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Sample records for santa ana california

  1. Native fish population and habitat study, Santa Ana River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Marissa L.; Brown, Larry R.; May, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Collection of additional data on the Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae) and the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) has been identified as a needed task to support development of the upper Santa Ana River Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP; http://www.uppersarhcp.com/). The ability to monitor population abundance and understanding the habitats used by species are important when developing such plans. The Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae) is listed as a threatened species under federal legislation and is considered a species of special concern in California by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (Moyle 2002). The Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) is considered a species of special concern in California by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (Moyle 2002). Both species are present in the Santa Ana River watershed in the area being evaluated for establishment of the upper Santa Ana River Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP; http://www.uppersarhcp.com/). The HCP is a collaborative effort involving the water resource agencies of the Santa Ana River Watershed, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and other government agencies and stakeholder organizations. The goals of the HCP are to: 1) enable the water resource agencies to provide a reliable water supply for human uses; 2) conserve and maintain natural rivers and streams that provide habitat for a diversity of unique and rare species; and 3) maintain recreational opportunities for activities such as hiking, fishing, and wildlife viewing, provided by the protection of these habitats and the river systems they depend on. The HCP will specify how species and their habitats will be protected and managed in the future and will provide the incidental take permits needed by the water resource agencies under the federal and State endangered species acts to maintain, operate, and improve their water resource infrastructure. Although the Santa Ana Sucker has been the subject of

  2. Spatial influence and oceanic thermal response to Santa Ana events along the Baja California peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)]. E-mail: rubenc@uabc.mx; Mascarenhas, A.; Martinez-Diaz-de-leon, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Durazo, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California, (Mexico); Gil Silva, E. [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Ensenada, Baja California, (Mexico)

    2006-07-15

    Meteorological data were recorded at eight stations located along the coast of the Pacific Ocean and three along the coast of the Gulf of California, aimed to assess the spatial influence of Santa Ana weather conditions in the Baja California peninsula. February 2002 featured two Santa Ana events: one from the 9 to the 12 and another from the 21 to the 22. The first Santa Ana event had the strongest winds, however relative humidity and temperature behaved similarly on both events at some stations. Data from the Pacific Ocean showed typical Santa Ana condition patterns: wind speed and temperature increase opposed to decreased relative humidity values. Data from the Gulf of California did not show the typical temperature rise of a Santa Ana condition, but there was a decrease on the amplitude of the diurnal variability of air temperature and relative humidity as well as a marked increase on wind strength. Wind direction during the Santa Ana events on the Pacific side was NE and NW on the Gulf of California. NE winds are associated to the shift on the position of the North Pacific High Pressure Center, which moves towards the continent. Data suggest that relative humidity may be the best parameter to monitor both occurrence and length of Santa Ana conditions on the Pacific side. Normal weather conditions show a negative air-sea temperature difference, but during both Santa Ana events this difference was positive and higher than 10 degrees Celsius. Latent and sensible heat fluxes drastically increased during both events, reaching values more than three times higher than those for normal conditions, which is due to the presence of strong winds combined with a drier and hotter air mass over the ocean. [Spanish] Con el proposito de estudiar la influencia espacial de condiciones Santa Ana a lo largo de la peninsula de Baja California, se registraron datos meteorologicos en ocho estaciones localizadas en el lado del Pacifico y tres estaciones en el Golfo de California. En

  3. The Santa Ana Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  4. Santa Ana Winds and Fire Regimes of Southern California National Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, J.

    2015-12-01

    In Southern California, it has long been understood that foehn-type Santa Ana winds are an important factor in the occurrence of large wildfires. Although a variety of anecdotal observations and statistical analyses have confirmed the importance of these winds to wildfire, particularly in the Fall months when Santa Ana winds overlap with dry fuels from summer drought, many of the details of those winds' impacts on fire remain obscure. This paper uses data regarding individual fires from California's Fire and Resource Assessment Program database and a compilation of Santa Ana Wind days (SAW days) published by Abatzoglou et al. in 2013 to assess the relationship of Santa Ana winds to fire occurrence and size in Southern California. The analysis included 474 fires larger than 20 ha (~50 acres).that burned on the four Southern California national forests (Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres and San Bernardino) between 1948 and 2010. Overall, just 10.3% of the fires started on SAW days, and 14.4% experienced at least one SAW day between start and containment dates. The impact of Santa Ana winds is greater, however, with increasing fire size. For fires > 4000 ha, 18.4% began on SAW days, with 30.4% experiencing at least one SAW day before containment. And 20% of fires > 20000 ha started on SAW days, with 50% including one or more SAW days. Fires beginning on SAW days were larger, with a mean of 6239 ha compared to 2150 ha for fires that began on non-SAW days. Only 2% of the fires that began on SAW days were started by lightning, suggesting that the impact of Santa Ana winds on Southern California fire regimes may be enhanced by humans' role in ignitions.

  5. Groundwater quality in the Upper Santa Ana Watershed study unit, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Upper Santa Ana Watershed is one of the study units being evaluated.

  6. Aquatic assemblages of the highly urbanized Santa Ana River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.R.; Burton, C.A.; Belitz, K.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the structure of periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblages and their associations with environmental variables at 17 sites on streams of the highly urbanized Santa Ana River basin in Southern California. All assemblages exhibited strong differences between highly urbanized sites in the valley and the least-impacted sites at the transition between the valley and undeveloped mountains. Results within the urbanized area differed among taxa. Periphyton assemblages were dominated by diatoms (>75% of total taxa). Periphyton assemblages within the urbanized area were not associated with any of the measured environmental variables, suggesting that structure of urban periphyton assemblages might be highly dependent on colonization dynamics. The number of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera (EPT) taxa included in macroinvertebrate assemblages ranged from 0 to 6 at urbanized sites. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages had significant correlations with several environmental variables within the urban area, suggesting that stream size and permanence were important determinants of distribution among the species able to survive conditions in urban streams. Only 4 of 16 fish species collected were native to the drainage. Fish assemblages of urbanized sites included two native species, arroyo chub Gila orcuttii and Santa Ana sucker Catostomus santaanae, at sites that were intermediate in coefficient of variation of bank-full width, depth, bed substrate, and water temperature. Alien species dominated urbanized sites with lesser or greater values for these variables. These results suggest that urban streams can be structured to enhance populations of native fishes. Continued study of urban streams in the Santa Ana River basin and elsewhere will contribute to the basic understanding of ecological principles and help preserve the maximum ecological value of streams in highly urbanized areas.

  7. Meteorological Controls on Biomass Burning During Santa Ana Events in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraverbeke, Sander; Capps, Scott; Hook, Simon J.; Randerson, James T.; Jin, Yufang; Hall, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Fires occurring during Santa Ana (SA) events in southern California are driven by extreme fire weather characterized by high temperatures, low humidities, and high wind speeds. We studied the controls on burned area and carbon emissions during two intensive SA burning periods in 2003 and 2007. We therefore used remote sensing data in parallel with fire weather simulations of the Weather and Regional Forecast model. Total carbon emissions were approximately 1800 gigagrams in 2003 and 900 gigagrams in 2007, based on a daily burned area and a fire emission model that accounted for spatial variability in fuel loads and combustion completeness. On a regional scale, relatively strong positive correlations were found between the daily Fosberg fire weather index and burned area/emissions (probability is less than 0.01). Our analysis provides a quantitative assessment of relationships between fire activity and weather during severe SA fires in southern California.

  8. Stratospheric intrusions, the Santa Ana winds, and wildland fires in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, A. O.; Pierce, R. B.; Schultz, P. J.

    2015-07-01

    The Santa Ana winds of Southern California have long been associated with wildland fires that can adversely affect air quality and lead to loss of life and property. These katabatic winds are driven primarily by thermal gradients but can be exacerbated by northerly flow associated with upper level troughs passing through the western U.S. In this paper, we show that the fire danger associated with the passage of upper level troughs can be further increased by the formation of deep tropopause folds that transport extremely dry ozone-rich air from the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere to the surface. Stratospheric intrusions can thus increase surface ozone both directly through transport and indirectly through their influence on wildland fires. We illustrate this situation with the example of the Springs Fire, which burned nearly 25,000 acres in Ventura County during May 2013.

  9. Sediment Dynamics Affecting the Threatened Santa Ana Sucker in the Highly-modified Santa Ana River and Inset Channel, Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minear, J. T.; Wright, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the sediment dynamics of the low-flow channel of the Santa Ana River that is formed by wastewater discharges and contains some of the last remaining habitat of the Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae). The Santa Ana River is a highly-modified river draining the San Bernardino Mountains and Inland Empire metropolitan area east of Los Angeles. Home to over 4 million people, the watershed provides habitat for the federally-threatened Santa Ana Sucker, which presently reside within the mainstem Santa Ana River in a reach supported by year-round constant discharges from water treatment plants. The nearly constant low-flow wastewater discharges and infrequent runoff events create a small, approximately 8 m wide, inset channel within the approximately 300 m wide mainstem channel that is typically dry except for large flood flows. The sediment dynamics within the inset channel are characterized by constantly evolving bed substrate and sediment transport rates, and occasional channel avulsions. The sediment dynamics have large influence on the Sucker, which rely on coarse-substrate (gravel and cobble) for their food production. In WY 2013 through the present, we investigated the sediment dynamics of the inset channel using repeat bathymetric and substrate surveys, bedload sampling, and discharge measurements. We found two distinct phases of the inset channel behavior: 1. 'Reset' flows, where sediment-laden mainstem discharges from upstream runoff events result in sand deposition in the inset channel or avulse the inset channel onto previously dry riverbed; and 2. 'Winnowing' flows, whereby the sand within the inset channel is removed by clear-water low flows from the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Thus, in contrast to many regulated rivers where high flows are required to flush fine sediments from the bed (for example, downstream from dams), in the Santa Ana River the low flows from wastewater treatment plants serve as the flushing

  10. Analysis of the effects of combustion emissions and Santa Ana winds on ambient ozone during the October 2007 southern California wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Bytnerowicz; D. Cayan; P. Riggan; S. Schilling; P. Dawson; M. Tyree; L. Wolden; R. Tissell; H. Preisler

    2010-01-01

    Combustion emissions and strong Santa Ana winds had pronounced effects on patterns and levels of ambient ozone (O3) in southern California during the extensive wildland fires of October 2007. These changes are described in detail for a rural receptor site, the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve, located among large fires in San Diego and Orange counties. In addition,...

  11. The Santa AnaWinds of Southern California in the context of Fire Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang

    The Santa Ana winds represent a high-impact weather event owing to the intimate relationship between the extremely dry, fast winds and the wildfire threat. The winds can be locally gusty, particularly in the complex terrain of San Diego county, where the airflow has characteristics of downslope windstorms. These winds can cause and/or rapidly spread wildfires, the threat of which is particularly acute during the autumn season before the onset of winter rains. It remains a day-to-day challenge to accurately predict wind gust speed, especially in the mountainous regions. Our study employs large physics ensembles composed of high-resolution simulations of severe downslope windstorms that involve an exhaustive examination of available model physical parameterizations. Model results are calibrated and validated against the San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) mesonet observations, a dense, homogenous, and well-positioned network with uniform high quality. Results demonstrate model horizontal resolution, model physics, random perturbations and landuse database can have a material effect on the strength, location and timing of Santa Ana winds in real-data simulations. A large model physics ensemble reveals the land surface model to be most crucial in skillful wind predictions, which are particularly sensitive to the surface roughness length. A surprisingly simple gust parameterization is proposed for the San Diego network, based on the discovery that this homogeneous mesonet has a nearly invariant network-averaged gust factor. The gust forecast technique is of special interest in the context of routine weather combined with atmospheric humidity and fuel moisture information. A real-time wildfire threat warning system, the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTI), has been developed to effectively communicate the upcoming Santa Ana wind strength with respect to the anticipated fire danger to first responders and the public. In addition to the wind and gust forecast techniques

  12. Ground-water geology of the coastal zone, Long Beach-Santa Ana area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, J.F.; Piper, A.M.

    1956-01-01

    This paper is the first chapter of a comprehensive report on the ground-water features in the southern part of the coastal plain in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, Calif., with special reference to the effectiveness of the so-called coastal barrier--the Newport-Inglewood structural zone--in restraining landwar,-1 movement of saline water. The coastal plain in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, which covers some 775 square miles, sustains a large urban and rural population, diverse industries, and intensive agricultural developments. The aggregate ground-water withdrawal in 1945 was about 400,000 acre-feet a year, an average of about 360 million gallons a day. The dominant land-form elements are a central lowland plain with tongues extending to the coast, bordering highlands and foothills, and a succession of low hills and mesas aligned northwestward along the coastal edge of the central low- land plain. These low hills and mesas are the land-surface expression of geologic structure in the Newport-Inglewood zone. The highland areas that border the inland edge of the coastal plain are of moderate altitude and relief; most of the ridge crests range from 1,400 to 2,500 feet in altitude, but Santiago Peak in the Santa Ana Mountains attains a height of 5,680 feet above sea level. From these highlands the land surface descends across foothills and aggraded alluvial aprons to the central lowland, Downey Plain, here defined as the surface formed by alluvial aggradation during the post-Pleistocene time of rising base level. The Newport-Inglewood belt of hills and plains (mesas) has a maximum relief of some 500 feet but is widely underlain at a depth of about 30 feet by a surface of marine plantation. As initially formed in late Pleistocene time that surface was largely a featureless plain. Thus the present land-surface forms within the Newport-Inglewood belt measure the earth deformation that has occurred there since late Pleistocene time and so are pertinent with respect to

  13. Free inside: The Music Class at Santa Ana Jail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Joe

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the workings of the music class at the Santa Ana Jail in Santa Ana, California. It gives us insight into a jail system and a music class focused on helping inmates position themselves to become productive members of society. In this article I examine how the facility encourages inmates' good behaviour and why the music class…

  14. Santa Ana Winds of Southern California: Their climatology, extremes, and behavior spanning six and a half decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Morales, Janin; Gershunov, Alexander; Theiss, Jurgen; Li, Haiqin; Cayan, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Santa Ana Winds (SAWs) are an integral feature of the regional climate of Southern California/Northern Baja California region, but their climate-scale behavior is poorly understood. In the present work, we identify SAWs in mesoscale dynamical downscaling of a global reanalysis from 1948 to 2012. Model winds are validated with anemometer observations. SAWs exhibit an organized pattern with strongest easterly winds on westward facing downwind slopes and muted magnitudes at sea and over desert lowlands. We construct hourly local and regional SAW indices and analyze elements of their behavior on daily, annual, and multidecadal timescales. SAWs occurrences peak in winter, but some of the strongest winds have occurred in fall. Finally, we observe that SAW intensity is influenced by prominent large-scale low-frequency modes of climate variability rooted in the tropical and north Pacific ocean-atmosphere system.

  15. Efecto de los vientos Santa Ana en las propiedades bio-ópticas frente a Baja California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de las propiedades bio-ópticas, los coeficientes de absorción por partículas, detritos y fitoplancton (ap, adT, aφ se evaluó el efecto de los vientos Santa Ana en el océano frente a Baja California ocurridos durante octubre de 1999. Los vientos medidos en la estación meteorológica frente a la Bahía de Todos Santos y los determinados a partir de información de satélite indicaron tres eventos Santa Ana, caracterizados por baja humedad relativa, alta temperatura del aire y vientos con dirección predominante del este-noreste. Los valores del coeficiente de absorción de detritos (adT fueron hasta diez veces mayores en las muestras superficiales de octubre, con relación a las de enero, abril y agosto de 1999. Los altos valores de adT se debieron al material inorgánico aero-transportado por los vientos tierra-mar ocurridos del 9 al 11 y del 17 al 20 de octubre. Los coeficientes de absorción de las particulas (ap y el fitoplancton (aφ en la zona eufótica fueron mayores en abril, como resultado de la abundancia del fitoplancton. Los valores de ap, aφ y Kd para la zona eufótica fueron ajustados a una función de potencia con la clorofila como variable independiente, con una variancia explicada de 37%, 72% y 16%, respectivamente. Cuando se excluyeron del ajuste los valores de adT medidos en la superficie durante octubre, la clorofila explicó 82% de la variabilidad en los coeficientes de absorción (ap y aφ y 87% en Kd. A partir de la ecuación que relaciona la reflectancia de la radiancia espectral ascendente (Rrs con la clorofila, se determinó que ~80% de la variabilidad en la clorofila superficial es explicada por la razón de reflectancia Rrs(443/Rrs(555 medida en la zona de estudio. Las estimaciones regionales de clorofila a partir de información bioóptica obtenida en la columna de agua no fueron afectadas fuertemente por el polvo aero-transportado durante los vientos Santa Ana ocurridos en octubre de 1999.

  16. Santa Ana Winds Over Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution ocean surface wind data from NASA's Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat) illustrate the strength of Santa Ana winds that pounded Southern California this week, causing damage and spreading brush fires. The colored arrows represent various ranges of wind speed, which were still well in excess of 30 knots (34 miles per hour), even after reaching the ocean and weakening. Santa Ana winds are offshore and down-slope winds unique to Southern California that are usually channeled through mountain gaps. These Santa Ana winds extend more than 500 kilometers (310 miles) offshore before changing direction to flow along the shore.The wind speeds and directions are retrieved from range-compressed backscatter data measured by QuikScat that has much higher spatial resolution than QuikScat's standard data products. Useful applications of high-resolution science-quality wind products derived from range-compressed backscatter have been demonstrated in two scientific papers: one on Hurricane Floyd and the other on Catalina Eddies. This is the first demonstration on near-real-time retrieval applications.

  17. Santa Ana Winds of Southern California: Their Climatology and Variability Spanning 6.5 Decades from Regional Dynamical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Morales, J.; Gershunov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Santa Ana Winds (SAWs) are an integral feature of the regional climate of Southern California/Northern Baja California region. In spite of their tremendous episodic impacts on the health, economy and mood of the region, climate-scale behavior of SAW is poorly understood. In the present work, we identify SAWs in mesoscale dynamical downscaling of a global reanalysis product and construct an hourly SAW catalogue spanning 65 years. We describe the long-term SAW climatology at relevant time-space resolutions, i.e, we developed local and regional SAW indices and analyse their variability on hourly, daily, annual, and multi-decadal timescales. Local and regional SAW indices are validated with available anemometer observations. Characteristic behaviors are revealed, e.g. the SAW intensity-duration relationship. At interdecadal time scales, we find that seasonal SAW activity is sensitive to prominent large-scale low-frequency modes of climate variability rooted in the tropical and north Pacific ocean-atmosphere system that are also known to affect the hydroclimate of this region. Lastly, we do not find any long-term trend in SAW frequency and intensity as previously reported. Instead, we identify a significant long-term trend in SAW behavior whereby contribution of extreme SAW events to total seasonal SAW activity has been increasing at the expense of moderate events. These findings motivate further investigation on SAW evolution in future climate and its impact on wildfires.

  18. Status of groundwater quality in the Upper Santa Ana Watershed, November 2006--March 2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile (2,590-square-kilometer) Upper Santa Ana Watershed (USAW) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southern California in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA USAW study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems in the study unit. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) are defined as the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the USAW study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from 90 wells during November 2006 through March 2007, and water-quality data from the CDPH database. The status of the current quality of the groundwater resource was assessed based on data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources within the primary aquifers of the USAW study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal or California regulatory or

  19. Developing and Validating a Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, S. B.; Rolinski, T.; DAgostino, B.; Vanderburg, S.; Fovell, R. G.; Cao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Santa Ana winds, common to southern California during the fall through spring, are a type of katabatic wind that originates from a direction generally ranging from 360°/0° to 100° and is usually accompanied by very low humidity. Since fuel conditions tend to be driest from late September through the middle of November, Santa Ana winds occurring during this period have the greatest potential to produce large, devastating fires when an ignition occurs. Such catastrophic fires occurred in 1993, 2003, 2007, and 2008. Because of the destructive nature of these fires, there has been a growing desire to categorize Santa Ana wind events in much the same way that tropical cyclones have been categorized. The Santa Ana Wildfire Threat index (SAWT) is an attempt to categorize such events with respect to fire activity, based on surface wind velocity, dew point depression, and forecasted fuel conditions. The index, a USDA Forest Service product, was developed by the Forest Service in collaboration with San Diego Gas and Electric Utility (SDG&E), the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at UCLA, The Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Vertum Partners. The methodology behind the SAWT index, along with the index itself will be presented in detail. Also, there will be a discussion on the construction of a 30-year climatology of the index, which includes various meteorological and fuel parameters. We will demonstrate the usefulness of the index as another decision support tool for fire agencies and first responders, and how it could assist the general public and private industry in the preparation of critical Santa Ana wind events.

  20. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2 GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem, Including Santiago Creek. Volume 3. Lower Santa Ana River. (Prado Dam to Pacific Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Water Company Gas Four Corners Pipe Company Telephone Pacific Telephone Company Television Cable Vision of Orange Water City of Santa Ana Electricity City...Elderberry Sambucus mexicana XII-2 Table XII-i. (Continued) Common Names Scientific Names TREES (Continued): Big Leaf Maple Acer Macrophyllum California

  1. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Upper Santa Ana Watershed Study Unit, November 2006-March 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile Upper Santa Ana Watershed study unit (USAW) was investigated from November 2006 through March 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Upper Santa Ana Watershed study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within USAW, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 99 wells in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Ninety of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells). Nine wells were selected to provide additional understanding of specific water-quality issues identified within the basin (understanding wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and potential wastewater-indicator compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], 1,4-dioxane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify sources and ages of the sampled ground water. Dissolved gases, and isotopes of nitrogen gas and of dissolved nitrate also were measured in order to investigate the sources and occurrence of

  2. Temporal Controls on Uplift and Slip Rates for the Puente Hills and Santa Ana Mountains, Southern Los Angeles Basin, Orange County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gath, E. M.; Grant, L. B.; Owen, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Puente Hills (PH) are seismically active and tectonically uplifted by the Puente Hills Blind Thrust fault (PHBTF). The rate of uplift, and consequently, the late Quaternary slip rate of the eastern part of the PHBTF, herein named the Santa Ana segment, can be constrained by mapping and dating Quaternary stream terraces and strath surfaces in the Santa Ana River Canyon. The PH are cut by the 2-3 mm/yr right-lateral Whittier fault, itself capable of M6.7-7.2 earthquakes. The 7 mapped terraces and strath surfaces of the PH are cut by the Whittier fault with minimal vertical separation. OSL dating, soil age estimates, and correlation with sea level highstands constrains the PH uplift rate to 0.6-1.4 mm/yr based on OSL dates, and 0.2-0.8 mm/yr from other methods. The rates overlap in the range 0.6-0.8 mm/yr, and we propose that this is the most reliable estimate of uplift rate because it is based on several methods. An uplift rate of 0.6-0.8 mm/yr for the PH is also consistent with a 500 700 ka emergent age based on our geomorphic analysis of PH drainage basin development. Using a 30° dip angle produces a slip rate on the Santa Ana segment of the PHBTF of 1.2-1.6 mm/yr. Preliminary tectonic geomorphic analysis of the Santa Ana Mountains (SAM) suggests that they too are being uplifted and are probably seismically active. Shorelines preserved on the lower foothills of Peralta and Loma Ridges were correlated to eustatic sea levels for age estimations. Mapping and dating of terraces in the Santiago Creek drainage, and the older marine terraces indicates that the SAM are uplifting at 0.2-0.7 mm/yr, probably due to a blind thrust associated with partial termination of the Elsinore fault.

  3. The Trail Inventory of Santa Ana NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  4. Development of water facilities in the Santa Ana River Basin, California, 1810-1968: a compilation of historical notes derived from many sources describing ditch and canal companies, diversions, and water rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    This report traces by text, maps, and photographs, the development of the water supply in the Santa Ana River basin from its beginning in 1810 or 1811 to 1968. The value of the report lies in the fact that interpretation of the hydrologic systems in the basin requires knowledge of the concurrent state of development of the water supply, because that development has progressively altered the local regimen of both surface water and ground water. Most of the information for the earlier years was extracted and condensed from an investigation made by W. H. Hall, California State Engineer during the years 1878-87. Hall's study described irrigation development in southern California from its beginning through 1888. Information for the years following 1888 was obtained from the archives of the numerous water companies and water agencies in the Santa Ana River basin and from the various depositories of courthouse, county, and municipal records. The history of water-resources development in the Santa Ana River basin begins with the introduction of irrigation in the area by the Spanish, who settled in southern California in the latter part, of the 18th century. The first irrigation diversion from the Santa Ana River was made in 1810 or 1811 by Jose Antonio Yorba and Juan Pablo Peralta. Irrigation remained a localized practice during the Mexican-Californian, or rancho, period following the separation of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Rancho grantees principally raised cattle, horses, and sheep and irrigated only small· plots of feed grain for their livestock and fruit crops for household use. The breakup of the ranchos through sales to Americans, who were migrating to California in ever-increasing numbers following the acquisition of California by the United States in 1848, marked the beginning of a rapid increase in water use and the beginning of widespread irrigation. Many water companies and water agencies were organized to divert the surface flow of the Santa Ana River and

  5. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2 GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem Including Santiago Creek. Volume 3. Lower Santa Ana River. Appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    NAWL REDDISH1 . MIST, SI 36 FINE 103’MM5 GWAtH SHE, IEFUSA. A 216.5FIF p TO1 17 41 99 31 SI).TI SAIT AMISH WICHN3. MIST, FEW 10 MIMIM WMED 5315D...Beach, Costa Mesa, and Newport Beach. Over 1,000,000 people reside or work within this area. Projected populations for the Lower Santa Ana River market

  6. Historical Climate and Streamflow Trends in Santa Ana River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, D.; Sultana, R.; Tang, V.

    2015-12-01

    Santa Ana River watershed, located in Southern California, is the home of more than 5 million people. Population is projected to double within the next 50 years in the 2,650 square miles watershed. With prolonged drought conditions, and projected climate change, a strong concern exists about sustainable water supply of the area. In this study, historic climate and streamflow trend from water year 1965 to 2014 is analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test. Climate trends are studied using annual rainfall, and annual average maximum and minimum temperature at 5 and 4 weather stations, respectively. Three of the precipitation stations show precipitation is decreasing in the watershed while minimum and maximum temperature has an increasing trend at three stations (p < 0.05). To assess whether streamflow and stream-channel characteristics are tended to increase or decrease monotonically with time, four variables - (1) annual maximum peak, (2) annual mean, (3) low to moderate and (4) moderate to high maximum peak streamflow were tested at 20 stream gauge sites. Only at 5 stream gage stations, significant streamflow trend is observed. At two stream gages, annual peak and annual average streamflow is increasing and at two stations, annual average streamflow has a decreasing trend. Low to moderate peak streamflow is increasing at two gage locations but there is no monotonic trend in moderate to high flows. As precipitation is decreasing in some part of the watershed, the effect of increasing urbanization in the area can be attributed for the localized increase in mean and peak streamflow. The trend analysis in weather and stream gage data will be presented in detail.

  7. 75 FR 17202 - Proposed Establishment of Long Beach, CA, Class C Airspace Area and Revision of Santa Ana (John...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Revision of Santa Ana (John Wayne), CA, Class C Airspace Area; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation... establish Class C airspace at Long Beach, CA, and revise the Santa Ana (John Wayne) Class C airspace area... Santa Ana (John Wayne), CA, Class C airspace area will be accepted. (b) The meetings will be open to...

  8. Evaluation of toxicity of sediment samples collected from the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments collected from the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Hidalgo Co in southern Texas, USA. A...

  9. The Trail Inventory of Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  10. Lower Rio Grande Valley and Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuges : Final Interim Comprehensive Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This CCP outlines a 15-year plan for the management of Lower Rio Grande Valley and Santa Ana NWRs. The general topics addressed in this plan include: wildlife...

  11. Evaluation of English Language Development Programs in the Santa Ana Unified School District. A Report on Data System Reliability and Statistical Modeling of Program Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Douglas E.; Destino, Tom; Karam, Rita

    In response to concern about the effectiveness of programs for English-as-a-Second-Language students in California's schools, the Santa Ana Unified School District, in which over 80 percent of students are limited-English-proficient (LEP) conducted a study of both the operations and effectiveness of the district's language development program,…

  12. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  13. Faults--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  14. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  15. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  16. Faults--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  17. Habitat--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor (see sheet 7, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The vector...

  18. Bathymetry--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  19. Habitat--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  20. Folds--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  1. Habitat--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  2. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  3. Contours--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  4. Faults--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California....

  5. Folds--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California....

  6. Bathymetry--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  7. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  8. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  9. Faults--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  10. Faults--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  11. Folds--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  12. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  13. Contours--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  14. 75 FR 77961 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for Santa Ana Sucker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... created for recreational purposes, such as those used for suction dredging or bathing. These dams may... rule states that Arroyo Tesquesquite, Sunnyslope Creek, Anza Park Drain, and the lower outlet of Hidden Valley Drain are used for spawning and nurseries (Service 2000, p. 19687), and therefore Santa Ana...

  15. Bathymetry--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  16. The changing influences of the AMO and PDO on the decadal variation of the Santa Ana winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Andy K.; Paek, Houk; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Santa Ana wind (SAW) events have great implications for the environment of Southern California, but the cause of their decadal variability has not been fully understood. We show with observational analysis that the Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation (AMO) has a stronger influence than the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) in modulating SAW activity through two mechanisms: the Great Basin pressure gradient mechanism, in which a strengthened Great Basin high promotes SAW activity and vice versa through the northeast-southwest pressure gradient across Southern California, and the Pacific jetstream displacement mechanism, in which a strengthened Pacific subtropical high (PSH) prohibits mid-latitude cyclones from traveling toward California, consequently encouraging SAW development and vice versa. While the AMO strengthens or weakens both the Great Basin and PSHs to strongly modulate SAW activity through these two mechanisms, the PDO strengthens one of the highs but weakens the other, causing the two mechanisms to cancel each other, producing little influence on SAW activity. A projection based on the AMO and PDO indicates that the above-average SAW activity observed since the beginning of the 21st century is likely to terminate after 2016, after which Southern California may experience an extended period of below-average SAW activity through 2030.

  17. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  18. 78 FR 16650 - In the Matter of: Dan Tran Dang, 1010 W. Moore Street, Santa Ana, CA 92707; Order Denying Export...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Dan Tran Dang, 1010 W. Moore Street, Santa Ana, CA... address at: 1010 W. Moore Street, Santa Ana, CA 92707, and when acting for or on behalf of Dang,...

  19. Occurrence and risk assessment of free and conjugated hormones in surface water of the Santa Ana River

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents a sensitive analytical method using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous monitoring of five estrogen conjugates, six estrogens and two progestagens in surface water of the Santa Ana River. Samples at ten representative sites along t...

  20. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  1. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  2. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  3. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  4. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  5. Seafloor character--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the seafloor-character map (see sheet 5, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The raster data...

  6. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The vector...

  7. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  8. Santa Barbara, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Santa Barbara, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  9. Santa Monica, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Santa Monica, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  10. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  11. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  12. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The vector...

  13. Seafloor character--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the seafloor-character map (see sheet 5, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The raster data...

  14. Evaluación financiera de la Reserva Cinegética Santa Ana Financial evaluation of the Santa Ana Hunting Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anel de la Vega Mena

    Full Text Available La investigación se centró en la experiencia de la Reserva Cinegética Santa Ana, debido a que ha orientado su operación al uso integral y conservación de sus recursos, con diversificación de actividades tales como la cacería deportiva; la cría y entrenamiento de perros de caza. Se evaluó la viabilidad financiera en dos partes, la primera se hizo una proyección a 10 años contemplando el contrato de arrendamiento que tiene la reserva, en la segunda, la proyección se realizó a 20 años; ya que la construcción del edificio y la cerca son el rubro más importante de este proyecto. Ambas partes tuvieron dos escenarios, en el primero se utilizaron los costos de inversión de 2007 y los costos de operación de 2007 a 2008, en segundo lugar se consideró como si la inversión iniciara en 2007. Con una tasa de actualización de 12% los indicadores obtenidos valor actual neto, relación beneficio-costo, relación beneficio-inversión neta y la tasa interna de rentabilidad, en ambas partes y con los dos escenarios demostraron que la reserva es viable financieramente. Otro aspecto importante fue la determinación del costo del viaje; es decir, el monto total de gastos en que se incurre desde el sitio de residencia al costo de casa, fue de $ 96 236 pesos para 350 personas por año, que indica una derrama económica indirecta que genera la reserva.This investigation was focused on the experience of the Santa Ana Hunting Reserve, since it has led its operation to the integral use and conservation of its resources, with a diversification of activities such as sport hunting and breeding and training of hunting dogs. The financial feasibility was analyzed in two parts. For the first one, a 10-year projection was made, contemplating the lease contract that the reserve has, and in the second one, the same projection was made for 20 years, since the construction ofthe building and the fence are the most important item in this project. Both parts had two

  15. Contours--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps (see sheets 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara...

  16. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  17. Contours--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps (see sheets 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map...

  18. Preliminary geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Stone, Paul; Powell, Charles L.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Selting, Amy J.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new geologic digital map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. This preliminary map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Santa Barbara and Goleta 7.5' quadrangles. A planned second version will extend the mapping westward into the adjoining Dos Pueblos Canyon quadrangle and eastward into the Carpinteria quadrangle. The mapping presented here results from the collaborative efforts of geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP) (Minor, Kellogg, Stanley, Stone, and Powell) and the tectonic geomorphology research group at the University of California at Santa Barbara (Gurrola and Selting). C.L. Powell, II, performed all new fossil identifications and interpretations reported herein. T.R. Brandt designed and edited the GIS database,performed GIS database integration and created the digital cartography for the map layout. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along a west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The coastal plain region, which extends from the Santa Ynez Mountains on the north to the Santa Barbara Channel on the south, is underlain by numerous active and potentially active folds and partly buried thrust faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt. Strong earthquakes that occurred in the region in 1925 (6.8 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude) are evidence that such structures pose a significant earthquake hazard to the approximately 200,000 people living within the major coastal population centers of Santa Barbara and Goleta. Also, young landslide deposits along the steep lower flank of the Santa

  19. La escritora Ana de Zayas y el obispo poblano Manuel Fernández de Santa Cruz

    OpenAIRE

    Zayas, Concepción

    2001-01-01

    Estudio de caso sobre la relación entre el obispo de la diócesis angelopolitana, don Manuel Fernández de Santa Cruz, y doña Ana de Zayas, escritora que la Inquisición novohispana procesó por alumbrada de 1694 a 1700. Este trabajo analiza principalmente la intervención del prelado a favor de esta mujer, lo cual impidió que ella fuera condenada por el Santo Oficio de México. El artículo se basa en fuentes mexicanas y españolas.

  20. La escritora Ana de Zayas y el obispo poblano Manuel Fernández de Santa Cruz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayas, Concepción

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudio de caso sobre la relación entre el obispo de la diócesis angelopolitana, don Manuel Fernández de Santa Cruz, y doña Ana de Zayas, escritora que la Inquisición novohispana procesó por alumbrada de 1694 a 1700. Este trabajo analiza principalmente la intervención del prelado a favor de esta mujer, lo cual impidió que ella fuera condenada por el Santo Oficio de México. El artículo se basa en fuentes mexicanas y españolas.

  1. Caracterización de la Violencia Intrafamiliar en mujeres del municipio Santa Ana. Beni Bolivia Junio-Diciembre 2010.

    OpenAIRE

    Yacquelynes Corona-Hechavarria; Caridad Mastrapa-Reyes; Liliana Rogaciana Leyva-Ruiz; Zoila Caridad Reyes-Herrera

    2013-01-01

    Abordó una investigación descriptiva en municipio Santa Ana, Beni en Bolivia para determinar el comportamiento de las mujeres que sufren violencia intrafamiliar en el 2010. Los datos se obtuvieron mediante la revisión de las fichas familiares e individuales, se realizaron encuestas directas a las mujeres que sufrían violencia intrafamiliar. Se concluyo que el grupo de edad más afectado fue el de 25-34, con nivel de escolaridad secundaria, predominaron las amas de casa, se encontraron paciente...

  2. Groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California established the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Santa Barbara Coastal Plain is one of the study units.

  3. Assessing marine microbial induced corrosion at Santa Catalina Island, California

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Antonio Ramírez; Colleen Lynn Hoffman; Lee, Michael D.; Lesniewski, Ryan A.; Roman Barco; Arkadiy Garber; Brandy Marie Toner; Charles Geoffrey Wheat; Katrina Jane Edwards; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2016-01-01

    High iron and eutrophic conditions are reported as environmental factors leading to accelerated low-water corrosion, an enhanced form of near-shore microbial-induced corrosion. To explore this hypothesis, we deployed flow-through colonization systems in laboratory-based aquarium tanks under a continuous flow of surface seawater from Santa Catalina Island, California, USA, for periods of two and six months. Substrates consisted of mild steel – a major constituent of maritime infrastructure – a...

  4. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  5. Incorporating Community Knowledge to Lahar Hazard Maps: Canton Buenos Aires Case Study, at Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajo, J. V.; Martinez-Hackert, B.; Polio, C.; Gutierrez, E.

    2015-12-01

    Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano is an active composite volcano located in the Apaneca Volcanic Field located in western part of El Salvador, Central America. The volcano is surrounded by rural communities in its proximal areas and the second (Santa Ana, 13 km) and fourth (Sonsosante, 15 km) largest cities of the country. On October 1st, 2005, the volcano erupted after months of increased activity. Following the eruption, volcanic mitigation projects were conducted in the region, but the communities had little or no input on them. This project consisted in the creation of lahar volcanic hazard map for the Canton Buanos Aires on the northern part of the volcano by incorporating the community's knowledge from prior events to model parameters and results. The work with the community consisted in several meetings where the community members recounted past events. They were asked to map the outcomes of those events using either a topographic map of the area, a Google Earth image, or a blank paper poster size. These maps have been used to identify hazard and vulnerable areas, and for model validation. These maps were presented to the communities and they accepted their results and the maps.

  6. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem, Including Santiago Creek. Volume 7. Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Santa Ysabel Creek near Mesa Grande ................... 53.9 21,100 .... ..... mGS wSp 426 San Luis Rey River at Oceanside ....................... 557...95,600 .... do ..... usS wSp 426 5 San Luis Rey River at Bonsall ......................... 512 128,OO 23 Feb 1691 (US G p 𔃾.7 s 6 San Luis Rey River...San Gabriel River at Camp Rincon ..... 102 i.,o .. ..... ,SGS C.af. i1 63 L 3 Devil’s Canyon above Cogswell Dam..................... . .. 3 -U0 .... do

  7. Groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Santa Clara River Valley (SCRV) study unit is located in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, and is bounded by the Santa Monica, San Gabriel, Topatopa, and Santa Ynez Mountains, and the Pacific Ocean. The 460-square-mile study unit includes eight groundwater basins: Ojai Valley, Upper Ojai Valley, Ventura River Valley, Santa Clara River Valley, Pleasant Valley, Arroyo Santa Rosa Valley, Las Posas Valley, and Simi Valley (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Montrella and Belitz, 2009). The SCRV study unit has hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 12 to 28 inches. The study unit is drained by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, and Calleguas Creek. The primary aquifer system in the Ventura River Valley, Ojai Valley, Upper Ojai Valley, and Simi Valley basins is largely unconfined alluvium. The primary aquifer system in the remaining groundwater basins mainly consists of unconfined sands and gravels in the upper portion and partially confined marine and nonmarine deposits in the lower portion. The primary aquifer system in the SCRV study unit is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. Public-supply wells typically are completed in the primary aquifer system to depths of 200 to 1,100 feet below land surface (bls). The wells contain solid casing reaching from the land surface to a depth of about 60-700 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing to allow water into the well. Water quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the water in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer. Land use in the study unit is approximately 40 percent (%) natural (primarily shrubs, grassland, and wetlands), 37% agricultural, and 23% urban. The primary crops are citrus, avocados, alfalfa, pasture, strawberries, and dry beans. The largest urban areas in the study unit are the cities of

  8. Initial Analysis of Inner Crater Eruptive Deposits and Modeling of the 2005 Eruption of Ilamatepec (Santa Ana) Volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hackert, B.; Bajo, J. V.; Escobar, D.; Gutierrez, E.

    2011-12-01

    The October 1st, 2005 eruption of Ilamatepec Volcano, also known as Santa Ana Volcano in El Salvador, Central America, was a relatively small phreatic possibly phreatomagmatic eruption that generated an approximately 10km high ash column, with a volume of 1.5 million cubic meters. It generated small pyroclastic density currents, and shortly after the eruption a hot lahar. All of these volcanic products present grat danger to the surrounding population and the surrounding fertile lands growing coffe and sugar cane, the major export products. To better understand the eruptive behavior of this active composite volcano, older deposits need to be studied. An initial analysis of the inner crater eruptive deposits was undertaken in 2011. The many layers that can be seen within the crater suggest that Santa Ana volcano alternates its eruptions from phreatic to phreatomagmatic to magmatic, back to phreatomagmatic to phreatic with a period of rest in between. The last magmatic eruption of the Santa Ana Volcano took place in 1904. There are some historical records of it, and the scoracious materials and lava flows can still be well traced on the flanks and the crater of Ilamatepec, while the 2005 eruption has been eroded away in most areas of the flanks. Observations and data collected in 2005 and 2011 indicate that pyroclastic density currents went not only to the Southeastern flanks of the volcano, but also towards the Northwestern flanks, an area behind the highest rim of the volcano. Deposits up to 0.5 m were found in 2011, after significant erosion already had taken place. We present here the partial stratigraphic column taken within the inner crater walls that indicate alternating eruption styles from eruptions well pre-1904, with radiocarbon dating pending. Additionally, we show the results of the modeling of pyroclastic deposits, and lahars using Titan2D on DEMs extracted from the only topographic map (pre-1980) which has a 10 m resolution of the volcano, and a DEM

  9. Submarine Landslides at Santa Catalina Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, M. R.; Francis, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Santa Catalina Island is an active tectonic block of volcanic and metamorphic rocks originally exposed during middle Miocene transtension along the evolving Pacific-North America transform plate boundary. Post-Miocene transpression created the existing large pop-up structure along the major strike-slip restraining bend of the Catalina fault that forms the southwest flank of the uplift. Prominent submerged marine terraces apparent in high-resolution bathymetric maps interrupt the steep submarine slopes in the upper ~400 meters subsea depths. Steep subaerial slopes of the island are covered by Quaternary landslides, especially at the sea cliffs and in the blueschist metamorphic rocks. The submarine slopes also show numerous landslides that range in area from a few hectares to more than three sq-km (300 hectares). Three or more landslides of recent origin exist between the nearshore and first submerged terrace along the north-facing shelf of the island's West End. One of these slides occurred during September 2005 when divers observed a remarkable change in the seafloor configuration after previous dives in the area. Near a sunken yacht at about 45-ft depth where the bottom had sloped gently into deeper water, a "sinkhole" had formed that dropped steeply to 100-ft or greater depths. Some bubbling sand was observed in the shallow water areas that may be related to the landslide process. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry acquired in 2008 by CSU Monterey Bay show this "fresh" slide and at least two other slides of varying age along the West End. The slides are each roughly 2 hectares in area and their debris aprons are spread across the first terrace at about 85-m water depth that is likely associated with the Last Glacial Maximum sealevel lowstand. Larger submarine slides exist along the steep Catalina and Catalina Ridge escarpments along the southwest flank of the island platform. A prominent slide block, exceeding 3 sq-km in area, appears to have slipped more than

  10. 75 FR 45082 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Reporting... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County...

  11. Caracterización de la Violencia Intrafamiliar en mujeres del municipio Santa Ana. Beni Bolivia Junio-Diciembre 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacquelynes Corona-Hechavarria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abordó una investigación descriptiva en municipio Santa Ana, Beni en Bolivia para determinar el comportamiento de las mujeres que sufren violencia intrafamiliar en el 2010. Los datos se obtuvieron mediante la revisión de las fichas familiares e individuales, se realizaron encuestas directas a las mujeres que sufrían violencia intrafamiliar. Se concluyo que el grupo de edad más afectado fue el de 25-34, con nivel de escolaridad secundaria, predominaron las amas de casa, se encontraron pacientes que reconocían sufrir algún tipo de violencia, las causas más frecuentes fueron los celos y el alcoholismo. Se recomendó continuar la investigación para lograr un incremento del conocimiento sobre la violencia intrafamiliar en la mujer.

  12. Geologic Map of the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain Area, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Keller, Edward A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a newly revised and expanded digital geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground)1 and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Dos Pueblos Canyon, Goleta, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria 7.5' quadrangles. The new map supersedes an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002; revised 2006) that provided coastal coverage only within the Goleta and Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping to the west and east, geologic mapping in parts of the central map area has been significantly revised from the preliminary map compilation - especially north of downtown Santa Barbara in the Mission Ridge area - based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units, including several new units recognized in the areas of expanded mapping, are described in detail in the accompanying pamphlet. Abundant new biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault kinematic observations embedded in the digital map database are more complete owing to the addition of slip-sense determinations. Finally, the pamphlet accompanying the present report includes an expanded and refined summary of stratigraphic and structural observations and interpretations that are based on the composite geologic data contained in the new map compilation. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest

  13. Tar Creek study, Sargent oil field, Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David L.; Fedasko, Bill; Carnahan, J.R.; Brunetti, Ross; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Lorenson, T.D.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Field work in the Tar Creek area of Sargent oil field was performed June 26 to 28, 2000. The Santa Clara County study area is located in Sections, 30, 31, and 32, Township 11 South, Range 4 East, M.D.B&M; and in Sections 25 and 36, Township 11 South, Range 3 East, M.D.B.&M., north and south of Tar Creek, west of Highway 101. The work was a cooperative effort of the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), California Geological Survey (CGS), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The purpose of the project was to map the stratigraphy and geologic structure (David Wagner, CGS); sample oil for age dating (Les Magoon, USGS); and search for undocumented wells plus conduct a GPS survey of the area (Bill Fedasko, J.P. Carnahan, and Ross Brunetti, DOGGR)

  14. Landscapes of Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R. Randall; Minor, Scott A.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Pigati, Jeffery S.

    2014-01-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is the second-largest of the California Channel Islands. It is one of 4 east–west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the 5 islands in Channel Islands National Park. The landforms, and collections of landforms called landscapes, of Santa Rosa Island have been created by tectonic uplift and faulting, rising and falling sea level, landslides, erosion and deposition, floods, and droughts. Landscape features, and areas delineating groups of related features on Santa Rosa Island, are mapped, classified, and described in this paper. Notable landscapes on the island include beaches, coastal plains formed on marine terraces, sand dunes, and sand sheets. In this study, the inland physiography has been classified into 4 areas based on relief and degree of fluvial dissection. Most of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, or barrancas, leaving a relict floodplain above the present channel. A better understanding of the processes and mechanisms that created these landscapes enhances visitors’ enjoyment of their surroundings and contributes to improving land and resource management strategies in order to optimize and balance the multiple goals of conservation, preservation, restoration, and visitor experience.

