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Sample records for samples study ofthe

  1. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 min of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  2. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2005-07-13

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17 {beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  3. bite ofthe face

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-12-09

    Dec 9, 1992 ... Microvascular replantation ofavulsed tissue after a dog bite ofthe face. T. H. J. VENTER, F. J. DUMINY. Abstract Various authors have described successful micro- surgical replantation of totally avulsed facial tis- sue. In a significant nwnber of cases difficulties were experienced with the venous anastomoses.

  4. Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals ofthe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals ofthe University ofCape Town . A. J. G~ THOMSON. Abstract In the 15 years 1975-1989, 239 patients attending the associated teaching hospitals ofthe University of Cape Town have been identified retrospectively as having neurocysticercosis. One hundred and.

  5. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROONACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faecal samples from 131 household dogs were examined forgastrointestinal helminth parasites using the simple floatation method. ... ing parasite species: Toxocara camis(34.35%), 4ncylostoma caninum (73.28%), 4ncylostoma brasiliense (1450%),. Uncinaria Stenocephala(26 .... Helminths, arthropods and protozoa of ...

  6. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on aspects of the bionomics and pest status of Piezotrachelus varius. Wagner (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) ... *International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Biological Control Centre for Africa, BP 08-0932, Cotonou, Repub- lic of Benin, X .... selected and agreements made with them for their fields to be used for the ...

  7. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    heritability. At the laterage, when those reserves de- crease, growth potential is less influenced and as such, the environmental component of variance decreases and the heritability estimates increase. The moderately high heritability estimates observed in this study sug- gest that selection based on individual performance.

  8. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JVinniecure is the trademark of an aqueous herbal com- bination of Ficus exaspirata, Ficus asperiifolia, Ficus sur and Sida corymbosa, The physicochemical .... be established. Further more, it was difficult in this study, to ensure that every volunteer was a naïve pa- tient, in which case primary resistance may have played.

  9. Surgical cure ofthe Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome a comparison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical cure ofthe Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome a comparison oftwo techniques. u. o. VON OPPELL, R. N. SCOTT MILLAR, D. A. MILNE. TABLE!. Characteristics of WPW patients referred for surgical ablation of their aberrant atrioventricular pathways. Patient population and methods. We' retrospectively reviewed 19 ...

  10. Biological Sampling Variability Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amidan, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hutchison, Janine R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-08

    There are many sources of variability that exist in the sample collection and analysis process. This paper addresses many, but not all, sources of variability. The main focus of this paper was to better understand and estimate variability due to differences between samplers. Variability between days was also studied, as well as random variability within each sampler. Experiments were performed using multiple surface materials (ceramic and stainless steel), multiple contaminant concentrations (10 spores and 100 spores), and with and without the presence of interfering material. All testing was done with sponge sticks using 10-inch by 10-inch coupons. Bacillus atrophaeus was used as the BA surrogate. Spores were deposited using wet deposition. Grime was coated on the coupons which were planned to include the interfering material (Section 3.3). Samples were prepared and analyzed at PNNL using CDC protocol (Section 3.4) and then cultured and counted. Five samplers were trained so that samples were taken using the same protocol. Each sampler randomly sampled eight coupons each day, four coupons with 10 spores deposited and four coupons with 100 spores deposited. Each day consisted of one material being tested. The clean samples (no interfering materials) were run first, followed by the dirty samples (coated with interfering material). There was a significant difference in recovery efficiency between the coupons with 10 spores deposited (mean of 48.9%) and those with 100 spores deposited (mean of 59.8%). There was no general significant difference between the clean and dirty (containing interfering material) coupons or between the two surface materials; however, there was a significant interaction between concentration amount and presence of interfering material. The recovery efficiency was close to the same for coupons with 10 spores deposited, but for the coupons with 100 spores deposited, the recovery efficiency for the dirty samples was significantly larger (65

  11. The use ofDoppler velocitnetry ofthe utnbilical artery before 24 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    association with proteinuric hypertension was too weak to be ofclinical use. Conclusion. Doppler velocimetry ofthe .... tions were intracranial bleeding and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The postpartum course of the mother was .... length infants by Doppler ultrasound. Br] Obslel Gynaecol 1989;. 96: 557-561. 11. Beattie RE ...

  12. Letter from Galo Jackson Final Comments on November 2012 Draft ofthe Remedial Investigation Report fpr Operable Unit 3-Upland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letter from Galo Jackson contains the Final Comments on November 2012 Draft ofthe Remedial Investigation Report for Operable Unit 3-Upland Soils: LCP Chemical National Priorities List Site, Brunswick, Glynn County, GA.

  13. Sample size in usability studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmettow, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Usability studies are important for developing usable, enjoyable products, identifying design flaws (usability problems) likely to compromise the user experience. Usability testing is recommended for improving interactive design, but discovery of usability problems depends on the number of users

  14. Sample size in qualitative interview studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane

    2016-01-01

    Sample sizes must be ascertained in qualitative studies like in quantitative studies but not by the same means. The prevailing concept for sample size in qualitative studies is “saturation.” Saturation is closely tied to a specific methodology, and the term is inconsistently applied. We propose...... the concept “information power” to guide adequate sample size for qualitative studies. Information power indicates that the more information the sample holds, relevant for the actual study, the lower amount of participants is needed. We suggest that the size of a sample with sufficient information power...... depends on (a) the aim of the study, (b) sample specificity, (c) use of established theory, (d) quality of dialogue, and (e) analysis strategy. We present a model where these elements of information and their relevant dimensions are related to information power. Application of this model in the planning...

  15. Phootprint - A Phobos sample return mission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschny, Detlef; Svedhem, Håkan; Rebuffat, Denis

    Introduction ESA is currently studying a mission to return a sample from Phobos, called Phootprint. This study is performed as part of ESA’s Mars Robotic Exploration Programme. Part of the mission goal is to prepare technology needed for a sample return mission from Mars itself; the mission should also have a strong scientific justification, which is described here. 1. Science goal The main science goal of this mission will be to Understand the formation of the Martian moons Phobos and put constraints on the evolution of the solar system. Currently, there are several possibilities for explaining the formation of the Martian moons: (a) co-formation with Mars (b) capture of objects coming close to Mars (c) Impact of a large body onto Mars and formation from the impact ejecta The main science goal of this mission is to find out which of the three scenarios is the most probable one. To do this, samples from Phobos would be returned to Earth and analyzed with extremely high precision in ground-based laboratories. An on-board payload is foreseen to provide information to put the sample into the necessary geological context. 2. Mission Spacecraft and payload will be based on experience gained from previous studies to Martian moons and asteroids. In particular the Marco Polo and MarcoPolo-R asteroid sample return mission studies performed at ESA were used as a starting point. Currently, industrial studies are ongoing. The initial starting assumption was to use a Soyuz launcher. Uunlike the initial Marco Polo and MarcoPolo-R studies to an asteroid, a transfer stage will be needed. Another main difference to an asteroid mission is the fact that the spacecraft actually orbits Mars, not Phobos or Deimos. It is possible to select a spacecraft orbit, which in a Phobos- or Deimos-centred reference system would give an ellipse around the moon. The following model payload is currently foreseen: - Wide Angle Camera, - Narrow Angle Camera, - Close-Up Camera, - Context camera for

  16. GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

    2003-08-24

    The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple

  17. Comparative Study of element composition of some honey samples ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out at the Federal College of Forestry, Ibadan with seven honey samples were randomly selected within Ibadan metropolis, labeled as: Sample A (Forestry Honey), Sample B(Pure Honey), Sample C (Mr. Honey), Sample D (Taraba Honey), Sample E (Sokoto Honey), Sample F (Saki Honey), and ...

  18. MARGINALIZATION OF SMALL RETAILERS AS A CONSEQUENCE OFTHE GROWTH OF MINIMARKET IN DENPASAR CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Adnyana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of minimarket, especially the Circle K Minimarket in Denpasar City has been so fast that small retailers with their limitations have been getting left behind. This present study explored the marginalization of the small retailer as a consequence of the growth of the Circle K Minimarket in Denpasar City. It was conducted to identify the forms of the marginalization of the small retailer as a consequence of the growth of the Circle K Minimarket in Denpasar City. The theory of generative structure proposed by Bourdieu and the theory of power and knowledge proposed by Foucault were used eclectically to answer the problems of the study. Qualitative research method with the approach of cultural studies was employed. The data were collected through observation, in-depth interview, and documentation study. The data were descriptively, qualitatively and interpretatively analyzed. The result of the study showed that as a consequence of the growth of the Circle K Minimarket the small retailers became marginalized in economy; business network; technology; management; and socio-politics. 

  19. Nature and landscape planning: Exploring the dynamics of valuation, the case ofthe Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, v.d. H.J.; Swart, J.A.A.; Keulartz, F.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    this study we examine the relevance and dynamics of views on nature in nature and landscape planning. In our conceptual framework we distinguish between three views on nature: a wilderness, an arcadian and a functional valuation approach to nature, each related to specific ecological, aesthetic and

  20. Problems of the protection of bioresources development ofthe Bovanenkovo gas condensate field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Dmitrievich Bogdanov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The data on the fish fauna and fish food resources in the Bovanenkovo gas field are presented. The estimation of fishery and fishery potential of water bodies, hydrobiological characteristics of water bodies in the studied area are given. It is shown that the arrangement of the gas field leads to overfishing BGKM fish and change the state of aquatic ecosystems associated with the violation of runoff, backfilling flood waters, crossing streams communications, water diversion, pollution, sand mining. Thehydrobionts reaction to anthropogenic influence in the area of the gas field developmentis identified and recommendations to reduce the impact on aquatic ecosystems in the period of construction are given

  1. Variability Study of the S5 Sample

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We present the results of flux density monitoring of the S5 sample at 5GHz with the Urumqi 25-m radio telescope during Dec. 2008 and Nov. 2009. Most sources exhibited > 2% rms variation in our one-year monitoring. Twenty-five highly variable sources were detected at a confidence level of 99%. Weaker ...

  2. Replicating studies in which samples of participants respond to samples of stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Jacob; Judd, Charles M; Kenny, David A

    2015-05-01

    In a direct replication, the typical goal is to reproduce a prior experimental result with a new but comparable sample of participants in a high-powered replication study. Often in psychology, the research to be replicated involves a sample of participants responding to a sample of stimuli. In replicating such studies, we argue that the same criteria should be used in sampling stimuli as are used in sampling participants. Namely, a new but comparable sample of stimuli should be used to ensure that the original results are not due to idiosyncrasies of the original stimulus sample, and the stimulus sample must often be enlarged to ensure high statistical power. In support of the latter point, we discuss the fact that in experiments involving samples of stimuli, statistical power typically does not approach 1 as the number of participants goes to infinity. As an example of the importance of sampling new stimuli, we discuss the bygone literature on the risky shift phenomenon, which was almost entirely based on a single stimulus sample that was later discovered to be highly unrepresentative. We discuss the use of both resampled and expanded stimulus sets, that is, stimulus samples that include the original stimuli plus new stimuli. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  4. Evidentials and advertising: a sample study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cruz García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of evidential devices in press adverts in English in a compilation of original advertisements. Due to the appellative nature of advertising discourse, I think that these texts are likely to convey source of knowledge through evidentials as an advertising strategy in order to pragmatically manifest a higher level of credibility and reliability of the information presented concerning the products and the brands. The selected corpus of adverts will allow us to focus special attention on this particular genre and on how evidentials are used, in the fashion of other works carried out in other textual genres (cf. Fox, 2001; Kaplan, 2007; Marín-Arrese, 2004, 2007; Ortega-Barrera and Torres-Ramírez, 2010. Evidentials are studied as part of a set of persuasion strategies used by different linguistic communities in the discourse of advertising (Block de Behar, 1992; Cook, 1992; Cortés de los Ríos, 2001; Pavitt, 2000; Rein, 1982. Conclusions will report on how evidentials are used in print adverts, and whether a type of evidential device prevails over the rest.

  5. [Respondent-Driven Sampling: a new sampling method to study visible and hidden populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantecón, Alejandro; Juan, Montse; Calafat, Amador; Becoña, Elisardo; Román, Encarna

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a variant of chain-referral sampling: respondent-driven sampling (RDS). This sampling method shows that methods based on network analysis can be combined with the statistical validity of standard probability sampling methods. In this sense, RDS appears to be a mathematical improvement of snowball sampling oriented to the study of hidden populations. However, we try to prove its validity with populations that are not within a sampling frame but can nonetheless be contacted without difficulty. The basics of RDS are explained through our research on young people (aged 14 to 25) who go clubbing, consume alcohol and other drugs, and have sex. Fieldwork was carried out between May and July 2007 in three Spanish regions: Baleares, Galicia and Comunidad Valenciana. The presentation of the study shows the utility of this type of sampling when the population is accessible but there is a difficulty deriving from the lack of a sampling frame. However, the sample obtained is not a random representative one in statistical terms of the target population. It must be acknowledged that the final sample is representative of a 'pseudo-population' that approximates to the target population but is not identical to it.

  6. Do Research Findings Apply to My Students? Examining Study Samples and Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Lysandra

    2017-01-01

    Special educators are urged to use research findings to inform their instruction in order to improve student outcomes. However, it can be difficult to tell whether and how research findings apply to one's own students. In this article, we discuss how special educators can consider the samples and the sampling methods in studies to examine the…

  7. Sample size of the reference sample in a case-augmented study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Palash; Dewanji, Anup

    2017-05-01

    The case-augmented study, in which a case sample is augmented with a reference (random) sample from the source population with only covariates information known, is becoming popular in different areas of applied science such as pharmacovigilance, ecology, and econometrics. In general, the case sample is available from some source (for example, hospital database, case registry, etc.); however, the reference sample is required to be drawn from the corresponding source population. The required minimum size of the reference sample is an important issue in this regard. In this work, we address the minimum sample size calculation and discuss related issues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Considerations in determining sample size for pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Melody A

    2008-04-01

    There is little published guidance concerning how large a pilot study should be. General guidelines, for example using 10% of the sample required for a full study, may be inadequate for aims such as assessment of the adequacy of instrumentation or providing statistical estimates for a larger study. This article illustrates how confidence intervals constructed around a desired or anticipated value can help determine the sample size needed. Samples ranging in size from 10 to 40 per group are evaluated for their adequacy in providing estimates precise enough to meet a variety of possible aims. General sample size guidelines by type of aim are offered.

  9. Sample Size and Statistical Power Calculation in Genetic Association Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Pyo Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A sample size with sufficient statistical power is critical to the success of genetic association studies to detect causal genes of human complex diseases. Genome-wide association studies require much larger sample sizes to achieve an adequate statistical power. We estimated the statistical power with increasing numbers of markers analyzed and compared the sample sizes that were required in case-control studies and case-parent studies. We computed the effective sample size and statistical power using Genetic Power Calculator. An analysis using a larger number of markers requires a larger sample size. Testing a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker requires 248 cases, while testing 500,000 SNPs and 1 million markers requires 1,206 cases and 1,255 cases, respectively, under the assumption of an odds ratio of 2, 5% disease prevalence, 5% minor allele frequency, complete linkage disequilibrium (LD, 1:1 case/control ratio, and a 5% error rate in an allelic test. Under a dominant model, a smaller sample size is required to achieve 80% power than other genetic models. We found that a much lower sample size was required with a strong effect size, common SNP, and increased LD. In addition, studying a common disease in a case-control study of a 1:4 case-control ratio is one way to achieve higher statistical power. We also found that case-parent studies require more samples than case-control studies. Although we have not covered all plausible cases in study design, the estimates of sample size and statistical power computed under various assumptions in this study may be useful to determine the sample size in designing a population-based genetic association study.

  10. Is Non-invasive Genetic Population Estimation via Faeces Sampling Feasible for Abundant Mammals with Low Defecation Rates? A Pilot Study on Free Ranging Wild Boar (Sus scrofa in South West Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EBERT, Cornelia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild boar is a widespread and abundant species for which until now reliable and accuratepopulation estimates are still lacking. In this study, a method based on non-invasive genetic sampling appliedin a mark-recapture framework is tested. Faeces collected along line transects serve as DNA source. Aim ofthe study was to evaluate efficiency and practicability of the sampling design and to assess if a sample sizesufficient for reliable population estimation can be achieved. In a 12-day sampling trial which was conductedin winter 2006 and covered approx. 25 km², 4 persons collected 141 fresh wild boar faeces originating from74 different individuals. This sample size was below those recommended for non-invasive mark-recapturestudies. Population estimates calculated using program CAPTURE strongly differed between models. Eventhough the non-invasive approach worked in principle for wild boar, further research will have to focus onincreasing sample size while keeping cost and effort acceptable for a large scale application of the method.

  11. Sample size computation for association studies using case–parents ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sample size for case–control association studies is discussed. Materials and methods. Parameter settings. We consider a candidate locus with two alleles A and a where. A is putatively associated with the disease status (increasing. Keywords. sample size; association tests; genotype relative risk; power; autism. Journal of ...

  12. Astronaut Neil Armstrong studies rock samples during geological field trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, studies rock samples during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas.

  13. Study of kissing molars in Turkish population sample | Yanik ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of kissing molars in Turkish population sample. ... refers to contacting occlusal surfaces of the impacted mandibular second and third molars. ... was to report the incidence of kissing molars (KMs), classification, incorporated pathologies, ...

