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Sample records for sara survivable autonomic

  1. using SARA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La solubilidad del CO2 en un crudo pesado colombiano fue calculada usando la ecuación cúbica de estado de Peng-Robinson y la correlación de Lee-Kesler. El crudo fue representado como una mezcla de pseudo-componentes y para cada uno de ellos se calcularon las propiedades termodinámicas y críticas. Los resultados obtenidos en la representación del crudo con cuatro, cinco y seis pseudocomponentes muestran que todas las representaciones producen resultados similares y por lo tanto el uso de cuatro pseudo-componentes es suficiente y tiene un costo computacional más bajo. Fueron obtenidos excelentes resultados al comparar los datos experimentales y calculados. Para este sistema es suficiente tener una completa caracterización del análisis SARA y usar cuatro pseudo-componentes para modelar adecuadamente el equilibrio líquido-vapor de CO2-crudo pesado.

  2. 2012 SARA Students Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briccetti, Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorei, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yonkings, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorio, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30

    The Service Academy Research Associates (SARA) program provides an opportunity for Midshipmen and Cadets from US Service Academies to participate in research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratory for several weeks during the summer as part of their summer training assignments. During the summer of 2012, three Midshipmen were assigned to work with the XCP Division at LANL for approximately 5-6 weeks. As one of the nation's top national security science laboratories, LANL stretches across 36 square miles, has over 2,100 facilities, and employs over 9,000 individuals including a significant number of students and postdocs. LANL's mission is to 'apply science and technology to: ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent, reduce global threats, and solve other emerging national security challenges.' While LANL officially operates under the US Department of Energy (DoE), fulfilling this mission requires mutual cooperation with the US Department of Defense (DoD) as well. LANL's high concentration of knowledge and experience provides interns a chance to perform research in many disciplines, and its connection with the DoD in both operation and personnel gives SARA students insight to career possibilities both during and after military service. SARA students have plenty of opportunity to enjoy hiking, camping, the Los Alamos YMCA, and many other outdoor activities in New Mexico while staying at the Buffalo Thunder Resort, located 20 miles east of the lab. XCP Division is the Computational Physics division of LANL's Weapons Department. Working with XCP Division requires individuals to be Q cleared by the DoE. This means it is significantly more convenient for SARA students to be assigned to XCP Division than their civilian counterparts as the DoD CNWDI clearance held by SARA students is easily transferred to the lab prior to the

  3. Sharing AIS Related Anomalies (SARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    misconfiguration and intentional misuse. These unintended behaviours generate an abundance of anomalies that the security community has an interest in monitoring...Lastly, the feedback loop formed with clients is essential to SARA’s advancement. The more SARA is exposed, the better and faster it can be adapted...to end-user needs and thus be adopted by them. This section is organised as follows : • Section 2.1 describes the strategy used to identify potential

  4. The SARA REU Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. A.; Oswalt, T. D.; SARA Collaboration

    2000-12-01

    We present an overview of the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site Program hosted by the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) for the past 6 years. SARA is a consortium of the six universities: Florida Institute of Technology, East Tennessee State University, Florida International University, The University of Georgia, Valdosta State University, and Clemson University. We host 10-11 student interns per year out of an application pool of ~150-200. Recruiting flyers are sent to the ~3400 undergraduate institutions in the United States, and we use a web-based application form and review process. We are a distributed REU Site, but come together for group meetings at the beginning and end of the summer program and stay in contact in between using email list manager software. Interns complete a research project working one-on-one with a faculty mentor, and each intern travels to observe at the SARA Observatory at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Interns give both oral and display presentations of their results at the final group meeting. In addition, all interns write a paper for publication in the IAPPP Communications, an international amateur-professional journal, and several present at professional meetings and in refereed publications. We include in the group meetings a ``how-to'' session on giving talks and posters, an Ethics Session, and a session on Women in Astronomy. This work was supported by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site Program through grant AST 96169939 to The Florida Institute of Technology.

  5. Exon: CBRC-SARA-01-0866 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CCAGGGGGTCACCGGTGTCTGGGTCAGTGGGAccatctctggagtcatgcatACGGCAGTTACTTATCCCATTCACTTCTGTGCCCCCCGcatcattcaccagttcttctgtgacatcCTCCAAGTCCTCCTGCTCTAG ... ...CBRC-SARA-01-0866 atgctcatcatcaccaccacttccctggatgacagtctccagtcccccatgtatttcttcctgaa

  6. Exon: CBRC-SARA-01-0862 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CCAGGGGGTCACCGGTGTCTGGGTCAGTGGGAccatctctggagtcatgcatACGGCAGTTACTTATCCCATTCACTTCTGTGCCCCCCGcatcattcaccagttcttctgtgacatcCTCCAAGTCCTCCTGCTCTAG ... ...CBRC-SARA-01-0862 atgctcatcatcaccaccacttccctggatgacagtctccagtcccccatgtatttcttcctgaa

  7. Experience with the SARA OSL method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, V.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    on the added dose is shown. Advantages of the SARA method is discussed and results obtained using this method for 15 archaeological samples are compared with TL results. A correlation coefficient of 0.967 was found. The test also included comparison of a SARA dare with an archaeomagnetic date for a brick kiln....... Identical results were obtained (1795 +/- 20 AD and 1800 +/- 20 AD, respectively). Similarly. SARA results for 14 sediments are compared with results obtained by TL and IRSL (multiple aliquots)and here the resulting correlation coefficient was 0.983. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  8. The impact of autonomic dysfunction on survival in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajsa Stubendorff

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Autonomic dysfunction is a well-known feature in neurodegenerative dementias, especially common in α-synucleinopathies like dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia. The most common symptoms are orthostatic hypotension, incontinence and constipation, but its relevance in clinical practice is poorly understood. There are no earlier studies addressing the influence of autonomic dysfunction on clinical course and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of the three most common features of autonomic dysfunction and analyze how it affects survival. METHODS: Thirty patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease with dementia were included in this prospective, longitudinal follow-up study. Presence of incontinence and constipation was recorded at baseline. Blood pressure was measured at baseline, after 3 months and after 6 months according to standardized procedures, with 5 measurements during 10 minutes after rising. Orthostatic hypotension was defined using consensus definitions and persistent orthostatic hypotension was defined as 5 or more measurements with orthostatic hypotension. Difference in survival was analyzed 36 months after baseline. RESULTS: There was a high frequency of persistent orthostatic blood pressure (50%, constipation (30% and incontinence (30%. Patients with persistent orthostatic hypotension had a significantly shorter survival compared to those with no or non-persistent orthostatic hypotension (Log rank x(2 = 4.47, p = 0.034. Patients with constipation and/or urinary incontinence, in addition to persistent orthostatic hypotension, had a poorer prognosis compared to those with isolated persistent orthostatic hypotension or no orthostatic hypotension (Log rank x(2 = 6.370, p = 0.041. DISCUSSION: According to our findings, the identification of autonomic dysfunction seems to be of great importance in clinical practice, not only to

  9. Severe Accident Recriticality Analyses (SARA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, W. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Hoejerup, F. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Lindholm, I.; Miettinen, J.; Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Nilsson, Lars [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoevall, H. [Teoliisuuden Voima Oy (Finland)

    1999-11-01

    Recriticality in a BWR has been studied for a total loss of electric power accident scenario. In a BWR, the B{sub 4}C control rods would melt and relocate from the core before the fuel during core uncovery and heat-up. If electric power returns during this time-window unborated water from ECCS systems will start to reflood the partly control rod free core. Recriticality might take place for which the only mitigating mechanisms are the Doppler effect and void formation. In order to assess the impact of recriticality on reactor safety, including accident management measures, the following issues have been investigated in the SARA project: 1. the energy deposition in the fuel during super-prompt power burst, 2. the quasi steady-state reactor power following the initial power burst and 3. containment response to elevated quasi steady-state reactor power. The approach was to use three computer codes and to further develop and adapt them for the task. The codes were SIMULATE-3K, APROS and RECRIT. Recriticality analyses were carried out for a number of selected reflooding transients for the Oskarshamn 3 plant in Sweden with SIMULATE-3K and for the Olkiluoto 1 plant in Finland with all three codes. The core state initial and boundary conditions prior to recriticality have been studied with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, MELCOR and MAAP4. The results of the analyses show that all three codes predict recriticality - both superprompt power bursts and quasi steady-state power generation - for the studied range of parameters, i. e. with core uncovery and heat-up to maximum core temperatures around 1800 K and water flow rates of 45 kg/s to 2000 kg/s injected into the downcomer. Since the recriticality takes place in a small fraction of the core the power densities are high which results in large energy deposition in the fuel during power burst in some accident scenarios. The highest value, 418 cal/g, was obtained with SIMULATE-3K for an Oskarshamn 3 case with reflooding

  10. Expression, purification, and functional characterization of recombinant PTD-SARA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Huang; Rui Du; Peng Zhang; Hua Meng; Huiwei Jia; Yang Song; Man Li; Yingqi Zhang; Shiren Sun

    2011-01-01

    The Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) protein is a binding partner for Smad2/3 that plays an important role in the fibrotic promoting signaling pathway initiated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). The C-terminal 665-750 aa of SARA comprises the Smad-binding domain (SBD). By direct interaction through the SBD, SARA inhibits Smad2/3 phosphorylation and blocks the interaction between Smad2/3 and Smad4, thereby restrains the process of fibrosis.In this study, we constructed a SARA peptide aptamer based on the SBD sequence. The recombinant SARA aptamer,fused with a protein transduction domain (PTD-SARA), was cloned, purified from E. coli, and characterized for the first time. The full-length PTD-SARA coding sequence, created with E. coli favored codons, was cloned into a pQE-30 vector,and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into an M15 strain. After Isopropyl β-D-1-Thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction and Ni2+ affinity purification, recombinant PTD-SARA was further identified by immunobiotting and protein N-terminal sequencing. Epifluorescence microscopy revealed that the recombinant PTD-SARA was transferred into the cytoplasm and nucleus more efficiently than SARA.Moreover, the recombinant PTD-SARA was found to up-regulate the level of E-cadherin and down-regulate the levels of α-SMA and phospho-Smad3 more efficiently than SARA (P< 0.05). Our work explored a method to obtain recombinant PTD-SARA protein. The recombinant PTDSARA fusion protein could enter HK2 cells (an immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell line) more efficiently than the SARA protein and reverse the renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation process that was induced by TGF-β1 more effectively than the SARA protein. Recombinant PDT-SARA is likely to be a potential candidate for clinical prevention and treatment of renal fibrosis.

  11. Exon: CBRC-SARA-01-1228 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1228 ATGTGgttttgctgttgttcttttctactgtggggatcaagcctgggtctccTATATGCAAGCCA...TAATATGCCCCGCCCTGCAGCTgtgtttttccctccctccctcccagctttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttcc...ttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttcctgccttccttcctgccttcctgccttccttcctccctcccttcctcccttccttcctgccttccttcctccctcc...cttcctcccttccttcctccctcccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttccttcc...ttccttccttccttccttccttccttcctcccttcctgccttcctgccttttttccttttttctttttcttcctgtctgtctgt

  12. Aqueous SARA ATRP using Inorganic Sulfites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Carlos M R; Fu, Liye; Carmali, Sheiliza; Serra, Arménio C; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Coelho, Jorge F J

    2017-01-14

    Aqueous supplemental activator and reducing agent atom transfer radical polymerization (SARA ATRP) using inorganic sulfites was successfully carried out for the first time. Under optimized conditions, a well-controlled poly[oligo(ethylene oxide) methyl ether acrylate] (POEOA) was obtained with sulfites (e.g. Na2S2O4) were continuously fed into the reaction mixture. The mechanistic studies proved that these salts can activate alkyl halides directly and regenerate the activator complex. The effects of the feeding rate of the SARA agent (inorganic sulfites), ligand and its concentration, halide salt and its concentration, sulfite used, and copper concentration, were systematically studied to afford fast polymerizations rates while maintaining the control over polymerization. The kinetic data showed linear first-order kinetics, linear evolution of molecular weights with conversion, and polymers with narrow molecular weight distributions (Đ ~1.2) during polymerization even at relatively high monomer conversions (~80%). "One-pot" chain extension and "one-pot" block copolymerization experiments proved the high chain-end functionality. The polymerization could be directly regulated by starting or stopping the continuous feeding of the SARA agent. Under biologically relevant conditions, the aqueous SARA ATRP using inorganic sulfites was used to synthesize a well-defined protein-polymer hybrid by grafting of P(OEOA480) from BSA-O-[iBBr]30.

  13. Estimating movement and survival rates of a small saltwater fish using autonomous antenna receiver arrays and passive integrated transponder tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudershausen, Paul J.; Buckel, Jeffery A.; Dubreuil, Todd; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Hightower, Joseph E.; Poland, Steven J.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of small (12.5 mm long) passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and custom detection antennas for obtaining fine-scale movement and demographic data of mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus in a salt marsh creek. Apparent survival and detection probability were estimated using a Cormack Jolly Seber (CJS) model fitted to detection data collected by an array of 3 vertical antennas from November 2010 to March 2011 and by a single horizontal antenna from April to August 2011. Movement of mummichogs was monitored during the period when the array of vertical antennas was used. Antenna performance was examined in situ using tags placed in wooden dowels (drones) and in live mummichogs. Of the 44 tagged fish, 42 were resighted over the 9 mo monitoring period. The in situ detection probabilities of the drone and live mummichogs were high (~80-100%) when the ambient water depth was less than ~0.8 m. Upstream and downstream movement of mummichogs was related to hourly water depth and direction of tidal current in a way that maximized time periods over which mummichogs utilized the intertidal vegetated marsh. Apparent survival was lower during periods of colder water temperatures in December 2010 and early January 2011 (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.979) than during other periods of the study (median estimate of daily apparent survival = 0.992). During late fall and winter, temperature had a positive effect on the CJS detection probability of a tagged mummichog, likely due to greater fish activity over warmer periods. During the spring and summer, this pattern reversed possibly due to mummichogs having reduced activity during the hottest periods. This study demonstrates the utility of PIT tags and continuously operating autonomous detection systems for tracking fish at fine temporal scales, and improving estimates of demographic parameters in salt marsh creeks that are difficult or impractical to sample with active fishing gear.

  14. The Survival Analysis of a Non-autonomous N-dimensional Volterra Mutualistic System in a Polluted Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-jian Li; Ke Wang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the autonomous n-Dimensional Volterra Mutualistic System to a nonautonomous system. The condition of persistence and extinction is obtained for each population, and the threshold is established for asymptotically autonomous system.

  15. SARA: a server for function annotation of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Emidio; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2009-07-01

    Recent interest in non-coding RNA transcripts has resulted in a rapid increase of deposited RNA structures in the Protein Data Bank. However, a characterization and functional classification of the RNA structure and function space have only been partially addressed. Here, we introduce the SARA program for pair-wise alignment of RNA structures as a web server for structure-based RNA function assignment. The SARA server relies on the SARA program, which aligns two RNA structures based on a unit-vector root-mean-square approach. The likely accuracy of the SARA alignments is assessed by three different P-values estimating the statistical significance of the sequence, secondary structure and tertiary structure identity scores, respectively. Our benchmarks, which relied on a set of 419 RNA structures with known SCOR structural class, indicate that at a negative logarithm of mean P-value higher or equal than 2.5, SARA can assign the correct or a similar SCOR class to 81.4% and 95.3% of the benchmark set, respectively. The SARA server is freely accessible via the World Wide Web at http://sgu.bioinfo.cipf.es/services/SARA/.

  16. Sara endosomes and the asymmetric division of intestinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Chrystelle; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    Tissue homeostasis is maintained by adult stem cells, which self-renew and give rise to differentiating cells. The generation of daughter cells with different fates is mediated by signalling molecules coming from an external niche or being asymmetrically dispatched between the two daughters upon stem cell mitosis. In the adult Drosophila midgut, the intestinal stem cell (ISC) divides to generate a new ISC and an enteroblast (EB) differentiating daughter. Notch signalling activity restricted to the EB regulates intestinal cell fate decision. Here, we show that ISCs divide asymmetrically, and Sara endosomes in ISCs are specifically dispatched to the presumptive EB. During ISC mitosis, Notch and Delta traffic through Sara endosomes, thereby contributing to Notch signalling bias, as revealed in Sara mutants: Sara itself contributes to the control of the ISC asymmetric division. Our data uncover an intrinsic endosomal mechanism during ISC mitosis, which participates in the maintenance of the adult intestinal lineage.

  17. Sensor Activation and Radius Adaptation (SARA) in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, Novella; la Porta, Thomas; Petrioli, Chiara; Silvestri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of prolonging the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) deployed to monitor an area of interest. In this scenario, a helpful approach is to reduce coverage redundancy and therefore the energy expenditure due to coverage. We introduce the first algorithm which reduces coverage redundancy by means of Sensor Activation and sensing Radius Adaptation (SARA)in a general applicative scenario with two classes of devices: sensors that can adapt their sensing range (adjustable sensors) and sensors that cannot (fixed sensors). In particular, SARA activates only a subset of all the available sensors and reduces the sensing range of the adjustable sensors that have been activated. In doing so, SARA also takes possible heterogeneous coverage capabilities of sensors belonging to the same class into account. It specifically addresses device heterogeneity by modeling the coverage problem in the Laguerre geometry through Voronoi-Laguerre diagrams. SARA executes quickly and is guarante...

  18. Gene : CBRC-SARA-01-1782 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1782 Novel UN A Family fz/smo receptors FZD6_CANFA 0.0 88% ref|XP_0014...GTSAIAITSHDYLGQETATEMQTSPDTSARDMRTEGVSTPNKLREQEGVEPASSPAASSVRLCGDQADRPGRAGTVHDKISLSGSARSEGRATPRSEVADSGPAPGNLLQVPSSSKPSSLKGSASLLPQSASEAREEQGAGT ...

  19. Gene : CBRC-SARA-01-1760 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1760 Novel UN C UNKNOWN ZNFX1_HUMAN 1e-17 95% ref|XP_589621.3| PREDICT...VCGQNVLSQDMVESAAASLASIVPWFLPCFARLRVFRSVLTLGVILLRLCSLYFISAAYLQFFPACQTSSSHAVPLPRICFFSPLCFSPNPSILSARSPPFRPTLLITFTQ ...

  20. UCLA SARA (System Architect's Apprentice) demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenchel, R.S.; Razouk, R.R.

    1978-06-01

    A sample session with the SARA system is given. The system is a set of design and modeling tools which are implemented on the MIT-Multics computer system. This demonstration is intended to acquaint all interested persons with the state of implementation of the SARA system and the flavor of its use. The system is currently under implementation; however, all the demonstrated tools are available to any user with access to the MIT-Multics system. Additional tools will soon be available.

  1. The relationship between SARA fractions and crude oil stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Ashoori

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Asphaltene precipitation and deposition are drastic issues in the petroleum industry. Monitoring the asphaltene stability in crude oil is still a serious problem and has been subject of many studies. To investigate crude oil stability by saturate, aromatic, resin and asphaltene (SARA analysis seven types of crudes with different components were used. The applied methods for SARA quantification are IP-143 and ASTM D893-69 and the colloidal instability index (CII is computed from the SARA values as well. In comparison between CII results, the values of oil compositions demonstrated that the stability of asphaltenes in crude oils is a phenomenon that is related to all these components and it cannot be associated only with one of them, individually.

  2. Det udstødtes poesi hos Sara Stridsberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2014-01-01

    Det synes at være et gennemgående projekt i Sara Stridsbergs forfatterskab at genoprejse en række upopulære, eller i hvert fald tvivlsomme og angribelige, kvindeskikkelser – hvad enten vi taler om historiske personer eller fiktive karakterer: Sally Bauer, Valerie Solanas, Medea, Lolita. Artiklen...

  3. Gene : CBRC-SARA-01-0195 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0195 UN A Cannabinoids receptors CNR1_RAT 0.0 97% ref|XP_001503797.1| ...PREDICTED: similar to central cannabinoid receptor isoform 1 [Equus caballus] 0.0 98% MKSILDGLADTTFRTITTDLLY...IHTSEDGKVQVTRPDQARMDIRLAKTLVLILVVLIICWGPLLAIMVYDVFGKMNKLIKTVFAFCSMLCLLNSTVNPIIYALRSKDLRHAFRSMFPSCEGTAQPLDNSMGDSDCLHKHANNAASVHRAAESCIKSTVKIAKVTMSVSTDTSAEAL ...

  4. Det udstødtes poesi hos Sara Stridsberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2014-01-01

    Det synes at være et gennemgående projekt i Sara Stridsbergs forfatterskab at genoprejse en række upopulære, eller i hvert fald tvivlsomme og angribelige, kvindeskikkelser – hvad enten vi taler om historiske personer eller fiktive karakterer: Sally Bauer, Valerie Solanas, Medea, Lolita. Artiklen...

  5. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  6. MYC through miR-17-92 Suppresses Specific Target Genes to Maintain Survival, Autonomous Proliferation, and a Neoplastic State

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yulin

    2014-08-01

    The MYC oncogene regulates gene expression through multiple mechanisms, and its overexpression culminates in tumorigenesis. MYC inactivation reverses turmorigenesis through the loss of distinguishing features of cancer, including autonomous proliferation and survival. Here we report that MYC via miR-17-92 maintains a neoplastic state through the suppression of chromatin regulatory genes Sin3b, Hbp1, Suv420h1, and Btg1, as well as the apoptosis regulator Bim. The enforced expression of miR-17-92 prevents MYC suppression from inducing proliferative arrest, senescence, and apoptosis and abrogates sustained tumor regression. Knockdown of the five miR-17-92 target genes blocks senescence and apoptosis while it modestly delays proliferative arrest, thus partially recapitulating miR-17-92 function. We conclude that MYC, via miR-17-92, maintains a neoplastic state by suppressing specific target genes.

  7. Apocalipsis XX di Sara de Ibáñez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Tedeschi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rewriting the text of Saint John, Sara de Ibáñez uses a kind of style innovative and away from schools and trends in vogue: is thus able able to evoke the tragic experiences of the twentieth century, but the date of publication of the book (1970 reveals that it advances in themes and forms the concrete apocalypse lived by Uruguay and Latin America in the seventies. However, far from political themes and motifs, Sara de Ibáñez is able to express the absolute horror of contemporary tragedies and to propose a poetic reflection of great quality. This article suggests a rediscovery of this twentieth-century poetic voice, unjustly forgotten, through her 'apocalyptic' text.

  8. Placeres, amores y viajes en Demasiado amor de Sara Sefchovich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Daniela Bianchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the construction of the prostitute female body where we analyze some strands of the circulation of pleasure, bodies, money and sexual intercourse in Demasiado amor (1990, Agustín Yáñez by Mexican writer Sara Sefchovich. Starting from a journey, of the protagonist of the novel, as nomadism and as a geographical corporal and internal displacement, the journey is seen as a deterritorialization of the body and the subjectivity.

  9. Placeres, amores y viajes en Demasiado amor de Sara Sefchovich

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Daniela Bianchi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the construction of the prostitute female body where we analyze some strands of the circulation of pleasure, bodies, money and sexual intercourse in Demasiado amor (1990, Agustín Yáñez) by Mexican writer Sara Sefchovich. Starting from a journey, of the protagonist of the novel, as nomadism and as a geographical corporal and internal displacement, the journey is seen as a deterritorialization of the body and the subjectivity.

  10. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenge, ruminal condition and cellular immunity in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is characterized by repeated bouts of low ruminal pH. Cows with SARA often develop complications or other diseases, and associate physiologically with immunosuppression and inflammation. Ruminal free lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increases during SARA and translocates into the blood circulation activating an inflammatory response. Ruminal fermentation and cellular immunity are encouraged by supplementing hay with calf starter during weaning. SARA calves given a 5-day repeated administration of a bacteria-based probiotic had stable ruminal pH levels (6.6-6.8). The repeated administration of probiotics enhance cellular immune function and encourage recovery from diarrhea in pre-weaning calves. Furthermore, the ruminal fermentation could guard against acute and short-term feeding changes, and changes in the rumen microbial composition of SARA cattle might occur following changes in ruminal pH. The repeated bouts of low ruminal pH in SARA cattle might be associated with depression of cellular immunity.

  11. Indicators of induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in Danish Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, Anne Mette; Li, Shucong; Andersen, Pia H.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in dairy cows is high with large impact on economy and welfare. Its current field diagnosis is based on point ruminal pH measurements by oral probe or rumenocentesis. These techniques are invasive and inaccurate, and better markers...... for the diagnosis of SARA are needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate clinical signs of SARA and to investigate the use of blood, faecal and urinary parameters as indicators of SARA. Six lactating, rumen cannulated, Danish Holstein cows were used in a cross-over study with three periods. The first and second...... periods included two cows on control diet and two cows on nutritional SARA challenge. The third period only included two cows on SARA challenge. Control diet was a conventional total mixed ration [45.5% dry matter (DM), 17.8% crude protein, 43.8% neutral detergent fibre, and 22.5% acid detergent fibre (DM...

  12. Teologi Politik Berbalu SARA Antara Ambisi dan Konspirasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sidi Ritau'din

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In a multi-cultural democracy based on Pancasila philosophy of independence, ethnic, religious, racial and intergroup issues it call (SARA are political indicators that can trigger conflict and division. If the player is ambitious and power-hungry, then he will not hesitate to do everything he can to gain power, even build a big conspiracy using SARA as a tool to divide the ummah, then he emerges as a unifier and presents programs prestigious sympathetic, there Imaging actions and slogans of the pro poor people, but essentially no more as political deceit, a false gift of hope, it familiar said (PHP that never realized, only reap the political advantage in the game of SARA, even not hesitate to shout thief when he Itself is a thieving thief based on greed and greed where the horizontal relations of fellow human beings deny the bond of faith as the foundation. Political conspiracy based on political interests and abuse of power, an action of political pathology that is not civilized that has become a trend of contemporary politics and globalization.

  13. SarA positively controls bap-dependent biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotonda, María Pilar; Manna, Adhar C; Cheung, Ambrose L; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2005-08-01

    The biofilm-associated protein Bap is a staphylococcal surface protein involved in biofilm formation. We investigated the influence of the global regulatory locus sarA on bap expression and Bap-dependent biofilm formation in three unrelated Staphylococcus aureus strains. The results showed that Bap-dependent biofilm formation was diminished in the sarA mutants by an agr-independent mechanism. Complementation studies using a sarA clone confirmed that the defect in biofilm formation was due to the sarA mutation. As expected, the diminished capacity to form biofilms in the sarA mutants correlated with the decreased presence of Bap in the bacterial surface. Using transcriptional fusion and Northern analysis data, we demonstrated that the sarA gene product acts as an activator of bap expression. Finally, the bap promoter was characterized and the transcriptional start point was mapped by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. As expected, we showed that purified SarA protein binds specifically to the bap promoter, as determined by gel shift and DNase I footprinting assays. Based on the previous studies of others as well as our work demonstrating the role for SarA in icaADBC and bap expression, we propose that SarA is an essential regulator controlling biofilm formation in S. aureus.

  14. Gene : CBRC-SARA-01-1167 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctin receptor 1 isoform 3 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001105751.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin... receptor 1 isoform 4 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001105805.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin re...ceptor 1 isoform 5 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001105878.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin... receptor 1 isoform 6 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001105957.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin recepto...CBRC-SARA-01-1167 Novel UN B UNKNOWN ADR1_HUMAN 1e-139 67% ref|XP_001105680.1| PREDICTED: similar to adipone

  15. Factors contributing to the biofilm-deficient phenotype of Staphylococcus aureus sarA mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura H Tsang

    Full Text Available Mutation of sarA in Staphylococcus aureus results in a reduced capacity to form a biofilm, but the mechanistic basis for this remains unknown. Previous transcriptional profiling experiments identified a number of genes that are differentially expressed both in a biofilm and in a sarA mutant. This included genes involved in acid tolerance and the production of nucleolytic and proteolytic exoenzymes. Based on this we generated mutations in alsSD, nuc and sspA in the S. aureus clinical isolate UAMS-1 and its isogenic sarA mutant and assessed the impact on biofilm formation. Because expression of alsSD was increased in a biofilm but decreased in a sarA mutant, we also generated a plasmid construct that allowed expression of alsSD in a sarA mutant. Mutation of alsSD limited biofilm formation, but not to the degree observed with the corresponding sarA mutant, and restoration of alsSD expression did not restore the ability to form a biofilm. In contrast, concomitant mutation of sarA and nuc significantly enhanced biofilm formation by comparison to the sarA mutant. Although mutation of sspA had no significant impact on the ability of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm, a combination of protease inhibitors (E-64, 1-10-phenanthroline, and dichloroisocoumarin that was shown to inhibit the production of multiple extracellular proteases without inhibiting growth was also shown to enhance the ability of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm. This effect was evident only when all three inhibitors were used concurrently. This suggests that the reduced capacity of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm involves extracellular proteases of all three classes (serine, cysteine and metalloproteases. Inclusion of protease inhibitors also enhanced biofilm formation in a sarA/nuc mutant, with the combined effect of mutating nuc and adding protease inhibitors resulting in a level of biofilm formation with the sarA mutant that approached that of the UAMS-1 parent strain. These results

  16. Low energy neutral atom imaging on the Moon with the SARA instrument aboard Chandrayaan-1 mission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Bhardwaj; Stas Barabash; Yoshifumi Futaana; Yoichi Kazama; Kazushi Asamura; David McCann; R Sridharan; Mats Holmstrom; Peter Wurz; Rickard Lundin

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports on the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA)experiment that will be flown on the first Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1.The SARA is a low energy neutral atom (LENA)imaging mass spectrometer,which will perform remote sensing of the lunar surface via detection of neutral atoms in the energy range from 10 eV to 3 keV from a 100 km polar orbit.In this report we present the basic design of the SARA experiment and discuss various scientific issues that will be addressed.The SARA instrument consists of three major subsystems:a LENA sensor (CENA),a solar wind monitor (SWIM),and a digital processing unit (DPU).SARA will be used to image the solar wind –surface interaction to study primarily the surface composition and surface magnetic anomalies and associated mini-magnetospheres.Studies of lunar exosphere sources and space weathering on the Moon will also be attempted.SARA is the first LENA imaging mass spectrometer of its kind to be flown on a space mission.A replica of SARA is planned to fly to Mercury onboard the BepiColombo mission.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  18. System Analysis and Risk Assessment system (SARA) Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattison, M B; Russell, K D; Skinner, N L [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This NUREG is the tutorial for the System Analysis and Risk Assessment System (SARA) Version 4.0, a microcomputer-based system used to analyze the safety issues of a family (i.e., a power plant, a manufacturing facility, any facility on which a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) might be performed). A series of lessons are provided that walk the user through some basic steps common to most analyses performed with SARA. The example problems presented in the lessons build on one another, and in combination, lead the user through all aspects of SARA sensitivity analysis.