  15. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Paula, and Santa Clara River Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Rectangular fields of the agriculturally rich Santa Clara River Valley are visible in this perspective view generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and an enhanced Landsat image. The Santa Clara River, which lends its name to this valley, flows from headwaters near Acton, California, 160 km (100 miles) to the Pacific Ocean, and is one of only two natural river systems remaining in southern California. In the foreground of this image, the largely dry riverbed can be seen as a bright feature as it winds its way along the base of South Mountain. The bright region at the right end of this portion of the valley is the city of Santa Paula, California. Founded in 1902, this small, picturesque town at the geographic center of Ventura County is referred to as the 'Citrus Capital of the World.' The city is surrounded by orange, lemon, and avocado groves and is a major distribution point for citrus fruits in the United States. The bright, linear feature in the center of the valley is State Highway 126, the valley's 'main drag.' For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors, from Landsat data, approximate natural color.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200 feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  16. Geologic Map of the Goleta Quadrangle, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2007-01-01

    This map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying those parts of the Santa Barbara coastal plain and adjacent southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains within the Goleta 7 ?? quadrangle at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The Goleta map overlaps an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002) that provided coverage within the coastal, central parts of the Goleta and contiguous Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping in the northern part of the Goleta quadrangle, geologic mapping in other parts of the map area has been revised from the preliminary map compilation based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units are described in detail in the accompanying map pamphlet. Abundant biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault-kinematic observations (including slip-sense determinations) are embedded in the digital map database. The Goleta quadrangle is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The Santa Barbara coastal plain surface, which spans the central part of the quadrangle, includes several mesas and hills that are geomorphic expressions of underlying, potentially active folds and partly buried oblique and reverse faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt (SBFFB). Strong earthquakes have occurred offshore within 10 km of the Santa Barbara coastal plain in 1925 (6.3 magnitude), 1941 (5.5 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude). These and numerous smaller seismic events

  17. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Santa Barbara, California, is often called 'America's Riviera.' It enjoys a Mediterranean climate, a mountain backdrop, and a long and varied coastline. This perspective view of the Santa Barbara region was generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced Landsat satellite image. The view is toward the northeast, from the Goleta Valley in the foreground to a snow-capped Mount Abel (elevation 2526 m or 8286 feet) along the skyline. The coast here generally faces south. Consequently, Fall and Winter sunrises occur over the ocean, which is unusual for the U.S. west coast. The Santa Barbara 'back country' is very rugged and largely remains as undeveloped wilderness and an important watershed for local communities. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data match the 30-meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors approximate natural colors.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface.To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200-feet) long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C. JPL is a

  18. American Pluralism in Microcosm: The City of Santa Ana as Text. Exploring America's Communities. Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancho Santiago Community Coll., Santa Ana, CA.

    In 1996, California's Rancho Santiago College (RSC) participated in the American Association of Community Colleges' Exploring America's Communities project, which works to strengthen the teaching and learning of American history, literature, and culture at U.S. community colleges. To enhance instruction about American pluralism and identity, RSC's…

  19. Parent and conjugated estrogens and progestagens in surface water of the Santa Ana River: Determination, occurrence, and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Yates, Scott R; Ashworth, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The present study investigated the occurrence of 13 parent and conjugated estrogens and progestagens in surface water of the Santa Ana River. With the exception of the synthetic hormones 17α-ethynylestradiol and mestranol, other compounds were detected at least twice at 10 representative sites, with the ubiquitous estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol-3-sulfate as the dominant compounds quantified (0.24-6.37 ng/L and 0.49-9.25 ng/L, respectively). Sites near dairy farms exhibited high levels of conjugates, whereas those close to a sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent outlet displayed relatively high concentrations of E1. Principle component analysis coupled with multiple linear regression revealed dairy farms and the STP as the 2 significant contamination sources, accounting for 69.9% and 31.1% of the total hormone burden, respectively. Risk assessment results suggested E1 and 17β-estradiol (E2) as the 2 hormones with the largest risks to aquatic organisms, and which combined, contributed >90% of the total estrogenicity. Most of the sites investigated showed that E1 and E2 posed a medium risk (0.1 1) at sites severely impacted by the STP and dairy farms. These results suggest that river health would benefit from effective treatment of waste at the STP and dairy farms prior to discharge. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2657-2664. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. 76 FR 60405 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District, Sacramento Municipal Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality... proposing to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District (SBAPCD),...

  1. Hydrogeologic framework of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrologic framework of the Santa Clara Valley in northern California was redefined on the basis of new data and a new hydrologic model. The regional groundwater flow systems can be subdivided into upper-aquifer and lower-aquifer systems that form a convergent flow system within a basin bounded by mountains and hills on three sides and discharge to pumping wells and the southern San Francisco Bay. Faults also control the flow of groundwater within the Santa Clara Valley and subdivide the aquifer system into three subregions.After decades of development and groundwater depletion that resulted in substantial land subsidence, Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) and the local water purveyors have refilled the basin through conservation and importation of water for direct use and artificial recharge. The natural flow system has been altered by extensive development with flow paths toward major well fields. Climate has not only affected the cycles of sedimentation during the glacial periods over the past million years, but interannual to interdecadal climate cycles also have affected the supply and demand components of the natural and anthropogenic inflows and outflows of water in the valley. Streamflow has been affected by development of the aquifer system and regulated flow from reservoirs, as well as conjunctive use of groundwater and surface water. Interaquifer flow through water-supply wells screened across multiple aquifers is an important component to the flow of groundwater and recapture of artificial recharge in the Santa Clara Valley. Wellbore flow and depth-dependent chemical and isotopic data indicate that flow into wells from multiple aquifers, as well as capture of artificial recharge by pumping of water-supply wells, predominantly is occurring in the upper 500 ft (152 m) of the aquifer system. Artificial recharge represents about one-half of the inflow of water into the valley for the period 1970–1999. Most subsidence is occurring below 250 ft

  2. South Fork of the Santa Clara River, Santa Clarita Valley, California. Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Santa Eriodictyon trichocalyx Eucrypta Eucrypta chrysanthemifolia LAMIACEAE Purple Sage Salvia leucophylla PAEONIACEAE Peony Paeonia californica...Bush Lupine Lupinus ex-cubitus HYDROPHYLLACEAE Yerba Santa Eriodictyon trichocaLx Eucrypta Eucrypta chrysanthemifolia LAMIACEAE Purple Sage Salvia

  3. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Barbara Coastline, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Santa Barbara, California, region provides a beautiful snapshot of the area's rugged mountains and long and varied coastline. Generated using data acquired from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced Landsat image this is a perspective view toward the northeast, from the Goleta Valley in the foreground to a snow-capped Mount Abel (elevation 2,526 m or 8,286 feet) along the skyline at the left. On a clear day, a pilot might see a similar view shortly before touching down on the east-west runway of the Santa Barbara Airport, seen just to the left of the coastline near the center of image. This area is one of the few places along the U.S. West Coast where because of a south-facing beach, fall and winter sunrises occur over the ocean.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data match the 30-meter(98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors approximate natural colors.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200-feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

  4. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Dieter, Bryan E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Endris, Charles A.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-03-24

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Santa Cruz map area is located in central California, on the Pacific Coast about 98 km south of San Francisco. The city of Santa Cruz (population, about 63,000), the largest incorporated city in the map area and the county seat of Santa Cruz County, lies on uplifted marine terraces between the shoreline and the northwest-trending Santa Cruz Mountains, part of California’s Coast Ranges. All of California’s State Waters in the map area is part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.The map area is cut by an offshore section of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, and it lies about 20 kilometers southwest of the San Andreas Fault Zone. Regional folding and uplift along the coast has been attributed to a westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone and to right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Most of the coastal zone is characterized by low, rocky cliffs and sparse, small pocket beaches backed by low, terraced hills. Point Santa Cruz, which forms the north edge of Monterey Bay, provides protection for the beaches in the easternmost part of the map area by sheltering them from the predominantly northwesterly waves.The shelf in the map area is underlain by variable amounts (0 to 25 m) of

  5. Evidence of shallow hydrocarbons offshore northern Santa Cruz county, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, H.T.; Nagel, D.K.

    1982-08-01

    Analyses of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and hydrocarbon samples indicate that natural hydrocarbon seepage is occurring along the San Gregorio and Monterey Bay fault zones offshore northern Santa Cruz County, California. A variety of anomalous seismic reflection features such as a water-column anomalies, subsurface amplitude anomalies (''bright spots''), and seismic ''smears/wipeouts'' has been observed and mapped. More than 100 water-column anomalies (probably gas seeps) occur in the study area of approximately 270 mi/sup 2/ (700 km/sup 2/). Many of these seismic anomalies are associated with subsurface geologic structures, which suggest hydrocarbon migration from depth. Samples of natural gas collected from a shallow coastal water well contain 74 to 91% methane, 7 to 23% nitrogen, approx.2% carbon dioxide, and < 1% ethane. The methane appears to be thermogenic in origin, having delta/sup 13/C values of -29.51 to -32.55% PDB. Rock dredges from 2,300 ft (700 m) of water in Ascension Submarine Canyon have also recovered oil-saturated sandstones, further suggesting the seepage of hydrocarbons. The shallow occurrence of most of these hydrocarbons are interpreted to be the result of migration from depth along active faults within the San Gregorio and Monterey Bay faults zones.

  6. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Greene, H. Gary; Dieter, Bryan E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Endris, Charles A.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-03-24

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Santa Cruz map area is located in central California, on the Pacific Coast about 98 km south of San Francisco. The city of Santa Cruz (population, about 63,000), the largest incorporated city in the map area and the county seat of Santa Cruz County, lies on uplifted marine terraces between the shoreline and the northwest-trending Santa Cruz Mountains, part of California’s Coast Ranges. All of California’s State Waters in the map area is part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.The map area is cut by an offshore section of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, and it lies about 20 kilometers southwest of the San Andreas Fault Zone. Regional folding and uplift along the coast has been attributed to a westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone and to right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Most of the coastal zone is characterized by low, rocky cliffs and sparse, small pocket beaches backed by low, terraced hills. Point Santa Cruz, which forms the north edge of Monterey Bay, provides protection for the beaches in the easternmost part of the map area by sheltering them from the predominantly northwesterly waves.The shelf in the map area is underlain by variable amounts (0 to 25 m) of

  7. Proyecto de desarrollo organizacional de talleres creativos en el currículo de la educación musical del Colegio de Santa Ana

    OpenAIRE

    Valverde Hernández, Walter

    2013-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se propone la realización de un proyecto que busca ser una opción práctica que favorezca la labor del docente de música en el campo educativo, asimismo, colabore en la búsqueda de la calidad de la administración ofrecida en un Centro Educativo. La investigación tiene como objetivo proporcionarle un proyecto al Colegio de Santa Ana para ser aplicado en el currículo de la Educación Musical. La propuesta es desarrollar alte...

  8. Breschini and Haversat, eds.: Analysis of South-Central California Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of South-Central Californian Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties. Gary S. Breschmi and Trudy Haversat, eds. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 23, 1988, xiv + 105 pp., 21 figs., 28 tables, $8.70, (paper).

  9. Environmental Assessment: Western Range Instrumentation Modernization Program Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, and Pillar Point Air Force Station, San Mateo County California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-03

    Ynez, CA University of California, Library, Santa Barbara, CA University of California, Museum of Systematics & Ecology, Santa Barbara, CA U.S. Fish...Arnold, R.A. 1983. Ecological studies of six endangered butterflies ( Lepidoptera : Lycaenidae): island biogeography, patch dynamics, and the design of...of Vandenberg AFB, Santa Barbara County, California. Museum of Systematics and Ecology, Report No. 4, University of California, Santa Barbara, in

  10. Assessing marine microbial induced corrosion at Santa Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Antonio Ramírez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High iron and eutrophic conditions are reported as environmental factors leading to accelerated low-water corrosion, an enhanced form of near-shore microbial-induced corrosion. To explore this hypothesis, we deployed flow-through colonization systems in laboratory-based aquarium tanks under a continuous flow of surface seawater from Santa Catalina Island, California, USA, for periods of two and six months. Substrates consisted of mild steel – a major constituent of maritime infrastructure – and the naturally occurring iron sulfide mineral pyrite. Four conditions were tested: free-venting high-flux conditions; a stagnant condition; an active flow-through condition with seawater slowly pumped over the substrates; and an enrichment condition where the slow pumping of seawater was supplemented with nutrient rich medium. Electron microscopy analyses of the two-month high flux incubations document coating of substrates with twisted stalks, resembling iron oxyhydroxide bioprecipitates made by marine neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria. Six-month incubations exhibit increased biofilm and substrate corrosion in the active flow and nutrient enriched conditions relative to the stagnant condition. A scarcity of twisted stalks was observed for all six month slow-flow conditions compared to the high-flux condition, which may be attributable to oxygen concentrations in the slow-flux conditions being prohibitively low for sustained growth of stalk-producing bacteria. All substrates developed microbial communities reflective of the original seawater input, as based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Deltaproteobacteria sequences increased in relative abundance in the active flow and nutrient enrichment conditions, whereas Gammaproteobacteria sequences were relatively more abundant in the stagnant condition. These results indicate that i high-flux incubations with higher oxygen availability favor the development of biofilms with twisted stalks resembling those of

  11. El carnaval del río: guardado en lo puro de sus raíces carnaval de santa ana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Royero

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cuando es tiempo de carnestolendas, momento de trasgresión, el ser comienza a reproducir el inventario de creatividad en sus raíces. El carn2val de Santa Ana, como una festividad legada en el proceso de aculturación ytransculturación mediante el tamiz adelantado por la Iglesia Católica durante la conquista y el coloniaje realizado por España, dejó las raíces de este festíncapaz de producir el frondoso árbol que hoy se conoce como Carnaval del Río.

  12. Evidences of volcanic unrest on high-temperature fumaroles by satellite thermal monitoring: The case of Santa Ana volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, M.; Coppola, D.; Barahona, F.; Benítez, J. E.; Cigolini, C.; Escobar, D.; Funes, R.; Gutierrez, E.; Henriquez, B.; Hernandez, A.; Montalvo, F.; Olmos, R.; Ripepe, M.; Finizola, A.

    2017-06-01

    On October 1st, 2005, Santa Ana volcano (El Salvador) underwent a VEI 3 phreatomagmatic eruption after approximately one century of rest. Casualties and damages to some of the local infrastructures and surrounding plantations were followed by the evacuation of the nearby communities. The analysis of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) infrared data reveals that the main explosion was preceded by a one-year-long thermal unrest, associated to the development of a fumaroles field, located at the western rim of the summit crater lake. By combining space-based thermal flux and ground-based measurements (seismicity, sulfur emissions and lake temperatures), we suggest that the activity observed at Santa Ana between 2004 and 2005 was driven by the gradual intrusion of an undegassed magma body at a very shallow depth. Magma injection induced thermal anomalies associated with sustained degassing from the fumaroles field and promoted the interaction between the magmatic-hydrothermal system and the overlying water table. This process culminated into the VEI 3 phreatomagmatic eruption of October 2005 that strongly modified the shallow structure of the crater area. The subsequent three-years-long activity resulted from self-sealing of the fracture system and by the opening of a new fracture network directly connecting the deeper hydrothermal system with the crater lake. Our results show that satellite-based thermal data allow us to detect the expansion of the high-temperature fumarolic field. This may precede an explosive eruption and/or a lava dome extrusion. In particular, we show that thermal records can be analyzed with other geochemical (i.e. SO2 emissions) and geophysical (seismicity) data to track a shallow magmatic intrusion interacting with the surrounding hydrothermal system. This provides a remarkable support for volcano monitoring and eruption forecasting, particularly in remote areas where permanent ground data acquisition is hazardous, expensive

  13. Assessing Marine Microbial Induced Corrosion at Santa Catalina Island, California

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Hoffman, Colleen L.; Lee, Michael D.; Lesniewski, Ryan A.; Barco, Roman A.; Garber, Arkadiy; Toner, Brandy M; Wheat, Charles G.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2016-01-01

    High iron and eutrophic conditions are reported as environmental factors leading to accelerated low-water corrosion, an enhanced form of near-shore microbial induced corrosion. To explore this hypothesis, we deployed flow-through colonization systems in laboratory-based aquarium tanks under a continuous flow of surface seawater from Santa Catalina Island, CA, USA, for periods of 2 and 6 months. Substrates consisted of mild steel – a major constituent of maritime infrastructure – and the natur...

  14. Geology and paleontology of the Santa Maria district, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodring, W.P.; Bramlette, M.N.

    1950-01-01

    Stratigraphy, paleontology, and geologic history.-A basement' consisting of igneous rocks of the Jurassic(?) Franciscan formation and sediments of the Upper Jurassic Knoxville formation, and formations of Tertiary and Quaternary age are exposed in the Santa Maria district. The outcrop section, exclusive of the Franciscan, has a maximum thickness of about 10,000 feet, the subsurface section about 27,000 feet. At no locality, however, is either outcrop or subsurface section as thick as the total maxima for the formations.

  15. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Santa Ana, California/Tustin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    marks beginning sometime in 1945, but few stations have punched data prior to 1948. This summary will, of course , be limited to period of available data...0 •3 ,7•? r. ,78, - -7 ’.?•U.77 7.7 ,’ 200__7 7..j 7~Z t2 i, 7 o3 79o3 79*7 afu. n 1 c9Dt .r, spoc spec ag~og bc o.O -soo t 910 18000 I.7 ś -7. 3.3

  16. Nutrient contributions to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the ephemeral Santa Clara River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Washburn, L.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Siegel, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Santa Clara River delivers nutrient rich runoff to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief (???1-3 day) episodic events. Using both river and oceanographic measurements, we evaluate river loading and dispersal of dissolved macronutrients (silicate, inorganic N and P) and comment on the biological implications of these nutrient contributions. Both river and ocean observations suggest that river nutrient concentrations are inversely related to river flow rates. Land use is suggested to influence these concentrations, since runoff from a subwatershed with substantial agriculture and urban areas had much higher nitrate than runoff from a wooded subwatershed. During runoff events, river nutrients were observed to conservatively mix into the buoyant, surface plume immediately seaward of the Santa Clara River mouth. Dispersal of these river nutrients extended 10s of km into the channel. Growth of phytoplankton and nutrient uptake was low during our observations (1-3 days following runoff), presumably due to the very low light levels resulting from high turbidity. However, nutrient quality of runoff (Si:N:P = 16:5:1) was found to be significantly different than upwelling inputs (13:10:1), which may influence different algal responses once sediments settle. Evaluation of total river nitrate loads suggests that most of the annual river nutrient fluxes to the ocean occur during the brief winter flooding events. Wet winters (such as El Nin??o) contribute nutrients at rates approximately an order-of-magnitude greater than "average" winters. Although total river nitrate delivery is considerably less than that supplied by upwelling, the timing and location of these types of events are very different, with river discharge (upwelling) occurring predominantly in the winter (summer) and in the eastern (western) channel. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coastal Processes Study of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Revell, David L.; Hoover, Dan; Warrick, Jon; Brocatus, John; Draut, Amy E.; Dartnell, Pete; Elias, Edwin; Mustain, Neomi; Hart, Pat E.; Ryan, Holly F.

    2009-01-01

    The Santa Barbara littoral cell (SBLC) is a complex coastal system with significant management challenges. The coastline ranges broadly in exposure to wave energy, fluvial inputs, hard structures, and urbanization. Geologic influence (structural control) on coastline orientation exerts an important control on local beach behavior, with anthropogenic alterations and the episodic nature of sediment supply and transport also playing important roles. Short- and long-term temporal analyses of shoreline change, beach width, and volume change show no obvious trends in regional beach behavior. Extensive armoring along the SBLC has accreted the back beach, narrowing beach widths and in some cases increasing sediment transport. Unarmored beaches have exhibited mild erosion while maintaining similar widths. Harbor constructions have had notable impacts on downdrift beaches, but once the coastal system has equilibrated the signal becomes strongly dampened and littoral-drift gradients driven by natural shoreline orientation again become dominant. Sediment inputs from the Santa Clara River dominate sediment processes on beaches to the south. The SBLC is dominated by episodic flood and storm-wave events. Exceptionally large accretion signals along this stretch of coastline are closely tied to major flood events when large amounts of sediment are deposited in deltas. These deltas decay over time, supplying downdrift beaches with sediment. Storm-wave impacts and gradients in alongshore transport can lead to beach rotations and migrating erosion hotspots when geological controls are weak. Annual and seasonal rates of cross-shore and alongshore transport are at least 2-3 times higher for the more west- and southwest-facing beaches south of the Ventura River as compared to the more sheltered beaches to the west/north. Gross littoral transports are good approximations of net littoral transports for beaches west/north of Ventura as transport is almost purely unidirectional. However

  18. Spatially explicit West Nile virus risk modeling in Santa Clara County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Sarah K; Miller, Scott N; Reeves, Will K; Tietze, Noor S

    2009-06-01

    A geographic information system model designed to identify regions at risk for West Nile virus (WNV) transmission was calibrated and tested with data collected in Santa Clara County, California. American Crows that died from WNV infection in 2005 provided spatial and temporal ground truth. When the model was run with parameters based on Culex tarsalis infected with the NY99 genotype of the virus, it underestimated WNV occurrence in Santa Clara Co. The parameters were calibrated to fit the field data by reducing the number of degree-days necessary to reach the mosquito's extrinsic incubation period from 109 to 76. The calibration raised model efficiency from 61% to 92% accuracy, and the model performed well the following year in Santa Clara Co.

  19. Structural superposition in fault systems bounding Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, Russell W.; Stanley, Richard G.; Ponce, David A.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2015-01-01

    Santa Clara Valley is bounded on the southwest and northeast by active strike-slip and reverse-oblique faults of the San Andreas fault system. On both sides of the valley, these faults are superposed on older normal and/or right-lateral normal oblique faults. The older faults comprised early components of the San Andreas fault system as it formed in the wake of the northward passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. On the east side of the valley, the great majority of fault displacement was accommodated by the older faults, which were almost entirely abandoned when the presently active faults became active after ca. 2.5 Ma. On the west side of the valley, the older faults were abandoned earlier, before ca. 8 Ma and probably accumulated only a small amount, if any, of the total right-lateral offset accommodated by the fault zone as a whole. Apparent contradictions in observations of fault offset and the relation of the gravity field to the distribution of dense rocks at the surface are explained by recognition of superposed structures in the Santa Clara Valley region.

  20. Condensed matter research using the UCSB FEL. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara Free Electron Laser project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) Free Electron Laser (FEL) project was initiated in 1981 to test the idea of using an electrostatic accelerator in a recirculating beam mode to produce high-power, continuously tunable, coherent far infrared radiation. The development and application of this device to condensed matter research are briefly recounted. Emphasis was on semiconductor research and two-photon experiments. (RWR)

  1. Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, from the SCSI-LR Seismic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Santa Clara Valley is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and generally includes the area south of the San Francisco Bay between the Santa Cruz Mountains on the southwest and the Diablo Ranges on the northeast. The area has a population of approximately 1.7 million including the city of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley. Major active strands of the San Andreas Fault system bound the Santa Clara Valley, including the San Andreas fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast; related faults likely underlie the alluvium of the valley. This report focuses on subsurface structures of the western Santa Clara Valley and the northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and their potential effects on earthquake hazards and ground-water resource management in the area. Earthquake hazards and ground-water resources in the Santa Clara Valley are important considerations to California and the Nation because of the valley's preeminence as a major technical and industrial center, proximity to major earthquakes faults, and large population. To assess the earthquake hazards of the Santa Clara Valley better, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential earthquake sources and potential effects of strong ground shaking within the valley. As part of that program, and to better assess water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began conducting collaborative studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the alluvial cover of the Santa Clara Valley in the year 2000. Such geologic features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local or regional

  2. Water-resources optimization model for Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of the city of Santa Barbara's water resources during a drought. The model, which links groundwater simulation with linear programming, has a planning horizon of 5 years. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply subject to: water demand constraints, hydraulic head constraints to control seawater intrusion, and water capacity constraints. The decision variables are montly water deliveries from surface water and groundwater. The state variables are hydraulic heads. The drought of 1947-51 is the city's worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. The simulation-optimization model was applied using three reservoir operation rules. In addition, the model's sensitivity to demand, carry over [the storage of water in one year for use in the later year(s)], head constraints, and capacity constraints was tested.

  3. 78 FR 21580 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego... District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portions of the California...

  4. Assessing Marine Microbial Induced Corrosion at Santa Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Gustavo A; Hoffman, Colleen L; Lee, Michael D; Lesniewski, Ryan A; Barco, Roman A; Garber, Arkadiy; Toner, Brandy M; Wheat, Charles G; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N

    2016-01-01

    High iron and eutrophic conditions are reported as environmental factors leading to accelerated low-water corrosion, an enhanced form of near-shore microbial induced corrosion. To explore this hypothesis, we deployed flow-through colonization systems in laboratory-based aquarium tanks under a continuous flow of surface seawater from Santa Catalina Island, CA, USA, for periods of 2 and 6 months. Substrates consisted of mild steel - a major constituent of maritime infrastructure - and the naturally occurring iron sulfide mineral pyrite. Four conditions were tested: free-venting "high-flux" conditions; a "stagnant" condition; an "active" flow-through condition with seawater slowly pumped over the substrates; and an "enrichment" condition where the slow pumping of seawater was supplemented with nutrient rich medium. Electron microscopy analyses of the 2-month high flux incubations document coating of substrates with "twisted stalks," resembling iron oxyhydroxide bioprecipitates made by marine neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Six-month incubations exhibit increased biofilm and substrate corrosion in the active flow and nutrient enriched conditions relative to the stagnant condition. A scarcity of twisted stalks was observed for all 6 month slow-flow conditions compared to the high-flux condition, which may be attributable to oxygen concentrations in the slow-flux conditions being prohibitively low for sustained growth of stalk-producing bacteria. All substrates developed microbial communities reflective of the original seawater input, as based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Deltaproteobacteria sequences increased in relative abundance in the active flow and nutrient enrichment conditions, whereas Gammaproteobacteria sequences were relatively more abundant in the stagnant condition. These results indicate that (i) high-flux incubations with higher oxygen availability favor the development of biofilms with twisted stalks resembling those of marine neutrophilic Fe

  5. Biologic origin of iron nodules in a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.; Schulz, C.; Fitzpatrick, J.; White, A.

    2010-01-01

    The distribution, chemistry, and morphology of Fe nodules were studied in a marine terrace soil chronosequence northwest of Santa Cruz, California. The Fe nodules are found at depths hematite with time. The abundance of soil Fe nodules increased with terrace age on the five terraces studied (aged 65,000-226,000 yr). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed Fe-oxide-containing fungal hyphae throughout the nodules, including organic structures incorporating fine-grained Fe oxides. The fine-grained nature of the Fe oxides was substantiated by M??ssbauer spectroscopy. Our microscopic observations led to the hypothesis that the nodules in the Santa Cruz terrace soils are precipitated by fungi, perhaps as a strategy to sequester primary mineral grains for nutrient extraction. The fungal structures are fixed by the seasonal wetting and dry cycles and rounded through bioturbation. The organic structures are compacted by the degradation of fungal C with time. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical subdivision and description of the water-bearing sediments of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Jachens, Robert C.; Williams, Robert A.; Tinsley, John C.; Hanson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    A thick Quaternary alluvial section fills a sedimentary basin beneath the Santa Clara Valley, California, located within the San Andreas Fault system at the south end of San Francisco Bay. This section consists of an upper sequence about 1,000 feet thick containing eight sedimentary cycles and a lower fine-grained unit as thick as several hundred feet. Together these constitute the Quaternary Santa Clara Basin. The section overlies an irregular unconformity with more than 1,200 feet of relief cut into the underlying bedrock. This stratigraphy is determined through study of new wells and seismic reflection profiles, together with a sample of the many thousands of water wells in the valley. It represents a major change and improvement in understanding of the basin, particularly with regard to the upper cyclic sequence, which forms a large groundwater system that is an important resource in the San Francisco Bay region.

  7. Potential earthquake faults offshore Southern California, from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M.A.; Sorlien, C.C.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Urban areas in Southern California are at risk from major earthquakes, not only quakes generated by long-recognized onshore faults but also ones that occur along poorly understood offshore faults. We summarize recent research findings concerning these lesser known faults. Research by the U.S. Geological Survey during the past five years indicates that these faults from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point pose a potential earthquake threat. Historical seismicity in this area indicates that, in general, offshore faults can unleash earthquakes having at least moderate (M 5-6) magnitude. Estimating the earthquake hazard in Southern California is complicated by strain partitioning and by inheritance of structures from early tectonic episodes. The three main episodes are Mesozoic through early Miocene subduction, early Miocene crustal extension coeval with rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges, and Pliocene and younger transpression related to plate-boundary motion along the San Andreas Fault. Additional complication in the analysis of earthquake hazards derives from the partitioning of tectonic strain into strike-slip and thrust components along separate but kinematically related faults. The eastern Santa Barbara Basin is deformed by large active reverse and thrust faults, and this area appears to be underlain regionally by the north-dipping Channel Islands thrust fault. These faults could produce moderate to strong earthquakes and destructive tsunamis. On the Malibu coast, earthquakes along offshore faults could have left-lateral-oblique focal mechanisms, and the Santa Monica Mountains thrust fault, which underlies the oblique faults, could give rise to large (M ??7) earthquakes. Offshore faults near Santa Monica Bay and the San Pedro shelf are likely to produce both strike-slip and thrust earthquakes along northwest-striking faults. In all areas, transverse structures, such as lateral ramps and tear faults, which crosscut the main faults, could

  8. A comparison of municipal forest benefits and costs in Modesto and Santa Monica, California, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; J.R. Simpson

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the structure, function, and value of street and park tree populations in two California cities. Trees provided net annual benefits valued at $ 2.2 million in Modesto and $805, 732 in Santa Monica. Benefit-cost ratios were 1.85:1 and 1.52:1 in Modesto and Santa Monica, respectively. Residents received $1.85 and $1.52 in annual...

  9. Seismic risk analysis for the Atomics International Nuclear Materials Development Facility, Santa Susana California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-29

    This report presents the results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) operated by Atomics International at Santa Susana, California. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases including the USGS, California Institute of Technology and NEIS data bases. The resulting seismic record, covering the period 1969 to 1977, was used to identify all possible sources of seismicity that could affect the site. The best estimate curve indicates that the facility will experience 30% g with a return period of 55 years and 60% g with a return period of 750 years.

  10. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Kass

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992–2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo. However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994–2005. The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes.

  11. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Philip H; Johnson, Karen L; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992-2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo). However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994-2005). The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes.

  12. Physical data of soil profiles formed on late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munster, Jennie; Harden, Jennifer W.

    2002-01-01

    The marine terraces in and around Santa Cruz, California, represent a set of well-preserved terraces formed as a product of geology, sea level, and climate. A marine terrace begins as a wave cut platform. Eustatic sea level changes, seacliff erosion, and tectonic uplift work together to generate marine terraces. "When a wave-cut platform is raised (due to tectonic activity) above sea level and cliffed by wave action it becomes a marine terrace" (Bradley, 1957, p. 424). During glacial periods, eustatic sea level is estimated to have dropped by 150 meters (Fairbanks, 1989). Cliff retreat measured from aerial photographs between 1930 and 1980 vary from 0.0 to 0.2 m yr–1 (Best and Griggs, 1991). Estimates of uplift rates along the Santa Cruz coastline vary from 0.10 to 0.48 m kyr–1 (Bradley and Griggs, 1976; Weber and others, 1999). Uplift mechanisms include coseismic uplift associated both with a reverse component of slip on the steeply SW dipping Loma Prieta fault in the restraining bend of the San Andreas Fault and a small component of reverse slip on the steeply SE dipping San Gregorio fault (Anderson and Menking 1994). Previous work studying physical properties on these terraces include Pinney and others (in press) and Aniku (1986) and Bowman and Estrada (1980). Sedimentary deposits of the marine terraces are a mixture of terrestrial and marine sediments but generally consist of a sheet of marine deposits overlying the old platform and a wedge of nonmarine deposits banked against the old sea cliff (Bradley, 1957). Bedrock underlying the terraces in the Santa Cruz area is generally either Santa Margarita Sandstone or Santa Cruz Mudstone. The Santa Margarita Sandstone represents an upper Miocene, transgressive, tidally dominated marine-shelf deposit with crossbedded sets of sand and gravel and horizontally stratified and bioturbated invertebrate-fossils beds (Phillips, 1990). The siliceous Santa Cruz Mudstone, of late Miocene age, conformably overlies the Santa

  13. Santa Fe Indian Camp, House 21, Richmond, California: Persistence of Identity among Laguna Pueblo Railroad Laborers, 1945-1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kurt

    1995-01-01

    In 1880 the Laguna people and the predecessor of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad reached an agreement giving the railroad unhindered right-of-way through Laguna lands in exchange for Laguna employment "forever." Discusses the Laguna-railroad relationship through 1982, Laguna labor camps in California, and the persistence of…

  14. 78 FR 21537 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego... Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD...

  15. The Old Spanish Days Fiesta in Santa Barbara, California: Cultural Hybridity, Colonial Mythologies and the Romanticization of a Latino Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ann Hardwick

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Old Spanish Days Fiesta is a tradition that was invented in 1924 by civic leaders in Santa Barbara, California to celebrate the periods of the Spanish settlement and the Mexican rule of California and to promote local tourism. This article will trace the historical narrative of the complex cultural and ethnic composition of Santa Barbara before interrogating the colonial and post-colonial histories of the Californian past that are so often romanticized during the events of the Santa Barbara Fiesta. Subsequent to the American appropriation of California, Anglo-American ideas of race and identity were imposed upon Latino Californians. This development led many Spanish-speaking Californians to cultivate a Spanish identity and de-emphasize their Mexican, Native American, or African ancestry as they attempted to maintain their land grants and social prominence under American rule. Official versions of Santa Barbara’s past promoted by Santa Barbara’s civic leaders and Old Spanish Days Fiesta literature tend to privilege romanticized historical interpretations that submerge and absorb California’s hybrid ethnic and cultural histories into an idealized Spanish colonial narrative. This article explores how many individual Santa Barbara Fiesteros choose to engage, negotiate, and/or subvert this simplified official civic narrative of Santa Barbara’s Spanish past through their own personal performances during the Fiesta. An analysis of how local festival participants envision their performance in the context of the festival allows outsiders to have a glimpse into how they create and embody their own personal and nuanced understandings of history during the Fiesta.

  16. Estudio energético de una guardería en Santa Eulalia de Ronçana construida con los parámetros de la bioarquitectura

    OpenAIRE

    Bascones Cebollada, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    El proyecto Final de Carrera consiste en un análisis de demanda energética y un análisis del consumo energético de los materiales utilizados en una GUARDERÍA MUNICIPAL, ubicada en la Avenida Josep Tarradelles, s/n. C.P. 08187. Municipio de SANTA EULÀLIA DE RONÇANA. Del Arquitecto GABRIEL BARBETA SOLA. El objetivo del PFC trata de demostrar con estos análisis; que la construcción de un tipo de edificación tradicional y con recursos naturales, tiene una eficiencia energética más ...

  17. Estrategias de Aprendizaje que promueven la Metacognición empleadas por los Docentes con el Fin de mejorar la Comprensión Lectora en Estudiantes de Cuarto Grado de una Escuela Pública en Santa Ana, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Gómez, Margoth

    2016-01-01

    El problema y el objetivo general del presente estudio investigativo buscó identificar las estrategias de aprendizaje empleadas por el docente que promueven la habilidad de metacognición con el fin de mejorar la comprensión de lectura de los estudiantes de una escuela pública en el distrito de Santa Ana, Costa Rica. En cuanto a la metodología se utilizaron el diseño cualitativo y el evaluativo. Para la recolección de datos se utilizaron las técnicas de observación, entrevista y análisis de co...

  18. Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Jesse L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and

  19. Status of groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Study Unit, 2011: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated in 2011 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study unit is mostly in Santa Barbara County and is in the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer system of California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Santa Barbara study unit. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Santa Barbara study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.The status assessment for the Santa Barbara study unit was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey from 23 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database for January 24, 2008–January 23, 2011. The data used for the assessment included volatile organic compounds; pesticides; pharmaceutical compounds; two constituents of special interest, perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used to evaluate groundwater quality for those constituents that have federal or California regulatory and non

  20. The Dogs of CA-SRI-2: Osteometry of Canis familiaris from Santa Rosa Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Hofman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Domesticated dogs (Canis familiaris are an important human companion around the world and have long been a focus of archaeological research. Osteometric analysis of six dogs from a Late Holocene Chumash village on Santa Rosa Island, California indicates that adults, juvenile/young adults, and a puppy were present. Similar to dogs on other Channel Islands, these dogs fall into the large Indian dog category, standing some 43-54 cm tall, with mesaticephalic or mild brachycephalic facial characteristics. No cutmarks were found on the bones, but one of the mandibles was burned. The CA-SRI-2 dogs appear to have eaten high trophic marine foods similar to what humans consumed, documenting the close bond between dogs and humans on the Channel Islands and broader North American Pacific Coast.

  1. Kirschenmann Road multi-well monitoring site, Cuyama Valley, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R.R.; Hanson, R.T.; Sweetkind, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Water Agency Division of the Santa Barbara County Department of Public Works, is evaluating the geohydrology and water availability of the Cuyama Valley, California (fig. 1). As part of this evaluation, the USGS installed the Cuyama Valley Kirschenmann Road multiple-well monitoring site (CVKR) in the South-Main subregion of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1). The CVKR well site is designed to allow for the collection of depth-specific water-level and water-quality data. Data collected at this site provides information about the geology, hydrology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the local aquifer system, thus, enhancing the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Cuyama Valley. This report presents the construction information and initial geohydrologic data collected from the CVKR monitoring site, along with a brief comparison to selected supply and irrigation wells from the major subregions of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1).

  2. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter-outer mainland shelf, eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Finlayson, David P.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Erdey, Mercedes D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 and 2011, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from the outer shelf region of the eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California. These surveys were conducted in cooperation with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). BOEM is interested in maps of hard-bottom substrates, particularly natural outcrops that support reef communities in areas near oil and gas extraction activity. The surveys were conducted using the USGS R/V Parke Snavely, outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping and real-time kinematic navigation equipment. This report provides the bathymetry and backscatter data acquired during these surveys in several formats, a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  3. “Experiencia de la escuela normal superior santa Ana de Baranoa en el diseño e implementacion de un sistema de Gestión Ambiental”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibón Silvera Rada (Página 37-54

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El  proyecto de investigación “Diseño e implementación de un Sistema de Gestión Ambiental en la Escuela Normal Superior Santa Ana y el barrio Santa Ana del municipio de Baranoa, que fomente la participación de la comunidad educativa en el manejo adecuado de los residuos sólidos” ; se viene realizando desde el año 2006 y actualmente se encuentra vigente.A través de éste proyecto se buscó diseñar e implementar un Sistema de Gestión Ambiental en la Escuela y el barrio, que fomentara la participación de la comunidad educativa y de los habitantes del barrio, con el propósito de plantear alternativas de solución  en torno a la problemática en común de las dos zonas de estudio residuos sólidos

  4. Field-trip guide to the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This field trip is an introduction to the geology of the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in southern Santa Clara County. Seven stops include four short hikes to access rock exposures and views of the foothills east of Loma Prieta Peak between Gilroy and San José. Field-trip destinations highlight the dominant rock types of the "Franciscan assemblage" including outcrops of serpentinite, basalt, limestone, ribbon chert, graywacke sandstone, and shale. General discussions include how the rocks formed, and how tectonism and stream erosion have changed the landscape through time. All field trip stops are on public land; most are near reservoir dams of the Santa Clara Valley Water District. In addition, stops include examination of an Ohlone Indian heritage site and the New Almaden Mining Museum.

  5. Status of groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Study Unit, 2011: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated in 2011 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study unit is mostly in Santa Barbara County and is in the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer system of California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Santa Barbara study unit. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Santa Barbara study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.The status assessment for the Santa Barbara study unit was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey from 23 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database for January 24, 2008–January 23, 2011. The data used for the assessment included volatile organic compounds; pesticides; pharmaceutical compounds; two constituents of special interest, perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used to evaluate groundwater quality for those constituents that have federal or California regulatory and non

  6. Coccolithophore response to climate and surface hydrography in Santa Barbara Basin, California, AD 1917–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grelaud

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The varved sedimentary AD 1917–2004 record from the depositional center of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB, California was analyzed with monthly to annual resolution to yield relative abundances of six coccolithophore species representing at least 96% of the coccolithophore assemblage. Seasonal/annual relative abundances respond to climatic and surface hydrographic conditions in the SBB, whereby (i the three species G. oceanica, H. carteri and F. profunda are characteristic of the strength of the northward flowing warm California Counter Current, (ii the two species G. ericsonii and G. muellerae are associated with the cold equatorward flowing California Current, (iii and E. huxleyi appears to be endemic to the SBB. Spectral analyses on relative abundances of these species show that all are influenced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO and/or by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO. Increased relative abundances of G. oceanica and H. carteri are associated with warm ENSO events, G. muellerae responds to warm PDO events, and the abundance of G. ericsonii increases during cold PDO events. Morphometric parameters measured on E. huxleyi, G. muellerae and G. oceanica indicate increasing coccolithophore calcification from ~1917 until 2004 concomitant with rising pCO2 and sea surface temperature in the region of the SBB.

  7. Report on data from the Nearshore Sediment Transport Study experiment at Leadbetter Beach, Santa Barbara, California, January-February 1980 (NODC Accession 8200080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF THE RESULTS OF THE NEARSHORE SEDIMENT Nearshore Sediment Transport Study at Leadbetter Beach, Santa Barbara, California. These data from 28...

  8. Santa Clara Valley water district multi-aquifer monitoring-well site, Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom, San Jose, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Newhouse, M.W.; Wentworth, C.M.; Williams, C.F.; Noce, T.E.; Bennett, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), has completed the first of several multiple-aquifer monitoring-well sites in the Santa Clara Valley. This site monitors ground-water levels and chemistry in the one of the major historic subsidence regions south of San Jose, California, at the Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom (CCOC) (fig. 1) and provides additional basic information about the geology, hydrology, geochemistry, and subsidence potential of the upper- and lower-aquifer systems that is a major source of public water supply in the Santa Clara Valley. The site also serves as a science education exhibit at the outdoor classroom operated by SCVWD.

  9. Nine endangered taxa, one recovering ecosystem: Identifying common ground for recovery on Santa Cruz Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, A. Kathryn; Wilken, Dieter H.

    2011-01-01

    It is not uncommon to have several rare and listed taxa occupying habitats in one landscape or management area where conservation amounts to defense against the possibility of further loss. It is uncommon and extremely exciting, however, to have several listed taxa occupying one island that is managed cooperatively for conservation and recovery. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the northern California island group in the Santa Barbara Channel, we have a golden opportunity to marry ecological knowledge and institutional "good will" in a field test of holistic rare plant conservation. Here, the last feral livestock have been removed, active weed control is underway, and management is focused on understanding and demonstrating system response to conservation management. Yet funding limitations still exist and we need to plan the most fiscally conservative and marketable approach to rare plant restoration. We still experience the tension between desirable quick results and the ecological pace of system recovery. Therefore, our research has focused on identifying fundamental constraints on species recovery at individual, demographic, habitat, and ecosystem levels, and then developing suites of actions that might be taken across taxa and landscapes. At the same time, we seek a performance middle ground that balances an institutional need for quick demonstration of hands-on positive results with a contrasting approach that allows ecosystem recovery to facilitate species recovery in the long term. We find that constraints vary across breeding systems, life-histories, and island locations. We take a hybrid approach in which we identify several actions that we can take now to enhance population size or habitat occupancy for some taxa by active restoration, while allowing others to recover at the pace of ecosystem change. We make our recommendations on the basis of data we have collected over the last decade, so that management is firmly grounded in ecological observation.

  10. Magnetostratigraphy of the late Neogene purisima formation, Santa Cruz County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Victor M.; Stuart, Robert M.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    1986-09-01

    The magnetic polarity zonation of a late Neogene sedimentary sequence in Santa Cruz County, California, has provided a chronologic framework for studies of the sedimentologic and tectonic processes involved in an episode of basin formation in the vicinity of the San Andreas fault system in central coastal California. The zonation is based on the analysis of samples from 79 horizons in a 300 m thick section of the Purisima Formation and a portion of the overlying Aromas Formation. Although rock magnetic studies support the hypothesis that the primary carrier of the remanence is magnetite, many samples contain a secondary overprint which cannot be completely removed by alternating field demagnetization. Nevertheless, systematic analysis of the behavior of the samples during demagnetization has led to an unambiguous determination of the polarity of each horizon and to the development of a magnetic polarity zonation containing thirteen magnetozones. These magnetozones can be correlated to the magnetic polarity time scale using biostratigraphic constraints provided by diatoms in the lower portion of the section and invertebrates and vertebrates in the upper portion. The studied section is found to span the interval from the Epoch 5/Epoch 6 boundary (6.07 Mya) to the Matuyama/Gauss boundary (2.47 Mya) with a hiatus corresponding to the upper part of the Gilbert epoch (4.5 Mya to 3.5 Mya). This hiatus does not coincide with major regressions in the global sea-level curve and is interpreted as a period of tectonic uplift. The compression which generated this uplift was probably caused by interplay between the San Andreas fault east of the study area and the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault west of it.

