the equivalent circuit depend on which of several equivalent circuits is chosen. The circuit (with a minimum number of elements) that was considered most reasonably consistent with the anatomy of the fiber has two branches in parallel: one branch having a resistance R(e) in series with a capacitance C(e); the other branch having a resistance R(b) in series with a parallel combination of a resistance R(m) and a capacitance C(m). The average circuit values (seven fibers) for this model, treating the fiber as a cylinder of sarcolemma without infoldings or tubular invaginations, are R(e) = 21 ohm cm(2); C(e) = 47 microf/cm(2); R(b) = 10.2 ohm cm(2); R(m) = 173 ohm cm(2); C(m) = 9.0 microf/cm(2). The relation of this equivalent circuit and another with a nonminimum number of circuit elements to the fine structure of crab muscle is discussed. In the above equivalent circuit R(m) and C(m) are attributed to the sarcolemma; R(e) and C(e), to the sarcotubular system; and R(b), to the amorphous material found around crab fibers. Estimates of actual surface area of the sarcolemma and sarcotubular system permit the average circuit values to be expressed in terms of unit membrane area. The

  10. A case report: Becker muscular dystrophy presenting with epilepsy and dysgnosia induced by duplication mutation of Dystrophin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jing; Feng, Jia-Chun; Zhu, Dan; Yu, Xue-Fan

    2016-12-12

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), a genetic disorder of X-linked recessive inheritance, typically presents with gradually progressive muscle weakness. The condition is caused by mutations of Dystrophin gene located at Xp21.2. Epilepsy is an infrequent manifestation of BMD, while cases of BMD with dysgnosia are extremely rare. We describe a 9-year-old boy with BMD, who presented with epilepsy and dysgnosia. Serum creatine kinase level was markedly elevated (3665 U/L). Wechsler intelligence tests showed a low intelligence quotient (IQ = 65). Electromyogram showed slight myogenic changes and skeletal muscle biopsy revealed muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical staining showed partial positivity of sarcolemma for dystrophin-N. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification revealed a duplication mutation in exons 37-44 in the Dystrophin gene. The present case report helps to better understand the clinical and genetic features of BMD.

  11. Why short stature is beneficial in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; McDonald, Craig M

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a genetic defect resulting in absent dystrophin, yet children are able to walk when small and young but lose this ability as they grow. The mdx mouse has absent dystrophin yet does not exhibit significant disability. Allometric modeling of linearly increasing load per muscle fiber and stress on the sarcolemma with growth and exponential decline associated with loss of muscle fibers correlated with case studies and animal models of DMD. Smaller species or breeds are predictably less affected than large as follows: mdx mice muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs < large GRMD dogs < humans. Case reports of combined growth hormone and dystrophin deficiency show a relatively benign course of disease. Future therapeutic trials in DMD might include specific growth inhibitors in combination with standard of care treatments to delay the clinical onset and reduce the severity of disease and disability. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian; Baum, Linda G.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  13. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengan, Celia H.; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-01-01

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle

  14. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F

    2015-10-13

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies.

  15. Localization and function of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Jung; Kristensen, Michael; Hellsten, Ylva

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated the localization of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in human skeletal muscle and the functional importance of these channels for human muscle K+ distribution at rest and during muscle activity. Membrane fractionation based on the giant vesicle technique...... or the sucrose-gradient technique in combination with Western blotting demonstrated that the KATP channels are mainly located in the sarcolemma. This localization was confirmed by immunohistochemical measurements. With the microdialysis technique, it was demonstrated that local application of the KATP channel...... to in vitro conditions, the present study demonstrated that under in vivo conditions the KATP channels are active at rest and contribute to the accumulation of interstitial K+....

  16. Muscle intermediate filaments and their links to membranes and membranous organelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capetanaki, Yassemi; Bloch, Robert J.; Kouloumenta, Asimina; Mavroidis, Manolis; Psarras, Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) play a key role in the integration of structure and function of striated muscle, primarily by mediating mechanochemical links between the contractile apparatus and mitochondria, myonuclei, the sarcolemma and potentially the vesicle trafficking apparatus. Linkage of all these membranous structures to the contractile apparatus, mainly through the Z-disks, supports the integration and coordination of growth and energy demands of the working myocyte, not only with force transmission, but also with de novo gene expression, energy production and efficient protein and lipid trafficking and targeting. Desmin, the most abundant and intensively studied muscle intermediate filament protein, is linked to proper costamere organization, myoblast and stem cell fusion and differentiation, nuclear shape and positioning, as well as mitochondrial shape, structure, positioning and function. Similar links have been established for lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles, consistent with the presence of widespread links between IFs and membranous structures and the regulation of their fusion, morphology and stabilization necessary for cell survival

  17. Insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid binding protein trafficking at the plasma membrane in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Serup, Annette Karen; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate lipid-induced regulation of lipid binding proteins in human skeletal muscle and the impact hereof on insulin sensitivity. Eleven healthy male subjects underwent a 3-day hyper-caloric and high-fat diet regime. Muscle biopsies were taken before......-regulated by increased fatty acid availability. This suggests a time dependency in the up-regulation of FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein during high availability of plasma fatty acids. Furthermore, we did not detect FATP1 and FATP4 protein in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from human skeletal muscle. In conclusion......, this study shows that a short-term lipid-load increases mRNA content of key lipid handling proteins in human muscle. However, decreased insulin sensitivity after high-fat diet is not accompanied with relocation of FAT/CD36 or FABPpm protein to the sarcolemma. Finally, FATP1 and FATP4 protein could...

  18. Dystroglycan and muscular dystrophies related to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandra, Francesca; Bozzi, Manuela; Bianchi, Marzia; Pavoni, Ernesto; Giardina, Bruno; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is an adhesion molecule composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, that are produced by the post-translational cleavage of a single precursor molecule. DG is a pivotal component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which connects the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle and many other tissues. Some muscular dystrophies are caused by mutations of DGC components, such as dystrophin, sarcoglycan or laminin-2, or also of DGC-associated molecules, such as caveolin-3. DG-null mice died during early embriogenesis and no neuromuscular diseases directly associated to genetic abnormalities of DG were identified so far. However, DG plays a crucial role for muscle integrity since its targeting at the sarcolemma is often perturbed in DGC-related neuromuscular disorders.

  19. Muscle interstitial potassium kinetics during intense exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai; Mohr, Magni; Pedersen, Lasse Dannemann

    2003-01-01

    Interstitial K+ ([K+]i) was measured in human skeletal muscle by microdialysis during exhaustive leg exercise, with (AL) and without (L) previous intense arm exercise. In addition, the reproducibility of the [K+]i determinations was examined. Possible microdialysis-induced rupture of the sarcolemma...... was assessed by measurement of carnosine in the dialysate, because carnosine is only expected to be found intracellularly. Changes in [K+]i could be reproduced, when exhaustive leg exercise was performed on two different days, with a between-day difference of approximately 0.5 mM at rest and 1.5 m......M at exhaustion. The time to exhaustion was shorter in AL than in L (2.7 +/- 0.3 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.3 min; P exercise period in AL compared with L (9.2 +/- 0.7 vs. 6.4 +/- 0.9 mM; P

  20. Muscle conduction velocity, surface electromyography variables, and echo intensity during concentric and eccentric fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Izal, Miriam; Lusa Cadore, Eduardo; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-03-01

    Concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) contractions may involve different mechanisms related to changes in sarcolemma status and the consequent alteration of action potential transmission along muscle fibers. Muscle conduction velocity (CV), surface electromyography signal (sEMG), muscle quality, and blood lactate concentrations were analyzed during CON and ECC actions. Compared with ECC, the CON protocol resulted in greater muscle force losses, blood lactate concentrations, and changes in sEMG parameters. Similar reductions in CV were detected in both protocols. Higher echo intensity values were observed 2 days after ECC due to greater muscle damage. The effects of the muscle damage produced by ECC exercise on the transmission of action potentials along muscle fibers (measured as the CV) may be comparable with the effects of hydrogen accumulation produced by CON exercise (related to greater lactate concentrations), which causes greater force loss and change in other sEMG variables during CON than during ECC actions.

  1. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  2. Fatigue in soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Krustrup, Peter; Bangsbo, Jens

    2005-01-01

    This review describes when fatigue may develop during soccer games and the potential physiological mechanisms that cause fatigue in soccer. According to time?-?motion analyses and performance measures during match-play, fatigue or reduced performance seems to occur at three different stages......, acidity or the breakdown of creatine phosphate. Instead, it may be related to disturbances in muscle ion homeostasis and an impaired excitation of the sarcolemma. Soccer players' ability to perform maximally is inhibited in the initial phase of the second half, which may be due to lower muscle...... concentrations in a considerable number of individual muscle fibres. In a hot and humid environment, dehydration and a reduced cerebral function may also contribute to the deterioration in performance. In conclusion, fatigue or impaired performance in soccer occurs during various phases in a game, and different...

  3. Skeletal Muscle and Liver Lipidomics and the Regulation of FAT/CD36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting

    induced obesity in mice, we observed an increased muscle and liver lipid content, analyzed by mass spectrometry, concomitant with decreased glucose tolerance. We observed that treadmill exercise-training in high-fat fed mice resulted in a reduction in the lipid content in the liver, but not in muscle...... that the current worldwide obesity epidemic has resulted in the increased prevalence of “metabolic disease clusters”, including type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease and dyslipidemia. Excessive plasma lipids can result in the accumulation of lipid metabolites at ectopic sites including skeletal muscle and liver...... during isolated muscle contractions. On the contrary, previous observations suggest that a permanent relocation of FAT/CD36 protein to the sarcolemma induces intracellular lipid accumulation, resulting in insulin resistance. Therefore, FAT/CD36 has been linked to insulin resistance. Whether increased FAT...

  4. Location of and post-mortem changes in some cytoskeletal proteins in pork and cod muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, E.H.; Bremner, Allan; Purslow, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The cytoskeletal proteins actin, nebulin, spectrin, desmin, vinculin and talin were labelled immunohistochemically in sections of muscle from commercially available pigs and cod (Gadus morhua) taken pre-rigor and from samples stored for several days. Actin, nebulin and spectrin gave similar...... labelling patterns in both pork and cod muscle which remained the same in stored samples. Desmin was intensely labelled at the cell boundaries and within the body of the cells in both pork and cod in the initial and the stored samples. Vinculin was readily labelled in pork muscle but showed only diffuse...... labelling in fish. Labelling for talin in pork muscle was intense at the sarcolemma but was not present in samples stored for 4 days. In contrast, the label for talin was concentrated at the myotendinous junction of the cod muscle throughout the storage period. These are the first reports of the detection...

  5. Mutation analysis and evaluation of the cardiac localization of TMEM43 in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Andersen, C B; Tybjærg-Hansen, A

    2011-01-01

    Christensen AH, Andersen CB, Tybjærg-Hansen A, Haunso S, Svendsen JH. Mutation analysis and evaluation of the cardiac localization of TMEM43 in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. A single report has associated mutations in TMEM43 (LUMA) with a distinctive form of arrhythmogenic right...... with anti-TMEM43, anti-plakoglobin, anti-plakophilin-2, anti-connexin-43, and anti-emerin antibodies was performed on myocardium from TMEM43-positive patients (n = 3) and healthy controls (n = 3). The genetic screening identified heterozygous variants in two families: one reported mutation (c.1073C> T......; in two related patients) and one novel variant (c.705+ 7G> A; in one patient) of unknown significance. All three patients fulfilled Task Force criteria and did not carry mutations in any other ARVC-related gene. Immunostaining with TMEM43 antibody showed intense staining of the sarcolemma. The signal...

  6. An Overview of Recent Therapeutics Advances for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K

    2018-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. Mutations of the DMD gene destabilize the dystrophin associated glycoprotein complex in the sarcolemma. Ongoing mechanical stress leads to unregulated influx of calcium ions into the sarcoplasm, with activation of proteases, release of proinflammatory cytokines, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cumulative damage and reparative failure leads to progressive muscle necrosis, fibrosis, and fatty replacement. Although there is presently no cure for DMD, scientific advances have led to many potential disease-modifying treatments, including dystrophin replacement therapies, upregulation of compensatory proteins, anti-inflammatory agents, and other cellular targets. Recently approved therapies include ataluren for stop codon read-through and eteplirsen for exon 51 skipping of eligible individuals. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical features of DMD, to describe current outcome measures used in clinical studies, and to highlight new emerging therapies for affected individuals.

  7. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. © 2013 FEBS.

  8. Attenuated muscle regeneration is a key factor in dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Yen-Hui; Hornsey, Mark A; Klinge, Lars

    2009-01-01

    in a mouse model of dysferlinopathy, with delayed removal of necrotic fibres, an extended inflammatory phase and delayed functional recovery. Satellite cell activation and myoblast fusion appear normal, but there is a reduction in early neutrophil recruitment in regenerating and also needle wounded muscle...... kinase levels and a prominent inflammatory infiltrate. We have observed that dysferlinopathy patient biopsies show an excess of immature fibres and therefore investigated the role of dysferlin in muscle regeneration. Using notexin-induced muscle damage, we have shown that regeneration is attenuated...... with the sarcolemma dysferlin is also involved in the release of chemotactic agents. Reduced neutrophil recruitment results in incomplete cycles of regeneration in dysferlinopathy which combines with the membrane repair deficit to ultimately trigger dystrophic pathology. This study reveals a novel pathomechanism...

  9. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester M Den Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term 3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated 3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated 3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (3 or sunflower oil (9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered 3-PUFAs. Plasma of 3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of 3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, 3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than 9 myocytes. In the 9 myocytes, but not in the 3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated 3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered 3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac 3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term 3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  10. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  11. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Janghra

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these

  12. Gamma-sarcoglycan is required for the response of archvillin to mechanical stimulation in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Tara C.; Liu, Min; Luna, Elizabeth J.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of gamma-sarcoglycan (γ-SG) induces muscle degeneration and signaling defects in response to mechanical load, and its absence is common to both Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Growing evidence suggests that aberrant signaling contributes to the disease pathology; however, the mechanisms of γ-SG-mediated mechanical signaling are poorly understood. To uncover γ-SG signaling pathway components, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and identified the muscle-specific protein archvillin as a γ-SG and dystrophin interacting protein. Archvillin protein and message levels were significantly upregulated at the sarcolemma of murine γ-SG-null (gsg−/−) muscle but delocalized in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscle. Similar elevation of archvillin protein was observed in human quadriceps muscle lacking γ-SG. Reintroduction of γ-SG in gsg−/− muscle by rAAV injection restored archvillin levels to that of control C57 muscle. In situ eccentric contraction of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from C57 mice caused ERK1/2 phosphorylation, nuclear activation of P-ERK1/2 and stimulus-dependent archvillin association with P-ERK1/2. In contrast, TA muscles from gsg−/− and mdx mice exhibited heightened P-ERK1/2 and increased nuclear P-ERK1/2 localization following eccentric contractions, but the archvillin–P-ERK1/2 association was completely ablated. These results position archvillin as a mechanically sensitive component of the dystrophin complex and demonstrate that signaling defects caused by loss of γ-SG occur both at the sarcolemma and in the nucleus. PMID:25605665

  13. Sub-cellular Electrical Heterogeneity Revealed by Loose Patch Recording Reflects Differential Localization of Sarcolemmal Ion Channels in Intact Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Kubasov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac action potential (AP is commonly recoded as an integral signal from isolated myocytes or ensembles of myocytes (with intracellular microelectrodes and extracellular macroelectrodes, respectively. These signals, however, do not provide a direct measure of activity of ion channels and transporters located in two major compartments of a cardiac myocyte: surface sarcolemma and the T-tubule system, which differentially contribute to impulse propagation and excitation-contraction (EC coupling. In the present study we investigated electrical properties of myocytes within perfused intact rat heart employing loose patch recording with narrow-tip (2 μm diameter extracellular electrodes. Using this approach, we demonstrated two distinct types of electric signals with distinct waveforms (single peak and multi-peak AP; AP1 and AP2, respectively during intrinsic pacemaker activity. These two types of waveforms depend on the position of the electrode tip on the myocyte surface. Such heterogeneity of electrical signals was lost when electrodes of larger pipette diameter were used (5 or 10 μm, which indicates that the electric signal was assessed from a region of <5 μm. Importantly, both pharmacological and mathematical simulation based on transverse (T-tubular distribution suggested that while the AP1 and the initial peak of AP2 are predominantly attributable to the fast, inward Na+ current in myocyte's surface sarcolemma, the late components of AP2 are likely representative of currents associated with L-type Ca2+ channel and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX currents which are predominantly located in T-tubules. Thus, loose patch recording with narrow-tip pipette provides a valuable tool for studying cardiac electric activity on the subcellular level in the intact heart.

  14. Acute rhabdomyolysis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Yamina; Mamoune, Asmaa; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Habarou, Florence; Lallement, Laetitia; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Ottolenghi, Chris; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2015-07-01

    Rhabdomyolysis results from the rapid breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers, which leads to leakage of potentially toxic cellular content into the systemic circulation. Acquired causes by direct injury to the sarcolemma are most frequent. The inherited causes are: i) metabolic with failure of energy production, including mitochondrial fatty acid ß-oxidation defects, LPIN1 mutations, inborn errors of glycogenolysis and glycolysis, more rarely mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency, purine defects and peroxysomal α-methyl-acyl-CoA-racemase defect (AMACR), ii) structural causes with muscle dystrophies and myopathies, iii) calcium pump disorder with RYR1 gene mutations, iv) inflammatory causes with myositis. Irrespective of the cause of rhabdomyolysis, the pathology follows a common pathway, either by the direct injury to sarcolemma by increased intracellular calcium concentration (acquired causes) or by the failure of energy production (inherited causes), which leads to fiber necrosis. Rhabdomyolysis are frequently precipitated by febrile illness or exercise. These conditions are associated with two events, elevated temperature and high circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. To illustrate these points in the context of energy metabolism, protein thermolability and the potential benefits of arginine therapy, we focus on a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis, aldolase A deficiency. In addition, our studies on lipin-1 (LPIN1) deficiency raise the possibility that several diseases involved in rhabdomyolysis implicate pro-inflammatory cytokines and may even represent primarily pro-inflammatory diseases. Thus, not only thermolability of mutant proteins critical for muscle function, but also pro-inflammatory cytokines per se, may lead to metabolic decompensation and rhabdomyolysis.