  14. Protocol for fir tree sampling for provenance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Thomas; Bandoniene, Donata; Zettl, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Isotopic (stable and radiogenic) as well as trace element fingerprinting methods used for tracing the geographical origin, rely on databases, that need to contain data sets representative of the measurands of the individual samples for a specific geographic entity. Through this work, we want to assess different sampling strategies for obtaining representative sample of fir trees (Abies sp.). Motivation for this work is the protection of the local Austrian Christmas tree market from wrongly tagged trees of non-Austrian origin. In particular, we studied three typical Christmas trees the most common species sold as Christmas tree, namely Abies nordmanniana (Nordmann Fir), from the same locality in lower Austria. For the initial tests we applied the elemental fingerprinting method, to study the suitability of the different parts of the tree applying ICP-MS analysis after complete acid digestion in a high pressure asher system (HPA-S).Needle samples from each year of life of the tree and stem wood from three different heights were analyzed for their trace element content to prove the repeatability and to find the best sampling protocol. For the analysis of the needles, the natural wax coating had to be removed in order to get reproducible results. For the analysis of stem wood only the bark was removed. As expected the data of all three trees allowed the differentiation of the individual needle ages, but interestingly enough also between the three sampling heights of the needs. Both needles and wood proved to be suitable for successful fingerprinting, but importantly, provided that sample of the same type and ages are compared. The same samples for the three trees will also be used for isotopic analysis studies to better understand the influence of age and sampling height on the representativeness of fir tree samples. Based on elemental fingerprinting alone, a successful discrimination between local (Austrian) and foreign (Danish, Irish) Christmas trees was possible.

  15. Using re-sampling methods in mortality studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Itskovich

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of computing standardized mortality ratios (SMR in mortality studies rely upon a number of conventional statistical propositions to estimate confidence intervals for obtained values. Those propositions include a common but arbitrary choice of the confidence level and the assumption that observed number of deaths in the test sample is a purely random quantity. The latter assumption may not be fully justified for a series of periodic "overlapping" studies. We propose a new approach to evaluating the SMR, along with its confidence interval, based on a simple re-sampling technique. The proposed method is most straightforward and requires neither the use of above assumptions nor any rigorous technique, employed by modern re-sampling theory, for selection of a sample set. Instead, we include all possible samples that correspond to the specified time window of the study in the re-sampling analysis. As a result, directly obtained confidence intervals for repeated overlapping studies may be tighter than those yielded by conventional methods. The proposed method is illustrated by evaluating mortality due to a hypothetical risk factor in a life insurance cohort. With this method used, the SMR values can be forecast more precisely than when using the traditional approach. As a result, the appropriate risk assessment would have smaller uncertainties.

  16. Sample size and power calculation for molecular biology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Sample size calculation is a critical procedure when designing a new biological study. In this chapter, we consider molecular biology studies generating huge dimensional data. Microarray studies are typical examples, so that we state this chapter in terms of gene microarray data, but the discussed methods can be used for design and analysis of any molecular biology studies involving high-dimensional data. In this chapter, we discuss sample size calculation methods for molecular biology studies when the discovery of prognostic molecular markers is performed by accurately controlling false discovery rate (FDR) or family-wise error rate (FWER) in the final data analysis. We limit our discussion to the two-sample case.

  17. Neuromuscular dose-response studies: determining sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopman, A F; Lien, C A; Naguib, M

    2011-02-01

    Investigators planning dose-response studies of neuromuscular blockers have rarely used a priori power analysis to determine the minimal sample size their protocols require. Institutional Review Boards and peer-reviewed journals now generally ask for this information. This study outlines a proposed method for meeting these requirements. The slopes of the dose-response relationships of eight neuromuscular blocking agents were determined using regression analysis. These values were substituted for γ in the Hill equation. When this is done, the coefficient of variation (COV) around the mean value of the ED₅₀ for each drug is easily calculated. Using these values, we performed an a priori one-sample two-tailed t-test of the means to determine the required sample size when the allowable error in the ED₅₀ was varied from ±10-20%. The COV averaged 22% (range 15-27%). We used a COV value of 25% in determining the sample size. If the allowable error in finding the mean ED₅₀ is ±15%, a sample size of 24 is needed to achieve a power of 80%. Increasing 'accuracy' beyond this point requires increasing greater sample sizes (e.g. an 'n' of 37 for a ±12% error). On the basis of the results of this retrospective analysis, a total sample size of not less than 24 subjects should be adequate for determining a neuromuscular blocking drug's clinical potency with a reasonable degree of assurance.

  18. Active versus Passive Sample Attrition: The Health and Retirement Study

    OpenAIRE

    Honggao Cao; Daniel H. Hill

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates sample attrition in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We compare attrition behavior in two of the HRS cohorts: original HRS cohort and AHEAD cohort. We distinguish attrition due to death (passive attrition) from attrition due to other causes (active attrition), examining potential effects of different attrition modes on the representativeness of the remaining samples. This distinction is justified based on a specification test on a multinomial logistic regression ...

  19. Serum Dried Samples to Detect Dengue Antibodies: A Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Maldonado-Rodríguez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dried blood and serum samples are useful resources for detecting antiviral antibodies. The conditions for elution of the sample need to be optimized for each disease. Dengue is a widespread disease in Mexico which requires continuous surveillance. In this study, we standardized and validated a protocol for the specific detection of dengue antibodies from dried serum spots (DSSs. Methods. Paired serum and DSS samples from 66 suspected cases of dengue were collected in a clinic in Veracruz, Mexico. Samples were sent to our laboratory, where the conditions for optimal elution of DSSs were established. The presence of anti-dengue antibodies was determined in the paired samples. Results. DSS elution conditions were standardized as follows: 1 h at 4°C in 200 µl of DNase-, RNase-, and protease-free PBS (1x. The optimal volume of DSS eluate to be used in the IgG assay was 40 µl. Sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 93.3%, and kappa concordance of 0.87 were obtained when comparing the antidengue reactivity between DSSs and serum samples. Conclusion. DSS samples are useful for detecting anti-dengue IgG antibodies in the field.

  20. Appearance Investment and Everyday Interpersonal Functioning: An Experience Sampling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forand, Nicholas R.; Gunthert, Kathleen C.; German, Ramaris E.; Wenze, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that body satisfaction affects interpersonal functioning. However, few have studied the specific interpersonal correlates of another important body image dimension, appearance investment--that is, the importance a woman places on appearance. We used an experience sampling design with PDA (personal digital assistant)…

  1. The Study on Mental Health at Work: Design and sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Uwe; Schiel, Stefan; Schröder, Helmut; Kleudgen, Martin; Tophoven, Silke; Rauch, Angela; Freude, Gabriele; Müller, Grit

    2017-08-01

    The Study on Mental Health at Work (S-MGA) generates the first nationwide representative survey enabling the exploration of the relationship between working conditions, mental health and functioning. This paper describes the study design, sampling procedures and data collection, and presents a summary of the sample characteristics. S-MGA is a representative study of German employees aged 31-60 years subject to social security contributions. The sample was drawn from the employment register based on a two-stage cluster sampling procedure. Firstly, 206 municipalities were randomly selected from a pool of 12,227 municipalities in Germany. Secondly, 13,590 addresses were drawn from the selected municipalities for the purpose of conducting 4500 face-to-face interviews. The questionnaire covers psychosocial working and employment conditions, measures of mental health, work ability and functioning. Data from personal interviews were combined with employment histories from register data. Descriptive statistics of socio-demographic characteristics and logistic regressions analyses were used for comparing population, gross sample and respondents. In total, 4511 face-to-face interviews were conducted. A test for sampling bias revealed that individuals in older cohorts participated more often, while individuals with an unknown educational level, residing in major cities or with a non-German ethnic background were slightly underrepresented. There is no indication of major deviations in characteristics between the basic population and the sample of respondents. Hence, S-MGA provides representative data for research on work and health, designed as a cohort study with plans to rerun the survey 5 years after the first assessment.

  2. WRAP Module 1 sampling strategy and waste characterization alternatives study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeson, C.L.

    1994-09-30

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 Facility is designed to examine, process, certify, and ship drums and boxes of solid wastes that have a surface dose equivalent of less than 200 mrem/h. These wastes will include low-level and transuranic wastes that are retrievably stored in the 200 Area burial grounds and facilities in addition to newly generated wastes. Certification of retrievably stored wastes processing in WRAP 1 is required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for onsite treatment and disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Criteria for the disposal of TRU waste. In addition, these wastes will need to be certified for packaging in TRUPACT-II shipping containers. Characterization of the retrievably stored waste is needed to support the certification process. Characterization data will be obtained from historical records, process knowledge, nondestructive examination nondestructive assay, visual inspection of the waste, head-gas sampling, and analysis of samples taken from the waste containers. Sample characterization refers to the method or methods that are used to test waste samples for specific analytes. The focus of this study is the sample characterization needed to accurately identify the hazardous and radioactive constituents present in the retrieved wastes that will be processed in WRAP 1. In addition, some sampling and characterization will be required to support NDA calculations and to provide an over-check for the characterization of newly generated wastes. This study results in the baseline definition of WRAP 1 sampling and analysis requirements and identifies alternative methods to meet these requirements in an efficient and economical manner.

  3. Practical recommendations for population PK studies with sampling time errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Leena; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Caffo, Brian S

    2013-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK) data collected from routine clinical practice offers a rich source of valuable information. However, in observational population PK data, accurate time information for blood samples is often missing, resulting in measurement errors (ME) in the sampling time variable. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects on model parameters when a scheduled time is used instead of the actual blood sampling time, and to propose ME correction methods. Simulation studies were conducted based on two major factors: the curvature in PK profiles and the size of ME. As ME correction methods, transform both sides (TBS) models were developed with application of Box-Cox power transformation and Taylor expansion. The TBS models were compared to a conventional population PK model using simulations. The most important determinant of bias due to time ME was the degree of curvature (nonlinearity) in PK profiles; the smaller the curvature around sampling times, the smaller the associated bias. The second important determinant was the magnitude of ME; the larger the ME, the larger the bias. The proposed TBS models performed better than a conventional population PK modeling when curvature and ME were substantial. Time ME in sampling time can lead to bias on the parameter estimators. The following practical recommendations are provided: 1) when the curvature of PK profiles is small, conventional population PK modeling is robust to even large ME; and 2) when the curvature is moderate or large, the proposed methodology reduces bias in parameter estimates.

  4. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin study rock samples during field trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, and Astronaut Edwin Aldrin, Lunar module pilot for Apollo 11, study rock samples during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas.

  5. Genesis Solar Wind Collector Cleaning Assessment: 60366 Sample Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreva, Y. S.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D.; Jurewicz, A. J.; Allton, J. H.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to recognize, localize, characterize and remove particle and thin film surface contamination, a small subset of Genesis mission collector fragments are being subjected to extensive study via various techniques [1-5]. Here we present preliminary results for sample 60336, a Czochralski silicon (Si-CZ) based wafer from the bulk array (B/C).

  6. Sampling challenges in a study examining refugee resettlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Sandra C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As almost half of all refugees currently under United Nations protection are from Afghanistan or Iraq and significant numbers have already been resettled outside the region of origin, it is likely that future research will examine their resettlement needs. A number of methodological challenges confront researchers working with culturally and linguistically diverse groups; however, few detailed articles are available to inform other studies. The aim of this paper is to outline challenges with sampling and recruitment of socially invisible refugee groups, describing the method adopted for a mixed methods exploratory study assessing mental health, subjective wellbeing and resettlement perspectives of Afghan and Kurdish refugees living in New Zealand and Australia. Sampling strategies used in previous studies with similar refugee groups were considered before determining the approach to recruitment Methods A snowball approach was adopted for the study, with multiple entry points into the communities being used to choose as wide a range of people as possible to provide further contacts and reduce selection bias. Census data was used to assess the representativeness of the sample. Results A sample of 193 former refugee participants was recruited in Christchurch (n = 98 and Perth (n = 95, 47% were of Afghan and 53% Kurdish ethnicity. A good gender balance (males 52%, females 48% was achieved overall, mainly as a result of the sampling method used. Differences in the demographic composition of groups in each location were observed, especially in relation to the length of time spent in a refugee situation and time since arrival, reflecting variations in national humanitarian quota intakes. Although some measures were problematic, Census data comparison to assess reasonable representativeness of the study sample was generally reassuring. Conclusions Snowball sampling, with multiple initiation points to reduce selection bias, was

  7. Study of β-NMR for Liquid Biological Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Beattie, Caitlin

    2017-01-01

    β-NMR is an exotic form of NMR spectroscopy that allows for the characterization of matter based on the anisotropic β-decay of radioactive probe nuclei. This has been shown to be an effective spectroscopic technique for many different compounds, but its use for liquid biological samples is relatively unexplored. The work at the VITO line of ISOLDE seeks to employ this technique to study such samples. Currently, preparations are being made for an experiment to characterize DNA G-quadruplexes and their interactions with stabilizing cations. More specifically, the work in which I engaged as a summer student focused on the experiment’s liquid handling system and the stability of the relevant biological samples under vacuum.

  8. Sample size considerations for clinical research studies in nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuzan, Cody; West, Erin A; Duong, Jimmy; Cheung, Ken Y K; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Sample size calculation is an important element of research design that investigators need to consider in the planning stage of the study. Funding agencies and research review panels request a power analysis, for example, to determine the minimum number of subjects needed for an experiment to be informative. Calculating the right sample size is crucial to gaining accurate information and ensures that research resources are used efficiently and ethically. The simple question "How many subjects do I need?" does not always have a simple answer. Before calculating the sample size requirements, a researcher must address several aspects, such as purpose of the research (descriptive or comparative), type of samples (one or more groups), and data being collected (continuous or categorical). In this article, we describe some of the most frequent methods for calculating the sample size with examples from nuclear cardiology research, including for t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric tests, correlation, Chi-squared tests, and survival analysis. For the ease of implementation, several examples are also illustrated via user-friendly free statistical software.

  9. Controlled samples for silicon defect and impurity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciszek, T.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Because of the diverse defects and impurities that are present in any given sample of silicon material, it can be extremely difficult to conduct a controlled experiment to study the influence of any particular defect or impurity on photovoltaic properties such as minority charge carrier lifetime {tau} or solar cell efficiency q. For example, the influence of iron may be different if boron is present, or the influence of silicon self interstitial clusters may be different if oxygen is present. It thus becomes important to conduct such studies on controlled samples where the influence of secondary effects is minimized. At NREL, over the past several years, we have focused on using the high-purity float-zone (FZ) growth method to obtain controlled samples. Because the silicon melt is not in contact with a container, and no heated components are in the growth region, very high purities and low defect levels can be achieved in baseline material. The baseline can be controllably perturbed by introduction of specific defects or impurities. The chart shown below lists some of the types of defect and impurity. combinations that can be studied in this way. The boxes marked with an {open_quotes}x{close_quotes} represent combinations we have studied to some extent.

  10. Sampling pig farms at the abattoir in a cross-sectional study - Evaluation of a sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkegård, Anna Camilla; Halasa, Tariq; Toft, Nils

    2017-09-15

    A cross-sectional study design is relatively inexpensive, fast and easy to conduct when compared to other study designs. Careful planning is essential to obtaining a representative sample of the population, and the recommended approach is to use simple random sampling from an exhaustive list of units in the target population. This approach is rarely feasible in practice, and other sampling procedures must often be adopted. For example, when slaughter pigs are the target population, sampling the pigs on the slaughter line may be an alternative to on-site sampling at a list of farms. However, it is difficult to sample a large number of farms from an exact predefined list, due to the logistics and workflow of an abattoir. Therefore, it is necessary to have a systematic sampling procedure and to evaluate the obtained sample with respect to the study objective. We propose a method for 1) planning, 2) conducting, and 3) evaluating the representativeness and reproducibility of a cross-sectional study when simple random sampling is not possible. We used an example of a cross-sectional study with the aim of quantifying the association of antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial consumption in Danish slaughter pigs. It was not possible to visit farms within the designated timeframe. Therefore, it was decided to use convenience sampling at the abattoir. Our approach was carried out in three steps: 1) planning: using data from meat inspection to plan at which abattoirs and how many farms to sample; 2) conducting: sampling was carried out at five abattoirs; 3) evaluation: representativeness was evaluated by comparing sampled and non-sampled farms, and the reproducibility of the study was assessed through simulated sampling based on meat inspection data from the period where the actual data collection was carried out. In the cross-sectional study samples were taken from 681 Danish pig farms, during five weeks from February to March 2015. The evaluation showed that the sampling

  11. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: srio@esrf.fr; Martinetto, P. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Somogyi, A. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Reyes-Valerio, C. [INAH, Mexico DF (Mexico); Dooryhee, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Peltier, N. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Alianelli, L. [INFM-OGG c/o ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Moignard, B. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Calligaro, T. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.-C. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France)

    2004-10-08

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used.