  11. Evidence for Rapid Post-Pliocene Exhumation of the Santa Monica Mountains, California, from Apatite (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, N. A.; Clark, M. K.; Yakovlev, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    Potential losses related to large earthquakes on blind or previously unrecognized thrust faults is of significant concern to southern California, where numerous individual mountain ranges are underlain by active faults. Some of the most hazardous thrust fault systems in Southern California are associated with high-slip-rate faults in the northern portion of the western Transverse Ranges, while the southern region is generally considered to be less seismically active. Determining slip rates on faults bounding the Santa Monica Mountains has been challenging, in part because many of the faults that underlie the range have submarine surface traces. Existing geologic studies predict that these faults slip relatively slowly; however, recent GPS models predict a band of relatively fast contraction on faults that lie beneath the Santa Monica Mountains (Marshall et al., 2013). These geodetic models suggest unrecognized hazard associated with shortening and vertical uplift of this range. Late Cenozoic strata in the central Santa Monica Mountains are of sufficient thickness to bury Cretaceous and Paleocene strata above the closure temperature for apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry (~70°C). As a result, these older rocks, now exposed in the southern Santa Monica Mountains, may record exhumation associated with fault slip and associated structural deformation of the range. Preliminary apatite (U-Th)/He ages near Las Flores Canyon span from 3.5 to 6.5 Ma, and are the youngest apatite (U-Th)/He ages we are aware of in southern California outside of the transpressional San Andreas system. When plotted as depth beneath the base of the marine Modelo Formation, an inflection in age/depth gradient at 4 Ma is inferred to reflect the onset of fault motion and is consistent with the late Miocene age of the Modelo Formation. Based on average geothermal gradients for the Ventura and Los Angeles basins and an assumed thrust fault dip of 20°, observed apparent exhumation rates are

  12. Coastal groundwater dynamics off Santa Barbara, California: combining geochemical tracers, electromagnetic seepmeters, and electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Izbicki, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents repeat field measurements of 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra, electromagnetic seepage meter-derived advective fluxes, and multi-electrode, stationary and continuous marine resistivity surveys collected between November 2005 and April 2007 to study coastal groundwater dynamics within a marine beach in Santa Barbara, California. The study provides insight into magnitude and dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and associated nutrient loadings into near-shore coastal waters, where the predominant SGD drivers can be both spatially and temporally separated. Rn-222 and 223,224,226,228Ra were utilized to quantify the total and saline contribution, respectively, of SGD. The two short-lived 224,223Ra isotopes provided an estimate of apparent near-shore water mass age, as well as an estimate of the Ra-derived eddy diffusion coefficient, Kh (224Ra = 2.86 ?? 0.7 m2 s-1; 223Ra = 1.32 ?? 0.5 m2 s-1). Because 222Rn (t1/2 = 3.8 day) and 224Ra (t1/2 = 3.66 day) have comparable half-lives and production terms, they were used in concert to examine respective water column removal rates. Electromagnetic seepage meters recorded the physical, bi-directional exchange across the sediment/water interface, which ranged from -6.7 to 14.5 cm day-1, depending on the sampling period and position relative to the low tide line. Multi-day time-series 222Rn measurements in the near-shore water column yielded total (saline + fresh) SGD rates that ranged from 3.1 ?? 2.6 to 9.2 ?? 0.8 cm day-1, depending on the sampling season. Offshore 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 year) and 222Rn gradients were used with the calculated Kh values to determine seabed flux estimates (dpm m-2 day-1), which were then converted into SGD rates (7.1 and 7.9 cm day-1, respectively). Lastly, SGD rates were used to calculate associated nutrient loads for the near-shore coastal waters off Santa Barbara. Depending on both the season and the SGD method utilized, the following SGD-derived nutrient inputs were

  13. Land subsidence in the Santa Clara Valley, California as of 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, J.F.; Ireland, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    From 1916 to 1966 in the San Jose area of Santa Clara Valley, California, deficient rainfall and runoff was accompanied by a fourfold increase in groundwater withdrawals. In response the artesian head declined 180-240 ft. The land surface subsided 12.7 ft in San Jose, due to compaction of the fine-grained compressible beds. The subsidence resulted in flooding of lands, and the compaction of the sediments caused compressional failure of many well casings. From 1967 to 1975, the artesian head recovered 70 to 100 feet due to a fivefold increase in surface water imports, favorable local water supply, decreased withdrawal, and increased recharge. In 1960, the Geological Survey installed extensometers in core holes 1,000 ft deep in San Jose and Sunnyvale. Measurements of compaction of the confined aquifer system obtained from these extensometers demonstrate the marked decrease in rate of compaction in response to the major head recovery since 1967. In San Jose the rate decreased from about 1 ft/yr in 1961 to 0.1 ft/yr in 1973. The subsidence has been stopped by raising the artesian head in the aquifers until it equaled or exceeded the maximum pore pressures in the fine-grained beds. However, the subsidence will recommence if the artesian head is drawn down appreciably below the levels of 1971-73. (USGS)

  14. Methane oxidation in permeable sediments at hydrocarbon seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2010-03-01

    A shallow-water area in the Santa Barbara Channel (California), known collectively as the Coal Oil Point seep field, is one the largest natural submarine oil and gas emission areas in the world. Both gas and oil are seeping constantly through a predominantly sandy seabed into the ocean. This study focused on the methanotrophic activity within the surface sediments (0-15 cm) of the permeable seabed in the so-called Brian Seep area at a water depth ~10 m. Detailed investigations of biogeochemical parameters in the sediment surrounding active gas vents indicated that methane seepage through the permeable seabed induces a convective transport of fluids within the surface sediment layer, which results in a deeper penetration of oxidants (oxygen, sulfate) into the sediment, as well as in a faster removal of potentially inhibiting reduced end products (e.g. hydrogen sulfide). Methanotrophic activity was often found close to the sediment-water interface, indicating the involvement of aerobic bacteria. However, biogeochemical data suggests that the majority of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction below the surface layer (>15 cm), where sulfate is still available in high concentrations. This subsurface maximum of AOM activity in permeable sands is in contrast to known deep-sea seep habitats, where upward fluid advection through more fine-grained sediments leads to an accumulation of AOM activity within the top 10 cm of the sediments, because sulfate is rapidly depleted.

  15. Documentation of the Santa Clara Valley regional ground-water/surface-water flow model, Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Li, Zhen; Faunt, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley is a long, narrow trough extending about 35 miles southeast from the southern end of San Francisco Bay where the regional alluvial-aquifer system has been a major source of water. Intensive agricultural and urban development throughout the 20th century and related ground-water development resulted in ground-water-level declines of more than 200 feet and land subsidence of as much as 12.7 feet between the early 1900s and the mid-1960s. Since the 1960s, Santa Clara Valley Water District has imported surface water to meet growing demands and reduce dependence on ground-water supplies. This importation of water has resulted in a sustained recovery of the ground-water flow system. To help support effective management of the ground-water resources, a regional ground-water/surface-water flow model was developed. This model simulates the flow of ground water and surface water, changes in ground-water storage, and related effects such as land subsidence. A numerical ground-water/surface-water flow model of the Santa Clara Valley subbasin of the Santa Clara Valley was developed as part of a cooperative investigation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The model better defines the geohydrologic framework of the regional flow system and better delineates the supply and demand components that affect the inflows to and outflows from the regional ground-water flow system. Development of the model includes revisions to the previous ground-water flow model that upgraded the temporal and spatial discretization, added source-specific inflows and outflows, simulated additional flow features such as land subsidence and multi-aquifer wellbore flow, and extended the period of simulation through September 1999. The transient-state model was calibrated to historical surface-water and ground-water data for the period 197099 and to historical subsidence for the period 198399. The regional ground-water flow system consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped

  16. Investigación y análisis del clima organizacional y la motivación de los empleados en la Clínica Santa Ana en el año 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo Córdova, Abraham Boanerges

    2014-01-01

    El propósito de la presente investigación es identificar la relación entre el clima organizacional y la motivación de los empleados en la Clínica Santa Ana de la Ciudad de Cuenca en el año 2013. El tipo de investigación es descriptivo-correlacional. La orientación teórica se orientó al conocimiento del modelo de Clima Organizacional de seis dimensiones de Litwin y Stringer y la teoría de las tres necesidades de McClelland. El coeficiente de confiabilidad se calculó para los cuestionarios ...

  17. [A "people dump": marks of suffering and transformations at the former Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana and in psychiatric care in Santa Catarina, 1970-1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Viviane Trindade

    2013-10-01

    The article explores transformations to psychiatric care in Santa Catarina starting in the 1970s, when the state's longtime asylum, Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana, reached the height of overcrowding. To this end, along with other sources, it analyzes interviews that had been conducted with professionals who worked at the hospital in that era, sourced from the facility's Center for Documentation and Research. The goal was to problematize these testimonies, examining the texture of the accounts and approaching them as memories that weave a history of the hospital through recollections marked by suffering. Within this proposed framework, suffering is understood as a historical event that can give rise to new social arrangements.

  18. Backscattering and geophysical features of volcanic ridges offshore Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabriol, Hubert; Delgado-Argote, Luis A.; Dañobeitia, Juan José; Córdoba, Diego; González, Antonio; García-Abdeslem, Juan; Bartolomé, Rafael; Martín-Atienza, Beatriz; Frias-Camacho, Víctor

    1999-11-01

    Volcanic ridges formed by series of volcanic edifices are identified in the central part of the Gulf of California, between Isla Tortuga and La Reforma Caldera-Santa Rosalı´a region. Isla Tortuga is part of the 40-km-long Tortuga Volcanic Ridge (TVR) that trends almost perpendicular to the spreading center of the Guaymas Basin. The Rosalı´a Volcanic Ridge (RVR), older than TVR, is characterized by volcanic structures oriented towards 310°, following a fracture zone extension and the peninsular slope. It is interpreted that most of the aligned submarine volcanic edifices are developed on continental crust while Isla Tortuga lies on oceanic-like crust of the Guaymas Basin. From a complete Bouguer anomaly map, it is observed that the alignments of gravity highs trending 310° and 290° support the volcanic and subvolcanic origin of the bathymetric highs. Volcanic curvilinear structures, lava flows and mounds were identified from backscattering images around Isla Tortuga and over a 400-m high (Vı´rgenes High), where the TVR and the RVR intersect. A refraction/wide-angle seismic profile crossing perpendicular to the Vı´rgenes High, together with gravity and magnetic data indicate the presence of shallow intrusive bodies presumably of basaltic or andesitic composition. It is inferred that most volcanic edifices along the ridges have similar internal structures. We suggest that the growth of different segments of the ridges have a volcano-tectonic origin. The older RVR lies along the extension of a fracture zone and it probably is associated with Pliocene NE-SW extension.

  19. Near-Surface Structure and Velocities of the Northeastern Santa Cruz Mountains and the Western Santa Clara Valley, California, From Seismic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Steedman, Clare

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Santa Clara Valley (SCV) is located in the southern San Francisco Bay area of California and is bounded by the Santa Cruz Mountains to the southwest, the Diablo Ranges to the northeast, and the San Francisco Bay to the north (Fig. 1). The SCV, which includes the City of San Jose, numerous smaller cities, and much of the high-technology manufacturing and research area commonly referred to as the Silicon Valley, has a population in excess of 1.7 million people (2000 U. S. Census;http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/06085.html The SCV is situated between major active faults of the San Andreas Fault system, including the San Andreas Fault to the southwest and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the northeast, and other faults inferred to lie beneath the alluvium of the SCV (CWDR, 1967; Bortugno et al., 1991). The importance of the SCV as a major industrial center, its large population, and its proximity to major earthquake faults are important considerations with respect to earthquake hazards and water-resource management. The fault-bounded alluvial aquifer system beneath the valley is the source of about one-third of the water supply for the metropolitan area (Hanson et al., 2004). To better address the earthquake hazards of the SCV, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has undertaken a program to evaluate potential seismic sources, the effects of strong ground shaking, and stratigraphy associated with the regional aquifer system. As part of that program and to better understand water resources of the valley, the USGS and the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) began joint studies to characterize the faults, stratigraphy, and structures beneath the SCV in the year 2000. Such features are important to both agencies because they directly influence the availability and management of groundwater resources in the valley, and they affect the severity and distribution of strong shaking from local and regional earthquakes sources that may affect

  20. Field-trip guide to the geology of the Lexington Reservoir and Loma Prieta areas in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This guide contains a road log and five stop descriptions for a field trip in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains. The trip officially begins at the boat dock parking area on Alma Bridge Road near the dam of Lexington Reservoir. Stop 1 involves a walk up the Limekiln Trail to examine a large landslide in serpentinite that frequently takes out the trail. Stop 2 is at Miller Point picnic area along the shore of the reservoir where exposures of massive, fractured graywacke sandstone are capped with terrace gravel deposits. Stop 3 is along Highland Way in the Santa Cruz Mountains where large landslides have occasionally force the closure of the road. Stop 4A-C are several closely spaced outcrop areas along Loma Prieta Avenue and Summit-Mt. Madonna Road in the Loma Prieta summit area. A walk to scenic vista points provide opportunity to discuss the evolution of regional landscape along the crest of the Sierra Azul. In addition, a variety of rock types are exposed in the Stop 4 area along a series of road cuts, including Cretaceous age conglomerate, turbidites (consisting of interbedded sandstone and shale), and fossiliferous mudstone. Stop 5 involves returning to the boat dock parking area to examine geology and the placement of the Lexington Dam in the Los Gatos Creek canyon.

  1. A case history study on causation of the landslide in Santa Clara, California, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Liao; Sadek M. Derrega; Craig A. Hall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case history study on the geologic investigation and numerical modeling of a reactivated landslide in the County of Santa Clara, California to identify the failure mechanism. The landslide occurred on an approximately 18.3-m high, north-facing slope during March 2011. The land-slide measured about 33.5 m in width and about 51.8 m in length. Along the toe of the slope, a residential structure with a swimming pool was built on a cut and fill pad and there are several other structures present along the western side of the pad. The landslide occurred immediately to the south of the residential building and moved northward between the County Road A and the house’s side yard. The movement of the landslide resulted in damaging the west-bound traffic lane of County Road A and encroached onto the paved driveway for the residential property. An investigation was performed to identify the failure mechanism of the landslide to conclude whether Road A re-alignment by the County or prominent cutting performed along the lower portion of the slope by the homeowner during 2000 through 2004 contributed to the reactivation of the old landslide deposit. The investigation included site reconnaissance, reviewing available published geologic information, reviewing site-specific geologic and geotechnical data developed by other consultants, and performing numerical modeling. The outcomes of the investigation indicate that the primary causation for the reactivation and failure of the subject pre-existing landslide is the prominent cutting performed along the lower portion of the slope during 2000 through 2004 and water tank cut bench. The Road A re-alignment did not contribute to the reactivation of the old landslide deposit.

  2. A case history study on causation of the landslide in Santa Clara, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case history study on the geologic investigation and numerical modeling of a reactivated landslide in the County of Santa Clara, California to identify the failure mechanism. The landslide occurred on an approximately 18.3-m high, north-facing slope during March 2011. The landslide measured about 33.5 m in width and about 51.8 m in length. Along the toe of the slope, a residential structure with a swimming pool was built on a cut and fill pad and there are several other structures present along the western side of the pad. The landslide occurred immediately to the south of the residential building and moved northward between the County Road A and the house's side yard. The movement of the landslide resulted in damaging the west-bound traffic lane of County Road A and encroached onto the paved driveway for the residential property. An investigation was performed to identify the failure mechanism of the landslide to conclude whether Road A re-alignment by the County or prominent cutting performed along the lower portion of the slope by the homeowner during 2000 through 2004 contributed to the reactivation of the old landslide deposit. The investigation included site reconnaissance, reviewing available published geologic information, reviewing site-specific geologic and geotechnical data developed by other consultants, and performing numerical modeling. The outcomes of the investigation indicate that the primary causation for the reactivation and failure of the subject pre-existing landslide is the prominent cutting performed along the lower portion of the slope during 2000 through 2004 and water tank cut bench. The Road A re-alignment did not contribute to the reactivation of the old landslide deposit.

  3. Natural Offshore Oil Seepage and Related Tarball Accumulation on the California Coastline - Santa Barbara Channel and the Southern Santa Maria Basin: Source Identification and Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Gutmacher, Christina E.; Wong, Florence L.; Normark, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Oil spillage from natural sources is very common in the waters of southern California. Active oil extraction and shipping is occurring concurrently within the region and it is of great interest to resource managers to be able to distinguish between natural seepage and anthropogenic oil spillage. The major goal of this study was to establish the geologic setting, sources, and ultimate dispersal of natural oil seeps in the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Basins. Our surveys focused on likely areas of hydrocarbon seepage that are known to occur between Point Arguello and Ventura, California. Our approach was to 1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seep oils or tar; 2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential tar sources in this region, both onshore and offshore; 3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; 4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; and 5) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. To document the location of sub-sea oil seeps, we first looked into previous studies within and near our survey area. We measured the concentration of methane gas in the water column in areas of reported seepage and found numerous gas plumes and measured high concentrations of methane in the water column. The result of this work showed that the seeps were widely distributed between Point Conception east to the vicinity of Coal Oil Point, and that they by in large occur within the 3-mile limit of California State waters. Subsequent cruises used sidescan and high resolution seismic to map the seafloor, from just south of Point Arguello, east to near Gaviota, California. The results of the methane survey guided the exploration of the area west of Point Conception east to Gaviota using a combination of seismic instruments. The

  4. Fluvial Tufa Evidence of Late Pleistocene Wet Intervals from Santa Barbara, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Past pluvials in the western United States provide valuable context for understanding regional hydroclimate variability. Here we report evidence of conditions substantially wetter than today from fluvial tufa deposits located near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara County, California that have been dated by radiocarbon (14C) and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL). Two successions of tufa deposition occur within a small catchment that drains Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock: 1) a fluvial deposit (0-0.5 m thick, 200 m in extent) that formed along a narrow valley below a modern spring, and 2) a perched deposit about 10 m higher (2 m thick, 15 m in extent). IRSL and radiocarbon dating of the perched carbonates suggests at least two episodes of carbonate growth: one at 19.4 ± 2.4 (1σ) through 17.8 ± 2.8 (1σ) ka and another at 11.9 ± 1.5 (1σ) ka verified with a charcoal 14C age of 10.95 ± 0.12 (2σ) cal ka BP. The relationship between the perched and fluvial spring deposits is inferred to represent a drop in the water table of more than 10 m associated with a transition from a wet climate in the late glacial to a dry Holocene today. The wet period indicated by tufa growth between 19.4 and 17.8 ka is relatively consistent with other California climate records both north and south of Zaca Lake. However, tufa growth ca. 12 to 11 ka demonstrates wet conditions occurred as far south as Zaca Lake during the Younger Dryas event, in contrast to climate records farther south in Lake Elsinore indicating persistently dry conditions through this interval. A small shift north in the average position of the winter season storm track could explain wet winters at Zaca while at the same time generating dry winters at Lake Elsinore, 275 km southwest of Zaca. If true, these data indicate that rather small latitudinal shifts in the average winter season storm track can produce large changes in regional hydroclimate.

  5. Water quality of Calero Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California, 1981-83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, D.G.; Gloege, I.S.

    1987-01-01

    Data were collected from December 1980 to September 1983 to describe water quality conditions of Calero Reservoir and the Almaden-Calero canal, Santa Clara County, California. Results show that water in Calero Reservoir and the canal generally met water quality criteria, as identified by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board San Francisco Bay Region, for municipal and domestic supply, water contact and non-contact recreation, warm water fish habitat, wildlife habitat, and fish spawning. Water temperature profiles show that Calero Reservoir can be classified as a warm monomictic reservoir. Water transparency profiles showed rapid attenuation of light with depth in the water column. The depth of the euphotic zone ranged from .5 m to 5.0 m. In winter and spring, light-extinction values generally were high throughout the water column; in summer and fall, values generally were high near the reservoir bottom. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were anion in Calero Reservoir. Concentrations of total recoverable mercury in the bottom sediments in Calero Reservoir ranged from 0.06 to 0.85 mg/kg, but concentrations in the water column were was generally < 1 mg/L. Mean total nitrogen concentration in the Reservoir was 1.00 mg/L, much of it in dissolved form (mean concentration was 0.85 mg/L). Mean total organic nitrogen concentration in Calero Reservoir was 0.65 mg/L, and mean total nitrate concentration was 0.21 mg/L. Mean total phosphorus and dissolved orthophosphorous concentrations were 0.05 and 0.019 mg/L, respectively. Net primary productivity in the euphotic zone ranged from -2,000 to 10,000 mg of oxygen/sq m/day; the median value was 930. Carlson 's trophic-state index, calculated using water transparency, total phosphorus, and chlorophyll-a values, indicated that the reservoir was eutrophic. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations were < 20 colonies/100 ml in the reservoir and < 200 colonies/100 ml in the canal. Fecal streptococcal bacteria concentrations

  6. Santa Ana River Main Stem Including Santiago Creek and Oak Street Drain. Phase I GDM (General Design Memorandum). Appendix G. Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    three regional water-oriented recreation areas in the Prado area: Whittier Narrows, Lake Elsinore and Puddingstone Reservoir. Puddingstone and Whittier...Resource Use Objectives ...................................51 Proposed Park Development .................................51 Prado Reservoir--Four Lakes ...54 Prado Reservoir--One Lake (Alternative Plan) ...................57 Proposed Park Development .................................57 Lower Santa

  7. Breast- and cervical-cancer screening among Korean women--Santa Clara County, California, 1994 and 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-27

    Asians account for an increasing proportion of the U.S. population. Koreans are the fifth largest Asian subpopulation, totaling 1.2 million in 2000. In Santa Clara County (2000 population: 1.7 million), California, Koreans constitute 1.3% of the population. In 1994 and 2002, two population-based surveys were conducted among Korean women (2000 population: approximately 12,000) in Santa Clara County regarding breast- and cervical-cancer screening. The results were contrasted with two surveys of the general population of California women conducted during the same years. This report summarizes the findings of those surveys, which indicated that Korean women received less frequent breast- and cervical-cancer screening compared with all California women. This report also assesses compliance with the 2010 national health objectives for Papanicolaou (Pap) tests and mammography screening. Multifaceted community programs that include culturally and linguistically sensitive education of community members and their health-care providers, along with improved health-care access, will be required to achieve the 2010 national health objectives.

  8. Monitoring Domoic Acid production by Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking off the Santa Cruz Municipal Warf, Santa Cruz, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, M.; Ziccarelli, L.; Kudela, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Certain species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia are producers of the neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA). DA is known to cause amnesic shellfish poisoning also known as domoic acid poisoning, which can lead to permanent brain damage in humans and marine mammals. DA accumulates at higher trophic levels, generally due to consumption of toxic cells or through trophic transfer, and can potentially cause death of both humans and marine wildlife. The Santa Cruz Municipal Warf experiences periodic rises in DA concentrations, which can reach toxic levels in shellfish, fish, and other marine organisms. While these increases in toxicity often occur during Pseudo-nitzschia blooms, several periods of elevated DA have occurred when diatom abundance is restricted and/or dominated by non-toxic species, and there is increasing evidence that DA dissolved in seawater may be prevalent. One theory suggests that senescent or dead Pseudo-nitzschia cells sink to the benthos while retaining their toxin and are buried in sediment following the death of a bloom. Therefore, DA may accumulate in the benthos, where it is eventually released during storms or wave and tide conditions that disturb the sediment. We sampled DA in situ using Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) bags SPATT uses a synthetic resin to capture dissolved DA, allowing for the determination of integrated DA concentrations at known time intervals. The alternative method is mussel biotoxin monitoring, but it is less accurate due to uncertainties in the time of DA accumulation within the mussel, and the lack of uptake of dissolved DA by the mussel. We deployed and collected SPATT off the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf at multiple depths beginning in February 2013. We expect to see increasing DA following the death of a harmful algal bloom. Under pre-bloom conditions, little to no DA has been detected in mussels or surface SPATT, but DA from SPATT is frequently observed at depth, suggesting that the sediment is exposed to

  9. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of

  10. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Barbara study unit, 2011: results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from January to February 2011, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Santa Barbara study unit was the thirty-fourth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Santa Barbara study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the Santa Barbara study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the Santa Barbara study unit located in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, groundwater samples were collected from 24 wells. Eighteen of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and six wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds); constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]); naturally occurring inorganic constituents (trace

  11. Modeling and validation of a 3D velocity structure for the Santa Clara Valley, California, for seismic-wave simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Williams, R.A.; Carver, D.; Frankel, A.; Choy, G.; Liu, P.-C.; Jachens, R.C.; Brocher, T.M.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 3D seismic velocity and attenuation model is developed for Santa Clara Valley, California, and its surrounding uplands to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes. The model is developed using a variety of geologic and geophysical data. Our starting point is a 3D geologic model developed primarily from geologic mapping and gravity and magnetic surveys. An initial velocity model is constructed by using seismic velocities from boreholes, reflection/refraction lines, and spatial autocorrelation microtremor surveys. This model is further refined and the seismic attenuation is estimated through waveform modeling of weak motions from small local events and strong-ground motion from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Waveforms are calculated to an upper frequency of 1 Hz using a parallelized finite-difference code that utilizes two regions with a factor of 3 difference in grid spacing to reduce memory requirements. Cenozoic basins trap and strongly amplify ground motions. This effect is particularly strong in the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the Santa Clara Valley, where the steeply dipping Silver Creek fault forms the southwestern boundary of the basin. In comparison, the Cupertino Basin on the southwestern side of the valley has a more moderate response, which is attributed to a greater age and velocity of the Cenozoic fill. Surface waves play a major role in the ground motion of sedimentary basins, and they are seen to strongly develop along the western margins of the Santa Clara Valley for our simulation of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

  12. Quantification of CH 4 loss and transport in dissolved plumes of the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Susan; Heintz, Monica B.; Valentine, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted into the coastal ocean faces two primary fates: escape to the atmosphere or prolonged dissolution that allows sufficient time for oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria. The partitioning of CH4 between these fates is modulated by physical, chemical and biological factors, including the distribution of CH4 in the water, temperature, wind speed, water movement, and the biological CH4 oxidation rate. Because of the underlying complexity, studies rarely quantify all of these factors in unison, thereby leaving gaps in our understanding of CH4 biogeochemistry in the coastal ocean. In this study we estimated the partitioning of CH4 between transport, microbial oxidative loss, and sea-air transfer in a defined plume of dissolved CH4 originating from one of the world's largest seep fields, near Coal Oil Point (COP) in the Santa Barbara Channel, California. Depth distributions of CH4 concentration, biologically mediated oxidation rate, and current velocity were quantified at 12 stations in a 198 km2 area down-current from COP on July 4-5, 2007. Six stations were sampled again on July 7, 2007 to evaluate temporal plume variability. The observed CH4 distribution revealed two distinct CH4 plumes: a shallow plume centered at ∼40 m and a deeper plume centered at ∼200 m. The shallow plume originates at COP; the source of the deeper CH4 plume is not known. Cross-sections of both plumes were used to calculate transport and loss terms for dissolved CH4. The results indicate that the majority of the dissolved CH4 is advected and diffuses horizontally by turbulence whereas microbial oxidation, sea-air gas transfer, and vertical turbulent diffusion are less significant. Based on rates estimated in the study area, a model was developed to simulate the fate of the dissolved CH4. The model results suggest that 60% of the CH4 of the sampled plumes will ultimately be microbially oxidized and 40% will be transferred to the atmosphere by sea-air gas exchange under the

  13. A simulation-optimization model for water-resources management, Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    In times of drought, the local water supplies of the city of Santa Barbara, California, are insufficient to satisfy water demand. In response, the city has built a seawater desalination plant and gained access to imported water in 1997. Of primary concern to the city is delivering water from the various sources at a minimum cost while satisfying water demand and controlling seawater intrusion that might result from the overpumping of ground water. A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of Santa Barbara?s water resources. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply while satisfying various physical and institutional constraints such as meeting water demand, maintaining minimum hydraulic heads at selected sites, and not exceeding water-delivery or pumping capacities. The model is formulated as a linear programming problem with monthly management periods and a total planning horizon of 5 years. The decision variables are water deliveries from surface water (Gibraltar Reservoir, Cachuma Reservoir, Cachuma Reservoir cumulative annual carryover, Mission Tunnel, State Water Project, and desalinated seawater) and ground water (13 production wells). The state variables are hydraulic heads. Basic assumptions for all simulations are that (1) the cost of water varies with source but is fixed over time, and (2) only existing or planned city wells are considered; that is, the construction of new wells is not allowed. The drought of 1947?51 is Santa Barbara?s worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. Assumptions that were made for this base case include a head constraint equal to sea level at the coastal nodes; Cachuma Reservoir carryover of 3,000 acre-feet per year, with a maximum carryover of 8,277 acre-feet; a maximum annual demand of 15,000 acre-feet; and average monthly capacities for the

  14. Análisis del confort y el comportamiento higrotérmico de sistemas constructivos tradicionales y actuales en viviendas de Santa Ana-Ciudad Colón (Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo, B. G.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in Santa Ana- Ciudad Colón (Costa Rica. The aim of this study is to compare comfort between traditional (adobe houses with ceramic tile roofs and modern (block or precast concrete houses with galvanized sheet roofs building systems. To analyze comfort it was designed an experiment measuring real climatic parameters in a set of houses of different building systems. Data was analysed using ISO 7730 and ASHRAE Standard 55 rules, considering variables such as the predicted mean vote (PMV, predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD and the thermal sensation of the body for different scenarios of humidity, temperature, wind, user activity and shelter. Results show that comfort increases when the house has thick exterior walls under studied climate conditions that ensure thermal inertia and insulated roof covers to avoid over-abstraction of heat. Traditional homes present comfortable conditions in at least 97% of the recorded time while current houses present comfortable conditions

    El objetivo de la investigación es comparar el confort de viviendas tradicionales de Santa Ana-Ciudad Colón (Costa Rica, construidas en adobe con cubierta cerámica, frente a los sistemas constructivos actualmente empleados. Para analizar el confort se diseñó un experimento de medición real de parámetros climáticos en una muestra de viviendas de distintos sistemas constructivos. Los datos se interpretaron según la norma ISO 7730 y la norma 55 de ASHRAE considerando las variables de Voto Medio Estimado (PMV, Porcentaje de Personas Insatisfechas (PPD y la sensación térmica del cuerpo para distintos escenarios de humedad, temperatura, movimiento del aire, actividad física y abrigo del usuario. Los resultados muestran que, en este clima, el confort térmico aumenta en viviendas con muros exteriores pesados y cubiertas aisladas que eviten la captación excesiva de calor. Las viviendas tradicionales presentan más del 97% de los datos

  15. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Santa Barbara Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  16. California State Waters Map Series--Santa Barbara Channel Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  17. California State Waters Map Series--Santa Barbara Channel Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  18. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Santa Barbara Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  19. Pinniped ecology in Santa Monica Bay, California%加州Santa Monica海湾鳍足类的生态学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maddalena BEARZI; Charles A.SAYLAN; Celia BARROSO

    2008-01-01

    研究了加州Santa Monica海湾鳍足类的生态学.从1997-2007年乘船调查了277次,发现海狮(Zalophus californianus)是最常见的动物(89%,见到的次数为1393次),其次是港海豹(Phoca vitulina richardsi,8%,n=131)和北象海豹(Mirounga angustirostris,1%,n=15).在29%的遇见次数(观察到瓶海豚205次)中,发现海狮(偶尔也发现港海豹)与瓶鼻海豚集群(Tursiops truncatus);短喙真海豚(Delphinus delphis)与长喙真海豚(D.capensis)在53% 的遇见次数(遇见真海豚次数n=155)中,发现短喙真海豚(Delphinus delphis)与长喙真海豚(D.capensis)集群;一般在沿岸水域(离岸边距离<500 m)见到海狮和港海豹,但在整个海湾也能见到,表现出这两个物种对海底峡谷的偏爱.北象海豹仅见于近海,主要在海底峡谷附近. 经常看到海狮、港海豹和北象海豹游动(50%,n=728)、进行热调节(14%,n=205)、以及取食(3.2%,n=47),但几乎见不到有社会性活动(0.21%,n=3).%We investigated pinniped ecology at sea in Santa Monica Bay, California. Animals were studied during 277 boat-based surveys conducted in 1997-2007 do cumenting that California sea lion Zalophus californianus was the most observed species (89%,n sightings=1393), followed by harbor seal (Phoca vitulina richardsi; 8%,n sightings=131), and northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris; 1%,n sightings=15). Sea lions, and occasionally harbor seals, were found in aggregations with bottlenose dolphinsTursiops truncatus in 29% of the sightings (n bottlenose dolphin sightings=205), short-beaked common dolphinsDelphinus delphis and long-beaked common dolphinsD.capensis in 53% of the sightings (n common dolphins=155). Sea lions and harbor seals were regularly observed in coastal waters (<500 m from shore) but also in the entire bay, with both species showing a preference for submarine canyons. Northern elephant seals were only seen in offshore waters and mostly in proximity of the canyons. The three species were

  20. Ana credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To support the implementation of some tasks in the Euro system regarding the financial system stability supervision, risk management and monetary policy, the European Central Bank adopted a project of setting up a comprehensive database containing the detailed information on individual bank loans in the Eurozone, named Ana Credit. The full implementation of the project begins on 30 September 2018.

  1. Raman spectroscopic study of the mineral qingheiite Na2(Mn2+,Mg,Fe2+)2(Al,Fe3+)(PO4)3, a pegmatite phosphate mineral from Santa Ana pegmatite, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; López, Andrés; Moreira, Caio; de Lena, Jorge Carvalho

    2013-10-01

    The pegmatite mineral qingheiite Na2(Mn2+,Mg,Fe2+)2(Al,Fe3+)(PO4)3 has been studied by a combination of SEM and EMP, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The studied sample was collected from the Santa Ana pegmatite, Argentina. The mineral occurs as a primary mineral in lithium bearing pegmatite, in association with beausite and lithiophilite. The Raman spectrum is characterized by a very sharp intense Raman band at 980 cm-1 assigned to the PO43- symmetric stretching mode. Multiple Raman bands are observed in the PO43- antisymmetric stretching region, providing evidence for the existence of more than one phosphate unit in the structure of qingheiite and evidence for the reduction in symmetry of the phosphate units. This concept is affirmed by the number of bands in the ν4 and ν2 bending regions. No intensity was observed in the OH stretching region in the Raman spectrum but significant intensity is found in the infrared spectrum. Infrared bands are observed at 2917, 3195, 3414 and 3498 cm-1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations. It is suggested that some water is coordinating the metal cations in the structure of qingheiite.

  2. Digital Compilation of "Preliminary Map of Landslide Deposits in Santa Cruz County, California, By Cooper-Clark and Associates, 1975": A Digital Map Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report by Roberts, Sebastian; Barron, Andrew D.; Preface by Brabb, Earl E.; Pike, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A 1:62,500-scale black-and-white map identifying some 2,000 landslides of various types in Santa Cruz County, California, has been converted to a digital-map database that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

  3. The Quaternary Silver Creek Fault Beneath the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Williams, Robert A.; Jachens, Robert C.; Graymer, Russell W.; Stephenson, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The northwest-trending Silver Creek Fault is a 40-km-long strike-slip fault in the eastern Santa Clara Valley, California, that has exhibited different behaviors within a changing San Andreas Fault system over the past 10-15 Ma. Quaternary alluvium several hundred meters thick that buries the northern half of the Silver Creek Fault, and that has been sampled by drilling and imaged in a detailed seismic reflection profile, provides a record of the Quaternary history of the fault. We assemble evidence from areal geology, stratigraphy, paleomagnetics, ground-water hydrology, potential-field geophysics, and reflection and earthquake seismology to determine the long history of the fault in order to evaluate its current behavior. The fault formed in the Miocene more than 100 km to the southeast, as the southwestern fault in a 5-km-wide right step to the Hayward Fault, within which the 40-km-long Evergreen pull-apart basin formed. Later, this basin was obliquely cut by the newly recognized Mt. Misery Fault to form a more direct connection to the Hayward Fault, although continued growth of the basin was sufficient to accommodate at least some late Pliocene alluvium. Large offset along the San Andreas-Calaveras-Mt Misery-Hayward Faults carried the basin northwestward almost to its present position when, about 2 Ma, the fault system was reorganized. This led to near abandonment of the faults bounding the pull-apart basin in favor of right slip extending the Calaveras Fault farther north before stepping west to the Hayward Fault, as it does today. Despite these changes, the Silver Creek Fault experienced a further 200 m of dip slip in the early Quaternary, from which we infer an associated 1.6 km or so of right slip, based on the ratio of the 40-km length of the strike-slip fault to a 5-km depth of the Evergreen Basin. This dip slip ends at a mid-Quaternary unconformity, above which the upper 300 m of alluvial cover exhibits a structural sag at the fault that we interpret as

  4. 76 FR 60376 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District... Control District, Sacramento Municipal Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality... the environment. Section 110(a) of the CAA requires States to submit regulations that control...

  5. 78 FR 32274 - Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... National Park Service Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara... analysis process for the proposed replacement and potential relocation of the existing Scorpion Pier at..., Attn: Scorpion Pier Project, 1901 Spinnaker Drive, Ventura, CA 93001 or electronically to...

  6. Terapias utilizadas no Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana: berço da psiquiatria catarinense (1941-1960 Terapias utilizadas en el Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana: la origen de la psiquiatria catarinenese (1941-1960 Therapies used in Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana: the cradle of psychiatry in Santa Catarina State, Brazil (1941-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Süsskind Borenstein

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma pesquisa qualitativa de natureza sócio-histórica cujo objetivo foi historicizar o tratamento prestado aos pacientes psiquiátricos internados no antigo Hospital Colônia Santa'Ana (HCS, no período de 1941 a 1960. Para a coleta de dados foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas com cinco funcionários que trabalharam no Hospital no período, utilizando-se o Método de História Oral (HO. Após a análise das entrevistas utilizando-se da análise de conteúdo de Bardin, chegou-se aos seguintes resultados: os doentes psiquiátricos internados faziam uso de algumas terapias como: eletrochoque, insulinoterapia, cardiazol, psicofármacos, praxiterapia e assistência heterofamiliar. Embora muitas destas terapias atualmente estejam em desuso, e sejam criticadas por diversos segmentos sociais, estavam na época, em consonância ao preconizado pela psiquiatria mundial.El presente artículo es producto de una investigación cualitativa de naturaleza socio-histórica, cuyo objetivo fue el de historiar el tratamiento dado a los pacientes psiquiátricos internados en el antiguo Hospital Colônia Santa'Ana (HCS, en el período de 1941 a 1960. Para la recolección de los datos fueron realizadas entrevistas parcialmente elaboradas con cinco empleados que trabajaron en el Hospital en el período citado, utilizándose para ello el Método de Historia Oral (HO. Después del análisis de las entrevistas, para el cual se utilizó el análisis de contenido de Bardin, se llegó a los siguientes resultados: en los enfermos psiquiátricos internados se empleaban algunas terapias como: electroshock, insulinoterapia, cardiazol, psicofármacos, laborterapia y asistencia heterofamiliar. Aunque actualmente muchas de estas terapias se encuentran en desuso y son criticadas por diversos segmentos sociales, en la época estaban de acuerdo a lo recomendado por la psiquiatría mundial.This article is a qualitative research with socio-historical approach

  7. Geologic map of the southern White Ledge Peak and Matilija quadrangles, Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a digital geologic strip map of the southern parts of the contiguous White Ledge Peak and Matilija 7.5’ quadrangles in coastal southern California. With a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground), the map depicts the distribution of bedrock units, surficial deposits, and associated deformation adjacent to and south of the Arroyo Parida fault and in the southern Ojai Valley east of the Ventura River. This new compilation, combined with a recently published geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3001), completes a 69-km-long east-west mapping transect from Goleta to Ojai by the U.S. Geological Survey. These two contiguous geologic maps provide new insights and constraints on Neogene-through-Quaternary tectonic deformation and consequent landscape change, including geohazards in the urbanized southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains.

  8. Demographic factors associated with perceptions about water safety and tap water consumption among adults in Santa Clara County, California, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Brianna; Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

    2014-06-12

    The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11-0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11-2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption.

  9. A comparison of three tests to detect general clustering of a rare disease in Santa Clara County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E G; Ding, L; Waller, L A

    2000-05-30

    Statistical tests to detect clustering of a rare disease investigate whether an observed spatial pattern of cases appears to be due to chance alone. Heterogeneous population density and the geographic structure of the data under consideration complicate the ability to make comparisons of different tests. Further, interpretation of test results depends on the nature of the test used and what feature of the data it is designed to detect. With these issues in mind, we compare three recent tests for assessing general clustering among cases where the population is distributed heterogeneously across the study area, namely those of Besag and Newell, Turnbull et al. and Tango. We compare these methods using 1981 incidence data for severe cardiac birth defects from Santa Clara County, California.

  10. Deformation from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Peterson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the 17 October 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provides evidence for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California (USA). A total of 1427 damage sites, collected from more than 30 sources, are concentrated in four zones, three of which lie near previously mapped faults. In one of these zones, the channel lining of Los Gatos Creek, a 2-km-long concrete strip trending perpendicular to regional geologic structure, was broken by thrusts that were concentrated in two belts, each several tens of meters wide, separated by more than 300 m of relatively undeformed concrete.

  11. High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data

  12. Southern sea otter range expansion and habitat use in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M. Tim; Tomoleoni, Joseph; LaRoche, Nicole; Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Murray, Mike; Staedler, Michelle; Randell, Zachary

    2017-01-17

    The re-colonization of the Santa Barbara channel by sea otters brings these ESA-listed marine mammals closer to active oil and gas production facilities, shipping lanes and naturally occurring oil and gas seeps. However, the degree to which sea otters may actually be affected by human-caused oil spills or exposure to natural oil seeps is currently unknown. Between 2012 and 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey and collaborating agencies conducted a telemetry-based study of sea otters in Santa Barbara channel, in order to provide critical information for resource managers (specifically the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, henceforth BOEM, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, henceforth USFWS) about the spatial ecology, population status, and potential population threats to sea otters in Santa Barbara Channel, with particular reference to exposure to manmade structures and sources of oil and natural gas. Analysis of spatial monitoring data using a Bayesian-based synoptic model allowed for description of sea otter home ranges, identification of hot-spots of use, and insights into habitat selection behavior by male and female sea otters. Important findings included the deeper modal depth preferred by males versus females, strong preferences by both sexes for areas with persistent kelp canopy, and greater use of soft-sediment areas by males. The synoptic model also provided the ability to predict population-level density distribution for each sex in new habitats: by calculating the value of these probability density distributions at the known locations of natural seeps, we were able to identify those seeps with higher potential for sea otter encounters. The relative probability of occurrence at locations near to some seeps was sufficiently high (about 1% likelihood of occurrence for some of our study animals) that one would anticipate occasional encounters. Data on male and female survival, reproductive success, activity budgets, and body condition all indicated that

  13. Comments on Potential Geologic and Seismic Hazards Affecting Proposed Liquefied Natural Gas Site in Santa Monica Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Lee, Homa J.; Parsons, Tom E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Boore, David M.; Conrad, James E.; Edwards, Brian D.; Fisher, Michael A.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Geist, Eric L.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hough, Susan E.; Kayen, Robert E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Luco, Nicolas; McCrory, Patricia A.; McGann, Mary; Nathenson, Manuel; Nolan, Michael; Petersen, Mark D.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Powell, Charles L.; Ryan, Holly F.; Tinsley, John C.; Wills, Chris J.; Wong, Florence L.; Xu, Jingping

    2008-01-01

    In a letter to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) dated March 25, 2008, Representative Jane Harman (California 36th district) requested advice on geologic hazards that should be considered in the review of a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility off the California coast in Santa Monica Bay. In 2004, the USGS responded to a similar request from Representative Lois Capps, regarding two proposed LNG facilities offshore Ventura County, Calif., with a report summarizing potential geologic and seismic hazards (Ross and others, 2004). The proposed LNG Deepwater Port (DWP) facility includes single point moorings (SPMs) and 35 miles of underwater pipelines. The DWP submersible buoys, manifolds, and risers would be situated on the floor of the southern Santa Monica Basin, in 3,000 feet of water, about 23 miles offshore of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Twin 24-inch diameter pipelines would extend northeastward from the buoys across the basin floor, up the basin slope and across the continental shelf, skirting north around the Santa Monica submarine canyon. Figure 1 provides locations of the project and geologic features. Acronyms are defined in table 1. This facility is being proposed in a region of known geologic hazards that arise from both the potential for strong earthquakes and geologic processes related to sediment transport and accumulation in the offshore environment. The probability of a damaging earthquake (considered here as magnitude 6.5 or greater) in the next 30 years within about 30 miles (50 km) of the proposed pipeline ranges from 16% at the pipeline's offshore end to 48% where it nears land (Petersen, 2008). Earthquakes of this magnitude are capable of producing strong shaking, surface fault offsets, liquefaction phenomena, landslides, underwater turbidity currents and debris flow avalanches, and tsunamis. As part of the DWP license application for the Woodside Natural Gas proposal in Santa Monica Bay (known as the OceanWay Secure Energy Project), Fugro

  14. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Santa Clara River Valley, 2007-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Carmen A.; Montrella, Joseph; Landon, Matthew K.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit was investigated from April through June 2007 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit contains eight groundwater basins located in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties and is within the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The Santa Clara River Valley study unit was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer system. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2007 by the USGS from 42 wells on a spatially distributed grid, and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer system was defined as that part of the aquifer system corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the CDPH database for the Santa Clara River Valley study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifer system may differ from that in shallow or deep water-bearing zones; for example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. Eleven additional wells were sampled by the USGS to improve understanding of factors affecting water quality.The status assessment of the quality of the groundwater used data from samples analyzed for anthropogenic constituents, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides, as well as naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of untreated groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the Santa Clara River Valley study unit

  15. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2004 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  16. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2005 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  17. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2006 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  18. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2010 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  19. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2007 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  20. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2008 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  1. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Self Monitoring Program for Alviso Ponds Within South San Francisco Bay Low Salinity Salt Ponds Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, California : 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report summarizes the results of the 2009 water quality sampling conducted at the Alviso Ponds in Santa Clara County, California, which are part of the...

  2. Temperature, salinity, radioisotopes, sediments, and other data from Phase II Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Monitoring Program in the Santa Maria Basin, California from 21 Oct 1986 to 08 Mar 1987 (NODC Accession 8900198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are part of the data collected for the California Phase II OCS Monitoring Program of the Santa Maria Basin by Dr. Hyland from Battelle Ocean Science and...

  3. Subsurface and petroleum geology of the southwestern Santa Clara Valley ("Silicon Valley"), California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Richard G.; Jachens, Robert C.; Lillis, Paul G.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Hostettler, Frances D.; McDougall, Kristin A.; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2002-01-01

    Gravity anomalies, historical records of exploratory oil wells and oil seeps, new organic-geochemical results, and new stratigraphic and structural data indicate the presence of a concealed, oil-bearing sedimentary basin beneath a highly urbanized part of the Santa Clara Valley, Calif. A conspicuous isostatic-gravity low that extends about 35 km from Palo Alto southeastward to near Los Gatos reflects an asymmetric, northwest-trending sedimentary basin comprising low-density strata, principally of Miocene age, that rest on higher-density rocks of Mesozoic and Paleogene(?) age. Both gravity and well data show that the low-density rocks thin gradually to the northeast over a distance of about 10 km. The thickest (approx 4 km thick) accumulation of low-density material occurs along the basin's steep southwestern margin, which may be controlled by buried, northeast-dipping normal faults that were active during the Miocene. Movement along these hypothetical normal faults may been contemporaneous (approx 17–14 Ma) with sedimentation and local dacitic and basaltic volcanism, possibly in response to crustal extension related to passage of the northwestward-migrating Mendocino triple junction. During the Pliocene and Quaternary, the normal faults and Miocene strata were overridden by Mesozoic rocks, including the Franciscan Complex, along northeastward-vergent reverse and thrust faults of the Berrocal, Shannon, and Monte Vista Fault zones. Movement along these fault zones was accompanied by folding and tilting of strata as young as Quaternary and by uplift of the modern Santa Cruz Mountains; the fault zones remain seismically active. We attribute the Pliocene and Quaternary reverse and thrust faulting, folding, and uplift to compression caused by local San Andreas Fault tectonics and regional transpression along the Pacific-North American Plate boundary. Near the southwestern margin of the Santa Clara Valley, as many as 20 exploratory oil wells were drilled between 1891

  4. Fractured genetic connectivity threatens a southern california puma (Puma concolor) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Holly B; Vickers, T Winston; Morrison, Scott A; Buchalski, Michael R; Boyce, Walter M

    2014-01-01

    Pumas (Puma concolor; also known as mountain lions and cougars) in southern California live among a burgeoning human population of roughly 20 million people. Yet little is known of the consequences of attendant habitat loss and fragmentation, and human-caused puma mortality to puma population viability and genetic diversity. We examined genetic status of pumas in coastal mountains within the Peninsular Ranges south of Los Angeles, in San Diego, Riverside, and Orange counties. The Santa Ana Mountains are bounded by urbanization to the west, north, and east, and are separated from the eastern Peninsular Ranges to the southeast by a ten lane interstate highway (I-15). We analyzed DNA samples from 97 pumas sampled between 2001 and 2012. Genotypic data for forty-six microsatellite loci revealed that pumas sampled in the Santa Ana Mountains (n = 42) displayed lower genetic diversity than pumas from nearly every other region in California tested (n = 257), including those living in the Peninsular Ranges immediately to the east across I-15 (n = 55). Santa Ana Mountains pumas had high average pairwise relatedness, high individual internal relatedness, a low estimated effective population size, and strong evidence of a bottleneck and isolation from other populations in California. These and ecological findings provide clear evidence that Santa Ana Mountains pumas have been experiencing genetic impacts related to barriers to gene flow, and are a warning signal to wildlife managers and land use planners that mitigation efforts will be needed to stem further genetic and demographic decay in the Santa Ana Mountains puma population.