  15. Galectin-3 and N-acetylglucosamine promote myogenesis and improve skeletal muscle function in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, Ann; Dufresne, Sébastien S; St-Pierre, Guillaume; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Nakamura, Haruka; Kikuchi, Yodai; Satoh, Masahiko S; Frenette, Jérôme; Sato, Sachiko

    2018-06-12

    The muscle membrane, sarcolemma, must be firmly attached to the basal lamina. The failure of proper attachment results in muscle injury, which is the underlying cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), in which mutations in the dystrophin gene disrupts the firm adhesion. In patients with DMD, even moderate contraction causes damage, leading to progressive muscle degeneration. The damaged muscles are repaired through myogenesis. Consequently, myogenesis is highly active in patients with DMD, and the repeated activation of myogenesis leads to the exhaustion of the myogenic stem cells. Therefore, approaches to reducing the risk of the exhaustion are to develop a treatment that strengthens the interaction between the sarcolemma and the basal lamina and increases the efficiency of the myogenesis. Galectin-3 is an oligosaccharide-binding protein and is known to be involved in cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Galectin-3 is expressed in myoblasts and skeletal muscle, although its function in muscle remains elusive. In this study, we found evidence that galectin-3 and the monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine, which increases the synthesis of binding partners (oligosaccharides) of galectin-3, promote myogenesis in vitro. Moreover, in the mdx mouse model of DMD, treatment with N-acetylglucosamine increased muscle-force production. The results suggest that treatment with N-acetylglucosamine might mitigate the burden of DMD.-Rancourt, A., Dufresne, S. S., St-Pierre, G., Lévesque, J.-C., Nakamura, H., Kikuchi, Y., Satoh, M. S., Frenette, J., Sato, S. Galectin-3 and N-acetylglucosamine promote myogenesis and improve skeletal muscle function in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  16. Responses of skeletal muscle lipid metabolism in rat gastrocnemius to hypothyroidism and iodothyronine administration: a putative role for FAT/CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Assunta; De Matteis, Rita; Moreno, Maria; Napolitano, Laura; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Senese, Rosalba; de Lange, Pieter; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-11-15

    Iodothyronines such as triiodothyronine (T(3)) and 3,5-diiodothyronine (T(2)) influence energy expenditure and lipid metabolism. Skeletal muscle contributes significantly to energy homeostasis, and the above iodothyronines are known to act on this tissue. However, little is known about the cellular/molecular events underlying the effects of T(3) and T(2) on skeletal muscle lipid handling. Since FAT/CD36 is involved in the utilization of free fatty acids by skeletal muscle, specifically in their import into that tissue and presumably their oxidation at the mitochondrial level, we hypothesized that related changes in lipid handling and in FAT/CD36 expression and subcellular redistribution would occur due to hypothyroidism and to T(3) or T(2) administration to hypothyroid rats. In gastrocnemius muscles isolated from hypothyroid rats, FAT/CD36 was upregulated (mRNA levels and total tissue, sarcolemmal, and mitochondrial protein levels). Administration of either T(3) or T(2) to hypothyroid rats resulted in 1) little or no change in FAT/CD36 mRNA level, 2) a decreased total FAT/CD36 protein level, and 3) further increases in FAT/CD36 protein level in sarcolemma and mitochondria. Thus, the main effect of each iodothyronine seemed to be exerted at the level of FAT/CD36 cellular distribution. The effect of further increases in FAT/CD36 protein level in sarcolemma and mitochondria was already evident at 1 h after iodothyronine administration. Each iodothyronine increased the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation rate. However, the mechanisms underlying their rapid effects seem to differ; T(2) and T(3) each induce FAT/CD36 translocation to mitochondria, but only T(2) induces increases in carnitine palmitoyl transferase system activity and in the mitochondrial substrate oxidation rate.

  17. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini

    2011-01-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  18. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Perrin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adult human muscle, but laminin subunit alpha 1 (LAMA1 gene is expressed only during embryogenesis. We thus developed an alternative method to laminin-111 protein repeated administration by inducing expression of the endogenous mouse Lama1 gene. This was done with the CRSPR/Cas9 system, i.e., by targeting the Lama1 promoter with one or several gRNAs and a dCas9 coupled with the VP160 transcription activation domain. Lama1 mRNA (qRT-PCR and proteins (immunohistochemistry and western blot were not detected in the control C2C12 myoblasts and in control muscles. However, significant expression was observed in cells transfected and in mouse muscles electroporated with plasmids coding for dCas9-VP160 and a gRNA. Larger synergic increases were observed by using two or three gRNAs. The increased Lama1 expression did not modify the expression of the α7 and β1 integrins. Increased expression of Lama1 by the CRISPR/Cas9 system will have to be further investigated by systemic delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 components to verify whether this could be a treatment for several myopathies.

  19. Increased Expression of Laminin Subunit Alpha 1 Chain by dCas9-VP160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Arnaud; Rousseau, Joël; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2017-03-17

    Laminin-111 protein complex links the extracellular matrix to integrin α7β1 in sarcolemma, thus replacing in dystrophic muscles links normally insured by the dystrophin complex. Laminin-111 injection in mdx mouse stabilized sarcolemma, restored serum creatine kinase to wild-type levels, and protected muscles from exercised-induced damages. These results suggested that increased laminin-111 is a potential therapy for DMD. Laminin subunit beta 1 and laminin subunit gamma 1 are expressed in adult human muscle, but laminin subunit alpha 1 (LAMA1) gene is expressed only during embryogenesis. We thus developed an alternative method to laminin-111 protein repeated administration by inducing expression of the endogenous mouse Lama1 gene. This was done with the CRSPR/Cas9 system, i.e., by targeting the Lama1 promoter with one or several gRNAs and a dCas9 coupled with the VP160 transcription activation domain. Lama1 mRNA (qRT-PCR) and proteins (immunohistochemistry and western blot) were not detected in the control C2C12 myoblasts and in control muscles. However, significant expression was observed in cells transfected and in mouse muscles electroporated with plasmids coding for dCas9-VP160 and a gRNA. Larger synergic increases were observed by using two or three gRNAs. The increased Lama1 expression did not modify the expression of the α7 and β1 integrins. Increased expression of Lama1 by the CRISPR/Cas9 system will have to be further investigated by systemic delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 components to verify whether this could be a treatment for several myopathies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isoform-specific changes in the Na,K-ATPase of rat soleus muscle during acute hindlinb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoi, Igor; Heiny, Judith; Bouzinova, Elena; Matchkov, Vladimir; Kravtsova, Violetta; Petrov, Aleksey; Zefirov, Andrey; Vasiliev, Alexander

    The largest pool of Na,K-ATPase (NKA) in a vertebrate's body is contained in the skeletal muscles where the alpha1 and alpha2 isoforms of NKA alpha subunit are expressed. The NKA is critically important for excitability, electrogenesis and contractility of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle use strongly regulates the content of NKA, and increased muscle activity differently regulates the alpha1 and alpha2 isoforms. However, whether skeletal muscle disuse affects NKA content and activity has not been investigated. This study examines for the first time the consequences of acute hindlinb suspension (HS) on the alpha1 and alpha2 NKA isozymes in rat soleus muscle. We subjected rats to HS for 6-12 hours and analyzed its effect on the resting membrane potential (RMP) in different sarcolemma regions of m.soleus fibers; the electrogenic transport activity, protein content and mRNA expression of the alpha1 and alpha2 NKA; the extracellular level of acetylcholine, and the plasma membrane localization of the alpha2 isozyme using confocal microscopy with cytochemistry. Our results show that 6 h HS specifically decreases the electrogenic activity of the NKA alpha2 isozyme and depolarizes m.soleus fibers. These effects are irreversible in the extrajunctional membrane region up to 12 h HS. The decreased alpha2 NKA activity is due to a decrease in enzyme activity rather than by altered protein content, mRNA expression, or localization in the sarcolemma. In addition, HS does not alter the alpha2 NKA electrogenic transport due to decreased extracellular acetylcholine level. However, adaptive mechanism(s) operate at the junctional membrane to restore alpha2 NKA electrogenic activities and the RMP after 12 h of HS. This mechanism operates specifically at the synaptic membrane region, presumably via increase in both alpha2 isozyme mRNA expression and protein content. This basic information on a protein as vital as the NKA is expected to advance our understanding of the cellular and

  1. Dexamethasone Protects Against Tourniquet-Induced Acute Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mouse Hindlimb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Corrick

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Extremity injuries with hemorrhage have been a significant cause of death in civilian medicine and on the battlefield. The use of a tourniquet as an intervention is necessary for treatment to an injured limb; however, the tourniquet and subsequent release results in serious acute ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury in the skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Much evidence demonstrates that inflammation is an important factor to cause acute IR injury. To find effective therapeutic interventions for tourniquet-induced acute IR injuries, our current study investigated effect of dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory drug, on tourniquet-induced acute IR injury in mouse hindlimb. In C57/BL6 mice, a tourniquet was placed on unilateral hindlimb (left hindlimb at the hip joint for 3 h, and then released for 24 h to induce IR. Three hours of tourniquet and 24 h of release (24-h IR caused gastrocnemius muscle injuries including rupture of the muscle sarcolemma and necrosis (42.8 ± 2.3% for infarct size of the gastrocnemius muscle. In the NMJ, motor nerve terminals disappeared, and endplate potentials were undetectable in 24-h IR mice. There was no gastrocnemius muscle contraction in 24-h IR mice. Western blot data showed that inflammatory cytokines (TNFα and IL-1β were increased in the gastrocnemius muscle after 24-h IR. Treatment with dexamethasone at the beginning of reperfusion (1 mg/kg, i.p. significantly inhibited expression of TNFα and IL-1β, reduced rupture of the muscle sarcolemma and infarct size (24.8 ± 2.0%, and improved direct muscle stimulation-induced gastrocnemius muscle contraction in 24-h IR mice. However, this anti-inflammatory drug did not improve NMJ morphology and function, and sciatic nerve-stimulated skeletal muscle contraction in 24-h IR mice. The data suggest that one-time treatment with dexamethasone at the beginning of reperfusion only reduced structural and functional impairments of the skeletal muscle but not the

  2. Novel Functional Role of Heat Shock Protein 90 in Mitochondrial Connexin 43-Mediated Hypoxic Postconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hui Tu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that heat shock protein 90 (HSP90-mediated mitochondrial import of connexin 43 (Cx43 is critical in preconditioning cardioprotection. The present study was designed to test whether postconditioning has the same effect as preconditioning in promoting Cx43 translocation to mitochondria and whether mitochondrial HSP90 modulates this effect. Methods: Cellular models of hypoxic postconditioning (HPC from rat heart-derived H9c2 cells and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were employed. The effects of HPC on cardiomyocytes apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining. Reactive oxidative species (ROS production was assessed with the peroxide-sensitive fluorescent probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin in diacetate (DCFH-DA. The anti- and pro-apoptotic markers Bcl-2 and Bax, HSP90 and Cx43 protein levels were studied by Western blot analysis in total cell homogenate and sarcolemmal and mitochondrial fractions. The effects on HPC of the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA, ROS scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting Cx43 and HSP90 were also investigated. Results: HPC significantly reduced hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. These beneficial effects were accompanied by an increase in Bcl-2 levels and a decrease in Bax levels in both sarcolemmal and mitochondrial fractions. HPC with siRNA targeting Cx43 or the ROS scavengers SOD plus CAT significantly prevented ROS generation and HPC cardioprotection, but HPC with either SOD or CAT did not. These data strongly supported the involvement of Cx43 in HPC cardioprotection, likely via modulation of the ROS balance which plays a central role in HPC protection. Furthermore, HPC increased total and mitochondrial levels of HSP90 and the mitochondria-to-sarcolemma ratio of Cx43; blocking the function of HSP90 with the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA or siRNA targeting

  3. Pronounced limb and fibre type differences in subcellular lipid droplet content and distribution in elite skiers before and after exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Han-Chow E; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2017-09-01

    Although lipid droplets in skeletal muscle are an important energy source during endurance exercise, our understanding of lipid metabolism in this context remains incomplete. Using transmission electron microscopy, two distinct subcellular pools of lipid droplets can be observed in skeletal muscle - one beneath the sarcolemma and the other between myofibrils. At rest, well-trained leg muscles of cross-country skiers contain 4- to 6-fold more lipid droplets than equally well-trained arm muscles, with a 3-fold higher content in type 1 than in type 2 fibres. During exhaustive exercise, lipid droplets between the myofibrils but not those beneath the sarcolemma are utilised by both type 1 and 2 fibres. These findings provide insight into compartmentalisation of lipid metabolism within skeletal muscle fibres. Although the intramyocellular lipid pool is an important energy store during prolonged exercise, our knowledge concerning its metabolism is still incomplete. Here, quantitative electron microscopy was used to examine subcellular distribution of lipid droplets in type 1 and 2 fibres of the arm and leg muscles before and after 1 h of exhaustive exercise. Intermyofibrillar lipid droplets accounted for 85-97% of the total volume fraction, while the subsarcolemmal pool made up 3-15%. Before exercise, the volume fractions of intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal lipid droplets were 4- to 6-fold higher in leg than in arm muscles (P exercise, intermyofibrillar lipid droplet volume fraction was 53% lower (P = 0.0082) in both fibre types in arm, but not leg muscles. This reduction was positively associated with the corresponding volume fraction prior to exercise (R 2  = 0.84, P exercise-induced change in the subsarcolemmal pool could be detected. These findings indicate clear differences in the subcellular distribution of lipid droplets in the type 1 and 2 fibres of well-trained arm and leg muscles, as well as preferential utilisation of the intermyofibrillar pool

  4. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca(2+) homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Arthur M; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D; Tilley, Douglas G; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2016-03-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and L-type Ca(2+) channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca(2+) channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content but not Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca(2+) uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca(2+) entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca(2+) channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca2+ homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Arthur M.; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J.; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na+-K+-ATPase and L-type Ca2+ channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca2+ channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca2+]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content but not Na+/Ca2+ exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca2+ uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyrl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca2+ entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure. PMID:26796036

  6. Reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum content of releasable Ca2+ in rat soleus muscle fibres after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J S; Sahlin, K; Ørtenblad, N

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The purpose was to evaluate the effects of fatiguing eccentric contractions (EC) on calcium (Ca2+) handling properties in mammalian type I muscles. We hypothesized that EC reduces both endogenous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content of releasable Ca2+ (eSRCa2+) and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity....... METHODS: Isolated rat soleus muscles performed 30 EC bouts. Single fibres were isolated from the muscle and after mechanical removal of sarcolemma used to measure eSRCa2+, rate of SR Ca2+ loading and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. RESULTS: Following EC maximal force in whole muscle was reduced by 30......% and 16/100 Hz force ratio by 33%. The eSRCa2+ in fibres from non-stimulated muscles was 45 +/- 5% of the maximal loading capacity. After EC, eSRCa2+ per fibre CSA decreased by 38% (P = 0.05), and the maximal capacity of SR Ca2+ loading was depressed by 32%. There were no effects of EC on either...

  7. Targeting artificial transcription factors to the utrophin A promoter: effects on dystrophic pathology and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yifan; Tian, Chai; Danialou, Gawiyou; Gilbert, Rénald; Petrof, Basil J; Karpati, George; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2008-12-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by a genetic defect in the dystrophin gene. The absence of dystrophin results in muscle fiber necrosis and regeneration, leading to progressive muscle fiber loss. Utrophin is a close analogue of dystrophin. A substantial, ectopic expression of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers can prevent deleterious effects of dystrophin deficiency. An alternative approach for the extrasynaptic up-regulation of utrophin involves the augmentation of utrophin transcription via the endogenous utrophin A promoter using custom-designed transcriptional activator proteins with zinc finger (ZFP) motifs. We tested a panel of custom-designed ZFP for their ability to activate the utrophin A promoter. Expression of one such ZFP efficiently increased, in a time-dependent manner, utrophin transcript and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo. In dystrophic mouse (mdx) muscles, administration of adenoviral vectors expressing this ZFP led to significant enhancement of muscle function with decreased necrosis, restoration of the dystrophin-associated proteins, and improved resistance to eccentric contractions. These studies provide evidence that specifically designed ZFPs can act as strong transcriptional activators of the utrophin A promoter. These may thus serve as attractive therapeutic agents for dystrophin deficiency states such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  8. Skeletal muscle phosphatidylcholine fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clore, J N; Li, J; Gill, R; Gupta, S; Spencer, R; Azzam, A; Zuelzer, W; Rizzo, W B; Blackard, W G

    1998-10-01

    The fatty acid composition of skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids (PL) is known to influence insulin responsiveness in humans. However, the contribution of the major PL of the outer (phosphatidylcholine, PC) and inner (phosphatidylethanolamine, PE) layers of the sarcolemma to insulin sensitivity is not known. Fatty acid composition of PC and PE from biopsies of vastus lateralis from 27 normal men and women were correlated with insulin sensitivity determined by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique at insulin infusion rates of 0.4, 1.0, and 10.0 mU . kg-1 . min-1. Significant variation in the half-maximal insulin concentration (ED50) was observed in the normal volunteers (range 24.0-146.0 microU/ml), which correlated directly with fasting plasma insulin (r = 0.75, P insulin sensitivity was observed in PE (NS). These studies suggest that the fatty acid composition of PC may be of particular importance in the relationship between fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in normal humans.

  9. Genetically Encoded Biosensors Reveal PKA Hyperphosphorylation on the Myofilaments in Rabbit Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Federica; Xu, Bing; Reddy, Gopireddy R; West, Toni; Wang, Qingtong; Fu, Qin; Li, Minghui; Shi, Qian; Ginsburg, Kenneth S; Ferrier, William; Isidori, Andrea M; Naro, Fabio; Patel, Hemal H; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald; Xiang, Yang K

    2016-09-30

    In heart failure, myofilament proteins display abnormal phosphorylation, which contributes to contractile dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying the dysregulation of protein phosphorylation on myofilaments is not clear. This study aims to understand the mechanisms underlying altered phosphorylation of myofilament proteins in heart failure. We generate a novel genetically encoded protein kinase A (PKA) biosensor anchored onto the myofilaments in rabbit cardiac myocytes to examine PKA activity at the myofilaments in responses to adrenergic stimulation. We show that PKA activity is shifted from the sarcolemma to the myofilaments in hypertrophic failing rabbit myocytes. In particular, the increased PKA activity on the myofilaments is because of an enhanced β2 adrenergic receptor signal selectively directed to the myofilaments together with a reduced phosphodiesterase activity associated with the myofibrils. Mechanistically, the enhanced PKA activity on the myofilaments is associated with downregulation of caveolin-3 in the hypertrophic failing rabbit myocytes. Reintroduction of caveolin-3 in the failing myocytes is able to normalize the distribution of β2 adrenergic receptor signal by preventing PKA signal access to the myofilaments and to restore contractile response to adrenergic stimulation. In hypertrophic rabbit myocytes, selectively enhanced β2 adrenergic receptor signaling toward the myofilaments contributes to elevated PKA activity and PKA phosphorylation of myofilament proteins. Reintroduction of caveolin-3 is able to confine β2 adrenergic receptor signaling and restore myocyte contractility in response to β adrenergic stimulation. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Alterations in cardiac sarcolemmal Ca2+ pump activity during diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyliger, C.E.; Prakash, A.; McNeill, J.

    1987-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is frequently associated with a primary cardiomyopathy. The mechanisms responsible for this heart disease are not clear, but an alteration in myocardial Ca 2+ transport is believed to be involved in its development. Even though sarcolemma plays a crucial role in cellular Ca 2+ transport, little appears to be known about its Ca 2+ transporting capability in the diabetic myocardium. In this regard, the authors have examined the status of the cardiac sarcolemmal Ca 2+ pump during diabetes mellitus. Purified sarcolemmal membranes were isolated from male Wistar diabetic rat hearts 8 wk after streptozotocin injection. Ca 2+ pump activity assessed by measuring its Ca 2+ -stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and Ca 2+ -uptake ability in the absence and presence of calmodulin was significantly depressed in the diabetic myocardium relative to controls. These results did not appear to have been influenced by the minimal sarcoplasmic reticular and mitochondrial contamination of this membrane preparation. Hence, it appears that the sarcolemmal Ca 2+ pump is defective in the diabetic myocardium and may be involved in the altered Ca 2+ transport of the heart during diabetes mellitus

  11. Gentamicin treatment in exercised mdx mice: Identification of dystrophin-sensitive pathways and evaluation of efficacy in work-loaded dystrophic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Annamaria; Nico, Beatrice; Rolland, Jean-François; Cozzoli, Anna; Burdi, Rosa; Mangieri, Domenica; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Liantonio, Antonella; Cippone, Valentina; De Bellis, Michela; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2008-11-01

    Aminoglycosides force read through of premature stop codon mutations and introduce new mutation-specific gene-corrective strategies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A chronic treatment with gentamicin (32 mg/kg/daily i.p., 8-12 weeks) was performed in exercised mdx mice with the dual aim to clarify the dependence on dystrophin of the functional, biochemical and histological alterations present in dystrophic muscle and to verify the long term efficiency of small molecule gene-corrective strategies in work-loaded dystrophic muscle. The treatment counteracted the exercise-induced impairment of in vivo forelimb strength after 6-8 weeks. We observed an increase in dystrophin expression level in all the fibers, although lower than that observed in normal fibers, and found a concomitant recovery of aquaporin-4 at sarcolemma. A significant reduction in centronucleated fibers, in the area of necrosis and in the percentage of nuclear factor-kB-positive nuclei was observed in gastrocnemious muscle of treated animals. Plasma creatine kinase was reduced by 70%. Ex vivo, gentamicin restored membrane ionic conductance in mdx diaphragm and limb muscle fibers. No effects were observed on the altered calcium homeostasis and sarcolemmal calcium permeability, detected by electrophysiological and microspectrofluorimetric approaches. Thus, the maintenance of a partial level of dystrophin is sufficient to reinforce sarcolemmal stability, reducing leakiness, inflammation and fiber damage, while correction of altered calcium homeostasis needs greater expression of dystrophin or direct interventions on the channels involved.