  19. SarA influences the sporulation and secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor M145

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xijun Ou; Bo Zhang; Lin Zhang; Kai Dong; Chun Liu; Guoping Zhao; Xiaoming Ding

    2008-01-01

    The filamentous bacteria Streptomyces exhibit a complex life cycle involving morphological differentiation and secondary metabolism. A putative membrane protein gene sarA (sco4069), sporulation and antibiotic production related gene A, was partially characterized in Streptomyces coelicolor M145. The gene product had no characterized functional domains and was highly conserved in Streptomyces. Compared with the wild-type M145, the sarA mutant accelerated sporulation and dramatically decreased the production of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that SarA influenced antibiotic production by controlling the abundance of actll-orf4 and redZ messenger RNA.

  20. [Autonomic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, T; Penzlin, A I; Illigens, B M W

    2013-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that involve damage of small peripheral autonomic Aδ- and C-fibers. Causes of autonomic nerve fiber damage are disorders such as diabetes mellitus and HIV-infection. Predominant symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are orthostatic hypotension, gastro-intestinal problems, urogenital dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmia, which can severely impair the quality of life in affected patients. Furthermore, autonomic neuropathies can be induced by autoimmune diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary disorders such as the lysosomal storage disorder Fabry disease and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, as well as certain toxins and drugs.

  1. Sara, a patient with borderline personality structure: A "crisis" management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marinelli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author examines some significant passages of his treatment of a patient with borderline personality structure, with the intention of giving a formative contribution to the delicate issue of the search for congruence between theory and clinic operations. This reflection is therefore an opportunity to integrate these aspects. The individualization of the therapeutic relationship in the theoretical framework of group analysis allowed the emotional investment in the person of the therapist, which is useful in the construction of a meaningful relationship on the human, emotional and cognitive plane; a space within which it has become increasingly possible for Sara, share and process emotions, re-build, contact parts of the self frustrated and disappointed, perceive less and less the void and become less vulnerable, being able to pull over to the original trauma. 

  2. PDB: CBRC-SARA-01-0838 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0838 3ODU,3OE0,3OE6,3OE8,3OE9, Region:8-324(Identity=89%) PDB:3ODU Chain:A (X-ray Resolution...=2.5),Region:8-324(Identity=89%) PDB:3OE0 Chain:A (X-ray Resolution=2.9),Region:8-330(...Identity=90%) PDB:3OE6 Chain:A (X-ray Resolution=3.2),Region:8-324(Identity=89%) PDB:3OE8 Chain:A (X-ray Resolution...=3.1),Region:8-324(Identity=89%) PDB:3OE9 Chain:A (X-ray Resolution=3.1), ...

  3. Depression of biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance by sarA disruption in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju-Hong Tao; Chang-Sheng Fan; Shan-E Gao; Hai-Jiao Wang; Guo-Xin Liang; Qing Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of disruption of sarA gene on biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis ).METHODS: In order to disrupt sarA gene, the doublecrossover homologous recombination was applied in S. epidermidis RP62A, and tetracycline resistance gene (tet) was used as the selective marker which was amplified by PCR from the pBR322 and inserted into the locus between sarA upstream and downstream,resulting in pBT2△sarA. By electroporation, the plasmid pBT2△sarA was transformed into S. epidermidis.Gene transcription was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Determination of biofilm was performed in 96-well flat-bottomed culture plates, and antibiotic resistance was analyzed with test tube culture by spectrophotometry at 570 nm respectively.RESULTS: A sarA disrupted strain named S. epidermidis RP62A△sarA was constructed, which was completely defective in biofilm formation, while the sarA complement strain RP62A△sarA (pHPS9sarA) restored the biofilm formation phenotype. Additionally, the knockout of sarA resulted in decreased erythromycin and kanamycin resistance of S. epidermidis RP62A. Compared to the original strain, S. epidermidis RP62A△sarA had an increase of the sensitivity to erythromycin at 200-400 μg/mL and kanamycin at 200-800 μg/mL respectively.CONCLUSION: The knockout of sarA can result in the defect in biofilm formation and the decreased erythromycin and kanamycin resistance in S. epidermidis RP62A.

  4. SarA and not sigmaB is essential for biofilm development by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Jaione; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Berasain, Carmen; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Amorena, Beatriz; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2003-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is associated with the production of the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA/PNAG), the product of the ica operon. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is a central regulatory element that controls the production of S. aureus virulence factors. By screening a library of Tn917 insertions in a clinical S. aureus strain, we identified SarA as being essential for biofilm development. Non-polar mutations of sarA in four genetically unrelated S. aureus strains decreased PIA/PNAG production and completely impaired biofilm development, both in steady state and flow conditions via an agr-independent mechanism. Accordingly, real-time PCR showed that the mutation in the sarA gene resulted in downregulation of the ica operon transcription. We also demonstrated that complete deletion of sigmaB did not affect PIA/PNAG production and biofilm formation, although it slightly decreased ica operon transcription. Furthermore, the sarA-sigmaB double mutant showed a significant decrease of ica expression but an increase of PIA/PNAG production and biofilm formation compared to the sarA single mutant. We propose that SarA activates S. aureus development of biofilm by both enhancing the ica operon transcription and suppressing the transcription of either a protein involved in the turnover of PIA/PNAG or a repressor of its synthesis, whose expression would be sigmaB-dependent.

  5. Single-access retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy (SARA) versus conventional retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy (CORA): a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Martin K; Groeben, Harald; Alesina, Piero F

    2010-06-01

    Stimulated by the concept of Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES), minimizing the access even further has become a new trend in minimally invasive surgery. We compare our recently described new method of endoscopic single-access adrenalectomy with the conventional retroperitoneoscopic approach in a matched-pairs study. Fifty single-access retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomies (SARA) were performed in 47 selected patients suffering from Conn's adenomas (n = 20), pheochromocytomas (n = 15), Cushing's adenomas (n = 6), and other diseases (n = 6). For SARA, a single 2-cm skin incision beneath the 12th rib was used. Following creation of the retroperitoneal space with the rigid endoscope, dissection was carried out single-handed. Another 47 patients served as control group; they were treated by the traditional retroperitoneoscopic three-port approach (CORA). Patients were matched with respect to gender, body mass index, diagnoses, tumor size, and tumor site. Mortality was zero and no major complications occurred in both groups. SARA was completed in 41 cases (86%). The overall complication rate was 8.5% in SARA and 6.4% in CORA. Operative time was longer for SARA (56 +/- 28 min) than for CORA (40 +/- 12 min) (P CORA patients (P = 0.01). Mean hospital stay was 2.4 +/- 0.7 days (SARA) and 3.1 +/- 1.2 days (CORA) (P < 0.01). Because feasibility and safety of SARA could be demonstrated in a large group of selected patients, this surgical technique may represent a new milestone in minimally invasive endocrine surgery.

  6. Autonomic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  7. Directional Notch trafficking in Sara endosomes during asymmetric cell division in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressmann, Sabine; Campos, Claudia; Castanon, Irinka; Fürthauer, Maximilian; González-Gaitán, Marcos

    2015-03-01

    Asymmetric division of neural precursor cells contributes to the generation of a variety of neuronal types. Asymmetric division is mediated by the asymmetric inheritance of fate determinants by the two daughter cells. In vertebrates, asymmetric fate determinants, such as Par3 and Mib, are only now starting to be identified. Here we show that, during mitosis of neural precursors in zebrafish, directional trafficking of Sara endosomes to one of the daughters can function as such a determinant. In asymmetric lineages, where one daughter cell becomes a neuron (n cell) whereas the other divides again to give rise to two neurons (p cell), we found that the daughter that inherits most of the Sara endosomes acquires the p fate. Sara endosomes carry an endocytosed pool of the Notch ligand DeltaD, which is thereby itself distributed asymmetrically. Sara and Notch are both essential for cell fate assignation within asymmetric lineages. Therefore, the Sara endosome system determines the fate decision between neuronal differentiation and mitosis in asymmetric lineages and thereby contributes to controlling the number of neural precursors and differentiated neurons during neurogenesis in a vertebrate.

  8. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy is often difficult to establish, since clinical symptoms generally appear late in the course of the disease, and may be non-specific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on th...

  9. Autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the physiological significance of autonomic neuropathy in juvenile diabetics, cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic functions have been investigated in three groups of juvenile diabetics: One group had no signs of neuropathy, one group had presumably slight autonomic...... neuropathy (reduced beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation) and one group had clinically severe autonomic neuropathy, defined by presence of orthostatic hypotension. In all three experimental situations we found sympathetic dysfunction causing cardiovascular and/or hormonal...... maladjustments in patients with autonomic neuropathy. Regarding metabolic functions we found normal responses to graded exercise and insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with autonomic neuropathy in spite of blunted catecholamine responses, suggesting increased sensitivity of glycogen stores and adipose...

  10. ESTETIKA TARIAN SARA DOUDA DALAM MASYARAKAT ADAT LOLI (SEBUAH PENDEKATAN LINGUISTIK KEBUDAYAAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyastuti Sutomo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not only does art   have   self-fullfillment, but  it also has axiological  benefits both socially, culturally, religiously, and economiclally.  So does Sara Douda dance.  Sara Douda aesthetics  is first contained  in its whole dance movements. In addition, it  can also be found in the whole dance equipments.  Moreover,  this dance aesthetics  may  also be contained in the verbal symbols in the speech forms  prior to the dance performance. However,  both verbal and non-verbal aesthetical forms are incorporated by the pieces of socio-cultural and  religious values in the Loli community about  their honoring their ancestors,  having social harmony, and  highly respecting each other among the community members. This study uses a cultural linguistic approach to find out and to review the aesthetics of Sara Douda dance.   Seni memang memiliki kepenuhan dalam dirinya sendiri. Tetapi ia juga sekaligus punya faedah aksiologis, baik secara sosial, kultural, religius maupun secara ekonomis. Tarian Sara Douda pun demikian. Estetika Sara Douda pertama-tama ada dalam semua gerak tariannya. Juga dalam seluruh perlengkapan tarian tersebut. Bukan itu saja, estetika tarian ini juga ada dalam simbol-simbol verbal berupa tuturan menjelang tarian. Tetapi baik bentuk-bentuk estetisasi nonverbal maupun verbal, sama-sama disatukan oleh kepingan-kepingan nilai-nilai sosio-kultural dan religius masyarakat Loli tentang penghormatan kepada leluhur, tentang harmoni sosial, dan tentang penghargaan yang tinggi terhadap satu sama lain. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan linguistik kebudayaan demi menemukan dan menelaah estetika dalam tarian Sara Douda

  11. Autonomic dysreflexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common cause of autonomic dysreflexia (AD) is spinal cord injury. The nervous system of people with AD over-responds to the types of stimulation that do not bother healthy people. Other causes ...

  12. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1986 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1986 ref|YP_001391163.1| hypothetical protein CLI_1905 [Clostridium botulinum F str. Langel...and] gb|ABS40017.1| hypothetical protein CLI_1905 [Clostridium botulinum F str. Langeland] YP_001391163.1 3.1 34% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1177 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1177 ref|XP_592012.3| PREDICTED: similar to Sphingomyelin phosphodiest...erase 3 (Neutral sphingomyelinase 2) (Neutral sphingomyelinase II) (nSMase2) (nSMase-2) (Confluent 3Y1 cell-associated protein 1) isoform 1 [Bos taurus] XP_592012.3 7.4 33% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1323 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1323 ref|NP_001008277.1| rhodopsin [Canis lupus familiaris] ref|XP_855...608.1| PREDICTED: rhodopsin [Canis familiaris] emb|CAA70209.1| unnamed protein product [Canis familiaris] NP_001008277.1 2e-62 94% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-2020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-2020 ref|YP_857334.1| exopolyphosphatase [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrop...hila ATCC 7966] gb|ABK35937.1| exopolyphosphatase [Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ATCC 7966] YP_857334.1 5.5 42% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1116 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1116 gb|AAC62470.1| chemokine receptor CCR5 [Cercocebus torquatus torq...uatus] gb|AAC62473.1| chemokine receptor CCR5 [Cercocebus torquatus torquatus] AAC62470.1 3e-72 86% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0200 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0200 ref|NP_036900.1| dopamine receptor D5 [Rattus norvegicus] sp|P25115|DRD5_RAT D(1B) dopamin...e receptor (D(5) dopamine receptor) gb|AAA41072.1| dopamine D1B receptor NP_036900.1 3e-47 59% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0834 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0834 ref|NP_036900.1| dopamine receptor D5 [Rattus norvegicus] sp|P25115|DRD5_RAT D(1B) dopamin...e receptor (D(5) dopamine receptor) gb|AAA41072.1| dopamine D1B receptor NP_036900.1 3e-47 59% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1766 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1766 ref|NP_776833.1| opioid receptor, mu 1 [Bos taurus] sp|P79350|OPRM_BOVIN Mu-type opioid... receptor (MOR-1) gb|AAB49477.2| mu opioid receptor [Bos taurus] NP_776833.1 0.0 91% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1766 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1766 ref|NP_001029087.1| opioid receptor, mu 1 [Pan troglodytes] sp|Q5...IS39|OPRM_PANTR Mu-type opioid receptor (MOR-1) gb|AAV74327.1| opioid receptor MU-1 [Pan troglodytes] NP_001029087.1 0.0 90% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0854 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0854 gb|EAW79490.1| calcium-sensing receptor (hypocalciuric hypercalcemia 1, severe neonatal...eptor (hypocalciuric hypercalcemia 1, severe neonatal hyperparathyroidism), isoform CRA_c [Homo sapiens] EAW79490.1 0.0 90% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1309 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1309 ref|YP_001125845.1| hypothetical protein GTNG_1736 [Geobacillus thermoden...itrificans NG80-2] gb|ABO67100.1| Conserved hypothetical protein [Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2] YP_001125845.1 0.47 23% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1804 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1804 ref|NP_965427.1| hypothetical protein LJ1621 [Lactobacillus johnson...ii NCC 533] gb|AAS09393.1| hypothetical protein LJ_1621 [Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533] NP_965427.1 0.12 24% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1366 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1366 gb|AAI40135.1| Olfactory receptor 1239 [synthetic construct] gb|A...AI40175.1| Olfactory receptor 1239 [synthetic construct] gb|AAI43150.1| Olfactory receptor 1239 [synthetic construct] AAI40135.1 2e-80 82% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0489 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0489 ref|ZP_01035526.1| exopolysaccharide biosynthesis domain protein [Roseo...varius sp. 217] gb|EAQ25691.1| exopolysaccharide biosynthesis domain protein [Roseovarius sp. 217] ZP_01035526.1 1.0 26% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0832 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0832 ref|ZP_01585795.1| Polyphosphate kinase [Dinoroseobacter shibae D...FL 12] gb|ABV92485.1| Polyphosphate kinase [Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL 12] ZP_01585795.1 1.8 28% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0832 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0832 ref|ZP_01035526.1| exopolysaccharide biosynthesis domain protein [Roseo...varius sp. 217] gb|EAQ25691.1| exopolysaccharide biosynthesis domain protein [Roseovarius sp. 217] ZP_01035526.1 1.0 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0489 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0489 ref|ZP_01585795.1| Polyphosphate kinase [Dinoroseobacter shibae D...FL 12] gb|ABV92485.1| Polyphosphate kinase [Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL 12] ZP_01585795.1 1.8 28% ...

  10. Indicators of induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in Danish Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, Anne Mette; Li, Shucong; Andersen, Pia H.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in dairy cows is high with large impact on economy and welfare. Its current field diagnosis is based on point ruminal pH measurements by oral probe or rumenocentesis. These techniques are invasive and inaccurate, and better markers fo...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0590 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0590 ref|NP_297344.1| hypothetical protein XF0051 [Xylella fastidiosa ...9a5c] gb|AAF82864.1|AE003859_5 hypothetical protein XF_0051 [Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c] NP_297344.1 8e-19 51% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0430 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0430 ref|NP_878187.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Fejervarya limnoch...aris] gb|AAO12107.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Fejervarya limnocharis] NP_878187.1 2.5 29% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1095 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1095 ref|XP_001231930.1| PREDICTED: similar to claudin 14b [Gallus gal...lus] ref|XP_001231960.1| PREDICTED: similar to claudin 14b [Gallus gallus] XP_001231930.1 6e-34 37% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1648 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1648 ref|NP_694727.1| histamine H4 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAK97380.1|AF358859_1 histamine... H4 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|EDL01579.1| histamine H4 receptor [Mus musculus] NP_694727.1 1e-129 61% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1089 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1089 ref|ZP_00518636.1| Major facilitator superfamily [Crocosphaera watson...ii WH 8501] gb|EAM48279.1| Major facilitator superfamily [Crocosphaera watsonii WH 8501] ZP_00518636.1 1.3 32% ...

  16. Rumen Microbiome Composition in Cattle during Grain-Induced Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, Anne Mette; Derakshani, Hooman; Li, Shucong

    2014-01-01

    day of the control period, and first and last day of full SARA-feeding. DNA was extracted and V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA amplified and subjected to Illumina sequencing. Data was analyzed using QIIME pipelines and resultant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were aligned to Greengenes database...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1804 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1804 ref|ZP_00743402.1| Sensory box/GGDEF family protein [Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israel...ensis ATCC 35646] gb|EAO52327.1| Sensory box/GGDEF family protein [Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis ATCC 35646] ZP_00743402.1 0.20 36% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0256 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0256 ref|ZP_00739965.1| Integral membrane protein [Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israel...ensis ATCC 35646] gb|EAO55770.1| Integral membrane protein [Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis ATCC 35646] ZP_00739965.1 1.3 24% ...

  19. The new species of Mysidacea (Crustacea), Anchialina labatus and Gastrosaccus sarae, from south west Australia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Panampunnayil, S.U.

    Descriptions of two new sepcies Anchialina labatus and Gastrosaccus sarae, are give. A. lobatus is distinguished from the other species of the genus by the presence of a hairy lobe on the first segment of the antennule, by the modified setae...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1922 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1922 ref|NP_001003037.1| melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 2 [Can...is lupus familiaris] gb|AAM51852.1| melanin-concentrating hormone receptor subtype 2 [Canis familiaris] NP_001003037.1 1e-126 73% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1922 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1922 ref|NP_001038074.1| putative melanin concentrating hormone recept...or 2 [Sus scrofa] emb|CAJ55683.1| putative melanin concentrating hormone receptor 2 [Sus scrofa] NP_001038074.1 1e-129 73% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1099 ref|YP_001337495.1| hypothetical protein KPN_03841 [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumonia...e MGH 78578] gb|ABR79228.1| hypothetical protein KPN_03841 [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] YP_001337495.1 0.93 29% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0303 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0303 ref|YP_001109469.1| valine-pyruvate aminotransferase [Saccharopol...yspora erythraea NRRL 2338] emb|CAM06544.1| valine-pyruvate aminotransferase [Saccharopolyspora erythraea NRRL 2338] YP_001109469.1 5.0 33% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0991 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0991 ref|YP_873218.1| chitinase. Glycosyl Hydrolase family 18. [Acidot...hermus cellulolyticus 11B] gb|ABK53232.1| chitinase. Glycosyl Hydrolase family 18. [Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B] YP_873218.1 9.3 29% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0775 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0775 ref|ZP_01788010.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenza...e 3655] gb|EDJ93712.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenzae 3655] ZP_01788010.1 0.22 27% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0775 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0775 ref|ZP_01792636.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenza...e PittHH] gb|EDK09769.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenzae PittHH] ZP_01792636.1 0.22 27% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0775 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0775 ref|ZP_01797490.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenza...e R3021] gb|EDK13267.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenzae 22.4-21] ZP_01797490.1 0.22 27% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0775 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0775 ref|ZP_01785759.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenza...e 22.4-21] gb|EDJ91681.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenzae R3021] ZP_01785759.1 0.22 27% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0775 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0775 ref|ZP_01789776.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenza...e PittAA] gb|EDK08502.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenzae PittAA] ZP_01789776.1 0.22 27% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0775 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0775 ref|YP_248596.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenza...e 86-028NP] gb|AAX87936.1| multidrug resistance protein [Haemophilus influenzae 86-028NP] YP_248596.1 0.22 27% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0900 ref|YP_026098.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Habronattus oregon...ensis] gb|AAT02495.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Habronattus oregonensis] YP_026098.1 0.032 22% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0491 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0491 ref|YP_001517065.1| hypothetical protein AM1_2749 [Acaryochloris marina... MBIC11017] gb|ABW27749.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Acaryochloris marina MBIC11017] YP_001517065.1 2e-13 45% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1485 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1485 ref|YP_001518234.1| pentapeptide repeat domain protein [Acaryochloris marina... MBIC11017] gb|ABW28917.1| pentapeptide repeat domain protein [Acaryochloris marina MBIC11017] YP_001518234.1 1.9 43% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0594 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0594 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-10 35% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1578 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1578 ref|NP_001077100.1| cOR52N9 olfactory receptor family 52 subfamily N-like [Canis lupus... familiaris] gb|ABO36681.1| 52N9 olfactory receptor protein [Canis lupus familiaris] NP_001077100.1 1e-146 78% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1392 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1392 sp|Q9BDS7|GPR15_MACFA G-protein coupled receptor 15 gb|AAK25741.1...|AF291670_1 orphan seven transmembrane receptor GPR15 [Macaca fascicularis] Q9BDS7 1e-169 81% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-2020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-2020 ref|ZP_01666375.1| conserved hypothetical protein 374 [Thermosinus... carboxydivorans Nor1] gb|EAX47725.1| conserved hypothetical protein 374 [Thermosinus carboxydivorans Nor1] ZP_01666375.1 0.86 31% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0522 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0522 ref|YP_001499570.1| Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase [Rickettsia massiliae... MTU5] gb|ABV85023.1| Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase [Rickettsia massiliae MTU5] YP_001499570.1 4.7 36% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1560 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1560 ref|YP_984227.1| filamentous haemagglutinin family outer membrane... protein [Polaromonas naphthalenivorans CJ2] gb|ABM39306.1| filamentous haemagglutinin family outer membrane protein [Polaromonas naphthalenivorans CJ2] YP_984227.1 2.9 30% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0844 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0844 ref|NP_949451.1| putative conjugal transfer protein trbI [Rhodopseudomonas... palustris CGA009] emb|CAE29556.1| putative conjugal transfer protein trbI [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] NP_949451.1 0.38 29% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1393 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1393 ref|NP_946691.1| hypothetical protein RPA1341 [Rhodopseudomonas p...alustris CGA009] emb|CAE26784.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009] NP_946691.1 2.4 28% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1960 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1960 ref|YP_687145.1| hypothetical protein RRC34 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37819.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687145.1 9e-19 40% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1960 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1960 ref|YP_687144.1| hypothetical protein RRC32 [uncultured methanogen...ic archaeon RC-I] emb|CAJ37818.1| hypothetical protein [uncultured methanogenic archaeon RC-I] YP_687144.1 7e-22 39% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1273 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1273 ref|YP_001111321.1| hypothetical protein GrBNV_gp54 [Gryllus bima...culatus nudivirus] gb|ABO45387.1| unknown [Gryllus bimaculatus nudivirus] YP_001111321.1 0.001 35% ...

  5. Reading, Laterality, and the Brain: Early Contributions on Reading Disabilities by Sara S. Sparrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jack M.; Morris, Robin D.

    2014-01-01

    Although best known for work with children and adults with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorders, training in speech pathology and a doctorate in clinical psychology and neuropsychology was the foundation for Sara Sparrow's long-term interest in reading disabilities. Her first papers were on dyslexia and laterality, and the…

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1167 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1167 ref|XP_848356.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 iso...form 2 [Canis familiaris] ref|XP_537118.2| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 1 [Canis familiaris] XP_848356.1 1e-138 67% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1030 ref|NP_001015581.1| chemokine binding protein 2 [Bos taurus] gb|A...AX46341.1| chemokine binding protein 2 [Bos taurus] gb|AAX46675.1| chemokine binding protein 2 [Bos taurus] NP_001015581.1 1e-170 79% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1688 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1688 emb|CAH72617.1| chromosome 10 open reading frame 18 [Homo sapiens...] emb|CAI13368.1| chromosome 10 open reading frame 18 [Homo sapiens] CAH72617.1 1e-103 49% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0522 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ensis HTE831] sp|Q8EQA1|PRSW_OCEIH Protease prsW (Protease responsible for activating sigma-W) dbj|BAC13763....CBRC-SARA-01-0522 ref|NP_692728.1| hypothetical protein OB1807 [Oceanobacillus ihey

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0991 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0991 ref|YP_574775.1| transcriptional regulator, LysR family [Chromohalobacter salex...igens DSM 3043] gb|ABE60076.1| transcriptional regulator, LysR family [Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043] YP_574775.1 9.3 31% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0831 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0831 ref|XP_001526559.1| hypothetical protein LELG_01387 [Lodderomyces... elongisporus NRRL YB-4239] gb|EDK43209.1| hypothetical protein LELG_01387 [Lodderomyces elongisporus NRRL YB-4239] XP_001526559.1 2.8 51% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0106 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0106 ref|XP_001524609.1| hypothetical protein LELG_04581 [Lodderomyces... elongisporus NRRL YB-4239] gb|EDK46400.1| hypothetical protein LELG_04581 [Lodderomyces elongisporus NRRL YB-4239] XP_001524609.1 3e-17 39% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0566 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0566 sp|Q91ZI0|CELR3_MOUSE Cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor... 3 precursor gb|AAL25099.1|AF427498_1 cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor [Mus musculus] Q91ZI0 0.0 74% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0144 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0144 ref|YP_438659.1| alcohol dehydrogenase, zinc-containing [Burkholderia thail...andensis E264] gb|ABC35120.1| alcohol dehydrogenase, zinc-containing [Burkholderia thailandensis E264] YP_438659.1 0.69 35% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0383 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0383 ref|XP_361721.2| hypothetical protein MGG_04195 [Magnaporthe gris...ea 70-15] gb|EDJ99501.1| hypothetical protein MGG_04195 [Magnaporthe grisea 70-15] XP_361721.2 1.4 24% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0195 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0195 ref|NP_001009331.1| cannabinoid receptor 1 [Felis catus] sp|O02777|CNR1_FELCA Canna...binoid receptor 1 (CB1) (CB-R) gb|AAB53440.1| CB1 cannabinoid receptor [Felis catus] NP_001009331.1 0.0 96% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0175 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0175 ref|NP_603288.1| hypothetical protein FN0384 [Fusobacterium nucle...atum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94587.1| Hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_603288.1 9.0 32% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0415 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0415 ref|YP_547770.1| NADH dehydrogenase (quinone) [Polaromonas sp. JS...666] gb|ABE42872.1| NADH dehydrogenase (quinone) [Polaromonas sp. JS666] YP_547770.1 4.6 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1012 ref|YP_468056.1| phosphate ABC transporter, permease protein [Rhizobium... etli CFN 42] gb|ABC89329.1| phosphate ABC transporter, permease protein [Rhizobium etli CFN 42] YP_468056.1 1.1 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1549 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1549 ref|YP_001101288.1| twin-arginine translocase subunit, sec-indepe...ndent protein export [Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans] emb|CAL63167.1| twin-arginine translocase subunit, sec-i

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1142 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1142 ref|NP_787448.1| twin-arginine translocase TatC component [Trophe...ryma whipplei str. Twist] gb|AAO44417.1| twin-arginine translocase TatC component [Tropheryma whipplei str. Twist] NP_787448.1 0.17 24% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0268 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0268 ref|XP_566600.1| hypothetical protein [Cryptococcus neoformans var. neo...formans JEC21] gb|AAW40781.1| expressed protein [Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans JEC21] XP_566600.1 0.017 30% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0144 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0144 ref|XP_572921.1| hypothetical protein CNI03200 [Cryptococcus neoformans var. neo...formans JEC21] gb|AAW45614.1| hypothetical protein CNI03200 [Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans JEC21] XP_572921.1 0.90 26% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0348 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0348 ref|XP_001586881.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN97385.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001586881.1 2.4 28% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1099 ref|XP_001588188.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1...980] gb|EDN94760.1| predicted protein [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum 1980] XP_001588188.1 4.6 34% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1986 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1986 ref|NP_223335.1| INTEGRASE-RECOMBINASE PROTEIN (XERCD FAMILY) [Helicobacter... pylori J99] gb|AAD06197.1| INTEGRASE-RECOMBINASE PROTEIN (XERCD FAMILY) [Helicobacter pylori J99] NP_223335.1 5.2 32% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1253 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1253 ref|YP_264377.1| hypothetical protein Psyc_1092 [Psychrobacter arctic...us 273-4] gb|AAZ18943.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4] YP_264377.1 1.2 25% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0873 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0873 ref|ZP_01187451.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Bacillus weihenstep...hanensis KBAB4] gb|EAR73176.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4] ZP_01187451.1 0.36 25% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1488 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1488 ref|ZP_01187451.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Bacillus weihenstep...hanensis KBAB4] gb|EAR73176.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4] ZP_01187451.1 0.78 25% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1099 ref|YP_708759.1| hypothetical protein RHA1_ro10412 [Rhodococcus s...p. RHA1] gb|ABH00601.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Rhodococcus sp. RHA1] YP_708759.1 2.7 25% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1967 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1967 ref|ZP_00370594.1| Predicted DNA repair exonuclease [Campylobacter upsalien...sis RM3195] gb|EAL53370.1| Predicted DNA repair exonuclease [Campylobacter upsaliensis RM3195] ZP_00370594.1 0.047 31% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0033 ref|NP_001015622.1| prostacyclin receptor [Bos taurus] sp|P79393|PI2R_BOVIN Prostacy...clin receptor (Prostanoid IP receptor) (PGI receptor) (Prostaglandin I2 receptor) emb|CAB07510.1| prostacyclin receptor [Bos taurus] NP_001015622.1 1e-113 86% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0378 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0378 ref|YP_001302962.1| putative flippase [Parabacteroides distasonis... ATCC 8503] gb|ABR43340.1| putative flippase [Parabacteroides distasonis ATCC 8503] YP_001302962.1 5.1 26% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0459 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0459 ref|YP_001297164.1| hypothetical protein FP2308 [Flavobacterium p...sychrophilum JIP02/86] emb|CAL44363.1| Protein of unknown function [Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP02/86] YP_001297164.1 7.3 30% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1901 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1901 ref|ZP_01733372.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_03440 [Flavobacte...ria bacterium BAL38] gb|EAZ96441.1| hypothetical protein FBBAL38_03440 [Flavobacteria bacterium BAL38] ZP_01733372.1 4.4 19% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0253 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0253 ref|NP_001038089.1| G protein-coupled receptor 54 [Sus scrofa] gb...|ABE73452.1| G protein-coupled receptor 54 [Sus scrofa] gb|ABE73453.1| G protein-coupled receptor 54 [Sus scrofa] NP_001038089.1 3e-51 67% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0420 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0420 ref|ZP_00588106.1| Bile acid:sodium symporter [Pelodictyon phaeocl...athratiforme BU-1] gb|EAN26387.1| Bile acid:sodium symporter [Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme BU-1] ZP_00588106.1 0.33 29% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1117 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available moniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] gb|ABR77598.1| putative H+/gluconate symporter ...and related permeases [Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578] YP_001335828.1 1.8 26% ... ...CBRC-SARA-01-1117 ref|YP_001335828.1| putative H+/gluconate symporter and related permeases [Klebsiella pneu