  5. Fractured genetic connectivity threatens a southern california puma (Puma concolor population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly B Ernest

    Full Text Available Pumas (Puma concolor; also known as mountain lions and cougars in southern California live among a burgeoning human population of roughly 20 million people. Yet little is known of the consequences of attendant habitat loss and fragmentation, and human-caused puma mortality to puma population viability and genetic diversity. We examined genetic status of pumas in coastal mountains within the Peninsular Ranges south of Los Angeles, in San Diego, Riverside, and Orange counties. The Santa Ana Mountains are bounded by urbanization to the west, north, and east, and are separated from the eastern Peninsular Ranges to the southeast by a ten lane interstate highway (I-15. We analyzed DNA samples from 97 pumas sampled between 2001 and 2012. Genotypic data for forty-six microsatellite loci revealed that pumas sampled in the Santa Ana Mountains (n = 42 displayed lower genetic diversity than pumas from nearly every other region in California tested (n = 257, including those living in the Peninsular Ranges immediately to the east across I-15 (n = 55. Santa Ana Mountains pumas had high average pairwise relatedness, high individual internal relatedness, a low estimated effective population size, and strong evidence of a bottleneck and isolation from other populations in California. These and ecological findings provide clear evidence that Santa Ana Mountains pumas have been experiencing genetic impacts related to barriers to gene flow, and are a warning signal to wildlife managers and land use planners that mitigation efforts will be needed to stem further genetic and demographic decay in the Santa Ana Mountains puma population.

  6. Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

  7. Seroprevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis infection among humans, Santa Barbara County, California, USA, 2014–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sara B.; Lake, Camille M.; Chastain, Holly M.; Fisk, David; Handali, Sukwan; Kahn, Philip L.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (raccoon roundworm) infection is common in raccoons and can cause devastating pathology in other animals, including humans. Limited information is available on the frequency of asymptomatic human infection. We tested 150 adults from California, USA, for B. procyonis antibodies; 11 were seropositive, suggesting that subclinical infection does occur.

  8. Ephemeral stream reaches preserve the evolutionary and distributional history of threespine stickleback in the Santa Clara and Ventura River watersheds of southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Jacobs, David K.; Backlin, Adam R.; Swift, Camm C.; Dellith, Chris; Fisher, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Much remains to be understood about the evolutionary history and contemporary landscape genetics of unarmored threespine stickleback in southern California, where populations collectively referred to as Gasterosteus aculeatus williamsoni have severely declined over the past 70+ years and are now endangered. We used mitochondrial sequence and microsatellite data to assess the population genetics and phylogeography of unarmored populations sampled immediately downstream from the type locality of G. a. williamsoni in the upper Santa Clara River, and assessed their distinctiveness with respect to low-armor populations in the downstream sections of the river and the adjacent Ventura River. We also characterized the geographic limits of different plate morphs and evaluated the congruence of those boundaries with barriers to dispersal in both river systems and to neutral genetic variation. We show substantial population structuring within the upper reach of the Santa Clara River, but little partitioning between the lower Santa Clara and Ventura Rivers—we attribute these patterns to different ancestry between spatially subdivided populations within the same drainage, a predominance of downstream gene flow, and ability for coastal dispersal between the Santa Clara and Ventura Rivers. We also show that alleles from introduced low-plate stock have infiltrated a native population in at least one upper Santa Clara River tributary, causing this formerly unarmored population to become gradually low-plated over a 30 + year time period. Measures of genetic diversity, census surveys, and severe habitat disturbance all indicate that unarmored stickleback near the type locality are currently at high risk of extinction.

  9. Intensive Cultural Resources Survey for the Goleta Flood Protection Program, Santa Barbara County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    8217m . .. . ... ... ..r i i ... .. ;; ] ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ : Mexico , named after the legend. From the time of Portola onward the name...de Borica, who forwarded Goycoehea’s plan to the Viceroy in * Mexico (California Archives 50:226-233). 20 Goycoechea’s proposal met with opposition...may have served to integrate localized political and economic groups within portions of the Chumash region. A fiesta system is known to have existed

  10. Evaluation of blood and muscle tissues for molecular detection and characterization of hematozoa infections in northern pintails (Anas acuta) wintering in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Information on the molecular detection of hematozoa from different tissue types and multiple years would be useful to inform sample collection efforts and interpret results of meta-analyses or investigations spanning multiple seasons. In this study, we tested blood and muscle tissue collected from northern pintails (Anas acuta) during autumn and winter of different years to evaluate prevalence and genetic diversity ofLeucocytozoon, Haemoproteus, and Plasmodium infections in this abundant waterfowl species of the Central Valley of California. We first compared results for paired blood and wing muscle samples to assess the utility of different tissue types for molecular investigations of haemosporidian parasites. Second, we explored inter-annual variability of hematozoa infection in Central Valley northern pintails and investigated possible effects of age, sex, and sub-region of sample collection on estimated parasite detection probability and prevalence. We found limited evidence for differences between tissue types in detection probability and prevalence ofLeucocytozoon, Haemoproteus, and Plasmodium parasites, which supports the utility of both sample types for obtaining information on hematozoan infections. However, we detected 11 haemosporidian mtDNA cyt bhaplotypes in blood samples vs. six in wing muscle tissue collected during the same sample year suggesting an advantage to using blood samples for investigations of genetic diversity. Estimated prevalence ofLeucocytozoon parasites was greater during 2006–2007 as compared to 2011–2012 and four unique haemosporidian mtDNA cyt b haplotypes were detected in the former sample year but not in the latter. Seven of 15 mtDNA cyt b haplotypes detected in northern pintails had 100% identity with previously reported hematozoa lineages detected in waterfowl (Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon) or other avian taxa (Plasmodium) providing support for lack of host specificity for some parasite lineages.

  11. Ground water/surface water responses to global climate simulations, Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Climate variations can play an important, if not always crucial, role in successful conjunctive management of ground water and surface water resources. This will require accurate accounting of the links between variations in climate, recharge, and withdrawal from the resource systems, accurate projection or predictions of the climate variations, and accurate simulation of the responses of the resource systems. To assess linkages and predictability of climate influences on conjunctive management, global climate model (GCM) simulated precipitation rates were used to estimate inflows and outflows from a regional ground water model (RGWM) of the coastal aquifers of the Santa ClaraCalleguas Basin at Ventura, California, for 1950 to 1993. Interannual to interdecadal time scales of the El Nin??o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) climate variations are imparted to simulated precipitation variations in the Southern California area and are realistically imparted to the simulated ground water level variations through the climate-driven recharge (and discharge) variations. For example, the simulated average ground water level response at a key observation well in the basin to ENSO variations of tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures is 1.2 m/??C, compared to 0.9 m/??C in observations. This close agreement shows that the GCM-RGWM combination can translate global scale climate variations into realistic local ground water responses. Probability distributions of simulated ground water level excursions above a local water level threshold for potential seawater intrusion compare well to the corresponding distributions from observations and historical RGWM simulations, demonstrating the combination's potential usefulness for water management and planning. Thus the GCM-RGWM combination could be used for planning purposes and - when the GCM forecast skills are adequate - for near term predictions.

  12. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, Carl; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation, and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka Marine Terrace Chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized [White A. F., Schulz M. S., Vivit D. V., Blum A., Stonestrom D. A. and Anderson S. P. (2008) Chemical weathering of a Marine Terrace Chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California. I: interpreting the long-term controls on chemical weathering based on spatial and temporal element and mineral distributions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 (1), 36-68] and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisserand [Hellmann R. and Tisserand D. (2006) Dissolution kinetics as a function of the Gibbs free energy of reaction: An experimental study based on albite feldspar. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 (2), 364-383] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [Oelkers E. H., Schott J. and Devidal J. L. (1994) The effect of aluminum, pH, and chemical affinity on the rates of aluminosilicate dissolution reactions. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 58 (9), 2011-2024], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Additionally, observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at

  13. Autigenic and Anthropogenic Uranium in the Marine Sediments of the Gulf of California in Front of Santa Rosalia Mining District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choumiline, K.; Rodríguez-Figueroa, G.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2007-05-01

    To verify the possibilities of U enrichments in the marine sedimentary environment of the eastern sector of the central Gulf of Califoria (GC), eleven sediment cores were collected in front of the Santa Rosalia mining region, peninsula of Baja California. Uranium and some other trace element contents in sliced core layers, dried and homogenized, were determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Average total U contents in sediments of five cores collected in the open GC in front of Santa Rosalía at sites with water depths from 265 m to 1030 m and in the Guaymas Basin with 2019 m, ranged from 1.36±0.26 mg kg-1 (Guaymas Basin) to 9.31±3.03 mg kg-1 (SR63 core, depth 630 m). To distinguish non-lithogenic U from the lithogenic one, the normalization of total U contents to the concentrations of Sc in the samples was used. That because this element is a reliable indicator of crustal materials, mainly aluminosilicates in the marine sediments. The relative contribution of non-lithogenic (authigenic) U varied from 49.8±3 % (Guaymas Basin) to 84.2±8.2 % (SR62 core) of the total U content in the sediments of the open central GC. Surprisingly, in three sediment cores from the coastal zone adjacent to the town of Santa Rosalía in water depth range 3-6 m very high concentrations of total U were found, ranging from 54.2±7.3 mg kg-1 (SR4 core) to 110±13 mg kg-1 (SR2 core) and exceeding not only U average abundance in the earth´s crust (2.7 mg kg-1), but also its levels found for SR62 core, as well as those reported for natural enrichments of U in suboxic-anoxic environments, e.g. at Mexico and Peru margin sites (3.04 mg kg-1 - 24.54 mg kg-1, McManus et al., 2006). The relative contribution of non-lithogenic U in the sediments of these three anomalous cores varied from 97.2±0.4 % (SR4 core) to 98.80.2 % (SR1 and SR2 cores) of their total U content. The sediments were also depleted in organic C (0.05 % - 0.18 %), which is not typical for marine solid phases

  14. Budgets and behaviors of uranium and thorium series isotopes in the Santa Monica Basin off the California Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lei.

    1991-12-16

    Samples from three time-series sediment traps deployed in the Santa Monica Basin off the California coast were analyzed to study the flux and scavenging of uranium and thorium series isotopes. Variations of uranium and thorium series isotopes fluxes in the water column were obtained by integrating these time-series deployment results. Mass and radionuclide fluxes measured from bottom sediment traps compare favorably with fluxed determined from sediment core data. This agreement suggests that the near-bottom sediment traps are capable of collecting settling particles representative of the surface sediment. The phase distributions of {sup 234}Th in the water column were calculated by an inverse method using sediment trap data, which help to study the variations of {sup 234}Th scavenging in the water column. Scavenging and radioactive decay of {sup 234}Th are the two principal processes for balancing {sup 234}Th budget in the water column. The residence times of dissolved and particulate {sup 234}Th were determined by a {sup 234}Th scavenging model.

  15. Potential toxicity of chemical elements in beach sediments near Santa Rosalía copper mine, Baja California Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, M. P.; Shumilin, E.; Rodríguez-Figueroa, G. M.; Rodriguez-Espinosa, P. F.; Sujitha, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    A total of 17 beach sediment samples were analyzed for the determination of thirty-one chemical elements to generate a geochemical data set from the Santa Rosalía mining area in the State of Baja California Sur (south), Mexico. Results indicate that the beach sediments were enriched in Cu, Zn, Co, Pb, Cd (3856, 2599, 635, 236, 240 mg kg-1, respectively) and in Mn (2.01%) due to a century of mining and smelting activities. Comparison of these concentration with ecotoxicological sediment quality criteria (ERL, ERM, LEL, SEL) indicated the values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn and Mn were higher than the permissible limits. Average values of the calculated geoaccumulation index (Igeo) suggest that the key elements such as Mn, Ba, Cd, Co, Mo, Pb, Sr, Zn are categorized in class 4 to 6 encompassing the strongly polluted to extremely polluted groups. The association and enrichment of the above elements are also well supported statistically (factor analysis) which points to the role of Fe-Mn oxides as the main scavengers for retaining these chemical elements.

  16. Holocene dinoflagellate cyst record of climate and marine primary productivity change in the Santa Barbara Basin, southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospelova, Vera; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Hendy, Ingrid, L.; Pedersen, Thomas F.

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution sedimentary records of dinoflagellate cysts and other marine palynomorphs from the Santa Barbara Basin (Ocean Drilling Program Hole 893A) demonstrate large variability of primary productivity during the Holocene, as the California Current System responded to climate change. Throughout the sequence, dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are characterized by the dominance of cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, and particularly by Brigantedinium, accompanied by other upwelling-related taxa such as Echinidinium and cysts of Protoperidinium americanum. During the early Holocene (~12-7 ka), the species richness is relatively low (16 taxa) and genius Brigantedinium reaches the highest relative abundance, thus indicating nutrient-rich and highly productive waters. The middle Holocene (~7-3.5 ka) is characterized by relatively constant cyst concentrations, and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are indicative of a slight decrease in sea-surface temperature. A noticeable increase and greater range of fluctuations in the cyst concentrations during the late Holocene (~3.5-1 ka) indicate enhanced marine primary productivity and increased climatic variability, most likely related to the intensification of El Niño-like conditions. Keywords: dinoflagellate cysts, Holocene, North Pacific, climate, primary productivity.

  17. Chromium geochemistry of serpentinous sediment in the Willow core, Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oze, Christopher J.; LaForce, Matthew J.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Hanson, Randall T.; Bird, Dennis K.; Coleman, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of Cr geochemistry in serpentinous sediment completed for a multiple-aquifer ground-water monitoring well (Willow core of Santa Clara County, CA) determined sediment at depths >225 meters contains Cr concentrations ranging from 195 to 1155 mg/kg. Serpentinous sediment from this site is a potential source of non-anthropogenic Cr contamination. Chromium-bearing minerals such as Cr-spinel appear to be the main source of Cr in the sediment; however, Cr-bearing silicates and clay minerals are additional Cr sources. Aqueous Cr concentrations in the sediment are <4.6 mg/L; however, the valence of Cr was not identified in the solutions or in the sediment. Although there is no indication of Cr(VI) contamination derived from the serpentinous sediment, elevated Cr concentrations in the sediment, the observed ‘dissolution’ textures of the Cr-bearing minerals, the estimated redox environment, and water chemistry indicate the formation of Cr(VI) is potentially favorable.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Santa Ysabel Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Mapping process and age of Quaternary deposits on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K. M.; Minor, S. A.; Bedford, D.

    2016-12-01

    Employing a geomorphic process-age classification scheme, we mapped the Quaternary surficial geology of Santa Rosa (SRI) within the Channel Islands National Park. This detailed (1:12,000 scale) map represents upland erosional transport processes and alluvial, fluvial, eolian, beach, marine terrace, mass wasting, and mixed depositional processes. Mapping was motivated through an agreement with the National Park Service and is intended to aid natural resource assessments, including post-grazing disturbance recovery and identification of mass wasting and tectonic hazards. We obtained numerous detailed geologic field observations, fossils for faunal identification as age control, and materials for numeric dating. This GPS-located field information provides ground truth for delineating map units and faults using GIS-based datasets- high-resolution (sub-meter) aerial imagery, LiDAR-based DEMs and derivative raster products. Mapped geologic units denote surface processes and Quaternary faults constrain deformation kinematics and rates, which inform models of landscape change. Significant findings include: 1) Flights of older Pleistocene (>120 ka) and possibly Pliocene marine terraces were identified beneath younger alluvial and eolian deposits at elevations as much as 275 m above modern sea level. Such elevated terraces suggest that SRI was a smaller, more submerged island in the late Neogene and (or) early Pleistocene prior to tectonic uplift. 2) Structural and geomorphic observations made along the potentially seismogenic SRI fault indicate a protracted slip history during the late Neogene and Quaternary involving early normal slip, later strike slip, and recent reverse slip. These changes in slip mode explain a marked contrast in island physiography across the fault. 3) Many of the steeper slopes are dramatically stripped of regolith, with exposed bedrock and deeply incised gullies, presumably due effects related to past grazing practices. 4) Surface water presence is

  20. Shaded relief aeromagnetic map of the Santa Clara Valley and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Carter W.; Jachens, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This aeromagnetic map covers the southern portion of San Francisco Bay, the Santa Clara Valley and surrounding mountains, part of which has been modelled in threedimensions (Jachens and other, 2001). The magnetic anomaly map has been compiled from existing digital data. Data was obtained from six aeromagnetic surveys that were flown at different times, spacings and elevations. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) for the date of each survey had been removed in the initial processing. The resulting residual magnetic anomalies were analytically continued onto a common surface 305 m (1000 ft) above terrain. Portions of each survey were substantially above the specified flight height listed in the table. The surveys were then merged together using a commercial software package called Oasis Montage. The gray lines on the map indicate the extent of each survey. The program used these regions of overlap to determine the best fit between surveys. Black dots show probable edges of magnetic bodies defined by the maximum horizontal gradient determined using a computer program by Blakely (1995). Crystalline rocks generally contain sufficient magnetic minerals to cause variations in the Earth’s magnetic field that can be mapped by aeromagnetic surveys. Sedimentary rocks are generally weakly magnetized and consequently have a small effect on the magnetic field: thus a magnetic anomaly map can be used to “see through” the sedimentary rock cover and can convey information on lithologic contrasts and structural trends related to the underlying crystalline basement (see Nettleton,1971; Blakely, 1995). Faults often cut magnetic bodies and offset magnetic anomalies can thus be used to help determine fault motion. Serpentinite, which is highly magnetic, is often found along faults. On this map areas of low magnetic anomalies are shown in blues and green while highs are shown in reds and magentas. Faults are from Brabb and others, 1998a,1998b, Graymer and others

  1. Budgeting postglacial sedimentation history on the Santa Cruz, California mid-continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, E.E.; Eittreim, S.L.; Hanes, D.M.; Field, M.E.; Edwards, B.D.; Fallon, S.J.; Anima, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiling and surface texture mapping of the central California continental shelf, reveal a prominent subsurface reflector interpreted as a low stand erosion surface and an overlying mudbelt that covers 421 km2 of the mid-shelf in depths of 40-90 m. Radiometric and sedimentologic analyses of samples from vibracores taken along the seaward edge of the mudbelt show that initial deposition above the pre-Holocene erosion surface began ca. 14.5 ka. These data and model results of sea-level history, tectonics, and the Monterey Bay littoral sediment budget support the notion that the entire midshelf deposit was formed during the postglacial transgression. An alternative explanation, that land-use activities while providing important boundary conditions for modeling shoreface evolution.

  2. DOECTZDATA; California sixteen-zone weather data. [IBM360

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmich, C.

    DOECTZDATA is a collection of hourly weather data for each of 365 days in a year for sixteen different California thermal zones representing Eureka, Santa Rosa, San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Ana, Pasadena, San Bernardino, Red Bluff, Sacramento, Fresno, Daggett, Brawley, and Tahoe. The data presented are in the form of the WBAN Hourly Surface Observation data used by the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. They include the sky condition, visibility, weather and/or obstruction to vision information, sea level pressure, dew point temperature, wind direction and speed, station pressure, dry and wet bulb temperature, relative humidity, and cloud and obscuring phenomena information.IBM360; OS/360.

  3. Preliminary paleomagnetic results from the Coyote Creek Outdoor Classroom drill hole, Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2003-01-01

    Paleomagnetic samples were obtained from cores taken during the drilling of a research well along Coyote Creek in San Jose, California, in order to use the geomagnetic field behavior recorded in those samples to provide age constraints for the sediment encountered. The well reached a depth of 308 meters and material apparently was deposited largely (entirely?) during the Brunhes Normal Polarity Chron, which lasted from 780 ka to the present time. Three episodes of anomalous magnetic inclinations were recorded in parts of the sedimentary sequence; the uppermost two we correlate to the Mono Lake (~30 ka) geomagnetic excursion and 6 cm lower, tentatively to the Laschamp (~45 ka) excursion. The lowermost anomalous interval occurs at 305 m and consists of less than 10 cm of fully reversed inclinations underlain by 1.5 m of normal polarity sediment. This lower anomalous interval may represent either the Big Lost excursion (~565 ka) or the polarity transition at the end of the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Chron (780 ka). The average rates of deposition for the Pleistocene section in this well, based on these two alternatives, are approximately 52 or 37 cm/kyr, respectively.

  4. Variability and trends of ocean acidification in the Southern California Current System: A time series from Santa Monica Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, A.; Gruber, N.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the temporal variability and trends of pH and of the aragonite saturation state, Ωarag, in the southern California Current System on the basis of a 6 year time series from Santa Monica Bay, using biweekly observations of dissolved inorganic carbon and combined calculated and measured alkalinity. Median values of pH and Ωarag in the upper 20 m are comparable to observations from the subtropical gyres, but the temporal variability is at least a factor of 5 larger, primarily driven by short-term upwelling events and mesoscale processes. Ωarag and pH decrease rapidly with depth, such that the saturation horizon is reached already at 130 m, on average, but it occasionally shoals to as low as 30 m. No statistically significant linear trends emerge in the upper 100 m, but Ωarag and pH decrease, on average, at rates of -0.009±0.006 yr-1 and -0.004±0.003 yr-1 in the 100-250 m depth range. These are somewhat larger, but not statistically different from the expected trends based on the recent increase in atmospheric CO2. About half of the variability in the deseasonalized data can be explained by the El Niño Southern Oscillation, with warm phases (El Niño) being associated with above normal pH and Ωarag. The observed variability and trend in Ωarag and pH is well captured by a multiple linear regression model on the basis of a small number of readily observable independent variables. This permits the estimation of these variables for related sites in the region.

  5. Reach-scale channel sensitivity to multiple human activities and natural events: Lower Santa Clara River, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Peter W.; Dusterhoff, Scott R.; Sears, William A.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the cumulative impact of natural and human influences on the sensitivity of channel morphodynamics, a relative measure between the drivers for change and the magnitude of channel response, requires an approach that accommodates spatial and temporal variability in the suite of primary stressors. Multiple historical data sources were assembled to provide a reach-scale analysis of the lower Santa Clara River (LSCR) in Ventura County, California, USA. Sediment supply is naturally high due to tectonic activity, earthquake-generated landslides, wildfires, and high magnitude flow events during El Niño years. Somewhat typically for the region, the catchment has been subject to four reasonably distinct land use and resource management combinations since European-American settlement. When combined with analysis of channel morphological response (quantifiable since ca. 1930), reach-scale and temporal differences in channel sensitivity become apparent. Downstream reaches have incised on average 2.4 m and become narrower by almost 50% with changes focused in a period of highly sensitive response after about 1950 followed by forced insensitivity caused by structural flood embankments and a significant grade control structure. In contrast, the middle reaches have been responsive but are morphologically resilient, and the upstream reaches show a mildly sensitive aggradational trend. Superimposing the natural and human drivers for change reveals that large scale stressors (related to ranching and irrigation) have been replaced over time by a suite of stressors operating at multiple spatial scales. Lower reaches have been sensitive primarily to 'local' scale impacts (urban growth, flood control, and aggregate mining) whereas, upstream, catchment-scale influences still prevail (including flow regulation and climate-driven sediment supply factors). These factors illustrate the complexity inherent to cumulative impact assessment in fluvial systems, provide evidence for a

  6. A spatial analysis of the Burrowing Owl (Speotyto cunicularia) population in Santa Clara County, California, using a geographic information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Taylor Buchanan

    1997-01-01

    A small population of Burrowing Owls (Speotyto cunicularia) is found in the San Francisco Bay Area, particularly in Santa Clara County. These owls utilize habitat that is dispersed throughout this heavily urbanized region. In an effort to establish a conservation plan for Burrowing Owls in Santa Clara County, a spatial analysis of owl distribution...

  7. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Santa Clara River Valley Study Unit, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrella, Joseph; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 460-square-mile Santa Clara River Valley study unit (SCRV) was investigated from April to June 2007 as part of the statewide Priority Basin project of the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw ground water used for public water supplies within SCRV, and to facilitate a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Fifty-seven ground-water samples were collected from 53 wells in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Forty-two wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells). Eleven wells (understanding wells) were selected to further evaluate water chemistry in particular parts of the study area, and four depth-dependent ground-water samples were collected from one of the eleven understanding wells to help understand the relation between water chemistry and depth. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, potential wastewater-indicator compounds, and pharmaceutical compounds), a constituent of special interest (perchlorate), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial constituents. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-13, carbon-14 [abundance], stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, chlorine-37, and bromine-81), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source

  8. Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, K.S.

    1972-01-01

    The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only

  9. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Cruz, San Gabriel, and Peninsular Ranges Hard Rock Aquifers study unit, 2011-2012: results from the California GAMA program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 2,400-square-mile Santa Cruz, San Gabriel, and Peninsular Ranges Hard Rock Aquifers (Hard Rock) study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from March 2011 through March 2012, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Hard Rock study unit was the 35th study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP.

  10. Planktonic foraminiferal shell weight reflects sea surface temperature over the past 150 years in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, D. K.; Clayman, L.; Weaver, J.; Schimmelmann, A.; Hendy, I. L.

    2011-12-01

    Size-normalized foraminiferal shell weight has been used as a proxy for past carbonate ion concentration in seawater, assuming that reduced carbonate ion concentration and pH lead to lower calcification rates and lighter, thinner shells. Previous research suggested that the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and ocean acidification over the last century has resulted in lower shell weight, but this has not yet been documented at high resolution. Here, we present an approximately annual record of size-normalized shell weight and Mg/Ca of the near-surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides to investigate the relationship between shell weight and sea surface temperature in Santa Barbara Basin, California (34° 16.847' N, 120° 02.268' W), over the last 150 years. Results indicate that foraminiferal shell weight is inversely correlated with instrumental sea surface temperature since 1850. Foraminiferal shell weights were highest between 1900 and 1920, corresponding to the lowest instrumental and Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures. Shell weights gradually decreased to their lowest values after the mid-1970s, coincident with northeast Pacific warming as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation shifted from cool to warm phase. G. bulloides Mg/Ca temperatures also gradually increased after 1970, from 13 ± 1°C to 14.5 ± 1°C. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the lowest shell-weight foraminifera, those deposited since the mid-1970s shift, exhibit a distinctive smooth shell texture devoid of spine bases, in contrast with higher shell-weight foraminifera, which have numerous spine bases and large pores. The smooth-shell surface morphology is replicated in laboratory dissolution experiments, consistent with removal of an outer layer of calcite during shell thinning and partial dissolution of G. bulloides. These results suggest that G. bulloides calcification rates were related to sea surface temperatures over the last 150 years, and that shells deposited

  11. Geologic map of the Hayward fault zone, Contra Costa, Alameda, and Santa Clara counties, California: a digital database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, R.W.; Jones, D.L.; Brabb, E.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Hayward is one of three major fault zones of the San Andreas system that have produced large historic earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area (the others being the San Andreas and Calaveras). Severe earthquakes were generated by this fault zone in 1836 and in 1868, and several large earthquakes have been recorded since 1868. The Hayward fault zone is considered to be the most probable source of a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area, as much as 28% chance for a magnitude 7 earthquake before the year 2021 (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1990). The Hayward fault zone, as described in this work, is a zone of highly deformed rocks, trending north 30 degrees west and ranging in width from about 2 to 10 kilometers. The historic earthquake generating activity has been concentrated in the western portion of the zone, but the zone as a whole reflects deformation derived from oblique right-lateral and compressive tectonic stress along a significant upper crustal discontinuity for the past 10 million or more years. The Hayward fault zone is bounded on the east by a series of faults that demarcate the beginning of one or more structural blocks containing rocks and structures unrelated to the Hayward fault zone. The eastern bounding faults are, from the south, the Calaveras, Stonybrook, Palomares, Miller Creek, and Moraga faults. These faults are not considered to be part of the Hayward fault zone, although they are shown on the map to demarcate its boundary. The western boundary of the zone is less clearly defined, because the alluvium of the San Francisco Bay and Santa Clara Valley basins obscures bedrock and structural relationships. Although several of the westernmost faults in the zone clearly project under or through the alluvium, the western boundary of the fault is generally considered to be the westernmost mapped fault, which corresponds more or less with the margin of thick unconsolidated surficial deposits. The Hayward fault

  12. Landslides: Geomorphology and Sea Cliff Hazard Potential, Santa Barbara - Isla Vista, California J.F. Klath and E.A. Keller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klath, J. F.; Keller, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    sea level rise estimates, a map displaying likely position of the coastline by 2100 will be created. This information will be useful to the county of Santa Barbara, California when considering future development and hazard mitigation plans.

  13. Santa Ana River Main Stem Including Santiago Creek, Counties of Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino, California. Phase I General Design Memorandum. Main Report and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    immense damages downstream in Orange County. In this flood additional flows entered Prado from Lake Elsinore , 25 miles away, down Temescal Wash. The...water surface level at Lake Elsinore during this flood exceeded the water level during the 1916 flood, the last time Lake Elsinore spilled. Any higher...water would have resulted in spills into Temescal Creek eventually reaching Prado Dam. Lake Elsinore , following the 1980 flood, will remain at an

  14. Santa Clara County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LAS format files, raw LiDAR data in its native format, classified bare-earth LiDAR DEM and photogrammetrically derived breaklines generated from LiDAR Intensity...

  15. Santa Monica Children's Centers, Santa Monica, California: Low-Cost Day Care Facilities for Children of Working Mothers Made Available Through the Cooperation of the California State Government and Local School District. Model Programs--Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Two of the four Santa Monica Children's Centers are nursery schools for children aged 3 to 5; the other two centers serve as extended care facilities for children of school age. All centers are concerned with meeting the physical, intellectual, and emotional needs of children on a long-term basis and stress a program offering a variety of play…

  16. Tracking Identity: Opportunity, Success, and Affiliation with Science among Fifth-Grade Latina/o Youth of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Grayson Ford

    This dissertation is an investigation into the American public education system at the elementary school level. It highlights important factors that shape the organizational structure of schools and classrooms, and in turn, how they engender disparities in the ways students experience education, namely, in the opportunities made available to them to achieve and succeed at a high level. This dissertation operates at the confluence of notions about class, gender, language, and race, especially as they revolve around public education and the hegemonic meritocratic discourse on which it is founded. This dissertation engages and contributes to scholarship within the following areas: The political economy of education; discourse and the dialectical relationship between agency and structure; cultural perspectives on identity, voice, and learning; and, Latinas/os in science education. The data that serve as the basis for the findings presented in this dissertation were collected throughout a three-phase yearlong ethnographic study of the two tracked fifth-grade classrooms at Amblen Elementary School, serving a socioeconomically disadvantaged Latina/o student population in Santa Barbara, California. In classrooms all across the nation, while it remains true that Latina/o students disproportionally take up space in the lower-tracked courses and not in the higher ones, this study does not examine inequality in tracking assignments made along ethnic/racial lines (as 100% of the students that participated in this research identify as Latina/o), rather, it investigates the consequences of what happens when Latina/o students are tracked according to symbolic markers of their ethnic/racial identity, that is, their varying levels of English language competency. Using data from participant observation, semi-structured interviews, students' drawings, as well as free-list and rank-order exercises, I was able to answer the following central research questions: In what ways do the

  17. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Cruz County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Schuster, Robert L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $14.5 million in damages were assessed in Santa Cruz County.

  18. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Clara County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, William L.; Harp, Edwin L.; Arnal, Caroline H.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $7.6 million in damages were assessed in Santa Clara County.

  19. Loss of genetic connectivity and diversity in urban microreserves in a southern California endemic Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae: Stenopelmatus n. sp. "santa monica")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, A.G.; Lewallen, E.A.; Deas, J.; Bohonak, A.J.; Weissman, D.B.; Fisher, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Microreserves may be useful in protecting native arthropod diversity in urbanized landscapes. However, species that do not disperse through the urban matrix may eventually be lost from these fragments. Population extinctions may be precipitated by an increase in genetic differentiation among fragments and loss of genetic diversity within fragments, and these effects should become stronger with time. We analyzed population genetic structure in the dispersal limited Jerusalem cricket Stenopelmatus n. sp. "santa monica" in the Santa Monica Mountains and Simi Hills north of Los Angeles, California (CA), to determine the impacts of fragmentation over the past 70 years. MtDNA divergence was greater among urban fragments than within contiguous habitat and was positively correlated with fragment age. MtDNA genetic diversity within fragments increased with fragment size and decreased with fragment age. Genetic divergence across 38 anonymous nuclear Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) loci was influenced by the presence of major highways and highway age, but there was no effect of additional urban fragmentation. ISSR diversity was not correlated with fragment size or age. Differing results between markers may be due to male-biased dispersal, or different effective population sizes, sorting rates, or mutation rates among sampled genes. Results suggest that genetic connectivity among populations has been disrupted by highways and urban development, prior to declines in local population sizes. We emphasize that genetic connectivity can rapidly erode in fragmented landscapes and that flightless arthropods can serve as sensitive indicators for these effects. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  20. Prehistoric fires and the shaping of colonial transported landscapes in southern California: A paleoenvironmental study at Dune Pond, Santa Barbara County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque, Ana; Anderson, R. Scott; Simms, Alexander R.; Gentry, Beau J.

    2015-03-01

    Using a novel combination of paleoecologic proxies including pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs), macroscopic charcoal, and Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles (SCPs), 5000 years of landscape change, fire history and land-use have been reconstructed from Dune Pond, Santa Barbara County, California. The pond was sensitive to Holocene regional climatic variability, showing different phases of lower (4600-3700 cal yr BP, 2100-700 cal yr BP, historical period) and higher (3700-2100 cal yr BP, 700-150 cal yr BP) local moisture availability. During this period the landscape was dominated by a coastal mosaic vegetation including dune mats, coastal scrub and salt marshes on the dunes and backdunes, with chaparral and oak woodland growing in the valley plains and foothills. Fire was intimately linked with such dominating mosaic vegetation, and the combination of wet conditions and the presence of nearby human settlement were a trigger favoring coastal fires for at least two periods: from 3100 to 1500 cal yr BP and from 650 cal yr BP until the 18th century. In both cases fire was an important tool to keep an open coastal landscape attractive to hunting wildlife. Finally, matching this varied range of high-resolution paleoecological proxies with historical records we could characterize the development of colonial transported landscapes following the Euro-American settlement of Santa Barbara. The introduction of livestock grazing by Spanish colonists favored erosive processes and the introduction of fecal-borne parasites in freshwater bodies, negatively impacted salt and brackish coastal marshes, and promoted the invasion of alien grasses and ruderals. This agro-pastoral landscape was consolidated during the American period, with a greater role for cultivation, the development of industrial activities and increased population. Despite negative environmental consequences such as the loss of native habitats, exotic land-uses and plants introduced during the historical period

  1. Upper crustal structure from the Santa Monica Mountains to the Sierra Nevada, Southern California: Tomographic results from the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, W.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Okaya, D.A.; Clayton, R.W.; Davis, P.M.; Prodehl, C.; Murphy, J.M.; Langenheim, V.E.; Benthien, M.L.; Godfrey, N.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Thygesen, K.; Thurber, C.H.; Simila, G.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) collected refraction and low-fold reflection data along a 150-km-long corridor extending from the Santa Monica Mountains northward to the Sierra Nevada. This profile was part of the second phase of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE II). Chief imaging targets included sedimentary basins beneath the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys and the deep structure of major faults along the transect, including causative faults for the 1971 M 6.7 San Fernando and 1994 M 6.7 Northridge earthquakes, the San Gabriel Fault, and the San Andreas Fault. Tomographic modeling of first arrivals using the methods of Hole (1992) and Lutter et al. (1999) produces velocity models that are similar to each other and are well resolved to depths of 5-7.5 km. These models, together with oil-test well data and independent forward modeling of LARSE II refraction data, suggest that regions of relatively low velocity and high velocity gradient in the San Fernando Valley and the northern Santa Clarita Valley (north of the San Gabriel Fault) correspond to Cenozoic sedimentary basin fill and reach maximum depths along the profile of ???4.3 km and >3 km , respectively. The Antelope Valley, within the western Mojave Desert, is also underlain by low-velocity, high-gradient sedimentary fill to an interpreted maximum depth of ???2.4 km. Below depths of ???2 km, velocities of basement rocks in the Santa Monica Mountains and the central Transverse Ranges vary between 5.5 and 6.0 km/sec, but in the Mojave Desert, basement rocks vary in velocity between 5.25 and 6.25 km/sec. The San Andreas Fault separates differing velocity structures of the central Transverse Ranges and Mojave Desert. A weak low-velocity zone is centered approximately on the north-dipping aftershock zone of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake and possibly along the deep projection of the San Gabriel Fault. Modeling of gravity data, using

  2. Coarse-grained sediment delivery and distribution in the Holocene Santa Monica Basin, California: Implications for evaluating source-to-sink flux at millennial time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romans, B.W.; Normark, W.R.; McGann, M.M.; Covault, J.A.; Graham, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing accumulations of coarse-grained terrigenous sediment from deep-marine basins to evaluate the relative contributions of and history of controls on sediment flux through a source-to-sink system has been difficult as a result of limited knowledge of event timing. In this study, six new radiocarbon (14C) dates are integrated with five previously published dates that have been recalibrated from a 12.5-m-thick turbidite section from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1015 in Santa Monica Basin, offshore California. This borehole is tied to high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles that cover an 1100 km2 area of the middle and lower Hueneme submarine fan and most of the basin plain. The resulting stratigraphic framework provides the highest temporal resolution for a thick-bedded Holocene turbidite succession to date, permitting an evaluation of source-to-sink controls at millennial (1000 yr) scales. The depositional history from 7 ka to present indicates that the recurrence interval for large turbidity-current events is relatively constant (300-360 yr), but the volume of sediment deposited on the fan and in the basin plain has increased by a factor of 2 over this period. Moreover, the amount of sand per event on the basin plain during the same interval has increased by a factor of 7. Maps of sediment distribution derived from correlation of seismic-reflection profiles indicate that this trend cannot be attributed exclusively to autogenic processes (e.g., progradation of depocenters). The observed variability in sediment accumulation rates is thus largely controlled by allogenic factors, including: (1) increased discharge of Santa Clara River as a result of increased magnitude and frequency of El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events from ca. 2 ka to present, (2) an apparent change in routing of coarse-grained sediment within the staging area at ca. 3 ka (i.e., from direct river input to indirect, littoral cell input into Hueneme submarine canyon), and (3

  3. Characterization of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures in the offshore Santa Maria Basin, south-central California: Chapter CC of Evolution of sedimentary basins/onshore oil and gas investigations - Santa Maria province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, C. Richard; Rietman, Jan D.; Heck, Ronald G.; Lettis, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone trends subparallel to the south-central California coast for 110 km from north of Point Estero to south of Purisima Point and forms the eastern margin of the present offshore Santa Maria Basin. Knowledge of the attributes of the Hosgri Fault Zone is important for petroleum development, seismic engineering, and environmental planning in the region. Because it lies offshore along its entire reach, our characterizations of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures are primarily based on the analysis of over 10,000 km of common-depth-point marine seismic reflection data collected from a 5,000-km2 area of the central and eastern parts of the offshore Santa Maria Basin. We describe and illustrate the along-strike and downdip geometry of the Hosgri Fault Zone over its entire length and provide examples of interpreted seismic reflection records and a map of the structural trends of the fault zone and adjacent structures in the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. The seismic data are integrated with offshore well and seafloor geologic data to describe the age and seismic appearance of offshore geologic units and marker horizons. We develop a basin-wide seismic velocity model for depth conversions and map three major unconformities along the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. Accompanying plates include maps that are also presented as figures in the report. Appendix A provides microfossil data from selected wells and appendix B includes uninterpreted copies of the annotated seismic record sections illustrated in the chapter. Features of the Hosgri Fault Zone documented in this investigation are suggestive of both lateral and reverse slip. Characteristics indicative of lateral slip include (1) the linear to curvilinear character of the mapped trace of the fault zone, (2) changes in structural trend along and across the fault zone that diminish in magnitude toward the ends of the fault zone, (3) localized compressional and extensional structures

  4. Joint Assimilation of InSAR and Water-level Data for Aquifer Parameter Estimation and Groundwater State Forecasting in Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullin, Ayrat; Jonsson, Sigurjon

    2017-04-01

    Ground subsidence induced by groundwater withdrawal is a widespread problem and can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure. The challenge is to forecast, accurately and in a cost effective way, when water extraction may threaten infrastructure, so that procedures can be applied to avoid unacceptable levels of ground deformation beyond construction engineering criteria. However, many characteristics of the heterogeneity of aquifer parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficients, are usually uncertain. Monitoring data, such as water-level data in monitoring wells, can be used to reduce these uncertainties, but the difficulty is that they usually only provide spatially limited information about the groundwater system. To take on these problems, we use an ensemble-based assimilation framework that efficiently integrates InSAR-derived displacements and hydraulic head data for improved understanding of groundwater reservoir behavior. We apply this framework for aquifer parameter estimation of the basin-wide Santa Clara Valley groundwater system in northern California. To study the deformation patterns in the area, we use time-series analysis of InSAR data, based on more than 150 images from the ERS, Envisat and ALOS satellites from 1992-2012. Using the InSAR observations, in addition to approximate data on pumping, managed recharge and rainfall amounts, we are able to advance our understanding of the ongoing hydrogeological processes within the aquifer system. We find that including both InSAR and well water-level data as observations improves the properties estimation compared to basic statistical interpolation between the available well data. We also compare the performance of our hydraulic head predictions with previous groundwater studies in Santa Clara Valley, such as those of Chaussard et al. (2014). The results suggest that the high spatial resolution subsidence observations from InSAR are useful for accurately quantifying hydraulic

  5. Development of a local-scale urban stream assessment method using benthic macroinvertebrates: An example from the Santa Clara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.L.; Purcell, A.H.; Fend, S.V.; Resh, V.H.

    2009-01-01

    Research that explores the biological response to urbanization on a site-specific scale is necessary for management of urban basins. Recent studies have proposed a method to characterize the biological response of benthic macroinvertebrates along an urban gradient for several climatic regions in the USA. Our study demonstrates how this general framework can be refined and applied on a smaller scale to an urbanized basin, the Santa Clara Basin (surrounding San Jose, California, USA). Eighty-four sampling sites on 14 streams in the Santa Clara Basin were used for assessing local stream conditions. First, an urban index composed of human population density, road density, and urban land cover was used to determine the extent of urbanization upstream from each sampling site. Second, a multimetric biological index was developed to characterize the response of macroinvertebrate assemblages along the urban gradient. The resulting biological index included metrics from 3 ecological categories: taxonomic composition ( Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera), functional feeding group (shredder richness), and habit ( clingers). The 90th-quantile regression line was used to define the best available biological conditions along the urban gradient, which we define as the predicted biological potential. This descriptor was then used to determine the relative condition of sites throughout the basin. Hierarchical partitioning of variance revealed that several site-specific variables (dissolved O2 and temperature) were significantly related to a site's deviation from its predicted biological potential. Spatial analysis of each site's deviation from its biological potential indicated geographic heterogeneity in the distribution of impaired sites. The presence and operation of local dams optimize water use, but modify natural flow regimes, which in turn influence stream habitat, dissolved O2, and temperature. Current dissolved O2 and temperature regimes deviate from natural

  6. The impact of a prominent rain shadow on flooding in California's Santa Cruz Mountains: A CALJET case study and sensitivity to the ENSO cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, F.M.; Neiman, P.J.; Kingsmill, D.E.; Persson, P.O.G.; White, A.B.; Strem, E.T.; Andrews, E.D.; Antweiler, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    Data from the California Land-Falling Jets Experiment (CALJET) are used to explore the causes of variations in flood severity in adjacent coastal watersheds within the Santa Cruz Mountains on 2-3 February 1998. While Pescadero Creek (rural) experienced its flood of record, the adjacent San Lorenzo Creek (heavily populated), attained only its fourth-highest flow. This difference resulted from conditions present while the warm sector of the storm, with its associated low-level jet, high moisture content, and weak static stability, was overhead. Rainfall in the warm sector was dominated by orographic forcing. While the wind speed strongly modulated rain rates on windward slopes, the wind direction positioned the edge of a rain shadow cast by the Santa Lucia Mountains partially over the San Lorenzo basin, thus protecting the city of Santa Cruz from a more severe flood. Roughly 26% ?? 9% of the streamflow at flood peak on Pescadero Creek resulted from the warm-sector rainfall. Without this rainfall, the peak flow on Pescadero Creek would likely not have attained record status. These results are complemented by a climatological analysis based on ???50-yr-duration streamflow records for these and two other nearby windward watersheds situated ???20 to 40 km farther to the east, and a comparison of this climatological analysis with composites of NCEP-NCAR reanalysis fields. The westernmost watersheds were found to have their greatest floods during El Nin??o winters, while the easternmost watersheds peaked during non-El Nin??o episodes. These results are consistent with the case study, that showed that the composite 925-mb, meridionally oriented wind direction during El Nin??os favors a rain shadow over the eastern watersheds. During non-El Nin??o periods, the composite, zonally oriented wind direction indicates that the sheltering effect of the rain shadow on the eastern watersheds is reduced, while weaker winds, less water vapor, and stronger stratification reduce the peak

  7. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

    2009-02-25

    In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total

  8. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to

  9. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W.; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationships of field habitat measurements, visual habitat indices, and land cover to benthic macroinvertebrates in urbanized streams of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fend, S.V.; Carter, J.L.; Kearns, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated several approaches for measuring natural and anthropogenic habitat characteristics to predict benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages over a range of urban intensity at 85 stream sites in the Santa Clara Valley, California. Land cover was summarized as percentage urban land cover and impervious area within upstream buffers and the upstream subwatersheds. Field measurements characterized water chemistry, channel slope, sediment, and riparian canopy. In . addition to applying the visual-based habitat assessment in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rapid bioassessment protocol, we developed a simplified urban habitat assessment index based on turbidity, fine sediment deposition, riparian condition, and channel modification. Natural and anthropogenic habitat variables covaried along longitudinal stream gradients and were highly correlated with elevation. At the scale of the entire watershed, benthic macroinvertebrate measures were equally correlated with variables expressing natural gradients and urbanization effects. When natural gradients were reduced by partitioning sites into ecoregion subsection groupings, habitat variables most highly correlated with macroinvertebrate measures differed between upland and valley floor site groups. Among the valley floor sites, channel slope and physical modification of channel and riparian habitats appeared more important than upstream land cover or water quality in determining macroinvertebrate richness and ordination scores. Among upland sites, effects of upstream reservoir releases on habitat quality appeared important. Rapid habitat evaluation methods appeared to be an effective method for describing habitat features important to benthic macroinvertebrates when adapted for the region and the disturbance of interest. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Rancho Santa Fe Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Simulated ground motion in Santa Clara Valley, California, and vicinity from M≥6.7 scenario earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Stephen C.; Hartzell, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Models of the Santa Clara Valley (SCV) 3D velocity structure and 3D finite-difference software are used to predict ground motions from scenario earthquakes on the San Andreas (SAF), Monte Vista/Shannon, South Hayward, and Calaveras faults. Twenty different scenario ruptures are considered that explore different source models with alternative hypocenters, fault dimensions, and rupture velocities and three different velocity models. Ground motion from the full wave field up to 1 Hz is exhibited as maps of peak horizontal velocity and pseudospectral acceleration at periods of 1, 3, and 5 sec. Basin edge effects and amplification in sedimentary basins of the SCV are observed that exhibit effects from shallow sediments with relatively low shear-wave velocity (330 m/sec). Scenario earthquakes have been simulated for events with the following magnitudes: (1) M 6.8–7.4 Calaveras sources, (2) M 6.7–6.9 South Hayward sources, (3) M 6.7 Monte Vista/Shannon sources, and (4) M 7.1–7.2 Peninsula segment of the SAF sources. Ground motions are strongly influenced by source parameters such as rupture velocity, rise time, maximum depth of rupture, hypocenter, and source directivity. Cenozoic basins also exert a strong influence on ground motion. For example, the Evergreen Basin on the northeastern side of the SCV is especially responsive to 3–5-sec energy from most scenario earthquakes. The Cupertino Basin on the southwestern edge of the SCV tends to be highly excited by many Peninsula and Monte Vista fault scenarios. Sites over the interior of the Evergreen Basin can have long-duration coda that reflect the trapping of seismic energy within this basin. Plausible scenarios produce predominantly 5-sec wave trains with greater than 30 cm/sec sustained ground-motion amplitude with greater than 30 sec duration within the Evergreen Basin.