  12. Studies of heterogeneous samples and material composition by fluorescence XAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannazi, Firouzeh

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy has proven to be an important tool for studying the composition and structure of materials. One benefit of XAFS is that it can be applied to a wide variety of systems, including complex real-world samples such as those found in biology and the environment. Determination of the chemical speciation of toxic elements in the environment currently is an active area of research. This dissertation describes my application of XAFS to chemical speciation in environmental soil samples as well as synthetic samples. In situ experimental XAFS measurements of metal speciation in soil core samples were made and the results were correlated with speciation results from chemical extraction. Several numerical approaches were implemented and tested. A novel approach to determining speciation by a Linear Programming algorithm was developed and found to be the most successful method for dilute samples of small particle size, i.e. in the linear regime. However, discrepancies between the in situ speciation results and other methods led to a fundamental investigation of x-ray transport in heterogeneous samples in which the observed fluorescence spectrum no longer is a linear combination of the spectra of the constituents. Useful theoretical models of x-ray propagation through heterogeneous media were found in older x-ray spectrometry literature, corrected, adapted for the first time to XAFS spectra. A Monte Carlo method was developed to calculate the effect on spectra of the shape, size, and orientation of particles of arbitrary convex shape, and the results are parameterized so that the loss factors can be easily calculated. Combining these models permits one to compute the fluorescence from arbitrary randomly heterogeneous particulate samples. This work demonstrates that the particle size distribution and the solid packing fraction have an important effect on the resulting spectra, which, if neglected, can introduce significant errors

  13. Identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents an introductory survey ofthe methodsthat have been developed for identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input-output data. The two basic approaches may be described as. the indirect method, where first a discrete-time model is estimated from the sampled data and then an ...

  14. TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume II. Gas generation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    Volume II of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report contains the data generated from evaluating the adequacy of venting/filtering devices for maintaining safe hydrogen levels in plutonium contaminated waste drums. Additional studies reported in this volume include gas generation rates, selected waste form monitoring, and evaluation of hydrogen migration from sealed 90-mil rigid polyethylene drum liners containing /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes. All wastes used in the studies were newly-generated, and the waste drums were under controlled, experimental conditions. Studies using /sup 239/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant. Studies using /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  15. Intrinsic factors determining the physical behaviour and durability ofthe Miocene sandstones used to build the Zaghouan-Carthage aqueduct (Tunis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoghlami, K.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses the relationship between the intrinsic factors, physical behaviour and durability of Miocene Age sandstone used to build Tunisian Heritage Monuments, and more specifically the Zaghouan-Carthage aqueduct. A petrography study (optical microscopy and mercury intrusion porosi metry was conducted to characterize the porous system of the rock. Stone hydric behaviour was also determined by finding vacuum saturation, desorption, capillary and water vapor transmission. Finally, mechanical strength (compressive strength, abrasion resistance and durability (via accelerated sodium sulfate crystallization ageing were also found. The results obtained were indicative of good hydric performance due to the macroporous nature of the stone and the connectivity of its porous system. This rock was also found to have very low mechanical strength due to its scant lithification, making it particularly susceptible to salt weathering. It was also observed to be highly resistant to chemical alteration, given the absence of chemically unstable minerals in its composition. The durability of the material was consequently found to depend directly on the presence or absence of salts in the monument.

    En este trabajo se estudia la relación entre los factores intrínsecos, el comportamiento físico y la alterabilidad de la arenisca miocénica utilizada en el Patrimonio Monumental de Túnez, en concreto, en el acueducto romano de Zaghouan-Cartago. A partir del estudio petrográfico detallado de la roca se ha caracterizado el sistema poroso mediante microscopía y porosimetría de mercurio. También se ha caracterizado su comportamiento hídrico (absorción al vacío, desorción, capilaridad, permeabilidad al vapor de agua, se ha determinado su comportamiento mecánico (resistencia a compresión, resistencia al desgaste por rozamiento y su durabilidad mediante ensayos acelerados de cristalización de sales (sulfato de sodio. Los resultados

  16. Salivary gland tumours in a Mexican sample. A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Garces-Ortiz, M

    2002-01-01

    Salivary gland tumours are an important part of the Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, unfortunately, only few studies on these tumours have been done in Latin-American population. The aim of this study was to compare demographic data on salivary gland tumours in a Mexican sample with those previously published from Latin American and non-Latin American countries. All cases of salivary gland tumours or lesions diagnosed in our service were reviewed. Of the reviewed cases,67 were confirmed as salivary gland tumours. Out of these 64.2% were benign neoplasms, 35.8% were malignant and a slight female predominance (56.7%) was found. The most common location was palate followed by lips and floor of the mouth. Mean age for benign tumours was 40.6 years with female predominance (60.5%). Mean age for malignant tumours was 41 years and female predominance was found again. Palate followed by retromolar area were the usual locations. Pleomorphic adenoma (58.2%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (17.9%) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (11.9%) were the more frequent neoplasms. All retromolar cases were malignant and all submandibular gland tumours were benign. We found a high proportion of salivary gland neoplasms in children. Our results showed that differences of the studied tumours among our sample and previously reported series exist. These differences can be related to race and geographical location.

  17. Saliva sampling in global clinical studies: the impact of low sampling volume on performance of DNA in downstream genotyping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The collection of viable DNA samples is an essential element of any genetics research programme. Biological samples for DNA purification are now routinely collected in many studies with a variety of sampling methods available. Initial observation in this study suggested a reduced genotyping success rate of some saliva derived DNA samples when compared to blood derived DNA samples prompting further investigation. Methods Genotyping success rate was investigated to assess the suitability of using saliva samples in future safety and efficacy pharmacogenetics experiments. The Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva from 1468 subjects enrolled in global clinical studies. Statistical analysis evaluated the impact of saliva sample volume of collection on the quality, yield, concentration and performance of saliva DNA in genotyping assays. Results Across 13 global clinical studies that utilized the Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit there was variability in the volume of saliva sample collection with ~31% of participants providing 0.5 mL of saliva, rather than the recommended 2 mL. While the majority of saliva DNA samples provided high quality genotype data, collection of 0.5 mL volumes of saliva contributed to DNA samples being significantly less likely to pass genotyping quality control standards. Assessment of DNA sample characteristics that may influence genotyping outcomes indicated that saliva sample volume, DNA purity and turbidity were independently associated with sample genotype pass rate, but that saliva collection volume had the greatest effect. Conclusion When employing saliva sampling to obtain DNA, it is important to encourage all study participants to provide sufficient sample to minimize potential loss of data in downstream genotyping experiments. PMID:23759220

  18. Reclaiming the Promise ofthe Sociological

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mass media. In response, our political and social leaders continue to stumble from one problem to another in a seeming state of political intoxication mixed with frenzied ..... Framing the challenge and the context of Contemporary Africa today ... tremendous changes in its substantive issues, methodology and theories. It has.

  19. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROONACADEMYOFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    active volcano on the continental sector of the Cameroon. Volcanic Line (CVL). Mount Cameroon erupted.6 times in the last century (1909, 1922, 1954, 1959, 1982 and. 1999). It entered into another session of active eruption this century on the 28* May 2000 (Figure 1). Fako Division has relatively high rainfall, with.

  20. Sample size requirement in analytical studies for similarity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Shein-Chung; Song, Fuyu; Bai, He

    2017-01-01

    For the assessment of biosimilar products, the FDA recommends a stepwise approach for obtaining the totality-of-the-evidence for assessing biosimilarity between a proposed biosimilar product and its corresponding innovative biologic product. The stepwise approach starts with analytical studies for assessing similarity in critical quality attributes (CQAs), which are relevant to clinical outcomes at various stages of the manufacturing process. For CQAs that are the most relevant to clinical outcomes, the FDA requires an equivalence test be performed for similarity assessment based on an equivalence acceptance criterion (EAC) that is obtained using a single test value of some selected reference lots. In practice, we often have extremely imbalanced numbers of reference and test lots available for the establishment of EAC. In this case, to assist the sponsors, the FDA proposed an idea for determining the number of reference lots and the number of test lots required in order not to have imbalanced sample sizes when establishing EAC for the equivalence test based on extensive simulation studies. Along this line, this article not only provides statistical justification of Dong, Tsong, and Weng's proposal, but also proposes an alternative method for sample size requirement for the Tier 1 equivalence test.

  1. Study population, questionnaire, data management and sample description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waure, Chiara; Poscia, Andrea; Virdis, Andrea; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This article describes methodological issues of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" project ("Youth Health Information Desk"), a multicenter study aimed at assessing the health status and attitudes and behaviours of university students in Italy. The questionnaire used to carry out the study was adapted from the Italian health behaviours in school-aged children (HBSC) project and consisted of 93 items addressing: demographics; nutritional habits and status; physical activity; lifestyles; reproductive and preconception health; health and satisfaction of life; attitudes and behaviours toward academic study and new technologies. The questionnaire was administered to a pool of 12 000 students from 18 to 30 years of age who voluntary decided to participate during classes held at different Italian faculties or at the three "Sportello Salute Giovani" centers which were established in the three sites of the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart of Rome). The final study sample was composed by 8516 university students. The mean age of responders was 22.2 (Standard Deviation 2.0) and 5702 (67.0%) were females. According to the distribution in age classes, 3601 (43.3%) belonged to the 18-21 one, 3796 (44.5%) to the 22-24 class and 1019 (12.2%) to the 25-30 class. With respect to socio-economic status, data were available for 8410 responders and showed that 50.3% of students belonged to the middle class. The project took into consideration a large number of individuals from different regions of the country and therefore may be considered representative of the general population of Italian university students. Furthermore, it is the first to address, at the same time, several issues, in particular attitudes and behaviours toward health, in Italian university students. The analysis of data from such a large sample of university students sets the basis for identifying the most appropriate interventions in order to address the specific needs of

  2. Sampling pig farms at the abattoir in a cross-sectional study − Evaluation of a sampling method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkegård, Anna Camilla; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Toft, Nils

    2017-01-01

    A cross-sectional study design is relatively inexpensive, fast and easy to conduct when compared to other study designs. Careful planning is essential to obtaining a representative sample of the population, and the recommended approach is to use simple random sampling from an exhaustive list of u...

  3. Study population, questionnaire, data management and sample description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara de Waure

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article describes methodological issues of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" project ("Youth Health Information Desk", a multicenter study aimed at assessing the health status and attitudes and behaviours of university students in Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The questionnaire used to carry out the study was adapted from the Italian health behaviours in school-aged children (HBSC project and consisted of 93 items addressing: demographics; nutritional habits and status; physical activity; lifestyles; reproductive and preconception health; health and satisfaction of life; attitudes and behaviours toward academic study and new technologies. The questionnaire was administered to a pool of 12 000 students from 18 to 30 years of age who voluntary decided to participate during classes held at different Italian faculties or at the three "Sportello Salute Giovani" centers which were established in the three sites of the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart of Rome. RESULTS: The final study sample was composed by 8516 university students. The mean age of responders was 22.2 (Standard Deviation 2.0 and 5702 (67.0% were females. According to the distribution in age classes, 3601 (43.3% belonged to the 18-21 one, 3796 (44.5% to the 22-24 class and 1019 (12.2% to the 25-30 class. With respect to socio-economic status, data were available for 8410 responders and showed that 50.3% of students belonged to the middle class. DISCUSSION: The project took into consideration a large number of individuals from different regions of the country and therefore may be considered representative of the general population of Italian university students. Furthermore, it is the first to address, at the same time, several issues, in particular attitudes and behaviours toward health, in Italian university students. CONCLUSION: The analysis of data from such a large sample of university students sets the basis for

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CARRYING CAPACITY GLULAM BEAMS, REINFORCED SPECIAL WAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Ustarkhanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals a new structural solution of reinforced glued wooden beam and results ofexperimental studies of the bearing capacity of reinforced beams in a special way. We presentthedesign parameters ofprototypebeams, description ofthe experimental setup, results of experimental studies and comparative analysis ofthe stresses anddeflectionsdepending on how the pinching inclined armature.

  5. A comparative study of sampling techniques for monitoring carcass contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, J.M.A.; Janssen, M.H.W.; Gerats, G.E.; Corstiaensen, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Four bacteriological sampling techniques i.e. the excision, double swab, agar contract and modified agar contact techniques were compared by sampling pig carcasses before and after chilling. As well as assessing the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques particular attention was paid to

  6. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  7. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  8. GY SAMPLING THEORY IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 2: SUBSAMPLING ERROR MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampling can be a significant source of error in the measurement process. The characterization and cleanup of hazardous waste sites require data that meet site-specific levels of acceptable quality if scientifically supportable decisions are to be made. In support of this effort,...

  9. Comparative Studies of Gasoline Samples Used in Nigeria | Faruq ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis was carried out on five samples of gasoline in the Nigerian market based on octane number, sulphur content, Reid vapour pressure, specific gravity, boiling point characteristics and chemical content. The result revealed that, Nigerian and Kuwait gasolines have low octane numbers in comparison to ...

  10. Planning Longitudinal Field Studies: Considerations in Determining Sample Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.Pierre, Robert G.

    1980-01-01

    Factors that influence the sample size necessary for longitudinal evaluations include the nature of the evaluation questions, nature of available comparison groups, consistency of the treatment in different sites, effect size, attrition rate, significance level for statistical tests, and statistical power. (Author/GDC)

  11. Sampling considerations for demographic and habitat studies of Northern Goshawks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard T. Reynolds; J. David Wiens; Suzanne M. Joy; Susan R. Salafsky

    2005-01-01

    We used mark-recapture methods to monitor Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) and their nests over 12 yr in an increasing sample of breeding territories (37 in 1991 to 121 in 2002) in northern Arizona. As many as 8 yr of repeated nest searching were required to identify the population of breeders, as individuals skipped egg-laying on territories...

  12. Strip transect sampling and analysis for avian habitat studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; James G. Dickson

    1980-01-01

    Censusing procedures that detect effects of habitat treatment on birds are outlined. We suggest that only relative values of bird species diversity, equitability, abundance, and species richness need be obtained. We also suggest that 4, 250-m strip transects per treatment and 8-10 trips over each transect are adequate. Aspects of sampling design that affect within-...

  13. Sample Size Calculations for Population Size Estimation Studies Using Multiplier Methods With Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Elizabeth; Chabata, Sungai T; Thompson, Jennifer A; Cowan, Frances M; Hargreaves, James R

    2017-09-14

    While guidance exists for obtaining population size estimates using multiplier methods with respondent-driven sampling surveys, we lack specific guidance for making sample size decisions. To guide the design of multiplier method population size estimation studies using respondent-driven sampling surveys to reduce the random error around the estimate obtained. The population size estimate is obtained by dividing the number of individuals receiving a service or the number of unique objects distributed (M) by the proportion of individuals in a representative survey who report receipt of the service or object (P). We have developed an approach to sample size calculation, interpreting methods to estimate the variance around estimates obtained using multiplier methods in conjunction with research into design effects and respondent-driven sampling. We describe an application to estimate the number of female sex workers in Harare, Zimbabwe. There is high variance in estimates. Random error around the size estimate reflects uncertainty from M and P, particularly when the estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey is low. As expected, sample size requirements are higher when the design effect of the survey is assumed to be greater. We suggest a method for investigating the effects of sample size on the precision of a population size estimate obtained using multipler methods and respondent-driven sampling. Uncertainty in the size estimate is high, particularly when P is small, so balancing against other potential sources of bias, we advise researchers to consider longer service attendance reference periods and to distribute more unique objects, which is likely to result in a higher estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey.

  14. Whose sample is it anyway? Widespread misannotation of samples in transcriptomics studies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilah Toker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Concern about the reproducibility and reliability of biomedical research has been rising. An understudied issue is the prevalence of sample mislabeling, one impact of which would be invalid comparisons. We studied this issue in a corpus of human transcriptomics studies by comparing the provided annotations of sex to the expression levels of sex-specific genes. We identified apparent mislabeled samples in 46% of the datasets studied, yielding a 99% confidence lower-bound estimate for all studies of 33%. In a separate analysis of a set of datasets concerning a single cohort of subjects, 2/4 had mislabeled samples, indicating laboratory mix-ups rather than data recording errors. While the number of mixed-up samples per study was generally small, because our method can only identify a subset of potential mix-ups, our estimate is conservative for the breadth of the problem. Our findings emphasize the need for more stringent sample tracking, and that re-users of published data must be alert to the possibility of annotation and labelling errors.

  15. Study of an RF Direct Sampling Technique for Geodetic VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takefuji, K.; Kondo, T.; Sekido, M.; Ichikawa, R.; Kurihara, S.; Kokado, K.; Kawabata, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recently some digital samplers, which involve high RF frequency sensitivity, have been developed. We installed such samplers (sensitivity up to 24 GHz) at the Kashima 11-m station and the Tsukuba 32-m station (about 50 km baseline) in Japan and directly sampled X-band without any frequency conversion such as analog mixers. After the correlation process, we successfully detected first fringes at X-band. For the purpose of observing geodetic VLBI, we mixed signals of the S-band and the X-band just after the low noise amplifier. The mixed signal became overlapped and aliased baseband signals after 1024 MHz, 2-bit sampling. We could obtain four fringes (one from S-band and three from X-band), which came from the overlapped baseband signals, and successfully determined the baseline length.

  16. Multiwavelength studies of X-ray selected extragalactic sample

    OpenAIRE

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The joint catalogue of Active Galactic Nuclei selected from optical identifications of X-ray sources was created as a combination of two samples: Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both are based on optical identifications of X-ray sources from ROSAT catalogues using low-dispersion spectra of Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS). However, HRC and BHRC contain a number of misidentifications and using the recent optical and multiwavelength (MW) catalogues we have ...

  17. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Leg 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, F.L.; Waterman, L.S.; Manheim, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    The chemistry of the pore fluids obtained on Leg 9 is remarkable primarily in its constancy. Excepting silicon and strontium, only at one site do the concentrations of the major and minor constituents deviate notably from sea water concentrations (see Tables 1 and 2). The trends, or lack of them, seen in these samples have been discussed previously and only references will be given here. The constancy of composition and similarity to sea water is particularly noteworthy, as the sediments at all of the 9 sites are thought to be intruded by the basal basalt. The pore fluid chemistry exhibits no evidence of intrusion except possibly at Site 84.