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1572 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1572 ref|NP_652753.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Tigriopus japonicu...s] dbj|BAB97224.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Tigriopus japonicus] NP_652753.1 0.14 27% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1999 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1999 ref|YP_126627.1| hypothetical protein lpl1277 [Legionella pneumop...hila str. Lens] emb|CAH15517.1| hypothetical protein [Legionella pneumophila str. Lens] YP_126627.1 0.38 21% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1615 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1615 ref|XP_001683626.1| formin, putative [Leishmania major] emb|CAJ04...769.1| formin, putative [Leishmania major] gb|ABQ43162.1| formin B [Leishmania major] XP_001683626.1 0.52 46% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-2040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-2040 ref|NP_001075253.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2A [Equus caba...llus] dbj|BAF32954.1| 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A [Equus caballus] NP_001075253.1 1e-128 87% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0322 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0322 ref|ZP_01459778.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Stigmatella aura...ntiaca DW4/3-1] gb|EAU69359.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4/3-1] ZP_01459778.1 5.2 34% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0796 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0796 ref|ZP_01774245.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Geobacter bemi...djiensis Bem] gb|EDJ80432.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem] ZP_01774245.1 3e-33 39% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0771 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0771 ref|NP_001029253.1| progestin and adipoQ receptor family member V...II [Rattus norvegicus] gb|AAY67652.1| progestin membrane receptor alpha [Rattus norvegicus] NP_001029253.1 1e-167 82% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0771 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0771 ref|NP_001033642.1| progestin and adipoQ receptor family member V...II [Bos taurus] gb|AAI11285.1| Progestin and adipoQ receptor family member VII [Bos taurus] NP_001033642.1 1e-180 87% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1656 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1656 ref|NP_001034958.1| bitter taste receptor Modo-T2R7B [Monodelphis... domestica] dbj|BAE80368.1| bitter taste receptor [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001034958.1 2e-39 43% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1755 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1755 ref|NP_001034947.1| bitter taste receptor Modo-T2R25 [Monodelphis... domestica] dbj|BAE80373.1| bitter taste receptor [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001034947.1 1e-40 35% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0389 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0389 ref|NP_001034959.1| bitter taste receptor Modo-T2R41 [Monodelphis... domestica] dbj|BAE80381.1| bitter taste receptor [Monodelphis domestica] NP_001034959.1 1e-101 60% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1309 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1309 ref|YP_033365.1| hypothetical protein BH05300 [Bartonella hensela...e str. Houston-1] emb|CAF27338.1| hypothetical protein [Bartonella henselae str. Houston-1] YP_033365.1 0.47 19% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1189 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1189 ref|ZP_01099747.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter... jejuni subsp. jejuni 84-25] gb|EAQ95323.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni 84-25] ZP_01099747.1 0.40 27% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1189 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1189 ref|ZP_01068559.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter... jejuni subsp. jejuni CF93-6] gb|EAQ56421.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni CF93-6] ZP_01068559.1 0.53 28% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0337 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0337 ref|ZP_01068559.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter... jejuni subsp. jejuni CF93-6] gb|EAQ56421.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni CF93-6] ZP_01068559.1 0.67 27% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1189 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1189 ref|ZP_01069237.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter... jejuni subsp. jejuni 260.94] gb|EAQ59437.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni 260.94] ZP_01069237.1 0.53 28% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0337 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0337 ref|ZP_01099747.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter... jejuni subsp. jejuni 84-25] gb|EAQ95323.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni 84-25] ZP_01099747.1 0.52 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0337 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0337 ref|ZP_01069237.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter... jejuni subsp. jejuni 260.94] gb|EAQ59437.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni 260.94] ZP_01069237.1 0.67 27% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1348 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1348 ref|NP_001028103.1| cholinergic receptor, muscarinic 5 [Macaca mu...latta] sp|P56490|ACM5_MACMU Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M5 gb|AAB95159.1| muscarinic receptor [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028103.1 0.0 88% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0900 ref|YP_898010.1| phosphatidylserine synthase [Francisella tularen...sis subsp. novicida U112] gb|ABK89256.1| phosphatidylserine synthase [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_898010.1 3.0 27% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0378 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0378 ref|NP_693392.1| glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [Oceanobacill...us iheyensis HTE831] dbj|BAC14427.1| glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831] NP_693392.1 8.7 23% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1651 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1651 ref|NP_203156.1|ND2_15766 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAC51700.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_203156.1 1.5 19% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-2020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-2020 ref|NP_203162.1|ND5_15766 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAC51706.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_203162.1 5.5 32% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0795 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0795 ref|NP_203156.1|ND2_15766 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Tribolium... castaneum] emb|CAC51700.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Tribolium castaneum] NP_203156.1 1.8 19% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1199 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1199 ref|NP_001039945.1| opioid receptor, kappa 1 [Bos taurus] sp|Q2KIP6|OPRK_BOVIN Kap...pa-type opioid receptor (KOR-1) gb|AAI12562.1| Opioid receptor, kappa 1 [Bos taurus] NP_001039945.1 9e-80 92% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1236 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1236 ref|XP_001221542.1| hypothetical protein CHGG_05447 [Chaetomium globo...sum CBS 148.51] gb|EAQ88828.1| hypothetical protein CHGG_05447 [Chaetomium globosum CBS 148.51] XP_001221542.1 0.21 28% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1012 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1012 ref|XP_001229383.1| hypothetical protein CHGG_02867 [Chaetomium globo...sum CBS 148.51] gb|EAQ90932.1| hypothetical protein CHGG_02867 [Chaetomium globosum CBS 148.51] XP_001229383.1 4.1 30% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0179 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0179 ref|XP_001226930.1| predicted protein [Chaetomium globosum CBS 14...8.51] gb|EAQ84989.1| predicted protein [Chaetomium globosum CBS 148.51] XP_001226930.1 1e-04 40% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0522 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0522 ref|YP_913161.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Romanomermis culicivo...rax] gb|ABL11588.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Romanomermis culicivorax] YP_913161.1 0.33 24% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1697 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1697 ref|YP_913162.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Romanomermis culic...ivorax] gb|ABL11589.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Romanomermis culicivorax] YP_913162.1 0.62 35% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1085 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1085 ref|NP_829355.1| hypothetical protein CCA00489 [Chlamydophila cav...iae GPIC] gb|AAP05233.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Chlamydophila caviae GPIC] NP_829355.1 0.26 23% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-2026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-2026 ref|YP_008277.1| hypothetical protein pc1278 [Candidatus Protochlamydia... amoebophila UWE25] emb|CAF24002.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25] YP_008277.1 0.89 28% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0159 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0159 ref|YP_008619.1| hypothetical protein pc1620 [Candidatus Protochlamydia... amoebophila UWE25] emb|CAF24344.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25] YP_008619.1 7.8 27% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-2026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-2026 ref|YP_008281.1| hypothetical protein pc1282 [Candidatus Protochlamydia... amoebophila UWE25] emb|CAF24006.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Candidatus Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25] YP_008281.1 3.4 25% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1753 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1753 ref|YP_001476411.1| amino acid permease-associated region [Serratia proteam...aculans 568] gb|ABV39283.1| amino acid permease-associated region [Serratia proteamaculans 568] YP_001476411.1 0.83 35% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1462 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1462 ref|YP_300930.1| accessory gene regulator C [Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. saprophyt...icus ATCC 15305] dbj|BAE17985.1| accessory gene regulator C [Staphylococcus saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus ATCC 15305] YP_300930.1 0.020 25% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1236 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1236 ref|YP_213442.1| putative iron transport, fusion membrane protein... [Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343] emb|CAH09534.1| putative iron transport, fusion membrane protein [Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343] YP_213442.1 1.8 26% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1386 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1386 ref|XP_001165973.1| PREDICTED: prokineticin receptor 2 isoform 1 ...[Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001166012.1| PREDICTED: prokineticin receptor 2 isoform 2 [Pan troglodytes] XP_001165973.1 1e-115 91% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1868 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1868 ref|NP_067356.2| prokineticin receptor 1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAH59003.1| Prokinetic...2080.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|EDK99210.1| prokineticin receptor 1 [Mus musculus] NP_067356.2 2e-55 77% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1746 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1746 ref|NP_001100989.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndro...me 1 homolog [Rattus norvegicus] gb|EDL86455.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1 homolog (human) (predicted) [Rattus norvegicus] NP_001100989.1 1e-113 80% ...

  19. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  20. Graph model of behavior simulator. [Interactive simulator developed as part of UCLA SARA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razouk, R.R.; Estrin, G.

    1966-01-01

    An interactive simulator developed at UCLA as part of the SARA system is described. This simulator, in conjunction with other design tools of the SARA system, allows the user to model the behavior of the system being designed at various levels of detail. The models which drive the simulator are control graphs and associated data graphs. The simulator uses the control graph to express synchronization of sequences of events. Initiation of any control node triggers the simulator to call on the data graph model to provide interpretation of a process at a desired level of abstraction. The simulator gives the user the capability to examine, or modify, the state of the control and data graphs during a simulation. 8 figures.

  1. SARA (System ARchitects Apprentice): Modeling, analysis, and simulation support for design of concurrent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrin, G.; Fenchel, R.S.; Razouk, R.R.; Vernon, M.K.

    1986-02-01

    An environment to support designers in the modeling, analysis and simulation of concurrent systems is described. It is shown how a fully nested structure model supports multilevel design and focuses attention on the interfaces between the modules which serve to encapsulate behavior. Using simple examples the paper indicates how a formal graph model can be used to model behavior in three domains: control flow, data flow, and interpretation. The effectiveness of the explicity environment model in SARA is discussed and the capability to analyze correctness and evaluate performance of a system model are demonstrated. A description of the integral help designed into SARA shows how the designer can be offered consistent use of any new tool introduced to support the design process.

  2. The Remote Observatories of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA)

    CERN Document Server

    Keel, William C; Mack, Peter; Henson, Gary; Hillwig, Todd; Batcheldor, Daniel; Berrington, Robert; De Pree, Chris; Hartmann, Dieter; Leake, Martha; Licandro, Javier; Murphy, Brian; Webb, James; Wood, Matt A

    2016-01-01

    We describe the remote facilities operated by the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA), a consortium of colleges and universities in the US partnered with Lowell Observatory, the Chilean National Telescope Allocation Committee, and the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. SARA observatories comprise a 0.96m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona; a 0.6m instrument on Cerro Tololo, Chile; and the 1m Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain. All are operated using standard VNC or Radmin protocols communicating with on-site PCs. Remote operation offers considerable flexibility in scheduling, allowing long-term observational cadences difficult to achieve with classical observing at remote facilities, as well as obvious travel savings. Multiple observers at different locations can share a telescope for training, educational use, or collaborative research programs. Each telescope has a CCD system for optical imaging, using thermoelectric cooling to avoid the need for f...

  3. Serum acute phase proteins in cows with SARA (Subacute Ruminal Acidosis suspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cannizzo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the variations of Acute Phase Proteins (APPs and other blood constituents during the onset of the sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA pathological status. A total of 108 cows from 12 dairy herds were randomly selected and divided into three Groups of 36 animals each. All animals were subjected to a rumenocentesis. Group A was composed by subjects with a rumen pH>5.8, Group B was composed by subjects with a rumen pH ≤5.5≤5.8 and Group C was composed by subjects with a rumen pH<5.5. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture and Haptoglobin (Hp, Serum Amyloid A (SAA, Total Proteins, Albumin and White Blood Cells (WBC were determined. One-way ANOVA showed a statistical significance on Rumen pH, Hp, SAA. SARA seems not stimulate the APPs production from liver.

  4. Reading, Laterality, and the Brain: Early Contributions on Reading Disabilities by Sara S. Sparrow

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, Jack M.; Morris, Robin D

    2014-01-01

    Although best known for work with children and adults with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorders, training in speech pathology and a doctorate in clinical psychology and neuropsychology was the foundation for Sara Sparrow’s long-term interest in reading disabilities. Her first papers were on dyslexia and laterality, and the maturational lag theory of developmental dyslexia proposed with Paul Satz, her mentor. The research program that emerged from this work had a wide impact...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1423 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1423 ref|NP_999614.1| luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor ...[Sus scrofa] sp|P16582|LSHR_PIG Lutropin-choriogonadotropic hormone receptor precursor (LH/CG-R) (LSH-R) (Lute...inizing hormone receptor) gb|AAA31062.1| luteinizing hormone receptor precursor NP_999614.1 0.0 65% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1423 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1423 ref|NP_776806.1| luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor ...[Bos taurus] sp|Q28005|LSHR_BOVIN Lutropin-choriogonadotropic hormone receptor precursor (LH/CG-R) (LSH-R) (Lute...inizing hormone receptor) gb|AAC24012.1| luteinizing hormone receptor [Bos taurus] NP_776806.1 0.0 65% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1215 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1215 ref|NP_776826.1| neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 [Bos taurus] sp|P79113|NPY2R_BOVIN Neurope...ptide Y receptor type 2 (NPY2-R) (NPY-Y2 receptor) gb|AAB40600.1| type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor NP_776826.1 0.0 85% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0123 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0123 dbj|BAF32759.1| taste receptor, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestic...a] dbj|BAF32761.1| taste receptor, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestica] dbj|BAF32762.1| taste recepto...r, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestica] dbj|BAF32763.1| taste receptor, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestica] BAF32759.1 1e-120 70% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1746 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1746 ref|NP_653200.2| non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome ...1 [Homo sapiens] sp|Q7RTP0|NIPA1_HUMAN Non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 1 tpg|...DAA01477.1| TPA_exp: non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_653200.2 1e-113 81% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0466 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0466 dbj|BAF32759.1| taste receptor, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestic...a] dbj|BAF32761.1| taste receptor, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestica] dbj|BAF32762.1| taste recepto...r, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestica] dbj|BAF32763.1| taste receptor, type 1, member 3 [Sus scrofa domestica] BAF32759.1 3e-32 71% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1400 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1400 gb|AAW70053.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70054.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapie...ns] gb|AAW70055.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70070.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70083.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] AAW70053.1 4e-34 52% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1193 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1193 ref|NP_776427.1| calcium-sensing receptor [Bos taurus] sp|P35384|...CASR_BOVIN Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor precursor (CaSR) (Parathyroid Cell calcium-sensing recepto...r) gb|AAB29171.1| Ca(2+)-sensing receptor [Bos taurus] prf||2002360A Ca-sensing receptor NP_776427.1 0.0 86% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1360 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1360 ref|NP_599155.1| trace-amine-associated receptor 1 [Rattus norveg...icus] gb|AAL65137.1|AF421352_1 trace amine receptor 1 [Rattus norvegicus] gb|AAV70127.1| trace amine associa...ted receptor 1 [Rattus norvegicus] gb|EDL87747.1| trace-amine-associated receptor 1 [Rattus norvegicus] NP_599155.1 1e-145 74% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0585 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0585 ref|NP_001071387.1| hypothetical protein LOC514131 [Bos taurus] r...ef|XP_001254537.1| PREDICTED: hypothetical protein LOC514131 [Bos taurus] dbj|BAF36506.1| p97Bucentaur-2 [Bos tau...rus] gb|AAI49203.1| P97Bucentaur-2 [Bos taurus] NP_001071387.1 4e-12 32% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0259 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0259 ref|NP_001029267.1| tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous [Pan troglodytes] ...sp|Q5R1W4|TBA1B_PANTR Tubulin alpha-1B chain (Tubulin alpha-ubiquitous chain) (Alpha-tubulin ubiquitous) (Tu...bulin K-alpha-1) dbj|BAD74034.1| ubiquitous alpha-tubulin [Pan troglodytes verus] NP_001029267.1 1e-136 86% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1488 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1488 ref|YP_001474562.1| DNA internalization-related competence protei...n ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] gb|ABV37434.1| DNA internalization-related competence protein ComEC/Rec2 [Shewanella sediminis HAW-EB3] YP_001474562.1 1.7 33% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0675 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0675 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-136 76% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1437 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1437 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-123 71% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0312 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0312 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-137 76% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1238 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1238 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-116 72% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0756 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0756 gb|AAW70053.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70054.1| MRGX2 [Homo sa...piens] gb|AAW70055.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70070.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70083.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] AAW70053.1 1e-66 52% ...

  2. The Remote Observatories of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, William C.; Oswalt, Terry; Mack, Peter; Henson, Gary; Hillwig, Todd; Batcheldor, Daniel; Berrington, Robert; De Pree, Chris; Hartmann, Dieter; Leake, Martha; Licandro, Javier; Murphy, Brian; Webb, James; Wood, Matt A.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the remote facilities operated by the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) , a consortium of colleges and universities in the US partnered with Lowell Observatory, the Chilean National Telescope Allocation Committee, and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. SARA observatories comprise a 0.96 m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona; one of 0.6 m aperture on Cerro Tololo, Chile; and the 1 m Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain. All are operated using standard VNC or Radmin protocols communicating with on-site PCs. Remote operation offers considerable flexibility in scheduling, allowing long-term observational cadences difficult to achieve with classical observing at remote facilities, as well as obvious travel savings. Multiple observers at different locations can share a telescope for training, educational use, or collaborative research programs. Each telescope has a CCD system for optical imaging, using thermoelectric cooling to avoid the need for frequent local service, and a second CCD for offset guiding. The Arizona and Chile telescopes also have fiber-fed echelle spectrographs. Switching between imaging and spectroscopy is very rapid, so a night can easily accommodate mixed observing modes. We present some sample observational programs. For the benefit of other groups organizing similar consortia, we describe the operating structure and principles of SARA, as well as some lessons learned from almost 20 years of remote operations.

  3. Innovative Stormwater Quality Tools by SARA for Holistic Watershed Master Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S. M.; Su, Y. C.; Hummel, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Stormwater management strategies such as Best Management Practices (BMP) and Low-Impact Development (LID) have increasingly gained attention in urban runoff control, becoming vital to holistic watershed master plans. These strategies can help address existing water quality impairments and support regulatory compliance, as well as guide planning and management of future development when substantial population growth and urbanization is projected to occur. However, past efforts have been limited to qualitative planning due to the lack of suitable tools to conduct quantitative assessment. The San Antonio River Authority (SARA), with the assistance of Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam, Inc. (LAN) and AQUA TERRA Consultants (a division of RESPEC), developed comprehensive hydrodynamic and water quality models using the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) for several urban watersheds in the San Antonio River Basin. These models enabled watershed management to look at water quality issues on a more refined temporal and spatial scale than the limited monitoring data. They also provided a means to locate and quantify potential water quality impairments and evaluate the effects of mitigation measures. To support the models, a suite of software tools were developed. including: 1) SARA Timeseries Utility Tool for managing and processing of large model timeseries files, 2) SARA Load Reduction Tool to determine load reductions needed to achieve screening levels for each modeled constituent on a sub-basin basis, and 3) SARA Enhanced BMP Tool to determine the optimal combination of BMP types and units needed to achieve the required load reductions. Using these SARA models and tools, water quality agencies and stormwater professionals can determine the optimal combinations of BMP/LID to accomplish their goals and save substantial stormwater infrastructure and management costs. The tools can also help regulators and permittees evaluate the feasibility of achieving compliance

  4. Reactivity of Athabasca residue and of its SARA fractions during residue hydroconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, J.; Danial-Fortain, P.; Gauthier, T.; Merdrignac, I. [IFP-Lyon, Vermaison (France); Budzinski, H. [Bordeaux Univ. (France). ISM-LPTC, UMR CNRS

    2009-07-01

    Residue conversion processes are becoming increasingly important because of the declining market for residual fuel oil and a greater demand for middle distillates. Ebullated-bed hydroconversion is a commercially proven technology for converting heavy feedstocks with high amounts of impurities. The process enables the conversion of atmospheric or vacuum residues at temperatures up to 440 degrees C, and at liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV) conditions in the range of 0.15 to 0.5 per hour. A 540 degrees C conversion of up to 80 weight per cent can be achieved under these conditions. This paper reported on a research study conducted at IFP Lyon in which the residue hydroconversion in a large-scale ebullated bed bench unit was investigated to determine the impact of operating conditions and feed properties on yield and product qualities. Hydrogen was added to the feed in the bench units to keep a high hydrogen partial pressure and favour the catalytic hydroconversion reactions. In a typical test, the reactor was fed with 50 g of feedstock and 0.45 g of crushed equilibrium industrial NiMo catalyst, pressurized hydrogen and quickly heated at the reaction temperature. This paper also discussed the conversion of Athabasca bitumen residue in the large-scale pilot plant and also in the small scale batch reactor. The effect of operating temperature and space velocity was examined. The reactivity of the saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes (SARA) fractions of the bitumen was studied separately in order to better understand the conversion mechanisms and reactivities. The Athabasca bitumen feed and SARA fractions were also analyzed in terms of standard petroleum analysis, SARA fractionation, elemental analysis, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and 13C NMR. Hydroconversion experiments were conducted in the batch unit at different reaction temperatures and reaction times. A comparison of small-scale batch results with those obtained with the continuous large-scale bench

  5. Autonomous Airship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin POSPÍŠILÍK

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a project of attaching the autonomous monitoring system to a small helium airship. The airship is capable of independent operating inside a closed hall, being driven by means of ultrasonic detectors. It is accommodated to carry different monitoring units providing students with the opportunity to process various experiments and measurements. In the first experiment, the airship will carry WiFi router, camera and IP Relay by means of which the pertinent control of the airship through external web interface is enabled, independently on the ultrasonic detecting system.

  6. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  7. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  8. Impact of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) adaptation and recovery on the density and diversity of bacteria in the rumen of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hook, S.E.; Steele, M.A.; Northwood, K.S.; Dijkstra, J.; France, J.; Wright, A.G.; McBride, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is characterized by ruminal pH depression and microbial perturbation. The impact of SARA adaptation and recovery on rumen bacterial density and diversity was investigated following high-grain feeding. Four ruminally cannulated dairy cows were fed a hay diet, transiti

  9. PLS models for determination of SARA analysis of Colombian vacuum residues and molecular distillation fractions using MIR-ATR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Orrego-Ruiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, prediction models of Saturates, Aromatics, Resins and Asphaltenes fractions (SARA from thirty-seven vacuum residues of representative Colombian crudes and eighteen fractions of molecular distillation process were obtained. Mid-Infrared (MIR Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares (PLS regression analysis was used to estimate accurately SARA analysis in these kind of samples. Calibration coefficients of prediction models were for saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes fractions, 0.99, 0.96, 0.97 and 0.99, respectively. This methodology permits to control the molecular distillation process since small differences in chemical composition can be detected. Total time elapsed to give the SARA analysis per sample is 10 minutes.

  10. SARAS: a precision system for measurement of the Cosmic Radio Background and signatures from the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Nipanjana; Raghunathan, A; Shankar, N Udaya

    2012-01-01

    SARAS is a correlation spectrometer purpose designed for precision measurements of the cosmic radio background and faint features in the sky spectrum at long wavelengths that arise from redshifted 21-cm from gas in the reionization epoch. SARAS operates in the octave band 87.5-175 MHz. We present herein the system design arguing for a complex correlation spectrometer concept. The SARAS design concept provides a differential measurement between the antenna temperature and that of an internal reference termination, with measurements in switched system states allowing for cancellation of additive contaminants from a large part of the signal flow path including the digital spectrometer. A switched noise injection scheme provides absolute spectral calibration. Additionally, we argue for an electrically small frequency-independent antenna over an absorber ground. Various critical design features that aid in avoidance of systematics and in providing calibration products for the parametrization of other unavoidable s...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0144 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0144 ref|YP_104995.1| alcohol dehydrogenase, zinc-containing [Burkholder...ia mallei ATCC 23344] ref|YP_111924.1| alcohol dehydrogenase [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] ref|ZP_004...40487.1| COG1064: Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases [Burkholderia mallei GB8 horse 4] ref|YP_336176.1| alc...ohol dehydrogenase, zinc-containing [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710b] ref|ZP_0093...0750.1| COG1064: Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases [Burkholderia mallei FMH] ref|ZP_00934487.1| COG1064: Z

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1695 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1695 sp|Q9NYW0|T2R10_HUMAN Taste receptor type 2 member 10 (T2R10) (Taste... receptor family B member 2) (TRB2) gb|AAH69089.1| Taste receptor, type 2, member 10 [Homo sapiens] gb|AA...U21148.1| taste receptor T2R10 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI01763.1| Taste receptor, type 2, member 10 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI01765.1| Taste

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1608 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1608 ref|NP_001832.1| cannabinoid receptor 2 (macrophage) [Homo sapien...s] sp|P34972|CNR2_HUMAN Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) (CB-2) (CX5) emb|CAA52376.1| CB2 (peripheral) cannabinoid... receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAD22548.1| peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAD22549.1| peripheral cannabinoid... receptor CB2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAO92299.1| cannabinoid r...eceptor 2 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAI14799.1| cannabinoid receptor 2 (macrophage) [Homo sapiens] emb|CAJ42137.1| cannabinoid

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0195 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0195 ref|NP_036916.1| cannabinoid receptor 1 (brain) [Rattus norvegicu...s] sp|P20272|CNR1_RAT Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) (CB-R) (Brain-type cannabinoid receptor) emb|CAA39332.1| CB1 cannabinoid... receptor [Rattus norvegicus] gb|AAA99067.1| neuronal cannabinoid receptor gb|EDL98589.1| cannabinoid... receptor 1 (brain) [Rattus norvegicus] prf||1613453A cannabinoid receptor NP_036916.1 0.0 97% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0921 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0921 ref|NP_003292.1| thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor [Homo sap...iens] sp|P34981|TRFR_HUMAN Thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRH-R) (Thyroliberin receptor) emb|CAA52965.1| thyrotropin-releasi...BAA04120.1| human thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAB32222.1| thyrotropin-releasi...ng hormone receptor; TRH receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAA12796.1| thyrotropin-releasing... hormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR84356.1| thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1167 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1167 ref|XP_001105680.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 ...isoform 3 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001105751.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 4 [Macac...a mulatta] ref|XP_001105805.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 5 [Macaca mulatta] ref|X...P_001105878.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 6 [Macaca mul...atta] ref|XP_001105957.1| PREDICTED: similar to adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 7 [Macaca mulatta] XP_001105680.1 1e-138 67% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1167 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1167 ref|NP_057083.2| adiponectin receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] ref|XP_514107.1| PREDICTED: adipone...ctin receptor 1 isoform 7 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001152270.1| PREDICTED: adiponectin... receptor 1 isoform 1 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001152338.1| PREDICTED: adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 2 [...Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001152393.1| PREDICTED: adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 3 ...[Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_001152460.1| PREDICTED: adiponectin receptor 1 isoform 4 [Pan troglodytes] ref|XP_0

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0033 ref|NP_000951.1| prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin) receptor (IP) [H...in I2 receptor) dbj|BAA05008.1| prostacyclin receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA36448.1| prostanoid IP receptor dbj|BAA06110.1| pros...tacyclin receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAA07325.1| prostacyclin ...receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAO92301.1| prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin) receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH75814.1| Prostaglandin I2 (pros...tacyclin) receptor (IP) [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW57432.1| prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0259 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0259 ref|XP_001107503.1| PREDICTED: tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous isoform... 10 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001107562.1| PREDICTED: tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous isoform 11 [Macaca mulatta] r...ef|XP_001107624.1| PREDICTED: tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous isoform 12 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001107684.1| PRE...| PREDICTED: tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous isoform 14 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001107805.1| PREDICTED: tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous... isoform 15 [Macaca mulatta] ref|XP_001107870.1| PREDICTED: tubulin, alpha, ubiquitous isof

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0771 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0771 ref|NP_848509.1| progestin and adipoQ receptor family member VII ...[Homo sapiens] sp|Q86WK9|MPRA_HUMAN Membrane progestin receptor alpha (mPR alpha) (Progestin and adipoQ rece...ptor family member VII) gb|AAO47233.1|AF313620_1 putative membrane steroid receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR08373.1| progesti...1| hCG1642829 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAM12867.1| progestin and adipoQ receptor family member VII [Homo sapiens] NP_848509.1 1e-178 87% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0900 ref|YP_001122232.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Francise...lla tularensis subsp. tularensis WY96-3418] ref|YP_001427783.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. holarctica FTA] gb|ABO47111.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Francisella tular...ensis subsp. tularensis WY96-3418] gb|EDN35713.1| phosphatidylserine synthase [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. novicida GA99-3549] gb|EDN37179.1| hypothetical protein FTDG_01588 [Francisella

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1750 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1750 gb|ABR53744.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubent...onia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53745.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensi...s] gb|ABR53746.1| opsin 1 short-wavelength senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53747.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53748.1| opsin 1 short-wave...length senstive protein [Daubentonia madagascariensis] gb|ABR53749.1| opsin 1 short-wave

  3. saeRS and sarA act synergistically to repress protease production and promote biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara N Mrak

    Full Text Available Mutation of the staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA limits biofilm formation in diverse strains of Staphylococcus aureus, but there are exceptions. One of these is the commonly studied strain Newman. This strain has two defects of potential relevance, the first being mutations that preclude anchoring of the fibronectin-binding proteins FnbA and FnbB to the cell wall, and the second being a point mutation in saeS that results in constitutive activation of the saePQRS regulatory system. We repaired these defects to determine whether either plays a role in biofilm formation and, if so, whether this could account for the reduced impact of sarA in Newman. Restoration of surface-anchored FnbA enhanced biofilm formation, but mutation of sarA in this fnbA-positive strain increased rather than decreased biofilm formation. Mutation of sarA in an saeS-repaired derivative of Newman (P18L or a Newman saeRS mutant (ΔsaeRS resulted in a biofilm-deficient phenotype like that observed in clinical isolates, even in the absence of surface-anchored FnbA. These phenotypes were correlated with increased production of extracellular proteases and decreased accumulation of FnbA and/or Spa in the P18L and ΔsaeRS sarA mutants by comparison to the Newman sarA mutant. The reduced accumulation of Spa was reversed by mutation of the gene encoding aureolysin, while the reduced accumulation of FnbA was reversed by mutation of the sspABC operon. These results demonstrate that saeRS and sarA act synergistically to repress the production of extracellular proteases that would otherwise limit accumulation of critical proteins that contribute to biofilm formation, with constitutive activation of saeRS limiting protease production, even in a sarA mutant, to a degree that can be correlated with increased enhanced capacity to form a biofilm. Although it remains unclear whether these effects are mediated directly or indirectly, studies done with an sspA::lux reporter suggest they

  4. Quantitative Autonomic Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Disorders associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system are quite common yet frequently unrecognized. Quantitative autonomic testing can be invaluable tool for evaluation of these disorders, both in clinic and research. There are number of autonomic tests, however, only few were validated clinically or are quantitative. Here, fully quantitative and clinically validated protocol for testing of autonomic functions is presented. As a bare minimum the clinical autonomic laboratory shoul...