  13. 77 FR 14058 - Santa Teresa Southern Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Rail Line of Verde Logistics Railroad...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... Logistics Railroad, LLC at Santa Teresa, Dona Ana County, NM Santa Teresa Southern Railroad, LLC (STSR), a... feet of rail line owned by Verde Logistics Railroad, LLC (Verde). The rail line extends between a point... to shippers and receivers located in the Santa Teresa Logistics Industrial Park. \\1\\ STSR states that...

  14. Effects of limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations on runoff and sediment yields in the Upper Permanente Creek basin, Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, K.M.; Hill, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    High sediment loads below headwater areas of the Permanente Creek drainage basin, Santa Clara County, California, have caused flood-control problems in downstream lowland areas. Measured sediment yields in Permanente Creek, which drains areas affected by limestone quarrying and cement-plant operations, were 14 times greater than yields from the West Fork Permanente Creek, which primarily drains parkland. Part of this large disparity in yields is the result of higher runoff/unit of drainage area in the Permanente Creek Basin. Results of rainfall-runoff modeling indicate that the tendency for higher runoff from Permanente Creek results from natural differences in basin physiography. Runoff during periods of high streamflow (when most sediment is transported) is dominated by subsurface flow, which is not affected by human activities. Although artificial features created by human activities seem to have had only minor effects on runoff, they apparently have had major effects on sediment availability. Artificial features accounted for 273 acres (89%) of the 307 acres of active erosional landforms mapped in 1984. Increased availability of sediment in the Permanente Creek basin appears to be indicated by elevated intercepts of sediment-transport curves. A comparison of sediment-transport curves for the West Fork Permanente Creek with similar curves for the Permanente Creek basin under natural conditions suggests that the sediment yield from Permanente Creek is about 3.5 times higher than it would be under natural basin conditions. The increased yield apparently is due to an increase in sediment availability rather than an increase in runoff. (USGS)

  15. A History of Warming Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Acidification Recorded by Planktonic Foraminifera Geochemistry from the Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, E.; Thunell, R.; Bizimis, M.; Buckley, W. P., Jr.; benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Chartier, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry of foraminiferal shells has been widely used to reconstruct past conditions of the ocean and climate. Since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenically produced CO2 has resulted in an increase in global temperatures and a decline in the mean pH of the world's oceans. The California Current System is a particularly susceptible region to ocean acidification due to natural upwelling processes that also cause a reduction in seawater pH. The trace element concentration of magnesium and boron in planktonic foraminiferal shells are used here as proxies for temperature and carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]), respectively. Newly developed calibrations relating Mg/Ca ratios to temperature (R2 0.91) and B/Ca ratios to [CO32-] (R2 0.84) for the surface-mixed layer species Globogerina bulloides were generated using material collected in the Santa Barbara Basin sediment trap time-series. Using these empirical relationships, temperature and [CO32-] are reconstructed using a 0.5 meter long multi-core collected within the basin. 210Pb activities were used to determine a sedimentation rate for the core to estimate ages for core samples (sedimentation rate: 0.341 cm/yr). A spike in 137Cs activity is used as a tie-point to the year 1965 coinciding with the peak of nuclear bomb testing. Our down-core record extends through the mid-19th century to create a history of rising sea surface temperatures and declining [CO32-] as a result of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  16. Short baseline variations in site response and wave-propagation effects and their structural causes: Four examples in and around the santa clara valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Carver, D.; Liu, P.

    2010-01-01

    Ground motion records of local and regional events from a portable array are used to investigate the structural causes of variations in ground motion over distances of a few hundred meters to a few kilometers in the sedimentary basin environment of the Santa Clara Valley, California, and its margins. Arrays of portable seismic stations are used to target four study areas with different ground motion patterns: (1) an edge of the alluvial basin extending up onto a marginal ridge (Blossom Hill), (2) a Cenozoic basin with a nearly flat bottom (Cupertino Basin), (3) a long, narrow Cenozoic basin with a steep V profile (Evergreen Basin), and (4) a line perpendicular to the trace of the Hayward fault. Average peak velocities on Blossom Hill from local earthquakes are a factor of 2.5 times higher than nearby valley sites. Three-dimensional (3D) modeling is used to conclude that the majority of the amplification is due to lower shear-wave velocities along a local fault zone (Shannon–Berrocal). Site amplification over the Cupertino Basin in the frequency band 0.5–4 Hz is generally low (less than 2.0 relative to a Mesozoic rock site) and spatially uniform. This response is attributed to the shallow, flat-bottomed shape of the basin and the uniform, flat-laying sedimentary fill. In contrast, site amplification in the Evergreen Basin generally exceeds 3.0 and is attributed to the deep, V-shaped geometry of the basin and younger sedimentary fill. 3D waveform modeling shows the elongated shape of the Evergreen Basin causes more efficient trapping of long-period waves for sources along the long axis of the basin. A low-velocity zone is postulated along the Hayward fault with a width between 100 and 200 m, based on elevated site response along the fault trace and 4.5-Hz fault zone guided waves on the horizontal components of stations near the fault.

  17. Long-term and seasonal ground deformation in the Santa Clara Valley, California, revealed by multi decadal InSAR time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussard, E.; Burgmann, R.; Shirzaei, M.; Baker, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Santa Clara Valley, California, is a shallow basin located between the San Andreas and Hayward-Calaveras fault zones. The Valley is known to experience land subsidence and uplift related to groundwater extraction and recharge. We use Small Baseline (SB) Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) time series to precisely map time-dependent ground deformation at the scale of the basin, relying on data sets from 4 satellites (ERS1, ERS2, Envisat, and ALOS1) to cover a twenty-year time period (1992-2012). The ground deformation map produced provides constraints on the lateral distribution of water-bearing units in the valley, information that is critical to effectively manage groundwater resources, and on the areas more likely to experience subsidence related ground deformation or flooding. Multi-year and seasonal time-series reveal different ground deformation patterns. Long-term uplift at few millimeters per year dominates east of the Silver Creek fault (SCF) and likely relates to the poroelastic response of the confined aquifer to recovery of groundwater levels since the 1960s. In contrast seasonal uplift and subsidence in winter and summer, respectively, dominate west of the SCF, near San Jose. We compare the InSAR derived deformation to precipitation and well data to explain this seasonal variability. The differential subsidence across the SCF indicates that the fault partitions the shallow confined aquifer and was likely active since the deposition of these Holocene sediments. Relying on the multiple viewing geometries from the different spacecraft we isolate a narrow band of horizontal deformation in the immediate vicinity of the SCF. This zone of high extensional strain is due to the localized differential subsidence and is likely to experience fissuring.

  18. Fires in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In what seemed like the blink of an eye, wildfires ignited in the paper-dry, drought-stricken vegetation of Southern California over the weekend of October 20, 2007, and exploded into massive infernos that forced hundreds of thousands of people to evacuate their communities. Driven by Santa Ana winds, fires grew thousands of acres in just one to two days. The fires sped down from the mountains into the outskirts of coastal cities, including San Diego. Dozens of homes have burned to the ground, and at least one person has died, according to local news reports. Several of the fires were burning completely out of control as of October 22. This image of the fires in California was captured at 1:55 p.m. U.S. Pacific Daylight Time on October 22, 2007. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are outlined in red. Thick streamers of smoke unfurl over the Pacific Ocean. The brownish plumes are clouds of dust. Fires northwest of Los Angeles seemed calmer at the time of this image than they were the previous day.

  19. Simulation of ground-water/surface-water flow in the Santa Clara-Calleguas ground-water basin, Ventura County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Randall T.; Martin, Peter; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2003-01-01

    Ground water is the main source of water in the Santa Clara-Calleguas ground-water basin that covers about 310 square miles in Ventura County, California. A steady increase in the demand for surface- and ground-water resources since the late 1800s has resulted in streamflow depletion and ground-water overdraft. This steady increase in water use has resulted in seawater intrusion, inter-aquifer flow, land subsidence, and ground-water contamination. The Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped into upper- and lower-aquifer systems. The upper-aquifer system includes the Shallow, Oxnard, and Mugu aquifers. The lower-aquifer system includes the upper and lower Hueneme, Fox Canyon, and Grimes Canyon aquifers. The layered aquifer systems are each bounded below by regional unconformities that are overlain by extensive basal coarse-grained layers that are the major pathways for ground-water production from wells and related seawater intrusion. The aquifer systems are bounded below and along mountain fronts by consolidated bedrock that forms a relatively impermeable boundary to ground-water flow. Numerous faults act as additional exterior and interior boundaries to ground-water flow. The aquifer systems extend offshore where they crop out along the edge of the submarine shelf and within the coastal submarine canyons. Submarine canyons have dissected these regional aquifers, providing a hydraulic connection to the ocean through the submarine outcrops of the aquifer systems. Coastal landward flow (seawater intrusion) occurs within both the upper- and lower-aquifer systems. A numerical ground-water flow model of the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to better define the geohydrologic framework of the regional ground-water flow system and to help analyze the major problems affecting water-resources management of a typical coastal aquifer system. Construction of the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin model required

  20. Evaluation of tracer tests completed in 1999 and 2000 on the upper Santa Clara River, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Marisa H.; Mendez, Gregory O.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of surface water and hyporheic water along the Santa Clara River in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, was evaluated by conducting tracer tests and analyzing water-quality data under different flow conditions in October 1999 and May 2000. Tracer and water-quality samples were collected at multiple river and hyporheic sites as well as at the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts Saugus and Valencia Water Reclamation Plants. These water reclamation plants provide the main source of base flow in the river. Rhodamine WT dye was injected into the river to determine river traveltimes and to indicate when Lagrangian water-quality sampling could be performed at each site. Sodium bromide was injected into the river at a constant rate at the water reclamation plants to evaluate the surface-water and shallow ground-water interactions in the hyporheic zone. In the upper reach of the study area, which extends 2.9 river miles downstream from the Saugus Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 3.2 hours during May 2000. In the lower reach, which extends 14.1 river miles downstream from the Valencia Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 9.6 hours during October 1999 and 7.1 hours during May 2000. The sodium bromide tracer was detected at both hyporheic locations sampled during October 1999, and at two of the three hyporheic locations sampled during May 2000. On the basis of Rhodamine dye tests, flow curves were constructed from the discharge measurements in the Valencia reach. Flow-curve results indicate net gains in flow throughout most, but not all, of the upper parts of the reach and net losses in flow at the lower part of the reach. Lagrangian water-quality sampling provides information on the changes in chemistry as the water flows downstream from the water reclamation plants. Along both reaches there is an increase in sulfate (40-60 mg/L in the Saugus reach and 160 mg/L in the Valencia reach) and a decrease in chloride (about 45 mg/L in the

  1. SECRU1M.TIF - Southeast Santa Cruz sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the Southeast Santa Cruz area was mosaicked from data collected in 1999. A Klein 2000...

  2. SECRU1M.TIF - Southeast Santa Cruz sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the Southeast Santa Cruz area was mosaicked from data collected in 1999. A Klein...

  3. SECRU1M.TIF - Southeast Santa Cruz sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the Southeast Santa Cruz area was mosaicked from data collected in 1999. A Klein 2000...

  4. Fluvial system response to late Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level change on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R. Randall; Pigati, Jeffery S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is one of four east-west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the five islands in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA. The island setting provides an unparalleled environment in which to record the response of fluvial systems to major changes of sea level. Many of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, leaving a relict floodplain as much as 12–14 m above the present channel. The period of falling sea level between the end of the last interglacial highstand at ~ 80 ka and the last glacial lowstand at ~ 21 ka was marked by erosion and incision in the uplands and by deposition of alluvial sediment on the exposed marine shelf. Sea level rose relatively rapidly following the last glacial lowstand of − 106 m, triggering a shift from an erosional to a depositional sedimentary regime. Accumulation of sediment occurred first through vertical and lateral accretion in broad, shallow channels on the shelf. Channel avulsion and delta sedimentation produced widespread deposition, creating lobes or wedges of sediment distributed across relatively large areas of the shelf during the latest Pleistocene. Backfilling of valleys onshore (landward of present sea level) appears to have progressed in a more orderly and predictable fashion throughout the Holocene primarily because the streams were confined to their valleys. Vertical aggradation locally reduced stream gradients, causing frequent overbank flooding and lateral channel shift by meandering and/or avulsion. Local channel gradient and morphology, short-term climate variations, and intrinsic controls also affected the timing and magnitudes of these cut, fill, and flood events, and are reflected in the thickness and spacing of the episodic alluvial sequences. Floodplain aggradation within the valleys continued until at least 500 years ago

  5. Fluvial system response to late Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level change on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R. Randall; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-09-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is one of four east-west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the five islands in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA. The island setting provides an unparalleled environment in which to record the response of fluvial systems to major changes of sea level. Many of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, leaving a relict floodplain as much as 12-14 m above the present channel. The period of falling sea level between the end of the last interglacial highstand at ~ 80 ka and the last glacial lowstand at ~ 21 ka was marked by erosion and incision in the uplands and by deposition of alluvial sediment on the exposed marine shelf. Sea level rose relatively rapidly following the last glacial lowstand of - 106 m, triggering a shift from an erosional to a depositional sedimentary regime. Accumulation of sediment occurred first through vertical and lateral accretion in broad, shallow channels on the shelf. Channel avulsion and delta sedimentation produced widespread deposition, creating lobes or wedges of sediment distributed across relatively large areas of the shelf during the latest Pleistocene. Backfilling of valleys onshore (landward of present sea level) appears to have progressed in a more orderly and predictable fashion throughout the Holocene primarily because the streams were confined to their valleys. Vertical aggradation locally reduced stream gradients, causing frequent overbank flooding and lateral channel shift by meandering and/or avulsion. Local channel gradient and morphology, short-term climate variations, and intrinsic controls also affected the timing and magnitudes of these cut, fill, and flood events, and are reflected in the thickness and spacing of the episodic alluvial sequences. Floodplain aggradation within the valleys continued until at least 500 years ago, followed by

  6. Geologic, water-chemistry, and hydrologic data from multiple-well monitoring sites and selected water-supply wells in the Santa Clara Valley, California, 1999-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, M.W.; Hanson, R.T.; Wentworth, C.M.; Everett, Rhett; Williams, C.F.; Tinsley, J.C.; Noce, T.E.; Carkin, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    To better identify the three-dimensional geohydrologic framework of the Santa Clara Valley, lithologic, geologic, geophysical, geomechanical, hydraulic, and water-chemistry data were collected from eight ground-water multiple-well monitoring sites constructed in Santa Clara County, California, as part of a series of cooperative studies between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The data are being used to update and improve the three-dimensional geohydrologic framework of the basin and to address issues related to water supply, water chemistry, sequence stratigraphy, geology, and geological hazards. This report represents a compilation of data collected from 1999 to 2003, including location and design of the monitoring sites, cone penetrometer borings, geologic logs, lithologic logs, geophysical logs, core analysis, water-chemistry analysis, ground-water-level measurements, and hydraulic and geomechanical properties from wells and core samples. Exploratory cone penetrometer borings taken in the upper 17 to 130 feet at six of the monitoring sites identified the base of Holocene as no deeper than 75 feet in the central confined area and no deeper than 35 feet in the southern unconfined areas of the valley. Generalized lithologic characterization from the monitoring sites indicates about four to six different aquifer units separated by relatively fine-grained units occur within the alluvial deposits shallower than 860 feet deep. Analysis of geophysical logs indicates that coarse-grained units varied in thickness between 10 and 25 feet in the southeastern unconfined area of the valley and between 50 and 200 feet in the south-central and southwestern areas of the valley. Deviations from temperature-gradient logs indicate that the majority of horizontal ground-water flow occurs above a depth of 775 feet in the south central and above 510 feet in the southeastern areas of the valley. Bulk physical properties from more than 1,150 feet of

  7. 76 FR 39443 - National Environmental Policy Act; Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Santa Susana Field Laboratory AGENCY: National... administered portion of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL), Ventura County, California. SUMMARY:...

  8. Chirp seismic-reflection data of field activity 2014-645-FA; Santa Cruz Basin offshore Santa Barbara, southern California from 2014-11-12 to 2014-11-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release contains high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 to explore to explore marine geologic hazards offshore of southern California....

  9. The Road Inventory of Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  10. Complejo parroquial de Santa Ana, en Moratalaz, Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisac, Miguel

    1967-06-01

    Full Text Available This church is sited at Moratalaz, a modern district of low rent houses in Madrid, and the architect has attempted to represent in the design the liturgical concepts developed in the Vatican II Council. These precise ideas have been expressed in the architecture by means of highly plastic symbols. In addition, the planform is very functional and the reinforced and prestressed concrete have been almost the only material used: so that the construction medium is also in accord with the modern nature of the design. The shapes, the space arrangement and everything which might seem a capricious creation of the artist in fact are the result of a detailed analysis of function and reason.Este complejo parroquial se ha levantado en Moratalaz, que es un barrio popular de la capital de España, procurando imprimir y recoger todas las premisas litúrgicas marcadas por el Concilio Vaticano II. El arquitecto ha plasmado sus precisas ideas en un edificio de gran expresividad plástica y de planta orgánica y eficaz, utilizando, casi exclusivamente, un material de nuestro tiempo: hormigón armado y pretensado. Las formas, la disposición de espacios y todo cuanto puede parecer caprichosa creación del artista, no son, en realidad, sino resultado de un cuidadoso estudio de funcionalismo racional y utilitario.

  11. Rapid climatic signal propagation from source to sink in a southern California sediment-routing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covault, J.A.; Romans, B.W.; Fildani, A.; McGann, M.; Graham, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial source areas are linked to deep-sea basins by sediment-routing systems, which only recently have been studied with a holistic approach focused on terrestrial and submarine components and their interactions. Here we compare an extensive piston-core and radiocarbon-age data set from offshore southern California to contemporaneous Holocene climate proxies in order to test the hypothesis that climatic signals are rapidly propagated from source to sink in a spatially restricted sediment-routing system that includes the Santa Ana River drainage basin and the Newport deep-sea depositional system. Sediment cores demonstrate that variability in rates of Holocene deep-sea turbidite deposition is related to complex ocean-atmosphere interactions, including enhanced magnitude and frequency of the North American monsoon and El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation cycles, which increased precipitation and fluvial discharge in southern California. This relationship is evident because, unlike many sediment-routing systems, the Newport submarine canyon-and-channel system was consistently linked tothe Santa Ana River,which maintained sediment delivery even during Holocene marine transgression and highstand. Results of this study demonstrate the efficiency of sediment transport and delivery through a spatially restricted, consistently linked routing system and the potential utility of deep-sea turbidite depositional trends as paleoclimate proxies in such settings. ?? 2010 by The University of Chicago.

  12. Liquefaction Hazard Maps for Three Earthquake Scenarios for the Communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale, Northern Santa Clara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Maps showing the probability of surface manifestations of liquefaction in the northern Santa Clara Valley were prepared with liquefaction probability curves. The area includes the communities of San Jose, Campbell, Cupertino, Los Altos, Los Gatos Milpitas, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Saratoga, and Sunnyvale. The probability curves were based on complementary cumulative frequency distributions of the liquefaction potential index (LPI) for surficial geologic units in the study area. LPI values were computed with extensive cone penetration test soundings. Maps were developed for three earthquake scenarios, an M7.8 on the San Andreas Fault comparable to the 1906 event, an M6.7 on the Hayward Fault comparable to the 1868 event, and an M6.9 on the Calaveras Fault. Ground motions were estimated with the Boore and Atkinson (2008) attenuation relation. Liquefaction is predicted for all three events in young Holocene levee deposits along the major creeks. Liquefaction probabilities are highest for the M7.8 earthquake, ranging from 0.33 to 0.37 if a 1.5-m deep water table is assumed, and 0.10 to 0.14 if a 5-m deep water table is assumed. Liquefaction probabilities of the other surficial geologic units are less than 0.05. Probabilities for the scenario earthquakes are generally consistent with observations during historical earthquakes.

  13. Santa Muerte

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, A.; The Photographers' Gallery; Trolley Books; Bar-Tur Foundation; Arts Council England

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Santa Muerte - a religion/cult that has been denounced as satanic by the Mexican Catholic Church - can be dated back hundreds of years. It was developed through a syncretism between indigenous Mesoamerican and Spanish Catholic beliefs and practices. Only in the last decade however has it become more predominant in Mexican society, where many commentators have noted its rise with the killing and violence associated with the war between rival drug cartels and the Mexican Governme...

  14. Detailed mapping and rupture implications of the 1 km releasing bend in the Rodgers Creek Fault at Santa Rosa, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Suzanne; Langenheim, Victoria; Williams, Robert; Hitchcock, Christopher S.; DeLong, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) topography reveals for the first time the trace of the Rodgers Creek fault (RCF) through the center of Santa Rosa, the largest city in the northern San Francisco Bay area. Vertical deformation of the Santa Rosa Creek floodplain expresses a composite pull‐apart basin beneath the urban cover that is part of a broader 1‐km‐wide right‐releasing bend in the fault. High‐resolution geophysical data illuminate subsurface conditions that may be responsible for the complex pattern of surface faulting, as well as for the distribution of seismicity and possibly for creep behavior. We identify a dense, magnetic basement body bounded by the RCF beneath Santa Rosa that we interpret as a strong asperity, likely part of a larger locked patch of the fault to the south. A local increase in frictional resistance associated with the basement body appears to explain (1) distributed fault‐normal extension above where the RCF intersects the body; (2) earthquake activity around the northern end of the body, notably the 1969 ML 5.6 and 5.7 events and aftershocks; and (3) creep rates on the RCF that are higher to the north of Santa Rosa than to the south. There is a significant probability of a major earthquake on the RCF in the coming decades, and earthquakes associated with the proposed asperity have the potential to release seismic energy into the Cotati basin beneath Santa Rosa, already known from damaging historical earthquakes to produce amplified ground shaking.

  15. New records and description of two new species of carideans shrimps from Bahía Santa María-La Reforma lagoon, Gulf of California, Mexico (Crustacea, Caridea, Alpheidae and Processidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Barragán, José; Ayón-Parente, Manuel; Zamora-Tavares, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Two new species of the family Alpheidae: Alpheus margaritaesp. n. and Leptalpheus melendezensissp. n. are described from Santa María-La Reforma, coastal lagoon, SE Gulf of California. Alpheus margaritaesp. n. is closely related to A. antepaenultimus and A. mazatlanicus from the Eastern Pacific and to A. chacei from the Western Atlantic, but can be differentiated from these by a combination of characters, especially the morphology of the scaphocerite and the first pereopods. Leptalpheus melendezensissp. n. resembles L. mexicanus but can be easily differentiated because L. melendezensissp. n. has the anterior margin of the carapace broadly rounded and has only one spine on the mesial margin of ischium in the major cheliped, versus an acute rostrum and an unarmed major cheliped. Additionally, a phylogenetic analysis was used to explore the relationships of these two new taxa. These results show that Alpheus margaritaesp. n. and Leptalpheus melendezensissp. n. are indeed related to the species against which we are comparing them, and demonstrate that they can be considered as different species. Additional specimens of Leptalpheus cf. mexicanus, Ambidexter panamensis and A. swifti are recorded for the first time in the Santa María-La Reforma coastal lagoon.

  16. 77 FR 61022 - Notice of Realty Action: Notice of Receipt of Conveyance of Mineral Interest Application, Santa...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Application, Santa Clara County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Realty... of land in Santa Clara County, California. Publication of this notice temporarily segregates the... consists of a 1,148.68 acres situated in Santa Clara County, California, and is described as...

  17. 76 FR 72972 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County... approximately 23.42 acres, more or less, in Santa Clara County, California. The public land would be sold for... described contains 23.42 acres, more or less, in Santa Clara County, California. Appraised fair market...

  18. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in... in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California, consists of several non...

  19. Facts relating to Well No. 5, Lease OCS-P 0234, Pitas Point Unit area, and the earthquake of August 13, 1978, Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayland, Russell G.; Acuff, A. Dewey; McCulloh, Thane M.; Raleigh, C. Barry; Vedder, John G.; Yenne, Keith A.

    1978-01-01

    A build-up of pressures developed in an exploratory well being drilled in the Santa Barbara Channel during the period August 9 to 15, 1978. Nearly coincidentally, a sharp earthquake occurred 2 miles south of the city of Santa Barbara at 3:55 p.m. PDT on August 13, 1978. A task group was formed by the Director, Geological Survey, on August 14, mainly because of concern over the high down-hole pressures in the well. The charge to the task group was to study the situation fully in order that appropriate and immediate measures could be directed to protect against a fracturing of rock formations in the vicinity of the hole that might permit the escape of gas or oil to the surface. The task group was also asked to look into the possibility of any relationship between the well problems and the earthquake.

  20. 76 FR 9640 - Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ..., ``Santa Clara,'' which was abolished as a NAF FWS wage area by a final rule (74 FR 9951) published on... MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 532 RIN 3206-AM22 Prevailing Rate Systems: Santa Clara, CA, Tulsa County, OK, and... of California by removing the entry for ``Santa Clara.'' 0 3. Appendix D to subpart B is amended...

  1. Ana Blandiana: Poetry as Something

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timofei ROŞCA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among Romanian poets of the 60s, as far as “exploring the abyss” is concerned and in an entirely innovative fashion, Ana Blandiana stands out as the second feminine voice, after Magda Isanos.Ana Blandiana avoids what might currently be called journalistic lyricism, circumstantial or political poetry. She remains faithful to her lyrical formula, with abysmal implications or depths. The poet rejects didacticism, journalistic referentiality, as well as literary rhetoric. The purpose and mission of poetry is, in the author’s view, to see the world integrally, in its multiple relations and meanings, subject to universal laws, as is artistic thought.

  2. Purification and Characterization of Anacardium occidentale (Cashew) Allergens Ana o 1, Ana o 2, and Ana o 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, Marit; Bastiaan-Net, Shanna; Sforza, Stefano; Valk, Van Der J.P.M.; Gerth Van Wijk, Van Roy; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Jong, De N.W.; Wichers, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study a fast and simple purification procedure for the three known allergens from cashew (7S globulin Ana o 1, 11S globulin Ana o 2, and 2S albumin Ana o 3) is described. The purified allergens are characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), West

  3. ["Pro Ana": Psychodynamic References for Anorexia Nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Linda

    2017-02-01

    "Pro Ana": Psychodynamic References for Anorexia Nervosa The internet-based phenomenon "Pro Ana" refers to the eating disorder anorexia nervosa in a positive way. To understand what the phenomenon "Pro Ana" represents, the websites are used as a starting point of the current analysis. Based on these results, similarities and differences between "Pro Ana" and the eating disorder anorexia nervosa are discussed. Furthermore psychodynamic references for anorexia nervosa are derived and finally their importance for treatment motivation will be considered.

  4. Paleoseismic investigations in the Santa Cruz mountains, California: Implications for recurrence of large-magnitude earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D. P.; Pantosti, D.; Okumura, K.; Powers, T. J.; Hamilton, J. C.

    1998-08-01

    Trenching, microgeomorphic mapping, and tree ring analysis provide information on timing of paleoearthquakes and behavior of the San Andreas fault in the Santa Cruz mountains. At the Grizzly Flat site alluvial units dated at 1640-1659 A.D., 1679-1894 A.D., 1668-1893 A.D., and the present ground surface are displaced by a single event. This was the 1906 surface rupture. Combined trench dates and tree ring analysis suggest that the penultimate event occurred in the mid-1600 s, possibly in an interval as narrow as 1632-1659 A.D. There is no direct evidence in the trenches for the 1838 or 1865 earthquakes, which have been proposed as occurring on this part of the fault zone. In a minimum time of about 340 years only one large surface faulting event (1906) occurred at Grizzly Flat, in contrast to previous recurrence estimates of 95-110 years for the Santa Cruz mountains segment. Comparison with dates of the penultimate San Andreas earthquake at sites north of San Francisco suggests that the San Andreas fault between Point Arena and the Santa Cruz mountains may have failed either as a sequence of closely timed earthquakes on adjacent segments or as a single long rupture similar in length to the 1906 rupture around the mid-1600 s. The 1906 coseismic geodetic slip and the late Holocene geologic slip rate on the San Francisco peninsula and southward are about 50-70% and 70% of their values north of San Francisco, respectively. The slip gradient along the 1906 rupture section of the San Andreas reflects partitioning of plate boundary slip onto the San Gregorio, Sargent, and other faults south of the Golden Gate. If a mid-1600 s event ruptured the same section of the fault that failed in 1906, it supports the concept that long strike-slip faults can contain master rupture segments that repeat in both length and slip distribution. Recognition of a persistent slip rate gradient along the northern San Andreas fault and the concept of a master segment remove the requirement that

  5. Estimation of effective hydrologic properties of soils from observations of vegetation density. M.S. Thesis; [water balance of watersheds in Clinton, Maine and Santa Paula, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellers, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    An existing one-dimensional model of the annual water balance is reviewed. Slight improvements are made in the method of calculating the bare soil component of evaporation, and in the way surface retention is handled. A natural selection hypothesis, which specifies the equilibrium vegetation density for a given, water limited, climate-soil system, is verified through comparisons with observed data and is employed in the annual water balance of watersheds in Clinton, Ma., and Santa Paula, Ca., to estimate effective areal average soil properties. Comparison of CDF's of annual basin yield derived using these soil properties with observed CDF's provides excellent verification of the soil-selection procedure. This method of parameterization of the land surface should be useful with present global circulation models, enabling them to account for both the non-linearity in the relationship between soil moisture flux and soil moisture concentration, and the variability of soil properties from place to place over the Earth's surface.

  6. The 2003 and 2007 wildfires in southern California: Chapter 5 in Natural Disasters and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Fotheringham, C.J.; Boulter, Sarah; Palutikof, Jean; Karoly, David John; Guitart, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Although many residents of southern California have long recognised that wildfires in the region are an ongoing, constant risk to lives and property, the enormity of the regional fire hazard caught the world’s attention during the southern California firestorms of 2003 (Figure 5.1). Beginning on 21 October, a series of fourteen wildfires broke out across the five-county region under severe Santa Ana winds, and within two weeks, more than 300,000 ha had burned (Keeley et al., 2004). The event was one of the costliest in the state’s history, with more than 3,600 homes damaged or destroyed and twenty-four fatalities. Suppression costs for the 12,000 firefighters have been estimated at US$120 million, and the total response and damage cost has been estimated at more than US$3 billion (COES, 2004). [Excerpt

  7. Dollar Summary of Prime Contract Awards by State, Place, and Contractor, FY84, Part 1 (Adamsville, Alabama-Santa Clara, California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    INC 167 167 C P I MACHINING CO INC 2,761 2,761 CALCOMP CORPORATION 55 55 CALIFORNIA CMPTR PRDTS INC 201 49 97 30 25 CARTWRIGHT ENGINEERING INC 6,000...UNITED MEDIA INC 28 28 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT DEF 43 43 WALTER DORWIN TEAGUE INC 254 254 YEAGER MANUFACTURING CORF 36 36 TOTAL - ANAHEIM 1,020,504...POMONA T & T INDUSTRIES 57 57 WALTER DORWIN TEAGUE INC 2,013 2,013

  8. Inference of Eco-geomorphic Processes Using Integrated Historical Data for a Rapidly Changing Mediterranean-climate River Corridor: Lower Santa Clara River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, E. E.; Grossinger, R. M.; Downs, P. W.; Orr, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    Environmental conservation demands reach-specific data as the basis for place-based restoration and management measures. However, areas such as the lower Santa Clara River valley have been subject to intensive modification since the at least the nineteenth century, but without regular hydrogeomorphic or ecological monitoring (e.g., flow gauging, repeat topographic surveys, vegetation mapping) until the mid-twentieth century. This gap has limited data on former river corridor form and understanding of historical eco-geomorphic processes. The result is a lack of consensus about the range of potential riparian and aquatic habitats to consider as restoration targets, their appropriate relative distribution, and the relationship between such ecological targets and physical processes on the river, past and present. To address this data gap on the lower Santa Clara River, we initiated an effort to extend the documentation of river characteristics beyond readily available early data sets (such as aerial photography from 1927) by integrating historical cartographic, textual, and visual accounts to create a heterogeneous but substantial dataset describing hydrologic, geomorphic, and riparian characteristics back to 1769 - the date of the first non-native exploration of the region. We collected over 1,000 documents, including General Land Office survey data, early maps from the county surveyor, and traveler’s accounts of the region, evaluating each source for its accuracy and reliability. These data were synthesized to evaluate the location and composition of riparian areas that persisted despite substantial flood events and impacts of rapidly changing land use, and to determine aspects of the former hydrology of the river affecting riparian pattern that are still relevant today. The data also indicate the general resilience of mainstem channel form in response to these events in contrast to the present-day eco-geomorphic system, which is far more sensitive to change. Used

  9. Tectonics and Unroofing of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California, from Low-Temperature Thermochronology and Catchment-Averaged 10Be-Derived Denudation Rates (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, G. E.; Burgmann, R.; Dumitru, T. A.; Ebert, Y.; Fosdick, J. C.; Le, K.; Levine, N. M.; Wilson, A.; Gudmundsdottir, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present eleven Apatite Fission Track (AFT) and Apatite (U-Th)/He (A-He) analyses and eighteen catchment-averaged cosmogenic 10Be denudation rates from the Santa Cruz Mountains (SCM) that resolve the unroofing history of this range over the past several Myr. This range lies within a restraining bend in the San Andreas Fault (SAF), which appears to be fixed to the crust on the northeast side of the fault based on previous work. In this view, the topographic asymmetry of the SCM reflects the advection of material southwest of the right-lateral SAF through a zone of uplift centered on the restraining bend, while material northwest of the fault remains trapped this zone. Northeast of the fault bend in the Sierra Azul block of the SCM, AFT ages adjacent to the SAF appear completely reset during the Pliocene, and show partial resetting at the periphery of the block. This suggests that total exhumation exceeded 3-4 km within the heart of the block and was SCM are near mass flux steady state over the timescales captured by the CRN (~1.5-6.5 ka). Nonetheless, the extent of topography in areas far from the bend suggests that there may be some component of regional fault-normal contraction and/or that this steady state has not been fully attained because of geomorphic lags and isostatic adjustments.

  10. Purification and Characterization of Anacardium occidentale (Cashew) Allergens Ana o 1, Ana o 2, and Ana o 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsma, Marit; Bastiaan-Net, Shanna; Sforza, Stefano; van der Valk, Johanna P M; van Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Savelkoul, Huub F J; de Jong, Nicolette W; Wichers, Harry J

    2016-02-10

    In this study a fast and simple purification procedure for the three known allergens from cashew (7S globulin Ana o 1, 11S globulin Ana o 2, and 2S albumin Ana o 3) is described. The purified allergens are characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blot, glycoprotein stain, and protein identification. The purified proteins still bind IgE, and this IgE binding varied between different pools of patient serum. Ana o 1 was found to be a glycoprotein. Ana o 3 has been studied more in detail to identify both the small and large subunits, both displaying microheterogeneity, and epitope mapping of Ana o 3 has been performed.

  11. Regional Analysis of Stormwater Runoff for the Placement of Managed Aquifer Recharge Sites in Santa Cruz and Northern Monterey Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. S.; Beganskas, S.; Fisher, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    We apply a USGS surface hydrology model, Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), to analyze stormwater runoff in Santa Cruz and Northern Monterey Counties, CA with the goal of supplying managed aquifer recharge (MAR) sites. Under the combined threats of multiyear drought and excess drawdown, this region's aquifers face numerous sustainability challenges, including seawater intrusion, chronic overdraft, increased contamination, and subsidence. This study addresses the supply side of this resource issue by increasing our knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of runoff that could provide water for MAR. Ensuring the effectiveness of MAR using stormwater requires a thorough understanding of runoff distribution and site-specific surface and subsurface aquifer conditions. In this study we use a geographic information system (GIS) and a 3-m digital elevation model (DEM) to divide the region's four primary watersheds into Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs), or topographic sub-basins, that serve as discretized input cells for PRMS. We then assign vegetation, soil, land use, slope, aspect, and other characteristics to these HRUs, from a variety of data sources, and analyze runoff spatially using PRMS under varying precipitation conditions. We are exploring methods of linking spatially continuous and high-temporal-resolution precipitation datasets to generate input precipitation catalogs, facilitating analyses of a variety of regimes. To gain an understanding of how surface hydrology has responded to land development, we will also modify our input data to represent pre-development conditions. Coupled with a concurrent MAR suitability analysis, our model results will help screen for locations of future MAR projects and will improve our understanding of how changes in land use and climate impact hydrologic runoff and aquifer recharge.

  12. Timing of large earthquakes during the past 500 years along the Santa Cruz Mountains segment of the San Andreas fault at Mill Canyon, near Watsonville, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumal, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    A paleoseismic investigation across the Santa Cruz Mountains section of the San Andreas fault at Mill Canyon indicates that four surface‐rupturing earthquakes have occurred there during the past ~500  years. At this site, right‐lateral fault slip has moved a low shutter ridge across the mouth of the canyon, ponding latest Holocene sediments. These alluvial deposits are deformed along a narrow zone of faulting. There is excellent evidence for a 1906 (M 7.8) and three earlier earthquakes consisting of well‐developed fissures, scarps, and colluvial wedges. Deformation resulting from the earlier earthquakes is comparable to that from 1906, suggesting they also were large‐magnitude events. The earthquake prior to 1906 occurred either about A.D. 1750 (1711–1770) or A.D. 1855 (1789–1904), depending on assumptions incorporated into two alternative OxCal models. If the later age range is correct, then the earthquake may have been a historical early‐to‐mid‐nineteenth‐century earthquake, possibly the A.D. 1838 earthquake. Both models are viable, and there is no way to select one over the other with the available data. Two earlier earthquakes occurred about A.D. 1690 (1660–1720) and A.D. 1522 (1454–1605). Using OxCal, recalculation of the age of the reported penultimate earthquake reported from the Grizzly Flat site, located about 10 km northwest of Mill Canyon, indicates it occurred about A.D. 1105–1545, earlier than any of the past three earthquakes, and possibly correlates to the fourth earthquake at Mill Canyon.

  13. Tectonic and eustatic controls of late quaternary shelf sedimentation along the Central California (Santa Cruz) continental margin: high-resolution seismic stratigraphic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.; Dominguez, Laura L.

    1985-07-01

    A high-resolution "uniboom", seismic stratigraphic investigation of a portion of the central California continental shelf has demonstrated that depositional patterns and sequences are controlled largely by an interplay of glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations superimposed on local tectonics. Wrench tectonics, associated with active right-lateral shear along the San Gregorio fault zone, and the Pigeon Point Basement High control the location, distribution and overall geometry of depositional sequences via en echelon folding and differential subsidence. Areas of relatively thick and thin late Quaternary sediments conform in large part with structures produced during wrenching. Glacioeustatic sea-level oscillations have also shaped depositional patterns and sequences. Correlation of our seismic stratigraphic data with a southern California continental margin sea-level curve, suggests that during the last glacial maximum, approximately 18,000 yrs ago, a relative lowstand resulted in the erosion of a distinct unconformity upon which late Quaternary sediments have accumulated. A rapid rise of sea level to a relative stillstand, approximately 12,000 yrs ago, produced a concave-up, marine terrace profile across the mid-shelf, that has since been infilled with as much as 22 m of Holocene clastic sediments. A relative drop of sea level, approximately 11,000 yrs ago, allowed sediments to build seaward as a series of prograding clinoforms that form the basal sequences of the late Quaternary sediment fill. The succeeding Holocene transgression partially eroded the top of this earlier regressive sequence, and has now established a typical, wave-graded shelf along which sediments fine in a seaward direction to water depths of 90-100 m. At greater shelf water depths, surface sediments coarsen and appear to be relicts of previous relative sea-level lowstands. The presence of now submerged and buried marine terraces along both the central and southern California continental margins

  14. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  15. Sazonalidade reprodutiva de ovelhas da raça Churra Galega Bragançana: II comportamento sexual

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Teresa Montenegro; Valentim, Ramiro; Azevedo, Jorge; Mendonça, Álvaro; Almeida, José Carlos de [UNIFESP; Galvão, Lurdes; Maurício, Raimundo

    2001-01-01

    Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objectivo de estudar a sazonalidade da actividade éstrica de ovelhas adultas da raça Churra Galega Bragançana. Neste sentido, na cidade de Bragança (latitude 41° 49' N, longitude 6° 40' W e altitude 720 metros), mais precisamente na Quinta de Santa Apolónia, pertencente à Escola Superior Agrária de Bragança, um grupo de vinte e cinco ovelhas Churras Bragançanas, com 3 a 4 anos de idade, multíparas, vazias e secas, foi escolhido para a realização deste estu...

  16. The universe of ANA testing: a case for point-of-care ANA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Rubin, Robert L

    2017-12-01

    Testing for total antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is a critical tool for diagnosis and management of autoimmune diseases at both the primary care and subspecialty settings. Repurposing of ANA from a test for lupus to a test for any autoimmune condition has driven the increase in ANA requests. Changes in ANA referral patterns include early or subclinical autoimmune disease detection in patients with low pre-test probability and use of negative ANA results to rule out underlying autoimmune disease. A positive result can lead to further diagnostic considerations. Currently, ANA tests are performed in centralized laboratories; an alternative would be ANA testing at the clinical point-of-care (POC). By virtue of its near real-time data collection capability, low cost, and ease of use, we believe the POC ANA has the potential to enable a new paradigm shift in autoimmune serology testing.

  17. 76 FR 16812 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Bid Sale of Public Land in Santa Clara County, CA AGENCY... approximately 9.27 acres in Santa Clara County, California, for not less than the appraised fair market value of..., more or less, in Santa Clara County. The public land was originally identified as suitable for...

  18. Quaternary geology of Alameda County, and parts of Contra Costa, Santa Clara, San Mateo, San Francisco, Stanislaus, and San Joaquin counties, California: a digital database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, E.J.; Graymer, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Alameda County is located at the northern end of the Diablo Range of Central California. It is bounded on the north by the south flank of Mount Diablo, one of the highest peaks in the Bay Area, reaching an elevation of 1173 meters (3,849 ft). San Francisco Bay forms the western boundary, the San Joaquin Valley borders it on the east and an arbitrary line from the Bay into the Diablo Range forms the southern boundary. Alameda is one of the nine Bay Area counties tributary to San Francisco Bay. Most of the country is mountainous with steep rugged topography. Alameda County is covered by twenty-eight 7.5' topographic Quadrangles which are shown on the index map. The Quaternary deposits in Alameda County comprise three distinct depositional environments. One, forming a transgressive sequence of alluvial fan and fan-delta facies, is mapped in the western one-third of the county. The second, forming only alluvial fan facies, is mapped in the Livermore Valley and San Joaquin Valley in the eastern part of the county. The third, forming a combination of Eolian dune and estuarine facies, is restricted to the Alameda Island area in the northwestern corner of the county.

  19. Touching stories: performances of intimacy in the diary of Anaïs Nin

    OpenAIRE

    Charnock, Ruth Naomi Ekaterina

    2011-01-01

    My thesis re-situates the diarist and fiction writer Anaïs Nin within the fields of life-writing criticism, modernist studies, and intimacy studies by reading her diaries as performing, producing and inviting various intimate affects. This thesis focuses mainly on Nin‟s edited and unexpurgated published diaries and also draws on material gathered from the Anaïs Nin Special Collection at the Charles E. Young Library, based at the University of California, Los Angeles.\\ud \\ud Chapter 1 argues t...

  20. Simulation of climate change in San Francisco Bay Basins, California: Case studies in the Russian River Valley and Santa Cruz Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Flint, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of ongoing changes in climate, hydrologic and ecologic effects are being seen across the western United States. A regional study of how climate change affects water resources and habitats in the San Francisco Bay area relied on historical climate data and future projections of climate, which were downscaled to fine spatial scales for application to a regional water-balance model. Changes in climate, potential evapotranspiration, recharge, runoff, and climatic water deficit were modeled for the Bay Area. In addition, detailed studies in the Russian River Valley and Santa Cruz Mountains, which are on the northern and southern extremes of the Bay Area, respectively, were carried out in collaboration with local water agencies. Resource managers depend on science-based projections to inform planning exercises that result in competent adaptation to ongoing and future changes in water supply and environmental conditions. Results indicated large spatial variability in climate change and the hydrologic response across the region; although there is warming under all projections, potential change in precipitation by the end of the 21st century differed according to model. Hydrologic models predicted reduced early and late wet season runoff for the end of the century for both wetter and drier future climate projections, which could result in an extended dry season. In fact, summers are projected to be longer and drier in the future than in the past regardless of precipitation trends. While water supply could be subject to increased variability (that is, reduced reliability) due to greater variability in precipitation, water demand is likely to steadily increase because of increased evapotranspiration rates and climatic water deficit during the extended summers. Extended dry season conditions and the potential for drought, combined with unprecedented increases in precipitation, could serve as additional stressors on water quality and habitat. By focusing on the

  1. A "Clarice" de Ana Miranda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Cardozo de Mello

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7917.2012v17n2p119 O presente artigo tenciona analisar a novela Clarice de Ana Miranda, por meio dos conceitos de metaficção historiográfica e de biografia imaginária, visto que a narrativa parodia o gênero biografia, dando ênfase a momentos banais da vida da personagem e centra-se no interior do ser narrado e, além disso, apresenta uma estrutura fragmentada composta por uma série de intertextos com a obra da romancista Clarice Lispector, protagonista do livro, que são utilizados para a construção de um mosaico da personagem em algumas fases de sua vida como, por exemplo, a infância e a juventude relacionadas ao primeiro livro da autora Perto do coração selvagem. Outro aspecto importante refere-se à reinvenção de um grande nome da literatura brasileira através de sua obra e, principalmente, a partir da imaginação de uma leitora – Ana Miranda – que cria a “sua Clarice” e a partir dela debate a criação da obra de arte literária, a condição de escritora e de mulher na sociedade.

  2. 77 FR 19687 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... in consultation with representatives of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua... Ramona Band or Village of Cahuilla Mission Indians of California); Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians, California (formerly the Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Santa Rosa Reservation);...

  3. Santa and the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The appearanc

  4. Santa and the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, P.

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The

  5. River channel sensitivity to change in the context of human activities and natural factors: an 80-year record of channel morphodynamics on the lower Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, P. W.; Dusterhoff, S. R.; Sears, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    River channel adjustments arise from the application of numerous catchment-based stressors operating at different space and time scales. Natural stressors include the impact of climatic phenomena and their inheritance; human stressors include both direct and indirect factors whose impacts have grown in magnitude and intensity during the Anthropocene, especially since about 1945. Consequently, the sensitivity of river channel morphodynamics is likely to have changed also, with implications for landform understanding and river management. Reconstructing channel morphodynamics during the Anthropocene requires interpreting multiple historical and secondary data sources to document changes at sufficient (i.e., reach-scale) resolution: for the 60-km lower Santa Clara River (LSCR), Ventura County, California, we used flow, sediment and precipitation records, repeat aerial photographs, LiDAR data, repeat topographic surveys, in-channel vegetation data, field observations, numerical modeling of high flow events, and narrative accounts. The catchment historical context since European-American settlement includes periods dominated by ranching and colonization (ca.1820-1890), irrigations and diversions (ca.1890-1955), dams and river modifications (1955-1990), and urban population growth (1990-present). Natural stressors were investigated based on the correlation of instantaneous flood peaks with annual rainfall records in this semi-arid setting. Successful prediction of the majority of gauged floods since about 1950 allows a flood sequence to be reconstructed back to 1873. Floods are clustered and of considerably greater magnitude in El Nino years of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The great majority of sediment transport thus occurs in El Nino years so that the dominant discharge is the largest discharge on record, in contrast to humid-region alluvial rivers. Responding to these stressors, the average width of the active channel bed has become narrower by almost 50% (1938

  6. C-CAP Santa Cruz 2001 era High Resolution Land Cover Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset represents land cover for the San Lorenzo River basin in Santa Cruz County, California derived from high resolution imagery. The land cover features in...