  18. Sampling Key Populations for HIV Surveillance: Results From Eight Cross-Sectional Studies Using Respondent-Driven Sampling and Venue-Based Snowball Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Amrita; Stahlman, Shauna; Hargreaves, James; Weir, Sharon; Edwards, Jessie; Kochelani, Duncan; Kochelani, Duncan; Mavimbela, Mpumelelo; Baral, Stefan

    2017-10-20

    In using regularly collected or existing surveillance data to characterize engagement in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services among marginalized populations, differences in sampling methods may produce different pictures of the target population and may therefore result in different priorities for response. The objective of this study was to use existing data to evaluate the sample distribution of eight studies of female sex workers (FSW) and men who have sex with men (MSM), who were recruited using different sampling approaches in two locations within Sub-Saharan Africa: Manzini, Swaziland and Yaoundé, Cameroon. MSM and FSW participants were recruited using either respondent-driven sampling (RDS) or venue-based snowball sampling. Recruitment took place between 2011 and 2016. Participants at each study site were administered a face-to-face survey to assess sociodemographics, along with the prevalence of self-reported HIV status, frequency of HIV testing, stigma, and other HIV-related characteristics. Crude and RDS-adjusted prevalence estimates were calculated. Crude prevalence estimates from the venue-based snowball samples were compared with the overlap of the RDS-adjusted prevalence estimates, between both FSW and MSM in Cameroon and Swaziland. RDS samples tended to be younger (MSM aged 18-21 years in Swaziland: 47.6% [139/310] in RDS vs 24.3% [42/173] in Snowball, in Cameroon: 47.9% [99/306] in RDS vs 20.1% [52/259] in Snowball; FSW aged 18-21 years in Swaziland 42.5% [82/325] in RDS vs 8.0% [20/249] in Snowball; in Cameroon 15.6% [75/576] in RDS vs 8.1% [25/306] in Snowball). They were less educated (MSM: primary school completed or less in Swaziland 42.6% [109/310] in RDS vs 4.0% [7/173] in Snowball, in Cameroon 46.2% [138/306] in RDS vs 14.3% [37/259] in Snowball; FSW: primary school completed or less in Swaziland 86.6% [281/325] in RDS vs 23.9% [59/247] in Snowball, in Cameroon 87.4% [520/576] in RDS vs 77.5% [238/307] in Snowball) than the snowball

  19. n4Studies: Sample Size Calculation for an Epidemiological Study on a Smart Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetta Ngamjarus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was to develop a sample size application (called “n4Studies” for free use on iPhone and Android devices and to compare sample size functions between n4Studies with other applications and software. Methods: Objective-C programming language was used to create the application for the iPhone OS (operating system while javaScript, jquery mobile, PhoneGap and jstat were used to develop it for Android phones. Other sample size applications were searched from the Apple app and Google play stores. The applications’ characteristics and sample size functions were collected. Spearman’s rank correlation was used to investigate the relationship between number of sample size functions and price. Results: “n4Studies” provides several functions for sample size and power calculations for various epidemiological study designs. It can be downloaded from the Apple App and Google play store. Comparing n4Studies with other applications, it covers several more types of epidemiological study designs, gives similar results for estimation of infinite/finite population mean and infinite/finite proportion from GRANMO, for comparing two independent means from BioStats, for comparing two independent proportions from EpiCal application. When using the same parameters, n4Studies gives similar results to STATA, epicalc package in R, PS, G*Power, and OpenEpi. Conclusion: “n4Studies” can be an alternative tool for calculating the sample size. It may be useful to students, lecturers and researchers in conducting their research projects.

  20. Multiscale study for stochastic characterization of shale samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman; Javadpour, Farzam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of shale reservoirs, which are typically of low permeability, is very difficult because of the presence of multiscale structures. While three-dimensional (3D) imaging can be an ultimate solution for revealing important complexities of such reservoirs, acquiring such images is costly and time consuming. On the other hand, high-quality 2D images, which are widely available, also reveal useful information about shales' pore connectivity and size. Most of the current modeling methods that are based on 2D images use limited and insufficient extracted information. One remedy to the shortcoming is direct use of qualitative images, a concept that we introduce in this paper. We demonstrate that higher-order statistics (as opposed to the traditional two-point statistics, such as variograms) are necessary for developing an accurate model of shales, and describe an efficient method for using 2D images that is capable of utilizing qualitative and physical information within an image and generating stochastic realizations of shales. We then further refine the model by describing and utilizing several techniques, including an iterative framework, for removing some possible artifacts and better pattern reproduction. Next, we introduce a new histogram-matching algorithm that accounts for concealed nanostructures in shale samples. We also present two new multiresolution and multiscale approaches for dealing with distinct pore structures that are common in shale reservoirs. In the multiresolution method, the original high-quality image is upscaled in a pyramid-like manner in order to achieve more accurate global and long-range structures. The multiscale approach integrates two images, each containing diverse pore networks - the nano- and microscale pores - using a high-resolution image representing small-scale pores and, at the same time, reconstructing large pores using a low-quality image. Eventually, the results are integrated to generate a 3D model. The methods

  1. Assessing the precision of a time-sampling-based study among GPs: balancing sample size and measurement frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hassel, Daniël; van der Velden, Lud; de Bakker, Dinny; van der Hoek, Lucas; Batenburg, Ronald

    2017-12-04

    Our research is based on a technique for time sampling, an innovative method for measuring the working hours of Dutch general practitioners (GPs), which was deployed in an earlier study. In this study, 1051 GPs were questioned about their activities in real time by sending them one SMS text message every 3 h during 1 week. The required sample size for this study is important for health workforce planners to know if they want to apply this method to target groups who are hard to reach or if fewer resources are available. In this time-sampling method, however, standard power analyses is not sufficient for calculating the required sample size as this accounts only for sample fluctuation and not for the fluctuation of measurements taken from every participant. We investigated the impact of the number of participants and frequency of measurements per participant upon the confidence intervals (CIs) for the hours worked per week. Statistical analyses of the time-use data we obtained from GPs were performed. Ninety-five percent CIs were calculated, using equations and simulation techniques, for various different numbers of GPs included in the dataset and for various frequencies of measurements per participant. Our results showed that the one-tailed CI, including sample and measurement fluctuation, decreased from 21 until 3 h between one and 50 GPs. As a result of the formulas to calculate CIs, the increase of the precision continued and was lower with the same additional number of GPs. Likewise, the analyses showed how the number of participants required decreased if more measurements per participant were taken. For example, one measurement per 3-h time slot during the week requires 300 GPs to achieve a CI of 1 h, while one measurement per hour requires 100 GPs to obtain the same result. The sample size needed for time-use research based on a time-sampling technique depends on the design and aim of the study. In this paper, we showed how the precision of the

  2. Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program partners with a subset of commercial fishermen to collect high quality, high resolution, haul by haul...

  3. Study population, questionnaire, data management and sample description

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara de Waure; Andrea Poscia; Andrea Virdis; Maria Luisa Di Pietro; Walter Ricciardi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This article describes methodological issues of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" project ("Youth Health Information Desk"), a multicenter study aimed at assessing the health status and attitudes and behaviours of university students in Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The questionnaire used to carry out the study was adapted from the Italian health behaviours in school-aged children (HBSC) project and consisted of 93 items addressing: demographics; nutritional habits and status; phys...

  4. Practical Approaches For Determination Of Sample Size In Paired Case-Control Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Demirel, Neslihan; Ozlem EGE ORUC; Gurler, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cross-over design or paired case control studies that are using in clinical studies are the methods of design of experiments which requires dependent samples. The problem of sample size determination is generally difficult step of planning the statistical design. The aim of this study is to provide the researchers a practical approach for determining the sample size in paired control studies. Material and Methods: In this study, determination of sample size is mentioned in detail i...

  5. Thermoluminescent properties studies of spodumene lilac sample to dosimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, L. L.; Oliveira, R. A. P.; Lima, H. R. B. R.; Santos, H. N.; Santos, J. O.; Lima, A. F.; Souza, S. O.

    2010-11-01

    This work investigates the thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetric properties in natural spodumene, LiAlSi2O6, called kunzite, from Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The mineralogical and chemical composition of this material was identified by means X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Some dosimetric properties were studied, such as thermoluminescent emission curves as function of gamma dose. The glow curves of annealed kunzite presented two very intense TL peaks at 215 °C (peak II) and 350 °C (peak III), after gamma irradiation, being both of first kinetic order. These two most prominent peaks analyzed do not presented a linear growth in the range of 50 to 5000 Gy in the range of doses studied. The peak II also presented a very short calculated lifetime, which means it is hardly can be used in dosimetry, while the peak III has a longer lifetime and could be used in some applications for high doses dosimetry.

  6. The Aggression Questionnaire: a validation study in student samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, Ana; Reyes, Gustavo A; Vila, Jaime; Pérez, Nieves; Robles, Humbelina; Ramos, Manuel M

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) in Spain. The AQ is a 29-item instrument designed to measure the different dimensions of the hostility/anger/aggression construct. It consists of 4 subscales that assess: (a) anger, (b) hostility, (c) verbal aggression, and (d) physical aggression. In Study 1, reliability, construct validity, and convergent validity were evaluated in a group of 384 male and female university students. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using a group of 154 male and female university students. The results of the factor analysis were similar to the scale structure claimed for this instrument. The subscales also showed internal consistency and stability over time. The AQ and its subscales were also compared with the scales and subscales of the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (Ho), the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), and the Jenkins Activity Survey-Form H (JASE-H). The results show that the AQ evaluates some aspects of anger, such as Anger-Trait and Anger-Out, rather than other elements, such as Anger-In or Anger-State. In Study 2, two new male groups were used to evaluate the criterion validity of the AQ: 57 prison inmates and 93 university students, finding that this instrument discriminated between the scores obtained by common offenders and university students.

  7. Oral leukoplakia in a South African sample: a clinicopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, R; Meer, S; Feller, L

    2013-09-01

    This study analysed differences in clinicopathological features of oral leukoplakia in different racial groups in the greater Johannesburg area of South Africa, with emphasis on the black population. The retrospective review included cases diagnosed clinically as oral leukoplakia and histologically as hyperkeratosis without dysplasia, hyperkeratosis with mild, moderate or severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ from 1990 to 2010. Age, gender, ethnicity, clinical appearance, site of lesion and tobacco smoking habit were recorded. Fourteen per cent of oral leukoplakia occurred in black South Africans compared with 80% in white South Africans. In contrast to whites, blacks were diagnosed with oral leukoplakia at a younger age; there were more men affected than women; and the proportion of idiopathic leukoplakia was greater. There were significantly more blacks (23%) than whites (13%) with non-homogenous leukoplakia and significantly more whites (51%) than blacks (23%) with dysplastic oral leukoplakia. This study suggests that oral leukoplakia, especially non-homogenous and idiopathic forms affects South African blacks less frequently than white South Africans; and in the former, it occurs more in men and at a younger age. These findings may provide some guidance in establishing screening policies for oral cancer, particularly suited for blacks. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Thermoluminescent properties studies of spodumene lilac sample to dosimetric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, L L; Oliveira, R A P; Lima, H R B R; Santos, H N; Santos, J O; Lima, A F; Souza, S O, E-mail: sosouza@fisica.ufs.b

    2010-11-01

    This work investigates the thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetric properties in natural spodumene, LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, called kunzite, from Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The mineralogical and chemical composition of this material was identified by means X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Some dosimetric properties were studied, such as thermoluminescent emission curves as function of gamma dose. The glow curves of annealed kunzite presented two very intense TL peaks at 215 {sup 0}C (peak II) and 350 {sup 0}C (peak III), after gamma irradiation, being both of first kinetic order. These two most prominent peaks analyzed do not presented a linear growth in the range of 50 to 5000 Gy in the range of doses studied. The peak II also presented a very short calculated lifetime, which means it is hardly can be used in dosimetry, while the peak III has a longer lifetime and could be used in some applications for high doses dosimetry.

  9. Effectiveness of quadrat sampling on terrestrial cave fauna survey - a case study in a Neotropical cave

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Elina Bichuette; Luiza Bertelli Simões; Diego Monteiro von Schimonsky; Jonas Eduardo Gallão

    2015-01-01

    Quadrat sampling is a method used for a long time in plant ecology studies but only recently it has been used with focus on fauna. For the cave fauna samplings, there are rare works applying this methodology. The present study compared the methods of quadrat sampling with direct search qualitative for terrestrial cave fauna. For this, we conducted five sampling collections in a limestone cave in central Brazil. Quadrat sampling contributed with 121 exclusive species and 716 specimens and dire...

  10. [A comparative study of different sampling designs in fish community estimation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shou-Yu; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Xi-Jie

    2014-04-01

    The study of fishery community ecology depends on quality and quantity of data collected from well-designed sampling programs. The optimal sampling design must be cost-efficient, and the sampling results have been recognized as a significant factor affecting resources management. In this paper, the performances of stationary sampling, simple random sampling and stratified random sampling in estimating fish community were compared based on computer simulation by design effect (De), relative error (REE) and relative bias (RB). The results showed that, De of stationary sampling (average De was 3.37) was worse than simple random sampling and stratified random sampling (average De was 0.961). Stratified random sampling performed best among the three designs in terms of De, REE and RB. With the sample size increased, the design effect of stratified random sampling decreased but the precision and accuracy increased.

  11. Study of interaction between croscarmellose and escitalopram during sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jesper; Melander, Claes

    2012-10-01

    During routine analysis of an escitalopram tablet formulation, it was seen that there was a systematic deviation between content uniformity (CU - one tablet analysis) and assay analysis (ten pooled tablets). In the presence of the excipients from the tablet, it was found that the extraction of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was incomplete. It was shown that the commonly used tablet disintegrant croscarmellose sodium (crosslinked carboxy-methyl cellulose) had a significant interaction with escitalopram. This was later found to be the explanation for the lower extraction during assay testing. Under normal conditions, the extraction took place in acidic medium which caused protonation of the amine and thereby the interaction of charged species in solution. The interaction of API was studied further with pure croscarmellose and the entire tablet matrix. A range of conditions was considered, including altering extraction volumes, organic solvents, pH of the extraction solvent, and addition of competitive binder in various concentrations. It was seen that arginine was the most effective cationic competitive binder of those tested and that adding it at a suitable concentration level could significantly improve the analytical methods. In the present case, an improvement in recovery was from 98.5% to almost 100% was achieved.

  12. Table 1. Description of samples used for simulation study with S1, 2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    priyanka

    Description of samples used for simulation study with S1, 2, 3. Sample name Treatment_time Treatment_agent Sample source. GEO sample. (GSM) file Ids. 1. Lm_Adult1. 0 h. Listeria monocytogenes. Peripheral blood. GSM1467819. 2 h. GSM1467820. 6 h. GSM1467821. 2. Lm_Adult2. 0 h. Peripheral blood. GSM1467822.

  13. Optical Methods for Identifying Hard Clay Core Samples During Petrophysical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morev, A. V.; Solovyeva, A. V.; Morev, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    X-ray phase analysis of the general mineralogical composition of core samples from one of the West Siberian fields was performed. Electronic absorption spectra of the clay core samples with an added indicator were studied. The speed and availability of applying the two methods in petrophysical laboratories during sample preparation for standard and special studies were estimated.

  14. Work Sampling Study of an Engineering Professor during a Regular Contract Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jan; McDonald, Dale B.