  12. Immunopathological Features of Canine Myocarditis Associated with Leishmania infantum Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Costagliola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis associated with infectious diseases may occur in dogs, including those caused by the protozoa Neospora caninum, Trypanosoma cruzi, Babesia canis, and Hepatozoon canis. However, although cardiac disease due to Leishmania infection has also been documented, the immunopathological features of myocarditis have not been reported so far. The aim of this study was to examine the types of cellular infiltrates and expression of MHC classes I and II in myocardial samples obtained at necropsy from 15 dogs with an established intravitam diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Pathological features of myocardium were characterized by hyaline degeneration of cardiomyocytes, necrosis, and infiltration of mononuclear inflammatory cells consisting of lymphocytes and macrophages, sometimes with perivascular pattern; fibrosis was also present in various degrees. Immunophenotyping of inflammatory cells was performed by immunohistochemistry on cryostat sections obtained from the heart of the infected dogs. The predominant leukocyte population was CD8+ with a fewer number of CD4+ cells. Many cardiomyocytes expressed MHC classes I and II on the sarcolemma. Leishmania amastigote forms were not detected within macrophages or any other cell of the examined samples. Our study provided evidence that myocarditis in canine visceral leishmaniasis might be related to immunological alterations associated with Leishmania infection.

  13. Influence of exercise and aging on extracellular matrix composition in the skeletal muscle stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Koyal; Boppart, Marni D

    2016-11-01

    Skeletal muscle is endowed with a remarkable capacity for regeneration, primarily due to the reserve pool of muscle resident satellite cells. The satellite cell is the physiologically quiescent muscle stem cell that resides beneath the basal lamina and adjacent to the sarcolemma. The anatomic location of satellite cells is in close proximity to vasculature where they interact with other muscle resident stem/stromal cells (e.g., mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes) through paracrine mechanisms. This mini-review describes the components of the muscle stem cell niche, as well as the influence of exercise and aging on the muscle stem cell niche. Although exercise promotes ECM reorganization and stem cell accumulation, aging is associated with dense ECM deposition and loss of stem cell function resulting in reduced regenerative capacity and strength. An improved understanding of the niche elements will be valuable to inform the development of therapeutic interventions aimed at improving skeletal muscle regeneration and adaptation over the life span. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. How Does the Ca2+-paradox Injury Induce Contracture in the Heart?—A Combined Study of the Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics and Cell Structures in Perfused Rat Hearts—

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hideo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ikegawa, Masaya; Dai, Ping; Fujita, Naohisa; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    The calcium (Ca 2+ )-paradox injury of the heart, induced by restoration of extracellular Ca 2+ after its short-term depletion, is known to provoke cardiomyocyte contracture. However, undetermined is how the Ca 2+ -paradox provokes such a distinctive presentation of myocytes in the heart. To address this, we imaged sequential intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics and concomitant structures of the subepicardial ventricular myocytes in fluo3-loaded, Langendorff-perfused rat hearts produced by the Ca 2+ paradox. Under rapid-scanning confocal microscopy, repletion of Ca 2+ following its depletion produced high-frequency Ca 2+ waves in individual myocytes with asynchronous localized contractions, resulting in contracture within 10 min. Such alterations of myocytes were attenuated by 5-mM NiCl 2 , but not by verapamil, SEA0400, or combination of ryanodine and thapsigargin, indicating a contribution of non-specific transmembrane Ca 2+ influx in the injury. However, saponin-induced membrane permeabilization of Ca 2+ showed no apparent contracture despite the emergence of high-frequency Ca 2+ waves, indicating an essential role of myocyte-myocyte and myocyte-extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical connections in the Ca 2+ paradox. In immunohistochemistry Ca 2+ depletion produced separation of the intercalated disc that expresses cadherin and dissipation of β-dystroglycan located along the sarcolemma. Taken together, along with the trans-sarcolemmal Ca 2+ influx, disruption of cell-cell and cell-ECM connections is essential for contracture in the Ca 2+ -paradox injury

  15. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Riquelme

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7, a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7 production, in wild type (wt and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7, which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  16. Non-uniform muscle fat replacement along the proximodistal axis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, M T; Niks, E H; Burakiewicz, J; Anastasopoulos, C; van den Berg, S I; van Zwet, E; Webb, A G; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2017-05-01

    The progressive replacement of muscle tissue by fat in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been studied using quantitative MRI between, but not within, individual muscles. We studied fat replacement along the proximodistal muscle axis using the Dixon technique on a 3T MR scanner in 22 DMD patients and 12 healthy controls. Mean fat fractions per muscle per slice for seven lower and upper leg muscles were compared between and within groups assuming a parabolic distribution. Average fat fraction for a small central slice stack and a large coverage slice stack were compared to the value when the stack was shifted one slice (15 mm) up or down. Higher fat fractions were observed in distal and proximal muscle segments compared to the muscle belly in all muscles of the DMD subjects (p muscle end regions are exposed to higher mechanical strain, which points towards mechanical disruption of the sarcolemma as one of the key factors in the pathophysiology. Overall, this non-uniformity in fat replacement needs to be taken into account to prevent sample bias when applying quantitative MRI as biomarker in clinical trials for DMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Muscle hypertrophy as the presenting sign in a patient with a complete FHL1 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, T A; Wood, C L; Hudson, J; Polvikoski, T; Barresi, R; Lochmüller, H; Bushby, K; Straub, V

    2016-08-01

    Four and a half LIM protein 1 (FHL1/SLIM1) has recently been identified as the causative gene mutated in four distinct diseases affecting skeletal muscle that have overlapping features, including reducing body myopathy, X-linked myopathy, X-linked dominant scapuloperoneal myopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. FHL1 localises to the sarcomere and the sarcolemma and is believed to participate in muscle growth and differentiation as well as in sarcomere assembly. We describe in this case report a boy with a deletion of the entire FHL1 gene who is now 15 years of age and presented with muscle hypertrophy, reduced subcutaneous fat, rigid spine and short stature. This case is the first, to our knowledge, with a complete loss of the FHL1 protein and MAP7D3 in combination. It supports the theory that dominant negative effects (accumulation of cytotoxic-mutated FHL1 protein) worsen the pathogenesis. It extends the phenotype of FHL1-related myopathies and should prompt future testing in undiagnosed patients who present with unexplained muscle hypertrophy, contractures and rigid spine, particularly if male. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Synemin acts as a regulator of signalling molecules during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara; Coletti, Dario; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Hourdé, Christophe; Joanne, Pierre; Gao-Li, Jacqueline; Blanc, Jocelyne; Ferry, Arnaud; Paulin, Denise; Xue, Zhigang; Agbulut, Onnik

    2014-11-01

    Synemin, a type IV intermediate filament (IF) protein, forms a bridge between IFs and cellular membranes. As an A-kinase-anchoring protein, it also provides temporal and spatial targeting of protein kinase A (PKA). However, little is known about its functional roles in either process. To better understand its functions in muscle tissue, we generated synemin-deficient (Synm(-) (/-)) mice. Synm(-) (/-) mice displayed normal development and fertility but showed a mild degeneration and regeneration phenotype in myofibres and defects in sarcolemma membranes. Following mechanical overload, Synm(-) (/-) mice muscles showed a higher hypertrophic capacity with increased maximal force and fatigue resistance compared with control mice. At the molecular level, increased remodelling capacity was accompanied by decreased myostatin (also known as GDF8) and atrogin (also known as FBXO32) expression, and increased follistatin expression. Furthermore, the activity of muscle-mass control molecules (the PKA RIIα subunit, p70S6K and CREB1) was increased in mutant mice. Finally, analysis of muscle satellite cell behaviour suggested that the absence of synemin could affect the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of these cells. Taken together, our results show that synemin is necessary to maintain membrane integrity and regulates signalling molecules during muscle hypertrophy. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Quantitative determination of Na+-K+-ATPase and other sarcolemmal components in muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.; Clausen, T.

    1988-01-01

    A recurring problem in the characterization of plasma membrane enzymes in tissues and cells is whether the samples tested are representative for the entire population of enzyme molecules present in the starting material. Measurements of [ 3 H]-ouabain binding, enzyme activity, and maximum transport capacity all indicate that the concentration of Na + -K + pumps in mammalian skeletal muscle is high. Studies on Na + -K + -ATPase activity in isolated sarcolemma, however, generally give little or no information on total cellular enzyme concentration. Due to the low and variable enzyme recovery, such subcellular preparations may, therefore, give misleading data on factors regulating Na + -K + -ATPase in heart and skeletal muscle cells. As the same isolation and purification procedures are used for the study of other sarcolemmal components, this inadequate recovery has general implications for statements on regulatory changes in the sarcolemmal composition of muscle cells. On the other hand, complete quantification of Na + -K + -ATPase in muscle tissue can now be achieved using simple procedures and the entire material. Recent studies have shown that regulatory changes in the entire population of Na + -K + pumps in muscle can be quantified in measurements of [ 3 H]-ouabain binding, K + -activated 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphatase activity, as well as maximum ouabain suppressible Na + -K + transport capacity

  20. Profound regulation of Na/K pump activity by transient elevations of cytoplasmic calcium in murine cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang-Min; Deisl, Christine; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2016-09-14

    Small changes of Na/K pump activity regulate internal Ca release in cardiac myocytes via Na/Ca exchange. We now show conversely that transient elevations of cytoplasmic Ca strongly regulate cardiac Na/K pumps. When cytoplasmic Na is submaximal, Na/K pump currents decay rapidly during extracellular K application and multiple results suggest that an inactivation mechanism is involved. Brief activation of Ca influx by reverse Na/Ca exchange enhances pump currents and attenuates current decay, while repeated Ca elevations suppress pump currents. Pump current enhancement reverses over 3 min, and results are similar in myocytes lacking the regulatory protein, phospholemman. Classical signaling mechanisms, including Ca-activated protein kinases and reactive oxygen, are evidently not involved. Electrogenic signals mediated by intramembrane movement of hydrophobic ions, such as hexyltriphenylphosphonium (C6TPP), increase and decrease in parallel with pump currents. Thus, transient Ca elevation and Na/K pump inactivation cause opposing sarcolemma changes that may affect diverse membrane processes.

  1. Purification and reconstitution of the calcium antagonist receptor of the voltage-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment with digitonin solubilized the calcium antagonist receptor as a stable complex with [ 3 H]nitrendipine from rat brain membranes. The solubilized complex retains allosteric coupling to binding sites for diltiazem, verapamil, and inorganic calcium antagonist sites. The calcium antagonist receptor from cardiac sarcolemma and the transverse-tubule membrane of skeletal muscle is also efficiently solubilized with digitonin and the receptor in all three tissues is a large glycoprotein with a sedimentation coefficient of 20 S. The T-tubule calcium antagonist receptor complex was extensively purified by a combination of chromatography on WGA-Sepharose, ion exchange chromatography, and sedimentation on sucrose gradients to yield preparations estimated to be 41% homogeneous by specific activity and 63% homogeneous by SDS gel electrophoresis. Analysis of SDS gels detect three polypeptides termed α(Mr 135,000), β(Mr 50,000), and γ(Mr 32,000) as noncovalently associated subunits of the calcium antagonist receptor. The α and γ subunits are glycosylated polypeptides, and the molecular weight of the core polypeptides are 108,000 and 24,000 respectively. The calcium antagonist receptor was reconstituted into a phospholipid bilayer by adding CHAPS and exogeneous lipid to the purified receptor followed by rapid detergent removal. This procedure resulted in the incorporation of 45% of the calcium antagonist receptor into closed phospholipid vesicles. Data suggests that the α, β, and γ subunits of the T-tubule calcium antagonist receptor are sufficient to form a functional calcium channel

  2. Milrinone and thyroid hormone stimulate myocardial membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity and share structural homologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylotte, K M; Cody, V; Davis, P J; Davis, F B; Blas, S D; Schoenl, M

    1985-01-01

    We have recently shown that thyroid hormone in physiological concentrations stimulates sarcolemma-enriched rabbit-myocardial-membrane Ca2+-ATPase in vitro. In this study, milrinone [2-methyl-5-cyano-(3,4'-bipyridin)-6(1H)-one], a cardiac inotropic agent, was thyromimetic in the same system. At clinically achievable concentrations (50-500 nM), milrinone significantly stimulated membrane Ca2+-ATPase in vitro. This action was antagonized by W-7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide], an agent that also blocks thyroid hormone action on the Ca2+-ATPase, at concentrations as low as 5 microM. Progressive additions of milrinone to membranes incubated with a fixed concentration of thyroxine (0.10 nM) or triiodothyronine resulted in a progressive obliteration of the thyroid hormone effect on Ca2+-ATPase. Amrinone [5-amino-(3,4'-bipyridin)-6(1H)-one], the parent bipyridine of milrinone, had no effect on myocardial Ca2+-ATPase activity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of milrinone and amrinone revealed structural homologies between the phenolic ring of thyroxine and the substituted ring of milrinone, whereas amrinone did not share these homologies. The mechanism(s) of the inotropic actions of thyroxine and of milrinone is not clearly understood, but these observations implicate Ca2+-ATPase, a calcium pump-associated enzyme, as one mediator of the effects on the heart of these two compounds. PMID:2933747

  3. The 2013 German-Russian BION-M1 Joint Flight Project: Skeletal Muscle and Neuromuscular Changes in Mice Housed for 30 Days in a Biosatellite on Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blottner, Dieter; Shenkman, Boris; Salanova, Michele

    Exposure to microgravity results in various structural, biochemical and molecular changes of the skeletal neuromuscular system. The BION Joint Flight Proposal between the Charité Berlin Center of Space Medicine (www.zwmb.de) in Berlin, and the Institute of Biomedical Problem (IMBP) in Moscow, provided an exciting opportunity for a more detailed analysis of neuromuscular changes in mice (C57/bl6) exposed to real microgravity housed for 30 days in a BION M1 biosatellite on orbit. The mice from the BION flight group (n=5) were compared to three different on-ground control groups (Flight control, BION-ground and Vivarium, each n=5 mice). We started to analyse various skeletal muscles from the hind limbs or trunk. Apart from routine structural and biochemical analysis (fiber size and type distribution, slow/fastMyHC) we test the hypothesis for the presence of a microgravity-induced sarcolemma-cytosolic protein shift of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and partial loss in neuromuscular synapse scaffold protein (Homer) immunoexpression known to be prone to disuse in mice or humans (hind limb unloading, bed rest) as previously shown (Sandonà D et al., PLoS One, 2012, Salanova M et al., FASEB J, 2011). National Sponsors: Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) via the German AeroSpace Board, DLR e.V., Bonn-Oberkassel, Germany (#50WB1121); Contract RAS-IMBP/Charité Berlin # Bion-M1/2013

  4. Absence of correlation between utrophin localization and quantity and the clinical severity in Duchenne/Becker dystrophies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainzof, M.; Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Man, N.; Zatz, M. [IB USP, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [and others

    1995-09-25

    While present in the surface membrane of embryonic muscle fibers, in adult normal muscle fibers, utrophin is restricted to the motor endplate and cells of blood vessel walls. However, the observation that utrophin is maintained in the extrajunctional plasma membrane in Duchenne (DMD) and in mdx muscle fibers has led to the suggestion that excess utrophin might compensate for dystrophin deficiency in the Xp21 muscular dystrophies. In order to detect an inverse correlation of utrophin presence and clinical severity, we have assessed utrophin distribution and quantity in DMD and Becker (BMD) patients of different ages and stages of clinical severity. All patients showed a positive discontinuous immunolabeling of utrophin on the sarcolemma, staining equally small and large muscle fibers, indicating that immature characteristics are maintained in such fibers. On Western blot, utrophin bands with concentrations 2- to 10-fold greater than in normal controls were detected in all DMD/BMD patients. However, no negative correlation was found between the amount of utrophin and the severity of clinical course, implying that the detectable utrophin levels in these patients did not compensate for dystrophin deficiency. In a DMD patient with growth hormone (GH) deficiency and a BMD-like clinical course, utrophin levels were comparable to the other typical DMD cases, which reinforces the hypothesis that the observed increase in utrophin is apparently not responsible for a milder clinical course in some patients with Xp21 muscular dystrophies. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Immunohistochemical and Morphofunctional Studies of Skeletal Muscle Tissues with Electric Nerve Stimulation by In Vivo Cryotechnique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, Yuki; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Saitoh, Yurika; Saigusa, Takeshi; Arita, Jun; Ohno, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, morphological and immunohistochemical alterations of skeletal muscle tissues during persistent contraction were examined by in vivo cryotechnique (IVCT). Contraction of gastrocnemius muscles was induced by sciatic nerve stimulation. The IVCT was performed immediately, 3 min or 10 min after the stimulation start. Prominent ripples of muscle fibers or wavy deformation of sarcolemma were detected immediately after the stimulation, but they gradually diminished to normal levels during the stimulation. The relative ratio of sarcomere and A band lengths was the highest in the control group, but it immediately decreased to the lowest level and then gradually recovered at 3 min or 10 min. Although histochemical intensity of PAS reaction was almost homogeneous in muscle tissues of the control group or immediately after the stimulation, it decreased at 3 min or 10 min. Serum albumin was immunolocalized as dot-like patterns within some muscle fibers at 3 min stimulation. These patterns became more prominent at 10 min, and the dots got larger and saccular in some sarcoplasmic regions. However, IgG1 and IgM were immunolocalized in blood vessels under nerve stimulation conditions. Therefore, IVCT was useful to capture the morphofunctional and metabolic changes of heterogeneous muscle fibers during the persistent contraction

  6. Quantitation of the calcium and membrane binding properties of the C2 domains of dysferlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nazish; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Marty, Naomi J; Johnson, Colin P

    2014-01-21

    Dysferlin is a large membrane protein involved in calcium-triggered resealing of the sarcolemma after injury. Although it is generally accepted that dysferlin is Ca(2+) sensitive, the Ca(2+) binding properties of dysferlin have not been characterized. In this study, we report an analysis of the Ca(2+) and membrane binding properties of all seven C2 domains of dysferlin as well as a multi-C2 domain construct. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that all seven dysferlin C2 domains interact with Ca(2+) with a wide range of binding affinities. The C2A and C2C domains were determined to be the most sensitive, with Kd values in the tens of micromolar, whereas the C2D domain was least sensitive, with a near millimolar Kd value. Mutagenesis of C2A demonstrates the requirement for negatively charged residues in the loop regions for divalent ion binding. Furthermore, dysferlin displayed significantly lower binding affinity for the divalent cations magnesium and strontium. Measurement of a multidomain construct indicates that the solution binding affinity does not change when C2 domains are linked. Finally, sedimentation assays suggest all seven C2 domains bind lipid membranes, and that Ca(2+) enhances but is not required for interaction. This report reveals for the first time, to our knowledge, that all dysferlin domains bind Ca(2+) albeit with varying affinity and stoichiometry. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Two desmin gene mutations associated with myofibrillar myopathies in Polish families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Piotr Fichna

    Full Text Available Desmin is a muscle-specific intermediate filament protein which forms a network connecting the sarcomere, T tubules, sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, mitochondria and other organelles. Mutations in the gene coding for desmin (DES cause skeletal myopathies often combined with cardiomyopathy, or isolated cardiomyopathies. The molecular pathomechanisms of the disease remain ambiguous. Here, we describe and comprehensively characterize two DES mutations found in Polish patients with a clinical diagnosis of desminopathy. The study group comprised 16 individuals representing three families. Two mutations were identified: a novel missense mutation (Q348P and a small deletion of nine nucleotides (A357_E359del, previously described by us in the Polish population. A common ancestry of all the families bearing the A357_E359del mutation was confirmed. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic using a bioinformatics approach, including molecular dynamics simulations which helped to rationalize abnormal behavior at molecular level. To test the impact of the mutations on DES expression and the intracellular distribution of desmin muscle biopsies were investigated. Elevated desmin levels as well as its atypical localization in muscle fibers were observed. Additional staining for M-cadherin, α-actinin, and myosin heavy chains confirmed severe disruption of myofibrill organization. The abnormalities were more prominent in the Q348P muscle, where both small atrophic fibers as well large fibers with centrally localized nuclei were observed. We propose that the mutations affect desmin structure and cause its aberrant folding and subsequent aggregation, triggering disruption of myofibrils organization.