  7. Current ANA Grantees/Awards FY2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ANA promotes self-sufficiency for Native Americans by providing discretionary grant funding for community based projects, and training and technical assistance to...

  8. Doñana era una fiesta

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Cobelas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    ...Hasta el punto de creer que yo no elegí Doñana como centro gravitatorio de mis predilecciones sino que fue Doñana quien me eligió a míJ.M. Caballero Bonald (Tiempo de guerras perdidas)La reciente catástrofe de Doñana debiera hacernos reflexionar a los indígenas sobre la importancia que damos a los problemas ambientales. En estos tiempos, todo se viste con el ropaje de la ecología, con el pleonasmo del medio ambiente, pero el fenómeno no es sino eso: travestismo. Y los sucesos de Doñana son...

  9. Administration for Native Americans (ANA) Projects Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The 2010 Congressional Report provides results for 70 ANA projects that ended in 2010. The report includes a brief summary of each project visited and an analysis of...

  10. Mañana remisión de V. crepúsculo de la mañana.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    [ES] Definición del término Mañana remisión de V. crepúsculo de la mañana. en el diccionario Dicter. [EN] Definition of the word Mañana remisión de V. crepúsculo de la mañana. in the dictionary Dicter.

  11. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  12. UC Santa Barbara physicist wins prestigious European award

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The prestigious High Energy and Particle Physics Prize of the European Physical Society for 2003 has been awarded to David Gross, a professor of physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He shares the prize with two other Americans - Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ... and David Politzer of the California Institute of Technology. They are the first Americans to ever receive the award" (1 page).

  13. San Antonio Creek Restoration, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-27

    constrictor Racer Potential Masticophis lateralis Chaparral whipsnake Potential Lampropeltis getula California kingsnake Observed Pituophis catenifer...Unpublished master’s thesis, University of California , Santa Barbara. Grant, C. 1978a. Chumash: Introduction . In California , edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp...Final Draft Environmental Assessment San Antonio Creek Restoration Vandenberg Air Force Base California

  14. Santa Barbara, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  15. DCS Hydrology, Santa Clara County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  16. BASE MAP DATASET, SANTA CRIZ COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  17. Floodplain Mapping, SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  18. Santa Monica, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  19. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem, Including Santiago Creek. Volume 6. Santiago Creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    J A V D E. S E N’ I. II’. Gold ~r MAP 62~ AACO~EB A Lake ~HAfmhtvd f/g Bear Lakeoo i ’\\R K- ___ VICNIT MA 0>- CO V~ET L~𔃺 ff COAC E Ln Jin.or *0 Scm...LYTLE CREEK LEVEE 822 RnnniC. Ct !~keBig Bear Lake ....- BaldwianFacic 0 M TS -- ~d B E IR N ’R , ’:’~a Rrain C. ]SEVE m \\. IL\\I1( 07 VICINITY MA P A...channel. The most significant of these seiswntectonic features, the Newport-Inglewood, Whittier- Elsinore and San :dreas fault zones, are as close as 7

  20. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem Including Santiago Creek. Volume 1. Seven Oaks Dam. Appendixes B Through G

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    approximately 177 square miles, excluding the 32 square miles tributary to Baldwin Lake , has its headwaters in the rugged San Bernardino Mountains. Elevations...include the Newport- Inglewood fault, which caused the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, the Whittier- Elsinore fault zone, and the San Jacinto fault zone...Upper Howell Dam, the Lower Howell Dam and the Lake Ranch Dam. For the latter two dams the fault is reported to have intersected the dam and for the

  1. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem, Including Santiago Creek. Volume 5. Oak Street Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    is located on recent and older alluvial fan deposits in the City of Corona. Two recognized faults occur within the area, the Chino and Elsinore faults...340~ - 4uL1 A \\ -/NDEVIL, VEAST f WI’q & WARM CREED( -- -~~8 / IMf~OVMENTS & LYTLE CREEK LEV Lake Arrwhifld CUCAMONGA AND O DERCREEKS ImpRovemENS...E 0 E C T F󈨀N:1AH D~i.EAST TWIN & WAMCREEKS GodtnN A DEIL Sarmno CRnof Lake .4 orrowe A Bi Bea Lake rLak MAL AIH AIh X I IIIT A UX) MIL REEKI) F>ian

  2. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2 GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem Including Santiago Creek. Volume 2. Prado Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    writing that their operation, facility or land is subject to periodic flooding. Current land uses include a variety of recreation uses, agriculture (on... teo hole -SI-TY Shroug @,.y I..., .. i ._~_~ ,A -tt SA ;V- .d.. UA MW -MP COWCT T. . 75 -36 T.N. 75 -37 T.75-36 &0 .t2 OC LL. as -4 -2005 ft46 JL M RC...em 00Gm -.ll * ter. I 543.0090 0.0O 010947 oetaoloadeiit bet.". W5.001 oft j y09I1y some wit9* WCOBW1isee lftfd C0116186 C 41 0.141.1 129 ift Vowel

  3. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  4. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  5. Streamflow gains and losses along San Francisquito Creek and characterization of surface-water and ground-water quality, southern San Mateo and northern Santa Clara counties, California, 1996-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Loren F.

    2002-01-01

    San Francisquito Creek is an important source of recharge to the 22-square-mile San Francisquito Creek alluvial fan ground-water subbasin in the southern San Mateo and northern Santa Clara Counties of California. Ground water supplies as much as 20 percent of the water to some area communities. Local residents are concerned that infiltration and consequently ground-water recharge would be reduced if additional flood-control measures are implemented along San Francisquito Creek. To improve the understanding of the surface-water/ground-water interaction between San Francisquito Creek and the San Francisquito Creek alluvial fan, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated streamflow gains and losses along San Francisquito Creek and determined the chemical quality and isotopic composition of surface and ground water in the study area.Streamflow was measured at 13 temporary streamflow-measurement stations to determine streamflow gains and losses along a 8.4-mile section of San Francisquito Creek. A series of five seepage runs between April 1996 and May 1997 indicate that losses in San Francisquito Creek were negligible until it crossed the Pulgas Fault at Sand Hill Road. Streamflow losses increased between Sand Hill Road and Middlefield Road where the alluvial deposits are predominantly coarse-grained and the water table is below the bottom of the channel. The greatest streamflow losses were measured along a 1.8-mile section of the creek between the San Mateo Drive bike bridge and Middlefield Road; average losses between San Mateo Drive and Alma Street and from there to Middlefield Road were 3.1 and 2.5 acre-feet per day, respectively.Downstream from Middlefield Road, streamflow gains and losses owing to seepage may be masked by urban runoff, changes in bank storage, and tidal effects from San Francisco Bay. Streamflow gains measured between Middlefield Road and the 1200 block of Woodland Avenue may be attributable to urban runoff and (or) ground-water inflow. Water

  6. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  7. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  8. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  9. Ilha de Santa Catarina

    OpenAIRE

    Nopes, Adriano

    2007-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Filosofia E Ciências Humanas. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Sociologia Política Este trabalho tem como foco de análise o processo de modernização na Praia dos Ingleses, um bairro atual situado no extremo norte da Ilha de Santa Catarina. Como referencial teórico da modernidade, utilizamos pensadores contemporâneos como Berman, Giddens e Habermas; para estes autores a modernização é compreendida como um fenômeno comple...

  10. Physical, Nutrient, and Biological Measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in November 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Durazo Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Ensenada, Mexico Libe Washburn University of California Santa Barbara, CA Paul Choboter...CalPoly State University San Luis Obispo, CA Roger Hewitt NOAA La Jolla, CA Carmen G. Castro Consejo Superior de Investigaciones

  11. 31 flavors to 50 shades of grey: battling Phytophthoras in native habitats managed by the Santa Clara Valley Water District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janet Hillman; Tedmund J. Swiecki; Elizabeth A. Bernhardt; Heather K. Mehl; Tyler B. Bourret; David Rizzo

    2017-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley Water District (District) is a wholesale water supplier for 1.8 million people in Santa Clara County, California. Capital, water utility, and stream maintenance projects result in extensive, long-term mitigation requirements in riparian, wetland, and upland habitats throughout the county. In 2014, several restoration sites on the valley floor and...

  12. 78 FR 35951 - Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the City of Santa Cruz Graham Hill Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the City of Santa Cruz Graham Hill Water Treatment Plant, Santa Cruz County, California AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... and conservation measures for the federally endangered Ben Lomond spineflower (Chorizanthe pungens...

  13. 76 FR 19515 - California Disaster # CA-00170 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Del Norte, Mendocino, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma. Contiguous Counties: California: Alameda, Glenn, Humboldt, Kern, Kings, Lake, Marin, Merced, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, Santa Barbara,...

  14. Environmental Assessment for the California Space Center at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    Cultural Resources Inventory, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California Hodges et al. (2000) 2000-04 Archaeological Survey of the...Review Laura Ornelaz, Attorney Advisor, 30 SW/JA, VAFB Nick Pelster, Technical Director, California Space Authority Roger Root, U.S. Fish and Wildlife...the terrestrial natural communities of California. Nongame Heritage Program. California Department of Fish and Game, Sacramento. Hodges , C.M., C.G

  15. Spatial and temporal controls on Southern California's large fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.; Hall, A. D.; Randerson, J. T.; Goulden, M.

    2010-12-01

    The largest and most destructive fires in Southern California occur during intense Santa Ana wind events. Predicting how these fires and subsequent impacts on ecosystem recovery, air quality, and human health are likely to change in the future requires an understanding of how fire weather, vegetation, and land use control contemporary fires and how they interact. We combined a multi-decade reconstruction of climate at 6 km resolution simulated with MM5 and a long term record of vegetation conditions at 1 km resolution derived from AVHRR and MODIS satellites to examine the spatial and temporal patterns of large fires from 1990 to 2008 as reported in California’s Fire and Resource Assessment Program (FRAP) historical fire perimeter data. Various statistical tests were performed to examine the controls for fire frequency and fire size, from both spatial and interannual perspectives. We constructed empirical models of fire occurrence and burned area for each ecological unit as a function of vegetation composition, fire weather, antecedent climate, and human activities. This study has policy implications for large fire management and mitigation strategies.

  16. CTD, current meter, pressure gauge, and wave spectra data from fixed platforms and other platforms from the Coastal Waters of California as part of the Santa Barbara Channel project from 27 April 1983 to 04 January 1985 (NODC Accession 8500177)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, current meter, pressure gauge, and wave spectra data were collected from fixed platforms and other platforms from the Coastal Waters of California from 27 April...

  17. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  18. Ecology of Waterfowl and Their Habitats During Spring Migration in Southern Oregon-Northeastern California (SONEC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Miller et al. (2005) defined the SONEC region using locations of the 77–87% of the female northern pintails (Anas acuta) from the Central Valley of California...

  19. Santa and the moon

    CERN Document Server

    Barthel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Happy end-of-the-year evening and night events provide good opportunities to explain the phases of the moon. The need for such moon phase education is once again demonstrated, through an investigation of illustrations on Santa Claus and Christmas gift wrap and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: The Netherlands and the USA. The moon on Halloween illustrations is also considered. The lack of knowledge concerning the physical origin of the moon phases, or lack of interest in understanding, is found to be widespread in The Netherlands but is also clearly present in the USA, and is quite possibly global. Definitely incomplete, but surely representative lists compiling both scientifically correct and scientifically incorrect gift wrap and children's books are also presented.

  20. Metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with Santa Barbara seep oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Erik R; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; Foster, Brian; Copeland, Alexander; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Pati, Amrita; Jansson, Janet R; Gilbert, Jack A; Tringe, Susannah Green; Lorenson, Thomas D; Hess, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with natural oils seeping into the Pacific Ocean offshore the coast of Santa Barbara (California, USA) were determined to complement already existing metagenomes generated from microbial communities associated with hydrocarbons that pollute the marine ecosystem. This genomics resource article is the first of two publications reporting a total of four new metagenomes from oils that seep into the Santa Barbara Channel.

  1. Environmental Assessment: San Antonio Creek Restoration at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-08

    Potential Masticophis lateralis Chaparral whipsnake Potential Lampropeltis getula California kingsnake Observed Pituophis catenifer San Diego... introduction of exotic predators, were important factors in the decline ofthe California red-legged frog in the early to mid-1900s. Continuing threats...master’s thesis, University of California , Santa Barbara. Grant, C. 1978a. Chumash: Introduction . In California , edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp. 505

  2. Water Resources Data for California, water year 1981: Vol. 1. Colorado River basin, Southern Great basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1982-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1981 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 169 gaging stations; stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 42 streams and 21 wells; water levels for 169 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  3. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action.

  4. DEMOGRAPHY AND SPATIAL POPULATION STRUCTURE IN CALIFORNIA TIGER SALAMANDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the causes of many amphibian declines remain mysterious, there is general agreement that human habitat alteration represents the greatest threat to amphibian populations. In January 2000 the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing Santa Barbara County California Ti...

  5. SANTA ANA: UN CASO DE SUBURBANIZACIÓN EN LA AGLOMERACIÓN METROPOLITANA

    OpenAIRE

    Greñas Morales, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    El objetivo principal del trabajo es dilucidar los problemas de un pequeño centro urbano del Valle Central de Costa Rica que por su cercanía a San José, capital política del país, ha venido sufriendo el impacto del proceso de metropolización. Esta influencia comienza a ejercerse desde mediados del siglo actual, tanto en lo que se refiere al uso de la tierra como al valor del suelo, a la reducción de los terrenos dedicados a labores agrícolas en provecho de una ampliación de nuevas áreas resid...

  6. 75 FR 38441 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Critical Habitat for Santa Ana Sucker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... public hearing at Ayres Suites Corona West, 1900 W Frontage Road, Corona, CA 92882. We will post all... from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Ayres Suites Corona West, 1900 W. Frontage Road, Corona, CA 92882. The public... majority of total baseline costs (approximately 90 percent of post-designation upper-bound baseline impacts...

  7. 77 FR 66578 - San Bernardino National Forest, Mountaintop Ranger District, CA, Santa Ana Watershed Hazardous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ..., only about 1,700 acres have burned within the past 50 years. Some mechanical treatments, thinning, and... and will be analyzed for recreation, wildlife, fire behavior, hydrology and soils, and plants...

  8. Migration strategy affects avian influenza dynamics in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nichola J; Takekawa, John Y; Ackerman, Joshua T; Hobson, Keith A; Herring, Garth; Cardona, Carol J; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Boyce, Walter M

    2012-12-01

    Studies of pathogen transmission typically overlook that wildlife hosts can include both migrant and resident populations when attempting to model circulation. Through the application of stable isotopes in flight feathers, we estimated the migration strategy of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) occurring on California wintering grounds. Our study demonstrates that mallards- a principal host of avian influenza virus (AIV) in nature, contribute differently to virus gene flow depending on migration strategy. No difference in AIV prevalence was detected between resident (9.6%), intermediate-distance (9.6%) and long-distance migrants (7.4%). Viral diversity among the three groups was also comparable, possibly owing to viral pool mixing when birds converge at wetlands during winter. However, migrants and residents contributed differently to the virus gene pool at wintering wetlands. Migrants introduced virus from northern breeding grounds (Alaska and the NW Pacific Rim) into the wintering population, facilitating gene flow at continental scales, but circulation of imported virus appeared to be limited. In contrast, resident mallards acted as AIV reservoirs facilitating year-round circulation of limited subtypes (i.e. H5N2) at lower latitudes. This study supports a model of virus exchange in temperate regions driven by the convergence of wild birds with separate geographic origins and exposure histories.

  9. U Portugalii dusha poeta / Ana Paula Zacarias ; interv. Aleksandr Shegedin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Zacarias, Ana Paula

    2006-01-01

    Äsja avatud Portugali saatkonda juhtiv suursaadik Ana Paula Baptista Grade Zacarias jagab Portugali kogemusi seoses liitumisega Euroopa Liiduga. Eesti-Portugali suhted, suursaadiku esmamuljed Eestist

  10. U Portugalii dusha poeta / Ana Paula Zacarias ; interv. Aleksandr Shegedin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Zacarias, Ana Paula

    2006-01-01

    Äsja avatud Portugali saatkonda juhtiv suursaadik Ana Paula Baptista Grade Zacarias jagab Portugali kogemusi seoses liitumisega Euroopa Liiduga. Eesti-Portugali suhted, suursaadiku esmamuljed Eestist

  11. Serpentine Locomotion Articulated Chain: ANA II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Cardona

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available When humanity faces challenges in solving problems beyond their technical resources, and has no foundation to solve a problem, engineering must search for an answer developing new concepts and innovative frameworks to excel these limitations and travel beyond our capabilities. This project “Serpentine locomotion articulated chain: ANA II” is a self-contained robot built to evaluate the behavior of the platform being capable of serpentine movements, in a modular chain mechanical design, based on a master/slave architecture.

  12. Ana Maria Lorandi and the Ethnohistory's train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Ramos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2016 it was celebrated eighty years of the Dra. Ana María Lorandi, who dedicated over fifty years to academic research. This finds as active as ever, working on new projects and following the new generations of anthropologists interested in Ethnohistory. In writing this article, we think of honoring it by examining its contribution through three forms of action that she developed prominently: management, research and insertion into transnational networks. Throughout the text we proposed to recover his voice, trying to incorporate his vision of the history of scientific development in which played a key role.

  13. Final Environmental Assessment for the California Space Center at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    Cultural Resources Inventory, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California Hodges et al. (2000) 2000-04 Archaeological Survey of the...VAFB Nick Pelster, Technical Director, California Space Authority Roger Root, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ventura Field Office Chris Ryan...Heritage Program. California Department of Fish and Game, Sacramento. Hodges , C.M., C.G. Lebow, and R.L. McKim. 2000. Archaeological Survey of the

  14. Communicating stigma: the pro-ana paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshua-Katz, Daphna; Martins, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the personal experience of pro-ana bloggers, members of an online community for people with eating disorders. Using Erving Goffman's work on stigma, this study explores the motivations, benefits, and drawbacks of blogging about a stigmatized mental illness, as taken from the bloggers' own perceptive. We conducted 33 interviews with bloggers from seven different countries via phone, Skype, and e-mail. Participants were motivated to blog because they found social support, a way to cope with a stigmatized illness, and means of self-expression. Participants described blogging as a cathartic experience and perceived the social support they received from other members of the pro-ana community as a benefit. The fear that the eating disorder will be revealed if the blog is exposed and the concern that the blog encourages disordered eating were the perceived negative consequences of maintaining such a blog. Thus, blogging about anorexia serves to both alleviate and trigger anxiety about living with this stigmatized illness. Recommendations for future research are made.

  15. Novel method for ANA quantitation using IIF imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaodong; Tang, Jiangtao; Wu, Yongkang; Yang, Bin; Hu, Jing

    2014-02-01

    A variety of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are found in the serum of patients with autoimmune diseases. The detection of abnormal ANA titers is a critical criterion for diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other connective tissue diseases. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF) on HEp-2 cells is the gold standard method to determine the presence of ANA and therefore provides information about the localization of autoantigens that are useful for diagnosis. However, its utility was limited in prognosing and monitoring of disease activity due to the lack of standardization in performing the technique, subjectivity in interpreting the results and the fact that it is only semi-quantitative. On the other hand, ELISA for the detection of ANA can quantitate ANA but could not provide further information about the localization of the autoantigens. It would be ideal to integrate both of the quantitative and qualitative methods. To address this issue, this study was conducted to quantitatively detect ANAs by using IIF imaging analysis system. Serum samples from patients with ANA positive (including speckled, homogeneous, nuclear mixture and cytoplasmic mixture patterns) and negative were detected for ANA titers by the classical IIF and analyzed by an image system, the image of each sample was acquired by the digital imaging system and the green fluorescence intensity was quantified by the Image-Pro plus software. A good correlation was found in between two methods and the correlation coefficients (R(2)) of various ANA patterns were 0.942 (speckled), 0.942 (homogeneous), 0.923 (nuclear mixture) and 0.760 (cytoplasmic mixture), respectively. The fluorescence density was linearly correlated with the log of ANA titers in various ANA patterns (R(2)>0.95). Moreover, the novel ANA quantitation method showed good reproducibility (F=0.091, p>0.05) with mean±SD and CV% of positive, and negative quality controls were equal to 126.4±9.6 and 7.6%, 10.4±1.25 and 12

  16. Using an Integrated Surface Water - Groundwater Flow Model for Evaluating the Hydrologic Impacts of Historic and Potential Future Dry Periods on Simulated Water Budgets in the Santa Rosa Plain Watershed, Northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevesi, J. A.; Woolfenden, L. R.; Nishikawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    Communities in the Santa Rosa Plain watershed (SRPW), Sonoma County, CA, USA are experiencing increasing demand for limited water resources. Streamflow in the SRPW is runoff dominated; however, groundwater also is an important resource in the basin. The watershed has an area of 262 mi2 that includes natural, agricultural, and urban land uses. To evaluate the hydrologic system, an integrated hydrologic model was developed using the U.S. Geological Survey coupled groundwater and surface-water flow model, GSFLOW. The model uses a daily time step and a grid-based discretization of the SRPW consisting of 16,741 10-acre cells for 8 model layers to simulate all water budget components of the surface and subsurface hydrologic system. Simulation results indicate significant impacts on streamflow and recharge in response to the below average precipitation during the dry periods. The recharge and streamflow distributions simulated for historic dry periods were compared to future dry periods projected from 4 GCM realizations (two different GCMs and two different CO2 forcing scenarios) for the 21st century, with the dry periods defined as 3 consecutive years of below average precipitation. For many of the projected dry periods, the decreases in recharge and streamflow were greater than for the historic dry periods due to a combination of lower precipitation and increases in simulated evapotranspiration for the warmer 21st century projected by the GCM realizations. The greatest impact on streamflow for both historic and projected future dry periods is the diminished baseflow from late spring to early fall, with an increase in the percentage of intermittent and dry stream reaches. The results indicate that the coupled model is a useful tool for water managers to better understand the potential effects of future dry periods on spatially and temporally distributed streamflow and recharge, as well as other components of the water budget.

  17. Preliminary photointerpretation map of landslide and other surficial deposits of the Mount Hamilton quadrangle and parts of the Mount Boardman and San Jose quadrangles, Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Tor H.

    1972-01-01

    The nine San Francisco Bay region counties lie within a geologically active, young, and dynamic part of the central and northern Coast Ranges of California. Significant movements of the earth's crust are occurring here at the present time, posing numerous problems to urbanization, including some of special concern. Geological processes such as fault movements, earthquakes, land subsidence, landsliding, slow downslope movement of bedrock and surficial materials, coastal and stream erosion, flooding, and sedimentation are all potentially hazardous. Because of these factors, an understanding of the operation of physical processes in the bay region is desirable for harmonious, efficient, and safe land-use planning, particularly now, with greatly expanded pressures for urban growth. 

  18. Near-conservative behavior of 129Iodine in the Orange County Aquifer System, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwer, K A; Santschi, P H; Moran, J E; Elmore, D

    2005-01-21

    Iodine is a biophilic element, with one stable isotope, {sup 127}I, and one long-lived radioisotope, {sup 129}I, which originates in the surface environment almost entirely from anthropogenic activities such as nuclear fuel reprocessing. Very few studies have evaluated the geochemical behavior of iodine isotopes in the subsurface. The concentrations of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I were measured in wells fed by a series of artificial recharge ponds in the Forebay Area of the Orange County groundwater basin (California, USA) to evaluate their potential use as hydrological tracers. To substantiate interpretation of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I concentration data, the aquifer system was evaluated using literature values of aquifer water mass age based on {sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, Xenon and {delta}{sup 18}O tracer data, as well as time-series data of Santa Ana River flow rates over the past decade. The aquifer data demonstrate the nearly conservative behavior of {sup 129}I, with {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios likely reflecting variations in source functions as well as climatic conditions, and with inferred particle-water partition coefficients (K{sub d}) of 0.1 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} or less.

  19. The PEN Project in Santa Monica: Interactive Communication, Equality, and Political Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigates the socioeconomic and gender equality aspects of the public's use of PEN (Public Electronic Network), a computer-based interactive communication system provided free to residents of Santa Monica (California). Topics discussed include public terminals; use by homeless people and by women; and participation in political communication…

  20. Spatially Explicit West Nile Virus Risk Modeling in Santa Clara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A geographic information systems model designed to identify regions of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission risk was tested and calibrated with data collected in Santa Clara County, California. American Crows that died from WNV infection in 2005, provided spatial and temporal ground truth. When the mo...

  1. Gender Representation in an Electronic City Hall: Female Adoption of Santa Monica's PEN System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Jarvis, Lori A.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of the use of electronic networking systems by women focuses on a study of their use of the Public Electronic Network (PEN) in Santa Monica (California). Characteristics of PEN that contributed to female adoption are described; gender, political participation, and motivation are examined; and future research is suggested. (46…

  2. Differential stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrid duplexes: roles of structure, pseudohydrogen bonding, hydration, ion uptake and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K; Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J

    2010-04-01

    Hybrids of RNA with arabinonucleic acids 2'F-ANA and ANA have very similar structures but strikingly different thermal stabilities. We now present a thorough study combining NMR and other biophysical methods together with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations on a fully modified 10-mer hybrid duplex. Comparison between the solution structure of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrids indicates that the increased binding affinity of 2'F-ANA is related to several subtle differences, most importantly a favorable pseudohydrogen bond (2'F-purine H8) which contrasts with unfavorable 2'-OH-nucleobase steric interactions in the case of ANA. While both 2'F-ANA and ANA strands maintained conformations in the southern/eastern sugar pucker range, the 2'F-ANA strand's structure was more compatible with the A-like structure of a hybrid duplex. No dramatic differences are found in terms of relative hydration for the two hybrids, but the ANA*RNA duplex showed lower uptake of counterions than its 2'F-ANA*RNA counterpart. Finally, while the two hybrid duplexes are of similar rigidities, 2'F-ANA single strands may be more suitably preorganized for duplex formation. Thus the dramatically increased stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA duplexes is caused by differences in at least four areas, of which structure and pseudohydrogen bonding are the most important.

  3. Risk factors for ANA positivity in healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan-Zhen; Karp, David R; Quan, Jiexia; Branch, Valerie K; Zhou, Jinchun; Lian, Yun; Chong, Benjamin F; Wakeland, Edward K; Olsen, Nancy J

    2011-03-02

    The finding of antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity in a healthy individual is usually of unknown significance and in most cases is benign. However, a subset of such individuals is at risk for development of autoimmune disease. We examined demographic and immunological features that are associated with ANA positivity in clinically healthy persons to develop insights into when this marker carries risk of progression to lupus. Biological samples from healthy individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were obtained from the Dallas Regional Autoimmune Disease Registry (DRADR). Measurements carried out on serum samples included ANA, extractable nuclear antibodies (ENA) and autoantibody profiling using an array with more than 100 specificities. Whole blood RNA samples from a subset of individuals were used to analyze gene expression on the Illumina platform. Data were analyzed for associations of high ANA levels with demographic features, the presence of other autoantibodies and with gene expression profiles. Overall, ANA levels are significantly higher in females than in males and this association holds in patients with the autoimmune diseases lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as in healthy controls (HC). Age was not significantly associated with ANA levels and the elevated ANA values could not be explained by higher IgG levels. Another autoantibody, anti- cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), did not show gender dimorphism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or healthy individuals. The autoantigen array showed significant elevations of other autoantibodies in high ANA HCs. Some of these autoantibodies were directed to antigens in skin and others were related to autoimmune conditions of kidney, thyroid or joints. Gene expression analyses showed a greater prevalence of significantly upregulated genes in HCs with negative ANA values than in those with significant ANA positivity. Genes upregulated in high ANA HCs included a celiac disease

  4. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  5. ciudad de Santa Marta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alfredo Ferreira Ospino

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación evalúa los resultados de un programa de Formación en Derechos con madres comunitarias para la solución de conflictos en la Comuna Ocho de la ciudad de Santa Marta. El programa buscó el desarrollo de la capacidad de análisis y discernimiento para la toma de decisiones, que les permitan participar activamente en la solución de problemas de la comunidad, tendientes a mejorar las condiciones de vida de los miembros de la ésta. El proyecto se enmarca en un diseño de investigación cuasiexperimental con grupo control y medida pre y post, de forma que puedan medirse no sólo los resultados del programa, sino su efectividad para la resolución de conflictos en la comunidad. Se utilizó el cuestionario adaptado a la Teoría de Rahim y otros autores de la teoría del conflicto con el fin de determinar la manera como se resuelven los conflictos en la comunidad. Esta investigación se centró en demostrar objetivamente la efectividad del programa y las diferencias deliberativas y discursivas más relevantes entre los sujetos que recibieron formación en derechos.

  6. Environmental Assessment for Landfill Drainage Improvements Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    Branch, San Luis Obispo, California. Jones, Terry L., and Georgie Waugh 1995 Central California Coastal Prehistory: A View from Little Pico Creek...J.F. Porcasi, and W.J. Howard 1995 Return to Little Harbor, Santa Catalina Island, California: A Critique of the Marine Paleotemperature Model

  7. A Different Shade Of Blue: An Evaluation Of The Civilian Detective Concept And Its Impact On Police Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    DC: Government Accountability Office, 2014), 1–2, http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-15-224SP. 13 Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Placentia, Santa Ana ...law enforcement departments were selected for evaluation: Costa Mesa, California; Huntington Beach, California; Placentia, California; Santa Ana ...Petersilia, The Criminal Investigation Process (P-5628-1) (Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 1976), http://www.rand.org/pubs/papers/P5628-1.html. 54 Frank

  8. Variação do comportamento sexual de carneiros da raça Churra Galega Bragançana ao longo de um ano

    OpenAIRE

    Valentim, Ramiro; Correia, Teresa Montenegro; Azevedo, Jorge; Mendonça, Álvaro; Bento, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    Este trabalho teve como principal objectivo estudar a variação do comportamento sexual de carneiros da raça Churra Galega Bragançana, ao longo de um ano. Neste sentido, na cidade de Bragança (latitude 41° 49' N, longitude 6° 40' W e altitude 720 metros), mais precisamente na Quinta de Santa Apolónia, pertencente à Escola Superior Agrária de Bragança (ESAB), 16 carneiros desta raça, todos eles com 3 anos de idade, foram submetidos à determinação do número total de saltos efectuados, do temp...

  9. Population genetic structure of the round stingray Urobatis halleri (Elasmobranchii: Rajiformes) in southern California and the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, S M; Lowe, C G; Feldheim, K A; Wilson, R R; Brusslan, J A

    2010-08-01

    The round stingray, Urobatis halleri, is a viviparous elasmobranch that inhabits inshore, benthic habitats ranging from the western U.S.A. to Panama. The population genetic structure of this species was inferred with seven polymorphic microsatellite loci in samples collected at three sites in coastal southern California, one near Santa Catalina Island, California and one in the eastern Gulf of California. Urobatis halleri is relatively common, but little is known of its movement patterns or population structure. Small F(ST) values (-0.0017 to 0.0005) suggested little structure among coastal populations of southern and Baja California. The population sampled at Santa Catalina Island, which is separated by a deep-water channel from the coastal sites, however, was significantly divergent (large F(ST), 0.0251) from the other populations, suggesting low connectivity with coastal populations. The Santa Catalina Island population also had the lowest allele richness and lowest average heterozygosity, suggesting recent population bottlenecks in size.

  10. ANA testing in the presence of acute and chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Christine M; Binder, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibody testing is performed to help diagnose patients who have clinical symptoms suggestive of possible autoimmune diseases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are present in many systemic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a positive ANA test may also be seen with non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including both acute and chronic infections. When the ANA test is used as an initial screen in patients with non-specific clinical symptoms, such as fever, joint pain, myalgias, fatigue, rash, or anemia, the likelihood of a positive result due to infection will increase, especially in children. This article identifies acute and chronic infectious diseases that are likely to produce a positive ANA result and summarizes recent literature addressing both the causes and consequences of these findings.

  11. ERP sistēmas ieviešana

    OpenAIRE

    Proskurins, Aleksandrs

    2008-01-01

    Šajā darbā tika apskatīta informācijas sistēmu klasifikācija, uzņēmuma resursu plānošanas sistēmas (ERP) definīcija un tās vieta IS klasifikācijā. Tika apskatīti ERP sistēmu ieviešanas teorētiskie aspekti, izstrādes un pielāgošanas specifika, kā arī tika izanalizēti vairāki ERP sistēmas ieviešanas projekti Latvijas uzņēmumos.

  12. ERP sistēmas ieviešana

    OpenAIRE

    Proskurins, Aleksandrs

    2008-01-01

    Šajā darbā tika apskatīta informācijas sistēmu klasifikācija, uzņēmuma resursu plānošanas sistēmas (ERP) definīcija un tās vieta IS klasifikācijā. Tika apskatīti ERP sistēmu ieviešanas teorētiskie aspekti, izstrādes un pielāgošanas specifika, kā arī tika izanalizēti vairāki ERP sistēmas ieviešanas projekti Latvijas uzņēmumos.

  13. The solution structure of double helical arabino nucleic acids (ANA and 2'F-ANA): effect of arabinoses in duplex-hairpin interconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Yahyaee-Anzahaee, Maryam; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Noronha, Anne M; Wilds, Christopher J; Damha, Masad J; González, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    We report here the first structure of double helical arabino nucleic acid (ANA), the C2'-stereoisomer of RNA, and the 2'-fluoro-ANA analogue (2'F-ANA). A chimeric dodecamer based on the Dickerson sequence, containing a contiguous central segment of arabino nucleotides, flanked by two 2'-deoxy-2'F-ANA wings was studied. Our data show that this chimeric oligonucleotide can adopt two different structures of comparable thermal stabilities. One structure is a monomeric hairpin in which the stem is formed by base paired 2'F-ANA nucleotides and the loop by unpaired ANA nucleotides. The second structure is a bimolecular duplex, with all the nucleotides (2'F-ANA and ANA) forming Watson-Crick base pairs. The duplex structure is canonical B-form, with all arabinoses adopting a pure C2'-endo conformation. In the ANA:ANA segment, steric interactions involving the 2'-OH substituent provoke slight changes in the glycosidic angles and, therefore, in the ANA:ANA base pair geometry. These distortions are not present in the 2'F-ANA:2'F-ANA regions of the duplex, where the -OH substituent is replaced by a smaller fluorine atom. 2'F-ANA nucleotides adopt the C2'-endo sugar pucker and fit very well into the geometry of B-form duplex, allowing for favourable 2'F···H8 interactions. This interaction shares many features of pseudo-hydrogen bonds previously observed in 2'F-ANA:RNA hybrids and in single 2'F-ANA nucleotides.

  14. Lead level in mallard (Anas platyrhynchos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Macinic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out on a hunting ground belonging to AJVPS Arad, county Arad. Lead (Pb was determined in Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos tissues (muscles and organs (liver, kidneys to see the contamination level of this tissues and organs and also the impact on humans health because in our days more and more wild game meat take a increasing percentage in humans food ratio. The Mallard is one of the most widespread duck species. Mallard has 50-62 cm length, 800-1400 g weight and lives about 11 years. It prefers rivers and shallow pounds with a lot of reed. It is a migratory species that is flying long distances to find food and unfrozen water, so it is a exposed to lead contamination that is under dust form in atmosphere. But another reason why lead level in Mallard can be higher that in other flying specie (pheasant, woodcock, quail, and pigeons are the lead shot shells that are used for duck hunting. It is known that the ducks can ingest these lead shot shells and so they are often exposed to lead intoxications. This is why in our days more ammunition for waterfowl are steel made or different type of alloys. Lead is known to be one of the most common pollutants with a large range of effects on human health: lead affects nervous system, digestive tract, kidneys, bones, enzymes. Lead has also mutagenic effect, carcinogenic effect, teratogenic effect.

  15. Transport and concentration controls for chloride, strontium, potassium and lead in Uvas Creek, a small cobble-bed stream in Santa Clara County, California, U.S.A. 2. Mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, A.P.; Walters, R.A.; Kennedy, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Three models describing solute transport of conservative ion species and another describing transport of species which adsorb linearly and reversibly on bed sediments are developed and tested. The conservative models are based on three different conceptual models of the transient storage of solute in the bed. One model assumes the bed to be a well-mixed zone with flux of solute into the bed proportional to the difference between stream concentration and bed concentration. The second model assumes solute in the bed is transported by a vertical diffusion process described by Fick's law. The third model assumes that convection occurs in a selected portion of the bed while the mechanism of the first model functions everywhere. The model for adsorbing species assumes that the bed consists of particles of uniform size with the rate of uptake controlled by an intraparticle diffusion process. All models are tested using data collected before, during and after a 24-hr. pulse injection of chloride, strontium, potassium and lead ions into Uvas Creek near Morgan Hill, California, U.S.A. All three conservative models accurately predict chloride ion concentrations in the stream. The model employing the diffusion mechanism for bed transport predicts better than the others. The adsorption model predicts both strontium and potassium ion concentrations well during the injection of the pulse but somewhat overestimates the observed concentrations after the injection ceases. The overestimation may be due to the convection of solute deep into the bed where it is retained longer than the 3-week post-injection observation period. The model, when calibrated for strontium, predicts potassium equally well when the adsorption equilibrium constant for strontium is replaced by that for potassium. ?? 1984.

  16. Santa Claus ’Names

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寒冰

    2005-01-01

    A ustria—Christkind Belgium and the N etherlands—N oel Saint Nicholas C hristkind and Black Pete Brazil—Papa;N oel D enm ark—Julinisse England—Father Christm as Finland—O ld M an C hristm asFrance—Pere N oel or le Petit Germ any—K riss Kringle Christkind or Saint N icholas Italy—B efana Japan—Santa K urohsu M exico—Three Kings Poland—Star M an or W ise M en Spain—Three Kings R ussia—B asbouschka ?Santa Claus ’Names@寒冰

  17. Velázquez en el Purgatorio: los días y los trabajos de un científico en California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabéu Albert, Salvador

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While the Creole scientist, Velázquez de León, was pursuing the projects of a visitor from Malaga, José de Gálvez, he absented himself from the University of Mexico and spent two years in the distant peninsula of California. The study of this little-known episode in his life shows us the diversity and complexity of social relations in one of the most remote places in the colony. Velázquez failed in his attempts to improve local mining and in his efforts as right-hand man to the visitor, but he wrote several very interesting descriptions and helped to measure the Transit of Venus from his residence in Santa Ana. His fondness for cards, parties and women will help to show the human side of a figure who is too often typecast in laboratories, chapels and respectable learned institutions.

    Siguiendo los proyectos del visitador malagueño José de Gálvez, el científico criollo Velázquez de León se ausentó de la Universidad de México y pasó dos años en la lejana península de California. El estudio de este episodio poco conocido de su vida nos revela la diversidad y complejidad de las relaciones sociales en uno de los lugares más remotos de la colonia. Velázquez fracasó en sus intentos por mejorar la minería local y en sus medidas como lugarteniente del visitador, pero escribió varias descripciones de gran interés y ayudó a medir el Paso de Venus desde su residencia de Santa Ana. Su afición a las cartas, a las fiestas y a las mujeres servirá para humanizar una figura demasiado encasillada en laboratorios, oratorios y respetables instituciones ilustradas.

  18. La conversión social de Santa Mónica en una ciudad sustentable

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Ibarra; Adriana Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Santa Mónica, California, inició su transición hacia un sistema de planeación urbana sustentable a finales de la década de 1970, continuándolo hasta la actualidad. El punto de partida del fenómeno fue un movimiento ciudadano surgido en 1978, que se consolidó en 1981 como la principal fuerza política local, al obtener Por Primera vez la mayoría de los asientos en el Consejo de la Ciudad. Este trabajo analiza los factores propulsores del plan local de desarrollo sustentable en Santa Mónica. Asi...

  19. The evolving fresh market berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tourte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fresh market berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties has contributed significantly to the agricultural vibrancy of the two counties and the state of California. Dramatic growth in strawberry, raspberry and blackberry production has been documented over the last 50 years, and most notably since the 1980s. Factors influencing this growth include innovations in agricultural practices and heightened consumer demand. Here, we review the historical context for the berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties. Organic production, production economics and challenges for the future are also discussed.

  20. CNOOC Cooperates with Santa Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Sanyong; Wang Keyu

    1997-01-01

    @@ China National Offshore Oil Corporatian (CNOOC) signed the Petroleum Contract for 15/34 Block in the Pearl River Mouth Basin of South China Sea and the Petroleum Contract for 23/28 Block in the Beibu Gulf of South China Sea with Santa Fe Resources Inc. of the United States in Beijing on January 16, 1997.

  1. California Bioregions

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — California regions developed by the Inter-agency Natural Areas Coordinating Committee (INACC) were digitized from a 1:1,200,000 California Department of Fish and...

  2. Concentration, UV-spectroscopic characteristics and fractionation of DOC in stormflow from an urban stream, Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, J.A.; Pimentel, I.M.; Johnson, R.; Aiken, G.R.; Leenheer, J.

    2007-01-01

    The composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in stormflow from urban areas has been greatly altered, both directly and indirectly, by human activities and there is concern that there may be public health issues associated with DOC, which has unknown composition from different sources within urban watersheds. This study evaluated changes in the concentration and composition of DOC in stormflow in the Santa Ana River and its tributaries between 1995 and 2004 using a simplified approach based on the differences in the optical properties of DOC and using operationally defined differences in molecular weight and solubility. The data show changes in the composition of DOC in stormflow during the rainy season and differences associated with runoff from different parts of the basin, including extensive upland areas burned prior to the 2004 rainy season. Samples were collected from the Santa Ana River, which drains ???6950 km2 of the densely populated coastal area of southern California, during 23 stormflows between 1995 and 2004. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations during the first stormflows of the ?winter' (November to March) rainy season increased rapidly with streamflow and were positively correlated with increased faecal indicator bacteria concentrations. DOC concentrations were not correlated with streamflow or with other constituents during stormflows later in the rainy season and DOC had increasing UV absorbance per unit carbon as the rainy season progressed. DOC concentrations in stormflow from an urban drain tributary to the river also increased during stormflow and were greater than concentrations in the river. DOC concentrations in stormflow from a tributary stream, draining urban and agricultural land that contained more than 320 000 animals, mostly dairy cows, were higher than concentrations in stormflow from the river and from the urban drain. Fires that burned large areas of the basin before the 2004 rainy season did not increase DOC

  3. CEREBRITIS AND NEUTROPENIA IN A CHILD WITH ANA NEGATIVE LUPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Akhoondian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveSystemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune systemic disease with unknown etiology, affects virtually every part of the body; involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients and is the least understood aspect of the disease. neutropenia is very uncommon in childhood lupus. True negative anti nuclear antibody (ANA tests in patients with lupus are now very rare. The patient reported here was a 12-year-old girl with ANA negative lupus cerebritis who presented with left hemiparesia after a generalized seizure, with neutropenia observed during its course.Key words:lupus cerebritis, neutropenia, ANA negative lupus, children

  4. Zeolite-like metal-organic frameworks with ana topology

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-04-20

    Embodiments of the present disclosure describe a zeolite-like metal-organic framework composition comprising a metal-organic framework composition with ana topology characterized by the formula [MIII(4, 5-imidazole dicarboxylic acid)2X(solvent)a]n wherein MIII comprises a trivalent cation of a rare earth element, X comprises an alkali metal element or alkaline earth metal element, and solvent comprises a guest molecule occupying pores. Embodiments of the present disclosure describe a method of separating paraffins comprising contacting a zeolite-like metal-organic framework with ana topology with a flow of paraffins, and separating the paraffins by size.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Micro Storage/Intel Magnetics, Santa Clara, CA. (First remedial action), August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-26

    The 3-acre Micro Storage/Intel Magnetics site consists of a former microcomputer disk drive manufacturing facility and a magnetic bubble production and testing facility in Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California. In addition, the site overlies two shallow aquifers zones, which in turn, overlie the Santa Clara Valley ground water basin, the primary drinking water source for the 1.4 million residents of the Santa Clara Valley. As a result of possible improper storage procedures at both facilities, a number of State and EPA investigations identified VOCs including benzene, TCE, and TCA, and other organics in the ground water aquifer beneath the site. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses ground water contaminated by past facility operations. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; and other organics. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

  6. Santa Paulina, reconquista a territorialidade

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, José do

    2006-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas. Programa de Pós-Graduação em História Esta dissertação trata de um estudo sobre a relação entre turismo e religiosidade a partir do estudo de caso do Santuário de Santa Paulina do Coração Agonizante de Jesus, em Nova Trento, no período de 1991 a 2005. Foi adotado o método de História Oral com a participação de diferentes atores, destacando-se os peregrinos ou passantes mais comumente de...

  7. 2009 Santa Fe Bone symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Laster, Andrew J; Miller, Paul D; Recker, Robert R; Russell, R Graham G; Whyte, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease with serious clinical consequences because of fractures. Despite the availability of clinical tools to diagnose osteoporosis and assess fracture risk, and drugs proven to reduce fracture risk, it remains a disease that is underdiagnosed and undertreated. When treatment is started, it is commonly not taken correctly or long enough to be effective. Recent advances in understanding of the regulators and mediators of bone remodeling have led to new therapeutic targets and the development of drugs that may offer advantages over current agents in reducing the burden of osteoporotic fractures. Many genetic factors that play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease have now been identified. At the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, the links between advances in genetics, basic bone science, recent clinical trials, and new and emerging therapeutic agents were presented and explored. Socioeconomic challenges and opportunities in the care of osteoporosis were discussed. This is a collection of medical essays based on key presentations at the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

  8. Clinical-laboratory characteristics of ANA-positive chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eli; Waitman, Dan-Andrei; Dickstein, Yoav; Davidovich, Valentina; Kahan, Natan R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the established association between chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU) and presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), the prevalence of autoimmune comorbidities in this population has not been analyzed. Here, we aim to identify clinical and laboratory manifestations associated with ANA-positive CIU. ANA-positive patients were identified via electronic data capture from the electronic patient record database of Leumit Health care Services (LHS) of Israel. Patient characteristics, medical histories, and details of diagnostic workup, medical treatment, and follow-up were retrieved by performing a chart review of electronic patient records (EPRs). The prevalence of target diseases among ANA(+) CIU(+), ANA(+) CIU(-), and ANA(-) CIU(+) patients was calculated. A total of 91 ANA(+) CIU(+), 3131 ANA(+) CIU(-), and 478 ANA(-) CIU(+) patients were identified. The ANA(+) CIU(+) group was characterized by higher prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome (SS)-A 52 antibodies (Ab) (7.7% versus 2.4%; p = 0.008), SS-A 60 Ab (11% versus 2.8%; p = ANA(-) CIU(+) group. Additionally, ANA(+) CIU(+) patients were more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid autoimmune diseases, higher C-reactive protein (6.4 ± 10.3 versus 4.1 ± 8.8 mg/L; p = 0.027), and more profound basopenia (0.04 ± 0.09 versus 0.15 ± 0.11 cell/mm(3); p ANA(-) CIU patients. More ANA(+) CIU(+) patients were resistant to four-fold standard licensed doses of antihistamines than ANA(-) CIU(+) patients [11 (12.1%) versus 29 (6.1%); p = 0.046]. ANA-positive CIU is characterized by higher prevalence of SS-A 52, SS-A 60, and SS-B antibodies and poorer clinical response to antihistamine medications.