    2015-01-01

    Work sampling is a technique that has been employed in industry and fields such as healthcare for some time. It is a powerful technique, and an alternative to conventional stop watch time studies, used by industrial engineers to focus upon random work sampling observations. This study applies work sampling to the duties performed by an individual…

  15. Self-sampling is appropriate for detection of Staphylococcus aureus: a validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Cleef Brigitte AGL

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies frequently use nasal swabs to determine Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Self-sampling would be extremely useful in an outhospital research situation, but has not been studied in a healthy population. We studied the similarity of self-samples and investigator-samples in nares and pharynxes of healthy study subjects (hospital staff in the Netherlands. Methods One hundred and five nursing personnel members were sampled 4 times in random order after viewing an instruction paper: 1 nasal self-sample, 2 pharyngeal self-sample, 3 nasal investigator-sample, and 4 pharyngeal investigator-sample. Results For nasal samples, agreement is 93% with a kappa coefficient of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74-0.96, indicating excellent agreement, for pharyngeal samples agreement is 83% and the kappa coefficient is 0.60 (95% CI 0.43-0.76, indicating good agreement. In both sampling sites self-samples even detected more S. aureus than investigator-samples. Conclusions This means that self-samples are appropriate for detection of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  16. Grab vs. composite sampling of particulate materials with significant spatial heterogeneity--a simulation study of "correct sampling errors".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkkinen, Pentti O; Esbensen, Kim H

    2009-10-19

    Sampling errors can be divided into two classes, incorrect sampling and correct sampling errors. Incorrect sampling errors arise from incorrectly designed sampling equipment or procedures. Correct sampling errors are due to the heterogeneity of the material in sampling targets. Excluding the incorrect sampling errors, which can all be eliminated in practice although informed and diligent work is often needed, five factors dominate sampling variance: two factors related to material heterogeneity (analyte concentration; distributional heterogeneity) and three factors related to the sampling process itself (sample type, sample size, sampling modus). Due to highly significant interactions, a comprehensive appreciation of their combined effects is far from trivial and has in fact never been illustrated in detail. Heterogeneous materials can be well characterized by the two first factors, while all essential sampling process characteristics can be summarized by combinations of the latter three. We here present simulations based on an experimental design that varies all five factors. Within the framework of the Theory of Sampling, the empirical Total Sampling Error is a function of the fundamental sampling error and the grouping and segregation error interacting with a specific sampling process. We here illustrate absolute and relative sampling variance levels resulting from a wide array of simulated repeated samplings and express the effects by pertinent lot mean estimates and associated Root Mean Squared Errors/sampling variances, covering specific combinations of materials' heterogeneity and typical sampling procedures as used in current science, technology and industry. Factors, levels and interactions are varied within limits selected to match realistic materials and sampling situations that mimic, e.g., sampling for genetically modified organisms; sampling of geological drill cores; sampling during off-loading 3-dimensional lots (shiploads, railroad cars, truckloads

  17. What about N? A methodological study of sample-size reporting in focus group studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Focus group studies are increasingly published in health related journals, but we know little about how researchers use this method, particularly how they determine the number of focus groups to conduct. The methodological literature commonly advises researchers to follow principles of data saturation, although practical advise on how to do this is lacking. Our objectives were firstly, to describe the current status of sample size in focus group studies reported in health journals. Secondly, to assess whether and how researchers explain the number of focus groups they carry out. Methods We searched PubMed for studies that had used focus groups and that had been published in open access journals during 2008, and extracted data on the number of focus groups and on any explanation authors gave for this number. We also did a qualitative assessment of the papers with regard to how number of groups was explained and discussed. Results We identified 220 papers published in 117 journals. In these papers insufficient reporting of sample sizes was common. The number of focus groups conducted varied greatly (mean 8.4, median 5, range 1 to 96). Thirty seven (17%) studies attempted to explain the number of groups. Six studies referred to rules of thumb in the literature, three stated that they were unable to organize more groups for practical reasons, while 28 studies stated that they had reached a point of saturation. Among those stating that they had reached a point of saturation, several appeared not to have followed principles from grounded theory where data collection and analysis is an iterative process until saturation is reached. Studies with high numbers of focus groups did not offer explanations for number of groups. Too much data as a study weakness was not an issue discussed in any of the reviewed papers. Conclusions Based on these findings we suggest that journals adopt more stringent requirements for focus group method reporting. The often poor and

  18. What about N? A methodological study of sample-size reporting in focus group studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Benedicte; Glenton, Claire

    2011-03-11

    Focus group studies are increasingly published in health related journals, but we know little about how researchers use this method, particularly how they determine the number of focus groups to conduct. The methodological literature commonly advises researchers to follow principles of data saturation, although practical advise on how to do this is lacking. Our objectives were firstly, to describe the current status of sample size in focus group studies reported in health journals. Secondly, to assess whether and how researchers explain the number of focus groups they carry out. We searched PubMed for studies that had used focus groups and that had been published in open access journals during 2008, and extracted data on the number of focus groups and on any explanation authors gave for this number. We also did a qualitative assessment of the papers with regard to how number of groups was explained and discussed. We identified 220 papers published in 117 journals. In these papers insufficient reporting of sample sizes was common. The number of focus groups conducted varied greatly (mean 8.4, median 5, range 1 to 96). Thirty seven (17%) studies attempted to explain the number of groups. Six studies referred to rules of thumb in the literature, three stated that they were unable to organize more groups for practical reasons, while 28 studies stated that they had reached a point of saturation. Among those stating that they had reached a point of saturation, several appeared not to have followed principles from grounded theory where data collection and analysis is an iterative process until saturation is reached. Studies with high numbers of focus groups did not offer explanations for number of groups. Too much data as a study weakness was not an issue discussed in any of the reviewed papers. Based on these findings we suggest that journals adopt more stringent requirements for focus group method reporting. The often poor and inconsistent reporting seen in these

  19. What about N? A methodological study of sample-size reporting in focus group studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenton Claire

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focus group studies are increasingly published in health related journals, but we know little about how researchers use this method, particularly how they determine the number of focus groups to conduct. The methodological literature commonly advises researchers to follow principles of data saturation, although practical advise on how to do this is lacking. Our objectives were firstly, to describe the current status of sample size in focus group studies reported in health journals. Secondly, to assess whether and how researchers explain the number of focus groups they carry out. Methods We searched PubMed for studies that had used focus groups and that had been published in open access journals during 2008, and extracted data on the number of focus groups and on any explanation authors gave for this number. We also did a qualitative assessment of the papers with regard to how number of groups was explained and discussed. Results We identified 220 papers published in 117 journals. In these papers insufficient reporting of sample sizes was common. The number of focus groups conducted varied greatly (mean 8.4, median 5, range 1 to 96. Thirty seven (17% studies attempted to explain the number of groups. Six studies referred to rules of thumb in the literature, three stated that they were unable to organize more groups for practical reasons, while 28 studies stated that they had reached a point of saturation. Among those stating that they had reached a point of saturation, several appeared not to have followed principles from grounded theory where data collection and analysis is an iterative process until saturation is reached. Studies with high numbers of focus groups did not offer explanations for number of groups. Too much data as a study weakness was not an issue discussed in any of the reviewed papers. Conclusions Based on these findings we suggest that journals adopt more stringent requirements for focus group method

  20. Sampling estimators of total mill receipts for use in timber product output studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    John P. Brown; Richard G. Oderwald

    2012-01-01

    Data from the 2001 timber product output study for Georgia was explored to determine new methods for stratifying mills and finding suitable sampling estimators. Estimators for roundwood receipts totals comprised several types: simple random sample, ratio, stratified sample, and combined ratio. Two stratification methods were examined: the Dalenius-Hodges (DH) square...

  1. How many is enough? Determining optimal sample sizes for normative studies in pediatric neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Ana J; Holler, Karen A

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine how confidence intervals (CIs) for pediatric neuropsychological norms vary as a function of sample size, and to determine optimal sample sizes for normative studies. First, the authors calculated 95% CIs for a set of published pediatric norms for four commonly used neuropsychological instruments. Second, 95% CIs were calculated for varying sample size (from n = 5 to n = 500). Results suggest that some pediatric norms have unacceptably wide CIs, and normative studies ought optimally to use 50 to 75 participants per cell. Smaller sample sizes may lead to overpathologizing results, while the cost of obtaining larger samples may not be justifiable.

  2. Is it really theoretical? A review of sampling in grounded theory studies in nursing journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Niall; Purssell, Edward

    2016-10-01

    Grounded theory is a distinct method of qualitative research, where core features are theoretical sampling and constant comparative analysis. However, inconsistent application of these activities has been observed in published studies. This review assessed the use of theoretical sampling in grounded theory studies in nursing journals. An adapted systematic review was conducted. Three leading nursing journals (2010-2014) were searched for studies stating grounded theory as the method. Sampling was assessed using a concise rating tool. A high proportion (86%) of the 134 articles described an iterative process of data collection and analysis. However, half of the studies did not demonstrate theoretical sampling, with many studies declaring or indicating a purposive sampling approach throughout. Specific reporting guidelines for grounded theory studies should be developed to ensure that study reports describe an iterative process of fieldwork and theoretical development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms ?

    OpenAIRE

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources...

  4. Mitochondrial DNA from archived tissue samples kept in formalin for forensic odontology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rahul; Mehrotra, Divya; Kowtal, Pradnya; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Sarin, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Samples used for DNA isolation to be used for forensic odontology studies are often limited. The possibility to use tissue samples stored in formalin for a prolonged period, which contains nucleic acids of questionable quality, opens exciting possibilities for genetic and molecular biology studies useful in speciality of forensic odontology. The present study defines substantial modification of existing protocols for total genomic isolation including mitochondrial DNA and proves the utility of such obtained mitochondrial DNA in microsatellite analyses. 50 dental tissue samples which were kept in neutral buffered formalin liquid bottles were taken for DNA isolation and subsequent analysis. For the isolation of total genomic DNA from tissue samples, a new protocol with substantial modifications from routine ones was adopted by us. Total genomic DNA from matched blood samples were extracted using standard phenol-chloroform extraction method. Polymerase Chain Reaction and Sequencing of such extracted DNA samples for mitochondrial D loop region were successful and the results were comparable with DNA extracted from normal sources of samples. The present study reports for the first time that nucleic acids extracted from human dental tissue samples under prolonged formalin fixation times can be used for forensic odontology studies using the described methodology.

  5. Sampling strategies for tropical forest nutrient cycling studies: a case study in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sparovek

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The precise sampling of soil, biological or micro climatic attributes in tropical forests, which are characterized by a high diversity of species and complex spatial variability, is a difficult task. We found few basic studies to guide sampling procedures. The objective of this study was to define a sampling strategy and data analysis for some parameters frequently used in nutrient cycling studies, i. e., litter amount, total nutrient amounts in litter and its composition (Ca, Mg, Κ, Ν and P, and soil attributes at three depths (organic matter, Ρ content, cation exchange capacity and base saturation. A natural remnant forest in the West of São Paulo State (Brazil was selected as study area and samples were collected in July, 1989. The total amount of litter and its total nutrient amounts had a high spatial independent variance. Conversely, the variance of litter composition was lower and the spatial dependency was peculiar to each nutrient. The sampling strategy for the estimation of litter amounts and the amount of nutrient in litter should be different than the sampling strategy for nutrient composition. For the estimation of litter amounts and the amount of nutrients in litter (related to quantity a large number of randomly distributed determinations are needed. Otherwise, for the estimation of litter nutrient composition (related to quality a smaller amount of spatially located samples should be analyzed. The determination of sampling for soil attributes differed according to the depth. Overall, surface samples (0-5 cm showed high short distance spatial dependent variance, whereas, subsurface samples exhibited spatial dependency in longer distances. Short transects with sampling interval of 5-10 m are recommended for surface sampling. Subsurface samples must also be spatially located, but with transects or grids with longer distances between sampling points over the entire area. Composite soil samples would not provide a complete

  6. Randomized controlled trials 5: Determining the sample size and power for clinical trials and cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Performing well-powered randomized controlled trials is of fundamental importance in clinical research. The goal of sample size calculations is to assure that statistical power is acceptable while maintaining a small probability of a type I error. This chapter overviews the fundamentals of sample size calculation for standard types of outcomes for two-group studies. It considers (1) the problems of determining the size of the treatment effect that the studies will be designed to detect, (2) the modifications to sample size calculations to account for loss to follow-up and nonadherence, (3) the options when initial calculations indicate that the feasible sample size is insufficient to provide adequate power, and (4) the implication of using multiple primary endpoints. Sample size estimates for longitudinal cohort studies must take account of confounding by baseline factors.

  7. Who Are We Studying? Sample Diversity in Teaching of Psychology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Aaron S.; Broussard, Kristin A.; Sterns, Jillian L.; Sanders, Kristina K.; Shardy, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the sample diversity of empirical articles published in four premier teaching of psychology journals from 2008 to 2013. We investigated which demographic information was commonly reported and if samples were ethnically representative and whether gender was representative compared to National…

  8. The mouthwash : A non-invasive sampling method to study cytokine gene polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, ML; Farre, MA; Crusius, JBA; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Pena, AS

    Background: We describe a simple, non-invasive mouthwash sampling method for rapid DNA isolation to detect cytokine gene polymorphisms. In the present paper, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1B) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN) gene polymorphisms were studied. Methods: Two mouthwash samples and

  9. Chlamydia trachomatis antibody detection in home-collected blood samples for use in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenderboom, B M; van Ess, E F; van den Broek, I V F; van Loo, I H M; Hoebe, C J P A; Ouburg, S; Morré, S A

    2018-01-01

    Capillary blood collected in serum tubes was subjected to centrifugation delay while stored at room temperature. Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) IgG concentrations in aliquoted serum of these blood samples remained stable for seven days after collection. CT IgG concentrations can reliably be measured in mailed blood samples in epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Statistical considerations for plot design, sampling procedures, analysis, and quality assurance of ozone injury studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Arbaugh; Larry Bednar

    1996-01-01

    The sampling methods used to monitor ozone injury to ponderosa and Jeffrey pines depend on the objectives of the study, geographic and genetic composition of the forest, and the source and composition of air pollutant emissions. By using a standardized sampling methodology, it may be possible to compare conditions within local areas more accurately, and to apply the...

  11. Protected sampling is preferable in bronchoscopic studies of the airway microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Grønseth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate susceptibility of oropharyngeal contamination with various bronchoscopic sampling techniques. 67 patients with obstructive lung disease and 58 control subjects underwent bronchoscopy with small-volume lavage (SVL through the working channel, protected bronchoalveolar lavage (PBAL and bilateral protected specimen brush (PSB sampling. Subjects also provided an oral wash (OW sample, and negative control samples were gathered for each bronchoscopy procedure. DNA encoding bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA was sequenced and bioinformatically processed to cluster into operational taxonomic units (OTU, assign taxonomy and obtain measures of diversity. The proportion of Proteobacteria increased, whereas Firmicutes diminished in the order OW, SVL, PBAL, PSB (p<0.01. The alpha-diversity decreased in the same order (p<0.01. Also, beta-diversity varied by sampling method (p<0.01, and visualisation of principal coordinates analyses indicated that differences in diversity were smaller between OW and SVL and OW and PBAL samples than for OW and the PSB samples. The order of sampling (left versus right first did not influence alpha- or beta-diversity for PSB samples. Studies of the airway microbiota need to address the potential for oropharyngeal contamination, and protected sampling might represent an acceptable measure to minimise this problem.

  12. Successful Sampling Strategy Advances Laboratory Studies of NMR Logging in Unconsolidated Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Knight, Rosemary; Müller-Petke, Mike

    2017-01-01

    , as is typically done in the petroleum industry. However, the challenge has been obtaining high-quality laboratory samples from unconsolidated aquifers. At a study site in Denmark, we employed sonic drilling, which minimizes the disturbance of the surrounding material, and extracted twelve 7.6-cm diameter samples...... for laboratory measurements. We present a detailed comparison of the acquired laboratory- and logging-NMR data. The agreement observed between the laboratory and logging data suggests that the methodologies proposed in this study provide good conditions for studying NMR measurements of unconsolidated near......-surface aquifers. Finally, we show how laboratory sample size and condition impact the NMR measurements....

  13. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Sampling strategies to measure the prevalence of common recurrent infections in longitudinal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luby Stephen P

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring recurrent infections such as diarrhoea or respiratory infections in epidemiological studies is a methodological challenge. Problems in measuring the incidence of recurrent infections include the episode definition, recall error, and the logistics of close follow up. Longitudinal prevalence (LP, the proportion-of-time-ill estimated by repeated prevalence measurements, is an alternative measure to incidence of recurrent infections. In contrast to incidence which usually requires continuous sampling, LP can be measured at intervals. This study explored how many more participants are needed for infrequent sampling to achieve the same study power as frequent sampling. Methods We developed a set of four empirical simulation models representing low and high risk settings with short or long episode durations. The model was used to evaluate different sampling strategies with different assumptions on recall period and recall error. Results The model identified three major factors that influence sampling strategies: (1 the clustering of episodes in individuals; (2 the duration of episodes; (3 the positive correlation between an individual's disease incidence and episode duration. Intermittent sampling (e.g. 12 times per year often requires only a slightly larger sample size compared to continuous sampling, especially in cluster-randomized trials. The collection of period prevalence data can lead to highly biased effect estimates if the exposure variable is associated with episode duration. To maximize study power, recall periods of 3 to 7 days may be preferable over shorter periods, even if this leads to inaccuracy in the prevalence estimates. Conclusion Choosing the optimal approach to measure recurrent infections in epidemiological studies depends on the setting, the study objectives, study design and budget constraints. Sampling at intervals can contribute to making epidemiological studies and trials more efficient, valid

  15. Statistical methods for genetic association studies with response-selective sampling designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balliu, Brunilda

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes new statistical methods designed to improve the power of genetic association studies. Of particular interest are studies with a response-selective sampling design, i.e. case-control studies of unrelated individuals and case-control studies of family members. The

  16. Relations among questionnaire and experience sampling measures of inner speech: a smartphone app study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderson-Day, Ben; Fernyhough, Charles

    2015-01-01

    ... (which involve collecting data at random timepoints). The present study compared self-reporting of inner speech collected via a general questionnaire and experience sampling, using data from a custom-made smartphone app (Inner Life...

  17. Clinical trials with nested subgroups: Analysis, sample size determination and internal pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, Marius; Friede, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The importance of subgroup analyses has been increasing due to a growing interest in personalized medicine and targeted therapies. Considering designs with multiple nested subgroups and a continuous endpoint, we develop methods for the analysis and sample size determination. First, we consider the joint distribution of standardized test statistics that correspond to each (sub)population. We derive multivariate exact distributions where possible, providing approximations otherwise. Based on these results, we present sample size calculation procedures. Uncertainties about nuisance parameters which are needed for sample size calculations make the study prone to misspecifications. We discuss how a sample size review can be performed in order to make the study more robust. To this end, we implement an internal pilot study design where the variances and prevalences of the subgroups are reestimated in a blinded fashion and the sample size is recalculated accordingly. Simulations show that the procedures presented here do not inflate the type I error significantly and maintain the prespecified power as long as the sample size of the smallest subgroup is not too small. We pay special attention to the case of small sample sizes and attain a lower boundary for the size of the internal pilot study.