  8. Erythropoietin receptor in human skeletal muscle and the effects of acute and long-term injections with recombinant human erythropoietin on the skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Hellsten, Ylva; Jensen, Mie B. F.

    2008-01-01

    The presence and potential physiological role of the erythropoietin receptor (Epo-R) were examined in human skeletal muscle. In this study we demonstrate that Epo-R is present in the endothelium, smooth muscle cells, and in fractions of the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. To study...... the potential effects of Epo in human skeletal muscle, two separate studies were conducted: one to study the acute effects of a single Epo injection on skeletal muscle gene expression and plasma hormones and another to study the effects of long-term (14 wk) Epo treatment on skeletal muscle structure. Subjects...... was studied in subjects (n = 8) who received long-term Epo administration, and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after. Epo treatment did not alter mean fiber area (0.84 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.3 mm(2)), capillaries per fiber (4.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.4 +/- 1.3), or number of proliferating endothelial cells...

  9. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph; Bernatchez, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. ► Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. ► Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  10. Proteomic identification of dysferlin-interacting protein complexes in human vascular endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Cleo; Utokaparch, Soraya; Sharma, Arpeeta; Yu, Carol; Abraham, Thomas; Borchers, Christoph [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Bernatchez, Pascal, E-mail: pbernatc@mail.ubc.ca [UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Institute for Heart and Lung Health, Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of Victoria - Genome BC Proteomics Centre, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi-directional (inward and outward) movement of GFP-dysferlin in COS-7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin interacts with key signaling proteins for transcytosis in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dysferlin mediates trafficking of vesicles carrying protein cargos in EC. -- Abstract: Dysferlin is a membrane-anchored protein known to facilitate membrane repair in skeletal muscles following mechanical injury. Mutations of dysferlin gene impair sarcolemma integrity, a hallmark of certain forms of muscular dystrophy in patients. Dysferlin contains seven calcium-dependent C2 binding domains, which are required to promote fusion of intracellular membrane vesicles. Emerging evidence reveal the unexpected expression of dysferlin in non-muscle, non-mechanically active tissues, such as endothelial cells, which cast doubts over the belief that ferlin proteins act exclusively as membrane repair proteins. We and others have shown that deficient trafficking of membrane bound proteins in dysferlin-deficient cells, suggesting that dysferlin might mediate trafficking of client proteins. Herein, we describe the intracellular trafficking and movement of GFP-dysferlin positive vesicles in unfixed reconstituted cells using live microscopy. By performing GST pull-down assays followed by mass spectrometry, we identified dysferlin binding protein complexes in human vascular endothelial cells. Together, our data further support the claims that dysferlin not only mediates membrane repair but also trafficking of client proteins, ultimately, help bridging dysferlinopathies to aberrant membrane signaling.

  11. Hearts of dystonia musculorum mice display normal morphological and histological features but show signs of cardiac stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G Boyer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dystonin is a giant cytoskeletal protein belonging to the plakin protein family and is believed to crosslink the major filament systems in contractile cells. Previous work has demonstrated skeletal muscle defects in dystonin-deficient dystonia musculorum (dt mice. In this study, we show that the dystonin muscle isoform is localized at the Z-disc, the H zone, the sarcolemma and intercalated discs in cardiac tissue. Based on this localization pattern, we tested whether dystonin-deficiency leads to structural defects in cardiac muscle. Desmin intermediate filament, microfilament, and microtubule subcellular organization appeared normal in dt hearts. Nevertheless, increased transcript levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF, 66% beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC, 95% and decreased levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump isoform 2A (SERCA2a, 26%, all signs of cardiac muscle stress, were noted in dt hearts. Hearts from two-week old dt mice were assessed for the presence of morphological and histological alterations. Heart to body weight ratios as well as left ventricular wall thickness and left chamber volume measurements were similar between dt and wild-type control mice. Hearts from dt mice also displayed no signs of fibrosis or calcification. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the intricate structure of the sarcomere by situating dystonin in cardiac muscle fibers and suggest that dystonin does not significantly influence the structural organization of cardiac muscle fibers during early postnatal development.

  12. Minoxidil opens mitochondrial KATP channels and confers cardioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiaki; Li, Yulong; Saito, Tomoaki; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2003-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channel in the mitochondrial inner membrane (mitoKATP channel) rather than in the sarcolemma (sarcKATP channel) appears to play an important role in cardioprotection. We examined the effect of minoxidil, a potent antihypertensive agent and hair growth stimulator, on sarcKATP and mitoKATP channels in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Minoxidil activated a glybenclamide-sensitive sarcKATP channel current in the whole-cell recording mode with an EC50 of 182.6 μM. Minoxidil reversibly increased the flavoprotein oxidation, an index of mitoKATP channel activity, in a concentration-dependent manner. The EC50 for mitoKATP channel activation was estimated to be 7.3 μM; this value was notably ≈25-fold lower than that for sarcKATP channel activation. Minoxidil (10 μM) significantly attenuated the ouabain-induced increase of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, which was measured by loading cells with rhod-2 fluorescence. Furthermore, pretreatment with minoxidil (10 μM) before 20-min no-flow ischaemia significantly improved the recovery of developed tension measured after 60 min of reperfusion in coronary perfused guinea-pig ventricular muscles. These cardioprotective effects of minoxidil were completely abolished by the mitoKATP channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (500 μM). Our results indicate that minoxidil exerts a direct cardioprotective effect on heart muscle cells, an effect mediated by the selective activation of mitoKATP channels. PMID:14691056

  13. Alteration of cardiac glycoside positive inotropic action by modulators of protein synthesis and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosek, T.M.; Adams, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Numerous membrane bound and cytoplasmic proteins participate in the cardiac expression of the positive inotropic action (PIA) of digitalis glycosides including the Na,K-ATPase (NKA). Exposure of the myocardium to an inhibitor of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, CYC) or of protein degradation (leupeptin, LEU) alters the PIA of ouabain in isolated, paced guinea pig papillary muscles (PM) in opposite ways. In vivo exposure to CYC for 3 hr resulted in a 30% depression of the in vitro PIA of ouabain at 1.7μM compared to control. In vivo exposure to LEU for 1 hr resulted in a 47% enhancement of the in vitro PIA of 1.7μM ouabain. Neither drug had an apparent effect on the ouabain PIA ED50. Neither CYC nor LEU exposure to PM in vitro affect resting or developed tension or the response of skinned PM to calcium. The mechanisms of the PIA alterations by CYC or LEU do not involve a direct effect on the digitalis receptor. Exposure of isolated cardiac sarcolemma enriched in NKA to 10-100μM CYC or LEU did not affect NKA activity or 3 H-ouabain binding. Although direct physicochemical effects of CYC or LEU may be involved in the alterations of the ouabain PIA, it is possible that modulation of the cellular levels or turnover rate of short-lived proteins may affect cardiac regulation of the digitalis PIA

  14. N-Acetylcysteine treatment of dystrophic mdx mice results in protein thiol modifications and inhibition of exercise induced myofibre necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated as a factor that increases necrosis of skeletal muscles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and the dystrophic mdx mouse. Consequently, drugs that minimize oxidative stress are potential treatments for muscular dystrophy. This study examined the in vivo benefits to mdx mice of an antioxidant treatment with the cysteine precursor N-acetylcysteine (NAC), administered in drinking water. NAC was completely effective in preventing treadmill exercise-induced myofibre necrosis (assessed histologically) and the increased blood creatine kinase levels (a measure of sarcolemma leakiness) following exercise were significantly lower in the NAC treated mice. While NAC had no effect on malondialdehyde level or protein carbonylation (two indicators of irreversible oxidative damage), treatment with NAC for one week significantly decreased the oxidation of glutathione and protein thiols, and enhanced muscle protein thiol content. These data provide in vivo evidence for protective benefits of NAC treatment on dystropathology, potentially via protein thiol modifications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic analysis of the dysferlin protein complex unveils its importance for sarcolemmal maintenance and integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine de Morrée

    Full Text Available Dysferlin is critical for repair of muscle membranes after damage. Mutations in dysferlin lead to a progressive muscular dystrophy. Recent studies suggest additional roles for dysferlin. We set out to study dysferlin's protein-protein interactions to obtain comprehensive knowledge of dysferlin functionalities in a myogenic context. We developed a robust and reproducible method to isolate dysferlin protein complexes from cells and tissue. We analyzed the composition of these complexes in cultured myoblasts, myotubes and skeletal muscle tissue by mass spectrometry and subsequently inferred potential protein functions through bioinformatics analyses. Our data confirm previously reported interactions and support a function for dysferlin as a vesicle trafficking protein. In addition novel potential functionalities were uncovered, including phagocytosis and focal adhesion. Our data reveal that the dysferlin protein complex has a dynamic composition as a function of myogenic differentiation. We provide additional experimental evidence and show dysferlin localization to, and interaction with the focal adhesion protein vinculin at the sarcolemma. Finally, our studies reveal evidence for cross-talk between dysferlin and its protein family member myoferlin. Together our analyses show that dysferlin is not only a membrane repair protein but also important for muscle membrane maintenance and integrity.

  16. Probable high prevalence of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen-Chen; Chou, Po-Ching; Hung, Chia-Cheng; Su, Yi-Ning; Kan, Tsu-Min; Chen, Wan-Zi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2016-03-15

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D), an autosomal-recessive inherited LGMD, is caused by the mutations in SGCA. SGCA encodes alpha-sarcoglycan (SG) that forms a heterotetramer with other SGs in the sarcolemma, and comprises part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. The frequency of LGMD2D is variable among different ethnic backgrounds, and so far only a few patients have been reported in Asia. We identified five patients with a novel homozygous mutation of c.101G>T (p.Arg34Leu) in SGCA from a big aboriginal family ethnically consisting of two tribes in Taiwan. Patient 3 is the maternal uncle of patients 1 and 2. All their parents, heterozygous for c.101G>T, denied consanguineous marriages although they were from the same tribe. The heterozygous parents of patients 4 and 5 were from two different tribes, originally residing in different geographic regions in Taiwan. Haplotype analysis showed that all five patients shared the same mutation-associated haplotype, indicating the probability of a founder effect and consanguinity. The results suggest that the carrier rate of c.101G>T in SGCA may be high in Taiwan, especially in the aboriginal population regardless of the tribes. It is important to investigate the prevalence of LGMD2D in Taiwan for early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Quantitative determination of Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase and other sarcolemmal components in muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, O.; Clausen, T. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark))

    1988-01-01

    A recurring problem in the characterization of plasma membrane enzymes in tissues and cells is whether the samples tested are representative for the entire population of enzyme molecules present in the starting material. Measurements of ({sup 3}H)-ouabain binding, enzyme activity, and maximum transport capacity all indicate that the concentration of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} pumps in mammalian skeletal muscle is high. Studies on Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in isolated sarcolemma, however, generally give little or no information on total cellular enzyme concentration. Due to the low and variable enzyme recovery, such subcellular preparations may, therefore, give misleading data on factors regulating Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase in heart and skeletal muscle cells. As the same isolation and purification procedures are used for the study of other sarcolemmal components, this inadequate recovery has general implications for statements on regulatory changes in the sarcolemmal composition of muscle cells. On the other hand, complete quantification of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase in muscle tissue can now be achieved using simple procedures and the entire material. Recent studies have shown that regulatory changes in the entire population of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} pumps in muscle can be quantified in measurements of ({sup 3}H)-ouabain binding, K{sup +}-activated 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphatase activity, as well as maximum ouabain suppressible Na{sup +}-K{sup +} transport capacity.

  18. Mena associates with Rac1 and modulates connexin 43 remodeling in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Rashmi; Wescott, Andrew P; Varandas, Katherine; Dirksen, Robert T; Blaxall, Burns C

    2014-01-01

    Mena, a member of the Ena/VASP family of actin regulatory proteins, modulates microfilaments and interacts with cytoskeletal proteins associated with heart failure. Mena is localized at the intercalated disc (ICD) of adult cardiac myocytes, colocalizing with numerous cytoskeletal proteins. Mena's role in the maintainence of mechanical myocardial stability at the cardiomyocyte ICD remains unknown. We hypothesized that Mena may modulate signals from the sarcolemma to the actin cytoskeleton at the ICD to regulate the expression and localization of connexin 43 (Cx43). The small GTPase Rac1 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of actin cytoskeletal reorganization and mediating morphological and transcriptional changes in cardiomyocytes. We found that Mena is associated with active Rac1 in cardiomyocytes and that RNAi knockdown of Mena increased Rac1 activity significantly. Furthermore, Mena knockdown increased Cx43 expression and altered Cx43 localization and trafficking at the ICD, concomitant with faster intercellular communication, as assessed by dye transfer between cardiomyocyte pairs. In mice overexpressing constitutively active Rac1, left ventricular Mena expression was increased significantly, concomitant with lateral redistribution of Cx43. These results suggest that Mena is a critical regulator of the ICD and is required for normal localization of Cx43 in part via regulation of Rac1.

  19. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  20. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and Their Function in Striated Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Roland F. R.; Scotton, Chiara; French, Vanessa; Ferlini, Alessandra; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) genes encode a novel class of cAMP effector proteins, which are abundantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here, we will review their role in striated muscle as deduced from work in cell and animal models and the recent analysis of patients carrying a missense mutation in POPDC1. Evidence suggests that POPDC proteins control membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss the current catalogue of established protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the number of POPDC-interacting proteins has been rising and currently includes ion channels (TREK-1), sarcolemma-associated proteins serving functions in mechanical stability (dystrophin), compartmentalization (caveolin 3), scaffolding (ZO-1), trafficking (NDRG4, VAMP2/3) and repair (dysferlin) or acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho-family GTPases (GEFT). Recent evidence suggests that POPDC proteins might also control the cellular level of the nuclear proto-oncoprotein c-Myc. These data suggest that this family of cAMP-binding proteins probably serves multiple roles in striated muscle. PMID:27347491

  1. Numerical Analysis of the Effect of T-tubule Location on Calcium Transient in Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Uduak Z.; Wang, Jun; Yu, Zeyun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signaling in cardiac myocytes is vital for proper functioning of the heart. Understanding the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics would give an insight into the functions of normal and diseased hearts. In the current study, spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics is investigated in ventricular myocytes by considering Ca2+ release and re-uptake via sarcolemma and transverse tubules (T-tubules), Ca2+ diffusion and buffering in the cytosol, and the blockade of Ca2+ activities associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study is carried out using a three dimensional (3D) geometric model of a branch of T-tubule extracted from the electron microscopy (EM) images of a partial ventricular myocyte. Mathematical modeling is done by using a system of partial differential equations involving Ca2+ , buffers, and membrane channels. Numerical simulation results suggest that a lack of T-tubule structure at the vicinity of the cell surface could increase the peak time of Ca2+ concentration in myocytes. The results also show that T-tubules and mobile buffers play an important role in the regulation of Ca2+ transient in ventricular myocytes. PMID:24212025

  2. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana C. M. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs. We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  3. Antisense pre-treatment increases gene therapy efficacy in dystrophic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccate, Cécile; Mollard, Amédée; Le Hir, Maëva; Julien, Laura; McClorey, Graham; Jarmin, Susan; Le Heron, Anita; Dickson, George; Benkhelifa-Ziyyat, Sofia; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Wood, Matthew J; Voit, Thomas; Lorain, Stéphanie

    2016-08-15

    In preclinical models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, dystrophin restoration during adeno-associated virus (AAV)-U7-mediated exon-skipping therapy was shown to decrease drastically after six months in treated muscles. This decline in efficacy is strongly correlated with the loss of the therapeutic AAV genomes, probably due to alterations of the dystrophic myofiber membranes. To improve the membrane integrity of the dystrophic myofibers at the time of AAV-U7 injection, mdx muscles were pre-treated with a single dose of the peptide-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO) antisense oligonucleotides that induced temporary dystrophin expression at the sarcolemma. The PPMO pre-treatment allowed efficient maintenance of AAV genomes in mdx muscles and enhanced the AAV-U7 therapy effect with a ten-fold increase of the protein level after 6 months. PPMO pre-treatment was also beneficial to AAV-mediated gene therapy with transfer of micro-dystrophin cDNA into muscles. Therefore, avoiding vector genome loss after AAV injection by PPMO pre-treatment would allow efficient long-term restoration of dystrophin and the use of lower and thus safer vector doses for Duchenne patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Delivery of AAV2/9-microdystrophin genes incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal domain of dystrophin improves muscle pathology and restores the level of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin in skeletal muscles of mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeyoung; Malerba, Alberto; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Trollet, Capucine; Boldrin, Luisa; Ferry, Arnaud; Popplewell, Linda; Foster, Helen; Foster, Keith; Dickson, George

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe X-linked inherited muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been extensively used to deliver genes efficiently for dystrophin expression in skeletal muscles. To overcome limited packaging capacity of AAV vectors (pathology of dystrophic mdx mice. However, the CT domain of dystrophin is thought to recruit part of the dystrophin-associated protein complex, which acts as a mediator of signaling between extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton in muscle fibers. In this study, we extended the ΔR4-23/ΔCT microdystrophin by incorporating helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin (MD2), which contains the α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin binding sites. Intramuscular injection of AAV2/9 expressing CT domain-extended microdystrophin showed efficient dystrophin expression in tibialis anterior muscles of mdx mice. The presence of the CT domain of dystrophin in MD2 increased the recruitment of α1-syntrophin and α-dystrobrevin at the sarcolemma and significantly improved the muscle resistance to lengthening contraction-induced muscle damage in the mdx mice compared with MD1. These results suggest that the incorporation of helix 1 of the coiled-coil motif in the CT domain of dystrophin to the microdystrophins will substantially improve their efficiency in restoring muscle function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  5. Organic preservation of fossil musculature with ultracellular detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria; Orr, Patrick J; Kearns, Stuart L; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver-Mollá, Enrique

    2010-02-07

    The very labile (decay-prone), non-biomineralized, tissues of organisms are rarely fossilized. Occurrences thereof are invaluable supplements to a body fossil record dominated by biomineralized tissues, which alone are extremely unrepresentative of diversity in modern and ancient ecosystems. Fossil examples of extremely labile tissues (e.g. muscle) that exhibit a high degree of morphological fidelity are almost invariably replicated by inorganic compounds such as calcium phosphate. There is no consensus as to whether such tissues can be preserved with similar morphological fidelity as organic remains, except when enclosed inside amber. Here, we report fossilized musculature from an approximately 18 Myr old salamander from lacustrine sediments of Ribesalbes, Spain. The muscle is preserved organically, in three dimensions, and with the highest fidelity of morphological preservation yet documented from the fossil record. Preserved ultrastructural details include myofilaments, endomysium, layering within the sarcolemma, and endomysial circulatory vessels infilled with blood. Slight differences between the fossil tissues and their counterparts in extant amphibians reflect limited degradation during fossilization. Our results provide unequivocal evidence that high-fidelity organic preservation of extremely labile tissues is not only feasible, but likely to be common. This is supported by the discovery of similarly preserved tissues in the Eocene Grube Messel biota.