  9. Reconnaissance Report for Navigation Improvements (Reduction of Shoaling) at Santa Cruz Harbor Santa Cruz County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    sand and small vegetated sand dunes are forming. There are no trees on the beach; those on the cliffs are pine, cypress, eucalyptus and various...centerline. It would create in essence a 1- to 2-foot wide "concrete/grout curtain" inside the center of the Jetty structure. The materials used in the east

  10. Exploration potential of offshore northern California basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    A series of exploratory wells was drilled in the northern California offshore basins in the 1960s following leasing of federal tracts off northern California, Oregon, and Washington. The drilling, although encountering numerous oil shows, was considered at the time to indicate low prospectivity in an area that extended as far south as the offshore Santa Maria basin. However, subsequent major discoveries in this decade in the offshore Santa Maria basin, such as the Point Arguello field, indicate that these offshore basins may be highly prospective exploration targets. Many of the key features of Monterey production in central and southern California are also present in the offshore basins of northern California. A new 5-year leasing plan has scheduled leasing in the northern California OCS starting in early 1989. The first basins on the schedule, the Point Arena and Eel River basins, differ in some respects. The Point Arena basin is more typical of a Monterey basin, with the potential for fractured chert reservoirs and organic-rich sections, deep burial of basinal sections to enhance the generation of higher gravity oils, and complex folding and faulting. The Eel River basin is more clastic-rich in its gas-producing, onshore extension. Key questions in the Eel River basin include whether the offshore, more distal stratigraphy will include Monterey-like biogenic sediments, and whether the basin has oil potential in addition to its proven gas potential. The Outer Santa Cruz basin shares a similar stratigraphy, structure, and hydrocarbon potential with the Point Arena basin. The Santa Cruz-Bodega basin, also with a similar stratigraphy, may have less exploration potential because erosion has thinned the Monterey section in parts of the basin.

  11. Anaïs Nin, pornografien og den kvinnelige seksualiteten

    OpenAIRE

    Tronvold, Gry Olsen

    2010-01-01

    Denne studien tar for seg Anaïs Nins samlinger Delta of venus (1977) og Little Birds (1979) I lys av Sigmund Freud argumenterer jeg for at Nins pornografi er metapornografi, som belyser problematiske aspekter ved den kvinnelige seksualiteten. Slik finner jeg belegg for at Nins samlinger er skjønnlitterære og dermed bryter med den konvensjonelle pornografien.

  12. Protocol, Engineering Research Center, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Raymond Klefstad * Juan Colmenares , Graduate Student Researcher • Shruti Gorappa, Graduate Student Researcher * Trevor Harmon, Graduate Student Researcher...Technology and Applications Symposium, Washington ,D.C., May - June 2000. K. Raman, Y. Zhang, M. Panahi, J. A. Colmenares and R. Klefstad, "RTZen...Systems, September 2005, Vienna, Austria. K. Raman, Y. Zhang, M. Panahi, J. A. Colmenares and R. Klefstad, "Patterns and tools for achieving

  13. Predicted seafloor facies of Central Santa Monica Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Gardner, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- Mapping surficial seafloor facies (sand, silt, muddy sand, rock, etc.) should be the first step in marine geological studies and is crucial when modeling sediment processes, pollution transport, deciphering tectonics, and defining benthic habitats. This report outlines an empirical technique that predicts the distribution of seafloor facies for a large area offshore Los Angeles, CA using high-resolution bathymetry and co-registered, calibrated backscatter from multibeam echosounders (MBES) correlated to ground-truth sediment samples. The technique uses a series of procedures that involve supervised classification and a hierarchical decision tree classification that are now available in advanced image-analysis software packages. Derivative variance images of both bathymetry and acoustic backscatter are calculated from the MBES data and then used in a hierarchical decision-tree framework to classify the MBES data into areas of rock, gravelly muddy sand, muddy sand, and mud. A quantitative accuracy assessment on the classification results is performed using ground-truth sediment samples. The predicted facies map is also ground-truthed using seafloor photographs and high-resolution sub-bottom seismic-reflection profiles. This Open-File Report contains the predicted seafloor facies map as a georeferenced TIFF image along with the multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data used in the study as well as an explanation of the empirical classification process.

  14. Physical, Nutrient, and Biological Measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Ensenada, Mexico Libe Washburn University of California Santa Barbara, CA Paul Choboter CalPoly...State University San Luis Obispo, CA Roger Hewitt NOAA La Jolla, CA Carmen G. Castro Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Spain

  15. Physical, Nutrient, and Biological Measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Ensenada, Mexico Libe Washburn University of California Santa Barbara, CA Paul Choboter CalPoly State...University San Luis Obispo, CA Roger Hewitt NOAA La Jolla, CA Carmen G. Castro Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas Spain

  16. Physical, Nutrient, and Biological Measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Reginaldo Durazo Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Ensenada, Mexico Libe Washburn University of California Santa Barbara, CA Paul Choboter...CalPoly State University San Luis Obispo, CA Roger Hewitt NOAA La Jolla, CA Carmen G. Castro Consejo Superior de Investigaciones

  17. The 2 MW Santa Clara Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Paul H.

    The City of Santa Clara, CA, USA, has hosted the world's first field demonstration of a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. This US$46 million, 2 MW generator was a joint effort of five US utilities, the federal government, and two US research organizations. The demonstration used sixteen 125 kW stacks placed in four modules. The balance of plant (BOP) is the equipment that prepares and supplies the fuel to the stacks and converts the d.c. current to a.c. BOP construction started in April 1994, and was completed in June 1995. The BOP configuration allowed testing and development before installation of the four modules. The final full-temperature test was completed in February 1996. The four fuel cell modules were installed and cured, and power delivery began in April 1996. The plant operated for approximately 720 h at design output before electrical anomalies occurred and the plant was shut down for repairs. The plant restarted in August, but it soon became obvious that other problems had been caused by the electrical anomalies. The plant shut down and was reconfigured to a 1 MW plant. The restarted plant was ramped to 1 MW, but additional problems began to occur and the plant demonstration ended. The plant produced 2500 MWh, and operated at 1000°F, or higher, for over 5290 h. The plant set operational records, and demonstrated multistack, automatic control, and stable-field operation. Power quality met all standards with no measurable NOx or SOx output. The plant isolated itself from the grid during two major California, USA grid outages. The plant also experienced a shutdown of the automatic control system, and placed itself on hot standby using the mechanical field systems. The plant then restarted without incident.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Intel Santa Clara III Superfund site, Santa Clara, CA. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-20

    The Intel (Santa Clara III) site includes a plant that performs quality control testing of chemicals and electrical testing of semiconductors in Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California. The site is in a predominantly industrial area, and overlies a major ground regional source of ground water, the Santa Clara Valley ground water basin. In 1982, the State conducted a leak detection program, which identified VOC contamination in an onsite shallow aquifer. Possible sources for the contamination may include the accidental dumping of solvents into an acid neutralization tank, accidental spills near an above-ground solvent storage facility, and cleaning of solvent-contaminated pipes during plant construction. It has been determined that no onsite source is presently contributing to ground water contamination. Since 1985, Intel has been pumping and treating ground water using granular activated carbon as an Initial Remedial Measure (IRM). The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses a final solution for restoring ground water to its beneficial use. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including TCE.

  19. Determination of ANA specificity using multiplexed fluorescent microsphere immunoassay in patients with ANA positivity at high titres after infliximab treatment: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramaschi, Paola; Ruzzenente, Orazio; Pieropan, Sara; Volpe, Alessandro; Carletto, Antonio; Bambara, Lisa Maria; Biasi, Domenico

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate ANA specificity using the fully automated multiplexed fluorescent microsphere immunoassay in patients affected either by rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis who developed strong positivity for ANA as assessed by indirect immunofluorescent method on HEp-2 cells during infliximab treatment. Three men affected by ankylosing spondylitis and 12 women affected by rheumatoid arthritis who developed ANA positivity at high titres during infliximab treatment underwent the identification of ANA specificity by multiplexed fluorescent microsphere immunoassay; moreover anti-DNA and anti-ENA antibodies were tested by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA method, respectively. In 4 out of 15 cases, the determination of ANA reactivity by multiplexed fluorescent microsphere immunoassay was also performed on the serum collected before infliximab administration. One patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis showed multiple ANA reactivities against SS-A, SS-B, RNP, Sm, Jo-1 and histones; one patient affected by ankylosing spondylitis resulted positive for the same autoantibodies, except for anti-Sm antibody. Moreover, two patients, one with rheumatoid arthritis and one with ankylosing spondylitis, showed single antibody specificity to SS-B and RNP, respectively. The remaining 11 cases did not show any positivity. Instead, all the patients resulted negative for anti-ENA antibodies by the ELISA method. In the four cases tested for ANA specificity by multiplexed fluorescent microsphere immunoassay before and after infliximab administration no difference was found. The search for anti-DNA antibody always resulted negative by both the traditional immunofluorescent assay and the novel technique. The use of multiplexed fluorescent microsphere immunoassay in patients treated with infliximab with ANA positivity at high titres allowed to find some ANA specificities which were not revealed by ELISA method. Nevertheless, the majority of patients resulted negative in spite of

  20. Meteorological and Satellite Analysis of Eddies in the Marine Stratocumulus Photographed by Pilots Over the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanical atmospheric eddies on the order of 10-20 km across produced by strong northwesterly marine boundary layer flow are often seen in satellite imagery near the California coast. Yet relatively little is known about the details of their structure and wind fields, since they occur at space scales that may only sporadically be observed by conventional coastal surface observation networks or meteorological buoys. For example, it is not clear whether they are mainly features of the marine inversion as indicated by their cloud-free eyes, or whether their circulations penetrate the depth of the boundary layer all the way to the surface. These eddies have implications for mixing and air pollution dispersion as well as predictability at the coastal margin. For example, they have been implicated in cross-inversion transport, yet it is an open question as to whether specific occurrences can be simulated by very high resolution regional models. Routine forecast models almost certainly do not currently operate at the small scales necessary to explicitly predict their existence. This submission presents a satellite and meteorological analysis of two such meso-gamma scale (2-20 km) eddies in the marine stratocumulus that were photographed by commercial pilots flying coastal routes between Santa Ana and San Francisco, California. One of the eddies formed in the wake of Santa Cruz Island, embedded in the southeasterly flow portion of a larger scale Catalina eddy circulation. The other formed over a headland west of San Luis Obispo and passed near several wind monitoring stations owned by PG&E supporting operations of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, before being photographed by the pilots near Grover Beach. Satellite imagery tracking the motions of the eddies prior to, during, and after the snapshots by the pilots, and eddy signatures in the Diablo Canyon wind data will be presented. Satellite imagery revealing the propensity for similar eddies to form near the

  1. Mistika u životu kršćana

    OpenAIRE

    Špehar, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Sve veći interes za mistiku na raznim područjima ljudskoga istraživanja traži i od nas kršćana i naših teologija određene prosudbe i istraživanja. Događa se da govorimo o istim stvarima, samo jezikom današnjega vremena. U biti ostaje za sve isto iskustvo, a to je da je mistika doista iskustvo Neiskustvenoga. Ona živi unutar kršćanstva i izvan njega, bila prihvaćana ili odbacivana. Kršćanska mistika ima svoje temeljne izvore u Sv. pismu, liturgiji i Crkvi. U tom ambijentu ona stvara svoje pojm...

  2. Online Stigma Resistance in the Pro-Ana Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshua-Katz, Daphna

    2015-10-01

    Media scholars often use concepts from Goffman's dramaturgical approach to study online communities of stigmatized individuals as "backstages," spaces where members take refuge from social disapproval. In this study, I extend this view through an examination of in-depth interviews with bloggers from the "pro-ana" community, an online community for people with eating disorders. To explore how this community uses an online environment that is both anonymous and public, I fuse Goffman's ideas about identity performance and stigma with more recent theories about boundary maintenance. In-depth interviews with "pro-ana" bloggers reveal that to protect this virtual group and resist stigmas associated both with their illness and with their online presence, they construct their own norms and rules in the online realm, and discipline and eject members deemed to be out-group.

  3. The Santa Barbara Basin is a symbiosis oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, J M; Buck, K R; Farmer, M A; Bowser, S S

    2000-01-06

    It is generally agreed that the origin and initial diversification of Eucarya occurred in the late Archaean or Proterozoic Eons when atmospheric oxygen levels were low and the risk of DNA damage due to ultraviolet radiation was high. Because deep water provides refuge against ultraviolet radiation and early eukaryotes may have been aerotolerant anaerobes, deep-water dysoxic environments are likely settings for primeval eukaryotic diversification. Fossil evidence shows that deep-sea microbial mats, possibly of sulphur bacteria similar to Beggiatoa, existed during that time. Here we report on the eukaryotic community of a modern analogue, the Santa Barbara Basin (California, USA). The Beggiatoa mats of these severely dysoxic and sulphidic sediments support a surprisingly abundant protistan and metazoan meiofaunal community, most members of which harbour prokaryotic symbionts. Many of these taxa are new to science, and both microaerophilic and anaerobic taxa appear to be represented. Compared with nearby aerated sites, the Santa Barbara Basin is a 'symbiosis oasis' offering a new source of organisms for testing symbiosis hypotheses of eukaryogenesis.

  4. O outro de Ana Cristina Cesar: WW ou um qualquer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Cernicchiaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2010nesp3p176 Quem é Ana Cristina Cesar? A quem perguntar senão ao outro (como fazia Jacques Derrida ao gato1, a um outro, ao outro qualquer que somos nós seus leitores, estes que ela abraça e se joga aos pés; ao outro qualquer que são seus amigos: WW, KM, LM, Jack, Charles, Caio, Ângela, enfim, um índice onomástico inteiro. Aos outros seus conterrâneos, não só os do Rio de Janeiro, mas os da cidade dos poetas, Londres, Lisboa, Paris, Nova York, Belo Horizonte, São Paulo, etc, etc, etc. Ao outro suas personagens, suas máscaras, Ana C, ACC, Ana Cristina Cesar, o gato, a toalha, aquela que ouve Roberto Carlos, que assiste Casablanca, que briga com Freud, que conversa com uma amiga, que bate à porta de um amigo, que pega um táxi, que fuma debaixo da janela, “meio-bruxa, meia-fera”, a que tem sobressaltos, que escreve no automóvel, entre tantas outras que não são

  5. 3,5-Dimetilpirazola alkilēšanas apstākļu optimizēšana

    OpenAIRE

    Pavloviča, Sanita

    2008-01-01

    Darbā veikta 3,5-dimetilpirazola alkilēšanas apstākļu optimizēšana ar a,w-dihalogēnsavienojumiem bāziskā vidē dažādu bāzu klātienē, lai iegūtu 1,3-di(3,5-dimetilpirazol-1-il)savienojumus, no kuriem varētu sintezēt jauna veida kompleksos savienojumus. Iegūtās vielas pētītas ar IS spektroskopijas, šķidruma hromatogrāfijas un masspektrometrijas palīdzību.

  6. Geologic Maps and Structure Sections of the southwestern Santa Clara Valley and southern Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Clark, J.C.; Brabb, E.E.; Helley, E.J.; Colon, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. Together with the accompanying text file (scvmf.ps, scvmf.pdf, scvmf.txt), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The scale of the source maps limits the spatial resolution (scale) of the database to 1:24,000 or smaller.

  7. FreeBSD žurnalēšanas rīki un to integrēšana

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    FreeBSD oprētājsistēma tiek plaši izmantota dažādos serveru risinājumos, kur lietotāja un sistēmas aktivitātes tiek fiksētas ar syslog rīka un FreeBSD drošības notikumu auditēšanas sistēmas palīdzību. Lai veiktu šo datu ātru apstrādi un analīzi, ir nepieciešams attiecīgs rīks. Šobrīd nav pieejami rīki, kas veiktu šo abu sistēmu ģenerēto datu sasaisti un analīzi. Bakalaura darbā „FreeBSD žurnalēšanas rīki un to integrēšana” ir apskatīts FreeBSD operētājsistēmā iekļautais žurnalēšanas rīks s...

  8. The SantaBot experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Svenstrup, Mikael; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    interactive mobile agents into public urban transit area. To investigate the hypothesis, an experiment was carried out using a robot capable of navigating autonomously based on the input of an onboard laser scanner. The robot would detect and follow random people, who afterwards were asked to fill out......The video shows how an autonomous mobile robot dressed as Santa Claus is interacting with people in a shopping mall. The underlying hypothesis is that it is possible to create interesting new living spaces and induce value in terms of experiences, information or economics, by putting socially...... a questionnaire for quantitative analysis of the experiment. The presented video is the corresponding video documentation of the experiment used in the evaluation. The results showed that people were generally positive towards having mobile robots in this type of environment where shopping is combined...

  9. High-Resolution Chirp and Mini-Sparker Seismic-Reflection Data From the Southern California Continental Shelf--Gaviota to Mugu Canyon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report consists of high-resolution chirp and single-channel Sparker seismic-reflection- profile data from the Santa Barbara Channel, California. These data were...

  10. High-Resolution Chirp and Mini-Sparker Seismic-Reflection Data From the Southern California Continental Shelf--Gaviota to Mugu Canyon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report consists of high-resolution chirp and single-channel Sparker seismic-reflection- profile data from the Santa Barbara Channel, California. These data were...

  11. Topographic Controls on Southern California Ecosystem Function and Post-fire Recovery: a Satellite and Near-surface Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, George

    Southern Californian wildfires can influence climate in a variety of ways, including changes in surface albedo, emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the production of tropospheric ozone. Ecosystem post-fire recovery plays a key role in determining the strength, duration, and relative importance of these climate forcing agents. Southern California's ecosystems vary markedly with topography, creating sharp transitions with elevation, aspect, and slope. Little is known about the ways topography influences ecosystem properties and function, particularly in the context of post-fire recovery. We combined images from the USGS satellite Landsat 5 with flux tower measurements to analyze pre- and post-fire albedo and carbon exchanged by Southern California's ecosystems in the Santa Ana Mountains. We reduced the sources of external variability in Landsat images using several correction methods for topographic and bidirectional effects. We used time series of corrected images to infer the Net Ecosystem Exchange and surface albedo, and calculated the radiative forcing due to CO2 emissions and albedo changes. We analyzed the patterns of recovery and radiative forcing on north- and south-facing slopes, stratified by vegetation classes including grassland, coastal sage scrub, chaparral, and evergreen oak forest. We found that topography strongly influenced post-fire recovery and radiative forcing. Field observations are often limited by the difficulty of collecting ground validation data. Current instrumentation networks do not provide adequate spatial resolution for landscape-level analysis. The deployment of consumer-market technology could reduce the cost of near-surface measurements, allowing the installation of finer-scale instrument networks. We tested the performance of the Microsoft Kinect sensor for measuring vegetation structure. We used Kinect to acquire 3D vegetation point clouds in the field, and used these data to compute plant height, crown diameter, and

  12. Variação do comportamento sexual de carneiros da raça Churra Galega Bragançana ao longo do Inverno

    OpenAIRE

    Valentim, Ramiro; Correia, Teresa Montenegro; Azevedo, Jorge; Teixeira, A; Pereira, Etelvina

    1998-01-01

    Este trabalho teve como principal objectivo estudar a variação do comportamento sexual de carneiros da raça Churra Galega Bragançana ao longo do Inverno. Neste sentido, na cidade de Bragança (latitude 41° 49' N, longitude 6° 40' W e altitude 720 metros), mais precisamente na Quinta de Santa Apolónia, pertencente à Escola Superior Agrária de Bragança (ESAB), 16 carneiros desta raça, todos eles com 3 anos de idade, foram submetidos à determinação do tempo de reacção, do número total de salto...

  13. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Ventura map area lies within the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the Ventura Basin, in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The city of Ventura is the major cultural center in the map area. The Ventura River cuts through Ventura, draining the Santa Ynez Mountains and the coastal hills north of Ventura. Northwest of Ventura, the coastal zone is a narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors and a few small residential clusters. Rincon Island, an island constructed for oil and gas production, lies offshore of Punta Gorda. Southeast of Ventura, the coastal zone consists of the mouth and broad, alluvial plains of the Santa Clara River

  14. Paleomagnetic investigation of late Neogene vertical axis rotation and remagnetization in central coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Daniel M.; Verosub, Kenneth L.

    1995-03-01

    Outcrops of shallow marine sedimentary rocks of the Neogene Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone occur throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains and along the coast of Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties in California. Within the Santa Cruz Mountains, the Purisima Formation has been extensively folded and offset by reverse faults. Along the coast, the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone are only gently folded although the Purisima Formation is cut by the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Previous paleomagnetic studies have shown that vertical axis rotation has occurred within some parts of the San Gregorio Fault Zone. As part of a kinematic study of the San Gregorio Fault Zone, this paleomagnetic investigation of the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone was conducted to determine the extent of the vertical axis rotation. The characteristic paleomagnetic directions of the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone, which we interpret as the primary directions, indicate that a clockwise vertical axis rotation of 35 deg to 60 deg has occurred throughout the San Gregorio Zone, whereas no rotation has occurred away from the fault zone. This result suggests that vertical axis rotation is fundamentally related to shear across the San Gregorio Fault Zone. Our work also indicates that while the Purisima Formation and Santa Cruz Mudstone along the coast have retained their primary magnetizations, the Purisima Formation within the Santa Cruz Mountains has been remagnetized after folding.

  15. Holocene Intermediate Water Variability in the Northeast Pacific: A Santa Barbara Basin 14C Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friddell, J. E.; Thunell, B.; Guilderson, T.; Roark, B.

    2009-05-01

    Pairs of benthic and planktonic foraminiferal 14C dates from the Santa Barbara Basin, offshore southern California, are used to assess millennial-scale hydrographic changes in the northeast Pacific during the Holocene. Current models of North Pacific Intermediate Water formation during the last glacial and the Holocene vary widely in their predicted relationships between thermal conditions in the north Pacific, 14C age and oxygen content of the Santa Barbara Basin's sub-sill bottom waters, and productivity in the basin's surface waters. Using benthic-planktonic 14C age differences as a proxy for North Pacific Intermediate Water influence on the basin's bottom waters and biogenic silica and sedimentary bioturbation as records of past productivity and bottom-water oxygenation, we test our data against these various models. It appears that the different models can be reconciled by invoking bifurcation of eastward-moving intermediate water along the North American coast: Changes in the benthic-planktonic 14C age difference and other proxies in Santa Barbara Basin can be explained by movement of the bifurcation point to the north or south during warm and cool intervals of the Holocene. Inferred behavior of water at intermediate depths on the northeast Pacific margin is compared with surface conditions and with records of deep circulation from the North Atlantic, with the Santa Barbara Basin records supporting surface and intermediate connection between the two ocean basins at millennial time scales during the Holocene.

  16. Synthesis and biophysical properties of constrained D-altritol nucleic acids (cANA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migawa, Michael T; Prakash, Thazha P; Vasquez, Guillermo; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E

    2013-09-06

    The first synthesis of constrained altritol nucleic acids (cANA) containing antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) was carried out to ascertain how conformationally restricting the D-altritol backbone-containing ASO (Me-ANA) would affect their ability to form duplexes with RNA. It was found that the thermal stability was reduced (cANA/RNA -1.1 °C/modification) compared to DNA/RNA, suggesting the constrained system results in a small destabilizing perturbation in the duplex structure.

  17. Negligencia en la Educacion de Estudiantes Mexico-Americanos en el Distrito Escolar Unificado Lucia Mar, Pismo Beach, California. (Educational Neglect of Mexican-American Students in Lucia Mar Unified School District, Pismo Beach, California.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

    California State Advisory Committee (SAC) of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held hearings in Santa Maria, California (May 20, 1972) to collect information on civil rights problems of Mexican American students in the Lucia Mar School District. Major issues were community complaints about the arrest of 26 Mexican American students and some…

  18. La Ex Hacienda de Santa Cruz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Pinto de Estrada

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Ex hacienda Santa Cruz was chosen to show the differences in the geographic and economic structure, and the historic causes that originated them, as an example of ihe situation in the northem part of Campeche.

  19. Increased body mass of ducks wintering in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleskes, Joseph P.; Yee, Julie L.; Yarris, Gregory S.; Loughman, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl managers lack the information needed to fully evaluate the biological effects of their habitat conservation programs. We studied body condition of dabbling ducks shot by hunters at public hunting areas throughout the Central Valley of California during 2006–2008 compared with condition of ducks from 1979 to 1993. These time periods coincide with habitat increases due to Central Valley Joint Venture conservation programs and changing agricultural practices; we modeled to ascertain whether body condition differed among waterfowl during these periods. Three dataset comparisons indicate that dabbling duck body mass was greater in 2006–2008 than earlier years and the increase was greater in the Sacramento Valley and Suisun Marsh than in the San Joaquin Valley, differed among species (mallard [Anas platyrhynchos], northern pintail [Anas acuta], America wigeon [Anas americana], green-winged teal [Anas crecca], and northern shoveler [Anas clypeata]), and was greater in ducks harvested late in the season. Change in body mass also varied by age–sex cohort and month for all 5 species and by September–January rainfall for all except green-winged teal. The random effect of year nested in period, and sometimes interacting with other factors, improved models in many cases. Results indicate that improved habitat conditions in the Central Valley have resulted in increased winter body mass of dabbling ducks, especially those that feed primarily on seeds, and this increase was greater in regions where area of post-harvest flooding of rice and other crops, and wetland area, has increased. Conservation programs that continue to promote post-harvest flooding and other agricultural practices that benefit wintering waterfowl and continue to restore and conserve wetlands would likely help maintain body condition of wintering dabbling ducks in the Central Valley of California.

  20. Entrevista realizada com Ana Cristina Limongi-França

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Camila Lopes; Pilatti, Luiz Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Ana Cristina Limongi-França é Professora Titular da Universidade de São Paulo, Psicóloga, Mestre em Psicologia Social PUCSP (1990) e Doutora em Administração - Recursos Humanos FEAUSP (1996). Criou e dirige o Núcleo de Estudos e Pesquisas em Gestão da Qualidade de Vida no Trabalho - NEP_GQVT FEA USP e Coordenadora da Fundação Instituto da Administração - FIA. Desenvolve seus estudos nas Linhas de pesquisa: Gestão da Qualidade de Vida no Trabalho, Gestão de Pessoas e Comportamento Organizacion...

  1. Oribela e os outros : intertextos em Desmundo, de Ana Miranda

    OpenAIRE

    Maranúbia Pereira Barbosa-Doiron

    2009-01-01

    Nesse estudo, apontamos, a partir de ocorrências textuais na cena enunciativa apresentada – o romance Desmundo - da escritora Ana Miranda (2005), os intertextos que transitam pelo corpus. Tendo como suporte os estudos em Linguística Textual, trabalhamos com o pressuposto de que todo e qualquer texto é um conjunto de intertextos, e que a presença da intertextualidade constitui-se como um dos critérios para a construção dos efeitos de sentido do texto. Desmundo, uma obra fictícia, tem como pano...

  2. Entrevista realizada com Ana Magnólia Bezerra Mendes

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Camila Lopes; Pilatti, Luiz Alberto

    2012-01-01

    A entrevistada é Ana Magnólia Bezerra Mendes, Professora do Departamento de Psicologia Social e do Trabalho e do Programa de Pós-graduação em Psicologia Social e do Trabalho e das Organizações (PSTO) do Instituto de Psicologia da Universidade de Brasília (UnB). Tem pós-doutorado no Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers (CNAM), Paris, doutorado em Psicologia pela UnB e sanduíche na Universidade de Bath, Inglaterra, mestrado e graduação em Psicologia. É coordenadora do Laboratório de Psico...

  3. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  4. Food System Support of the Relocation Strategy in California. Volume I. Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    755 161 1E Santa Clara 1171 1103 37 3t Z53 321 217 248 Santa Cruz t~f 2 0 149 554 703 1043 1191 Shasta 89 0 0 89 236 325 623 712 Sierra 3 0 0 3 9...Valley cities of Fresno, Modesto , Stockton and Sacramento. California food processors serve both national and regional markets; sugar refineries and...arcas. ’Jith smaller warehouses in other outlying cities such is Szcratcnt’, Fr--n’co, Santa Rosa, Modesto and Riverside. Some major chains (such ,s

  5. ANA deficiency enhances bone morphogenetic protein-induced ectopic bone formation via transcriptional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyai, Kentaro; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Hasegawa, Urara; Toita, Sayaka; Izu, Yayoi; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Ezura, Yoichi; Mizutani, Shuki; Miyazono, Kohei; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Noda, Masaki

    2009-04-17

    Ectopic bone formation after joint replacement or brain injury in humans is a serious complication that causes immobility of joints and severe pain. However, mechanisms underlying such ectopic bone formation are not fully understood. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMPs) are defined as inducers of ectopic bone formation, and they are regulated by several types of inhibitors. ANA is an antiproliferative molecule that belongs to Tob/BTG family, but its activity in bone metabolism has not been known. Here, we examined the role of ANA on ectopic bone formation activity of BMP. In ANA-deficient and wild-type mice, BMP2 was implanted to induce ectopic bone formation in muscle. ANA deficiency increased mass of newly formed bone in vivo compared with wild-type based on 3D-muCT analyses. ANA mRNA was expressed in bone in vivo as well as in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Such ANA mRNA levels were increased by BMP2 treatment in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. Overexpression of ANA suppressed BMP-induced expression of luciferase reporter gene linked to BMP response elements in these cells. Conversely, ANA mRNA knockdown by small interference RNA enhanced the BMP-dependent BMP response element reporter expression. It also enhanced BMP-induced osteoblastic differentiation in muscle-derived C2C12 cells. Immunoprecipitation assay indicated that ANA interacts with Smad8. Thus, ANA is a suppressor of ectopic bone formation induced by BMP, and this inhibitory ANA activity is a part of the negative feedback regulation of BMP function.

  6. Doctora Ana Larralde Pineda, ejemplo para nuestra profesión Doctor Ana Larralde Pineda, an example to our profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto James Pita

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available El papel de la mujer en la Cirugía Maxilofacial es valioso, y más aún el de la doctora Ana Larralde Pineda, primera cirujana maxilofacial de Cuba. Con este trabajo nos hemos propuesto resaltar la figura de esta ejemplar profesional y transmitir, sobre todo a las nuevas generaciones de nuestra especialidad y de la Estomatología en general, su recuerdo imperecedero. Se realizó una investigación de tipo histórica, para recopilar los datos biográficos más generales de la profesora. Se realizaron entrevistas abiertas. A los entrevistados se les explicó el objetivo y la intención de los autores. Todos dieron su consentimiento para ser entrevistados. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica mediante la consulta a de la base de datos Scielo Cuba y se consultó prensa escrita y el archivo de la Sociedad Cubana de Cirugía Maxilofacial. La doctora Ana Larralde Pineda supo en todo momento conjugar la responsabilidad profesional, docente, humana, con la vida familiar, y abrió las puertas a la incorporación de la mujer a esta especialidad de reconocida entrega, sacrificio y vocación para sus miembros, especialmente para las féminas.Women play a valuable role in maxillofacial surgery. A clear example is Doctor Ana Larralde Pineda, the first Cuban female maxillofacial surgeon. The purpose of this paper is to pay tribute to this outstanding professional and convey her imperishable example to the new generations of maxillofacial specialists and dental professionals at large. A historical study was conducted to gather the most general biographical information about the professor. Open interviews were carried out. Interviewees were informed of the authors' purpose and intention. All gave their consent to be interviewed. A bibliographic review was conducted based on Scielo Cuba database, the printed press and the archives of the Cuban Society of Maxillofacial Surgery. Doctor Ana Larralde Pineda was always able to combine her professional, teaching

  7. 令人陶醉的Santa Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘小松

    1999-01-01

    假如用汉字代替Santa Fe,这个名字就失去了许多诗意。四百多年来,Santa Fe市吸引了全世界的人们。人们惊叹她的新墨西哥式的自然美,享受那里宜人的气候,赞美那丰富的西班牙和印第安文化。Santa Fe是美国最早的行政首府,也是贸易和宗教的中枢,还是音乐、建筑、美术和休闲的胜地。Santa Fe蜿蜒的小路、长着当地花草的园子和四周的山景都叫人心旷神怡。在美国没有别的城市像Santa Fe这样保护自己的文化并为之感到骄傲。她的自然美和人文传统赢得了神圣的赞誉。Santa Fe坐落在落基山脚下,每晚日落时分,这里一片鲜红,人们称之为"基督的血"。远在清教徒登陆普利茅斯之前,西班牙人就在Santa Fe建立了政府。今天,这座城市是世界旅游胜地,是美国第三大美术作品

  8. Depresijas, ruminēšanas un sociālo problēmu risināšanas saistība

    OpenAIRE

    Pētersone, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Mērķis bija noskaidrot, kāda ir saistība starp depresijas izteiktības pakāpi, ruminatīvas reaģēšanas veidiem un problēmu risināšanas dimensijām. Pētījumā piedalījās 137 studenti (19–36 g.; M = 22,9), tostarp 105 sievietes un 32 vīrieši. Tika izmantota Beka Depresijas aptauja (Beck Depression Inventory II. Beck, Steer & Brown, 1996), Ruminatīvas reaģēšanas aptauja (Ruminative Responses Scale; Treynor, Gonzalez & Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, 2003) un Problēmu risināšanas aptauja (Problem Solving Inven...

  9. The loss rates of web tags applied to day-old Anas and Aythya ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blums, P.; Mednis, A.; Bauga, I.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers studied the loss rate of web tags on Anas and Aythya ducklings by double marking day-old ducklings of five species with web tags and plasticine-filled rings. Tag loss was examined over three-month, one-year, and three-year periods. Web tag loss was greatest for Anas and occurred mostly in the first three months following tagging.

  10. Deficiency of antiproliferative family protein Ana correlates with development of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Toru; Nakamura, Takahisa; Ajima, Rieko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Kakuta, Shigeru; Katsuko, Sudo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Yokota, Jun; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2009-02-01

    The abundant in neuroepithelium area (ana) gene was originally identified as a member of the tob/btg family of antiproliferative genes. Like the other family members, Ana inhibits growth of NIH3T3 cells when overexpressed. However, whether or not Ana is involved in tumor progression has been elusive. Here, we show that expression of ana is relatively high in the lung, the expression being restricted in type II alveolar epithelial cells. We further show that ana expression is reduced in 97% of the human lung cancer cell lines examined (61/63) and 86% of clinical samples from lung adenocarcinoma patients (36/42). Long-term observation of ana-deficient (ana−/–) mice reveals that 8% of them develop lung tumors (5/66) by 21 months after birth, while 0% of wild-type mice (0/35) develop the same type of tumors. We also show that exogenously expressed ana gene product suppresses the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in lung cancer cells. Taken together, we propose that ana functions as a tumor suppressor and that its product inhibits tumor progression as well by suppressing angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

  11. Choosing wisely: Review and commentary on anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2016-03-01

    Choosing Wisely®: Next Steps in Improving Healthcare Value is an initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation. The driving forces for the Choosing Wisely (CW) campaign include rising and unstainable health care expenditures and evidence that there is lack of fiscal stewardship of health care resources. The American College of Rheumatology and the Canadian Rheumatology Association published their top five Choosing Wisely recommendations, the first of which pertained to antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ANA subserology testing. Concerns about the wasteful use of these tests prompted an analysis of the expenditures attributable to ANA testing as a proportion of total health care expenditures and based on a financial model was in the range of 0.00125%. It is suggested that if the sole use of ANA testing is to add evidence to support a diagnosis when the pre-test probability is high, then the ANA test has limited clinical value. Accordingly, the goal of ANA testing needs to be reconsidered and expanded beyond an approach to simply confirming a diagnosis with 'intention to treat' to a goal of case finding of 'pre- or early disease' with an 'intent to prevent' disease. This an area where more significant inroads can be made in preventing end organ disease and thereby reducing health care expenditures HCE. One CW recommendation that bears emphasizing is that, with a few possible exceptions, repeat ANA or ANA subserology testing has little clinical value in monitoring disease activity or predicting a flare.

  12. Evaluation of the LIAISON ANA screen assay for antinuclear antibody testing in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghillani, P; Rouquette, A M; Desgruelles, C; Hauguel, N; Le Pendeven, C; Piette, J C; Musset, L

    2007-08-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are widely detected by immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells in patients with connective tissue diseases and other pathological conditions. We evaluated the first-automated chemiluminescence immunoassay for the detection of ANA (LIAISON ANA screen, DiaSorin). This study was carried out simultaneously in two laboratories by testing 327 patient samples with clinically defined connective diseases, 273 routine samples for ANA screening, and 300 blood donors. A total of 268 out of 337 IIF-positive sera were positive with LIAISON ANA screen (79.5% of agreement) and 240 out of 263 IIF-negative sera were negative with LIAISON ANA screen (91.2% of agreement). After resolution of discrepant results, the concordance reached, respectively, 94.9% and 98.8%. The specificity was 99.3% and the sensitivity was 94%. Unlike results obtained by other ANA screening assays, we observed acceptable sensitivity and specificity. Despite the presence of HEp-2 cell extract, we failed to detect some antibodies as antinucleolar, antinuclear envelope, and antiproliferating cell nuclear antigen. This automated assay allows quick process to results and exhibits satisfactory sensitivity for the detection of the main ANA specificities of connective tissue diseases.

  13. Macroeconomia do Turismo Argentino em Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Meurer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O Estado de Santa Catarina experimentou um considerável crescimento do setor de turismo nas últimas décadas. O fluxo turístico de origem argentina revelou-se um ingrediente importante dessa trajetória. Este artigo focaliza um aspecto pouco explorado, aparentemente, da participação argentina no turismo estadual: a relação entre a situação macroeconômica do país vizinho e a demanda turística por Santa Catarina lá originada. Começa-se abordando brevemente a problemática geral da macroeconomia do turismo. Depois, discorre-se sobre o crescimento desse setor em Santa Catarina, destacando a presença de argentinos. A terceira parte desenvolve uma análise baseada em tratamento estatístico de dados sobre demanda e receita geradas por esses turistas no estado, com exame das correlações envolvendo taxa de câmbio e taxa de crescimento do PIB da Argentina. Palavras-chave: turismo; Santa Catarina; turistas argentinos; economia argentina Abstract The State of Santa Catarina has witnessed a considerable development of its tourist sector in the last decades. The demand from Argentina has proved to be an important factor of that growth. This article deals with a feature of the presence of Argentinians in the state which seems to be scarcely studied: the relationship between the macroeconomic situation of Argentina and the tourist demand in Santa Catarina originated from that country. The first part of the article considers briefly the general issue of tourism macroeconomics. The second one looks upon tourism growth in Santa Catarina, stressing the presence of visitors from Argentine. The third section develops an analysis based on statistical treatment of data concerning demand and income generated by such tourists in Santa Catarina, involving correlations that consider aspects like exchange rate and the rate of GDP increase in Argentina. Keywords: tourism; Santa Catarina; tourists from Argentina; Argentina’s economy

  14. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Carpinteria map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The small city of Carpinteria is the most significant onshore cultural center in the map area; the smaller town of Summerland lies west of Carpinteria. These communities rest on a relatively flat coastal piedmont that is surrounded on the north, east, and west by hilly relief on the flanks of the Santa Ynez Mountains. El Estero, a salt marsh on the coast west of Carpinteria, is an ecologically important coastal estuary. Southeast of Carpinteria, the coastal zone is narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors

  15. Can Vertical Migrations of Dinoflagellates Explain Observed Bioluminescence Patterns During an Upwelling Event in Monterey Bay, California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    transect (Figure 1). The REMUS transect began near Santa Cruz in the SA, ran out to the buoy Ml (Figure 1), and then returned back to shore. Inshore...Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo , California, USA. ’Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, California...University, San Luis Obispo , CA 93407, USA. M. J. Oliver, College of Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of Delaware, 700 Pilottown Rd., Lewes, DE 19958, USA. 10 of 10

  16. Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, Jason M; Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    Both linear and conformational epitopes likely contribute to the allergenicity of tree nut allergens, yet, due largely to technical issues, few conformational epitopes have been characterized. Using the well studied recombinant cashew allergen, Ana o 2, an 11S globulin or legumin, we identified a murine monoclonal antibody which recognizes a conformational epitope and competes with patient IgE Ana o 2-reactive antibodies. This epitope is expressed on the large subunit of Ana o 2, but only when associated with an 11S globulin small subunit. Both Ana o 2 and the homologous soybean Gly m 6 small subunits can foster epitope expression, even when the natural N-terminal to C-terminal subunit order is reversed in chimeric molecules. The epitope, which is also expressed on native Ana o 2, is readily susceptible to destruction by physical and chemical denaturants.

  17. Th17-relevant cytokines vary with sera of different ANA staining patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinhui; Meng, Wei; Zhang, Denghai; Qiu, Chaolin; Hua, Ling; Xie, Qiuhua; He, Xiaoxue; Ye, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) react with components located in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. Differing ANA staining patterns may reflect the specificity of autoantibodies in sera and indicate some autoimmune diseases specifically, to some extent. Th17-relevant cytokines have been shown to be involved in a variety of autoimmune diseases, but not consistently. In this study, we investigated whether differences in Th17-relevant cytokines exist between different ANA pattern sera. Sera of 64 ANA-positive patients (12 homogeneous, 13 speckled particle, 11 nucleolar, 15 centromere, 6 peripheral nuclear) and 16 healthy donors were analyzed for IL-17, IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23 (p19), and TGF-β, and subsequently correlations between IL-17 and IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, IL-23, and TGF-β were analyzed. Results showed that these Th17-relevant cytokines varied with different ANA-positive sera compared with healthy donors, except TGF-β. Among them, IL-21 and IL-22 were higher with all ANA-positive sera and IL-17, IL-6, and IL-23 were higher with three or more ANA staining sera. No significant difference in these cytokines was seen between the different ANA staining sera except IL-17 levels in sera of peripheral nuclear staining positive subjects were higher than nucleolar. Additionally, in ANA-positive sera, IL-17 correlated with IL-6, IL-21, IL-22, and IL-23, but not with TGF-β. Thus, we demonstrated that Th17-relevant cytokines varied with different ANA staining pattern sera, suggesting that Th17-relevant cytokines play differing roles in autoimmune diseases.

  18. Medicīniska rakstura piespiedu līdzekļu piemērošana, grozīšana, atcelšana

    OpenAIRE

    Žuravļova, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Maģistra darbs atspoguļo medicīniska rakstura piespiedu līdzekļu institūta analizēšanu gan no teorētiskās, gan no praktiskās puses, to krimināltiesisko izpratni, kā arī aktuālo praksē esošo problēmu izvērtēšanu. Spēkā esošā normatīvā regulējuma praktiskā pielietošana, norada uz to, ka MRPL regulējošo tiesību normu nepilnības, kā arī nepieciešamā normatīvā regulējuma trūkums, nevar noteikt tādu kriminālprocesa kārtību, kas nodrošina efektīvu Krimināllikuma normu piemērošanu un krimināltie...

  19. An inventory of published and unpublished fluvial-sediment data for California, 1956-70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, George

    1972-01-01

    This inventory was prepared to provide a convenient reference to published and unpublished fluvial-sediment data for water years 1956-70, and updates substantially previous inventories. Sediment stations are listed in downstream order, and an alphabetical list of stations is also included. Figure 1 shows the approximate location of sediment stations in California. Most of the fluvial-sediment data in California were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, under cooperative agreements with the following Federal, State, and local agencies: California Department of Water Resources, California Department of Navigation and Ocean Development, California Department of Fish and Game, Bolinas Harbor District, Monterey County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Orange County Flood Control District, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, San Diego County Department of Sanitation and Flood Control, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Clara County Flood Control and Water District, Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Santa Cruz, city of, University of California, Ventura County Flood Control District, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. This report was prepared by the Geological Survey under the general supervision of R. Stanley Lord, district chief in charge of water-resources investigations in California.

  20. Water and heat balances in Doñana wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramos-Fuertes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main results of the study of water balance and surface heat balance in the Doñana marshlands. The study was based on a broad base of hydrometeorological data taken at 10 minute intervals from 2006 to 2011 by a network of six measuring stations located in areas of vegetation-free marsh. This information is used to characterize, at different time scales, the thermal behavior of the marsh by analyzing its hydrometeorology centering on the surface heat fluxes. Thus, we have modeled and analyzed the heat flux between the water and flooded soil and the processes of heat transfer between the water surface and the atmosphere. Special attention has been paid to evaporation, on which the marsh draining process depends.

  1. ANA - A framework for building ATHENA on ARM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Hamilton, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    The ATLAS software framework (ATHENA) is large and dynamic, comprised of around 6.5 million lines of code. It is compiled using the ATLAS monitoring system, NICOS which uses tools and scripts located and tuned for the CERN services, LXPLUS and AFS. Furthermore, the constraints placed on the hardware that the software is based, limits compilations to traditional x86 architecture. With the sudden interest in ARM processors for large scale high energy physics computing, a new system needs to be implemented to build ATHENA versions for ARM, on ARM. This letter serves to introduce a building framework called Atlas Nightly on ARM (ANA). This new framework implements patches to suit the ARM architecture with the goal of a final ATHENA version for ARM.

  2. Erythrodiplax ana sp. nov. (Odonata: Libellulidae) from Brazilian palm swamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo-Ferreira, Rhainer; Vilela, Diogo S; Del-Claro, Kleber; Bispo, Pitágoras C

    2016-08-29

    Erythrodiplax ana sp. nov. (male holotype, six male and three female paratypes), collected in Vereda wetlands (a unique Neotropical savanna environment) in Uberlândia (Minas Gerais) and Chapada dos Guimarães (Mato Grosso), Brazil, is described and illustrated. The new species fits in Borror's Basalis Group, and can be distinguished from other species by the combination of the following traits: blue pruinosity dorsally on thorax and third to eighth abdominal segments; sides of the thorax olive-green; face ivory or olive-green; wings hyaline with a small apical brown spot on all four wings, well defined in females; male genitalia with sclerotized erectile posterior lobe and inflatable sac-like median process. Last instar larvae were reared in the laboratory, resulting in the description of the larva. We also followed this population for 13 months and present resulting biological notes and comments on ontogenetic color change in males, as well as longevity.

  3. Failure Mechanisms of Ana Slide, Eivissa Channel, Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuerza, S.; Sultan, N.; Canals, M.; Lastras, G.; Cattaneo, A.; Frigola, J.; Costa, S.; Berndt, C.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid seepage has been considered as the most plausible explanation to account for slope instabilities in the Eivissa Channel in between the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean Sea. In situ geotechnical tests and sediment cores obtained in the Ana Slide area, on the Balearic slope of the Eivissa Channel, suggest that the development of the basal failure surface (BFS) was favoured by contrasting hydro-mechanical properties between a coarse unit (U7) charged with methane and a fine-grained unit above (U6). The presence of past methane seepage has been inferred from high magnetic susceptibility values found in sediments from the headwall area and is supported by seismic reflection data. Geotechnical data from piezocone tests, laboratory analyses and numerical calculations indicate degradation of the undrained shear strength generated by methane exsolution and expansion as the only plausible mechanism to explain the origin of Ana Slide. The probability of failure for different critical failure surfaces has been investigated by using the SAMU-3D slope stability model taking into account the role of free gas in the development of the landslide. According to SAMU-3D, the most probable failure surface is related to a minimum degradation of the undrained shear strength of units U6 and U7 of 95% and a basal failure surface developed at the base of U6, which acted as a weak layer. Wheeler's theory suggests that 9% of free-gas saturation in U7 is enough to reduce the undrained shear strength by 95%. However, using the theory of the undrained equilibrium behaviour of gassy sediments we conclude that the excess fluid pressure generated by gas exsolution and expansion is not relevant to bring the slope to fail.