  5. Illness, everyday life and narrative montage: the visual aesthetics of cancer in Sara Bro's Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Nina; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2011-05-01

    This article presents a study of Sara Bro's Diary (2004), a book montage of images and texts recording the experiences of a Danish breast cancer survivor, Sara Bro. It examines two montages of photography and text, drawing on Roland Barthes' concept of 'the third meaning' to explain and discuss the effect of the layered meanings in the montage alongside their multi-medium and self-referential expression. The discussion is centred on the aesthetic practices that are invited by Bro's book montage. The article considers how the juxtaposition of images and texts are experienced and co-created by the reader. It points to the effect of the aesthetics of disguise and carnival implicit in the visual-verbal montage and argues that these generate a third meaning. This meaning is associated with the breast cancer experience but is not directly discernible in the montage. The article concludes by discussing how Bro's montage acts as an ideological statement, subverting or 'poaching on' the health care system.

  6. First Results on the Epoch of Reionization from First Light with SARAS 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Fialkov, Anastasia; Cohen, Aviad; Barkana, Rennan; Girish, B. S.; Raghunathan, A.; Somashekar, R.; Srivani, K. S.

    2017-08-01

    Long-wavelength spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background arising from the 21 cm transition in neutral hydrogen are a key probe of the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization. These features may reveal the nature of the first stars and ultra-faint galaxies that transformed the spin temperature and ionization state of the primordial gas. SARAS 2 is a spectral radiometer purposely designed for the precision measurement of these monopole or all-sky global 21 cm spectral distortions. We use 63 hr nighttime observations of the radio background in the frequency band 110-200 MHz, with the radiometer deployed at the Timbaktu Collective in Southern India, to derive likelihoods for plausible redshifted 21 cm signals predicted by theoretical models. First light with SARAS 2 disfavors the class of models that feature weak X-ray heating (with {f}X≤slant 0.1) and rapid reionization (with peak \\tfrac{{{dT}}b}{{dz}}≥slant 120 mK per unit redshift interval).

  7. Should Community College Be Free? Forum. "Education Next" Talks with Sara Goldrick-Rab and Andrew P. Kelly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Kelly, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, "Education Next" talks with Sara Goldrick-Rab and Andrew Kelly. President Obama's proposal for tuition-free community college, seems to have laid down a marker for the Democratic Party. Vermont senator Bernie Sanders is touting his plan for free four-year public college on the primary trail; Massachusetts senator…

  8. A Different Curriculum of Preparation for Work: Commentary on Mike Rose, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez and Norton Grubb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Helena Harlow

    2012-01-01

    The January 2012 issue of "Mind, Culture, and Activity" published the Invited Presidential Address "Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide," given by Mike Rose at the 2011 meeting of the American Educational Research Association in New Orleans, along with responses and commentary by Sara Goldrick-Rab, Kris Gutierrez, and…

  9. Changes in Microbiota in Rumen Digesta and Feces Due to a Grain-Based Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA) Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaizier, Jan C; Li, Shucong; Danscher, Anne Mette; Derakshani, Hooman; Andersen, Pia H; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2017-02-08

    The effects of a grain-based subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenge on bacteria in the rumen and feces of lactating dairy cows were determined. Six lactating, rumen-cannulated Danish Holstein cows were used in a cross-over study with two periods. Periods included two cows on a control diet and two cows on a SARA challenge. The control diet was a total mixed ration containing 45.5% dry matter (DM), 43.8% DM neutral detergent fiber, and 19.6% DM starch. The SARA challenge was conducted by gradually substituting the control diet with pellets containing 50% wheat and 50% barley over 3 days to reach a diet containing 55.6% DM, 31.3% DM neutral detergent fiber, and 31.8% DM starch, which was fed for four more days. Rumen fluid samples were collected at day 7 and 10 of experimental periods. Feces samples were collected on days 8 and 10 of these periods. Extracted DNA from the rumen and feces samples was analyzed to assess their bacterial communities using MiSeq Illumina sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The induction of SARA reduced the richness, diversity, and stability of bacterial communities and resulted in distinctly different microbiota in the rumen and feces. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the most abundant phyla and, combined, they represented 76.9 and 94.4% of the bacterial community in the rumen fluid and the feces, respectively. Only the relative abundance of Firmicutes in the rumen was increased by the SARA challenge. In rumen fluid and feces, the abundances of nine out of the 90 and 25 out of the 89 taxa, respectively, were affected by the challenge. Hence, SARA challenge altered the composition of the bacterial community at the lower taxonomical level in the feces and therefore also likely in the hindgut, as well as in the rumen. However, only reductions in the bacterial richness and diversity in the rumen fluid and feces were in agreement with those of other studies and had a biological basis. Although the composition of the

  10. Autoimmune autonomic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeon, Andrew; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune autonomic disorders occur because of an immune response directed against sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric ganglia, autonomic nerves, or central autonomic pathways. In general, peripheral autoimmune disorders manifest with either generalized or restricted autonomic failure, whereas central autoimmune disorders manifest primarily with autonomic hyperactivity. Some autonomic disorders are generalized, and others are limited in their anatomic extent, e.g., isolated gastrointestinal dysmotility. Historically, these disorders were poorly recognized, and thought to be neurodegenerative. Over the last 20 years a number of autoantibody biomarkers have been discovered that have enabled the identification of certain patients as having an autoimmune basis for either autonomic failure or hyperactivity. Peripheral autoimmune autonomic disorders include autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG), paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy, and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. AAG manifests with acute or subacute onset of generalized or selective autonomic failure. Antibody targeting the α3 subunit of the ganglionic-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α3gAChR) is detected in approximately 50% of cases of AAG. Some other disorders are characterized immunologically by paraneoplastic antibodies with a high positive predictive value for cancer, such as antineuronal nuclear antibody, type 1 (ANNA-1: anti-Hu); others still are seronegative. Recognition of an autoimmune basis for autonomic disorders is important, as their manifestations are disabling, may reflect an underlying neoplasm, and have the potential to improve with a combination of symptomatic and immune therapies.

  11. Autonomic dysfunction in diabetes : a consequence of cardiovascular damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J; Zeebregts, C J; Gans, R O B; Hoogenberg, K H

    2010-01-01

    In 1976, D.J. Ewing showed a clear survival disadvantage for diabetic patients that had 'diabetic autonomic neuropathy', as assessed by heart rate and blood pressure variations during a battery of bedside tests. However, these variations do not solely depend on autonomic nervous system function, but

  12. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  13. Psyche’s Daughter of Today: Sara Jeannette Duncan and the New Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Gadpaille

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian novelist Sara Jeannette Duncan (1861-1922 constructed a New Woman heroine in the fin-de- siecle novel; A Daughter of Today (1894. Written in the popular mode of the transatlantic novel; the work engages in debate on the appropriate construction of femininity in art and public life. The heroine; Elfrida Bell; descends from artist; to muse; to model; to painted image—a descent framed by a rival male artist and a hostile London art scene. Represented as Psyche; the heroine undergoes a quest and failure similar to the mythical one. Adaptation of the Psyche myth clarifies the position of Duncan in the spectrum of gender ideologies of the fin-de- siecle.

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1066 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1066 ref|NP_473371.1| MAS-related GPR, member X2 [Homo sapiens] sp|Q96...LB1|MRGX2_HUMAN Mas-related G-protein coupled receptor member X2 gb|AAK91805.1| G protein-coupled receptor [Homo sapie...ns] dbj|BAB89339.1| putative G-protein coupled receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC06030.1| seven trans...membrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH63450.1| MAS-related GPR, member X2 [Homo sapie...ns] gb|AAW70056.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70057.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAW70058.1| MRGX2 [Homo sapie

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0185 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0185 ref|NP_000852.1| histamine receptor H1 [Homo sapiens] ref|NP_001091681.1| histamine... receptor H1 [Homo sapiens] ref|NP_001091682.1| histamine receptor H1 [Homo sapiens] ref|NP_001091683.1| histamine... receptor H1 [Homo sapiens] sp|P35367|HRH1_HUMAN Histamine H1 receptor emb|CAA54182.1| histamine... H1 receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAA05840.1| histamine H1 receptor [Ho...mo sapiens] emb|CAA84380.1| Human histamine H1 receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAA03319.1| histamine H1 receptor

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1746 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1746 ref|NP_705806.1| non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome ...1 [Mus musculus] sp|Q8BHK1|NIPA1_MOUSE Non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 1 homo...log gb|AAM34534.1| non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC32809.1| unnamed ...protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAH55828.1| Non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angel...man syndrome 1 homolog (human) [Mus musculus] gb|EDL21870.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1 homolog (human) [Mus musculus] NP_705806.1 1e-113 81% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1199 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1199 ref|NP_035141.1| opioid receptor, kappa 1 [Mus musculus] sp|P33534|OPRK_MOUSE Kap...pa-type opioid receptor (KOR-1) (MSL-1) gb|AAA39363.1| kappa opioid receptor gb|AAB34130.2| kap...pa opioid receptor; KOR [Mus sp.] gb|AAP32232.1| kappa-opioid receptor [Mus sp.] gb|AAI16796.1| Opioid receptor, kap...pa 1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI19027.1| Opioid receptor, kappa 1 [Mus muscu...lus] gb|EDL14259.1| opioid receptor, kappa 1, isoform CRA_a [Mus musculus] NP_035141.1 1e-78 92% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0004 ref|NP_000900.1| neuropeptide Y receptor Y1 [Homo sapiens] sp|P25929|NPY1R_HUMAN Neurope...ptide Y receptor type 1 (NPY1-R) gb|AAA73215.1| [Human neuropeptide Y peptide YY rece...ptor mRNA, complete cds.], gene product gb|AAA59947.1| neuropeptide Y receptor Y1 gb|AAH36657.1| Neuropeptid...e Y receptor Y1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAS55647.1| neuropeptide Y1 receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH71720.1| Neuro...peptide Y receptor Y1 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAX04841.1| neuropeptide Y receptor Y1 [Hom

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1215 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1215 ref|NP_000901.1| neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 [Homo sapiens] ref|NP_001012655.1| neurope...ptide Y receptor Y2 [Pan troglodytes] sp|P49146|NPY2R_HUMAN Neuropeptide Y receptor typ...e 2 (NPY2-R) (NPY-Y2 receptor) sp|Q5IS62|NPY2R_PANTR Neuropeptide Y receptor type 2 (NPY2-R) (NPY-Y2 receptor) gb|AAC50281.1| neurope...ptide Y/peptide YY Y2 receptor gb|AAB04120.1| neuropepti...de y2 receptor gb|AAC51115.1| type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor gb|AAO92062.1| neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 [Homo

  20. SarA is a negative regulator of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christer; Heinze, C.; Busch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant-associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive S. epidermidis isolates fail to show accumulative biofilm growth in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... to the existence of superimposed regulatory systems suppressing a multi-cellular biofilm life style in vitro. Transposon mutagenesis of clinical significant but biofilm-negative S. epidermidis 1585 was used to isolate a biofilm positive mutant carrying a Tn917 insertion in sarA,chief regulator of staphylococcal...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via over-expression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1942 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1942 ref|NP_000669.1| alpha-1D-adrenergic receptor [Homo sapiens] sp|P...25100|ADA1D_HUMAN Alpha-1D adrenergic receptor (Alpha 1D-adrenoceptor) (Alpha 1D-adrenoreceptor) (Alpha-1A adrenerg...ic receptor) (Alpha adrenergic receptor 1a) gb|AAB60351.1| adrenergic alpha-1a receptor protein gb|AA...B59487.1| alpha 1a/d adrenergic receptor dbj|BAA06222.1| alpha1A/D adrenergic rec...eptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAH70478.1| adrenergic, alpha-1D-, receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAC00601.2| adrenerg

  2. Escribiendo el silencio: la contemplación poética de Sara Pujol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gala, Candelas

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Reading Sara Pujol Russell's El fuego tiende su aire (1999 and Intacto asombro de la luz del silencio (2001, is entering into a poetic world whose content and form are both innovative and complex. This poetry invites the reader into a state of meditative contemplation that seeks correspondences among different elements in reality as the key to access a superior type of knowledge. Pujol's writing moves in the fringes between voice and silence, art and nature, meaning and nothingness, identity and difference, it seeks to surpass its own verbal texture while only in that texture does it find articulation and only through it does transcendence becones accessible. The focus of the present reading centers on the point where Pujol's language seeks to transcend the disjunction between sign and surrounding, the point where synthesis is fusion about to dissolve.La lectura de El fuego tiende su aire (1999 e Intacto asombro en la luz del silencio (2001 de Sara Pujol Russell, supone la entrada en un discurso poético innovador y complejo tanto en contenido como en forma. Esta poesía invita a una contemplación meditativa que busca las correspondencias entre los diversos elementos de la realidad como clave para acceder a un conocimiento superior. Su escritura se mueve en los bordes entre la voz y el silencio, el arte y la naturaleza, el sentido y el vacío, la identidad y la diferencia, buscando trascender lo que está más allá de su misma urdimbre verbal pero que sólo en ella se configura, y sólo desde ella se puede acceder. En el movimiento de esta escritura por superar la disyunción entre signo y entorno, en esa síntesis a punto de disolverse, es donde se enfoca la lectura en este ensayo.

  3. [Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, M Yu; Piradov, M A; Suanova, E T; Sineva, N A

    2015-01-01

    Review of literature on the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are presented. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are primary headaches with phenotype consisting of trigeminal pain with autonomic sign including lacrimation, rhinorrhea and miosis. Discussed are issues of classification, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of this headache. Special attention is paid to cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT syndrome, hemicrania continua.

  4. Functional impairment in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 can be assessed by an ataxia rating scale (SARA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaolo, Giovanni; Jimenez-Moreno, Cecilia; Nikolenko, Nikoletta; Atalaia, Antonio; Monckton, Darren G; Guglieri, Michela; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2017-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is not characterised by ataxia per se; however, DM1 and ataxia patients show similar disturbances in movement coordination often experiencing walking and balance difficulties, although caused by different underlying pathologies. This study aims to investigate the use of a scale previously described for the assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA) with the hypothesis that it could have utility in DM1 patients as a measure of disease severity and risk of falling. Data from 54 DM1 patients were pulled from the PHENO-DM1 natural history study for analysis. Mean SARA score in the DM1 population was 5.45 relative to the maximum score of eight. A flooring effect (score 0) was observed in mild cases within the sample. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability was high with intraclass coefficients (ICC) of 0.983 and 1.00, respectively. Internal consistency was acceptable as indicated by a Cronbach's alpha of 0.761. Component analysis revealed two principle components. SARA correlated with: (1) all measures of muscle function tested, including quantitative muscle testing of ankle dorsiflexion (r = -0.584*), the 6 min walk test (r = -0.739*), 10 m walk test (r = 0.741*), and the nine hole peg test (r = 0.602*) and (2) measures of disease severity/burden, such as MIRS (r = 0.718*), MDHI (r = 0.483*), and DM1-Activ (r = -0.749*) (*p < 0.001). The SARA score was predicted by an interaction between modal CTG repeat length and age at sampling (r = 0.678, p = 0.003). A score of eight or above predicted the use of a walking aid with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85.7%. We suggest that further research is warranted to ascertain whether SARA or components of SARA are useful outcome measures for clinical trials in DM1. As a tool, it can be used for gathering information about disease severity/burden and helping to identify patients in need of a walking aid, and can potentially be applied in both research and healthcare

  5. The autonomic laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system can now be studied quantitatively, noninvasively, and reproducibly in a clinical autonomic laboratory. The approach at the Mayo Clinic is to study the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers of peripheral nerve (using the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test [QSART]), the parasympathetic nerves to the heart (cardiovagal tests), and the regulation of blood pressure by the baroreflexes (adrenergic tests). Patient preparation is extremely important, since the state of the patient influences the results of autonomic function tests. The autonomic technologist in this evolving field needs to have a solid core of knowledge of autonomic physiology and autonomic function tests, followed by training in the performance of these tests in a standardized fashion. The range and utilization of tests of autonomic function will likely continue to evolve.

  6. The Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) Experiment Aboard Chandrayaan-1 Mission: Instrument and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, M B; Barabash, Stas; Yoshifumi, Futaana; Holmstrom, Mats; Sridharan, R; Wurz, Peter; Schaufelberger, Audrey; Kazushi, Asamura

    2010-01-01

    SARA experiment aboard the first Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 had the objective to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction using energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from the lunar surface as diagnostic tool. SARA consisted of an ENA imaging mass analyzer CENA (Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer) and an ion mass analyser SWIM (Solar Wind Monitor), along with a digital processing unit (DPU) which commands and controls the sensors and provides the interface to the spacecraft. Both sensors have provided excellent observational data. CENA has observed ENAs from the lunar surface and found that ~20% of the incident solar wind ions get backscattered as ENAs from the lunar surface. This is contrary to the previous assumptions of almost complete absorption of solar wind by the lunar surface. The observation is relevant for other airless bodies in the solar system.

  7. [Autonomic peripheral neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Cauquil, Cecile; Lozeron, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms of dysautonomic disturbances are varied and mostly acquired. They can result from lesions of sympathetic or parasympathetic vegetative fibers located in the peripheral contingent, or in the somatic contingent by demyelination or axonal loss; or more rarely by cellular bodies in the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. Several chronic peripheral neuropathies can be associated with dysautonomia. Only some causes need to be known because they can be clinically significant. Dysautonomia may be seen during chronic acquired neuropathies but also acute or subacute ones. The most frequent cause in the world is the dysautonomia of the diabetes; it affects all the systems; the cardiovascular dysfunction has an impact on the prognosis for survival when it is severe. Hereditary autonomic neuropathies are rare; they can declare themselves very early during the Riley-Day syndrome or very late during amyloid polyneuropathies due to transthyretin gene mutation. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular biology. The dysautonomia is frequent and often severe. These neuropathies justify symptomatic treatment to improve quality of life. For some of them, a specific treatment can be proposed to treat the causal affection to try to stop the progression of the disease.

  8. Holocene environment changes around the Sara Us River, northern China, revealed by optical dating of lacustrine-aeolian sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Sheng, Yongwei; Li, Bo; Fan, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    The Sara Us River is located along the boundary of the Mu Us Desert and the Chinese Loess Plateau in northern China. The river has cut down through Quaternary sediments creating 70-80 m deep valleys with thick lacustrine/aeolian sequences exposed. We applied optical stimulated luminescence on sediments from a Holocene section of aeolian sand/lacustrine deposits in the top of the river valley. The dating results show that a humid period existed from 7.1 to 2.0 ka ago as evidenced by two layers of peat and lacustrine sediments. However, compared to other published Holocene sections in the Sara Us River valleys close to the section under studying, the local environment experienced very complicated changes during the Holocene. All of the sections recorded a period with drought and/or cold before the Holocene at around 13 ka, and an episode of aridity after about 2 ka ago as evidenced by the layers of aeolian sand. However, the ages of the lacustrine and peat layers in these sections are substantially different. Geomorphological analysis by digital elevation models does not support the existence of a mega lake covering the study area at 2 ka. The intricate environmental changes may have been caused by the meandering of the Sara Us River. Environmental changes also strongly affected human migration in this area, which is documented by Chinese historical records.

  9. SARA: a self-adaptive and resource-aware approach towards secure wireless ad hoc and sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigan, Chunxiao; Li, Leiyuan

    2005-05-01

    Providing security is essential for mission critical Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks (WAHSN) applications. Often a highly secure mechanism inevitably consumes a rather large amount of system resources, which in turn may unintentionally cause a Security Service Denial of Service (SSDoS) attack. This paper proposes a self-adaptive resource-aware (SARA) security provisioning approach for WAHSNs. For resource scarce WAHSNs, SARA strives to provide the optimal tradeoff between the sufficient security (which is reflected by the Security Index (SI)) and the acceptable network performance degradation (which is reflected by the Performance Index (PI)). With the support of the offline optimal secure protocol selection module and the online self-adaptive security control module, SARA is capable of employing different combinations of secure protocol sets to satisfy different security need at different condition for different applications. To determine the security index SI of a secure protocol set, a heuristic cross-layer security-service mapping mechanism is presented. Furthermore, we evaluate performance index PI of a secure protocol set via simulation followed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Consequently, the proposed self-adaptive security provisioning based on both SI and PI achieves the maximum overall network security services and network performance services, without causing the SSDoS attack. Furthermore, this self-adaptive mechanism is capable of switching from one secure protocol set to another while keeping similar level of security and performance, it thus provides additional security by security service hopping.

  10. Saras Cranes in Palwal District in Southern Haryana are Asking for Immediate Attention for Their Last Rescue Effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirshem Kumar Kaushik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Saras Cranes Grus antigone are endangered birds of open wetlands with highly worrying depletion trends being witnessed related with disappearance of marshy and shallow perennial, expansive wetlands throughout northern India. Alongside, massive hunting in 18th, 19th and 20th centuries and even today is another serious cause for their worrisome deterioration. Also, destruction of nests, eggs, fledglings and adults by aboriginals indeliberately or deliberately is causing these cranes to perish sooner than latter, completely. Now, Saras Cranes are found in limited number and domain as four populations in the entire world including India, China, Burma, South East Asia and northern Australia. The population of Indian Saras Crane is pitiably restricted to Etawa and Mainpuri districts of Uttar Pradesh. Stray birds of this species are restricted to Kanha National Park in Madhya Pradesh and in some parts of Gujarat and Assam. It is interesting to note that few pairs have been seen in Faridabad and Palwal districts in southern Haryana, India. These need to be protected and conserved.

  11. Studying the Lunar-Solar Wind Interaction with the SARA Experiment aboard the Indian Lunar Mission Chandrayaan-1

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Dhanya, M B; Wieser, Martin; Yoshifumi, Futaana; Holmstrom, Mats; Sridharan, R; Wurz, Peter; Schaufelberger, Audrey; Kazushi, Asamura; 10.1063/1.3395916

    2010-01-01

    The first Indian lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 was launched on 22 October 2008. The Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) instrument onboard Chandrayaan-1 consists of an energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging mass analyzer called CENA (Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutrals Analyzer), and an ion-mass analyzer called SWIM (Solar wind Monitor). CENA performed the first ever experiment to study the solar wind-planetary surface interaction via detection of sputtered neutral atoms and neutralized backscattered solar wind protons in the energy range ~0.01-3.0 keV. SWIM measures solar wind ions, magnetosheath and magnetotail ions, as well as ions scattered from lunar surface in the ~0.01-15 keV energy range. The neutral atom sensor uses conversion of the incoming neutrals to positive ions, which are then analyzed via surface interaction technique. The ion mass analyzer is based on similar principle. This paper presents the SARA instrument and the first results obtained by the SWIM and CENA sensors. SARA observations suggest...

  12. Quantitative autonomic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Peter

    2011-07-19

    Disorders associated with dysfunction of autonomic nervous system are quite common yet frequently unrecognized. Quantitative autonomic testing can be invaluable tool for evaluation of these disorders, both in clinic and research. There are number of autonomic tests, however, only few were validated clinically or are quantitative. Here, fully quantitative and clinically validated protocol for testing of autonomic functions is presented. As a bare minimum the clinical autonomic laboratory should have a tilt table, ECG monitor, continuous noninvasive blood pressure monitor, respiratory monitor and a mean for evaluation of sudomotor domain. The software for recording and evaluation of autonomic tests is critical for correct evaluation of data. The presented protocol evaluates 3 major autonomic domains: cardiovagal, adrenergic and sudomotor. The tests include deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, head-up tilt, and quantitative sudomotor axon test (QSART). The severity and distribution of dysautonomia is quantitated using Composite Autonomic Severity Scores (CASS). Detailed protocol is provided highlighting essential aspects of testing with emphasis on proper data acquisition, obtaining the relevant parameters and unbiased evaluation of autonomic signals. The normative data and CASS algorithm for interpretation of results are provided as well.

  13. TRADE instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 2, Managers and supervisors training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This document provides instructional materials for an eight-hour training course for managers and supervisors of hazardous waste sites. It is one of three volumes of course materials TRADE is preparing to help DOE contractor training staff comply with 29 CFR 1910.120, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) rule that implements Title I of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. OSHA`s final rule for hazardous waste operators was published in the Federal Register of March 6, 1989 (54 FR 9294). Combined with the materials in Volumes I and III and with appropriate site-specific information, these materials will help DOE contractors to meet the requirements of 1910.120 (e) that ``on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations`` receive the same initial training as that of the employees they supervise and at least eight additional hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

  14. La difesa della donna ebrea: Sara Copio Sullam e Debora Ascarelli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Fortis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sara Copio Sullam and Debora Ascarelli, the best-known Jewish women poets of the age of the Italian ghetto, have often been studied with a focus on the distinctive features of their writing: the former as a translator of sacred texts, the latter as the author of original verses, sometimes written as a risposta per le rime (reply through rhymes or in defence of her orthodoxy. They share, however, a common theme, which has often been neglected: the defence of the Jewish woman, which is overt in some of Copio’s sonnets and prose, whereas it has not yet been properly pointed out in some of Ascarelli’s verses. This paper aims at bringing this theme to the fore not only in Copio, through a rereading of some passages of her Manifesto, but also in Debora Ascarelli, through an analysis of her few original verses. These hendecasyllables certainly reflect the Petrarchan and classicistic atmosphere of the late 16th century in Rome, but they are far from the mainstream modes of women’s poetry of the age. They allow us, therefore, to highlight, besides the differences, the similarities between the two poetesses; their commitment, in the late 16th and early 17th century, to the intellectual and moral defence of the Jewish woman, in a context of general depreciation of women, but also in the background of the claim to the “nobility and excellence of women”.

  15. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vision The Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  16. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — VisionThe Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  17. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course...

  18. Identification and characterization of msa (SA1233), a gene involved in expression of SarA and several virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Smeltzer, Mark S; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2006-09-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA) plays a central role in the regulation of virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. To date, studies involving sarA have focused on its activity as a global regulator that modulates transcription of a wide variety of genes (>100) and its role in virulence. However, there is also evidence to suggest the existence of accessory elements that modulate SarA production and/or function. A reporter system was developed to identify such elements, and a new gene, msa (SA1233), mutation of which results in reduced expression of SarA, was identified and characterized. Additionally, it was shown that mutation of msa resulted in altered transcription of the accessory gene regulator (agr) and the genes encoding several virulence factors including alpha toxin (hla) and protein A (spa). However, the impact of mutating msa was different in the laboratory strain RN6390 and the clinical isolate UAMS-1. For instance, mutation of msa caused a decrease in spa and hla transcription in RN6390 but had a different effect in UAMS-1. The strain-dependent effects of the msa mutation were similar to those observed previously, which suggests that msa may modulate the production of specific virulence factors through its impact on sarA. Interestingly, sequence analysis of Msa suggests that it is a putative membrane protein with three membrane-spanning regions, indicating that Msa might interact with the environment. The findings show that msa is involved in the expression of SarA and several virulence factors.

  19. Inherited autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Hilz, Max J

    2003-12-01

    Inherited autonomic neuropathies are a rare group of disorders associated with sensory dysfunction. As a group they are termed the "hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies" (HSAN). Classification of the various autonomic and sensory disorders is ongoing. In addition to the numerical classification of four distinct forms proposed by Dyck and Ohta (1975), additional entities have been described. The best known and most intensively studied of the HSANs are familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN type III) and congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (HSAN type IV). Diagnosis of the HSANs depends primarily on clinical examinations and specific sensory and autonomic assessments. Pathologic examinations are helpful in confirming the diagnosis and in differentiating between the different disorders. In recent years identification of specific genetic mutations for some disorders has aided diagnosis. Replacement or definitive therapies are not available for any of the disorders so that treatment remains supportive and directed toward specific symptoms.

  20. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targe...

  1. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  2. Autonomous Evolutionary Information Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Traditional information systems are passive, i.e., data orknowledge is created , retrieved, modified, updated, and deleted only in response to operations issued by users or application programs, and the systems only can execute queries or t ransactions explicitly submitted by users or application programs but have no ab ility to do something actively by themselves. Unlike a traditional information system serving just as a storehouse of data or knowledge and working passively a ccording to queries or transactions explicitly issued by users and application p rograms, an autonomous evolutionary information system serves as an autonomous a nd evolutionary partner of its users that discovers new knowledge from its datab ase or knowledge-base autonomously, cooperates with its users in solving proble m s actively by providing the users with advices, and has a certain mechanism to i mprove its own state of “knowing” and ability of “working”. This paper semi nall y defines what is an autonomous evolutionary information system, explain why aut onomous evolutionary information systems are needed, and presents some new issue s, fundamental considerations, and research directions in design and development of autonomous evolutionary information systems.

  3. Autonomic disturbances in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Maggi, Leonardo Serra; Donadio, Vincenzo; Vetrugno, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Pagotto, Uberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a clinical condition characterized mainly by excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis complete the narcoleptic tetrad; disrupted night sleep, automatic behaviors and weight gain are also usual complaints. Different studies focus on autonomic changes or dysfunctions among narcoleptic patients, such as pupillary abnormalities, fainting spells, erectile dysfunction, night sweats, gastric problems, low body temperature, systemic hypotension, dry mouth, heart palpitations, headache and extremities dysthermia. Even if many studies lack sufficient standardization or their results have not been replicated, a non-secondary involvement of the autonomic nervous system in narcolepsy is strongly suggested, mainly by metabolic and cardiovascular findings. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a high risk for overweight and for metabolic syndrome in narcoleptic patients represents an important warning for clinicians in order to monitor and follow them up for their autonomic functions. We review here studies on autonomic functions and clinical disturbances in narcoleptic patients, trying to shed light on the possible contribute of alterations of the hypocretin system in autonomic pathophysiology.

  4. Autonomous biomorphic robots as platforms for sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilden, M.; Hasslacher, B.; Mainieri, R.; Moses, J.

    1996-10-01

    The idea of building autonomous robots that can carry out complex and nonrepetitive tasks is an old one, so far unrealized in any meaningful hardware. Tilden has shown recently that there are simple, processor-free solutions to building autonomous mobile machines that continuously adapt to unknown and hostile environments, are designed primarily to survive, and are extremely resistant to damage. These devices use smart mechanics and simple (low component count) electronic neuron control structures having the functionality of biological organisms from simple invertebrates to sophisticated members of the insect and crab family. These devices are paradigms for the development of autonomous machines that can carry out directed goals. The machine then becomes a robust survivalist platform that can carry sensors or instruments. These autonomous roving machines, now in an early stage of development (several proof-of-concept prototype walkers have been built), can be developed so that they are inexpensive, robust, and versatile carriers for a variety of instrument packages. Applications are immediate and many, in areas as diverse as prosthetics, medicine, space, construction, nanoscience, defense, remote sensing, environmental cleanup, and biotechnology.