  18. (Sample) size matters! An examination of sample size from the SPRINT trial study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in patients with tibial fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Tornetta, Paul; Rampersad, Shelly-Ann; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Sanders, David W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Walter, Stephen; Guyatt, Gordon; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Holtby, Richard M.; Cameron, Hugh; Cameron, John; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Jodoin, Alain; Renaud, Eric; Gagnon, Sylvain; Maurais, Gilles; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Latendresse, Kim; Poirier, Marie-France; Daigneault, Gina; McKee, Michael M.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Ombremsky, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Hansley, Gloria; Obremskey, William Todd; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda Toddie; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Gregory, Sharon Allen; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, Davd E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Eastwood, Donna; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate sample size and power in randomized trials can result in misleading findings. This study demonstrates the effect of sample size in a large clinical trial by evaluating the results of the Study to Prospectively evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial fractures (SPRINT)

  19. cual-id: Globally Unique, Correctable, and Human-Friendly Sample Identifiers for Comparative Omics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, John H.; Bolyen, Evan; Rideout, Jai Ram

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The number of samples in high-throughput comparative “omics” studies is increasing rapidly due to declining experimental costs. To keep sample data and metadata manageable and to ensure the integrity of scientific results as the scale of these projects continues to increase, it is essential that we transition to better-designed sample identifiers. Ideally, sample identifiers should be globally unique across projects, project teams, and institutions; short (to facilitate manual transcription); correctable with respect to common types of transcription errors; opaque, meaning that they do not contain information about the samples; and compatible with existing standards. We present cual-id, a lightweight command line tool that creates, or mints, sample identifiers that meet these criteria without reliance on centralized infrastructure. cual-id allows users to assign universally unique identifiers, or UUIDs, that are globally unique to their samples. UUIDs are too long to be conveniently written on sampling materials, such as swabs or microcentrifuge tubes, however, so cual-id additionally generates human-friendly 4- to 12-character identifiers that map to their UUIDs and are unique within a project. By convention, we use “cual-id” to refer to the software, “CualID” to refer to the short, human-friendly identifiers, and “UUID” to refer to the globally unique identifiers. CualIDs are used by humans when they manually write or enter identifiers, while the longer UUIDs are used by computers to unambiguously reference a sample. Finally, cual-id optionally generates printable label sticker sheets containing Code 128 bar codes and CualIDs for labeling of sample collection and processing materials. IMPORTANCE The adoption of identifiers that are globally unique, correctable, and easily handwritten or manually entered into a computer will be a major step forward for sample tracking in comparative omics studies. As the fields transition to more

  20. Composition and properties of ceramic heat insulating building materials made ofthe masses of low temperature foaming on the basis of clay raw material

    OpenAIRE

    Selivanov Y.V.; Shiltsina A.D.; Selivanov V.M.; Loginova Y.V.; Korolkova N.N.

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic heat-insulating building materials are the most promising for modern construction. Longlived, bio-resistant and corrosion-resistant, nonhygroscopic and noncombustible, they have the greatest stability of heat engineering properties through time. The combination of these properties is especially important in construction in seismic areas.The article contains the study results of compositions and properties of ceramic heat-insulting building materials of masses on the basis of clay raw ...

  1. A simulation study provided sample size guidance for differential item functioning (DIF) studies using short scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Neil W; Fayers, Peter M; Aaronson, Neil K; Bottomley, Andrew; de Graeff, Alexander; Groenvold, Mogens; Gundy, Chad; Koller, Michael; Petersen, Morten A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2009-03-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses are increasingly used to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instruments, which often include relatively short subscales. Computer simulations were used to explore how various factors including scale length affect analysis of DIF by ordinal logistic regression. Simulated data, representative of HRQoL scales with four-category items, were generated. The power and type I error rates of the DIF method were then investigated when, respectively, DIF was deliberately introduced and when no DIF was added. The sample size, scale length, floor effects (FEs) and significance level were varied. When there was no DIF, type I error rates were close to 5%. Detecting moderate uniform DIF in a two-item scale required a sample size of 300 per group for adequate (>80%) power. For longer scales, a sample size of 200 was adequate. Considerably larger sample sizes were required to detect nonuniform DIF, when there were extreme FEs or when a reduced type I error rate was required. The impact of the number of items in the scale was relatively small. Ordinal logistic regression successfully detects DIF for HRQoL instruments with short scales. Sample size guidelines are provided.

  2. Case study: Curation and publication of physical samples using persistent identifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golodoniuc, Pavel; Devaraju, Anusuriya; Klump, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Physical samples are important observational units in Earth and Space sciences. Samples and their derived data play vital role in scientific validation and reproducibility. Systematic practices and technical solutions are required to curate and publish samples and their data on the Web. Persistent identifiers ensure unambiguous identification, and enable linkage and citation of samples and associated data sets. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) is a persistent and globally unique identifier for physical samples and sample collections. IGSNs are allocated to clients (e.g., laboratories, projects, individual users) through agents. Agents are institutions that represent the IGSN e.V., the IGSN Implementation Organization. For example, CSIRO, Geoscience Australia and Curtin University are IGSN allocating agents in Australia. Clients register IGSNs for samples through the respective agent's registration services. The Discovery research program of CSIRO is conducting research in the prolific metallogenic provinces of the Capricorn Orogen - a regional study aimed to define distal footprints of covered ore systems. In CSIRO, the Capricorn Distal Footprints (CAPDF) project is one of the early adopters of the IGSN in its sample curation. The project involves collection of various samples, including water, rock, sediment, vegetation and regolith, which are collected by different researchers. The application of IGSN requires not only the supporting infrastructure and tools (e.g., user interface, service, metadata model) but also systematic workflows to cater different users, i.e., practices of laboratories or individual researchers. We present the application of the IGSN in the context of the CAPDF project as a sample inventory management system, samples identification in publications and sample discovery through a web portal. We describe workflows that demonstrate IGSN integration into existing sample curation practices and highlight challenges and benefits of such a

  3. Effectiveness of quadrat sampling on terrestrial cave fauna survey - a case study in a Neotropical cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elina Bichuette

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quadrat sampling is a method used for a long time in plant ecology studies but only recently it has been used with focus on fauna. For the cave fauna samplings, there are rare works applying this methodology. The present study compared the methods of quadrat sampling with direct search qualitative for terrestrial cave fauna. For this, we conducted five sampling collections in a limestone cave in central Brazil. Quadrat sampling contributed with 121 exclusive species and 716 specimens and direct search qualitative method contributed with 91 exclusive species and 355 specimens. Mann-Whitney test evidenced significant differences between the two methods. We demonstrated that quadrat sampling method was slightly more efficient to analyze the species richness and much more effective to assess the abundance than the use of only direct search qualitative method, mainly considering tiny and/or cryptobiotic invertebrates (e.g., earth worms, symphylans, psocopterans, trichopterans, dipterans, small spiders, and small isopods. We recommend the association of different methods to test patterns in cave fauna, since incomplete sampling may lead to erroneous estimates and equivocated decisions about management, impact studies and cave conservation.

  4. Quantitative Study on Exact Reconstruction Sampling Condition in Limited-view CT

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan

    2016-01-01

    In limited-view computed tomography reconstruction, iterative image reconstruction with sparsity-exploiting methods, such as total variation (TV) minimization, inspired by compressive sensing, potentially claims large reductions in sampling requirements. However, a quantitative notion of this claim is non-trivial because of the ill-defined reduction in sampling achieved by the sparsity-exploiting method. In this paper, exact reconstruction sampling condition for limited-view problem is studied by verifying the uniqueness of solution in TV minimization model. Uniqueness is tested by solving a convex optimization problem derived from the sufficient and necessary condition of solution uniqueness. Through this method, the sufficient sampling number of exact reconstruction is quantified for any fixed phantom and settled geometrical parameter in the limited-view problem. This paper provides a reference to quantify the sampling condition. Using Shepp-Logan phantom as an example, the experiment results show the quant...

  5. Alternaria and Fusarium in Norwegian grains of reduced quality - a matched pair sample study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiak, B.; Torp, M.; Skjerve, E.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and geographic distribution of species belonging to the genera Alternaria and Fusarium in grains of reduced and of acceptable quality were studied post-harvest in 1997 and 1998. A total of 260 grain samples of wheat, barley and oats was analysed. The distribution of Alternaria...... and Fusarium spp. varied significantly in samples of reduced quality compared with acceptable samples. Alternaria spp. dominated in the acceptable samples with A. infectoria group as the most frequently isolated and most abundant species group of this genus while Fusarium spp. dominated in samples of reduced...... of reduced quality. The results indicated a negative interaction between E graminearum and Alternaria spp. as well as between F graminearum and other Fusarium spp....

  6. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Montagna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare facilities (HF represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis®μ and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis®μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4% by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis®μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis®μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  7. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-06-22

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis(®)μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis(®)μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis(®)μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis(®)μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  8. Small sample sizes in the study of ontogenetic allometry; implications for palaeobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Caleb Marshall; Vavrek, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative morphometric analyses, particularly ontogenetic allometry, are common methods used in quantifying shape, and changes therein, in both extinct and extant organisms. Due to incompleteness and the potential for restricted sample sizes in the fossil record, palaeobiological analyses of allometry may encounter higher rates of error. Differences in sample size between fossil and extant studies and any resulting effects on allometric analyses have not been thoroughly investigated, and a logical lower threshold to sample size is not clear. Here we show that studies based on fossil datasets have smaller sample sizes than those based on extant taxa. A similar pattern between vertebrates and invertebrates indicates this is not a problem unique to either group, but common to both. We investigate the relationship between sample size, ontogenetic allometric relationship and statistical power using an empirical dataset of skull measurements of modern Alligator mississippiensis. Across a variety of subsampling techniques, used to simulate different taphonomic and/or sampling effects, smaller sample sizes gave less reliable and more variable results, often with the result that allometric relationships will go undetected due to Type II error (failure to reject the null hypothesis). This may result in a false impression of fewer instances of positive/negative allometric growth in fossils compared to living organisms. These limitations are not restricted to fossil data and are equally applicable to allometric analyses of rare extant taxa. No mathematically derived minimum sample size for ontogenetic allometric studies is found; rather results of isometry (but not necessarily allometry) should not be viewed with confidence at small sample sizes.

  9. Outpatient Tinnitus Clinic, Self-Help Web Platform, or Mobile Application to Recruit Tinnitus Study Samples?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Thomas; Pryss, Rüdiger C; Langguth, Berthold; Spiliopoulou, Myra; Landgrebe, Michael; Vesala, Markku; Harrison, Stephen; Schobel, Johannes; Reichert, Manfred; Stach, Michael; Schlee, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    For understanding the heterogeneity of tinnitus, large samples are required. However, investigations on how samples recruited by different methods differ from each other are lacking. In the present study, three large samples each recruited by different means were compared: N = 5017 individuals registered at a self-help web platform for tinnitus (crowdsourcing platform Tinnitus Talk), N = 867 users of a smart mobile application for tinnitus (crowdsensing platform TrackYourTinnitus), and N = 3786 patients contacting an outpatient tinnitus clinic (Tinnitus Center of the University Hospital Regensburg). The three samples were compared regarding age, gender, and duration of tinnitus (month or years perceiving tinnitus; subjective report) using chi-squared tests. The three samples significantly differed from each other in age, gender and tinnitus duration (p platform were younger, users of the Tinnitus Talk crowdsourcing platform had more often female gender, and users of both newer technologies (crowdsourcing and crowdsensing) had more frequently acute/subacute tinnitus (20 years). The implications of these findings for clinical research are that newer technologies such as crowdsourcing and crowdsensing platforms offer the possibility to reach individuals hard to get in contact with at an outpatient tinnitus clinic. Depending on the aims and the inclusion/exclusion criteria of a given study, different recruiting strategies (clinic and/or newer technologies) offer different advantages and disadvantages. In general, the representativeness of study results might be increased when tinnitus study samples are recruited in the clinic as well as via crowdsourcing and crowdsensing.

  10. Genotyping faecal samples of Bengal tiger Panthera tigris tigris for population estimation: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Jyotsna; Singh, Lalji

    2006-01-01

    Background Bengal tiger Panthera tigris tigris the National Animal of India, is an endangered species. Estimating populations for such species is the main objective for designing conservation measures and for evaluating those that are already in place. Due to the tiger's cryptic and secretive behaviour, it is not possible to enumerate and monitor its populations through direct observations; instead indirect methods have always been used for studying tigers in the wild. DNA methods based on non-invasive sampling have not been attempted so far for tiger population studies in India. We describe here a pilot study using DNA extracted from faecal samples of tigers for the purpose of population estimation. Results In this study, PCR primers were developed based on tiger-specific variations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b for reliably identifying tiger faecal samples from those of sympatric carnivores. Microsatellite markers were developed for the identification of individual tigers with a sibling Probability of Identity of 0.005 that can distinguish even closely related individuals with 99.9% certainty. The effectiveness of using field-collected tiger faecal samples for DNA analysis was evaluated by sampling, identification and subsequently genotyping samples from two protected areas in southern India. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using tiger faecal matter as a potential source of DNA for population estimation of tigers in protected areas in India in addition to the methods currently in use. PMID:17044939

  11. Genotyping faecal samples of Bengal tiger Panthera tigris tigris for population estimation: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Lalji

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bengal tiger Panthera tigris tigris the National Animal of India, is an endangered species. Estimating populations for such species is the main objective for designing conservation measures and for evaluating those that are already in place. Due to the tiger's cryptic and secretive behaviour, it is not possible to enumerate and monitor its populations through direct observations; instead indirect methods have always been used for studying tigers in the wild. DNA methods based on non-invasive sampling have not been attempted so far for tiger population studies in India. We describe here a pilot study using DNA extracted from faecal samples of tigers for the purpose of population estimation. Results In this study, PCR primers were developed based on tiger-specific variations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b for reliably identifying tiger faecal samples from those of sympatric carnivores. Microsatellite markers were developed for the identification of individual tigers with a sibling Probability of Identity of 0.005 that can distinguish even closely related individuals with 99.9% certainty. The effectiveness of using field-collected tiger faecal samples for DNA analysis was evaluated by sampling, identification and subsequently genotyping samples from two protected areas in southern India. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using tiger faecal matter as a potential source of DNA for population estimation of tigers in protected areas in India in addition to the methods currently in use.

  12. Genotyping faecal samples of Bengal tiger Panthera tigris tigris for population estimation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavatula, Jyotsna; Singh, Lalji

    2006-10-17

    Bengal tiger Panthera tigris tigris the National Animal of India, is an endangered species. Estimating populations for such species is the main objective for designing conservation measures and for evaluating those that are already in place. Due to the tiger's cryptic and secretive behaviour, it is not possible to enumerate and monitor its populations through direct observations; instead indirect methods have always been used for studying tigers in the wild. DNA methods based on non-invasive sampling have not been attempted so far for tiger population studies in India. We describe here a pilot study using DNA extracted from faecal samples of tigers for the purpose of population estimation. In this study, PCR primers were developed based on tiger-specific variations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b for reliably identifying tiger faecal samples from those of sympatric carnivores. Microsatellite markers were developed for the identification of individual tigers with a sibling Probability of Identity of 0.005 that can distinguish even closely related individuals with 99.9% certainty. The effectiveness of using field-collected tiger faecal samples for DNA analysis was evaluated by sampling, identification and subsequently genotyping samples from two protected areas in southern India. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using tiger faecal matter as a potential source of DNA for population estimation of tigers in protected areas in India in addition to the methods currently in use.

  13. Impact of repeated measures and sample selection on genome-wide association studies of fasting glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Alonso, Alvaro; Li, Man; Kao, Wen; Köttgen, Anna; Yan, Yuer; Couper, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Pankow, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Although GWAS have been performed in longitudinal studies, most used only a single trait measure. GWAS of fasting glucose have generally included only normoglycemic individuals. We examined the impact of both repeated measures and sample selection on GWAS in ARIC, a study which obtained four longitudinal measures of fasting glucose and included both individuals with and without prevalent diabetes. The sample included Caucasians and the Affymetrix 6.0 chip was used for genotyping. Sample sizes for GWAS analyses ranged from 8372 (first study visit) to 5782 (average fasting glucose). Candidate SNP analyses with SNPs identified through fasting glucose or diabetes GWAS were conducted in 9133 individuals, including 761 with prevalent diabetes. For a constant sample size, smaller p-values were obtained for the average measure of fasting glucose compared to values at any single visit, and two additional significant GWAS signals were detected. For four candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs7903146, and rs4607517), the strength of association between genotype and glucose was significantly (p-interaction fasting glucose candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs560887, rs4607517, rs13266634) the association with measured fasting glucose was more significant in the smaller sample without prevalent diabetes than in the larger combined sample of those with and without diabetes. This analysis demonstrates the potential utility of averaging trait values in GWAS studies and explores the advantage of using only individuals without prevalent diabetes in GWAS of fasting glucose. PMID:20839289

  14. Comparative study of different Portuguese samples of propolis: pollinic, sensorial, physicochemical, microbiological characterization and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Luís G; Pereira, Ana Paula; Estevinho, Leticia M

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study four propolis samples from Trás-os-Montes region of Portugal. The propolis samples' color was different, which pollen analysis showed to be due to different botanical sources: Populus sp., Pinus sp., Quercus sp. and Castanea sativa. The data from physicochemical analysis (moisture, soluble and insoluble solids content, pH, conductivity, ash content, wax, total phenolics and flavonoids content) was treated using multivariate statistical tools as cluster heat map, principal components analysis and linear discriminant analysis with the purpose of classifying the sample accordingly to the botanical/geographical origin. The discriminant analysis was applied with stepwise to select the variables that most contribute to sample identification accordingly to pollinic profile. The cross-validation technique was applied, using the leave-one-out procedure, which showed good prediction capabilities of the samples. Microbiologically, the commercial quality was satisfactory, since the samples didn't contain deterioration or pathogenic microorganisms. All the samples studied presented antimicrobial activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a dose dependent way. The antimicrobial activity was strictly related to the physicochemical composition. This work will allow connecting a particular chemical propolis type to a specific type of biological activity, what is essential for the use in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND THE COMPANY’S PERFORMANCE: CASE OFTHE « SOURCE MARRAKECH » COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal LAALOU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Beyond a diagnosis that would only reason out the shortcomings of the practice of human resource management within the company and the causes of this situation, the issue of this thesis aims to identify the various factors and elements that do not favor a true and complete implementation of a human resources management policy in a Moroccan company and their degree of implementation on the company's performance. Thus, the study focused on the impact of human resource management on a company performance. We carried out our research at a company, “Source Marrakech”, specialized in the bottling of water that relies on establishing a HRM policy to increase its performance. With regard to its content, this paper is a mere outcome of an experience within the company (combined certainly with some theoretical research, that suggests to treat said problem by using some indicators to assess the main HRM practices (employment, staff appraisal, training, management of jobs and skills and human resources development and their influence on the company's financial, economic and social performance and propose a research model.