  4. Alignment Sensitivity Study of the St. ANA Beam Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Michelle; Couder, Manoel; Jung, Hyo Soon; Setoodehnia, Kiana

    2014-09-01

    The St. ANA (STable Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) accelerator is being prepared for use with the St. George recoil mass separator. The accelerator is in working condition for use in direct kinematic experiments but the St. George separator works with inverse kinematics and requires a highly controlled beam restricted by severe position and divergence parameters that are not achieved at the present time. A systematic sensitivity study was conducted using a simulation of the beam line in order to assess the impact of a misalignment in each optical element or in the beam itself. Tests were done with the beam to analyze how the beam behaves at various points in the line and to compare this data with simulation results to determine possible causes of misalignment. The results of these tests and simulations are that the beam characteristics are now better understood and the possible causes of the limitations have been narrowed down. The St. ANA (STable Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) accelerator is being prepared for use with the St. George recoil mass separator. The accelerator is in working condition for use in direct kinematic experiments but the St. George separator works with inverse kinematics and requires a highly controlled beam restricted by severe position and divergence parameters that are not achieved at the present time. A systematic sensitivity study was conducted using a simulation of the beam line in order to assess the impact of a misalignment in each optical element or in the beam itself. Tests were done with the beam to analyze how the beam behaves at various points in the line and to compare this data with simulation results to determine possible causes of misalignment. The results of these tests and simulations are that the beam characteristics are now better understood and the possible causes of the limitations have been narrowed down. Project advisor

  5. Viaje al palenque Caribe de Ana Mercedes Hoyos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Laverde Toscano

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Transitar por el camino de un artista consagrado despierta en el espectador diversos y entrañables sentimientos. Recorrer la obra de Ana Mercedes Hoyos nos enfrenta al proceso coherente y mesurado de una creadora que se apropió de la luz majestuosa para dar vida a objetos del entorno cotidiano. Objetos que danzan, dueños del movimiento y la sensualidad que los convierte en sagrados. El encuentro con un cuadro de esta artista se transforma así en un acto sublime de contemplación. Esta Maestra vive hoy en función de su trabajo las veinticuatro horas de cada día: sus viajes continuos tienen que ver siempre con sus labores artísticas en Nueva York, con sus exposiciones en los más disímiles puntos del planeta, con su anhelo ferviente de conocer lo que grandes maestros de la plástica universal muestran en famosos museos y galerías del mundo. Así preserva la riqueza de esa relación constante en su obra entre temáticas locales y estilos y lenguajes contemporáneos e internacionales. En Bogotá, la vida de Ana Mercedes Hoyos transcurre alderredor de su taller donde infatigablemente lleva al lienzo sólo algunos de los múltiples proyectos que invaden su creativa imaginación. Los pocos compromisos que acepta giran también en torno al trabajo, al igual que sus amigos con quienes comparte actividades y labores de su quehacer artístico. Al final, como ella afirma ... “todo se me vuelve el mismo cuento”.

  6. Ana Carolina Escosteguy: Cenários dos estudos culturais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisa Cristina Bueno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autora do livro “Cartografia dos Estudos Culturais”, “Comunicação e recepção” (em coautoria com Nilda Jacks, “Leituras em comunicação, cultura e tecnologia”, além de coautora e organizadora em outras obras de referência sobre o tema cultura e comunicação no Brasil, Ana Carolina Escosteguy é hoje um dos nomes mais importantes quando se pensa em Estudos Culturais no país. Doutora em Ciências da Comunicação pela Universidade de São Paulo (2000, com pós-doutorado no CAMRI (Communication and Media Research Institute, associado ao Department of Journalism and Mass Communication da School of Media, Art and Design da University of Westminster (UK, Ana Carolina Escosteguy é professora titular da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS e bolsista produtividade em pesquisa do CNPq, desde março 2001. Nesta entrevista ela discute pontos sensíveis da área, entre eles o pouco destaque das pesquisas desse campo têm tido no Jornalismo, o fato de a base teórica ser bem mais ampla que os tradicionais estudos de recepção a que são comumente aproximados, não se nega a tratar das confusões com a folkcomunicação, bem como as próprios limites e intersecções desse campo de estudos. Durante esta conversa, aproveita para apontar as obras que considera essenciais para adentrar na área e mostra coragem e segurança para se colocar como uma pesquisadora que busca entender o tempo atual, as tecnologias e as rupturas a partir da perspectiva do usuário. Confiram:

  7. VIAJE AL PALENQUE CARIBE DE ANA MERCEDES HOYOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Laverde Toscano

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitar por el camino de un artista consagrado despierta en el espectador diversos y entrañables sentimientos. Recorrer la obra de Ana Mercedes Hoyos nos enfrenta al proceso coherente y mesurado de una creadora que se apropió de la luz majestuosa para dar vida a objetos del entorno cotidiano. Objetos que danzan, dueños del movimiento y la sensualidad que los convierte en sagrados. El encuentro con un cuadro de esta artista se transforma así en un acto sublime de contemplación. Esta Maestra vive hoy en función de su trabajo las veinticuatro horas de cada día: sus viajes continuos tienen que ver siempre con sus labores artísticas en Nueva York, con sus exposiciones en los más disímiles puntos del planeta, con su anhelo ferviente de conocer lo que grandes maestros de la plástica universal muestran en famosos museos y galerías del mundo. Así preserva la riqueza de esa relación constante en su obra entre temáticas locales y estilos y lenguajes contemporáneos e internacionales. En Bogotá, la vida de Ana Mercedes Hoyos transcurre alderredor de su taller donde infatigablemente lleva al lienzo sólo algunos de los múltiples proyectos que invaden su creativa imaginación. Los pocos compromisos que acepta giran también en torno al trabajo, al igual que sus amigos con quienes comparte actividades y labores de su quehacer artístico. Al final, como ella afirma «... todo se me vuelve el mismo cuento».

  8. Ana Enriqueta Terán: poetisa de la lengua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Angulo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Este año ha sido esencial en la vida de la escritora Ana Enriqueta Terán, tres libros estupendos suyos han sido publicados en los primeros seis meses. Uno de sonetos con dibujos de ella misma (Otros sonetos de todos mis tiempos. Casa Nacional de las Letras Andrés Bello, Caracas, una novela (Apuntes y congojas de una decadencia narrada en tres muertes. Fundación Editorial El Perro y la Rana, Caracas, y a finales del mes de junio - en el marco del XI Festival Mundial de Poesía de Venezuela -, la prestigiosa Biblioteca Ayacucho ha presentado con el Nº 252 de su Colección Clásica a Piedra de habla, antología poética con prólogo de Patricia Guzmán titulado Ana Enriqueta Terán Voz relampagueante de misterio y belleza, amén de la profusa cronología y concienzuda compilación de las fuentes bibliográficas. También este año, el Museo de Arte Valencia conjuntamente con la Red de Escritores de Venezuela y de un grupo de amigos de la poetisa constituidos como comité preparatorio para la celebración del centenario de la escritora, le rindió un cálido homenaje el domingo 4 de mayo, aniversario noventa y seis (96 de su nacimiento en Valera, estado Trujillo, de la ahora República Bolivariana de Venezuela

  9. 78 FR 66982 - Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster #NM-00039

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster NM-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA- 4151-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... disaster: Primary Areas: Santa Clara Pueblo. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage:...

  10. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Santa Clara Valley. 9.126... Santa Clara Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Santa Clara Valley.” (b) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the...

  11. Frontier exploration in offshore northern California - lessons learned and new strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K.

    1987-05-01

    A series of exploratory wells were drilled in the northern California offshore basins in the 1960s following leasing of federal tracts off northern California, Oregon, and Washington. The drilling, while encountering numerous oil shows, was considered at the time to indicate low prospectivity in an area that extended as far south as the offshore Santa Maria basin. However, subsequent major discoveries in this decade in the offshore Santa Maria basin, such as the Point Arguello field, indicate that many of these basins are highly prospective exploration targets. Many of the features that make the offshore Santa Maria basin productive are also present in the other offshore basins of northern California and require a reevaluation of these basins. The lessons learned in offshore Santa Maria (and in other areas with Monterey production) is that the presence of several key features can indicate the potential for substantial reserves: (1) the presence of potential Monterey source and reservoir rocks; (2) diagenesis of siliceous rocks to opal-CT and quartz grades; (3) deep burial of basinal sections to enhance higher gravity oil generation; and (4) complex faulting and folding adjacent to areas of deep burial. These features are present in such northern California offshore areas as the Outer Santa Cruz and Point Arena basins and suggest that these basins may have substantially more reserve potential than previously considered. Exploration strategies can thus be formulated based on the experiences in offshore Santa Maria. In addition to Monterey plays, more conventional clastic source and reservoir rocks have exploration potential in the offshore Eel River basin, as well as in the other northern California basins.

  12. California State Waters Map Series--Hueneme Canyon and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Endris, Charles A.; Clahan, Kevin B.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Normark, William R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Hueneme Canyon and vicinity map area lies within the eastern Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. The area is part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation - at least 90° - since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area, which is offshore of the Oxnard plain and west of and along the trend of the south flank of the Santa Monica Mountains, lies at the east end of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, characterized by west-to-east littoral transport of sediment derived mainly from coastal watersheds. The Hueneme Canyon and vicinity map area in California's State Waters is characterized by two major physiographic features: (1) the nearshore continental shelf, and (2) the Hueneme and Mugu Submarine Canyon system, which, in the map area, includes Hueneme Canyon and parts

  13. The concordance of serial ANA tests in an Australian tertiary hospital pathology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adrian Y S; Hudspeth, Andrew R; Adelstein, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The antinuclear antibody (ANA) tests are some of the more frequently requested tests for the diagnosis of autoimmunity. Although they are used primarily as diagnostic blood tests, multiple requests on the same patient continue to be encountered in the laboratory. This retrospective analysis of serial ANA testing at one pathology laboratory in Australia is the first study that examines the statistical concordance and possible implications of this on clinical practice. High-titred ANA have quite good repeatability for titre and pattern, and low-titred ANA, which can be non-specific, have poor repeatability. Staining patterns are, in general, almost random in nature on serial tests when compared to the first-obtained ANA pattern for each patient. This study confirms that there is little benefit in serial ANA testing, and only if there is a clear change in the patient's clinical picture would repeat of an initial low-titred ANA be useful. The findings reinforce the need for pathology stewardship to minimise costs, wasted resources and unnecessary referrals.

  14. The ANA-reflex test as a model for improving clinical appropriateness in autoimmune diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola; Morozzi, Gabriella; Radice, Antonella; Cinquanta, Luigi; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Tampoia, Marilina; Porcelli, Brunetta; Fabris, Martina; Brusca, Ignazio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Barberio, Giuseppina; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Antico, Antonio; Bassetti, Danila; Fontana, Desré Ethel; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Visentini, Daniela; Pesce, Giampaola; Bagnasco, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Reflex tests are widely used in clinical laboratories, for example, to diagnose thyroid disorders or in the follow-up of prostate cancer. Reflex tests for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have recently gained attention as a way to improve appropriateness in the immunological diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and avoid waste of resources. However, the ANA-reflex test is not as simple as other consolidated reflex tests (the TSH-reflex tests or the PSA-reflex tests) because of the intrinsic complexity of the ANA test performed by the indirect immunofluorescence method on cellular substrates. The wide heterogeneity of the ANA patterns, which need correct interpretation, and the subsequent choice of the most appropriate confirmatory test (ANA subserology), which depend on the pattern feature and on clinical information, hinder any informatics automation, and require the pathologist's intervention. In this review, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases of the Italian Society of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine provides some indications on the configuration of the ANA-reflex test, using two different approaches depending on whether clinical information is available or not. We further give some suggestions on how to report results of the ANA-reflex test.

  15. Studies on the hydrolytic stability of 2'-fluoroarabinonucleic acid (2'F-ANA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K; Katolik, Adam; Viladoms, Júlia; Damha, Masad J

    2009-05-07

    The stability of 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroarabinonucleic acid (2'F-ANA) to hydrolysis under acidic and basic conditions was compared to that of DNA, RNA and 2'F-RNA. In enzyme-free simulated gastric fluid (pH approximately 1.2), 2'F-ANA was found to have dramatically increased stability (virtually no cleavage observed after 2 days) with respect to both DNA (t(1/2) approximately 2 min) and RNA (t(1/2) approximately 3 h (PO) or 3 days (PS)). These results were observed for both phosphodiester and phosphorothioate backbones and with multiple mixed-base sequences. Under basic conditions, 2'F-ANA also showed good stability. In 1 M NaOH at 65 degrees C, 2'F-ANA had a t(1/2) of approximately 20 h, while RNA was entirely degraded in a few minutes. Furthermore, the nuclease cleavage of phosphorothioate 2'F-ANA and DNA by snake venom phosphodiesterase was studied in detail. One diastereomer of the PS-2'F-ANA linkage was found to be much more vulnerable to enzymatic cleavage than the other, which is parallel to the properties observed for PS-DNA. Additional studies of 2'F-ANA-containing oligonucleotides are warranted based on the excellent stability properties described here.

  16. ANA IIF Automation: Moving towards Harmonization? Results of a Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bremt, Stefanie; Schouwers, Sofie; Van Blerk, Marjan; Van Hoovels, Lieve

    2017-01-01

    Background. Our study aimed to investigate whether the introduction of automated anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) analysis decreases the interlaboratory variability of ANA titer results. Method. Three serum samples were sent to 10 laboratories using the QUANTA-Lyser® in combination with the NOVA View®. Each laboratory performed the ANA IIF analysis 10x in 1 run and 1x in 10 different runs and determined the endpoint titer by dilution. One of the three samples had been sent in 2012, before the era of ANA IIF automation, by the Belgian National External Quality Assessment (EQA) Scheme. Harmonization was evaluated in terms of variability in fluorescence intensity (LIU) and ANA IIF titer. Results. The evaluation of the intra- and interrun LIU variability revealed a larger variability for 2 laboratories, due to preanalytical and analytical problems. Reanalysis of the EQA sample resulted in a lower titer variability. Diluted endpoint titers were similar to the estimated single well titer and the overall median titer as reported by the EQA in 2012. Conclusion. The introduction of automated microscopic analysis allows more harmonized ANA IIF reporting, provided that this totally automated process is controlled by a thorough quality assurance program, covering the total ANA IIF process.

  17. Santa Legends From Around the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The tradition of children receiving gifts during the month of December is relatively the same no matter where you go in the world, but the character that brings the gifts can vary quite a bit from country to country. The following are the top five Santa legends from around the world.

  18. Ecotourism: The Santa Elena Rainforest Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Describes an ecotourism project in which the community of Santa Elena, Costa Rica, are developing a rainforest reserve on government land leased permanently to the local high school. Discusses the impact of the project on the community's economy and environment. (Contains 30 references.) (MDH)

  19. Santa Fe Junior College, Gainesville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    The design of Santa Fe Junior College is examined, beginning with the development of an educational philosophy. Subsequent design decisions are based largely upon this philosophy which emphasizes the development of the individual student and the fulfillment of his needs. Further, the need for flexibility is recognized and is an important aspect of…

  20. Hyperspectral Ocean Color Science: Santa Barbara Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    goal of the PnB in situ sampling program is to develop state-of-the- art ocean color algorithms for Case II waters like those found in the Santa Barbara...S.Maritorena and W. Robinson, 1999: Atmospheric correction of satellite ocean color imagery: The black pixel assumption. Submitted to Applied Optics. Toole

  1. Power conversion and quality of the Santa Clara 2 MW direct carbonate fuel cell demonstration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skok, A.J. [Fuel Cell Engineering Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Abueg, R.Z. [Basic Measuring Instruments, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Schwartz, P. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is the first application of a commercial-scale carbonate fuel cell power plant on a US electric utility system. It is also the largest fuel cell power plant ever operated in the United States. The 2MW plant, located in Santa Clara, California, utilizes carbonate fuel cell technology developed by Energy Research Corporation (ERC) of Danbury, Connecticut. The ultimate goal of a fuel cell power plant is to deliver usable power into an electrical distribution system. The power conversion sub-system does this for the Santa Clara Demonstration Plant. A description of this sub-system and its capabilities follows. The sub-system has demonstrated the capability to deliver real power, reactive power and to absorb reactive power on a utility grid. The sub-system can be operated in the same manner as a conventional rotating generator except with enhanced capabilities for reactive power. Measurements demonstrated the power quality from the plant in various operating modes was high quality utility grade power.

  2. The use of pro-ana blogs for online social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Stephanie Tom; Heinemann-Lafave, Daria; Jeon, Jehoon; Kolodziej-Smith, Renata; Warshay, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to document the content on pro-ana blogs and to uncover how the unique socio-technical features of blogs (interactivity, self-disclosure, masspersonal communication) facilitate social support among members. A final sample of 48 pro-ana blogs provided 624 individual units for coding. Results indicate that prevalent forms of social support were emotional support, esteem support, and informational support. A new category, reciprocal self-disclosure, was also revealed to be quite frequent. Blogs are spaces where social support is sought and communicated among members of the pro-ana network. Interpretation of blog communication and implications for treatment and research are discussed.

  3. Biodīzeļdegvielas ražošanas blakusproduktu noteikšana fermentācijas barotnēs

    OpenAIRE

    Novada, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Biodīzeļdegvielas ražošanas blakusproduktu noteikšana fermentācijas barotnēs. Novada L., zinātniskā vadītāja Dr.ķīm. Nakurte I. Maģistra darbs, 52 lappuses, 24 attēli, 15 tabulas, 10 vienādojumi un 36 literatūras avoti. Latviešu valodā. Darbā ir apkopota literatūra par glicerīna un organisko skābju rašanos biodīzeļdegvielas ražošanas procesā, to noteikšanas metodēm biodīzeļdegvielā un fermentācijas barotnēs un izmantošanas iespējām ūdeņraža ieguvē. Praktiskajā daļā noteikta glicerīna konce...

  4. Klientu apkalpošanas kvalitātes vērtēšana veikalā “Apranga”.

    OpenAIRE

    Mičule, Anda

    2013-01-01

    Bakalaura darba temats ir “Klientu apkalpošanas kvalitātes vērtēšana veikalā Apranga”. Bakalaura darba mērķis, pamatojoties uz teorētiskajām atziņām un aptaujāto klientu datiem, ir izpētīt un izvērtēt klientu apkalpošanas kvalitāti veikalā “Apranga”, kā arī atklāt nepilnības un sniegt priekšlikumus, klientu apkalpošanas kvalitātes uzlabošanai šajā veikalā. Bakalaura darbs sastāv no trīs nodaļām. Pirmajā nodaļā sastāv no teorētiskās informācijas, kas ietver pircēju apkalpošanas teorētiskos asp...

  5. Datorprogrammēšanas uzņēmuma darbības nepārtrauktības vadīšana

    OpenAIRE

    Beļavska, Jūlija

    2014-01-01

    Bakalaura darba „Datorprogrammēšanas uzņēmuma darbības nepārtrauktības vadīšana” problēmas būtība ir noskaidrot iespējamus riskus uzņēmuma saimnieciskai darbībai un izstrādāt iespējamo risku mazināšanas pasākumus. Bakalaura darbā autore analizēja risku klasifikāciju, finanšu risku novērtēšanas metodes, izstrādāja bankrota riska prognozēšanas modeli, kā arī izstrādāja mazināšanas pasākumus uzņēmuma iekšējiem riskiem. Pētījuma mērķis ir analizēt iespējamus finanšu riskus un bankrota ris...

  6. Marine deep seismic reflection profiles off central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, J. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA) Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX (USA)); Talwani, M. (Rice Univ. Houston, TX (USA) Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX (USA))

    1991-04-10

    A strong reflection horizon at two-way travel time of approximately 6 s is observed in a deep seismic profile across the outer continental shelf of central California. It is interpreted as the seismic image of subducted oceanic crust emplaced prior to the change from principally convergent to principally transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North American plates during the late Paleogene. The reflector dips landward at a very shallow angle and is at a depth of 14-15 km under Santa Lucia Bank. The reflection is not observed, or at best is very discontinuous, under the inner shelf (Santa Maria Basin). This suggests that tectonic or other processes have produced significantly different structural styles or compositions on the two sides of the Santa Lucia Bank fault. Under the outer shelf a prominent, apparently deeper (later arrival time) horizon dips more steeply and diverges from the 6-s reflector. The deep horizon is at least partially composed of diffracted energy but is nearly linear after migration. Possible interpretations are that the horizon indicates crustal imbrication or out-of-plane diffractions. Alternatively, it is a relict feature imparted to the crust at the now inactive Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge. Reflective zones at intermediate depths are observed in apparently accreted sediments in parts of the Santa Lucia and Santa Maria basins. These features could represent tectonically induced fabrics within the accretionary complex, or they could be coherent depositional sequences.

  7. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of San Gregorio, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Watt, Janet T.; Golden, Nadine E.; Endris, Charles A.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Bretz, Carrie K.; Manson, Michael W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Chin, John L.; Cochran, Susan A.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of San Gregorio map area is located in northern California, on the Pacific coast of the San Francisco Peninsula about 50 kilometers south of the Golden Gate. The map area lies offshore of the Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the northwest-trending Coast Ranges that run roughly parallel to the San Andreas Fault Zone. The Santa Cruz Mountains lie between the San Andreas Fault Zone and the San Gregorio Fault system. The nearest significant onshore cultural centers in the map area are San Gregorio and Pescadero, both unincorporated communities with populations well under 1,000. Both communities are situated inland of state beaches that share their names. No harbor facilities are within the Offshore of San Gregorio map area. The hilly coastal area is virtually undeveloped grazing land for sheep and cattle. The coastal geomorphology is controlled by late Pleistocene and Holocene slip in the San Gregorio Fault system. A westward bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone, southeast of the map area, coupled with right-lateral movement along the San Gregorio Fault system have caused regional folding and uplift. The coastal area consists of high coastal bluffs and vertical sea cliffs. Coastal promontories in

  8. Data for southern sea otter range expansion and habitat use in the Santa Barbara Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M. Tim; Tomoleoni, Joseph; Staedler, Michelle M.; LaRoche, Nicole L.; Randell, Zachary; Bowen, Lizabeth; Murray, Michael J.; Miles, A. Keith

    2017-01-01

    The current study was designed to provide critical information for resource managers (specifically the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, henceforth BOEM, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, henceforth USFWS) about the spatial ecology, population status, and potential population threats to sea otters in Santa Barbara Channel, with particular reference to exposure to manmade structures and sources of oil and natural gas. Our four primary research objectives were: 1. Determine the extent of movements and spatial use patterns by sea otters along the southern California coast2. Identify important sea otter resting and foraging areas adjacent to manmade structures3. Assess sea otter distribution, behavior and habitat selection in the vicinity of natural oil and gas seep areas (e.g., Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara County)4. Combine data on tagged animal movements, habitat use patterns and population distribution (acquired during this study and from previous studies and USGS monitoring activities), to create population-level “risk of exposure” models for spatially explicit threats such as natural oil seeps or hypothetical oil spill scenarios.These data were used to support the folowing publication:Tinker, M.T., Tomoleoni, Joseph, LaRoche, Nicole, Bowen, Lizabeth, Miles, A. Keith, Murray, Mike, Staedler, Michelle, and Randell, Zach, 2017, Southern sea otter range expansion and habitat use in the Santa Barbara Channel, California: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2017–1001 (OCS Study BOEM 2017-002), 76 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20171001.

  9. Belgian recommendations on ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibody testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blerk, M; Bossuyt, X; Humbel, R; Mewis, A; Servais, G; Tomasi, J P; Van Campenhout, C; Van Hoovels, L; Vercammen, M; Damoiseaux, J; Coucke, W; Van de Walle, P

    2014-04-01

    Autoantibodies to nuclear antigens, i.e. antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA), are useful as diagnostic markers for a variety of autoimmune diseases. In March 2010, the Belgian national External Quality Assessment Scheme sent a questionnaire on ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibody testing designed by the Dutch EASI (European Autoimmunity Standardization Initiative) team, to all clinical laboratories performing ANA testing. Virtually all laboratories completed the questionnaire (97·7%, 127/130). This paper discusses the results of this questionnaire and provides valuable information on the state-of-the-art of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibody testing as practiced in the Belgian laboratories. In addition, this work presents practical recommendations developed by the members of the advisory board of the scheme as a result of the outcome of this study.

  10. Missugused on teie kogemused väikeklassidega? / Villu Mengel, Ana Kontor, Katrin Betlem, Riina Kink

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2013-01-01

    Küsimusele vastasid Sikupilli keskkooli direktor Villu Mengel, Tartu hariduse tugiteenuste keskuse eripedagoog Ana Kontor, Tabasalu ühisgümnaasiumi õppejuht-sotsiaalpedagoog Katrin Betlem, Keila kooli põhikooli õppejuht Riina Kink

  11. Programmēšanas spēle "PyDrone"

    OpenAIRE

    Siliņš, Viesturs

    2010-01-01

    Darbā “Programmēšanas spēle “PyDrone”” ir dokumentēta atvērtā koda programmas PyDrone izstrāde. PyDrone ir programmēšanas spēle, kas paredzēta izklaidei un izglītošanai, spēles veidā iepazīstinot cilvēkus ar programmēšanu. Programma izstrādāta, izmantojot Python programmēšanas valodu. Programma izstrādāta, izmantojot spējo metodiku programmizstrādes principus. Atslēgvārdi: Python, spējās metodikas, programmēšanas spēle.

  12. Programmēšanas spēle "PyDrone"

    OpenAIRE

    Siliņš, Viesturs

    2010-01-01

    Darbā “Programmēšanas spēle “PyDrone”” ir dokumentēta atvērtā koda programmas PyDrone izstrāde. PyDrone ir programmēšanas spēle, kas paredzēta izklaidei un izglītošanai, spēles veidā iepazīstinot cilvēkus ar programmēšanu. Programma izstrādāta, izmantojot Python programmēšanas valodu. Programma izstrādāta, izmantojot spējo metodiku programmizstrādes principus. Atslēgvārdi: Python, spējās metodikas, programmēšanas spēle.

  13. Missugused on teie kogemused väikeklassidega? / Villu Mengel, Ana Kontor, Katrin Betlem, Riina Kink

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2013-01-01

    Küsimusele vastasid Sikupilli keskkooli direktor Villu Mengel, Tartu hariduse tugiteenuste keskuse eripedagoog Ana Kontor, Tabasalu ühisgümnaasiumi õppejuht-sotsiaalpedagoog Katrin Betlem, Keila kooli põhikooli õppejuht Riina Kink

  14. Seismic-refraction measurements of crustal structure between Santa Monica Bay and Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, John C.; Healy, John H.

    1963-01-01

    A reversed seismic-refraction profile was recorded between Santa Monica Bay, California, and Lake Mead, Nevada, during November 1961. Depth to the Mohorovicic discontinuity was determined to be approximately 29 km at Santa Monica Bay, 36 km under the Transverse Ranges, 26 km under the Mojave Desert, and 30 km at Lake Mead. Prominent events on the seismograms in the distance range 30 to 150 km are interpreted as reflections from the Mohorovicic discontinuity and from a crustal layer of intermediate velocity. These reflected events are used to make a detailed interpretation of crustal structure. The velocity of compressional waves in the mantle immediately below the Mohorovicic discontinuity was determined to be 7.8 km/sec. The velocity of compressional waves in the intermediate layer is near 7.0 km/sec. The apparent velocity of the direct arrival in the crustal rocks near the surface is 6.l km/sec north-east of Santa Monica Bay, and 6.1 km/sec southwest of Lake Mead. The higher apparent velocity for the direct arrival from Santa Monica Bay seems to be the result of thinning toward the east of low-velocity rocks near the surface. These low-velocity near-surface rocks are Cenozoic sedimentary rocks and fractured and weathered granitic and metamorphic rocks. The velocity of Sg was determined to be 3.4. km/sec near Lake Mead. A prominent phase with apparent velocity of 6.3 to 6.4 km/sec was recorded at distances beyond 200 km. This phase is identified as P and is interpreted as a reflection from the intermediate layer. Amplitude measurements support the conclusion that the P phase is a reflected arrival.

  15. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  16. Environmental Assessment: 13th Street Bridge Emergency Repair and Retrofit Vandenberg Air Force Base California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-23

    23-1 Acres on Vandenberg Air Force Base. Robert 0. Gibson, Archaeologist, Paso Robles, California. Submitted toURS Corporation, Santa Barbara...Timbrook (editors). 1977. The Eye (?f the Flute: Chwnash Traditional History and Ritual, as told by Fernando Librado Kitsepmvit to John P. Harrington

  17. The University of California Institute of Environmental Stress Marathon Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1973, the Institute of Environmental Stress of the University of California-Santa Barbara, under the direction of Steven M. Horvath, began a series of field and laboratory studies of marathon runners during competition. As one of Horvath's graduate students, many of these studies became part of my doctoral dissertation. The rationale for…

  18. The University of California Institute of Environmental Stress Marathon Field Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1973, the Institute of Environmental Stress of the University of California-Santa Barbara, under the direction of Steven M. Horvath, began a series of field and laboratory studies of marathon runners during competition. As one of Horvath's graduate students, many of these studies became part of my doctoral dissertation. The rationale for…

  19. 78 FR 58459 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District, South Coast Air Quality Management... Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD)...

  20. Severity of banana leaf spot in an intercropping system in two cycles of banana Prata Ana

    OpenAIRE

    Valdeir Dias Gonçalves; Silvia Nietsche; Marlon Cristian Toledo Pereira; Manoel Xavier de Oliveira Júnior; Roberto Célio Antunes Júnior; Carlos Ruggiero

    2008-01-01

    Prata Ana is the most planted banana cultivar in northern Minas Gerais, Brazil. It is however susceptible to several pathogens. This study was carried out to evaluate the disease severity of banana leaf spot in the Prata Ana cv. in the first and second cycle under six different planting systems. The randomized block experimental design was used with six treatments and four replications. lit an evaluation of the severity of banana leaf spot, no disease symptoms were found on Thap Maeo and Caip...

  1. Review of Neopalpa Povolný, 1998 with description of a new species from California and Baja California, Mexico (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Vazrick

    2017-01-01

    The monotypic genus Neopalpa was described in 1998 by Czech entomologist Dalibor Povolný based on two male specimens from Santa Catalina Island, California, which he named Neopalpa neonata. The female of this species was discovered recently based on a DNA barcode match and is described. In addition, a new species with marked differences in morphology and DNA barcodes from southern California and Baja California Mexico is described as Neopalpa donaldtrumpisp. n. Adults and genitalia of both species are illustrated, new diagnosis for the genus Neopalpa is provided, and its position within Gelechiidae is briefly discussed.

  2. Review of Neopalpa Povolný, 1998 with description of a new species from California and Baja California, Mexico (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Vazrick

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The monotypic genus Neopalpa was described in 1998 by Czech entomologist Dalibor Povolný based on two male specimens from Santa Catalina Island, California, which he named Neopalpa neonata. The female of this species was discovered recently based on a DNA barcode match and is described. In addition, a new species with marked differences in morphology and DNA barcodes from southern California and Baja California Mexico is described as Neopalpa donaldtrumpi sp. n. Adults and genitalia of both species are illustrated, new diagnosis for the genus Neopalpa is provided, and its position within Gelechiidae is briefly discussed. PMID:28228677

  3. Onihomikozes diagnostika un ārstēšana

    OpenAIRE

    Grečaņuka, Viktorija

    2013-01-01

    Onihomikozes paaugstinātas izplatīšanās dēļ ir nepieciešams rūpēties par nagu veselību, jo nevērīgas attieksmes dēļ nagu sēnītes infekcija var augt un izplatīties uz veselajiem ādas rajoniem apkārt nagam, tāpēc ja ir aizdomas par nagu sēnīti ir savlaicīgi jāvēršās pie ārsta, lai viņš diagnosticētu sēnītes sugu un sāktu pareizo ārstēšanas kursu.Bakalura darba mērķis ir izpētīt inficētā naga paņemtos materiālus uz sēnīti un apstiprināt to laboratoriski, kā arī izanalizēt pretsēnīšu preparātu ap...

  4. Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) linkage mapping by AFLP fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Shin; Rouvier, Roger; Yang, Kuo-Tai; Wu, Chean-Ping; Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Huang, Mu-Chiou

    2009-03-17

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with multicolored fluorescent molecular markers was used to analyze duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genomic DNA and to construct the first AFLP genetic linkage map. These markers were developed and genotyped in 766 F2 individuals from six families from a cross between two different selected duck lines, brown Tsaiya and Pekin. Two hundred and ninety-six polymorphic bands (64% of all bands) were detected using 18 pairs of fluorescent TaqI/EcoRI primer combinations. Each primer set produced a range of 7 to 29 fragments in the reactions, and generated on average 16.4 polymorphic bands. The AFLP linkage map included 260 co-dominant markers distributed in 32 linkage groups. Twenty-one co-dominant markers were not linked with any other marker. Each linkage group contained three to 63 molecular markers and their size ranged between 19.0 cM and 171.9 cM. This AFLP linkage map provides important information for establishing a duck chromosome map, for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping) and for breeding applications.

  5. Duck (Anas platyrhynchos linkage mapping by AFLP fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Kuo-Tai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP with multicolored fluorescent molecular markers was used to analyze duck (Anas platyrhynchos genomic DNA and to construct the first AFLP genetic linkage map. These markers were developed and genotyped in 766 F2 individuals from six families from a cross between two different selected duck lines, brown Tsaiya and Pekin. Two hundred and ninety-six polymorphic bands (64% of all bands were detected using 18 pairs of fluorescent TaqI/EcoRI primer combinations. Each primer set produced a range of 7 to 29 fragments in the reactions, and generated on average 16.4 polymorphic bands. The AFLP linkage map included 260 co-dominant markers distributed in 32 linkage groups. Twenty-one co-dominant markers were not linked with any other marker. Each linkage group contained three to 63 molecular markers and their size ranged between 19.0 cM and 171.9 cM. This AFLP linkage map provides important information for establishing a duck chromosome map, for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping and for breeding applications.

  6. Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes

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    Orin J. Robinson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding migratory connectivity for species of concern is of great importance if we are to implement management aimed at conserving them. New methods are improving our understanding of migration; however, banding (ringing data is by far the most widely available and accessible movement data for researchers. Here, we use band recovery data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes from 1951–2011 and analyze their movement among seven management regions using a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We showed that black ducks generally exhibit flyway fidelity, and that many black ducks, regardless of breeding region, stopover or overwinter on the Atlantic coast of the United States. We also show that a non-trivial portion of the continental black duck population either does not move at all or moves to the north during the fall migration (they typically move to the south. The results of this analysis will be used in a projection modeling context to evaluate how habitat or harvest management actions in one region would propagate throughout the continental population of black ducks. This analysis may provide a guide for future research and help inform management efforts for black ducks as well as other migratory species.

  7. El ayer, el hoy y el mañana

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    Corredor Pardo Katya Anyud

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Culturalmente, el anciano de hoy en nuestra sociedad, o en las grandes urbes, es considerado algunas veces por los jóvenes como un ser extraño y desagradable, como punto de partida de los  valores transmitidos en la familia los cuales deben ser revaluados y nosotros, los ancianos del mañana con los ancianos de hoy, cambiar de adentro hacia fuera. A su vez, evitar la transmisión generacional de estos valores a nuestros hijos realizando un análisis retrospectivo de la vida; cuando bebes, se tiene conciencia del uno al otro, y los niños en edad preescolar empiezan a conseguir compañeros, pero el grupo de amigos se fortalece a partir de los cinco o siete años, con frecuencia se escucha hablar con nostalgia de la vida en el colegio. Este lugar común es grato y feliz, adornado con carcajadas y anécdotas que despiertan e incentivan la imaginación y la realidad creada a partir del propio yo social, individual y cultural.

  8. Quase nada, amor? - Quando Ana C. traduz Emily D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Franco Diniz

    2015-12-01

    Cristina Cesar para o poema “The Dying need but little, Dear”, de Emily Dickinson, ao mesmo tempo em que traço um paralelo com as soluções adotadas pelos tradutores José Lira e Isa Mara Lando em suas versões para a mesma obra. Para tanto, pondero sobre o esquema métrico e rímico do poema, sua prosódica e imagética, além de fazer menção a modulações como omissões e acréscimos nos poemas traduzidos. Uso como base os ensaios “Cinco e meio”, em que a própria Ana Cristina Cesar comenta sua experiência na tradução do poema em questão, e “Traduzindo o poema curto”, em que ela tenta estruturar suas ideias sobre tradução de poesia, ambos publicados no livro Crítica e Tradução.

  9. Entrevista con Ana Pizarro: el intelectual y la posmodernidad

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    Livia Reis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ana Pizarro es chilena, profesora e investigadora de la Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Doctora en Letras por la Universidad de París y especialista en temas relacionados con literatura y cultura en América Latina. Ha trabajado en centros de estudio y universidades en Chile, Francia, Argentina, Venezuela y Brasil. Su proyecto de investigación “Perfil cultural del área amazónica” fue premiado conla prestigiosa Beca Guggenheim en 2002. Ha compilado las siguientes obras: La literatura latinoamericana como proceso (1985, Hacia una historia de la literatura latinoamericana (1987, El archipiélago de fronteras externas, entre otras. Su obra más conocida en Brasil es la trilogía América Latina: palabra, literatura e cultura(1993-1995. También fue editada en Brasil por la editorial de la UFF, en 2006, la colección de ensayos O Sul e os trópicos. Actualmente es investigadora y profesora del Centro de Estudios Avanzados de la Universidad de Santiago de Chile.

  10. ANA detected by ELISA using nucleus of egg cell as antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Liu; Shijun, Li; Yue, Ma

    2008-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies, ANA, were usually detected with antigen of somatic cell nucleus. It has not been reported to detect ANA with egg cell nucleus as antigen. Enzyme linked immuosorbent assay, ELISA, coated with yolk was developed to detect ANA in our laboratory. A quality control test, cross absorption test, and cross antibody-induced test with yolk were performed. Results showed a good agreement between our method and IFA through measurement of the same samples from patients suspected of having rheumatic connective tissue diseases (Kappa=0.668, P=0.000). The results were not influenced by the RF and different sources of egg. CVs of inter-assay, were less than 10%. The cross absorption test was negative, as well; the ANA to somatic cell nucleus could be induced with egg cell nucleus. It is implied that there were both cross as well as overlapped Egg-ANA and Somatic-ANA. As egg nucleus, its volume was large, its purification was simple, so the better method might be established.

  11. ASBEL, an ANA/BTG3 antisense transcript required for tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Satoshi; Taniue, Kenzui; Sugimasa, Hironobu; Nasu, Emiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Mana; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Aikou; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous antisense non-coding RNAs, which are assumed to be involved in the regulation of the sense gene expression. However, the mechanisms of their action and involvement in the development of diseases have not been well elucidated. The ANA/BTG3 protein is an antiproliferative protein whose expression is downregulated in prostate and lung cancers. Here we show that an antisense transcript of the ANA/BTG3 gene, termed ASBEL, negatively regulates the levels of ANA/BTG3 protein, but not of ANA/BTG3 mRNA and is required for proliferation and tumorigenicity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. We further show that knockdown of ANA/BTG3 rescues growth inhibition caused by ASBEL knockdown. Moreover, we demonstrate that ASBEL forms duplexes with ANA/BTG3 mRNA in the nucleus and suppresses its cytoplasmic transportation. Our findings illustrate a novel function for an antisense transcript that critically promotes tumorigenesis by suppressing translation of the sense gene by inhibiting its cytoplasmic transportation.

  12. Report on the second International Consensus on ANA Pattern (ICAP) workshop in Dresden 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, E K L; Damoiseaux, J; de Melo Cruvinel, W; Carballo, O G; Conrad, K; Francescantonio, P L C; Fritzler, M J; Garcia-De La Torre, I; Herold, M; Mimori, T; Satoh, M; von Mühlen, C A; Andrade, L E C

    2016-07-01

    The second meeting for the International Consensus on Antinuclear antibody (ANA) Pattern (ICAP) was held on 22 September 2015, one day prior to the opening of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies in Dresden, Germany. The ultimate goal of ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody nomenclature, and thereby optimizing ANA usage in patient care. The newly developed ICAP website www.ANApatterns.org was introduced to the more than 50 participants. This was followed by several presentations and discussions focusing on key issues including the two-tier classification of ANA patterns into competent-level versus expert-level, the consideration of how to report composite versus mixed ANA patterns, and the necessity for developing a consensus on how ANA results should be reported. The need to establish on-line training modules to help users gain competency in identifying ANA patterns was discussed as a future addition to the website. To advance the ICAP goal of promoting wider international participation, it was agreed that there should be a consolidated plan to translate consensus documents into other languages by recruiting help from members of the respective communities.

  13. Interview with Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, Director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, USA, October 28, 2000 Entretien avec Joanna Bigfeather, Cherokee, directrice, Institute of American Indian Arts Museum (IAIA, Santa Fe, NM, États-Unis

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    Gérard Selbach

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available ForewordJoanna Bigfeather was appointed director of the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in April 1999. A Western Cherokee brought up in New Mexico, Joanna Osburn Bigfeather graduated from IAIA in 1987 and moved to the University of California at Santa Cruz to study for a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Then she attended the State University of New York in Albany, where she obtained a Master in Fine Arts. While exhibiting extensively prints, ceramics and installations...

  14. Submarine landslides of the Southern California Borderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.J.; Greene, H. Gary; Edwards, B.D.; Fisher, M.A.; Normark, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional bathymetry, sidescan-sonar and seismic-reflection data, and recent, multibeam surveys of large parts of the Southern California Borderland disclose the presence of numerous submarine landslides. Most of these features are fairly small, with lateral dimensions less than ??2 km. In areas where multibeam surveys are available, only two large landslide complexes were identified on the mainland slope- Goleta slide in Santa Barbara Channel and Palos Verdes debris avalanche on the San Pedro Escarpment south of Palos Verdes Peninsula. Both of these complexes indicate repeated recurrences of catastrophic slope failure. Recurrence intervals are not well constrained but appear to be in the range of 7500 years for the Goleta slide. The most recent major activity of the Palos Verdes debris avalanche occurred roughly 7500 years ago. A small failure deposit in Santa Barbara Channel, the Gaviota mudflow, was perhaps caused by an 1812 earthquake. Most landslides in this region are probably triggered by earthquakes, although the larger failures were likely conditioned by other factors, such as oversteepening, development of shelf-edge deltas, and high fluid pressures. If a subsequent future landslide were to occur in the area of these large landslide complexes, a tsunami would probably result. Runup distances of 10 m over a 30-km-long stretch of the Santa Barbara coastline are predicted for a recurrence of the Goleta slide, and a runup of 3 m over a comparable stretch of the Los Angeles coastline is modeled for the Palos Verdes debris avalanche. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Águas minerais de Santa Catarina

    OpenAIRE

    Coitinho, João Batista Lins

    2000-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico. Esta pesquisa representa uma análise hidrogeológica das águas minerais de Santa Catarina. Em função de suas características físico-químicas, modo de ocorrência e relações com o ambiente geológico, as águas minerais do Estado foram associadas à províncias hidrogeológicas, as quais foram subdividas em domínios/aqüíferos. Destaque especial foi dado à Província Cristalina, Domínio Meridional, por apresentar um...

  16. La subjetividad internacional de la Santa Sede

    OpenAIRE

    Mosquera Monelos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Presentamos el caso de la subjetividad internacional de la Santa Sede como un ejemplo que nos permita afrontar un nuevo enfoque del concepto de sujeto para el derecho internacional. El cumplimiento de los requisitos clásicos de la subjetividad internacional se ha visto superado por la fuerza creadora del derecho que nuevos sujetos internacionales han impulsado: ONG, sociedad civil, transnacionales, sujetos atípicos. Analizando el mecanismo de atribución de personalidad internacional de la San...

  17. Bancos de Dados Meteorológicos: Análise dos Metadados das Estações Meteorológicas no Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil

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    Luiz Fernando de Novaes Vianna

    Full Text Available Resumo O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar os metadados das estações meteorológicas no estado de Santa Catarina com base nas recomendações da Organização Mundial de Meteorologia (OMM. Os metadados das estações foram obtidos, via internet, nos sítios do Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (INMET, do Agritempo, da Agência Nacional de Águas (ANA e diretamente da Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária e Extensão Rural de Santa Catarina (Epagri. Os resultados demonstraram que os metadados disponíveis para as estações meteorológicas que cobrem o Estado de Santa Catarina não atendem integralmente às recomendações da WMO. Foram identificados problemas nos processos de codificação e georreferenciamento das estações, no cadastro em relação à responsabilidade institucional pelas estações, problemas de inconsistência cadastral entre estações presentes em mais de um banco de dados e incertezas relacionadas à posição geográfica das estações.

  18. Specializēto tekstu tulkošanas aspekti ar piemēriem metināšanas jomā

    OpenAIRE

    Matisone, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Šī darba nosaukums ir „Specializēto tekstu tulkošanas aspekti ar piemēriem metināšanas jomā”. Tajā tiek apskatīts specializēto tekstu jēdziens, iedalījums un galvenās īpašības, kas tos atšķir no vispārīgajiem tekstu veidiem, kā arī tehniskās tulkošanas procesu ietekmējoši faktori. Darbam izvirzītais mērķis – izpētīt tehniskās tulkošanas procesu un to kvalitāti ietekmējošos faktorus. Pētījuma rezultātā tika secināts, ka, tulkojot specializētos tekstus, tulkotājam ir nepieciešamas arī zin...

  19. ANA-Negative Lupus Presenting with Heart Failure and Severe Valvular Dysfunction: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Vu; Addison, Daniel; Lakkis, Nasser; Tabbaa, Rashed

    2015-01-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) negative lupus is an important subset of the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease spectrum. Since the introduction of human cell line for ANA assay, the occurrence of true ANA-negative SLE has been a rare clinical phenomenon. The nature of cardiac involvement in ANA-negative SLE is not well understood, although any cardiac involvement, including valvular dysfunction, should be considered as a presenting manifestation of SLE irrespective of serology status. Early recognition and intervention appears to be associated with decreased morbidity. The following report describes our first case of ANA-negative SLE with an initial presentation of severe cardiac valvular dysfunction and heart failure. It also characterizes the spectrum of disease severity in ANA-negative SLE and demonstrates how aggressive SLE therapy can improve cardiac disease.

  20. Novel method for quantitative ANA measurement using near-infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K; Wells, Daniel; Shaw, Laura; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Harbeck, Ronald; Dragone, Leonard L

    2009-09-30

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have been detected in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases and are used in the screening and/or diagnosis of autoimmunity in patients as well as mouse models of systemic autoimmunity. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp-2 cells is the gold standard for ANA screening. However, its usefulness is limited in diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of disease activity due to the lack of standardization in performing the technique, subjectivity in interpreting the results and the fact that it is only semi-quantitative. Various immunological techniques have been developed in an attempt to improve upon the method to quantify ANA, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), line immunoassays (LIAs), multiplexed bead immunoassays and IIF on substrates other than HEp-2 cells. Yet IIF on HEp-2 cells remains the most common screening method for ANA. In this study, we describe a simple quantitative method to detect ANA which combines IIF on HEp-2 coated slides with analysis using a near-infrared imaging (NII) system. Using NII to determine ANA titer, 86.5% (32 of 37) of the titers for human patient samples were within 2 dilutions of those determined by IIF, which is the acceptable range for proficiency testing. Combining an initial screening for nuclear staining using microscopy with titration by NII resulted in 97.3% (36 of 37) of the titers detected to be within two dilutions of those determined by IIF. The NII method for quantitative ANA measurements using serum from both patients and mice with autoimmunity provides a fast, relatively simple, objective, sensitive and reproducible assay, which could easily be standardized for comparison between laboratories.