  5. Pushing and Pulling Sara: A Case Study of the Contrasting Influences of High School and University Experiences on Engineering Agency, Identity, and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Allison; Potvin, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports a longitudinal case study of how one woman, Sara, who had previously considered dropping out of high school, authored strong mathematics and science identities and purposefully exhibited agency through her experiences in high school science. These experiences empowered her to choose an engineering major in college; however,…

  6. Impact of individual extracellular proteases on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in diverse clinical isolates and their isogenic sarA mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Allister J; Atwood, Danielle N; Anthony, Allison C; Harik, Nada S; Spencer, Horace J; Beenken, Karen E; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that the purified Staphylococcus aureus extracellular proteases aureolysin, ScpA, SspA, and SspB limit biofilm formation, with aureolysin having the greatest impact. Using protease-deficient derivatives of LAC, we confirmed that this is due to the individual proteases themselves. Purified aureolysin, and to a lesser extent ScpA and SspB, also promoted dispersal of an established biofilm. Mutation of the genes encoding these proteases also only partially restored biofilm formation in an FPR3757 sarA mutant and had little impact on restoring virulence in a murine bacteremia model. In contrast, eliminating the production of all of these proteases fully restored both biofilm formation and virulence in a sarA mutant generated in the closely related USA300 strain LAC. These results confirm an important role for multiple extracellular proteases in S. aureus pathogenesis and the importance of sarA in repressing their production. Moreover, purified aureolysin limited biofilm formation in 14 of 15 methicillin-resistant isolates and 11 of 15 methicillin-susceptible isolates, while dispersin B had little impact in UAMS-1, LAC, or 29 of 30 contemporary isolates of S. aureus. This suggests that the role of sarA and its impact on protease production is important in diverse strains of S. aureus irrespective of their methicillin resistance status.

  7. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Autonomous electrochromic assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Lanning, Bruce Roy; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne

    2015-03-10

    This disclosure describes system and methods for creating an autonomous electrochromic assembly, and systems and methods for use of the autonomous electrochromic assembly in combination with a window. Embodiments described herein include an electrochromic assembly that has an electrochromic device, an energy storage device, an energy collection device, and an electrochromic controller device. These devices may be combined into a unitary electrochromic insert assembly. The electrochromic assembly may have the capability of generating power sufficient to operate and control an electrochromic device. This control may occur through the application of a voltage to an electrochromic device to change its opacity state. The electrochromic assembly may be used in combination with a window.

  9. Simple Autonomous Chaotic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jessica; Sprott, J.

    2010-03-01

    Over the last several decades, numerous electronic circuits exhibiting chaos have been proposed. Non-autonomous circuits with as few as two components have been developed. However, the operation of such circuits relies on the non-ideal behavior of the devices used, and therefore the circuit equations can be quite complex. In this paper, we present two simple autonomous chaotic circuits using only opamps and linear passive components. The circuits each use one opamp as a comparator, to provide a signum nonlinearity. The chaotic behavior is robust, and independent of nonlinearities in the passive components. Moreover, the circuit equations are among the algebraically simplest chaotic systems yet constructed.

  10. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... organs they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  11. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  12. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple...

  13. Autonomous Hexapod Spider Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Nisha; Pandey, Bishwajeet; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Robotics world is changing very rapidly in today’s scenario. One of its unique applications is hexapod robots (walking leg robots). These types of robots can walk on uneven surfaces and can be used for spying purpose in various forms of industries. This paper represents the autonomous feature of ...

  14. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...

  15. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  16. Memoria de la guerra civil española. Entre el sol y la tormenta de Sara Berenguer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena López

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo pretendo analizar dos cuestiones en relación con las memorias de guerra de la militante anarquista Sara Berenguer. En primer lugar, quiero atender a las estrategias discursivas (clase, género, sexualidad de construcción de la subjetividad en este texto. Además, me interesa indagar cómo estos discursos se interseccionan con la posición espacio-temporal (tiempo de la memoria y tiempo-espacio del exilio del sujeto autobiográfico. Mi objetivo principal es proponer una problematización de los conceptos de “memoria colectiva” y de “experiencia femenina” y reivindicar, por lo tanto, la relevancia tanto teórica como política de análisis críticos basados en narrativas personales.

  17. Developments and challenges for autonomous unmanned vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    It is widely anticipated that autonomous vehicles will have a transformational impact on military forces and will play a key role in many future force structures. As a result, many tasks have already been identified that unmanned systems could undertake more readily than humans. However, for this to occur, such systems will need to be agile, versatile, persistent, reliable, survivable and lethal. This will require many of the vehicles 'cognitive' or higher order functions to be more fully developed, whereas to date only the 'component' or physical functions have been successfully automated and

  18. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  19. Autonomous robotic sweeper

    OpenAIRE

    Kržišnik, Domen

    2015-01-01

    There is already a wide range of personal/domestic robots on the market capable of performing various tasks. We haven't however been able to find any commercially available robots designed for effectively performing the task of backyard sweeping. This thesis presents the process and end result of planning, assembly and programming of an autonomous robot, capable of performing the above mentioned task. We first analyze robots with similar functions, including robotic vacuum cleaners and lawn m...

  20. Autonomous Undersea Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    less expensive sensor systems for a variety of applications, including measurement of physical characteristics of the ocean, threat detection, and...multiple autonomous environmental sensors within an acoustic modem-based infrastructure capable of communicating to and from the sensors and to and...networks, and telesonar with high speed platforms. This effort is concentrating on the development and demonstration of the two modem- based sensors . We

  1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day.

  2. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  3. Feminism and Faith: Exploring Christian Spaces in the Writing of Sara Maitland and Michèle Roberts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina LUNGU-CIRSTEA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En 1983, les féministes britanniques Sara Maitland et Jo Garcia ont publié Walking on the Water (London : Virago, une collection d’essais, de récits, de poèmes et de photos produits par des femmes sur le thème de la spiritualité. Les contributrices ont été en particulier invitées à explorer la relation entre leur identité féministe et leurs croyances religieuses. Le ton de ces contributions varie fortement, allant de l’envie passionnée de concilier les objectifs du féminisme avec le christianisme à un rejet total de l’Eglise comme institution patriarcale suprême. Cet article met en dialogue des récits diamétralement opposés du rapport entre christianisme et féminisme en s’intéressante plus particulièrement à deux des contributrices, Sara Maitland (1950 - et Michèle Roberts (1949 - . Ces deux écrivaines, qui se sont activement impliquées dans les mouvements féministes des années 1970, ont toutes deux lutté pour se réconcilier avec leur héritage chrétien. Néanmoins, alors que Maitland tente essentiellement de revisiter le christianisme en y incorporant les points essentiels d’une idéologie féministe, Roberts sent le besoin impérieux de se défaire de son identité religieuse afin de devenir indépendante ; en effet, dans son autobiographie Paper Houses (2007 elle décrit son éducation catholique comme “autoritaire et misogyne” (16. Cet article explore les façons dont l’identité spirituelle se construit dans le jeu complexe des interactions entre féminisme et foi. Il se propose, dans une perspective comparatiste, d’analyser d’une part le recueil de nouvelles de Sara Maitland intitulé A Book of Spells, et d’autre part, le roman acclamé de Michèle Roberts, Daughters of the House. Dans ces écrits, Maitland et Roberts ont un objectif commun qui est de renégocier la place des femmes dans l’histoire chrétienne dont elles reconnaissent – il est vrai à partir de perspectives diff

  4. Symmetries and solutions of the non-autonomous von Bertalanffy equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Maureen P.; Anderssen, Robert S.

    2015-05-01

    For growth in a closed environment, which is indicative of the situation in laboratory experiments, autonomous ODE models do not necessarily capture the dynamics under investigation. The importance and impact of a closed environment arise when the question under examination relates, for example, to the number of the surviving microbes, such as in a study of the spoilage and contamination of food, the gene silencing activity of fungi or the production of a chemical compound by bacteria or fungi. Autonomous ODE models are inappropriate as they assume that only the current size of the population controls the growth-decay dynamics. This is reflected in the fact that, asymptotically, their solutions can only grow or decay monotonically or asymptote. Non-autonomous ODE models are not so constrained. A natural strategy for the choice of non-autonomous ODEs is to take appropriate autonomous ones and change them to be non-autonomous through the introduction of relevant non-autonomous terms. This is the approach in this paper with the focus being the von Bertalanffy equation. Since this equation has independent importance in relation to practical applications in growth modelling, it is natural to explore the deeper relationships between the introduced non-autonomous terms through a symmetry analysis, which is the purpose and goal of the current paper. Infinitesimals are derived which allow particular forms of the non-autonomous von Bertalanffy equation to be transformed into autonomous forms for which some new analytic solutions have been found.

  5. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant‐associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates fail to form a biofilm in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via overexpression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  6. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego O Andrey

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1, encoded by tst(H, and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1, RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB. By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression.

  7. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrey, Diego O; Jousselin, Ambre; Villanueva, Maite; Renzoni, Adriana; Monod, Antoinette; Barras, Christine; Rodriguez, Natalia; Kelley, William L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1), encoded by tst(H), and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1), RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB). By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression.

  8. Beaudrie, Sara, Ducar, Cynthia, & Potowski, Kim (2014). Heritage language teaching: Research and practice. New York State, New York: McGraw Hill.

    OpenAIRE

    Florencia Henshaw

    2015-01-01

    This review introduces readers to Heritage language teaching: Research and practice, by Sara Beaudrie, Cynthia Ducar, and Kim Potowski, which is part of the “Directions in Second Language Learning” series. This handbook offers a comprehensive overview of key concepts, research findings, and pedagogical strategies to better meet the needs of heritage learners, and it underscores the importance of sociolinguistic issues and phenomena in heritage language instruction.

  9. Beaudrie, Sara, Ducar, Cynthia, & Potowski, Kim (2014. Heritage language teaching: Research and practice. New York State, New York: McGraw Hill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Henshaw

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review introduces readers to Heritage language teaching: Research and practice, by Sara Beaudrie, Cynthia Ducar, and Kim Potowski, which is part of the “Directions in Second Language Learning” series. This handbook offers a comprehensive overview of key concepts, research findings, and pedagogical strategies to better meet the needs of heritage learners, and it underscores the importance of sociolinguistic issues and phenomena in heritage language instruction.

  10. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    , which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep...... Medicine to assess the sleep disturbances. The aim of this PhD dissertation was to: 1) Develop a method to investigate autonomic changes during sleep in neurodegenerative diseases, and apply this method on PD, iRBD and narcolepsy patients to evaluate the autonomic function in these diseases. 2) Validate...... the method by applying standardized methods to measure the autonomic function based on heart rate variability (HRV) measures. 3) Based on the results, assess the validity of autonomic dysfunction as an early marker of a neurodegenerative disease. 4) Evaluate the influence of hypocretin loss in narcolepsy...

  11. Autonomic disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensch, E; Jost, W H

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease leading to disseminated lesions of the central nervous system resulting in both somatomotor and autonomic disturbances. These involve the central centers of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the automatic control and pathway systems. All autonomic functions may be disordered individually or in combined form. There is no other disease with a clinical picture so multifaceted. Besides cardiovascular dysfunctions disorders of bladder and rectum have become apparent. Somatomotor and autonomic disturbances occur with similar frequency; however the focused exam often heavily favors somatomotor symptoms. Autonomic disturbances should primarily be taken into account on history taking and clinical examination. Individual diagnosis and treatment is a secondary feature. Impairments of the autonomic nervous systems in multiple sclerosis are frequently overlooked.

  12. Autonomic Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lensch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease leading to disseminated lesions of the central nervous system resulting in both somatomotor and autonomic disturbances. These involve the central centers of the autonomic nervous system, as well as the automatic control and pathway systems. All autonomic functions may be disordered individually or in combined form. There is no other disease with a clinical picture so multifaceted. Besides cardiovascular dysfunctions disorders of bladder and rectum have become apparent. Somatomotor and autonomic disturbances occur with similar frequency; however the focused exam often heavily favors somatomotor symptoms. Autonomic disturbances should primarily be taken into account on history taking and clinical examination. Individual diagnosis and treatment is a secondary feature. Impairments of the autonomic nervous systems in multiple sclerosis are frequently overlooked.

  13. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors...

  14. Women Empowerment in the Realms of Institutionalized Religion and Patriarchy: El Saadawi’s Firdaus and Yezierska’s Sara as Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah K. Shehabat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains how the two protagonists, Firdaus and Sara, successfully paved their own ways in search of self-liberation despite the authoritarian patriarchy and institutionalized religions that plagued them. El Saadawi's Woman at Point Zero and Yezierska’s Bread Givers represent the fruitful struggle these protagonists experienced as they come to forge an identity and be themselves. The paper argues that the protagonists manage to free themselves, establish their own spiritual homes at their own homes and assert the potentials of their femininity despite their endings. Empowered by the powers of reading, strong will and meticulous work, the protagonists were able to realize their own material independence and achieve their lifelong ambitions. However, through Firdaus' and Sara's journeys of breaking their silence, they were subject to different patterns of self-annihilation. While Firdaus was sentenced to death for killing a pimp, Sara embraced living under the hegemony of an authoritarian husband.      Keywords: Women empowerment, authoritarian patriarchy, institutionalized and/or gendered religion, spiritual feminist homes

  15. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tordeux, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed difference term is taking into account. Within the linear OV models tested, the autonomous models including speed difference are sufficient to maximise the stability.

  16. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  17. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  18. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  19. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  20. Alle soglie dell'osceno. Poetiche della profanazione in Sara de Ibáñez e Alejandra Pizarnik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Salvi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Moving from Adorno’s statement about the enigmatic nature of modern aesthetics, this paper aims to analyse the forms the enigma takes in the works of the Uruguayan and Argentinian poets Sara de Ibáñez and Alejandra Pizarnik. The essay will consider the figures and the shapes of the enigma as they appear in both poetries. Proper of the revelation of the enigma through its profanation by the poetic language is, in fact, the never-ending and mutual reflection of two different states of the being. Through Martin Heidegger and Giorgio Agamben’s studies on language and negativity, the way in which the enigmatic word appears continuously in its constitutive suspension between infancy and adulthood, absence of time and history, language and silence, the Self and the Other will be revealed. Through the resulting dichotomy of matter and form, emerging from a passage of Agostino’s De natura boni, it will be possible, in conclusion, to recognise in the silent form of the enigma the embryonic proposal of a poetical ethics of writing.

  1. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test...... the ability of GUTS to predict survival of aquatic organisms across different pesticide exposure patterns, time scales and species. Firstly, using synthetic data, we identified experimental data requirements which allow for the estimation of all parameters of the GUTS proper model. Secondly, we assessed how...

  2. Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, George T.; Carey, Robin J.; Kapushion, Blanche M.

    2016-01-01

    "Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book" includes activities and strategies to support the development of autonomous learners. More than 40 activities are included, all geared to the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development of students. Teachers may use these activities and strategies with the entire class, small groups, or…

  3. Proportionality and Autonomous Weapons Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Given the swift technologic development, it may be expected that the availability of the first truly autonomous weapons systems is fast approaching. Once they are deployed, these weapons will use artificial intelligence to select and attack targets without further human intervention. Autonomous

  4. Proportionality and Autonomous Weapons Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Given the swift technologic development, it may be expected that the availability of the first truly autonomous weapons systems is fast approaching. Once they are deployed, these weapons will use artificial intelligence to select and attack targets without further human intervention. Autonomous weap

  5. Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System (EAHMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For supporting NASA's Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems Roadmap, we are proposing the "Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System" (EAHMS) for...

  6. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Murray, Claire E; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian L; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W M; Dickey, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the up...

  7. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra R. Raol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i perception and reasoning, (ii mobility and navigation,(iii haptics and teleoperation, (iv image fusion/computervision, (v modelling of manipulators, (vi hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii vehicle-robot path and motionplanning/control, (viii human-machine interfaces for interaction between humans and robots, and (ix application of artificial neural networks (ANNs, fuzzy logic/systems (FLS,probabilistic/approximate reasoning (PAR, Bayesian networks(BN and genetic algorithms (GA to the above-mentioned problems. Also, multi-sensor data fusion (MSDF playsvery crucial role at many levels of the data fusion process:(i kinematic fusion (position/bearing tracking, (ii imagefusion (for scene recognition, (iii information fusion (forbuilding world models, and (iv decision fusion (for tracking,control actions. The MIAS as a technology is useful for automation of complex tasks, surveillance in a hazardousand hostile environment, human-assistance in very difficultmanual works, medical robotics, hospital systems, autodiagnosticsystems, and many other related civil and military systems. Also, other important research areas for MIAScomprise sensor/actuator modelling, failure management/reconfiguration, scene understanding, knowledge representation, learning and decision-making. Examples ofdynamic systems considered within the MIAS would be:autonomous systems (unmanned ground vehicles, unmannedaerial vehicles, micro/mini air vehicles, and autonomousunder water vehicles, mobile/fixed robotic systems, dexterousmanipulator robots, mining robots, surveillance systems,and networked/multi-robot systems, to name a few.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(1, pp.3-4,

  8. Targeting the autonomic nervous system: measuring autonomic function and novel devices for heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh C; Rosen, Stuart D; Lindsay, Alistair; Hayward, Carl; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2013-12-10

    Neurohumoral activation, in which enhanced activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a key component, plays a pivotal role in heart failure. The neurohumoral system affects several organs and currently our knowledge of the molecular and systemic pathways involved in the neurohumoral activation is incomplete. All the methods of assessing the degree of activation of the autonomic system have limitations and they are not interchangeable. The methods considered include noradrenaline spillover, microneurography, radiotracer imaging and analysis of heart rate and blood pressure (heart rate variability, baroreceptor sensitivity, heart rate turbulence). Despite the difficulties, medications that affect the ANS have been shown to improve mortality in heart failure and the mechanism is related to attenuation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system. However, limitations of compliance with medication, side effects and inadequate SNS attenuation are issues of concern with the pharmacological approach. The newer device based therapies for sympathetic modulation are showing encouraging results. As they directly influence the autonomic nervous system, more mechanistic information can be gleaned if appropriate investigations are performed at the time of the outcome trials. However, clinicians should be reminded that the ANS is an evolutionary survival mechanism and therefore there is a need to proceed with caution when trying to completely attenuate its effects. So our enthusiasm for the application of these devices in heart failure should be controlled, especially as none of the devices have trial data powered to assess effects on mortality or cardiovascular events. © 2013.

  9. Autonomous software: Myth or magic?

    CERN Document Server

    Allan, Alasdair; Saunders, Eric S

    2008-01-01

    We discuss work by the eSTAR project which demonstrates a fully closed loop autonomous system for the follow up of possible micro-lensing anomalies. Not only are the initial micro-lensing detections followed up in real time, but ongoing events are prioritised and continually monitored, with the returned data being analysed automatically. If the ``smart software'' running the observing campaign detects a planet-like anomaly, further follow-up will be scheduled autonomously and other telescopes and telescope networks alerted to the possible planetary detection. We further discuss the implications of this, and how such projects can be used to build more general autonomous observing and control systems.

  10. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  11. SIRTF autonomous star tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bezooijen, Roelof W. H.

    2003-03-01

    Two redundant AST-301 autonomous star trackers (AST) serve as the primary attitude sensors for JPL's space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF). These units, which employ a 1553B interface to output their attitude quaternions and uncertainty at a 2 Hz rate, provide a 1 σaccuracy of better than 0.18, 0.18, and 5.1 arcsec about their X, Y, and Z axes, respectively. This is a factor 5.5 better than the accuracy of the flight-proven AST-201 from which the trackers were derived. To obtain this improvement, the field of view (FOV) was reduced to 5 by 5 degrees, the accurate Tycho-1 and ACT catalogs were used for selecting the 71,830 guide stars, star image centroiding was improved to better than 1/50th of a pixel, and optimal attitude estimation was implemented. In addition, the apparent direction to each guide star in the FOV is compensated for proper motion, parallax, velocity aberration, and optical distortion. The AST-301 employs autonomous time-delayed integration (TDI) to achieve image motion compensation (IMC) about its X axis that prevents accuracy degradation, even at rates of 2.1 deg/s, making it actually suitable for use on spinning spacecraft. About the Y axis, a software function called "image motion accommodation" (IMA) processes smeared images to maximize the signal to noise ratio of the resulting synthetic images, which enables robust and accurate tracking at rates tested up to 0.42 deg/s. The AST-301 is capable of acquiring its attitude anywhere in the sky in less than 3 seconds with a 99.98% probability of success, without requiring any a priori attitude knowledge. Following a description of the 7.1 kg AST-301, its operation and IMA, the methodology for translating the night sky test data into performance numbers is presented, while, in addition, the results of tests used to measure alignment stability over temperature are included.

  12. Beta-lactams interfering with PBP1 induce Panton-Valentine leukocidin expression by triggering sarA and rot global regulators of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Oana; Choudhury, Priya; Boisset, Sandrine; Badiou, Cédric; Bes, Michele; Benito, Yvonne; Wolz, Christiane; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Cheung, Ambrose L; Bowden, Maria Gabriela; Lina, Gerard

    2011-07-01

    Previous articles reported that beta-lactam antibiotics increase the expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by activating its transcription. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression by determining targets and regulatory pathways possibly implicated in this process. We measured PVL production in the presence of oxacillin (nonselective), imipenem (penicillin-binding protein 1 [PBP1] selective), cefotaxime (PBP2 selective), cefaclore (PBP3 selective), and cefoxitin (PBP4 selective). In vitro, we observed increased PVL production consistent with luk-PV mRNA levels that were 20 to 25 times higher for community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) cultures treated with PBP1-binding oxacillin and imipenem than for cultures treated with other beta-lactams or no antibiotic at all. This effect was also observed in vivo, with increased PVL mRNA levels in lung tissues from CA-MRSA-infected mice treated with imipenem but not cefoxitin. To confirm the involvement of PBP1 inhibition in this pathway, PBP1 depletion by use of an inducible pbp1 antisense RNA showed a dose-dependent relationship between the level of pbp1 antisense RNA and the luk-PV mRNA level. Upon imipenem treatment of exponential-phase cultures, we observed an increased sarA mRNA level after 30 min of incubation followed by a decreased rot mRNA level after 1 to 4 h of incubation. Unlike the agr and saeRS positive regulators, which were nonessential for PVL induction by beta-lactams, the sarA (positive) and rot (negative) PVL regulators were necessary for PVL induction by imipenem. Our results suggest that antibiotics binding to PBP1 increase PVL expression by modulating sarA and rot, which are essential mediators of the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression.

  13. β-Lactams Interfering with PBP1 Induce Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Expression by Triggering sarA and rot Global Regulators of Staphylococcus aureus ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Oana; Choudhury, Priya; Boisset, Sandrine; Badiou, Cédric; Bes, Michele; Benito, Yvonne; Wolz, Christiane; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Bowden, Maria Gabriela; Lina, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Previous articles reported that beta-lactam antibiotics increase the expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by activating its transcription. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression by determining targets and regulatory pathways possibly implicated in this process. We measured PVL production in the presence of oxacillin (nonselective), imipenem (penicillin-binding protein 1 [PBP1] selective), cefotaxime (PBP2 selective), cefaclore (PBP3 selective), and cefoxitin (PBP4 selective). In vitro, we observed increased PVL production consistent with luk-PV mRNA levels that were 20 to 25 times higher for community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) cultures treated with PBP1-binding oxacillin and imipenem than for cultures treated with other beta-lactams or no antibiotic at all. This effect was also observed in vivo, with increased PVL mRNA levels in lung tissues from CA-MRSA-infected mice treated with imipenem but not cefoxitin. To confirm the involvement of PBP1 inhibition in this pathway, PBP1 depletion by use of an inducible pbp1 antisense RNA showed a dose-dependent relationship between the level of pbp1 antisense RNA and the luk-PV mRNA level. Upon imipenem treatment of exponential-phase cultures, we observed an increased sarA mRNA level after 30 min of incubation followed by a decreased rot mRNA level after 1 to 4 h of incubation. Unlike the agr and saeRS positive regulators, which were nonessential for PVL induction by beta-lactams, the sarA (positive) and rot (negative) PVL regulators were necessary for PVL induction by imipenem. Our results suggest that antibiotics binding to PBP1 increase PVL expression by modulating sarA and rot, which are essential mediators of the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression. PMID:21502633

  14. The comparison of naturally weathered oil and artificially photo-degraded oil at the molecular level by a combination of SARA fractionation and FT-ICR MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Ananna; Cho, Yunju [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon [Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Geoje 656-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Division of Mass Spectrometry Research and Center for Analytical Research in Disease Sciences, Korea Basic Science Institute, Ochang 863-883 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan, E-mail: sunghwank@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Chemistry, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mass Spectrometry Research and Center for Analytical Research in Disease Sciences, Korea Basic Science Institute, Ochang 863-883 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Weathered oils from the Hebei Spirit oil spill and photo degraded oils are compared. • We investigate changes of polar species at the molecular level by 15T FT-ICR MS. • Significant reduction of sulfur class compounds in saturates fraction is observed. • The relative abundance of protonated compounds (presumably basic nitrogen compounds) increase after degradation. • Changes of polar compounds occurred by natural and photo degradation are similar. -- Abstract: Two sets of oil samples, one obtained from different weathering stages of the M/V Hebei Spirit oil spill site and the other prepared by an in vitro photo-degradation experiment, were analyzed and compared at the molecular level by atmospheric pressure photo-ionization coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). For a more detailed comparison at the molecular level, the oil samples were separated into saturate, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene (SARA) fractions before MS analysis. Gravimetric analysis of the SARA fractions revealed a decreased weight percentage of the aromatic fraction and an increased resin fraction in both sets of samples. Molecular-level investigations of the SARA fractions showed a significant reduction in the S{sub 1} class in the saturate fraction and increase of S{sub 1}O{sub 1} class compounds with high DBE values in resin fraction. Levels of N{sub 1} and N{sub 1}O{sub 1} class compounds resulting in protonated ions (presumably basic nitrogen compounds) increased after degradation compared to compounds generating molecular ions (presumably non-basic nitrogen compounds). This study revealed changes occurring in heteroatom polar species of crude oils such as sulfur and nitrogen containing compounds that have not been easily detected with conventional GC based techniques.

  15. Framework for Autonomous Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phoenix Integration and MIT propose to create a novel autonomous optimization tool and application programming interface (API). The API will demonstrate the ability...

  16. Cranial Autonomic Symptoms in Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranial autonomic symptoms (CAS in patients with migraine and cluster headaches (CH were characterized and compared in a prospective study of consecutive patients attending a headache clinic at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

  17. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  18. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  19. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  20. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  1. Unusual Structural Autonomic Disorders Presenting in Pediatrics: Disorders Associated with Hypoventilation and Autonomic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelimsky, Gisela; Chelimsky, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Structural autonomic disorders (producing structural damage to the autonomic nervous system or autonomic centers) are far less common than functional autonomic disorders (reflected in abnormal function of a fundamentally normal autonomic nervous system) in children and teenagers. This article focuses on this uncommon first group in the pediatric clinic. These disorders are grouped into 2 main categories: those characterized by hypoventilation and those that feature an autonomic neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Survivability design for a hybrid underwater vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Biao; Wu, Chao; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Qingkai; Ge, Tong [State Key Lab of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-10

    A novel hybrid underwater robotic vehicle (HROV) capable of working to the full ocean depth has been developed. The battery powered vehicle operates in two modes: operate as an untethered autonomous vehicle in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mode and operate under remote control connected to the surface vessel by a lightweight, fiber optic tether in remotely operated vehicle (ROV) mode. Considering the hazardous underwater environment at the limiting depth and the hybrid operating modes, survivability has been placed on an equal level with the other design attributes of the HROV since the beginning of the project. This paper reports the survivability design elements for the HROV including basic vehicle design of integrated navigation and integrated communication, emergency recovery strategy, distributed architecture, redundant bus, dual battery package, emergency jettison system and self-repairing control system.

  3. Integrated Motion Planning and Autonomous Control Technology for Autonomous ISR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI and MIT propose to design, implement and test a comprehensive Integrated Mission Planning & Autonomous Control Technology (IMPACT) for Autonomous ISR...

  4. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  5. Autonomous mobile robots: Vehicles with cognitive control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meystel, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book explores a new rapidly developing area of robotics. It describes the state-of-the-art intelligence control, applied machine intelligence, and research and initial stages of manufacturing of autonomous mobile robots. A complete account of the theoretical and experimental results obtained during the last two decades together with some generalizations on Autonomous Mobile Systems are included in this book. Contents: Introduction; Requirements and Specifications; State-of-the-art in Autonomous Mobile Robots Area; Structure of Intelligent Mobile Autonomous System; Planner, Navigator; Pilot; Cartographer; Actuation Control; Computer Simulation of Autonomous Operation; Testing the Autonomous Mobile Robot; Conclusions; Bibliography.

  6. Surviving Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Murjas, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Surviving Objects (2012) is a devised multi-media practice-as-research performance based on extensive interviews conducted with my elderly mother and recorded on a hand-held device. Our conversations concern her experiences as a child refugee following violent deportation by the Soviet Army from Eastern Poland to Siberia (1941), and her subsequent route, via Persia, to a British-run refugee camp in Northern Rhodesia, where she remained for 6 years before arriving in the UK. In order to aid my...

  7. Autonomous hazard detection and avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pien, Homer

    1992-01-01

    During GFY 91, Draper Laboratory was awarded a task by NASA-JSC under contract number NAS9-18426 to study and evaluate the potential for achieving safe autonomous landings on Mars using an on-board autonomous hazard detection and avoidance (AHDA) system. This report describes the results of that study. The AHDA task had four objectives: to demonstrate, via a closed-loop simulation, the ability to autonomously select safe landing sites and the ability to maneuver to the selected site; to identify key issues in the development of AHDA systems; to produce strawman designs for AHDA sensors and algorithms; and to perform initial trade studies leading to better understanding of the effect of sensor/terrain/viewing parameters on AHDA algorithm performance. This report summarizes the progress made during the first year, with primary emphasis on describing the tools developed for simulating a closed-loop AHDA landing. Some cursory performance evaluation results are also presented.

  8. Autonomous underwater riser inspection tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camerini, Claudio; Marnet, Robson [Petrobras SA, (Brazil); Freitas, Miguel; Von der Weid, Jean Pierre [CPTI/PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, (Brazil); Artigas Lander, Ricardo [EngeMOVI, Curitiba, (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The detection of damage on the riser is a serious concern for pipeline companies. Visual examinations by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) are presently carried out to detect the defects but this process has limitations and is expensive. This paper presents the development of a new tool to ensure autonomous underwater riser inspection (AURI) that uses the riser itself for guidance. The AURI, which is autonomous in terms of control and power supply, is equipped with several cameras that perform a complete visual inspection of the riser with 100 % coverage of the external surface of the riser. The paper presents the detailed characteristics of the first AURI prototype, describes its launching procedure and provides the preliminary test results from pool testing. The results showed that the AURI is a viable system for autonomous riser inspection. Offshore tests on riser pipelines are scheduled to be performed shortly.