  16. Adaptive autonomous sampling toward the study of microbial carbon and energy fluxes in a dynamic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfort, L.; Seaton, C. M.; Wilkin, M.; Baptista, A. M.; Roman, B.; Preston, C. M.; Scholin, C. A.; Melançon, C.; Simon, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    An autonomous microbial sampling device was integrated with a long-term (endurance) environmental sensor system to investigate variation in microbial composition and activities related to complex estuarine dynamics. This integration was a part of ongoing efforts in the Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) to study estuarine carbon and nitrogen cycling using an observation and prediction system (SATURN, http://www.stccmop.org/saturn) as foundational infrastructure. The two endurance stations fitted with physical and biogeochemical sensors that were used in this study are located in the SATURN observation network. The microbial sampler is the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), a commercially available electromechanical/fluidic system designed for automated collection, preservation and in situ analyses of marine water samples. The primary goal of the integration was to demonstrate that the ESP, developed for sampling of pelagic oceanic environments, could be successfully deployed for autonomous sample acquisition in the highly dynamic and turbid Columbia River estuary. The ability of the ESP to collect material at both pre-determined times and automatically in response to local conditions was tested. Pre-designated samples were acquired at specific times to capture variability in the tidal cycle. Autonomous, adaptive sampling was triggered when conditions associated with specific water masses were detected in real-time by the SATURN station's sensors and then communicated to the ESP via the station computer to initiate sample collection. Triggering criteria were based on our understanding of estuary dynamics, as provided by the analysis of extensive archives of high-resolution, long-term SATURN observations and simulations. In this manner, we used the ESP to selectively sample various microbial consortia in the estuary to facilitate the study of ephemeral microbial-driven processes. For example, during the summer of 2013 the adaptive sampling

  17. The impact of sample size and marker selection on the study of haplotype structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiao

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies of haplotype structures in the human genome in various populations have found that the human chromosomes are structured such that each chromosome can be divided into many blocks, within which there is limited haplotype diversity. In addition, only a few genetic markers in a putative block are needed to capture most of the diversity within a block. There has been no systematic empirical study of the effects of sample size and marker set on the identified block structures and representative marker sets, however. The purpose of this study was to conduct a detailed empirical study to examine such impacts. Towards this goal, we have analysed three representative autosomal regions from a large genome-wide study of haplotypes with samples consisting of African-Americans and samples consisting of Japanese and Chinese individuals. For both populations, we have found that the sample size and marker set have significant impact on the number of blocks and the total number of representative markers identified. The marker set in particular has very strong impacts, and our results indicate that the marker density in the original datasets may not be adequate to allow a meaningful characterisation of haplotype structures. In general, we conclude that we need a relatively large sample size and a very dense marker panel in the study of haplotype structures in human populations.

  18. Using Environmental Variables for Studying of the Quality of Sampling in Soil Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jafari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methods of soil survey are generally empirical and based on the mental development of the surveyor, correlating soil with underlying geology, landforms, vegetation and air-photo interpretation. Since there are no statistical criteria for traditional soil sampling; this may lead to bias in the areas being sampled. In digital soil mapping, soil samples may be used to elaborate quantitative relationships or models between soil attributes and soil covariates. Because the relationships are based on the soil observations, the quality of the resulting soil map depends also on the soil observation quality. An appropriate sampling design for digital soil mapping depends on how much data is available and where the data is located. Some statistical methods have been developed for optimizing data sampling for soil surveys. Some of these methods deal with the use of ancillary information. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of sampling of existing data. Materials and Methods: The study area is located in the central basin of the Iranian plateau (Figure 1. The geologic infrastructure of the area is mainly Cretaceous limestone, Mesozoic shale and sandstone. Air photo interpretation (API was used to differentiate geomorphic patterns based on their formation processes, general structure and morphometry. The patterns were differentiated through a nested geomorphic hierarchy (Fig. 2. A four-level geomorphic hierarchy is used to breakdown the complexity of different landscapes of the study area. In the lower level of the hierarchy, the geomorphic surfaces, which were formed by a unique process during a specific geologic time, were defined. A stratified sampling scheme was designed based on geomorphic mapping. In the stratified simple random sampling, the area was divided into sub-areas referred to as strata based on geomorphic surfaces, and within each stratum, sampling locations were randomly selected (Figure 2. This resulted in 191

  19. Phylogenetic representativeness: a new method for evaluating taxon sampling in evolutionary studies

    OpenAIRE

    Passamonti Marco; Ferrucci Ronald R; Plazzi Federico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Taxon sampling is a major concern in phylogenetic studies. Incomplete, biased, or improper taxon sampling can lead to misleading results in reconstructing evolutionary relationships. Several theoretical methods are available to optimize taxon choice in phylogenetic analyses. However, most involve some knowledge about the genetic relationships of the group of interest (i.e., the ingroup), or even a well-established phylogeny itself; these data are not always available in ge...

  20. A comparative study of extraction and purification methods for environmental DNA from soil and sludge samples

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Changhyun; Villatte, Francois; Kim, Byung-Gee; Schmid, Rolf D.

    2006-01-01

    An important prerequisite for a successful metagenome library construction is an efficient extraction procedure for DNA out of environmental samples. In this study we compared three indirect and four direct extraction methods, including a commercial kit, in terms of DNA yield, purity and time requirement. A special focus was set on methods which are appropriate for the extraction of environmental DNA (eDNA) from very limited sample sizes (0.1 g) to enable a highly parallel approach. Direct ex...

  1. Relations among questionnaire and experience sampling measures of inner speech: a smartphone app study

    OpenAIRE

    Ben eAlderson-Day; Charles eFernyhough

    2015-01-01

    Inner speech is often reported to be a common and central part of inner experience, but its true prevalence is unclear. Many questionnaire-based measures appear to lack convergent validity and it has been claimed that they overestimate inner speech in comparison to experience sampling methods (which involve collecting data at random timepoints). The present study compared self-reporting of inner speech collected via a general questionnaire and experience sampling, using data from a custom-mad...

  2. Kinetic studies in solid state reactions by sample-controlled methods and advanced analysis procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Maqueda, Luis A.; Criado, J. M.; Sánchez-Jiménez, P.E.; Perejón, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of both conventional rising temperature and sample-controlled methods, like constant rate thermal analysis (CRTA), is carried out after analyzing a set of solid state reactions using both methods. It is shown that CRTA avoids the influence of heat and mass transfer phenomena for a wide range of sample sizes leading to reliable kinetic parameters. On the other hand, conventional rising temperature methods yield α–T plots dependent on experimental conditions, even when using...

  3. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources or remote field sites. Moreover, shipping samples over long distances can cause loss of DNA quality e.g. by thawing or leaking of preservation liquid. In this study we use earthworms, a key organism in soil research, to compare three different DNA preservation methods – freezing at −20 °C, storing in 75% ethanol, and freeze drying. Samples were shipped from the United States of America to Austria. The DNA of the samples was extracted using two different extraction methods, peqGOLD™ and Chelex® 100. The DNA amplification success was determined by amplifying four DNA fragments of different length. The PCR amplification success is significantly influenced by preservation method and extraction method and differed significantly depending on the length of the DNA fragment. Freeze drying samples was the best preservation method when samples were extracted using the silica based extraction method peqGOLD™. For samples that were extracted with Chelex® 100, storage in ethanol was the best preservation method. However, the overall amplification success was significantly lower for the extraction procedure based on Chelex® 100. The detection of the small DNA fragments was higher and independent from the extraction method, while the amplification success was significantly reduced for the longer DNA fragments. We recommend freeze drying of DNA samples, especially when they have to be shipped for longer distances. No special packaging or declaration is needed for freeze dried

  4. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources or remote field sites. Moreover, shipping samples over long distances can cause loss of DNA quality e.g. by thawing or leaking of preservation liquid. In this study we use earthworms, a key organism in soil research, to compare three different DNA preservation methods - freezing at -20 °C, storing in 75% ethanol, and freeze drying. Samples were shipped from the United States of America to Austria. The DNA of the samples was extracted using two different extraction methods, peqGOLD™ and Chelex® 100. The DNA amplification success was determined by amplifying four DNA fragments of different length. The PCR amplification success is significantly influenced by preservation method and extraction method and differed significantly depending on the length of the DNA fragment. Freeze drying samples was the best preservation method when samples were extracted using the silica based extraction method peqGOLD™. For samples that were extracted with Chelex® 100, storage in ethanol was the best preservation method. However, the overall amplification success was significantly lower for the extraction procedure based on Chelex® 100. The detection of the small DNA fragments was higher and independent from the extraction method, while the amplification success was significantly reduced for the longer DNA fragments. We recommend freeze drying of DNA samples, especially when they have to be shipped for longer distances. No special packaging or declaration is needed for freeze dried

  5. Planning considerations for a Mars Sample Receiving Facility: summary and interpretation of three design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, David W; Allen, Carlton C; Bass, Deborah S; Buxbaum, Karen L; Campbell, James K; Lindstrom, David J; Miller, Sylvia L; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A

    2009-10-01

    It has been widely understood for many years that an essential component of a Mars Sample Return mission is a Sample Receiving Facility (SRF). The purpose of such a facility would be to take delivery of the flight hardware that lands on Earth, open the spacecraft and extract the sample container and samples, and conduct an agreed-upon test protocol, while ensuring strict containment and contamination control of the samples while in the SRF. Any samples that are found to be non-hazardous (or are rendered non-hazardous by sterilization) would then be transferred to long-term curation. Although the general concept of an SRF is relatively straightforward, there has been considerable discussion about implementation planning. The Mars Exploration Program carried out an analysis of the attributes of an SRF to establish its scope, including minimum size and functionality, budgetary requirements (capital cost, operating costs, cost profile), and development schedule. The approach was to arrange for three independent design studies, each led by an architectural design firm, and compare the results. While there were many design elements in common identified by each study team, there were significant differences in the way human operators were to interact with the systems. In aggregate, the design studies provided insight into the attributes of a future SRF and the complex factors to consider for future programmatic planning.

  6. Studies on natural recovery from alcohol dependence: sample selection bias by media solicitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, H J; Bischof, G; Hapke, U; Meyer, C; John, U

    2000-05-01

    To assess the selection bias of recruiting participants in studies on natural recovery from alcohol dependence through media solicitation. Two samples with different recruitment strategies are compared. Media solicitation and general population. Sample 1 consists of 176 alcohol-dependent individuals remitted without formal help and recruited through media solicitation, sample 2 consists of 32 natural remitters derived from a representative general population study with a sample size of 4075 respondents and a response rate of 70.2%. Several triggering mechanisms and maintenance factors of remission were assessed in a personal interview using standardized questionnaires. Results of logistic regression analyses show that media-solicited subjects were more often abstinent in the last 12 months, were more severely dependent, were less satisfied with eight life domains prior to remission and showed higher scores in a coping behaviour measure. Besides these major differences from the multivariate analysis, media subjects revealed more health problems prior to remission, experienced more social pressure to change drinking behaviour, and showed differences in reasons for not seeking help. Media solicitation leads to a sample selection bias in research on natural recovery from alcohol dependence. When measures to foster self-change are derived from such studies, findings from representative samples have to be considered.

  7. Laboratory Studies on Surface Sampling of Bacillus anthracis Contamination: Summary, Gaps, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2011-11-28

    This report summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and (2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed and recommendations are given for future studies.

  8. Successful Sampling Strategy Advances Laboratory Studies of NMR Logging in Unconsolidated Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Knight, Rosemary; Müller-Petke, Mike; Auken, Esben; Barfod, Adrian A. S.; Ferré, Ty P. A.; Vilhelmsen, Troels N.; Johnson, Carole D.; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique has become popular in groundwater studies because it responds directly to the presence and mobility of water in a porous medium. There is a need to conduct laboratory experiments to aid in the development of NMR hydraulic conductivity models, as is typically done in the petroleum industry. However, the challenge has been obtaining high-quality laboratory samples from unconsolidated aquifers. At a study site in Denmark, we employed sonic drilling, which minimizes the disturbance of the surrounding material, and extracted twelve 7.6 cm diameter samples for laboratory measurements. We present a detailed comparison of the acquired laboratory and logging NMR data. The agreement observed between the laboratory and logging data suggests that the methodologies proposed in this study provide good conditions for studying NMR measurements of unconsolidated near-surface aquifers. Finally, we show how laboratory sample size and condition impact the NMR measurements.

  9. Bayesian sample size determination for cost-effectiveness studies with censored data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Beavers

    Full Text Available Cost-effectiveness models are commonly utilized to determine the combined clinical and economic impact of one treatment compared to another. However, most methods for sample size determination of cost-effectiveness studies assume fully observed costs and effectiveness outcomes, which presents challenges for survival-based studies in which censoring exists. We propose a Bayesian method for the design and analysis of cost-effectiveness data in which costs and effectiveness may be censored, and the sample size is approximated for both power and assurance. We explore two parametric models and demonstrate the flexibility of the approach to accommodate a variety of modifications to study assumptions.

  10. Social Studies Teachers' Viewpoints of the Social Studies Lesson "Sample of Turkey and Afghanistan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Omer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to reveal the perceptions of history, geography and social studies teachers giving the social studies lesson at primary schools in Turkey and Afghanistan towards the social studies lesson. The working group of the study involves history, geography and social studies teachers rendering service in Tokat and Kayseri provinces…

  11. A comparative study of general intelligence in Spanish and Moroccan samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Amelia; Sellami, Khadija; Infanzón, Eugenia; Lanzón, Teresa; Lynn, Richard

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to fill a gap in intelligence research by presenting data for the average IQ in Morocco and for a comparable sample in Spain. Adult samples were administered the Raven Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) (Raven, Court, & Raven, 2001) and scored for the total test and for the three sub-factors of gestalt continuation, verbal-analytical reasoning and visuospatial ability identified by Lynn, Allik, and Irwing (2004). The total test and the three factors have shown satisfactory reliability. Our results for the Moroccan sample show significant relationship between general intelligence factor, gestalt continuation and visuospatial ability with education level and income. Conversely, these variables have been shown to be independent for the Spanish sample. This sample obtained significantly higher scores for the four factors assessed than the Moroccan one. These differences have been found also comparing samples with the same education levels. Finally, the errors percentage for Moroccans has been higher than for Spaniards in all the items, suggesting that the level of difficulty was higher for the Moroccan sample.

  12. A preliminary study on identification of Thai rice samples by INAA and statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsri, S.; Kukusamude, C.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the elemental compositions in 93 Thai rice samples using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and to identify rice according to their types and rice cultivars using statistical analysis. As, Mg, Cl, Al, Br, Mn, K, Rb and Zn in Thai jasmine rice and Sung Yod rice samples were successfully determined by INAA. The accuracy and precision of the INAA method were verified by SRM 1568a Rice Flour. All elements were found to be in a good agreement with the certified values. The precisions in term of %RSD were lower than 7%. The LODs were obtained in range of 0.01 to 29 mg kg-1. The concentration of 9 elements distributed in Thai rice samples was evaluated and used as chemical indicators to identify the type of rice samples. The result found that Mg, Cl, As, Br, Mn, K, Rb, and Zn concentrations in Thai jasmine rice samples are significantly different but there was no evidence that Al is significantly different from concentration in Sung Yod rice samples at 95% confidence interval. Our results may provide preliminary information for discrimination of rice samples and may be useful database of Thai rice.