  6. Two Desmin Gene Mutations Associated with Myofibrillar Myopathies in Polish Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdynski, Mariusz; Sikorska, Agata; Filipek, Slawomir; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta; Kaminska, Anna; Zekanowski, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    Desmin is a muscle-specific intermediate filament protein which forms a network connecting the sarcomere, T tubules, sarcolemma, nuclear membrane, mitochondria and other organelles. Mutations in the gene coding for desmin (DES) cause skeletal myopathies often combined with cardiomyopathy, or isolated cardiomyopathies. The molecular pathomechanisms of the disease remain ambiguous. Here, we describe and comprehensively characterize two DES mutations found in Polish patients with a clinical diagnosis of desminopathy. The study group comprised 16 individuals representing three families. Two mutations were identified: a novel missense mutation (Q348P) and a small deletion of nine nucleotides (A357_E359del), previously described by us in the Polish population. A common ancestry of all the families bearing the A357_E359del mutation was confirmed. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic using a bioinformatics approach, including molecular dynamics simulations which helped to rationalize abnormal behavior at molecular level. To test the impact of the mutations on DES expression and the intracellular distribution of desmin muscle biopsies were investigated. Elevated desmin levels as well as its atypical localization in muscle fibers were observed. Additional staining for M-cadherin, α-actinin, and myosin heavy chains confirmed severe disruption of myofibrill organization. The abnormalities were more prominent in the Q348P muscle, where both small atrophic fibers as well large fibers with centrally localized nuclei were observed. We propose that the mutations affect desmin structure and cause its aberrant folding and subsequent aggregation, triggering disruption of myofibrils organization. PMID:25541946

  7. Secondary reduction of alpha7B integrin in laminin alpha2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy supports an additional transmembrane link in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, R D; Mayer, U; Saher, G; Herrmann, R; van der Flier, A; Sonnenberg, A; Sorokin, L; Voit, T

    1999-03-01

    The integrins are a large family of heterodimeric transmembrane cellular receptors which mediate the association between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cytoskeletal proteins. The alpha7beta1 integrin is a major laminin binding integrin in skeletal and cardiac muscle and is thought to be involved in myogenic differentiation and migration processes. The main binding partners of the alpha7 integrin are laminin-1 (alpha1-beta1-gamma1), laminin-2 (alpha2-beta1-gamma1) and laminin-4 (alpha2-beta2-gamma1). Targeted deletion of the gene for the alpha7 integrin subunit (ITGA7) in mice leads to a novel form of muscular dystrophy. In the present study we have investigated the expression of two alternative splice variants, the alpha7B and beta1D integrin subunits, in normal human skeletal muscle, as well as in various forms of muscular dystrophy. In normal human skeletal muscle the expression of the alpha7 integrin subunit appeared to be developmentally regulated: it was first detected at 2 years of age. In contrast, the beta1D integrin could be detected in immature and mature muscle in the sarcolemma of normal fetal skeletal muscle at 18 weeks gestation. The expression of alpha7B integrin was significantly reduced at the sarcolemma in six patients with laminin alpha2 chain deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) (age >2 years). However, this reduction was not correlated with the amount of laminin alpha2 chain expressed. In contrast, the expression of the laminin alpha2 chain was not altered in the skeletal muscle of the alpha7 knock-out mice. These data argue in favor that there is not a tight correlation between the expression of the alpha7 integrin subunit and that of the laminin alpha2 chain in either human or murine dystrophic muscle. Interestingly, in dystrophinopathies (Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy; DMD/BMD) expression of alpha7B was upregulated irrespective of the level of dystrophin expression as shown by a strong sarcolemmal staining pattern even

  8. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merwe, Celia van der, E-mail: celiavdm@sun.ac.za [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Loos, Ben [Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Swart, Chrisna [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Kinnear, Craig [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology and the DST/NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical TB Research, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Henning, Franclo [Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Merwe, Lize van der [Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Department of Statistics, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town (South Africa); Pillay, Komala [National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) Histopathology Laboratory, Red Cross Children’s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Muller, Nolan [Division of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Zaharie, Dan [Neuropathology Unit, Division of Anatomical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Engelbrecht, Lize [Cell Imaging Unit, Central Analytical Facility, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); Carr, Jonathan [Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  9. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Legrand

    Full Text Available Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  10. Mitochondrial impairment observed in fibroblasts from South African Parkinson’s disease patients with parkin mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwe, Celia van der; Loos, Ben; Swart, Chrisna; Kinnear, Craig; Henning, Franclo; Merwe, Lize van der; Pillay, Komala; Muller, Nolan; Zaharie, Dan; Engelbrecht, Lize; Carr, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mitochondrial dysfunction observed in patients with parkin-null mutations. • Mitochondrial ATP levels were decreased. • Electron-dense vacuoles were observed in the patients. • Mitochondria from muscle biopsies appeared within normal limits. • One patient did not show these defects possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. - Abstract: Parkinson’s disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previous studies show conflicting findings regarding mitochondrial abnormalities in fibroblasts from patients harboring parkin-null mutations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether South African PD patients with parkin mutations exhibit evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. Fibroblasts were cultured from skin biopsies obtained from three patients with homozygous parkin-null mutations, two heterozygous mutation carriers and two wild-type controls. Muscle biopsies were obtained from two of the patients. The muscle fibers showed subtle abnormalities such as slightly swollen mitochondria in focal areas of the fibers and some folding of the sarcolemma. Although no differences in the degree of mitochondrial network branching were found in the fibroblasts, ultrastructural abnormalities were observed including the presence of electron-dense vacuoles. Moreover, decreased ATP levels which are consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction were observed in the patients’ fibroblasts compared to controls. Remarkably, these defects did not manifest in one patient, which may be due to possible compensatory mechanisms. These results suggest that parkin-null patients exhibit features of mitochondrial dysfunction. Involvement of mitochondria as a key role player in PD

  11. Zidovudine ameliorates pathology in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy via P2RX7 purinoceptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalidi, Rasha; Panicucci, Chiara; Cox, Paul; Chira, Natalia; Róg, Justyna; Young, Christopher N J; McGeehan, Rhiannon E; Ambati, Kameshwari; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Arkle, Stephen; Bruno, Claudio; Górecki, Dariusz C

    2018-04-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited muscle disorder that causes severe disability and death of young men. This disease is characterized by progressive muscle degeneration aggravated by sterile inflammation and is also associated with cognitive impairment and low bone density. Given that no current treatment can improve the long-term outcome, approaches with a strong translational potential are urgently needed. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) alters P2RX7 signaling in both muscle and inflammatory cells and inhibition of this receptor resulted in a significant attenuation of muscle and non-muscle symptoms in DMD mdx mouse model. As P2RX7 is an attractive target in a range of human diseases, specific antagonists have been developed. Yet, these will require lengthy safety testing in the pediatric population of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. In contrast, Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) can act as P2RX7 antagonists and are drugs with an established safety record, including in children. We demonstrate here that AZT (Zidovudine) inhibits P2RX7 functions acting via the same allosteric site as other antagonists. Moreover, short-term AZT treatment at the peak of disease in DMD mdx mice attenuated the phenotype without any detectable side effects. Recovery was evident in the key parameters such as reduced sarcolemma permeability confirmed by lower serum creatine kinase levels and IgG influx into myofibres, decreased inflammatory cell numbers and inflammation markers in leg and heart muscles of treated mice. Moreover, this short-term therapy had some positive impact on muscle strength in vivo and no detrimental effect on mitochondria, which is the main side-effect of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs). Given these results, we postulate that AZT could be quickly re-purposed for the treatment of this highly debilitating and lethal disease. This approach is not constrained by causative DMD mutations and

  12. Acute rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale de Lonlay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis results from the rapid breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers, which leads to leakage of potentially toxic cellular contents into the systemic circulation. Acquired causes by direct injury to the sarcolemma are the most frequent. The inherited causes are: metabolic with failure of energy production, including mitochondrial fatty acid ß-oxidation defects, LPIN1 mutations, inborn errors of glycogenolysis and glycolysis, more rarely mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency, purine defects and peroxysomalα-Methylacyl-CoA-racemase defect (AMACR; dystrophinopathies and myopathies; calcic causes with RYR1 mutations; inflammatory with myositis. Irrespective of the cause of rhabdomyolysis, the pathophysiologic events follow a common pathway, the ATP depletion leading to an increased intracellular calcium concentration and necrosis. Most episodes of rhabdomyolysis are triggered by an environmental stress, mostly fever. This condition is associated with two events, elevated temperature and high circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. We describe here an example of rhabdomyolysis related to high temperature, aldolase deficiency, in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. Thermolability was enhanced in patient myoblasts compared to control. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines. Lipotoxicity may participate to myolysis. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a

  13. The effects of ageing on mouse muscle microstructure: a comparative study of time-dependent diffusion MRI and histological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcari, Paola; Hall, Matt G; Clark, Chris A; Greally, Elizabeth; Straub, Volker; Blamire, Andrew M

    2018-03-01

    The investigation of age-related changes in muscle microstructure between developmental and healthy adult mice may help us to understand the clinical features of early-onset muscle diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We investigated the evolution of mouse hind-limb muscle microstructure using diffusion imaging of in vivo and in vitro samples from both actively growing and mature mice. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of the gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles were determined as a function of diffusion time (Δ), age (7.5, 22 and 44 weeks) and diffusion gradient direction, applied parallel or transverse to the principal axis of the muscle fibres. We investigated a wide range of diffusion times with the goal of probing a range of diffusion lengths characteristic of muscle microstructure. We compared the diffusion time-dependent ADC of hind-limb muscles with histology. ADC was found to vary as a function of diffusion time in muscles at all stages of maturation. Muscle water diffusivity was higher in younger (7.5 weeks) than in adult (22 and 44 weeks) mice, whereas no differences were observed between the older ages. In vitro data showed the same diffusivity pattern as in vivo data. The highlighted differences in diffusion properties between young and mature muscles suggested differences in underlying muscle microstructure, which were confirmed by histological assessment. In particular, although diffusion was more restricted in older muscle, muscle fibre size increased significantly from young to adult age. The extracellular space decreased with age by only ~1%. This suggests that the observed diffusivity differences between young and adult muscles may be caused by increased membrane permeability in younger muscle associated with properties of the sarcolemma. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Cardioprotection by controlling hyperamylinemia in a "humanized" diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despa, Sanda; Sharma, Savita; Harris, Todd R; Dong, Hua; Li, Ning; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Margulies, Kenneth B; Hammock, Bruce D; Despa, Florin

    2014-08-21

    Chronic hypersecretion of the pancreatic hormone amylin is common in humans with obesity or prediabetic insulin resistance and induces amylin aggregation and proteotoxicity in the pancreas. We recently showed that hyperamylinemia also affects the cardiovascular system. Here, we investigated whether amylin aggregates interact directly with cardiac myocytes and whether controlling hyperamylinemia protects the heart. By Western blot, we found abundant amylin aggregates in lysates of cardiac myocytes from obese patients, but not in controls. Aggregated amylin was elevated in failing hearts, suggesting a role in myocyte injury. Using rats overexpressing human amylin in the pancreas (HIP rats) and control myocytes incubated with human amylin, we show that amylin aggregation at the sarcolemma induces oxidative stress and Ca(2+) dysregulation. In time, HIP rats developed cardiac hypertrophy and left-ventricular dilation. We then tested whether metabolites with antiaggregation properties, such as eicosanoid acids, limit myocardial amylin deposition. Rats were treated with an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase, the enzyme that degrades endogenous eicosanoids. Treatment doubled the blood concentration of eicosanoids, which drastically reduced incorporation of aggregated amylin in cardiac myocytes and blood cells, without affecting pancreatic amylin secretion. Animals in the treated group showed reduced cardiac hypertrophy and left-ventricular dilation. The cardioprotective mechanisms included the mitigation of amylin-induced cardiac oxidative stress and Ca(2+) dysregulation. The results suggest blood amylin as a novel therapeutic target in diabetic heart disease and elevating blood levels of antiaggregation metabolites as a pharmacological strategy to reduce amylin aggregation and amylin-mediated cardiotoxicity. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Activation of AMPK by berberine induces hepatic lipid accumulation by upregulation of fatty acid translocase CD36 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Hyung Sik; Shim, Gayong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Oh, Seon-Hee; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that berberine has a protective effect against metabolic syndrome such as obesity and type II diabetes mellitus by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK induces CD36 trafficking to the sarcolemma for fatty acid uptake and oxidation in contracting muscle. However, little is known about the effects of AMPK on CD36 regulation in the liver. We investigated whether AMPK activation by berberine affects CD36 expression and fatty acid uptake in hepatocytes and whether it is linked to hepatic lipid accumulation. Activation of AMPK by berberine or transduction with adenoviral vectors encoding constitutively active AMPK in HepG2 and mouse primary hepatocytes increased the expression and membrane translocation of CD36, resulting in enhanced fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation as determined by BODIPY-C16 and Nile red fluorescence, respectively. Activation of AMPK by berberine induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and subsequently induced CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) binding to the C/EBP-response element in the CD36 promoter in hepatocytes. In addition, hepatic CD36 expression and triglyceride levels were increased in normal diet-fed mice treated with berberine, but completely prevented when hepatic CD36 was silenced with adenovirus containing CD36-specific shRNA. Taken together, prolonged activation of AMPK by berberine increased CD36 expression in hepatocytes, resulting in fatty acid uptake via processes linked to hepatocellular lipid accumulation and fatty liver. - Highlights: • Berberine increases the expression and membrane translocation of CD36 in hepatocytes. • The increase of CD36 results in enhanced fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation. • Berberine-induced fatty liver is mediated by AMPK-ERK-C/EBPβ pathway. • CD36-specific shRNA inhibited berberine-induced lipid accumulation in liver.

  16. SU9516 Increases α7β1 Integrin and Ameliorates Disease Progression in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Apurva; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Tarchione, Ashley R; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Heredia, Dante J; Nunes, Andreia M; Duan, Suzann; Brewer, Paul D; Van Ry, Tyler; Hennig, Grant W; Gould, Thomas W; Dulcey, Andrés E; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Chen, Catherine Z; Hu, Xin; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan; Burkin, Dean J

    2017-06-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a complete loss of the dystrophin protein. Dystrophin is a critical component of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC), which links laminin in the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton within myofibers and provides resistance to shear stresses during muscle activity. Loss of dystrophin in DMD patients results in a fragile sarcolemma prone to contraction-induced muscle damage. The α7β1 integrin is a laminin receptor protein complex in skeletal and cardiac muscle and a major modifier of disease progression in DMD. In a muscle cell-based screen for α7 integrin transcriptional enhancers, we identified a small molecule, SU9516, that promoted increased α7β1 integrin expression. Here we show that SU9516 leads to increased α7B integrin in murine C2C12 and human DMD patient myogenic cell lines. Oral administration of SU9516 in the mdx mouse model of DMD increased α7β1 integrin in skeletal muscle, ameliorated pathology, and improved muscle function. We show that these improvements are mediated through SU9516 inhibitory actions on the p65-NF-κB pro-inflammatory and Ste20-related proline alanine rich kinase (SPAK)/OSR1 signaling pathways. This study identifies a first in-class α7 integrin-enhancing small-molecule compound with potential for the treatment of DMD. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of epitope libraries to identify exon-specific monoclonal antibodies for characterization of altered dystrophins in muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen thi Man; Morris, G.E. (North East Wales Inst., Clwyd (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-01

    The majority of mutations in Xp21-linked muscular dystrophy (MD) can be identified by PCR or Southern blotting, as deletions or duplications of groups of exons in the dystrophin gene, but it is not always possible to predict how much altered dystrophin, if any, will be produced. Use of exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on muscle biopsies from MD patients can, in principle, provide information on both the amount of altered dystrophin produced and, when dystrophin is present, the nature of the genetic deletion or point mutation. For this purpose, mAbs which recognize regions of dystrophin encoded by known exons and whose binding is unaffected by the absence of adjacent exons are required. To map mAbs to specific exons, random [open quotes]libraries[close quotes] of expressed dystrophin fragments were created by cloning DNAseI digestion fragments of a 4.3-kb dystrophin cDNA into a pTEX expression vector. The libraries were then used to locate the epitopes recognized by 48 mAbs to fragments of 25--60 amino acids within the 1,434-amino-acid dystrophin fragment used to produce the antibodies. This is sufficiently detailed to allow further refinement by using synthetic peptides and, in many cases, to identify the exon in the DMD (Duchenne MD) gene which encodes the epitope. To illustrate their use in dystrophin analysis, a Duchenne patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 42 and 43 makes a truncated dystrophin encoded by exons 1--41, and the authors now show that this can be detected in the sarcolemma by mAbs up to and including those specific for exon 41 epitopes but not by mAbs specific for exon 43 or later epitopes. 38 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Roland N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po2 [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po2 dependence of oxygen consumption, V̇o2, proportional to the rate of Po2 decrease. Fitting equations obtained from a model of heterogeneous intracellular Po2 were applied to recover the parameters describing respiration in muscle fibers, with a predicted sigmoidal shape for the dependence of V̇o2 on Po2. This curve consists of two regions connected by the point for critical Po2 of the cell (i.e., Po2 at the sarcolemma when the center of the cell becomes anoxic). The critical Po2 was below the Po2 for half-maximal respiratory rate (P50) for the cells. In six muscles at rest, the rate of oxygen consumption was 139 ± 6 nl O2/cm3·s and mitochondrial P50 was k = 10.5 ± 0.8 mmHg. The range of Po2 values inside the muscle fibers was found to be 4–5 mmHg at the critical Po2. The oxygen dependence of respiration can be studied in thin muscles under different experimental conditions. In resting muscle, the critical Po2 was substantially lower than the interstitial Po2 of 53 ± 2 mmHg, a finding that indicates that V̇o2 under this circumstance is independent of oxygen supply and is discordant with the conventional hypothesis of metabolic regulation of the oxygen supply to tissue. PMID:22523254

  19. Effects of induced Na+/Ca2+ exchanger overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca2+ channels and junctophilin-2 in pressure-overloaded hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Satoshi; Katanosaka, Yuki