  9. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  10. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-09-01

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale-from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems-their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous the

  11. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  12. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta, E-mail: aneta@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-09-30

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  13. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  14. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  15. The Bering Autonomous Target Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    An autonomous asteroid target detection and tracking method has been developed. The method features near omnidirectionality and focus on high speed operations and completeness of search of the near space rather than the traditional faint object search methods, employed presently at the larger...... telescopes. The method has proven robust in operation and is well suited for use onboard spacecraft. As development target for the method and the associated instrumentation the asteroid research mission Bering has been used. Onboard a spacecraft, the autonomous detection is centered around the fully...

  16. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is an RNA-binding protein that modulates the mRNA turnover properties of late-exponential and stationary phase Staphylococcus aureus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Morrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of mRNA turnover is gaining recognition as a mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus regulates gene expression, but the factors that orchestrate alterations in transcript degradation are poorly understood. In that regard, we previously found that 138 mRNA species, including the virulence factors protein A (spa and collagen binding protein (cna, are stabilized in a sarA-dependent manner during exponential phase growth, suggesting that SarA protein may directly or indirectly effect the RNA turnover properties of these transcripts. Herein, we expanded our characterization of the effects of sarA on mRNA turnover during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Results revealed that the locus affects the RNA degradation properties of cells during both growth phases. Further, using gel mobility shift assays and RIP-ChIP, it was found that SarA protein is capable of binding mRNA species that it stabilizes both in vitro and within bacterial cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SarA post-transcriptionally regulates S. aureus gene expression in a manner that involves binding to and consequently altering the mRNA turnover properties of target transcripts.

  17. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [9] During autonomic instability there is an increase in noradrenaline and ... The systemic vascular resistance (SVR) may initially be low, but rises as the disease ... Deep analgosedation has been found to be important in overcoming autonomic ...

  18. Energy homeostasis, autonomic activity and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Balkan, B; Nyakas, C; vanDijk, G; Steffens, AB; Bohus, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The present paper summarizes the results of a number of studies designed to investigate autonomic functioning in normal, genetically, and experimentally obese rats, Particular emphasis is given

  19. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases...

  20. Nutritional Models of Experimentally-Induced Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA) Differ in Their Impact on Rumen and Hindgut Bacterial Communities in Dairy Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaizier, Jan C.; Li, Shucong; Tun, Hein M.; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Effects of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) challenges on the bacteria in rumen fluid, cecal digesta, and feces of dairy cows were determined using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. Six non-lactating Holstein cows with cannulas in the rumen and cecum were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square arrangement of treatments. During the first 3 wk of each experimental period, cows received a control diet containing 70% forages on a dry matter (DM) basis. In wk 4 of each period, cows received one of three diets: (1) the control diet; (2) a diet in which 34% of the dietary DM was replaced with pellets of ground wheat and barley (GBSC); or (3) a diet in which 37% of dietary DM was replaced with pellets of ground alfalfa (APSC). Rumen fluid, cecal digesta and feces were collected on d 5 of wk 4 of each period and the composition of the bacterial community was studied. Rumen fermentation responses were reported in a companion study. Both SARA-inducing challenges resulted in similar digesta pH depressions (as shown by the companion study), and reduced bacterial richness and diversity in rumen fluid, but GBSC had the larger effect. None of the challenges affected these measures in cecal digesta, and only GBSC reduced bacterial richness and diversity in feces. Only GBSC reduced the abundance of Bacteroidetes in rumen fluid. Abundances of limited number of bacterial genera identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the rumen, cecum and feces were affected by the GBSC. The APSC did not affect any of these abundances. Both challenges increased the abundances of several starch, pectin, xylan, dextrin, lactate, succinate, and sugar fermenting bacterial species in the rumen, cecum, and feces as determined by qPCR. Only GBSC increased that of Megasphaera elsdenii in the rumen. Both challenges decreased the abundance of Streptococcus bovis, and increased that of Escherichia coli, in cecal digesta and feces, with GBSC having the larger effect. These results showed that

  1. Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Morton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available From Hakim Bey's instructions on creating temporary autonomous zones we see an oscillation "between performance art and politics, circus clowning and revolution." In this essay Tim Morton discusses anarchist politics as, "the creation of fresh objects in a reality without a top or a bottom object, or for that matter a middle object."

  2. Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Tim Morton

    2011-01-01

    From Hakim Bey's instructions on creating temporary autonomous zones we see an oscillation "between performance art and politics, circus clowning and revolution." In this essay Tim Morton discusses anarchist politics as, "the creation of fresh objects in a reality without a top or a bottom object, or for that matter a middle object."

  3. Designing Assessment for Autonomous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Marie; Mathers, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to disseminate and evaluate an autonomous learning framework developed through collaborative research with first- and second-year undergraduate students at De Montfort University. Central to the framework is the involvement of students in the assessment of their peers and themselves using dialogue about the assessment and feedback…

  4. Autonomic dysreflexia: a medical emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bycroft, J; Shergill, I; Choong, E; Arya, N; Shah, P

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is an important clinical diagnosis that requires prompt treatment to avoid devastating complications. The condition may present itself to all members of medical and surgical specialties, who may not be accustomed to treating it. It is the clinician's responsibility to have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology of the condition and the simple steps required to treat it. PMID:15811886

  5. Autonomous vertical profiler data management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    The Autonomous Vertical Profiler (AVP), developed at NIO [1] [2], collects position and water column data over a period of 3 days and transmits through a satellite modem which is collated and stored on a PC. Data includes GPS positions, water column...

  6. Hazard Map for Autonomous Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels

    This dissertation describes the work performed in the area of using image analysis in the process of landing a spacecraft autonomously and safely on the surface of the Moon. This is suggested to be done using a Hazard Map. The correspondence problem between several Hazard Maps are investigated fu...

  7. Autonomous Bio-Optical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-30

    Autonomous Bio -Optical Instruments Russ E. Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla CA 92093-0230 phone: (858) 534-4415 fax: (858) 534... Bio -Optical Instruments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  8. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  9. Blunted autonomic response in cluster headache patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Brinth, Louise; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache (CH) is a disabling headache disorder with chronobiological features. The posterior hypothalamus is involved in CH pathophysiology and is a hub for autonomic control. We studied autonomic response to the head-up tilt table test (HUT) including heart rate variability...... be interpreted as dysregulation in the posterior hypothalamus and supports a theory of central autonomic mechanisms involvement in CH....

  10. Indoor Autonomous Airship Control and Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorenko Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an automatic control system for autonomous airship. The system is designed to organize autonomous flight of the mini-airship performing flight mission defined from ground control station. Structure, hardware and software implementation of indoor autonomous airship and its navigation and control system as well as experiment results are described.

  11. Autonomous Duffing-Holmes Type Chaotic Oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamaševičius, A.; Bumelienė, S.; Kirvaitis, R.

    2009-01-01

    We have designed and built a novel Duffing type autonomous 3rd-order chaotic oscillator. In comparison with the common non-autonomous DuffingHolmes type oscillator the autonomous circuit has an internal positive feedback loop instead of an external periodic drive source. In addition...

  12. CAAD: Computer Architecture for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shaoshan; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Zhe; Gaudiot, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We describe the computing tasks involved in autonomous driving, examine existing autonomous driving computing platform implementations. To enable autonomous driving, the computing stack needs to simultaneously provide high performance, low power consumption, and low thermal dissipation, at low cost. We discuss possible approaches to design computing platforms that will meet these needs.

  13. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  14. [Acute Sensory Neuropathies and Acute Autonomic Neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Haruki

    2015-11-01

    From the perspective of neuropathies with an acute onset mimicking that of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), cases with profound sensory and/or autonomic impairment without any significant weakness have been reported. Although the possibility of infectious or toxic etiologies should be carefully excluded, immune mechanisms similar to those in GBS are suggested to be involved in these so-called acute sensory neuropathies and acute autonomic neuropathies. The types of neuropathy include those with predominant sensory manifestations, predominant autonomic manifestations such as autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and both sensory and autonomic manifestations such as acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Neuronopathy in the sensory and/or autonomic ganglia (i.e., ganglionopathy) has been commonly suggested in patients with these types of neuropathies. The presence of Anti-GD1b antibodies has been reported in some of the patients with acute sensory neuropathy with deep sensory impairment, whereas anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies are reported to be present in half of the patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. The discovery of anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies significantly expanded the spectrum of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. This is because some of the patients with chronic progression mimicking neurodegenerative diseases such as pure autonomic failure were positive for these antibodies. In contrast, pathologically significant autoantibodies have not been identified in acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenesis and the spectrum of these types of neuropathies.

  15. Experiences in Benchmarking of Autonomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchevers, Xavier; Coupaye, Thierry; Vachet, Guy

    Autonomic computing promises improvements of systems quality of service in terms of availability, reliability, performance, security, etc. However, little research and experimental results have so far demonstrated this assertion, nor provided proof of the return on investment stemming from the efforts that introducing autonomic features requires. Existing works in the area of benchmarking of autonomic systems can be characterized by their qualitative and fragmented approaches. Still a crucial need is to provide generic (i.e. independent from business, technology, architecture and implementation choices) autonomic computing benchmarking tools for evaluating and/or comparing autonomic systems from a technical and, ultimately, an economical point of view. This article introduces a methodology and a process for defining and evaluating factors, criteria and metrics in order to qualitatively and quantitatively assess autonomic features in computing systems. It also discusses associated experimental results on three different autonomic systems.

  16. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  17. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Liu; Dongmei Chen; Yonggang Wang; Xin Zhao; Yang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia.DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using "heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation" as the key words.SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated.RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system.CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in the

  18. Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Nielsen, Oluf Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investiga......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper......; sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot-robot interaction, human-robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties. Findings - The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry...... Manipulation (AIMM)....

  19. Chaotic neurodynamics for autonomous agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Derek; Kozma, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Mesoscopic level neurodynamics study the collective dynamical behavior of neural populations. Such models are becoming increasingly important in understanding large-scale brain processes. Brains exhibit aperiodic oscillations with a much more rich dynamical behavior than fixed-point and limit-cycle approximation allow. Here we present a discretized model inspired by Freeman's K-set mesoscopic level population model. We show that this version is capable of replicating the important principles of aperiodic/chaotic neurodynamics while being fast enough for use in real-time autonomous agent applications. This simplification of the K model provides many advantages not only in terms of efficiency but in simplicity and its ability to be analyzed in terms of its dynamical properties. We study the discrete version using a multilayer, highly recurrent model of the neural architecture of perceptual brain areas. We use this architecture to develop example action selection mechanisms in an autonomous agent.

  20. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control i....... Evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CAN testing is lacking. Apart from the preventive role of intensive glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes, recommendations cannot be given for most therapeutic approaches to CAN. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....... in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and glycaemic control...

  1. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  2. AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC INSPECTION IN TUNNELS

    OpenAIRE

    E. Protopapadakis; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; A. Doulamis; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel’s lining, for a narrow region clos...

  3. [Autonomic nervous system in diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, M

    2001-08-01

    Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia have a primary role in determining the early functional and later anatomic changes at the level of the autonomic pathways controlling the circulation, and besides in directly influencing cardiac and vascular cellular targets and feed-back baroreceptor system sensitivity to neurohumoral modulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The basic mechanisms of dysfunction and damage, and the clinical and prognostic value of diabetic cardiovascular dysautonomia are discussed together with the diagnostic apparatus and the possible therapeutic approaches.

  4. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  5. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Few; Roelof Versteeg; Herman Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, a countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude – from an autonomous robotic perspective – the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  6. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Doug; Versteeg, Roelof; Herman, Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude - from an autonomous robotic perspective - the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  7. Intelligent agents: adaptation of autonomous bimodal microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrice; Terry, Theodore B.

    2014-03-01

    Autonomous bimodal microsystems exhibiting survivability behaviors and characteristics are able to adapt dynamically in any given environment. Equipped with a background blending exoskeleton it will have the capability to stealthily detect and observe a self-chosen viewing area while exercising some measurable form of selfpreservation by either flying or crawling away from a potential adversary. The robotic agent in this capacity activates a walk-fly algorithm, which uses a built in multi-sensor processing and navigation subsystem or algorithm for visual guidance and best walk-fly path trajectory to evade capture or annihilation. The research detailed in this paper describes the theoretical walk-fly algorithm, which broadens the scope of spatial and temporal learning, locomotion, and navigational performances based on optical flow signals necessary for flight dynamics and walking stabilities. By observing a fly's travel and avoidance behaviors; and, understanding the reverse bioengineering research efforts of others, we were able to conceptualize an algorithm, which works in conjunction with decisionmaking functions, sensory processing, and sensorimotor integration. Our findings suggest that this highly complex decentralized algorithm promotes inflight or terrain travel mobile stability which is highly suitable for nonaggressive micro platforms supporting search and rescue (SAR), and chemical and explosive detection (CED) purposes; a necessity in turbulent, non-violent structured or unstructured environments.

  8. Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors:A surgical point of view

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anton Stift; Josef Friedl; Michael Gnant; Friedrich Herbst; Raimund Jakesz; Etienne Wenzl

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors are uncommon stromal tumors of the intestinal tract. Their histological appearance is similar to that of other gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report two cases and performed an analysis of the literature by comparing our findings with the available case reports in the medical literature.METHODS: Two patients were admitted with abdominal tumor masses. One occurred in the stomach with large multiple liver metastases and the second originated in Meckel's diverticulum. The latter site has never been reported previously. Both patients underwent surgery. In one patient gastrectomy, right liver resection and colon transversum resection were performed to achieve aggressive tumor debulking. In the other patient the tumor bearing diverticulum was removed.RESULTS: Postoperative recovery of both patients was uneventful. Histological examination, immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopy revealed the diagnosis of a gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumor. The patient with the tumor in Meckel's diverticulum died 6 mo after surgery because of pneumonia. The patient with liver metastases have been alive 13 years after initial tumor diagnosis and 7 years after surgery with no evidence of tumor progression. In light of our results, we performed a thorough comparison with available literature reports.CONCLUSION: Radical surgical resection of gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors seems to be the only available curative approach to date, and long term survival is possible even in large metastasized tumors.ACKNOWLEDGMENTWe thank Christine Brostjan, PhD for critical review of the manuscript.

  9. Navigation and Control of an Autonomous Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Schworer, Ian Josef

    2005-01-01

    The navigation and control of an autonomous vehicle is a highly complex task. Making a vehicle intelligent and able to operate â unmannedâ requires extensive theoretical as well as practical knowledge. An autonomous vehicle must be able to make decisions and respond to situations completely on its own. Navigation and control serves as the major limitation of the overall performance, accuracy and robustness of an autonomous vehicle. This thesis will address this problem and propose a uni...

  10. Attainability of Carnot efficiency with autonomous engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Naoto

    2015-11-01

    The maximum efficiency of autonomous engines with a finite chemical potential difference is investigated. We show that, without a particular type of singularity, autonomous engines cannot attain the Carnot efficiency. This singularity is realized in two ways: single particle transports and the thermodynamic limit. We demonstrate that both of these ways actually lead to the Carnot efficiency in concrete setups. Our results clearly illustrate that the singularity plays a crucial role in the maximum efficiency of autonomous engines.

  11. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As...

  12. Attainability of Carnot efficiency with autonomous engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Naoto

    2015-11-01

    The maximum efficiency of autonomous engines with a finite chemical potential difference is investigated. We show that, without a particular type of singularity, autonomous engines cannot attain the Carnot efficiency. This singularity is realized in two ways: single particle transports and the thermodynamic limit. We demonstrate that both of these ways actually lead to the Carnot efficiency in concrete setups. Our results clearly illustrate that the singularity plays a crucial role in the maximum efficiency of autonomous engines.

  13. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Sun; Guangming Xiong; Weilong Song; Jianwei Gong; Huiyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China’s autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approac...

  14. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T van den Heever

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 50-year-old female patient after sustaining a wound to her right lower leg. She developed autonomic dysfunction, which included labile hypertension alternating with hypotension and sweating. The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine sulphate infusion, magnesium sulphate, and clonidine. She also received adrenaline and phenylephrine infusions as needed for hypotension. We then discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features and treatment options of autonomic dysfunction.

  15. Design of a Miniature Autonomous Surveillance Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chang-e; HUANG Qiang; HUANG Yuan-can

    2009-01-01

    The small size of miniature robots poses great challenges for the mechanical and deetrieal design and the implementation of autonomous capabilities.In this paper,the mechanical and electrical design for a twowheeled cylindrical miniature autonomous robot ("BMS-1",BIT MicroScout-1) is presented and some autonomous capabilities are implemented by multiple sensors and some arithmetic models.Several experimental results show that BMS-1 is useful for surveillance in confined spaces and suitable for large-scale surveillance due to some autonomous capabilities.

  16. Public Health, Ethics, and Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Janet

    2017-04-01

    With the potential to save nearly 30 000 lives per year in the United States, autonomous vehicles portend the most significant advance in auto safety history by shifting the focus from minimization of postcrash injury to collision prevention. I have delineated the important public health implications of autonomous vehicles and provided a brief analysis of a critically important ethical issue inherent in autonomous vehicle design. The broad expertise, ethical principles, and values of public health should be brought to bear on a wide range of issues pertaining to autonomous vehicles.

  17. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-01-01

    , and sexual dysfunction. Our results show that compared to control subjects with a similar overall age and sex distribution, patients with iRBD experience significantly more problems with gastrointestinal, urinary, and cardiovascular functioning. The most prominent differences in severity of autonomic......Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic...

  18. Autonomic dysfunction in patients with advanced cancer; prevalence, clinical correlates and challenges in assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Carol A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The results of a small number of studies of autonomic function in patients with advanced cancer suggest that autonomic dysfunction (AD is common. In other disease-specific groups this is associated with decreased survival, falls and symptoms such as postural hypotension, nausea, early satiety and fatigue. The contribution of AD to symptoms in advanced cancer is unknown. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study designed to identify the risk factors for falls in patients with advanced cancer. Ambulant adult patients admitted consecutively to palliative care services were invited to participate. Participants underwent an assessment at baseline which included standard clinical tests of autonomic function, assessment of symptom severity, muscle strength, anthropometric measurements, walking speed, medication use, comorbidities and demographics. Information regarding survival was recorded ten months following cessation of recruitment. The clinical correlates of AD, defined as definite or severe dysfunction using Ewing's classification, were examined by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier plots and the log rank test. Results Of 185 patients recruited, 45% were unable to complete all of the clinical tests of autonomic function. Non-completion was associated with scoring high on clinical indicators of frailty. It was possible to accurately classify 138/185 (74.6% of participants as having either definite or severe versus normal, early or atypical AD: 110 (80% had definite/severe AD. In logistic regression analysis, age (OR = 1.07 [95% CI; 1.03-1.1] P = 0.001 and increased severity of fatigue (OR = 1.26 [95% CI; 1.05-1.5] p = 0.016 were associated with having definite/severe AD. In analysis adjusted for age, median survival of participants with definite/severe AD was shorter than in those with normal/early/atypical classification (χ2 = 4.3, p = 0

  19. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  20. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  1. Topological entropy of autonomous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    When studying fluid dynamics, especially in a turbulent regime, it is crucial to estimate the number of active degrees of freedom or of localized structures in the system. The topological entropy quantifies the exponential growth of the number of `distinct` orbits in a dynamical system as a function of their length, in the infinite spatial resolution limit. Here, I illustrate a novel method for its evaluation, which extends beyond maps and is applicable to any system, including autonomous flows: these are characterized by lack of a definite absolute time scale for the orbit lengths. (author) 8 refs.

  2. Autonomous systems for plant protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griepentrog, Hans W.; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm;

    2010-01-01

    Advances in automation are demanded by the market mainly as a response to high labor costs. Robotic outdoor systems are ready to allow not only economically viable operations but also increased efficiency in agriculture, horticulture and forestry. The aim of this chapter is to give examples...... of autonomous operations related to crop protection probably commercially available in the near future. Scouting and monitoring together with the efficient application of chemicals or mechanical treatments are operations which can be successful automated. Drawbacks are that current systems are lacking robust...

  3. Autonomous Dome for Robotic Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Akash; Ganesh, Shashikiran

    2016-01-01

    Physical Research Laboratory operates a 50cm robotic observatory at Mount Abu. This Automated Telescope for Variability Studies (ATVS) makes use of Remote Telescope System 2 (RTS2) for autonomous operations. The observatory uses a 3.5m dome from Sirius Observatories. We have developed electronics using Arduino electronic circuit boards with home grown logic and software to control the dome operations. We are in the process of completing the drivers to link our Arduino based dome controller with RTS2. This document is a short description of the various phases of the development and their integration to achieve the required objective.

  4. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  5. Plant Watering Autonomous Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Nagaraja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Now days, due to busy routine life, people forget to water their plants. In this paper, we present a completely autonomous and a cost-effective system for watering indoor potted plants placed on an even surface. The system comprises of a mobile robot and a temperature-humidity sensing module. The system is fully adaptive to any environment and takes into account the watering needs of the plants using the temperature-humidity sensing module. The paper describes the hardware architecture of the fully automated watering system, which uses wireless communication to communicate between the mobile robot and the sensing module. This gardening robot is completely portable and is equipped with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID module, a microcontroller, an on-board water reservoir and an attached water pump. It is capable of sensing the watering needs of the plants, locating them and finally watering them autonomously without any human intervention. Mobilization of the robot to the potted plant is achieved by using a predefined path. For identification, an RFID tag is attached to each potted plant. The paper also discusses the detailed implementation of the system supported with complete circuitry. Finally, the paper concludes with system performance including the analysis of the water carrying capacity and time requirements to water a set of plants.

  6. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  7. Multi-agent autonomous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  8. Autonomous Lawnmower using FPGA implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabihah; Lokman, Nabill bin; Helmy Abd Wahab, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, there are various types of robot have been invented for multiple purposes. The robots have the special characteristic that surpass the human ability and could operate in extreme environment which human cannot endure. In this paper, an autonomous robot is built to imitate the characteristic of a human cutting grass. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the movements where all data and information would be processed. Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is used to describe the hardware using Quartus II software. This robot has the ability of avoiding obstacle using ultrasonic sensor. This robot used two DC motors for its movement. It could include moving forward, backward, and turning left and right. The movement or the path of the automatic lawn mower is based on a path planning technique. Four Global Positioning System (GPS) plot are set to create a boundary. This to ensure that the lawn mower operates within the area given by user. Every action of the lawn mower is controlled by the FPGA DE' Board Cyclone II with the help of the sensor. Furthermore, Sketch Up software was used to design the structure of the lawn mower. The autonomous lawn mower was able to operate efficiently and smoothly return to coordinated paths after passing the obstacle. It uses 25% of total pins available on the board and 31% of total Digital Signal Processing (DSP) blocks.

  9. Energy homeostasis, autonomic activity and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Balkan, B; Nyakas, C; vanDijk, G; Steffens, AB; Bohus, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The present paper summarizes the results of a number of studies designed to investigate autonomic functioning in normal, genetically, and experimentally obese rats, Particular emphasis is given t

  10. Intelligent autonomous systems 12. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukhan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of). College of Information and Communication Engineering; Yoon, Kwang-Joon [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyungsuck [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jangmyung (eds.) [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electronics Engineering

    2013-02-01

    Recent research in Intelligent and Autonomous Systems. Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 12th International Conference IAS-12, held June 26-29, 2012, jeju Island, Korea. Written by leading experts in the field. Intelligent autonomous systems are emerged as a key enabler for the creation of a new paradigm of services to humankind, as seen by the recent advancement of autonomous cars licensed for driving in our streets, of unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles carrying out hazardous tasks on-site, and of space robots engaged in scientific as well as operational missions, to list only a few. This book aims at serving the researchers and practitioners in related fields with a timely dissemination of the recent progress on intelligent autonomous systems, based on a collection of papers presented at the 12th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems, held in Jeju, Korea, June 26-29, 2012. With the theme of ''Intelligence and Autonomy for the Service to Humankind, the conference has covered such diverse areas as autonomous ground, aerial, and underwater vehicles, intelligent transportation systems, personal/domestic service robots, professional service robots for surgery/rehabilitation, rescue/security and space applications, and intelligent autonomous systems for manufacturing and healthcare. This volume 2 includes contributions devoted to Service Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction and Autonomous Multi-Agent Systems and Life Engineering.

  11. Goal Reasoning for an Autonomous Squad Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    2015 Annual Conference on Advances in Cognitive Systems: Workshop on Goal Reasoning Goal Reasoning for an Autonomous Squad Member Kellen...20375 USA Abstract Autonomous agents are beginning to play larger roles within team-oriented tasks and missions in various domains. Many reasoning ...present a goal reasoning system for this agent that integrates natural language processing, explanation generation, and plan recognition components

  12. Energy homeostasis, autonomic activity and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Balkan, B; Nyakas, C; vanDijk, G; Steffens, AB; Bohus, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The present paper summarizes the results of a number of studies designed to investigate autonomic functioning in normal, genetically, and experimentally obese rats, Particular emphasis is given t

  13. An autonomous weeding robot for organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at ¯eld level. The autonomous weeding robot was designed using a structured design approach, giving a good overview of the total design. A vehicle was developed with a diesel engine,

  14. A mission planner for an autonomous tractor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Vougioukas, S.G.; Griepentrog, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a mission planner of field coverage operations for an autonomous agricultural tractor is presented. Missions for a particular autonomous tractor are defined using an XML (extendible markup language) formatted file that can be uploaded to the tractor through the user interface...

  15. A mission planner for an autonomous tractor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Vougioukas, S.G.; Griepentrog, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a mission planner of field coverage operations for an autonomous agricultural tractor is presented. Missions for a particular autonomous tractor are defined using an XML (extendible markup language) formatted file that can be uploaded to the tractor through the user interface...

  16. Safe and Autonomous Drones for Urban Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are no longer futuristic technology; in fact, there are already cars with self-driving features on the road. Over the next five years, the connected vehicles will disrupt the entire automotive and UAS ecosystems. The industry will undergo fundamental change as semi-autonomous driving and flying emerges, followed by an eventual shift to full autonomy.

  17. Technologies for highly miniaturized autonomous sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, K.; Gyselinckx, B.; Torfs, T.; Leonov, V.; Yazicioglu, F.; Brebels, S.; Donnay, S.; Vanfleteren, J.; Beyne, E.; Hoof, C. van

    2006-01-01

    Recent results of the autonomous sensor research program HUMAN++ will be summarized in this paper. The research program aims to achieve highly miniaturized and (nearly) autonomous sensor systems that assist our health and comfort. Although the application examples are dedicated to human monitoring/a

  18. An autonomous weeding robot for organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at ¯eld level. The autonomous weeding robot was designed using a structured design approach, giving a good overview of the total design. A vehicle was developed with a diesel engine,

  19. Shh-mediated degradation of Hhip allows cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous Shh signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Lina; Bijlsma, Maarten F; Roelink, Henk

    2014-09-12

    The distribution of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a highly regulated and critical process for development. Several negative feedback mechanisms are in place, including the Shh-induced upregulation of Hedgehog-interacting protein (Hhip). Hhip sequesters Shh, leading to a non-cell autonomous inhibition of the pathway. Hhip overexpression has a severe effect on neural tube development, raising the question why normal sites of Hhip expression have a seemingly unimpaired response to Shh. Here we show that although Hhip is able to leave its sites of synthesis to inhibit Shh non-cell autonomously, activation of Smoothened (Smo) drastically increases Hhip internalization and degradation cell autonomously. Although Hhip is unable to cell autonomously inhibit the consequences of Smo activation, it can inhibit the Shh response non-cell autonomously. Our data provide a mechanism by which the Shh ligand can activate the response and negate cell autonomous effects of Hhip, while Hhip can still induce non-cell autonomous inhibition.

  20. Evolution of autonomous and semi-autonomous robotic surgical systems: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustris, G P; Hiridis, S C; Deliparaschos, K M; Konstantinidis, K M

    2011-12-01

    Autonomous control of surgical robotic platforms may offer enhancements such as higher precision, intelligent manoeuvres, tissue-damage avoidance, etc. Autonomous robotic systems in surgery are largely at the experimental level. However, they have also reached clinical application. A literature review pertaining to commercial medical systems which incorporate autonomous and semi-autonomous features, as well as experimental work involving automation of various surgical procedures, is presented. Results are drawn from major databases, excluding papers not experimentally implemented on real robots. Our search yielded several experimental and clinical applications, describing progress in autonomous surgical manoeuvres, ultrasound guidance, optical coherence tomography guidance, cochlear implantation, motion compensation, orthopaedic, neurological and radiosurgery robots. Autonomous and semi-autonomous systems are beginning to emerge in various interventions, automating important steps of the operation. These systems are expected to become standard modality and revolutionize the face of surgery. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Autonomous power system intelligent diagnosis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Mark J.; Quinn, Todd M.; Merolla, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA Lewis Research Center is designed to demonstrate the abilities of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control, and scheduling techniques to space power distribution hardware. Knowledge-based software provides a robust method of control for highly complex space-based power systems that conventional methods do not allow. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for fault diagnosis and control, the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to determine system configuration, and power hardware (Brassboard) to simulate a space based power system. The operation of the Autonomous Power System as a whole is described and the responsibilities of the three elements - APEX, AIPS, and Brassboard - are characterized. A discussion of the methodologies used in each element is provided. Future plans are discussed for the growth of the Autonomous Power System.

  2. Anesthesia Management in Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus and encompasses damage to the autonomic nerve fibers, resulting in abnormalities in heart rate control and vascular dynamics. There is an increased mortality and morbidity rate among these patients. A series of cardiovascular reflex tests known as Ewing's battery tests are used for diagnosis cardiac autonomic neuropathy and provide valuable information to the clinical assessment of these patients. As anesthesia has a major influence on perioperative autonomic function, the interplay between cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and anesthesia may result in unexpected haemodynamic instability during surgery and postoperative recovery. A comprehensive preoperative assessment and perioperative cautious monitoring are necessary for successful anesthesia management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 140-151

  3. Autonomic Management for Multi-agent Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salih, Nadir K; Viju, PG K; Mohamed, Abdelmotalib A

    2011-01-01

    Autonomic computing is a computing system that can manage itself by self-configuration, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protection. Researchers have been emphasizing the strong role that multi agent systems can play progressively towards the design and implementation of complex autonomic systems. The important of autonomic computing is to create computing systems capable of managing themselves to a far greater extent than they do today. With the nature of autonomy, reactivity, sociality and pro-activity, software agents are promising to make autonomic computing system a reality. This paper mixed multi-agent system with autonomic feature that completely hides its complexity from users/services. Mentioned Java Application Development Framework as platform example of this environment, could applied to web services as front end to users. With multi agent support it also provides adaptability, intelligence, collaboration, goal oriented interactions, flexibility, mobility and persistence in software systems

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Niño Mantilla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is a serious problem in diabetic patients. The cardiovacular autonomic neuropathy is the most important autonomic dysfuntion for it´s implication in the increasesof the mortality rate in diabetis patients. tis ethiopatogenesis is the result of a multifactorial process caused by chronic hyperglycemia, ending up in damage of the autonomic fibers thet innervate the heart and blood vessels, leading to dysfuntional hearth rate control and abnormal vascular dynamics. the associated clinical manifestations include orthotatic hypotension, excecise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular liability and silent myocardial ischemia. Being important its recognition, quantitative test to evaluate the cardiovascular funtion, to value its evolution and the effects of the treatment ahould be done, being the most used, the hearth rate response to standing test, and teh valsalva maneuver. the handling of this entity is done improving control of glucose blood levels its the most effective way to prevent the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

  5. sara(g)ur到sal(i)r——撒拉族源流的语言人类学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马伟

    2013-01-01

    本文以撒拉族相关族名为重点,通过语言人类学的研究,提出撒拉族源自Qaramang(尕勒莽)部,和土库曼、土耳其的Karaman,乌兹别克的努尔塔Salur人都应是源自历史上著名的、Salur乌古斯部的一位领袖Karaman的观点.撒拉族的自称Sal(i)r,是由历史上的Salur、Sal(g)ur、*Sara(g)ur、*Sar(i)(g) O(g)ur等演变而来.Sar(i)(g) O(g)ur意为“黄箭(部落)”,曾是匈奴的一个重要组成部分.撒拉族等一些乌古斯(O(g)uz)民族和维吾尔族、裕固族的祖先回纥(O(g)ur)都同出一源.

  6. Digital autonomous terminal access communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A significant problem for the Bus Monitor Unit is to identify the source of a given transmission. This problem arises from the fact that the label which identifies the source of the transmission as it is put into the bus is intercepted by the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communications (DATAC) terminal and removed from the transmission. Thus, a given subsystem will see only data associated with a label and never the identifying label itself. The Bus Monitor must identify the source of the transmission so as to be able to provide some type of error identification/location in the event that some problem with the data transmission occurs. Steps taken to alleviate this problem by modifications to the DATAC terminal are discussed.

  7. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  8. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  9. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barløse, Mads; Lund, Nunu; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sleep and cluster headache (CH) are believed to be interconnected but the precise relation to the other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) is uncertain and complex. A better understanding of these relations may eventually lead to a clarification of the underlying mechanisms...... and eventually to more effective therapeutic regimens. This review aims to evaluate the existing literature on the subject of TACs and sleep. An association between episodic CH and distinct macrostructural sleep phases, especially the relation to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been described in some older...... studies but could not be confirmed in other, more recent studies. Investigations into the microstructure of sleep in these patients are lacking. Only a few case reports exist on the relation between sleep and other TACs. SUMMARY: Recent studies do not find an association between CH and REM sleep. One...

  10. Autonomous navigation system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  11. Responsibility and autonomous nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R J

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, the consequences were there greater autonomy in nursing practice, are considered. Autonomous practice implies accountability which entails both personal and professional responsibility: a personal responsibility to endorse ethical conduct consistent with professional practice; and a professional responsibility to exercise discretionary powers to the ultimate benefit of the patient. In this context, discretionary responsibility implies: recognizing a patient's wants may not be consistent with a patient's needs; abstaining from collusion with noncompliant patients; supporting the patient's right to refuse treatment only after full psychological exploration; understanding the psychological ramifications of informed consent from a practitioner and recipient point of view; maintaining appropriate personal and professional boundaries; and fostering collegiate relationships with the medical fraternity grounded on egalitarian principles. The author provides a philosophical and psychological analysis of responsibility in an effort to achieve a deeper understanding of the relationship this has with the concepts of 'freedom' and 'accountability'.

  12. Mechanical autonomous stochastic heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, Andre; Moleron, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara; . Team

    Stochastic heat engines extract work from the Brownian motion of a set of particles out of equilibrium. So far, experimental demonstrations of stochastic heat engines have required extreme operating conditions or nonautonomous external control systems. In this talk, we will present a simple, purely classical, autonomous stochastic heat engine that uses the well-known tension induced nonlinearity in a string. Our engine operates between two heat baths out of equilibrium, and transfers energy from the hot bath to a work reservoir. This energy transfer occurs even if the work reservoir is at a higher temperature than the hot reservoir. The talk will cover a theoretical investigation and experimental results on a macroscopic setup subject to external noise excitations. This system presents an opportunity for the study of non equilibrium thermodynamics and is an interesting candidate for innovative energy conversion devices.

  13. Autonomous navigation system and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  14. Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordano, A. J.; Mcswain, G. G.; Fernandes, S. T.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Autonomous Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) Bridging program is reviewed to demonstrate the program plan and GN&C systems for the Space Shuttle. The ascent CN&C system is described in terms of elements such as the general-purpose digital computers, sensors for the navigation subsystem, the guidance-system software, and the flight-control subsystem. Balloon-based and lidar wind soundings are used for operations assessment on the day of launch, and the guidance software is based on dedicated units for atmospheric powered flight, vacuum powered flight, and abort-specific situations. Optimization of the flight trajectories is discussed, and flight-control responses are illustrated for wavelengths of 500-6000 m. Alternate sensors are used for load relief, and adaptive GN&C systems based on alternate gain synthesis are used for systems failures.

  15. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner; Jessner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  16. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  17. Autonomous caregiver following robotic wheelchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, E. Venkata; Sivaramalingam, Sethurajan; Vignesh, A. Sri; Vasanth, Elanthendral; Joans, S. Mary

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade, a variety of robotic/intelligent wheelchairs have been proposed to meet the need in aging society. Their main research topics are autonomous functions such as moving toward some goals while avoiding obstacles, or user-friendly interfaces. Although it is desirable for wheelchair users to go out alone, caregivers often accompany them. Therefore we have to consider not only autonomous functions and user interfaces but also how to reduce caregivers' load and support their activities in a communication aspect. From this point of view, we have proposed a robotic wheelchair moving with a caregiver side by side based on the MATLAB process. In this project we discussing about robotic wheel chair to follow a caregiver by using a microcontroller, Ultrasonic sensor, keypad, Motor drivers to operate robot. Using camera interfaced with the DM6437 (Davinci Code Processor) image is captured. The captured image are then processed by using image processing technique, the processed image are then converted into voltage levels through MAX 232 level converter and given it to the microcontroller unit serially and ultrasonic sensor to detect the obstacle in front of robot. In this robot we have mode selection switch Automatic and Manual control of robot, we use ultrasonic sensor in automatic mode to find obstacle, in Manual mode to use the keypad to operate wheel chair. In the microcontroller unit, c language coding is predefined, according to this coding the robot which connected to it was controlled. Robot which has several motors is activated by using the motor drivers. Motor drivers are nothing but a switch which ON/OFF the motor according to the control given by the microcontroller unit.

  18. Radar based autonomous sensor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Most surveillance systems combine camera sensors with other detection sensors that trigger an alert to a human operator when an object is detected. The detection sensors typically require careful installation and configuration for each application and there is a significant burden on the operator to react to each alert by viewing camera video feeds. A demonstration system known as Sensing for Asset Protection with Integrated Electronic Networked Technology (SAPIENT) has been developed to address these issues using Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASM) and a central High Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that can fuse the detections from multiple sensors. This paper describes the 24 GHz radar based ASM, which provides an all-weather, low power and license exempt solution to the problem of wide area surveillance. The radar module autonomously configures itself in response to tasks provided by the HLDMM, steering the transmit beam and setting range resolution and power levels for optimum performance. The results show the detection and classification performance for pedestrians and vehicles in an area of interest, which can be modified by the HLDMM without physical adjustment. The module uses range-Doppler processing for reliable detection of moving objects and combines Radar Cross Section and micro-Doppler characteristics for object classification. Objects are classified as pedestrian or vehicle, with vehicle sub classes based on size. Detections are reported only if the object is detected in a task coverage area and it is classified as an object of interest. The system was shown in a perimeter protection scenario using multiple radar ASMs, laser scanners, thermal cameras and visible band cameras. This combination of sensors enabled the HLDMM to generate reliable alerts with improved discrimination of objects and behaviours of interest.

  19. The Autonomic Symptom Profile: a new instrument to assess autonomic symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, G. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Offord, K. P.; Atkinson, E. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a new specific instrument called the Autonomic Symptom Profile to measure autonomic symptoms and test its validity. BACKGROUND: Measuring symptoms is important in the evaluation of quality of life outcomes. There is no validated, self-completed questionnaire on the symptoms of patients with autonomic disorders. METHODS: The questionnaire is 169 items concerning different aspects of autonomic symptoms. The Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale (COMPASS) with item-weighting was established; higher scores indicate more or worse symptoms. Autonomic function tests were performed to generate the Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale (CASS) and to quantify autonomic deficits. We compared the results of the COMPASS with the CASS derived from the Autonomic Reflex Screen to evaluate validity. RESULTS: The instrument was tested in 41 healthy controls (mean age 46.6 years), 33 patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies (mean age 59.5 years), and 39 patients with autonomic failure (mean age 61.1 years). COMPASS scores correlated well with the CASS, demonstrating an acceptable level of content and criterion validity. The mean (+/-SD) overall COMPASS score was 9.8 (+/-9) in controls, 25.9 (+/-17.9) in the patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies, and 52.3 (+/-24.2) in the autonomic failure group. Scores of symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and secretomotor dysfunction best predicted the CASS on multiple stepwise regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a questionnaire that measures autonomic symptoms and present evidence for its validity. The instrument shows promise in assessing autonomic symptoms in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies.

  20. Current challenges in autonomous vehicle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J.; Hong, W. S.; Mahoney, R. B., Jr.; Sparrow, D. A.

    2006-05-01

    The field of autonomous vehicles is a rapidly growing one, with significant interest from both government and industry sectors. Autonomous vehicles represent the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, combining decision-making with real-time control. Autonomous vehicles are desired for use in search and rescue, urban reconnaissance, mine detonation, supply convoys, and more. The general adage is to use robots for anything dull, dirty, dangerous or dumb. While a great deal of research has been done on autonomous systems, there are only a handful of fielded examples incorporating machine autonomy beyond the level of teleoperation, especially in outdoor/complex environments. In an attempt to assess and understand the current state of the art in autonomous vehicle development, a few areas where unsolved problems remain became clear. This paper outlines those areas and provides suggestions for the focus of science and technology research. The first step in evaluating the current state of autonomous vehicle development was to develop a definition of autonomy. A number of autonomy level classification systems were reviewed. The resulting working definitions and classification schemes used by the authors are summarized in the opening sections of the paper. The remainder of the report discusses current approaches and challenges in decision-making and real-time control for autonomous vehicles. Suggested research focus areas for near-, mid-, and long-term development are also presented.

  1. Management Approaches to Hypertension in Autonomic Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review Supine hypertension is a common finding in autonomic failure that can worsen orthostatic hypotension and predispose to end-organ damage. This review focuses on non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to manage hypertension in these patients, in the face of disabling orthostatic hypotension. Recent Findings The hypertension of autonomic failure can be driven by sympathetic dependent or independent mechanisms, depending on the site of autonomic lesions. Management of supine hypertension should include simple non-pharmacologic approaches including avoiding the supine position during the daytime and head-up tilt at night. Most patients, however, require pharmacologic treatment. Several antihypertensive therapies lower night-time pressure in autonomic failure, but none improve nocturnal volume depletion or morning orthostatic tolerance. Regardless, treatment may still be beneficial in some patients but must be determined on an individual basis, considering disease type and overnight monitoring. Further, doses must be carefully titrated as these patients are hypersensitive to depressor agents due to loss of baroreceptor reflexes. Summary Autonomic failure provides a unique opportunity to study blood pressure regulation independent of autonomic influences. Understanding mechanisms driving supine hypertension will have important implications for the treatment of autonomic failure and will improve our knowledge of cardiovascular regulation in other populations, including essential hypertension and elderly hypertensives with comorbid orthostatic hypotension. PMID:22801444

  2. Autonomous underwater pipeline monitoring navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Byrel; Mahmoudian, Nina; Meadows, Guy

    2014-06-01

    This paper details the development of an autonomous motion-control and navigation algorithm for an underwater autonomous vehicle, the Ocean Server IVER3, to track long linear features such as underwater pipelines. As part of this work, the Nonlinear and Autonomous Systems Laboratory (NAS Lab) developed an algorithm that utilizes inputs from the vehicles state of the art sensor package, which includes digital imaging, digital 3-D Sidescan Sonar, and Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers. The resulting algorithms should tolerate real-world waterway with episodic strong currents, low visibility, high sediment content, and a variety of small and large vessel traffic.

  3. Irresponsibilities, inequalities and injustice for autonomous vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hin-Yan

    2017-01-01

    With their prospect for causing both novel and known forms of damage, harm and injury, the issue of responsibility has been a recurring theme in the debate concerning autonomous vehicles. Yet, the discussion of responsibility has obscured the finer details both between the underlying concepts...... of responsibility. Two different approaches are offered to the question of responsibility and autonomous vehicles: targeting and risk distribution. The article then introduces a thought experiment which situates autonomous vehicles within the context of crash optimisation impulses and coordinated or networked...

  4. Multiculturalismo, interculturalismo y autonomía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Cruz Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo examina dos enfoques teóri- cos sobre la autonomía: el multiculturalis- mo liberal y el interculturalismo latinoa- mericano. El argumento principal es que el enfoque intercultural es idóneo para fun- damentar la autonomía que el multicultu- ralismo porque tiene un mayor alcance metodológico y sus horizontes normativos son más amplios. En primer lugar, se exa- minan las críticas del interculturalismo al multiculturalismo liberal de Kymlicka. Se- guidamente, se estudian sus concepciones de la autonomía.

  5. PHM Enabled Autonomous Propellant Loading Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The utility of Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) software capability applied to Autonomous Operations (AO) remains an active research area within aerospace applications. The ability to gain insight into which assets and subsystems are functioning properly, along with the derivation of confident predictions concerning future ability, reliability, and availability, are important enablers for making sound mission planning decisions. When coupled with software that fully supports mission planning and execution, an integrated solution can be developed that leverages state assessment and estimation for the purposes of delivering autonomous operations. The authors have been applying this integrated, model-based approach to the autonomous loading of cryogenic spacecraft propellants at Kennedy Space Center.

  6. Development of a Commercially Viable, Modular Autonomous Robotic Systems for Converting any Vehicle to Autonomous Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, David W.; Grabbe, Robert D.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    1994-01-01

    A Modular Autonomous Robotic System (MARS), consisting of a modular autonomous vehicle control system that can be retrofit on to any vehicle to convert it to autonomous control and support a modular payload for multiple applications is being developed. The MARS design is scalable, reconfigurable, and cost effective due to the use of modern open system architecture design methodologies, including serial control bus technology to simplify system wiring and enhance scalability. The design is augmented with modular, object oriented (C++) software implementing a hierarchy of five levels of control including teleoperated, continuous guidepath following, periodic guidepath following, absolute position autonomous navigation, and relative position autonomous navigation. The present effort is focused on producing a system that is commercially viable for routine autonomous patrolling of known, semistructured environments, like environmental monitoring of chemical and petroleum refineries, exterior physical security and surveillance, perimeter patrolling, and intrafacility transport applications.

  7. Development of a Commercially Viable, Modular Autonomous Robotic Systems for Converting any Vehicle to Autonomous Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, David W.; Grabbe, Robert D.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    1994-01-01

    A Modular Autonomous Robotic System (MARS), consisting of a modular autonomous vehicle control system that can be retrofit on to any vehicle to convert it to autonomous control and support a modular payload for multiple applications is being developed. The MARS design is scalable, reconfigurable, and cost effective due to the use of modern open system architecture design methodologies, including serial control bus technology to simplify system wiring and enhance scalability. The design is augmented with modular, object oriented (C++) software implementing a hierarchy of five levels of control including teleoperated, continuous guidepath following, periodic guidepath following, absolute position autonomous navigation, and relative position autonomous navigation. The present effort is focused on producing a system that is commercially viable for routine autonomous patrolling of known, semistructured environments, like environmental monitoring of chemical and petroleum refineries, exterior physical security and surveillance, perimeter patrolling, and intrafacility transport applications.

  8. Risk analysis for autonomous underwater vehicle operations in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Mario Paulo; Griffiths, Gwyn; Challenor, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are used increasingly to explore hazardous marine environments. Risk assessment for such complex systems is based on subjective judgment and expert knowledge as much as on hard statistics. Here, we describe the use of a risk management process tailored to AUV operations, the implementation of which requires the elicitation of expert judgment. We conducted a formal judgment elicitation process where eight world experts in AUV design and operation were asked to assign a probability of AUV loss given the emergence of each fault or incident from the vehicle's life history of 63 faults and incidents. After discussing methods of aggregation and analysis, we show how the aggregated risk estimates obtained from the expert judgments were used to create a risk model. To estimate AUV survival with mission distance, we adopted a statistical survival function based on the nonparametric Kaplan-Meier estimator. We present theoretical formulations for the estimator, its variance, and confidence limits. We also present a numerical example where the approach is applied to estimate the probability that the Autosub3 AUV would survive a set of missions under Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica in January-March 2009.

  9. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  10. Fully autonomous navigation for the NASA cargo transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, James R.; Skulsky, E. David

    1991-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid to navigation during the close approach (less than or equal to 1 km) phase of spacecraft rendezvous. However, most spacecraft also require a navigation system which provides the necessary accuracy for placing both satellites within the range of the docking sensors. The Microcosm Autonomous Navigation System (MANS) is an on-board system which uses Earth-referenced attitude sensing hardware to provide precision orbit and attitude determination. The system is capable of functioning from LEO to GEO and beyond. Performance depends on the number of available sensors as well as mission geometry; however, extensive simulations have shown that MANS will provide 100 m to 400 m (3(sigma)) position accuracy and 0.03 to 0.07 deg (3(sigma)) attitude accuracy in low Earth orbit. The system is independent of any external source, including GPS. MANS is expected to have a significant impact on ground operations costs, mission definition and design, survivability, and the potential development of very low-cost, fully autonomous spacecraft.

  11. Requirement analysis for autonomous systems and intelligent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... analysis for autonomous systems and intelligent agents in future Danish electric power systems. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from ...

  12. Comparative anatomy of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan

    2011-11-16

    This short review aims to point out the general anatomical features of the autonomic nervous systems of non-mammalian vertebrates. In addition it attempts to outline the similarities and also the increased complexity of the autonomic nervous patterns from fish to tetrapods. With the possible exception of the cyclostomes, perhaps the most striking feature of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is the similarity between the vertebrate classes. An evolution of the complexity of the system can be seen, with the segmental ganglia of elasmobranchs incompletely connected longitudinally, while well developed paired sympathetic chains are present in teleosts and the tetrapods. In some groups the sympathetic chains may be reduced (dipnoans and caecilians), and have yet to be properly described in snakes. Cranial autonomic pathways are present in the oculomotor (III) and vagus (X) nerves of gnathostome fish and the tetrapods, and with the evolution of salivary and lachrymal glands in the tetrapods, also in the facial (VII) and glossopharyngeal (IX) nerves.

  13. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, Hugo H G; Myburgh, Herman C

    2015-12-02

    There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV), such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  14. LEO AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION BASED ON IMAGE MOTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUANFang; LIUJian-ye; YUFeng

    2005-01-01

    A method of LEO autonomous navigation is presented based on the nonlinear satellite velocity relative to the earth. The velocity is detected by a high-speed camera, with the attitude information detected by a star sensor. Compared with traditional autonomous navigation by landmark identification, the satellite velocity relarive to the earth is obtained by correlativity analysis of images. It does not need to recognize ground objects or views. Since it is not necessary to pre-store the database of ground marks, lots of memory space can be saved.The state and observation equations are constructed, and the filtering is processed by the Kalman filter. Simulation results show that the system has high autonomous navigation precision in LEO autonomous navigation.

  15. AGATE: Autonomous Go and Touch Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation (AGATE, for Autonomous Go And Touch Exploration) will enable single-sol "go and touch" instrument placement from distances of up to five meters for...

  16. Tracked robot controllers for climbing obstacles autonomously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    Research in mobile robot navigation has demonstrated some success in navigating flat indoor environments while avoiding obstacles. However, the challenge of analyzing complex environments to climb obstacles autonomously has had very little success due to the complexity of the task. Unmanned ground vehicles currently exhibit simple autonomous behaviours compared to the human ability to move in the world. This paper presents the control algorithms designed for a tracked mobile robot to autonomously climb obstacles by varying its tracks configuration. Two control algorithms are proposed to solve the autonomous locomotion problem for climbing obstacles. First, a reactive controller evaluates the appropriate geometric configuration based on terrain and vehicle geometric considerations. Then, a reinforcement learning algorithm finds alternative solutions when the reactive controller gets stuck while climbing an obstacle. The methodology combines reactivity to learning. The controllers have been demonstrated in box and stair climbing simulations. The experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for crossing obstacles.

  17. Autonomic html interface generator for web applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bassil, Youssef; 10.5121/ijwest.2012.3104

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computing systems have led to a new digital era in which every area of life is nearly interrelated with information technology. However, with the trend towards large-scale IT systems, a new challenge has emerged. The complexity of IT systems is becoming an obstacle that hampers the manageability, operability, and maintainability of modern computing infrastructures. Autonomic computing popped up to provide an answer to these ever-growing pitfalls. Fundamentally, autonomic systems are self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing, and self-protecting; hence, they can automate all complex IT processes without human intervention. This paper proposes an autonomic HTML web-interface generator based on XML Schema and Style Sheet specifications for self-configuring graphical user interfaces of web applications. The goal of this autonomic generator is to automate the process of customizing GUI web-interfaces according to the ever-changing business rules, policies, and operating environment with th...

  18. Acupuncture Effect and Central Autonomic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Qian Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a therapeutic technique and part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Acupuncture has clinical efficacy on various autonomic nerve-related disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, epilepsy, anxiety and nervousness, circadian rhythm disorders, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and subfertility. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that acupuncture can control autonomic nerve system (ANS functions including blood pressure, pupil size, skin conductance, skin temperature, muscle sympathetic nerve activities, heart rate and/or pulse rate, and heart rate variability. Emerging evidence indicates that acupuncture treatment not only activates distinct brain regions in different kinds of diseases caused by imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, but also modulates adaptive neurotransmitter in related brain regions to alleviate autonomic response. This review focused on the central mechanism of acupuncture in modulating various autonomic responses, which might provide neurobiological foundations for acupuncture effects.

  19. Rover: Autonomous concepts for Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiget, A.; Castets, B.; Chochon, H.; Hayard, M.; Lamarre, H.; Lamothe, A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a mobile, autonomous vehicle that will be launched towards an unknown planet is considered. The rover significant constraints are: Ariane 5 compatibility, Earth/Mars transfer capability, 1000 km autonomous moving in Mars environment, on board localization, and maximum science capability. Two different types of subsystem were considered: classical subsystems (mechanical and mechanisms, thermal, telecommunications, power, onboard data processing) and robotics subsystem, (perception/navigation, autonomous displacement generation, autonomous localization). The needs of each subsystem were studied in terms of energy and data handling capability, in order to choose an on board architecture which best use the available capability, by means of specialized parts. A compromise must always be done between every subsystem in order to obtain the real need with respect to the goal, for example: between perception/navigation and the motion capability. A compromise must also be found between mechanical assembly and calibration need, which is a real problem.

  20. Cranial Autonomic Symptoms in Pediatric Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the University of California, San Francisco, examined the frequency of cranial autonomic symptoms in all pediatric and adolescent patients with migraine seen in 4 different clinical settings during July 2010 to June 2012.

  1. Autonomous Control, Climate and Environmental Changes Effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autonomous Control, Climate and Environmental Changes Effects on Trypanosomiasis in ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... benefits of increased production, improved human health must exceed the costs of control.

  2. Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A.; Baker, Matthew J.; Wahba, Mervat; Hauser, Robert A.

    2003-03-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), affects 70% to 80% of patients, and causes significant morbidity and discomfort. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms in PD include sexual dysfunction, swallowing and gastrointestinal disorders, bowel and bladder abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and derangements of cardiovascular regulation, particularly, orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in PD may be caused by an underlying degenerative process that affects the autonomic ganglia, brainstem nuclei, and hypothalamic nuclei. Anti-parkinsonian medications can cause or worsen symptoms of ANS dysfunction. The care of a PD patient with ANS dysfunction relies on its recognition and directed treatment, including coordinated care between the neurologist and appropriate subspecialist. Pharmacotherapy may be useful to treat orthostasis, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction.

  3. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo H. G. Coppejans

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV, such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  4. Autonomic contributions to empathy: evidence from patients with primary autonomic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bina; Mathias, Christopher J; Critchley, Hugo D

    2008-06-01

    Empathy for the emotions of others may require simulatory engagement of corresponding autonomic arousal states. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of autonomic control impairs the ability to empathize emotionally with others. Fifteen patients with primary autonomic failure showed attenuated scores on the Mehrabian Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale (BEES), compared to both younger and older controls. This effect was not accounted for by age, gender, mood state or functional disability. These early observations provide preliminary evidence for a direct contribution of autonomic responsivity to the 'higher-order' social cognitive process of empathy, and may inform the dynamics of supportive care.

  5. Autonomous robotic platforms for locating radio sources buried under rubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasu, A. S.; Anchidin, L.; Tamas, R.; Paun, M.; Danisor, A.; Petrescu, T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the use of autonomous robotic platforms able to locate radio signal sources such as mobile phones, buried under collapsed buildings as a result of earthquakes, natural disasters, terrorism, war, etc. This technique relies on averaging position data resulting from a propagation model implemented on the platform and the data acquired by robotic platforms at the disaster site. That allows us to calculate the approximate position of radio sources buried under the rubble. Based on measurements, a radio map of the disaster site is made, very useful for locating victims and for guiding specific rubble lifting machinery, by assuming that there is a victim next to a mobile device detected by the robotic platform; by knowing the approximate position, the lifting machinery does not risk to further hurt the victims. Moreover, by knowing the positions of the victims, the reaction time is decreased, and the chances of survival for the victims buried under the rubble, are obviously increased.

  6. Intelligent control system of autonomous objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E. A.; Kovalev, I. V.; Engel, N. E.; Brezitskaya, V. V.; Prohorovich, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control system of autonomous objects as framework. The intelligent control framework includes two different layers: a reflexive layer and a reactive layer. The proposed multiagent adaptive fuzzy neuronet combines low-level reaction with high-level reasoning in an intelligent control framework. The formed as the multiagent adaptive fuzzy neuronet the intelligent control system on the base of autonomous object’s state, creates the effective control signal under random perturbations.

  7. Visual navigation for an autonomous mobile vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Kevin Robert

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Image understanding for a mobile robotic vehicle is an important and complex task for ensuring safe navigation and extended autonomous operations. The goal of this work is to implement a working vision-based navigation control mechanism within a known environment onboard the autonomous mobile vehicle Yamabico-II. Although installing a working hardware system was not accomplished, the image processing, model description, pattern match...

  8. Autonomous Preservation Tools in Minimal Effort Ingest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Bolette Ammitzbøll; Blekinge, Asger Askov; Andersen, Thorbjørn Ravn

    2016-01-01

    This poster presents the concept of Autonomous Preservation Tools, as developed by the State and University Library, Denmark. The work expands the idea of Minimal Effort Ingest, where most preservation actions such as Quality Assurance and enrichment of the digital objects are performed after...... content is ingested for preservation, rather than before. We present our Newspaper Digitisation Project as a case-study of real-world implementations of Autonomous Preservation Tools....

  9. Autonomous Systems: Issues for Defence Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    cavalrymen no longer fight with edged weapons, work the sails and rigging of ships, or ride horses , but the ethos embodied in their job specialties lives on...or emergent behaviour that was not directly predictable from an inspection of its code. An example would be a self-learning robot that taught...or merely the fear that other nations might develop autonomous weapon systems, could spark an autonomous weapons arms race . This potential

  10. Autonomic Circulatory Control during Pregnancy in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with dramatic alterations in maternal hemodynamics, which begin early (i.e., following conception, 4 to 5 weeks of gestation) and are accompanied by changing levels of various pressor hormones and vasoactive metabolites. It has been proposed that these changes occur through autonomic control mechanisms, but the actual role of the autonomic nervous system in pregnancy is poorly understood. New research has shed more light on the links between pregnancy and cardiovascula...

  11. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    experimental situations insufficient contraction of resistance vessels has been demonstrated. The vasoconstrictor defects demonstrated are of a magnitude sufficient to account for the prevailing hypotension. Furthermore, during exercise cardiac output is low in patients with autonomic neuropathy, a finding...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  12. Autonomous gliding entry guidance with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel three-dimensional autonomous entry guidance for relatively high lift-to-drag ratio vehicles satisfying geographic constraints and other path constraints. The guidance is composed of onboard trajectory planning and robust trajectory tracking. For trajectory planning, a longitudinal sub-planner is introduced to generate a feasible drag-versus-energy profile by using the interpolation between upper boundary and lower boundary of entry corridor to get the desired trajectory length. The associated magnitude of the bank angle can be specified by drag profile, while the sign of bank angle is determined by lateral sub-planner. Two-reverse mode is utilized to satisfy waypoint constraints and dynamic heading error corridor is utilized to satisfy no-fly zone constraints. The longitudinal and lateral sub-planners are iteratively employed until all of the path constraints are satisfied. For trajectory tracking, a novel tracking law based on the active disturbance rejection control is introduced. Finally, adaptability tests and Monte Carlo simulations of the entry guidance approach are performed. Results show that the proposed entry guidance approach can adapt to different entry missions and is able to make the vehicle reach the prescribed target point precisely in spite of geographic constraints.

  13. Semi-Autonomous Vehicle Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective this summer is "evaluating standards for wireless architecture for the internet of things". The Internet of Things is the network of physical objects or "things" embedded with electronics, software, sensors and network connectivity which enables these objects to collect and exchange data and make decisions based on said data. This was accomplished by creating a semi-autonomous vehicle that takes advantage of multiple sensors, cameras, and onboard computers and combined them with a mesh network which enabled communication across large distances with little to no interruption. The mesh network took advantage of what is known as DTN - Disruption Tolerant Networking which according to NASA is the new communications protocol that is "the first step towards interplanetary internet." The use of DTN comes from the fact that it will store information if an interruption in communications is detected and even forward that information via other relays within range so that the data is not lost. This translates well into the project because as the car moves further away from whatever is sending it commands (in this case a joystick), the information can still be forwarded to the car with little to no loss of information thanks to the mesh nodes around the driving area.