    2016-11-25

    The Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) is an essential Ca 2+ efflux system in cardiomyocytes. Although NCX1 is distributed throughout the sarcolemma, a subpopulation of NCX1 is localized to transverse (T)-tubules. There is growing evidence that T-tubule disorganization is a causal event that shifts the transition from hypertrophy to heart failure (HF). However, the detailed molecular mechanisms have not been clarified. Previously, we showed that induced NCX1 expression in pressure-overloaded hearts attenuates defective excitation-contraction coupling and HF progression. Here, we examined the effects of induced NCX1 overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) and junctophilin-2 (JP2), a structural protein that connects the T-tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, in pressure-overloaded hearts. Quantitative analysis showed that the regularity of NCX1 localization was significantly decreased at 8 weeks after transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-surgery; however, T-tubule organization and the regularities of LTCC and JP2 immunofluorescent signals were maintained at this time point. These observations demonstrated that release of NCX1 from the T-tubule area occurred before the onset of T-tubule disorganization and LTCC and JP2 mislocalization. Moreover, induced NCX1 overexpression at 8 weeks post-TAC not only recovered NCX1 regularity but also prevented the decrease in LTCC and JP2 regularities at 16 weeks post-TAC. These results suggested that NCX1 may play an important role in the proper spatial distribution of LTCC and JP2 in T-tubules in the context of pressure-overloading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation and Role of Nitric Oxide (NO) and BCL-2 in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawed, F.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The dystrophin protein is located beneath the cell membrane (sarcolemma) of the muscle cell (myofiber) and serves to link the contractile machinery (sarcomere) and associated cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix where collagens transmit the muscle force (Grounds, 2008). Absent or defective dystrophin results in myofiber fragility leading to breakdown (necrosis) that is repeated over time until formation of new muscle (regeneration) fails and the amaged skeletal muscle is replaced by fibrous or fatty connective tissue (Cyrulnik and Hinton, 2008; Matsumura et al., 2009). Skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration due to stem cells that reside in skeletal muscle and non-muscle (circulating) stem cell populations (Narciso et al., 2007). However, in severe myopathic diseases such as DMD, this regenerative capacity is exhausted (Shi and Garry, 2006). This exhaustion could be explained by two plausible theories: oxidative stress (Sato et al., 2008) and replicative aging, that lead to increased rate of myofiber death (Abdel et al., 2007). If a physician suspects DMD after examining the boy, he will use the creatine phosphokinase (CPK) test to determine Introduction xiv if the muscles are damaged. This test measures the amount of CPK in the blood. In DMD patients, CPK leaks out of the muscle cell into the bloodstream, so a high level (nearly 50 to 100 times more) confirms that there is muscle damage (Burdi et al., 2009). During the 1990s and through the early years of the 21st century, many promising, sophisticated genetic techniques have been designed to ameliorate the devastating impact of muscular dystrophy on the structure and function of skeletal muscles. There is no known cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, although recent stem-cell research is showing promising vectors that may replace damaged muscle tissue (Faulkner et al., 2008). Meanwhile, the use of low energy laser irradiation, is a promising means to enhance both the survival and functionality of

  1. Tissue-specific Role of the Na,K-ATPase α2 Isozyme in Skeletal Muscle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Neumann, Jonathon C.; Rindler, Tara N.; Oshiro, Naomi; Goldhamer, David J.; Lingrel, Jerry B.; Heiny, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase α2 isozyme is the major Na,K-ATPase of mammalian skeletal muscle. This distribution is unique compared with most other cells, which express mainly the Na,K-ATPase α1 isoform, but its functional significance is not known. We developed a gene-targeted mouse (skα2−/−) in which the α2 gene (Atp1a2) is knocked out in the skeletal muscles, and examined the consequences for exercise performance, membrane potentials, contractility, and muscle fatigue. Targeted knockout was confirmed by genotyping, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Skeletal muscle cells of skα2−/− mice completely lack α2 protein and have no α2 in the transverse tubules, where its expression is normally enhanced. The α1 isoform, which is normally enhanced on the outer sarcolemma, is up-regulated 2.5-fold without change in subcellular targeting. skα2−/− mice are apparently normal under basal conditions but show significantly reduced exercise capacity when challenged to run. Their skeletal muscles produce less force, are unable to increase force to match demand, and show significantly increased susceptibility to fatigue. The impairments affect both fast and slow muscle types. The subcellular targeting of α2 to the transverse tubules is important for this role. Increasing Na,K-ATPase α1 content cannot fully compensate for the loss of α2. The increased fatigability of skα2−/− muscles is reproduced in control extensor digitorum longus muscles by selectively inhibiting α2 enzyme activity with ouabain. These results demonstrate that the Na,K-ATPase α2 isoform performs an acute, isoform-specific role in skeletal muscle. Its activity is regulated by muscle use and enables working muscles to maintain contraction and resist fatigue. PMID:23192345

  2. Rac1 governs exercise‐stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle through regulation of GLUT4 translocation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ida L.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Møller, Lisbeth L. V.; Ploug, Thorkil; Schjerling, Peter; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira; Jensen, Thomas E.; Richter, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    Key point Exercise increases skeletal muscle energy turnover and one of the important substrates for the working muscle is glucose taken up from the blood.The GTPase Rac1 can be activated by muscle contraction and has been found to be necessary for insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake, although its role in exercise‐stimulated glucose uptake is unknown.We show that Rac1 regulates the translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in skeletal muscle during exercise.We find that Rac1 knockout mice display significantly reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle during exercise. Abstract Exercise increases skeletal muscle energy turnover and one of the important substrates for the working muscle is glucose taken up from the blood. Despite extensive efforts, the signalling mechanisms vital for glucose uptake during exercise are not yet fully understood, although the GTPase Rac1 is a candidate molecule. The present study investigated the role of Rac1 in muscle glucose uptake and substrate utilization during treadmill exercise in mice in vivo. Exercise‐induced uptake of radiolabelled 2‐deoxyglucose at 65% of maximum running capacity was blocked in soleus muscle and decreased by 80% and 60% in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles, respectively, in muscle‐specific inducible Rac1 knockout (mKO) mice compared to wild‐type littermates. By developing an assay to quantify endogenous GLUT4 translocation, we observed that GLUT4 content at the sarcolemma in response to exercise was reduced in Rac1 mKO muscle. Our findings implicate Rac1 as a regulatory element critical for controlling glucose uptake during exercise via regulation of GLUT4 translocation. PMID:27061726

  3. Rac1 Activation Caused by Membrane Translocation of a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor in Akt2-Mediated Insulin Signaling in Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

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    Nobuyuki Takenaka

    Full Text Available Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT4, which is translocated to the plasma membrane following insulin stimulation. Several lines of evidence suggested that the protein kinase Akt2 plays a key role in this insulin action. The small GTPase Rac1 has also been implicated as a regulator of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, acting downstream of Akt2. However, the mechanisms whereby Akt2 regulates Rac1 activity remain obscure. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 has been identified as a direct regulator of Rac1 in Akt2-mediated signaling, but its characterization was performed mostly in cultured myoblasts. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FLJ00068 indeed acts downstream of Akt2 as a Rac1 regulator by using mouse skeletal muscle. Small interfering RNA knockdown of FLJ00068 markedly diminished GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma following insulin administration or ectopic expression of a constitutively activated mutant of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Akt2. Additionally, insulin and these constitutively activated mutants caused the activation of Rac1 as shown by immunofluorescent microscopy using a polypeptide probe specific to activated Rac1 in isolated gastrocnemius muscle fibers and frozen sections of gastrocnemius muscle. This Rac1 activation was also abrogated by FLJ00068 knockdown. Furthermore, we observed translocation of FLJ00068 to the cell periphery following insulin stimulation in cultured myoblasts. Localization of FLJ00068 in the plasma membrane in insulin-stimulated, but not unstimulated, myoblasts and mouse gastrocnemius muscle was further affirmed by subcellular fractionation and subsequent immunoblotting. Collectively, these results strongly support a critical role of FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation in mouse skeletal muscle insulin signaling.

  4. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-rescue of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice does not require nNOS localization to the cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available Survival of dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dko mice was increased by muscle-specific expression of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS transgene. Dko mice expressing the transgene (nNOS TG+/dko experienced delayed onset of mortality and increased life-span. The nNOS TG+/dko mice demonstrated a significant decrease in the concentration of CD163+, M2c macrophages that can express arginase and promote fibrosis. The decrease in M2c macrophages was associated with a significant reduction in fibrosis of heart, diaphragm and hindlimb muscles of nNOS TG+/dko mice. The nNOS transgene had no effect on the concentration of cytolytic, CD68+, M1 macrophages. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in the extent of muscle fiber lysis in the nNOS TG+/dko mice. These findings show that nNOS/NO (nitric oxide-mediated decreases in M2c macrophages lead to a reduction in the muscle fibrosis that is associated with increased mortality in mice lacking dystrophin and utrophin. Interestingly, the dramatic and beneficial effects of the nNOS transgene were not attributable to localization of nNOS protein at the cell membrane. We did not detect any nNOS protein at the sarcolemma in nNOS TG+/dko muscles. This important observation shows that sarcolemmal localization is not necessary for nNOS to have beneficial effects in dystrophic tissue and the presence of nNOS in the cytosol of dystrophic muscle fibers can ameliorate the pathology and most importantly, significantly increase life-span.

  5. Early dystrophin loss is coincident with the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P Prado

    Full Text Available Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, one of the most important risk factors for heart failure (HF. Despite the importance of cardiac hypertrophy as a risk factor for the development of HF, not all hypertrophied hearts will ultimately fail. Alterations of cytoskeletal and sarcolemma-associated proteins are considered markers cardiac remodeling during HF. Dystrophin provides mechanical stability to the plasma membrane through its interactions with the actin cytoskeleton and, indirectly, to extracellular matrix proteins. This study was undertaken to evaluate dystrophin and calpain-1 in the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to HF. Wistar rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction and killed at 30, 60 and 90 days post surgery (dps. Cardiac function and blood pressure were evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blotting and immunofluorescence performed for dystrophin, calpain-1, alpha-fodrin and calpastatin. Statistical analyses were performed and considered significant when p<0.05. After 90 dps, 70% of the animals showed hypertrophic hearts (HH and 30% hypertrophic+dilated hearts (HD. Systolic and diastolic functions were preserved at 30 and 60 dps, however, decreased in the HD group. Blood pressure, cardiomyocyte diameter and collagen content were increased at all time points. Dystrophin expression was lightly increased at 30 and 60 dps and HH group. HD group showed decreased expression of dystrophin and calpastatin and increased expression of calpain-1 and alpha-fodrin fragments. The first signals of dystrophin reduction were observed as early as 60 dps. In conclusion, some hearts present a distinct molecular pattern at an early stage of the disease; this pattern could provide an opportunity to identify these failure-prone hearts during the development of the cardiac disease. We showed that decreased expression of dystrophin and increased expression of calpains are coincident and could work as possible

  6. Neutralization of Apis mellifera bee venom activities by suramin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kik, Camila Z; Fernandes, Fabrício F A; Tomaz, Marcelo Amorim; Gaban, Glauco A; Fonseca, Tatiane F; Calil-Elias, Sabrina; Oliveira, Suellen D S; Silva, Claudia L M; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco; Melo, Paulo A

    2013-06-01

    In this work we evaluated the ability of suramin, a polysulfonated naphthylurea derivative, to antagonize the cytotoxic and enzymatic effects of the crude venom of Apis mellifera. Suramin was efficient to decrease the lethality in a dose-dependent way. The hemoconcentration caused by lethal dose injection of bee venom was abolished by suramin (30 μg/g). The edematogenic activity of the venom (0.3 μg/g) was antagonized by suramin (10 μg/g) in all treatment protocols. The changes in the vascular permeability caused by A. mellifera (1 μg/g) venom were inhibited by suramin (30 μg/g) in the pre- and posttreatment as well as when the venom was preincubated with suramin. In addition, suramin also inhibited cultured endothelial cell lesion, as well as in vitro myotoxicity, evaluated in mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle, which was inhibited by suramin (10 and 25 μM), decreasing the rate of CK release, showing that suramin protected the sarcolemma against damage induced by components of bee venom (2.5 μg/mL). Moreover, suramin inhibited the in vivo myotoxicity induced by i.m. injection of A. mellifera venom in mice (0.5 μg/g). The analysis of the area under the plasma CK vs. time curve showed that preincubation, pre- and posttreatment with suramin (30 μg/g) inhibited bee venom myotoxic activity in mice by about 89%, 45% and 40%, respectively. Suramin markedly inhibited the PLA2 activity in a concentration-dependent way (1-30 μM). Being suramin a polyanion molecule, the effects observed may be due to the interaction of its charges with the polycation components present in A. mellifera bee venom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The utrophin A 5'-UTR drives cap-independent translation exclusively in skeletal muscles of transgenic mice and interacts with eEF1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, P; Coriati, A; Bélanger, G; De Repentigny, Y; Lee, J; Kothary, R; Holcik, M; Jasmin, B J

    2010-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating expression of utrophin A are of therapeutic interest since upregulating its expression at the sarcolemma can compensate for the lack of dystrophin in animal models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). The 5'-UTR of utrophin A has been previously shown to drive cap-independent internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation in response to muscle regeneration and glucocorticoid treatment. To determine whether the utrophin A IRES displays tissue specific activity, we generated transgenic mice harboring control (CMV/betaGAL/CAT) or utrophin A 5'-UTR (CMV/betaGAL/UtrA/CAT) bicistronic reporter transgenes. Examination of multiple tissues from two CMV/betaGAL/UtrA/CAT lines revealed that the utrophin A 5'-UTR drives cap-independent translation of the reporter gene exclusively in skeletal muscles and no other examined tissues. This expression pattern suggested that skeletal muscle-specific factors are involved in IRES-mediated translation of utrophin A. We performed RNA-affinity chromatography experiments combined with mass spectrometry to identify trans-factors that bind the utrophin A 5'-UTR and identified eukaryotic elongation factor 1A2 (eEF1A2). UV-crosslinking experiments confirmed the specificity of this interaction. Regions of the utrophin A 5'-UTR that bound eEF1A2 also mediated cap-independent translation in C2C12 muscle cells. Cultured cells lacking eEF1A2 had reduced IRES activity compared with cells overexpressing eEF1A2. Together, these results suggest an important role for eEF1A2 in driving cap-independent translation of utrophin A in skeletal muscle. The trans-factors and signaling pathways driving skeletal-muscle specific IRES-mediated translation of utrophin A could provide unique targets for developing pharmacological-based DMD therapies.

  8. Intramuscular injection of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells improves cardiac function in dilated cardiomyopathy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chenggang; Hou, Xu; Wang, Benzhen; Chi, Jingwei; Jiang, Yanjie; Zhang, Caining; Li, Zipu

    2017-01-28

    Stem cells provide a promising candidate for the treatment of the fatal pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study aimed to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on the cardiac function of a DCM rat model. A DCM model was established by intraperitoneal injections of doxorubicin in Sprague-Dawley rats. hUCMSCs at different concentrations or cultured medium were injected via limb skeletal muscles, with blank medium injected as the control. The rats were monitored for 4 weeks, meanwhile BNP, cTNI, VEGF, HGF, GM-CSF, and LIF in the peripheral blood were examined by ELISA, and cardiac function was monitored by echocardiography (Echo-CG). Finally, the expression of IGF-1, HGF, and VEGF in the myocardium was examined by histoimmunochemistry and real-time PCR, and the ultrastructure of the myocardium was examined by electron microscopy. Injection of hUCMSCs markedly improved cardiac function in the DCM rats by significantly elevating left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS). The BNP and cTNI levels in the peripheral blood were reduced by hUCMSCs, while HGF, LIF, GM-CSF, and VEGF were increased by hUCMSCs. Expression of IGF-1, HGF, and VEGF in the myocardium from the DCM rats was significantly increased by hUCMSC injection. Furthermore, hUCMSCs protected the ultrastructure of cardiomyocytes by attenuating mitochondrial swelling and maintaining sarcolemma integrity. Intramuscular injection of UCMSCs can improve DCM-induced cardiac function impairment and protect the myocardium. These effects may be mediated by regulation of relevant cytokines in serum and the myocardium.

  9. Adverse effects of cyclosporine A on HSP25, alpha B-crystallin and myofibrillar cytoskeleton in rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Bonomini, Francesca; Lavazza, Antonio; Rodella, Luigi Fabrizio; Rezzani, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is a universally used immunosuppressive drug which induces adverse side effects in several organs, but its impact on the heart is still controversial. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), such as HSP25 and alpha B-crystallin, are cytoprotective stress proteins exceptionally represented in the heart. They act as myofibrillar chaperones that help actin and desmin to maintain their optimum configuration and stability, thereby antagonizing oxidative damage. The present study examined: (1) the cardiac distribution and abundance of HSP25 and alpha B-crystallin in rats receiving CsA at a therapeutic dosage (15 mg/kg/day) for 42 days and 63 days; (2) the presence of myofibrillar proteins, such as actin, alpha-actinin and desmin following the CsA treatments; (3) the subcellular effects of prolonged CsA exposure on the cardiomyocytes by histopathology and transmission electron microscopy. After 63 days CsA intake, sHSPs translocated from a regular sarcomeric pattern to peripheral sarcolemma and intercalated discs, together with actin and desmin. In contrast, the sarcomeric alpha-actinin pattern did not change in all experimental groups. The abundance of actin and HSP25 was unchanged in every time point of treatment while after 63 days CsA, alpha B-crystallin and desmin levels significantly decreased. Furthermore CsA induced fibrosis, irregular sarcomeric alignment and damaged desmosomes. These findings indicate that following prolonged CsA exposure, the cardiac muscle network was affected. In particular, the translocation of sHSPs to intercalated discs merits special consideration as a direct compensatory mechanism to limit CsA cardiotoxicity.

  10. Integrins, muscle agrin and sarcoglycans during muscular inactivity conditions: an immunohistochemical study

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    G Anastasi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoglycans are transmembrane proteins that seem to be functionally and pathologically as important as dystrophin. Sarcoglycans cluster together to form a complex, which is localized in the cell membrane of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It has been proposed that the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC links the actin cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix and the proper maintenance of this connection is thought to be crucial to the mechanical stability of the sarcolemma. The integrins are a family of heterodimeric cell surface receptors which play a crucial role in cell adhesion including cell-matrix and intracellular interactions and therefore are involved in various biological phenomena, including cell migration, and differentiation tissue repair. Sarcoglycans and integrins play a mechanical and signaling role stabilizing the systems during cycles of contraction and relaxation.Several studies suggested the possibility that integrins might play a role in muscle agrin signalling. On these basis, we performed an immunohistochemical analyzing sarcoglycans, integrins and agrin, on human skeletal muscle affected by sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, in order to better define the correlation between these proteins and neurogenic atrophy due to peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed the existence of a cascade mechanism which provoke a loss of regulatory effects of muscle activity on costameres, due to loss of muscle and neural agrin.This cascade mechanism could determine a quantitative modification of transmembrane receptors and loss of ?7B could be replaced and reinforced by enhanced expression of the ?7A integrin to restore muscle fiber viability. Second, it is possible that the reduced cycles of contraction and relaxation of muscle fibers, during muscular atrophy, provoke a loss of mechanical stresses transmitted over cell surface receptors that physically couple the cytoskeleton to extracellular matrix. Consequently, these mechanical

  11. Investigating the role of uncoupling of Troponin I phosphorylation from changes in myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity in the pathogenesis of Cardiomyopathy

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    Andrew Easton Messer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Contraction in the mammalian heart is controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration as it is in all striated muscle, but the heart has an additional signalling system that comes into play to increase heart rate and cardiac output during exercise or stress. β-adrenergic stimulation of heart muscle cells leads to release of cyclic-AMP and the activation of protein kinase A which phosphorylates key proteins in the sarcolemma, sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile apparatus. Troponin I (TnI and Myosin Binding Protein C (MyBP-C are the prime targets in the myofilaments. TnI phosphorylation lowers myofibrillar Ca2+-sensitivity and increases the speed of Ca2+-dissociation and relaxation (lusitropic effect.Recent studies have shown that this relationship between Ca2+-sensitivity and TnI phosphorylation may be unstable. In familial cardiomyopathies, both dilated and hypertrophic (DCM and HCM, a mutation in one of the proteins of the thin filament often results in the loss of the relationship (uncoupling and blunting of the lusitropic response. For familial dilated cardiomyopathy in thin filament proteins it has been proposed that this uncoupling is causative of the phenotype. Uncoupling has also been found in human heart tissue from patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy as a secondary effect. Recently, it has been found that Ca2+-sensitizing drugs can promote uncoupling, whilst one Ca2+-desensitising drug Epigallocatechin 3-Gallate (EGCG can reverse uncoupling.We will discuss recent findings about the role of uncoupling in the development of cardiomyopathies and the molecular mechanism of the process.