  14. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  15. Autonomous Systems Developments and Trends

    CERN Document Server

    Kyamaky, Kyandoghere; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    The Workshops on Autonomous Systems emanated from a gathering with the doctoral students of just three chairs at Fernuniversität in Hagen, which we organise twice per year for a number of years now. Their purpose is to discuss on-going research and to create a community spirit. Furthermore, they serve as a means of structuring the students' research processes. The workshop has grown and matured in several respects. The doctoral students presenting their work do not come from a single university anymore, but from three. Besides them and their supervisors, also other scientists became interested in the event and contribute to its programme. Following the model of Advanced Study Institutes, they are available on the premises for relaxed, informal discussions outside the formal sessions. Finally, with the co-sponsorship of Gesellschaft für Informatik, the German Computer Society, and this surprisingly comprehensive volume of contributions published by Springer-Verlag the workshop turned into a visible scientifi...

  16. Development of autonomous triggering instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Steve E.; Swift, Theresa M.; Fonda, James W.

    2008-03-01

    Triggering instrumentation for autonomous monitoring of load-induced strain is described for economical, fast bridge inspection. The development addresses one aspect for the management of transportation infrastructure - bridge monitoring and inspection. The objectives are to provide quantitative performance information from a load test, to minimize the setup time at the bridge, and to minimize the closure time to traffic. Multiple or networked measurements can be made for a prescribed loading sequence. The proposed smart system consists of in-situ strain sensors, an embedded data acquisition module, and a measurement triggering system. A companion control unit is mounted on the truck serving as the load. As the truck moves to the proper position, the desired measurement is automatically relayed back to the control unit. In this work, the testing protocol is developed and the performance parameters for the triggering and data acquisition are measured. The test system uses a dedicated wireless sensor mote and an infrared positioning system. The electronic procedure offers improvements in available information and economics.

  17. Mechanical Autonomous Stochastic Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, André; Molerón, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic heat engines are devices that generate work from random thermal motion using a small number of highly fluctuating degrees of freedom. Proposals for such devices have existed for more than a century and include the Maxwell demon and the Feynman ratchet. Only recently have they been demonstrated experimentally, using, e.g., thermal cycles implemented in optical traps. However, recent experimental demonstrations of classical stochastic heat engines are nonautonomous, since they require an external control system that prescribes a heating and cooling cycle and consume more energy than they produce. We present a heat engine consisting of three coupled mechanical resonators (two ribbons and a cantilever) subject to a stochastic drive. The engine uses geometric nonlinearities in the resonating ribbons to autonomously convert a random excitation into a low-entropy, nonpassive oscillation of the cantilever. The engine presents the anomalous heat transport property of negative thermal conductivity, consisting in the ability to passively transfer energy from a cold reservoir to a hot reservoir.

  18. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  19. The Human Element and Autonomous Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauli Ahvenjärvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomous ship technology has become a “hot” topic in the discussion about more efficient, environmentally friendly and safer sea transportation solutions. The time is becoming mature for the introduction of commercially sensible solutions for unmanned and fully autonomous cargo and passenger ships. Safety will be the most interesting and important aspect in this development. The utilization of the autonomous ship technology will have many effects on the safety, both positive and negative. It has been announced that the goal is to make the safety of an unmanned ship better that the safety of a manned ship. However, it must be understood that the human element will still be present when fully unmanned ships are being used. The shore-based control of a ship contains new safety aspects and an interesting question will be the interaction of manned and unmanned ships in the same traffic area. The autonomous ship technology should therefore be taken into account on the training of seafarers. Also it should not be forgotten that every single control algorithm and rule of the internal decision making logic of the autonomously navigating ship has been designed and coded by a human software engineer. Thus the human element is present also in this point of the lifetime navigation system of the autonomous ship.

  20. [Autonomic dysfunction syndrome and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in children with diabetes mellitus type I. The correction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukian, V Iu; Bolotova, N V; Aver'ianov, A P; Filina, N Iu; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the state of the autonomic nervous system in 90 children with diabetes mellitus type I. The autonomic dysfunction syndrome was found in 58,9% and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in 28,9% of patients. We revealed the high risk of the development of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in children with diabetes mellitus type I in the presence of the autonomic dysfunction syndrome. It has been shown that the early treatment of functional disturbances of the autonomic nervous system using transcranial magnetic stimulation is necessary to prevent the manifestation of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  1. Análisis del proceso de cierre contable mensual y propuesta de mejora basada en la filosofía de manufactura esbelta para la empresa Sara Lee Underwear, Operación Centroamérica

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchilla Méndez, Ana Catalina

    2006-01-01

    Tesis de maestría -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Posgrado en Administración y Dirección de Empresas. Maestría Profesional en Administración y Dirección de Empresas con énfasis en Gerencia, 2006 El objetivo general del trabajo es analizar las áreas de mejora del proceso de cierre contable mensual de la empresa Sara Lee Underwear, Operación Centroamérica, con base en los principios básicos establecidos en la filosofía de manufactura esbelta; esto, con el fin de proponer un proceso mejorado aj...

  2. Autonomous and autonomic systems with applications to NASA intelligent spacecraft operations and exploration systems

    CERN Document Server

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rouff, Christopher; Karlin, Jay; Rash, James; Hinchey, Michael; Sterritt, Roy

    2009-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth discussion of autonomous and autonomic systems, their interdependencies, differences and similarities. Current and pending issues in these evermore increasingly important subjects are highlighted and discussed. Concepts, ideas and experiences are explored in relation to real-life NASA systems in spacecraft control and in the exploration domain.

  3. A Priori User Acceptance and the Perceived Driving Pleasure in Semi-autonomous and Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Thomas

    The aim of this minor pilot study is, from a sociological user perspective, to explore a priori user acceptance and the perceived driving pleasure in semi- autonomous and autonomous vehicles. The methods used were 13 in-depth interviews while having participants watch video examples within four...

  4. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing...... sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non......-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non...

  5. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  6. Autonomous Learning and Improving Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝红; 孙晓黎

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, English as a world language becomes more and more important. Consequently, English learning becomes more and more popular. As we know, an important object for English learners is to improve their communicative competence. So autonomous learning is a good way to improve communicative competence. In this paper, two terms, autonomous learning and communicative competence, and their relationship will be introduced from the perspective of English learning. Autonomous learning is self-managed learning, which is contrary to passive learning and mechanical learning, according to intrinsic property of language learning. Communicative competence is a concept introduced by Dell Hymes and is discussed and refined by many oth⁃er linguists. According to Hymes, communicative competence is the ability not only to apply the grammatical rules of language in order to form grammatically correct sentences but also to know when and where to use these sentences and to whom. Communi⁃cative competence includes 4 aspects: Possibility, feasibility, appropriateness and performance. Improving communicative compe⁃tence is the result of autonomous learning, autonomous learning is the motivation of improving communicative competence. English, of course, is a bridge connecting China to the world, and fostering students’communicative competence through auton⁃omous learning is the vital element of improving English learning in China.

  7. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China's autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approach, the test content is designed to be stage by stage, moving from simplicity to complexity and from individual modules to the entire vehicle. The hierarchical test environment is established according to the levels of test content. The test method based on multilevel platforms and sensors is put forward to ensure the accuracy of test results. A fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method combined with analytic hierarchy process (AHP is used for the comprehensive evaluation which can quantitatively evaluate the individual module and the overall technical performance of autonomous ground vehicles. The proposed test and evaluation system has been successfully applied to real autonomous ground vehicle competitions.

  8. Cutaneous autonomic denervation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Otano, Judith; Casanova-Mollà, Jordi; Morales, Merche; Valls-Solé, Josep; Tolosa, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Numerous studies have detailed involvement of the peripheral autonomic nervous system (PANS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed autonomic innervation of dermal annexes through quantitative fluorescence measurement from skin obtained via punch biopsies at distal leg region in PD and control subjects. We defined a ratio between the area corresponding to protein gen product (PGP) immunoreactivity and the area corresponding to blood vessel or sweat gland as a quantitative measure of autonomic innervation. Presence of alpha-synuclein (AS) deposits in dermis and hypodermis was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Skin biopsies form six PD patients and six healthy controls were studied. Autonomic innervation scores were lower in PD than in controls in both blood vessels and sweat glands. No AS or phosphorylated AS (pAS) immunoreactivity was detected in dermis or hypodermis in any of the studied subjects. The results of this investigation suggest that autonomic innervation of dermal annexes in living patients with PD is reduced compared to controls. AS or pAS deposits were not found in dermis or hypodermis suggesting that distal leg skin study is not useful for in vivo detection of AS in PD.

  9. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-02-15

    Symptoms of cardiovascular dysautonomia are a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to this dysautonomia as part of PD itself, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) can be triggered as a side-effect of drug treatment interacting with the ANS or - if prominent and early - an indication of a different disease such as multiple system atrophy (MSA). Various diagnostic tests are available to demonstrate autonomic failure. While autonomic function tests can differentiate parasympathetic from sympathetic dysfunction, cardiac imaging can define the pathophysiologically involved site of a lesion. Standard tests such as 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements can identify significant autonomic failure which needs treatment. The most frequent and disturbing symptom of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is orthostatic hypotension. Symptoms include generalized weakness, light-headiness, mental "clouding" up to syncope. Factors like heat, food, alcohol, exercise, activities which increase intrathoraric pressure (e.g. defecation, coughing) and certain drugs (e.g. vasodilators) can worsen a probably asymptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Non-medical and medical therapies can help the patient to cope with a disabling symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Supine hypertension is often associated with orthostatic hypotension. The prognostic role of cardiovagal and baroreflex dysfunction is still not yet known.

  10. Hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy 1 maps to chromosome 20q13.2-13.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA or hereditary motor neuronopathies result from the continuous degeneration and death of spinal cord lower motor neurons, leading to progressive muscular weakness and atrophy. We describe a large Brazilian family exhibiting an extremely rare, late-onset, dominant, proximal, and progressive SMA accompanied by very unusual manifestations, such as an abnormal sweating pattern, and gastrointestinal and sexual dysfunctions, suggesting concomitant involvement of the autonomic nervous system. We propose a new disease category for this disorder, `hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy', and attribute the term, `survival of motor and autonomic neurons 1' (SMAN1 to the respective locus that was mapped to a 14.5 cM region on chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 by genetic linkage analysis and haplotype studies using microsatellite polymorphic markers. This locus lies between markers D20S120 and D20S173 showing a maximum LOD score of 4.6 at D20S171, defining a region with 33 known genes, including several potential candidates. Identifying the SMAN1 gene should not only improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lower motor neuron diseases but also help to clarify the relationship between motor and autonomic neurons.

  11. MECHANICAL DESIGN OF AN AUTONOMOUS MARINE ROBOTIC SYSTEM FOR INTERACTION WITH DIVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Stilinović

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SCUBA diving, professional or recreational, remains one of the most hazardous activities known by man, mostly due to the fact that the human survival in the underwater environment requires use of technical equipment such as breathing regulators. Loss of breathing gas supply, burst eardrum, decompression sickness and nitrogen narcosis are just a few problems which can occur during an ordinary dive and result in injuries, long-term illnesses or even death. Most common way to reduce the risk of diving is to dive in pairs, thus allowing divers to cooperate with each other and react when uncommon situation occurs. Having the ability to react before an unwanted situation happens would improve diver safety. This paper describes an autonomous marine robotic system that replaces a human dive buddy. Such a robotic system, developed within an FP7 project “CADDY – Cognitive Autonomous Diving Buddy” provides a symbiotic link between robots and human divers in the underwater. The proposed concept consists of a diver, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV Buddy and an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV PlaDyPos, acting within a cooperative network linked via an acoustic communication channel. This is a first time that an underwater human-robot system of such a scale has ever been developed. In this paper, focus is put on mechanical characteristics of the robotic vehicles.

  12. A power autonomous monopedal robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, Benjamin T.; Pratt, Jerry E.

    2006-05-01

    We present the design and initial results of a power-autonomous planar monopedal robot. The robot is a gasoline powered, two degree of freedom robot that runs in a circle, constrained by a boom. The robot uses hydraulic Series Elastic Actuators, force-controllable actuators which provide high force fidelity, moderate bandwidth, and low impedance. The actuators are mounted in the body of the robot, with cable drives transmitting power to the hip and knee joints of the leg. A two-stroke, gasoline engine drives a constant displacement pump which pressurizes an accumulator. Absolute position and spring deflection of each of the Series Elastic Actuators are measured using linear encoders. The spring deflection is translated into force output and compared to desired force in a closed loop force-control algorithm implemented in software. The output signal of each force controller drives high performance servo valves which control flow to each of the pistons of the actuators. In designing the robot, we used a simulation-based iterative design approach. Preliminary estimates of the robot's physical parameters were based on past experience and used to create a physically realistic simulation model of the robot. Next, a control algorithm was implemented in simulation to produce planar hopping. Using the joint power requirements and range of motions from simulation, we worked backward specifying pulley diameter, piston diameter and stroke, hydraulic pressure and flow, servo valve flow and bandwidth, gear pump flow, and engine power requirements. Components that meet or exceed these specifications were chosen and integrated into the robot design. Using CAD software, we calculated the physical parameters of the robot design, replaced the original estimates with the CAD estimates, and produced new joint power requirements. We iterated on this process, resulting in a design which was prototyped and tested. The Monopod currently runs at approximately 1.2 m/s with the weight of all

  13. Impact of the regulatory loci agr, sarA and sae of Staphylococcus aureus on the induction of alpha-toxin during device-related infection resolved by direct quantitative transcript analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, C; Fluckiger, U; Steinhuber, A; Zimmerli, W; Wolz, C

    2001-06-01

    The cytotoxic alpha-toxin (encoded by hla) of Staphylococcus aureus is regulated by three loci, agr, sarA and sae, in vitro. Here, we assess the regulation of hla in a guinea pig model of device-related infection by quantifying RNAIII (the effector molecule of agr) and hla directly in exudates accumulating in infected devices without subculturing of the bacteria. LightCycler reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to quantify the transcripts. Strains RN6390 and Newman expressed considerably smaller amounts of RNAIII in the guinea pig than during in vitro growth. The residual RNAIII expression decreased during the course of infection and was negatively correlated with bacterial densities. As with RNAIII, the highest hla expression was detected in both strains early in infection. Even in strain Newman, a weak hla producer in vitro, a pronounced expression of hla was observed during infection. Likewise, four S. aureus isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients expressed Q1hla despite an inactive agr during device-related infection as in the CF lung. Mutation of agr and sarA in strain Newman and RN6390 had no consequence for hla expression in vivo. In contrast, the mutation in sae resulted in severe downregulation of hla in vitro as well as in vivo. In conclusion, S. aureus seems to be provided with regulatory circuits different from those characterized in vitro to ensure alpha-toxin synthesis during infections.

  14. Autonomic Involvement in Subacute and Chronic Immune-Mediated Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Anna; Stancanelli, Claudia; Vita, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic function can be impaired in many disorders in which sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric arms of the autonomic nervous system are affected. Signs and symptoms of autonomic involvement are related to impairment of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital, thermoregulatory, sudomotor, and pupillomotor autonomic functions. Availability of noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tests can help to recognize these disorders and to better understand specific mechanisms of some, potentially treatable, immune-mediated autonomic neuropathies. This paper describes autonomic involvement in immune-mediated neuropathies with a subacute or chronic course. PMID:23853716

  15. Characteristics of velocity distribution functions and entry mechanisms of protons in the near-lunar wake from SWIM/SARA on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Bhardwaj, Anil; Wurz, Peter; Alok, Abhinaw; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Moon is an airless body with no global magnetic field, although regions of crustal magnetic fields known as magnetic anomalies exist on Moon. Solar wind, the magnetized plasma flow from the Sun, continuously impinges on Moon. Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The source of these protons have been found to be the solar wind that enter the wake either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface or with the magnetic anomalies. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor, which was an ion-mass analyzer, of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, the characteristics of velocity distribution of these protons were investigated to understand the entry mechanisms to near lunar wake. The velocity distribution functions were computed in the two dimensional velocity space, namely in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the IMF (v_allel and v_perp) in the solar wind rest frame. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, the trajectories of the protons were computed backward in time (backtracing) for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source mechanism obtained from

  16. A Collaborative Knowledge Plane for Autonomic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Maïssa; Krief, Francine

    Autonomic networking aims to give network components self-managing capabilities. Several autonomic architectures have been proposed. Each of these architectures includes sort of a knowledge plane which is very important to mimic an autonomic behavior. Knowledge plane has a central role for self-functions by providing suitable knowledge to equipment and needs to learn new strategies for more accuracy.However, defining knowledge plane's architecture is still a challenge for researchers. Specially, defining the way cognitive supports interact each other in knowledge plane and implementing them. Decision making process depends on these interactions between reasoning and learning parts of knowledge plane. In this paper we propose a knowledge plane's architecture based on machine learning (inductive logic programming) paradigm and situated view to deal with distributed environment. This architecture is focused on two self-functions that include all other self-functions: self-adaptation and self-organization. Study cases are given and implemented.

  17. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally...... available environment features (natural landmarks). The goal is also to integrate techniques and algorithms (also related to other research field) in the same navigation system, in order to improve localization performance and system autonomy. The proposed localization strategy is based on a continuous...... update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores...

  18. Control of autonomous robot using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Adam; Volna, Eva

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the article is to design a method of control of an autonomous robot using artificial neural networks. The introductory part describes control issues from the perspective of autonomous robot navigation and the current mobile robots controlled by neural networks. The core of the article is the design of the controlling neural network, and generation and filtration of the training set using ART1 (Adaptive Resonance Theory). The outcome of the practical part is an assembled Lego Mindstorms EV3 robot solving the problem of avoiding obstacles in space. To verify models of an autonomous robot behavior, a set of experiments was created as well as evaluation criteria. The speed of each motor was adjusted by the controlling neural network with respect to the situation in which the robot was found.

  19. An Expert System for Autonomous Spacecraft Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Rob; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Cichy, Benjamin; Castano, Rebecca; Davies, Ashley; Rabideau, Gregg

    2005-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE), part of the New Millennium Space Technology 6 Project, is flying onboard the Earth Orbiter 1 (EO-1) mission. The ASE software enables EO-1 to autonomously detect and respond to science events such as: volcanic activity, flooding, and water freeze/thaw. ASE uses classification algorithms to analyze imagery onboard to detect chang-e and science events. Detection of these events is then used to trigger follow-up imagery. Onboard mission planning software then develops a response plan that accounts for target visibility and operations constraints. This plan is then executed using a task execution system that can deal with run-time anomalies. In this paper we describe the autonomy flight software and how it enables a new paradigm of autonomous science and mission operations. We will also describe the current experiment status and future plans.

  20. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally...... update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores...... of the proposed method is based on a system with a simple setup. The novelty and potentiality, are in combining algorithms for panoramic view-synthesis, attention selection, stereo reconstruction, triangulation, optimal triplet selection, and image-based rendering. Experiments demonstrate that the system can...

  1. Autonomous Deep-Space Optical Navigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Deep-space navigation capability applied to Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of limited testing in the Integrated Power, Avionics and Software (IPAS) with the ARCM (Asteroid Retrieval Crewed Mission) DRO (Distant Retrograde Orbit) Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) scenario. The technology, which will be harnessed, is called 'optical flow', also known as 'visual odometry'. It is being matured in the automotive and SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) applications but has yet to be applied to spacecraft navigation. In light of the tremendous potential of this technique, we believe that NASA needs to design a optical navigation architecture that will use this technique. It is flexible enough to be applicable to navigating around planetary bodies, such as asteroids.

  2. Autonomous Preservation Tools in Minimal Effort Ingest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurik, Bolette Ammitzbøll; Blekinge, Asger Askov; Andersen, Thorbjørn Ravn

    2016-01-01

    This poster presents the concept of Autonomous Preservation Tools, as developed by the State and University Library, Denmark. The work expands the idea of Minimal Effort Ingest, where most preservation actions such as Quality Assurance and enrichment of the digital objects are performed after con...... content is ingested for preservation, rather than before. We present our Newspaper Digitisation Project as a case-study of real-world implementations of Autonomous Preservation Tools.......This poster presents the concept of Autonomous Preservation Tools, as developed by the State and University Library, Denmark. The work expands the idea of Minimal Effort Ingest, where most preservation actions such as Quality Assurance and enrichment of the digital objects are performed after...

  3. Autonomous forward inference via DNA computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yan; Li Gen; Li Yin; Meng Dazhi

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies direct the researchers into building DNA computing machines with intelligence, which is measured by three main points: autonomous, programmable and able to learn and adapt. Logical inference plays an important role in programmable information processing or computing. Here we present a new method to perform autonomous molecular forward inference for expert system.A novel repetitive recognition site (RRS) technique is invented to design rule-molecules in knowledge base. The inference engine runs autonomously by digesting the rule-molecule, using a Class ⅡB restriction enzyme PpiⅠ. Concentration model has been built to show the feasibility of the inference process under ideal chemical reaction conditions. Moreover, we extend to implement a triggering communication between molecular automata, as a further application of the RRS technique in our model.

  4. On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly from Nanosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, Luke S.; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The On-Orbit Autonomous Assembly from Nanosatellites (OAAN) project will demonstrate autonomous control algorithms for rendezvous and docking maneuvers; low-power reconfigurable magnetic docking technology; and compact, lightweight and inexpensive precision relative navigation using carrier-phase differential (CD) GPS with a three-degree of freedom ground demonstration. CDGPS is a specific relative position determination method that measures the phase of the GPS carrier wave to yield relative position data accurate to.4 inch (1 centimeter). CDGPS is a technology commonly found in the surveying industry. The development and demonstration of these technologies will fill a current gap in the availability of proven autonomous rendezvous and docking systems for small satellites.

  5. Technology readiness level six and autonomous mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodt, Barry A.; Camden, Rick S.

    2004-09-01

    During FY03, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory undertook a series of experiments designed to assess the maturity of autonomous mobility technology for the Future Combat Systems Armed Robotic Vehicle concept. The experiments assessed the technology against a level 6 standard in the technology readiness level (TRL) maturation schedule identified by a 1999 Government Accounting Office report. During the course of experimentation, 646 missions were conducted over a total distance of ~560 km and time of ~100 hr. Autonomous operation represented 96% and 88% of total distance and time, respectively. To satisfy the TRL 6 "relevant environment" standard, several experimental factors were varied over the three-site test as part of a formal, statistical, experimental design. This paper reports the specific findings pertaining to relevant-environment questions that were posed for the study and lends additional support to the Lead System Integrator decision that TRL 6 has been attained for the autonomous navigation system.

  6. An Autonomous Reference Frame for Relativistic GNSS

    CERN Document Server

    Kostić, Uroš; Carloni, Sante; Delva, Pacôme; Gomboc, Andreja

    2014-01-01

    Current GNSS systems rely on global reference frames which are fixed to the Earth (via the ground stations) so their precision and stability in time are limited by our knowledge of the Earth dynamics. These drawbacks could be avoided by giving to the constellation of satellites the possibility of constituting by itself a primary and autonomous positioning system, without any a priori realization of a terrestrial reference frame. Our work shows that it is possible to construct such a system, an Autonomous Basis of Coordinates, via emission coordinates. Here we present the idea of the Autonomous Basis of Coordinates and its implementation in the perturbed space-time of Earth, where the motion of satellites, light propagation, and gravitational perturbations are treated in the formalism of general relativity.

  7. Autonomous driving technical, legal and social aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Gerdes, J; Lenz, Barbara; Winner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    This book takes a look at fully automated, autonomous vehicles and discusses many open questions: How can autonomous vehicles be integrated into the current transportation system with diverse users and human drivers? Where do automated vehicles fall under current legal frameworks? What risks are associated with automation and how will society respond to these risks? How will the marketplace react to automated vehicles and what changes may be necessary for companies? Experts from Germany and the United States define key societal, engineering, and mobility issues related to the automation of vehicles. They discuss the decisions programmers of automated vehicles must make to enable vehicles to perceive their environment, interact with other road users, and choose actions that may have ethical consequences. The authors further identify expectations and concerns that will form the basis for individual and societal acceptance of autonomous driving. While the safety benefits of such vehicles are tremendous, the auth...

  8. Are Turkish University Students Autonomous or Not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Kırtık

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tried to determine Turkish learners’ attitudes, and the Turkish education system’s approach towards learner autonomy with regard to three main points: 1 whether Turkish university students are aware of learner autonomy or not 2 whether Turkish university students have the characteristics of autonomous learners (whether they are autonomous learners or not, and 3 if the Turkish education system is suitable for fostering learner autonomy or not from the viewpoint of the participants. Participants were 50 second grade learners in the English Language Teaching Departments of Hacettepe University (N=10, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University (N=10, and Uludag University (N=30 who had already taken courses about learner autonomy.  The data were collected by means of a questionnaire which had two Likert-scale sections and an open-ended questions section. The first Likert-scale section contained 15 characteristics of autonomous learners each of which was rated by the participants in a scale from strongly disagree to agree, from 1 to 5. In the second Likert-scale section, the participants were asked to rate the Turkish education system’s five basic elements such as school curriculums, course materials, approaches used by the teachers in classrooms, learning activities, and classroom settings. Additionally, learners’ opinions about their awareness and understanding of learner autonomy were gathered by five open ended questions. The results proposed that the participants were aware of learner autonomy, and had the characteristics of autonomous learners. On the other hand, results showed that the Turkish education system was not suitable for autonomous learners and did not foster learner autonomy. The findings suggested that the Turkish education system should be designed again in such a way to support the autonomous learners and to foster learner autonomy in all sections of the education.

  9. Road boundary detection for autonomous vehicle navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.S.; Kushner, T.R.; LeMoigne, J.J.; Waxman, A.M.

    1986-03-01

    The Computer Vision Laboratory at the University Maryland for the past year has been developing a computer vision system for autonomous ground navigation of roads and road networks for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Strategic Computing Program. The complete system runs on a VAX 11/785, but certain parts of it have been reimplemented on a VICOM image processing sysem for experimentation on an autonomous vehicle built for the Martin Marietta Corp., Aerospace Division, in Denver, Colorado. A brief overview is given of the principal software components of the system and the VICOM implementation in detail.

  10. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  11. Diagnosis and behavior in autonomic trigeminal headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erélido Hernández Valero

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic trigeminal headaches are primary headaches which include: cluster headaches, paroxistical hemicranea, and syndrome of unilateral headache in a neuralgic way, of short duration, accompanied by cojunctival injection and tearing and the continuous hemicranea. It is also accompanied by autonomic manifestations such as: palpebrate ptosis, tearing, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, Horner syndrome (palpebrate ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos and changes in the coloration of the periocular skin and in the cheek. In this paper we propose the most likely diagnosis and therapeutic to this nosologic entity

  12. CMU's autonomous helicopter explores new territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J.

    1998-10-01

    In the summer of 1998, several members of Carnegie Mellon University's (CMUs) Autonomous Helicopter Project team joined NASA on a multidisciplinary expedition to the Canadian Arctic's Haughton Crater. NASA was willing to travel to such a remote corner of the globe because of its similarity to an even more remote locale - Mars. Researchers are studying the 23-million-year-old meteorite impact crater in the hope of learning more about Mars's environment. While there, they also tested a number of technologies that will enable future exploration of Mars, including CMU's autonomous helicopter.

  13. Autonomous control of multi-fingered hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li; LIU Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand based on a modular control system of dexterous manipulation. A simple proportional-integral-derivative(PID) position control with friction compensation, which requires few friction parameters, is used to realize accurate and smooth trajectory tracking in pregrasp phase. In grasp and manipulation phases, an event-driven switcher is adopted to determine the switching between unconstrained position control and constrained torque control, and an improved explicit integral force control strategy is implemented to realize simultaneously stable contact transition and accurate force tracking. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness of the proposed autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand.

  14. Autonomous operations through onboard artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  15. Emerging Technologies for Autonomous Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Warschauer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a lengthier review completed for the US National Institute for Literacy, this paper examines emerging technologies that are applicable to self-access and autonomous learning in the areas of listening and speaking, collaborative writing, reading and language structure, and online interaction. Digital media reviewed include podcasts, blogs, wikis, online writing sites, text-scaffolding software, concordancers, multiuser virtual environments, multiplayer games, and chatbots. For each of these technologies, we summarize recent research and discuss possible uses for autonomous language learning.

  16. Evolutionary strategy for achieving autonomous navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    An approach is presented for the evolutionary development of supervised autonomous navigation capabilities for small 'backpackable' ground robots, in the context of a DARPA- sponsored program to provide robotic support to small units of dismounted warfighters. This development approach relies on the implementation of a baseline visual serving navigation capability, including tools to support operator oversight and override, which is then enhanced with semantically referenced commands and a mission scripting structure. As current and future machine perception techniques are able to automatically designate visual serving goal points, this approach should provide a natural evolutionary pathway to higher levels of autonomous operation and reduced requirements for operator intervention.

  17. Towards Autonomous Control of HVAC Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brath, P.

    This thesis considered development of an autonomous control system for heating ventilation and air conditioning applications. By including auto-tuning, adaptation, diagnosis and supervision functions in the control system used in the HVAC industry will move the control of HVAC systems towards...... autonomous control. Together with better tuned controllers and more dedicated control it would be possible to decrease the energy consumption, save money and increase the indoor air climate. A flexible HVAC test system was designed and implemented. Standard components and sensors were used in the design...

  18. Light Sailboats: Laser driven autonomous microrobots

    CERN Document Server

    Búzás, Anrdás; Mathesz, Anna; Oroszi, László; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Vicsek, Tamás; Ormos, Pál; 10.1063/1.4737646

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.

  19. NEURON: Enabling Autonomicity in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Gouvas, Panagiotis; Liakopoulos, Athanassios; Mentzas, Gregoris; Mitrou, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    Future Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) will be ubiquitous, large-scale networks interconnected with the existing IP infrastructure. Autonomic functionalities have to be designed in order to reduce the complexity of their operation and management, and support the dissemination of knowledge within a WSN. In this paper a novel protocol for energy efficient deployment, clustering and routing in WSNs is proposed that focuses on the incorporation of autonomic functionalities in the existing approaches. The design of the protocol facilitates the design of innovative applications and services that are based on overlay topologies created through cooperation among the sensor nodes. PMID:22399931

  20. NEURON: Enabling Autonomicity in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Zafeiropoulos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Future Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs will be ubiquitous, large-scale networks interconnected with the existing IP infrastructure. Autonomic functionalities have to be designed in order to reduce the complexity of their operation and management, and support the dissemination of knowledge within a WSN. In this paper a novel protocol for energy efficient deployment, clustering and routing in WSNs is proposed that focuses on the incorporation of autonomic functionalities in the existing approaches. The design of the protocol facilitates the design of innovative applications and services that are based on overlay topologies created through cooperation among the sensor nodes.