  12. Piezo channels and GsMTx4: Two milestones in our understanding of excitatory mechanosensitive channels and their role in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchyna, Thomas M

    2017-11-01

    Discovery of Piezo channels and the reporting of their sensitivity to the inhibitor GsMTx4 were important milestones in the study of non-selective cationic mechanosensitive channels (MSCs) in normal physiology and pathogenesis. GsMTx4 had been used for years to investigate the functional role of cationic MSCs, especially in muscle tissue, but with little understanding of its target or inhibitory mechanism. The sensitivity of Piezo channels to bilayer stress and its robust mechanosensitivity when expressed in heterologous systems were keys to determining GsMTx4's mechanism of action. However, questions remain regarding Piezo's role in muscle function due to the non-selective nature of GsMTx4 inhibition toward membrane mechanoenzymes and the implication of MCS channel types by genetic knockdown. Evidence supporting Piezo like activity, at least in the developmental stages of muscle, is presented. While the MSC targets of GsMTx4 in muscle pathology are unclear, its muscle protective effects are clearly demonstrated in two recent in situ studies on normal cardiomyocytes and dystrophic skeletal muscle. The muscle protective function may be due to the combined effect of GsMTx4's inhibitory action on cationic MSCs like Piezo and TRP, and its potentiation of repolarizing K + selective MSCs like K2P and SAKCa. Paradoxically, the potent in vitro action of GsMTx4 on many physiological functions seems to conflict with its lack of in situ side-effects on normal animal physiology. Future investigations into cytoskeletal control of sarcolemma mechanics and the suspected inclusion of MSCs in membrane micro/nano sized domains with distinct mechanical properties will aide our understanding of this dichotomy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Activation of AMPK by berberine induces hepatic lipid accumulation by upregulation of fatty acid translocase CD36 in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Jung, Seung-Hwan [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Sik [School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Gayong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Oh, Yu-Kyoung [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seon-Hee [The Division of Natural Medical Sciences, College of Health Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Dae Won [Internal Medicine, Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Hoon, E-mail: lee@snu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that berberine has a protective effect against metabolic syndrome such as obesity and type II diabetes mellitus by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK induces CD36 trafficking to the sarcolemma for fatty acid uptake and oxidation in contracting muscle. However, little is known about the effects of AMPK on CD36 regulation in the liver. We investigated whether AMPK activation by berberine affects CD36 expression and fatty acid uptake in hepatocytes and whether it is linked to hepatic lipid accumulation. Activation of AMPK by berberine or transduction with adenoviral vectors encoding constitutively active AMPK in HepG2 and mouse primary hepatocytes increased the expression and membrane translocation of CD36, resulting in enhanced fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation as determined by BODIPY-C16 and Nile red fluorescence, respectively. Activation of AMPK by berberine induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and subsequently induced CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) binding to the C/EBP-response element in the CD36 promoter in hepatocytes. In addition, hepatic CD36 expression and triglyceride levels were increased in normal diet-fed mice treated with berberine, but completely prevented when hepatic CD36 was silenced with adenovirus containing CD36-specific shRNA. Taken together, prolonged activation of AMPK by berberine increased CD36 expression in hepatocytes, resulting in fatty acid uptake via processes linked to hepatocellular lipid accumulation and fatty liver. - Highlights: • Berberine increases the expression and membrane translocation of CD36 in hepatocytes. • The increase of CD36 results in enhanced fatty acid uptake and lipid accumulation. • Berberine-induced fatty liver is mediated by AMPK-ERK-C/EBPβ pathway. • CD36-specific shRNA inhibited berberine-induced lipid accumulation in liver.

  14. Cytoskeleton, L-type Ca2+ and stretch activated channels in injured skeletal muscle

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    Fabio Francini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The extra-sarcomeric cytoskeleton (actin microfilaments and anchoring proteins is involved in maintaining the sarco-membrane stiffness and integrity and in turn the mechanical stability and function of the intra- and sub-sarcoplasmic proteins. Accordingly, it regulates Ca2+ entry through the L-type Ca2+ channels and the mechano-sensitivity of the stretch activated channels (SACs. Moreover, being intra-sarcomeric cytoskeleton bound to costameric proteins and other proteins of the sarcoplasma by intermediate filaments, as desmin, it integrates the properties of the sarcolemma with the skeletal muscle fibres contraction. The aim of this research was to compare the cytoskeleton, SACs and the ECC alterations in two different types of injured skeletal muscle fibres: by muscle denervation and mechanical overload (eccentric contraction. Experiments on denervation were made in isolated Soleus muscle of male Wistar rats; forced eccentric-contraction (EC injury was achieved in Extensor Digitorum Longus muscles of Swiss mice. The method employed conventional intracellular recording with microelectrodes inserted in a single fibre of an isolated skeletal muscle bundle. The state of cytoskeleton was evaluated by recording SAC currents and by evaluating the resting membrane potential (RMP value determined in current-clamp mode. The results demonstrated that in both injured skeletal muscle conditions the functionality of L-type Ca2+ current, ICa, was affected. In parallel, muscle fibres showed an increase of the resting membrane permeability and of the SAC current. These issues, together with a more depolarized RMP are an index of altered cytoskeleton. In conclusion, we found a symilar alteration of ICa, SAC and cytoskeleton in both injured skeletal muscle conditions.

  15. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  16. Ventricular performance and Na+-K+ ATPase activity are reduced early and late after myocardial infarction in rats

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    I. Stefanon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction leads to compensatory ventricular remodeling. Disturbances in myocardial contractility depend on the active transport of Ca2+ and Na+, which are regulated by Na+-K+ ATPase. Inappropriate regulation of Na+-K+ ATPase activity leads to excessive loss of K+ and gain of Na+ by the cell. We determined the participation of Na+-K+ ATPase in ventricular performance early and late after myocardial infarction. Wistar rats (8-10 per group underwent left coronary artery ligation (infarcted, Inf or sham-operation (Sham. Ventricular performance was measured at 3 and 30 days after surgery using the Langendorff technique. Left ventricular systolic pressure was obtained under different ventricular diastolic pressures and increased extracellular Ca2+ concentrations (Ca2+e and after low and high ouabain concentrations. The baseline coronary perfusion pressure increased 3 days after myocardial infarction and normalized by 30 days (Sham 3 = 88 ± 6; Inf 3 = 130 ± 9; Inf 30 = 92 ± 7 mmHg; P < 0.05. The inotropic response to Ca2+e and ouabain was reduced at 3 and 30 days after myocardial infarction (Ca2+ = 1.25 mM; Sham 3 = 70 ± 3; Inf 3 = 45 ± 2; Inf 30 = 29 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05, while the Frank-Starling mechanism was preserved. At 3 and 30 days after myocardial infarction, ventricular Na+-K+ ATPase activity and contractility were reduced. This Na+-K+ ATPase hypoactivity may modify the Na+, K+ and Ca2+ transport across the sarcolemma resulting in ventricular dysfunction.

  17. Regenerative Potential of D-δ-Tocotrienol Rich Fraction on Crushed Skeletal Muscle of Diabetic Rats

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    Bijo Elsy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delayed muscle growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle in diabetics is believed to be due to diabetic myopathy because of alteration in the skeletal muscle homeostatis. Since vitamin E is a natural antioxidant and is also important for the integrity of sarcolemma, the present study was designed to explore the muscle regenerative potency of d-δ-tocotrienol-rich fraction (d-δ-TRF on crushed skeletal muscle in healthy and diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced through single subcutaneous injection of alloxan (100 mg/kg. Twenty-four albino rats were divided into four groups; healthy control, diabetic control, healthy treated, and diabetic treated. Treated groups received injections orally, daily (200 mg/kg for 3 weeks. A horizontal skin incision was made on the shaved right mid-thigh region, by splitting the fascia between gluteus maximus and tensor fascia lata, and gluteus maximus was crushed with Kocher’s forceps. Skin wound was closed with an absorbable suture. The crushed muscle changes were studied by assessing the histopathological features, histomorphological measurements, and biochemical analyses on 3rd week following induction of injury. One-way “ANOVA” followed by Tukey’s test and Student t-test were used for statistical analysis of data. Results: Results obtained through various methods indicate that the d-δ-TRF treated groups have controlled glycemic status, improved antioxidant capacity, faster revascularization, re-innervation, regeneration of myofibers, and connective tissue remodeling. Conclusion: It is, therefore, concluded that the d-δ-TRF is a beneficial nutritional adjuvant for skeletal muscles’ structural and functional recovery after crushed injury in both healthy and diabetics. [J Interdiscip Histopathol 2017; 5(2.000: 36-42

  18. Beneficial Effects of N-acetylcysteine and N-mercaptopropionylglycine on Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in the Heart.

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    Bartekova, Monika; Barancik, Miroslav; Ferenczyova, Kristina; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2018-01-30

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the heart as a consequence of myocardial infarction or cardiac surgery represents a serious clinical problem. One of the most prominent mechanisms of I/R injury is the development of oxidative stress in the heart. In this regard, I/R has been shown to enhance the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in the heart which lead to the imbalance between the pro-oxidants and antioxidant capacities of the endogenous radical-scavenging systems. Increasing the antioxidant capacity of the heart by the administration of exogenous antioxidants is considered beneficial for the heart exposed to I/R. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and Nmercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) are two sulphur containing amino acid substances, which belong to the broad category of exogenous antioxidants that have been tested for their protective potential in cardiac I/R injury. Pretreatment of hearts with both NAC and MPG has demonstrated that these agents attenuate the I/R-induced alterations in sarcolemma, sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and myofibrils in addition to improving cardiac function. While experimental studies have revealed promising data suggesting beneficial effects of NAC and MPG in cardiac I/R injury, the results of clinical trials are not conclusive because both positive and no effects of these substances have been reported on the post-ischemic recovery of heart following cardiac surgery or myocardial infarction. It is concluded that both NAC and MPG exert beneficial effects in preventing the I/Rinduced injury; however, further studies are needed to establish their effectiveness in reversing the I/R-induced abnormalities in the heart. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Progressive muscular dystrophy: Duchenne type. Controversies of the kinesitherapy treatment

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    Ana Valéria de Araujo Leitão

    Full Text Available The authors carried out a study of children with progressive muscular dystrophy of Duchenne type (DMD, giving special attention to physiatrical follow-up, having in mind that the practice of exercises has been debated very much in the specialized literature. The goal of this study is to try to settle the limits for the utilization of kinesitherapy which should be applied only in specific situations, such as: after skeletal muscular trauma or when the respiratory system is at risk. In this situation the physiatrical procedure would be to restrict physical activity, with early use of wheelchairs and the exclusion of the use of orthoses for orthostatism. DMD, at present, has been considered a result of duplication (60%, deletion (5 to 6% or point mutations at gen Xp21 (Zatz, 1994, that codifies a protein called Dystrophin ( Hoffman et al., 1987. Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal sarcolemmic protein that constitutes about .002% of the total protein of the muscle, present in skeletal fibers concentrated in muscle tendinous joints, which supplies mechanical reinforcement to the surface of the membrane during stretching and shortening physical activity. This protein is absent in DMD cases, wherefore, the sarcolemma undergoes a segmentary necrosis losing its contractile property during eccentric and concentric physical activity. The importance of physiatrical follow-up for DMD patients is to avoid deformities and tendon shortening, to ameliorate the patient's quality of life, to provide respiratory assistance and general couseling to members of the patient's family. The objective of this study is to try to clarify the risks and possibilities of kinesitherapy applied to DMD cases.

  20. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; Ptreatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  1. Muscle Structure Influences Utrophin Expression in mdx Mice

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    Banks, Glen B.; Combs, Ariana C.; Odom, Guy L.; Bloch, Robert J.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To examine the influence of muscle structure on the pathogenesis of DMD we generated mdx4cv:desmin double knockout (dko) mice. The dko male mice died of apparent cardiorespiratory failure at a median age of 76 days compared to 609 days for the desmin−/− mice. An ∼2.5 fold increase in utrophin expression in the dko skeletal muscles prevented necrosis in ∼91% of 1a, 2a and 2d/x fiber-types. In contrast, utrophin expression was reduced in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma of the dko fast 2b fibers leading to increased membrane fragility and dystrophic pathology. Despite lacking extrasynaptic utrophin, the dko fast 2b fibers were less dystrophic than the mdx4cv fast 2b fibers suggesting utrophin-independent mechanisms were also contributing to the reduced dystrophic pathology. We found no overt change in the regenerative capacity of muscle stem cells when comparing the wild-type, desmin−/−, mdx4cv and dko gastrocnemius muscles injured with notexin. Utrophin could form costameric striations with α-sarcomeric actin in the dko to maintain the integrity of the membrane, but the lack of restoration of the NODS (nNOS, α-dystrobrevin 1 and 2, α1-syntrophin) complex and desmin coincided with profound changes to the sarcomere alignment in the diaphragm, deposition of collagen between the myofibers, and impaired diaphragm function. We conclude that the dko mice may provide new insights into the structural mechanisms that influence endogenous utrophin expression that are pertinent for developing a therapy for DMD. PMID:24922526

  2. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo.

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    Sebastian Frese

    Full Text Available Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human

  3. Protein-anchoring therapy to target extracellular matrix proteins to their physiological destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mikako; Ohno, Kinji

    2018-02-20

    Endplate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency is a form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) caused by mutations in COLQ, which encodes collagen Q (ColQ). ColQ is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that anchors AChE to the synaptic basal lamina. Biglycan, encoded by BGN, is another ECM protein that binds to the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) on skeletal muscle, which links the actin cytoskeleton and ECM proteins to stabilize the sarcolemma during repeated muscle contractions. Upregulation of biglycan stabilizes the DPAC. Gene therapy can potentially ameliorate any disease that can be recapitulated in cultured cells. However, the difficulty of tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific regulated expression of transgenes, as well as the difficulty of introducing a transgene into all cells in a specific tissue, prevents us from successfully applying gene therapy to many human diseases. In contrast to intracellular proteins, an ECM protein is anchored to the target tissue via its specific binding affinity for protein(s) expressed on the cell surface within the target tissue. Exploiting this unique feature of ECM proteins, we developed protein-anchoring therapy in which a transgene product expressed even in remote tissues can be delivered and anchored to a target tissue using specific binding signals. We demonstrate the application of protein-anchoring therapy to two disease models. First, intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8-COLQ to Colq-deficient mice, resulting in specific anchoring of ectopically expressed ColQ-AChE at the NMJ, markedly improved motor functions, synaptic transmission, and the ultrastructure of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In the second example, Mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, were intravenously injected with AAV8-BGN. The treatment ameliorated motor deficits, mitigated muscle histopathologies, decreased plasma creatine kinase activities, and upregulated expression

  4. Immunohistochemical alterations of dystrophin in congenital muscular dystrophy Alterações imuno-hístoquímicas da distrofina na distrofia muscular congênita

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    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin distribution in the plasma muscle membrane using immunohystochemistry was studied in 22 children with congenital muscular dystrophy. The dystrophin was detected by immunofluorescence in muscle biopsy through a polyclonal antibody. All the cases had patchy interruptions of the fluorescence in the plasma membrane. A large patchy interruption of the sarcolemma was found in 17 cases, small interruption in 12, and a combination of large and small patchy discontinuity in 7. Small gaps around the fiber like a rosary were found in 15 cases. The frequency of these abnormalities ranged cases from: all fibers in 5 cases, frequent in 8, occasional in 5, and rare in 4. Five cases had total absence of immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the dystrophin expression is abnormal in this group of children and that this type of abnormalities can not be differentiated from early Becker muscular dystrophy nor childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy through immunohystochemistry alone.Foi estudada a distribuição da distrofina na membrana plasmática das fibras musculares em 22 crianças com distrofia muscular congênita, através de técnicas de imuno-histoquímica. A distrofina foi identificada nas biópsias musculares processadas a fresco, por técnicas de imunofluorescência utilizando anticorpos policlonais. Todos os casos tinham interrupções da imunofluorescência na membrana plasmática. Em 17 elas eram grandes, em 12 eram pequenas e em 7 eram de ambos os tipos. Fibras com interrupções pequenas e constantes, como um rosário, foram vistas em 15 casos. Essas anormalidades estavam presentes em todas as fibras em 5 casos, eram frequentes em 8, ocasionais em 5 e raras em 4. Cinco casos mostraram fibras sem distrofina. Esses dados sugerem que a expressão da distrofina é anormal nesse grupo de crianças. Essas anormalidades podem também ser encontradas em casos precoces de distrofia muscular de Becker e distrofia autoss

  5. Sarcospan: a small protein with large potential for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purification of the proteins associated with dystrophin, the gene product responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, led to the discovery of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Sarcospan, a 25-kDa transmembrane protein, was the last component to be identified and its function in skeletal muscle has been elusive. This review will focus on progress over the last decade revealing that sarcospan is an important regulator of muscle cell adhesion, strength, and regeneration. Investigations using several transgenic mouse models demonstrate that overexpression of sarcospan in the mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy ameliorates pathology and restores muscle cell binding to laminin. Sarcospan improves cell surface expression of the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes as well as α7β1 integrin, which are the three major laminin-binding complexes in muscle. Utrophin and α7β1 integrin compensate for the loss of dystrophin and the finding that sarcospan increases their abundance at the extra-synaptic sarcolemma supports the use of sarcospan as a therapeutic target. Newly discovered phenotypes in sarcospan-deficient mice, including a reduction in specific force output and increased drop in force in the diaphragm muscle, result from decreased utrophin and dystrophin expression and further reveal sarcospan’s role in determining abundance of these complexes. Dystrophin protein levels and the specific force output of the diaphragm muscle are further reduced upon genetic removal of α7 integrin (Itga7) in SSPN-deficient mice, demonstrating that interactions between integrin and sarcospan are critical for maintenance of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and force production of the diaphragm muscle. Sarcospan is a major regulator of Akt signaling pathways and sarcospan-deficiency significantly impairs muscle regeneration, a process that is dependent on Akt activation. Intriguingly, sarcospan regulates glycosylation of a specific subpopulation of

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Prolong Cardiac Repolarization through Transcriptional Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Stan; Deurinck, Mark; Ju, Haisong; Traebert, Martin; McLean, LeeAnne; Marlowe, Jennifer; Emotte, Corinne; Tritto, Elaine; Tseng, Min; Shultz, Michael; Friedrichs, Gregory S

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of anticancer agents that modify gene expression by altering the acetylation status of lysine residues of histone proteins, thereby inducing transcription, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and cell death or apoptosis of cancer cells. In the clinical setting, treatment with HDAC inhibitors has been associated with delayed cardiac repolarization and in rare instances a lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmia known as torsades de pointes. The mechanism(s) of HDAC inhibitor-induced effects on cardiac repolarization is unknown. We demonstrate that administration of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors to dogs causes delayed but persistent increases in the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc), an in vivo measure of cardiac repolarization, at timepoints far removed from the Tmax for parent drug and metabolites. Transcriptional profiling of ventricular myocardium from dogs treated with various HDAC inhibitors demonstrated effects on genes involved in protein trafficking, scaffolding and insertion of various ion channels into the cell membrane as well as genes for specific ion channel subunits involved in cardiac repolarization. Extensive in vitro ion channel profiling of various structural classes of HDAC inhibitors (and their major metabolites) by binding and acute patch clamp assays failed to show any consistent correlations with direct ion channel blockade. Drug-induced rescue of an intracellular trafficking-deficient mutant potassium ion channel, hERG (G601S), and decreased maturation (glycosylation) of wild-type hERG expressed by CHO cells in vitro correlated with prolongation of QTc intervals observed in vivo The results suggest that HDAC inhibitor-induced prolongation of cardiac repolarization may be mediated in part by transcriptional changes of genes required for ion channel trafficking and localization to the sarcolemma. These data have broad implications for the development of these drug classes and

  7. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

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    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-06-06

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd -/- ) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  8. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

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    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  9. Increased free Zn2+ correlates induction of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum stress via altered expression levels of Zn2+ -transporters in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgar, Yusuf; Durak, Aysegul; Tuncay, Erkan; Bitirim, Ceylan Verda; Ozcinar, Evren; Inan, Mustafa Bahadir; Tokcaer-Keskin, Zeynep; Akcali, Kamil Can; Akar, Ahmet Ruchan; Turan, Belma

    2018-03-01

    Zn 2+ -homoeostasis including free Zn 2+ ([Zn 2+ ] i ) is regulated through Zn 2+ -transporters and their comprehensive understanding may be important due to their contributions to cardiac dysfunction. Herein, we aimed to examine a possible role of Zn 2+ -transporters in the development of heart failure (HF) via induction of ER stress. We first showed localizations of ZIP8, ZIP14 and ZnT8 to both sarcolemma and S(E)R in ventricular cardiomyocytes (H9c2 cells) using confocal together with calculated Pearson's coefficients. The expressions of ZIP14 and ZnT8 were significantly increased with decreased ZIP8 level in HF. Moreover, [Zn 2+ ] i was significantly high in doxorubicin-treated H9c2 cells compared to their controls. We found elevated levels of ER stress markers, GRP78 and CHOP/Gadd153, confirming the existence of ER stress. Furthermore, we measured markedly increased total PKC and PKCα expression and PKCα-phosphorylation in HF. A PKC inhibition induced significant decrease in expressions of these ER stress markers compared to controls. Interestingly, direct increase in [Zn 2+ ] i using zinc-ionophore induced significant increase in these markers. On the other hand, when we induced ER stress directly with tunicamycin, we could not observe any effect on expression levels of these Zn 2+ transporters. Additionally, increased [Zn 2+ ] i could induce marked activation of PKCα. Moreover, we observed marked decrease in [Zn 2+ ] i under PKC inhibition in H9c2 cells. Overall, our present data suggest possible role of Zn 2+ transporters on an intersection pathway with increased [Zn 2+ ] i and PKCα activation and induction of HF, most probably via development of ER stress. Therefore, our present data provide novel information how a well-controlled [Zn 2+ ] i via Zn 2+ transporters and PKCα can be important therapeutic approach in prevention/treatment of HF. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and

  10. Serum and tissue markers of myopathy in patients with colorectal cancer

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    Nicoletta Adami

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles in patients with cancer undergo many changes due to immuno-inflammatory factors of tumor origin, or to chemotherapy and irradiation. Aim of the present study is to identify serological biomarkers and early myopathic features in skeletal muscle biopsies from weight stable patients bearing colorectal cancer at the onset of disease. Morphometric analyses by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were performed on intraoperative muscle biopsies from patients with early colorectal cancer and from weight stable patients undergoing surgery for benign non-inflammatory conditions. Serological analyses for testing markers of inflammation (C Reactive Protein, CRP, muscle enzymes, (Creatin Kinase, CK, soluble isoforms of adhesion molecules (Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM, and a marker of protein turnover (prealbumin, a typical indicator of caloric and protein malnutrition were also performed. Fifty oncologic patients (28 male/22 female and 25 non oncologic patients (18 male/7 female (p=N.S. were studied. In muscles from cancer patients we observed a subclinical myopathy characterized by an abnormal distribution of myonuclei. The percentage of myofibers with internalized nuclei was significantly higher in oncologic (median= 13.1%, IQR= 6.0-20.3 than in non oncologic patients (median= 3%, IQR= 2.5-6.1 (p<0.0001. The frequency of these internally nucleated myofibers is even higher in a subgroup of oncologic patients taking myotoxic drugs. In cancer patients, we observed an inverse correlation between the number of internally nucleated fibers and the presence of node metastasis (N+ (ρ=-0.30 (p=0.03. Moreover, in patients with colorectal cancer, low serum levels of preoperative prealbumin (median= 167,7 mg/L, normal range 200-400 mg/L, were detected. The link between the observed early myopathy and long-term cachexia is supported also by the altered expression of sarcolemma associated proteins, in particular laminin and dystrophin

  11. Spontaneous, local diastolic subsarcolemmal calcium releases in single, isolated guinea-pig sinoatrial nodal cells.

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    Sirenko, Syevda G; Yang, Dongmei; Maltseva, Larissa A; Kim, Mary S; Lakatta, Edward G; Maltsev, Victor A

    2017-01-01

    Uptake and release calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (dubbed "calcium clock"), in the form of spontaneous, rhythmic, local diastolic calcium releases (LCRs), together with voltage-sensitive ion channels (membrane clock) form a coupled system that regulates the action potential (AP) firing rate. LCRs activate Sodium/Calcium exchanger (NCX) that accelerates diastolic depolarization and thus participating in regulation of the time at which the next AP will occur. Previous studies in rabbit SA node cells (SANC) demonstrated that the basal AP cycle length (APCL) is tightly coupled to the basal LCR period (time from the prior AP-induced Ca2+ transient to the diastolic LCR occurrence), and that this coupling is further modulated by autonomic receptor stimulation. Although spontaneous LCRs during diastolic depolarization have been reported in SANC of various species (rabbit, cat, mouse, toad), prior studies have failed to detect LCRs in spontaneously beating SANC of guinea-pig, a species that has been traditionally used in studies of cardiac pacemaker cell function. We performed a detailed investigation of whether guinea-pig SANC generate LCRs and whether they play a similar key role in regulation of the AP firing rate. We used two different approaches, 2D high-speed camera and classical line-scan confocal imaging. Positioning the scan-line beneath sarcolemma, parallel to the long axis of the cell, we found that rhythmically beating guinea-pig SANC do, indeed, generate spontaneous, diastolic LCRs beneath the surface membrane. The average key LCR characteristics measured in confocal images in guinea-pig SANC were comparable to rabbit SANC, both in the basal state and in the presence of β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Moreover, the relationship between the LCR period and APCL was subtended by the same linear function. Thus, LCRs in guinea-pig SANC contribute to the diastolic depolarization and APCL regulation. Our findings indicate that coupled-clock system

  12. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: a molecular and immunohistochemical approach Distrofia muscular de Duchenne e Becker: abordagem molecular e imuno-histoquímica

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    Aline Andrade Freund

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. We studied 106 patients with a diagnosis of probable DMD/BMD by analyzing 20 exons of the dystrophin gene in their blood and, in some of the cases, by immunohistochemical assays for dystrophin in muscle biopsies. In 71.7% of the patients, deletions were found in at least one of the exons; 68% of these deletions were in the hot-spot 3' region. Deletions were found in 81.5% of the DMD cases and in all the BMD cases. The cases without deletions, which included the only woman in the study with DMD, had dystrophin deficiency. The symptomatic female carriers had no deletions but had abnormal dystrophin distribution in the sarcolemma (discontinuous immunostains. The following diagnoses were made for the remaining cases without deletions with the aid of a muscle biopsy: spinal muscular atrophy, congenital myopathy; sarcoglycan deficiency and unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin analysis by immunohistochemistry continues to be the most specific method for diagnosis of DMD/BMD and should be used when no exon deletions are found in the dystrophin gene in the blood.As distrofias musculares de Duchenne (DMD e de Becker (DMB são doenças causadas por mutação no gene da distrofina. Foram estudados 106 casos com a suspeita diagnóstica de DMD/BMD com a analise de 20 exons do gene da distrofina no sangue e biópsia muscular com imuno-histoquímica para distrofina em alguns casos. Em 71,7% dos casos foi encontrada deleção em pelo menos um dos exons, sendo que 68% das deleções localizam-se na região 3' hot spot. Foram encontradas deleções em 81,5% dos DMD e em todos os BMD, sendo que os sem deleção tinham deficiência de distrofina, incluindo a mulher com DMD. As portadoras sintomáticas não tinham deleções mas anormalidades na distribuição da distrofina no sarcolema. Os outros casos sem deleção, com auxilio da

  13. Skeletal muscle microvascular and interstitial PO2 from rest to contractions.

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    Hirai, Daniel M; Craig, Jesse C; Colburn, Trenton D; Eshima, Hiroaki; Kano, Yutaka; Sexton, William L; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen pressure gradients across the microvascular walls are essential for oxygen diffusion from blood to tissue cells. At any given flux, the magnitude of these transmural gradients is proportional to the local resistance. The greatest resistance to oxygen transport into skeletal muscle is considered to reside in the short distance between red blood cells and myocytes. Although crucial to oxygen transport, little is known about transmural pressure gradients within skeletal muscle during contractions. We evaluated oxygen pressures within both the skeletal muscle microvascular and interstitial spaces to determine transmural gradients during the rest-contraction transient in anaesthetized rats. The significant transmural gradient observed at rest was sustained during submaximal muscle contractions. Our findings support that the blood-myocyte interface provides substantial resistance to oxygen diffusion at rest and during contractions and suggest that modulations in microvascular haemodynamics and red blood cell distribution constitute primary mechanisms driving increased transmural oxygen flux with contractions. Oxygen pressure (PO2) gradients across the blood-myocyte interface are required for diffusive O 2 transport, thereby supporting oxidative metabolism. The greatest resistance to O 2 flux into skeletal muscle is considered to reside between the erythrocyte surface and adjacent sarcolemma, although this has not been measured during contractions. We tested the hypothesis that O 2 gradients between skeletal muscle microvascular (PO2 mv ) and interstitial (PO2 is ) spaces would be present at rest and maintained or increased during contractions. PO2 mv and PO2 is   were determined via phosphorescence quenching (Oxyphor probes G2 and G4, respectively) in the exposed rat spinotrapezius during the rest-contraction transient (1 Hz, 6 V; n = 8). PO2 mv was higher than PO2 is in all instances from rest (34.9 ± 6.0 versus 15.7 ± 6.4) to contractions (28.4 ± 5

  14. Persistent muscle fiber regeneration in long term denervation. Past, present, future

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    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ravages of long term denervation there is structural and ultrastructural evidence for survival of muscle fibers in mammals, with some fibers surviving at least ten months in rodents and 3-6 years in humans. Further, in rodents there is evidence that muscle fibers may regenerate even after repeated damage in the absence of the nerve, and that this potential is maintained for several months after denervation. While in animal models permanently denervated muscle sooner or later loses the ability to contract, the muscles may maintain their size and ability to function if electrically stimulated soon after denervation. Whether in mammals, humans included, this is a result of persistent de novo formation of muscle fibers is an open issue we would like to explore in this review. During the past decade, we have studied muscle biopsies from the quadriceps muscle of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI patients suffering with Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a condition that fully and irreversibly disconnects skeletal muscle fibers from their damaged innervating motor neurons. We have demonstrated that human denervated muscle fibers survive years of denervation and can be rescued from severe atrophy by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES. Using immunohistochemistry with both non-stimulated and the h-bFES stimulated human muscle biopsies, we have observed the persistent presence of muscle fibers which are positive to labeling by an antibody which specifically recognizes the embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb. Relative to the total number of fibers present, only a small percentage of these MHCemb positive fibers are detected, suggesting that they are regenerating muscle fibers and not pre-existing myofibers re-expressing embryonic isoforms. Although embryonic isoforms of acetylcholine receptors are known to be re-expressed and to spread from the end-plate to the sarcolemma of muscle fibers in early phases of muscle denervation, we suggest

  15. [Alpha but not beta-adrenergic stimulation has a positive inotropic effect associated with alkalinization of intracellular pH].

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    Gambassi, G; Lakatta, E G; Capogrossi, M C

    1991-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that alpha-adrenoceptors also exist in the myocardium and that an increase in force of contraction may be produced by stimulation of these sites. This positive inotropism seems to be dependent either on an increased amount of Ca++ released into the cytosol with each action potential or on increased myofilament responsiveness. In contrast, beta-adrenergic stimulation reduces the sensitivity of the contractile proteins and the positive inotropic effect is due to the activation of L-type calcium channels on the sarcolemma. We used single, isolated, enzymatically dissociated, adult rat ventricular myocytes. Cells were loaded either with the ester derivative of the Ca++ probe Indo-1 or with the intracellular pH probe Snarf-1 and at the same time we measured the contractile parameters and monitored the fluorescence as an index of intracellular calcium concentration or pH value. The single cells (bicarbonate buffer continuously gassed with O2 95%, CO2 5%, Ca++ 1.5 mM, field stimulation 0.5 Hz) were exposed to phenylephrine (50 microM) and nadolol (1 microM). Alpha-adrenergic stimulation increased twitch amplitude (delta ES = 1.93 +/- 0.77, n = 8; p less than 0.05) and showed only a slight increase in Ca++ transient. On the other end, the positive inotropic effect (delta ES = 2.84 +/- 0.86, n = 4; p less than 0.02) obtained with beta-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol 50 nM, bicarbonate buffer, Ca++ 0.5 mM, field stimulation 0.2 Hz) was always associated with a large increase in intracellular Ca++ concentration. Isoproterenol did not change intracellular pH (delta pH = 0.006 +/- 0.006, n = 4; NS) while phenylephrine increased it significantly (delta pH = 0.055 +/- 0.011, n = 8; p less than 0.002). Moreover, there was a statistically significant correlation between delta ES and delta pH (R2 = 0.532; p less than 0.05) when phenylephrine was present. This alkalinization as well as the increased contractility was antagonized by treatment with

  16. Myocardial contractility in the echo lab: molecular, cellular and pathophysiological basis

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    Bombardini Tonino

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the standard accepted concept, contractility is the intrinsic ability of heart muscle to generate force and to shorten, independently of changes in the preload or afterload with fixed heart rates. At molecular level the crux of the contractile process lies in the changing concentrations of Ca2+ ions in the myocardial cytosol. Ca2+ ions enter through the calcium channel that opens in response to the wave of depolarization that travels along the sarcolemma. These Ca2+ ions "trigger" the release of more calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and thereby initiate a contraction-relaxation cycle. In the past, several attempts were made to transfer the pure physiological concept of contractility, expressed in the isolated myocardial fiber by the maximal velocity of contraction of unloaded muscle fiber (Vmax, to the in vivo beating heart. Suga and Sagawa achieved this aim by measuring pressure/volume loops in the intact heart: during a positive inotropic intervention, the pressure volume loop reflects a smaller end-systolic volume and a higher end-systolic pressure, so that the slope of the pressure volume relationship moves upward and to the left. The pressure volume relationship is the most reliable index for assessing myocardial contractility in the intact circulation and is almost insensitive to changes in preload and after load. This is widely used in animal studies and occasionally clinically. The limit of the pressure volume relationship is that it fails to take into account the frequency-dependent regulation of contractility: the frequency-dependent control of transmembrane Ca2+ entry via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels provides cardiac cells with a highly sophisticated short-term system for the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. An increased stimulation rate increases the force of contraction: the explanation is repetitive Ca2+ entry with each depolarization and, hence, an accumulation of cytosolic calcium. As the heart

  17. Pain-alleviating effect of bupivacaine polylactic acid microspheres in rabbits%布比卡因聚乳酸微球在家兔体内的缓释效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅强; 王新华; 邹最; 俞媛; 高申; 钟延强; 张宏

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bupivacaine is widely used to alleviate post-operation pain and cure acute and chronic pain caused by inflammation or cancer.Its analgesic time cannot meet the request that drug is released slowly to prolong the analgesic time in clinic.OBJECTIVE: To detect the alleviating effect of bupivacaine polylactic acid microspheres taking high molecular polymer-polylactic acid as vector in rabbits with high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and traditional skin test method.DESIGN: A completely randomized controlled animal experimental study.SETTING: School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLAMATERIALS: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits, weighing (2.58±0.17)kg were used in this experiment.INTERVENTIONS: The experiment was carried out at the Department of pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between September and November 2002. ① Animal models were established according to traditional skin test method. ② Totally 16 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups: Group A and Group B, with 8 in each one. 5 mg/kg bupivacaine parenteral solution was injected subcutaneously in Group A, 5 mg/kg bupivacaine polylactic acid microspheres were implanted between subcutaneous tissue and sarcolemma in Group B. We took 1.5 mL blood from ear border vein at 5, 10, 20, 30,45 minutes, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours after administration of bupivacaine parenteral solution respectively in Group A and another 1.5 mL at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 12, 24, 3 6, 48 and 60 hours after admistration of bupivacaine microsphere powder for index detection. ③ HPLC method was used to detect the concentration and releasing effect of bupivacaine in blood serum.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Concentration change of bupivacaine in blood serum and efficacy diameter of local anesthetic.RESULTS:All the 16 rabbits entered the stage of result analysis. ①Change of bupivacaine concentration: Plasma bupivacaine concentration

  18. Metabolic Responses to Weight Lifting

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    Arnold Nelson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Editor's Note, The ability to lift heavy loads while performing multiple repetitions is not only highly correlated with muscle mass or the total number actomyosin interactions, but also metabolic functions that includes substrate concentrations and by-product removal.  Muscles use adenosine triphosphate (ATP in at least three locations during exercise; to run the actomyosin interaction, operate sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps, and operate sarcolemma sodium and potassium pumps.  Weight lifting sessions are considered to be an intermittent activity that includes only a few second bursts of high force and/or velocity movements followed by rest periods of up to several minutes. Therefore, the anaerobic pathways such as the phosphagen and glycolytic systems are the initial pathways to respond due in part to the ability to match the increased rates of ATP depletion by increasing ATP production. After the initial resting ATP stores are used up, the phosphagen system starts contributing to ATP replenishment.  This system consists of reactions from the creatine kinase (CK pathway and the adenylate kinase (AK pathway.  However, the CK pathway can only work at max capacity for a short period for resting phosphocreatine (PCr concentrations are only about 4-6 times the amount of resting ATP stores.  Once the PCr concentrations are depleted, the AK reaction will begin by using two adenosine diphosphate (ADP to form one ATP and one adenosine monophosphate (AMP. Although ATP is produced in this pathway, this production of ATP does coincide with an increased concentration of AMP. This is problematic because increased AMP levels will in turn stimulate the adenylate deaminase reaction, which will produce ammonia (NH3. This conversion of AMP into NH3 will result in the muscle cell having a net loss of total adenine nucleotides available to resynthesize ATP.  Glycolysis is the next reaction in line, which increases its role in ATP replenishment as PCr