  13. A Study on Primary and Secondary School Students' Misconceptions about Greenhouse Effect (Erzurum Sampling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Seyda; Yesilyurt, Selami

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what level of primary and secondary school students' misconceptions related to greenhouse effect is. Study group consists of totally 280 students attended to totally 8 primary and secondary schools (4 primary school, 4 secondary school) which were determined with convenient sampling method from center of…

  14. Assessment of dust sampling methods for the study of cultivable-microorganism exposure in stables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normand, A.C.; Vacheyrou, M.; Sudre, B.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Piarroux, R.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown a link between living on a farm, exposure to microbial components (e.g., endotoxins or beta-d-glucans), and a lower risk for allergic diseases and asthma. Due to the lack of validated sampling methods, studies of asthma and atopy have not relied on exposure assessment based on

  15. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Asphaltene Deposition Mechanism in Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Behbahani T.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental studies were conducted to determine the effect of asphaltene deposition on the permeability reduction and porosity reduction of carbonate, sandstone and dolomite rock samples using an Iranian bottom hole live oil sample which is close to reservoir conditions, whereas in the majority of previous work, a mixture of recombined oil (a mixture of dead oil and associated gas was injected into a core sample which is far from reservoir conditions. The effect of the oil injection rate on asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction was studied. The experimental results showed that an increase in the oil injection flow rate can result in an increase in asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction. Also, it can be observed that at lower injection flow rates, a monotonic decrease in permeability of the rock samples can be attained upon increasing the injection flow rate, while at higher injection rates, after a decrease in rock permeability, an increasing trend is observed before a steady-state condition can be reached. The experimental results also showed that the rock type can affect the amount of asphaltene deposition, and the asphaltene deposition has different mechanisms in sandstone and carbonate core samples. It can be seen that the adsorption and plugging mechanisms have a more important role in asphaltene deposition in carbonate core samples than sandstone core samples. From the results, it can be observed that the pore volumes of the injected crude oil are higher for sandstone cores compared with the carbonate cores. Also, it can be inferred that three depositional types may take place during the crude oil injection, i.e., continuous deposition for low-permeability cores, slow, steady plugging for high-permeability cores and steady deposition for medium-permeability cores. It can be seen from the experimental results that damage to the core samples was found to increase when the production pressures were

  16. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROONACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In fact, the diopside Crystallized at pressures lowers than 0.5 GPa and Cr- diopside at higher pressures (10-1.5 ... Crystalline cumulates resulting from the Crystallization of a basaltic magma emplaced in the upper part of the lithospheric mantle. ... lherzolites à spinelle; quelques pyroxénites sont présentes. | laves historiques.

  17. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROONACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bybrid vigour: This suggested these criteria vere controled bygenes with additive effects. Genetic gain dould be made by recurrent selection of genitors vith high rate for these parameters. Key words: Phaseolus vulgaris L., harvest index, nitrogen harvest index, selection. Auteur Pour Correspondance. BELL Joseph Martin ...

  18. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

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    birth and weaningweights (P< 0,05) as well as bodyweights at six months and one year ofage (P< 0,01). Age of dam significantly ... were better selection criteria for genetic improvement of market weights in Blackbelly sheep than birth and one year ... planning efficient breeding programmes and for pre- dicting response to ...

  19. PARTS OFTHE LOWER BENUE TROUGH, NIGERIA.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-14

    Jan 14, 2008 ... located at N26°E; N48"E; N82°E and N4“W. Short wavelength anomalies show broad or sharp peaks and well-defined trendings unlike the medium and longer wavelengtli anomalies of deep seated intrusive bodies} of asthenospheric origin which produce broad and indeterminate trendingsj. (Ofoegbu ...

  20. Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals ofthe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyg 1934; 27: 343-363. 21. Arseni C, Cristescu A. Epilepsy due to cerebral cysticercosis. Epilepsia (Amst) 1972; 13: 253-258. 22. Hemandez AL, Garaizar e. Childhood cerebral cysticercosis: clini- cal features and computed tomographic findings in 89 Mexican children. Can] Neurol Sci 1982; 9: 401-407. 23. Zini D, Farrell V, ...

  1. JOURN AL OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    poses of their existence in a swampy environment; 2 other library schools formulate their .... ganization internal and external environment. the process by grouping activities whereas the Ameri-. Kotlers model and the AMAs are the two ..... former school of journalism where the library/infor- mation science programis housed, ...

  2. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (5) L'indice de lixiviation potentielle (LLP). (Gib + Bœ)100 + (Kand)75 + .... basiques et ultrabasiques, entre les données pondérales réelles et les résultats normatifs. ..... N.B. : IFL : Importance du fer ferrique libre ; IRCP : Indice relatif de confinement potentiel ; IRLP : Indice relatif de lixiviation potentielle ; DVRAR : degré ...

  3. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

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    secondary data to assess the sustainability of these development actions based on the ecological, economic .... Data on climatic parameters investigated was obtained from the Provincial Meteorological station in Maroua. This was complemented by secondary data. The soil ..... the disadvantages of traditional irrigation.

  4. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROONACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thought to reinforce international stability and to make international organizations more effective (Griffin,. 1996). AS an all-empowering concept, globalization has po- litical, economic, social and institutional dimensions, AS itbreaks across national boundaries, globalization means different things to different people and has ...

  5. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La forme de résistance de Giardia sp. a été isolée et identifiée dans les eaux usées et les eaux de. Surface du réseau hydrographique du Mfoundi Les kystes de Giardia ont été identifiés apres centrifugation et coloration avec la solution de Lugol ioduréLa densité des kystes de Giardia atteint 891 kystes /L dans l'éffluent du ...

  6. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fique pour le dosage de la glycémie par l'O-toluidine pour les urgences Bulletin de le Société de Suisse Chimie. 4:54. MILLER, LC and TAINTER, M.L (1944): Estimation of the LD50 and its error by means of Logarithmic-probit graph paper. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biol-. Qgy And Medicine 57:261-264.

  7. Page 1 JOURNAL OFTHE CAMEROONACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    port à l'œil, l'antennule et l'antenne, le labre, postabdomen et la griffe terminale. Les résultats sont comparés avec celles de foret dense de quelques pays Africain (Nigeria et Congo). La diversité total est la meme pour le Cameroun et le Nigeria (7èspèces chacun) mais un peu plus élevée pour le Congo (9èspèces) avec ...

  8. Page 1 JOURNAL, OFTHE CAMEROON ACADEMY OFSCIENCES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    frottement interne (Pu) qui ne semblent pas s'inscrire dans la logique de la variation des valeurs obtenues les autres jours. Les résultats d'essais portés sur le tableau 02 montrent en ce qui concerne la teneur en eau une diminution à partir du deuxième jour d'exposition à l'air ambiant du laboratoire. Cette variation est très ...

  9. Phylogenetic representativeness: a new method for evaluating taxon sampling in evolutionary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Federico; Ferrucci, Ronald R; Passamonti, Marco

    2010-04-27

    Taxon sampling is a major concern in phylogenetic studies. Incomplete, biased, or improper taxon sampling can lead to misleading results in reconstructing evolutionary relationships. Several theoretical methods are available to optimize taxon choice in phylogenetic analyses. However, most involve some knowledge about the genetic relationships of the group of interest (i.e., the ingroup), or even a well-established phylogeny itself; these data are not always available in general phylogenetic applications. We propose a new method to assess taxon sampling developing Clarke and Warwick statistics. This method aims to measure the "phylogenetic representativeness" of a given sample or set of samples and it is based entirely on the pre-existing available taxonomy of the ingroup, which is commonly known to investigators. Moreover, our method also accounts for instability and discordance in taxonomies. A Python-based script suite, called PhyRe, has been developed to implement all analyses we describe in this paper. We show that this method is sensitive and allows direct discrimination between representative and unrepresentative samples. It is also informative about the addition of taxa to improve taxonomic coverage of the ingroup. Provided that the investigators' expertise is mandatory in this field, phylogenetic representativeness makes up an objective touchstone in planning phylogenetic studies.

  10. Phylogenetic representativeness: a new method for evaluating taxon sampling in evolutionary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamonti Marco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxon sampling is a major concern in phylogenetic studies. Incomplete, biased, or improper taxon sampling can lead to misleading results in reconstructing evolutionary relationships. Several theoretical methods are available to optimize taxon choice in phylogenetic analyses. However, most involve some knowledge about the genetic relationships of the group of interest (i.e., the ingroup, or even a well-established phylogeny itself; these data are not always available in general phylogenetic applications. Results We propose a new method to assess taxon sampling developing Clarke and Warwick statistics. This method aims to measure the "phylogenetic representativeness" of a given sample or set of samples and it is based entirely on the pre-existing available taxonomy of the ingroup, which is commonly known to investigators. Moreover, our method also accounts for instability and discordance in taxonomies. A Python-based script suite, called PhyRe, has been developed to implement all analyses we describe in this paper. Conclusions We show that this method is sensitive and allows direct discrimination between representative and unrepresentative samples. It is also informative about the addition of taxa to improve taxonomic coverage of the ingroup. Provided that the investigators' expertise is mandatory in this field, phylogenetic representativeness makes up an objective touchstone in planning phylogenetic studies.

  11. The 4-vessel Sampling Approach to Integrative Studies of Human Placental Physiology In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Ane M; Holm, Maia B; Roland, Marie C P; Horne, Hildegunn; Michelsen, Trond M; Haugen, Guttorm; Henriksen, Tore

    2017-08-02

    The human placenta is highly inaccessible for research while still in utero. The current understanding of human placental physiology in vivo is therefore largely based on animal studies, despite the high diversity among species in placental anatomy, hemodynamics and duration of the pregnancy. The vast majority of human placenta studies are ex vivo perfusion studies or in vitro trophoblast studies. Although in vitro studies and animal models are essential, extrapolation of the results from such studies to the human placenta in vivo is uncertain. We aimed to study human placenta physiology in vivo at term, and present a detailed protocol of the method. Exploiting the intraabdominal access to the uterine vein just before the uterine incision during planned cesarean section, we collect blood samples from the incoming and outgoing vessels on the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta. When combining concentration measurements from blood samples with volume blood flow measurements, we are able to quantify placental and fetal uptake and release of any compound. Furthermore, placental tissue samples from the same mother-fetus pairs can provide measurements of transporter density and activity and other aspects of placental functions in vivo. Through this integrative use of the 4-vessel sampling method we are able to test some of the current concepts of placental nutrient transfer and metabolism in vivo, both in normal and pathological pregnancies. Furthermore, this method enables the identification of substances secreted by the placenta to the maternal circulation, which could be an important contribution to the search for biomarkers of placenta dysfunction.

  12. [Modeling and simulation activities to design sampling scheme for population pharmacokinetic study on amlodipine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiao-Cong; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Bi-Kui; Ng, Chee M; Barrett, Jeff S; Yang, Guo-Ping; Huang, Zhi-Jun; Pei, Qi; Guo, Ren; Zhou, Ya-Nan; Jing, Ning-Ning; Di, Wu

    2012-07-01

    Reasonable sampling scheme is the important basis for establishing reliable population pharmacokinetic model. It is an effective method for estimation of population pharmacokinetic parameters with sparse data to perform population pharmacokinetic analysis using the nonlinear mixed-effects models. We designed the sampling scheme for amlodipine based on D-optimal sampling strategy and Bayesian estimation method. First, optimized sample scenarios were designed using WinPOPT software according to the aim, dosage regimen and visit schedule of the clinical study protocol, and the amlodipine population model reported by Rohatagi et al. Second, we created a NONMEM-formatted dataset (n = 400) for each sample scenario via Monte Carlo simulation. Third, the estimation of amlodipine pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance (CL/F), volume (V/F) and Ka) was based on the simulation results. All modeling and simulation exercises were conducted with NONMEM version 7.2. Finally, the accuracy and precision of the estimated parameters were evaluated using the mean prediction error (MPE) and the mean absolute error (MAPE), respectively. Among the 6 schemes, schemes 6 and 3 have good accuracy and precision. MPE is 0.1% for scheme 6 and -0.6% for scheme 3, respectively. MAPE is 0.7% for both schemes. There is no significant difference in MPE and MAPE of volume among them. Therefore, we select scheme 3 as the final sample scenario because it has good accuracy and precision and less sample points. This research aims to provide scientific and effective sampling scheme for population pharmacokinetic (PK) study of amlodipine in patients with renal impairment and hypertension, provide a scientific method for an optimum design in clinical population PK/PD (pharmacodynamics) research.

  13. [Sampling procedure for a survey of an interventional study on acute respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón Bravo, J; González Ochoa, E

    1993-01-01

    A description is made of the methodology used for obtaining a sample made up of 500 children under 5 years and 500 adults 65 year old and more, in order to carry out an intervention study on acute respiratory tract infections in an urban zone in Havana City and in a rural zone in Matanzas province, where different intervention stops will be taken with regards sanitary education about management of acute respiratory tract infections for the population and training for primary care medical personnel. We show the way the selected sample fits was planned with a very homogeneous distribution in the 8 areas under study, which allows for great reliability in the results.

  14. Study design and sampling intensity for demographic analyses of bear populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.B.; Schwartz, C.C.; Mace, R.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The rate of population change through time (??) is a fundamental element of a wildlife population's conservation status, yet estimating it with acceptable precision for bears is difficult. For studies that follow known (usually marked) bears, ?? can be estimated during some defined time by applying either life-table or matrix projection methods to estimates of individual vital rates. Usually however, confidence intervals surrounding the estimate are broader than one would like. Using an estimator suggested by Doak et al. (2005), we explored the precision to be expected in ?? from demographic analyses of typical grizzly (Ursus arctos) and American black (U. americanus) bear data sets. We also evaluated some trade-offs among vital rates in sampling strategies. Confidence intervals around ?? were more sensitive to adding to the duration of a short (e.g., 3 yrs) than a long (e.g., 10 yrs) study, and more sensitive to adding additional bears to studies with small (e.g., 10 adult females/yr) than large (e.g., 30 adult females/yr) sample sizes. Confidence intervals of ?? projected using process-only variance of vital rates were only slightly smaller than those projected using total variances of vital rates. Under sampling constraints typical of most bear studies, it may be more efficient to invest additional resources into monitoring recruitment and juvenile survival rates of females already a part of the study, than to simply increase the sample size of study females. ?? 2011 International Association for Bear Research and Management.

  15. Numerical study of the lateral resolution in electrostatic force microscopy for dielectric samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, C.; Alegría, A.; Schwartz, G. A.; Colmenero, J.; Sáenz, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    We present a study of the lateral resolution in electrostatic force microscopy for dielectric samples in both force and gradient modes. Whereas previous studies have reported expressions for metallic surfaces having potential heterogeneities (Kelvin probe force microscopy), in this work we take into account the presence of a dielectric medium. We introduce a definition of the lateral resolution based on the force due to a test particle being either a point charge or a polarizable particle on the dielectric surface. The behaviour has been studied over a wide range of typical experimental parameters: tip-sample distance (1-20) nm, sample thickness (0-5) µm and dielectric constant (1-20), using the numerical simulation of the equivalent charge method. For potential heterogeneities on metallic surfaces expressions are in agreement with the bibliography. The lateral resolution of samples having a dielectric constant of more than 10 tends to metallic behaviour. We found a characteristic thickness of 100 nm, above which the lateral resolution measured on the dielectric surface is close to that of an infinite medium. As previously reported, the lateral resolution is better in the gradient mode than in the force mode. Finally, we showed that for the same experimental conditions, the lateral resolution is better for a polarizable particle than for a charge, i.e. dielectric heterogeneities should always look 'sharper' (better resolved) than inhomogeneous charge distributions. This fact should be taken into account when interpreting images of heterogeneous samples.

  16. Studies on the Presence of Mycotoxins in Biological Samples: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, Laura; Font, Guillermina; Manyes, Lara

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites with bioaccumulation levels leading to their carry-over into animal fluids, organs, and tissues. As a consequence, mycotoxin determination in biological samples from humans and animals has been reported worldwide. Since most mycotoxins show toxic effects at low concentrations and considering the extremely low levels present in biological samples, the application of reliable detection methods is required. This review summarizes the information regarding the studies involving mycotoxin determination in biological samples over the last 10 years. Relevant data on extraction methodology, detection techniques, sample size, limits of detection, and quantitation are presented herein. Briefly, liquid-liquid extraction followed by LC-MS/MS determination was the most common technique. The most analyzed mycotoxin was ochratoxin A, followed by zearalenone and deoxynivalenol—including their metabolites, enniatins, fumonisins, aflatoxins, T-2 and HT-2 toxins. Moreover, the studies were classified by their purpose, mainly focused on the development of analytical methodologies, mycotoxin biomonitoring, and exposure assessment. The study of tissue distribution, bioaccumulation, carry-over, persistence and transference of mycotoxins, as well as, toxicokinetics and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) were other proposed goals for biological sample analysis. Finally, an overview of risk assessment was discussed. PMID:28820481

  17. A review of blood sample handling and pre-processing for metabolomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Vinicius Veri; Barbas, Coral; Dudzik, Danuta

    2017-09-01

    Metabolomics has been found to be applicable to a wide range of clinical studies, bringing a new era for improving clinical diagnostics, early disease detection, therapy prediction and treatment efficiency monitoring. A major challenge in metabolomics, particularly untargeted studies, is the extremely diverse and complex nature of biological specimens. Despite great advances in the field there still exist fundamental needs for considering pre-analytical variability that can introduce bias to the subsequent analytical process and decrease the reliability of the results and moreover confound final research outcomes. Many researchers are mainly focused on the instrumental aspects of the biomarker discovery process, and sample related variables sometimes seem to be overlooked. To bridge the gap, critical information and standardized protocols regarding experimental design and sample handling and pre-processing are highly desired. Characterization of a range variation among sample collection methods is necessary to prevent results misinterpretation and to ensure that observed differences are not due to an experimental bias caused by inconsistencies in sample processing. Herein, a systematic discussion of pre-analytical variables affecting metabolomics studies based on blood derived samples is performed. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations concerning experimental design, collection, pre-processing procedures and storage conditions as a practical review that can guide and serve for the standardization of protocols and reduction of undesirable variation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A non-uniform sampling approach enables studies of dilute and unstable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljenović, Tomas; Jia, Xinying; Lavrencic, Peter; Kobe, Bostjan; Mobli, Mehdi

    2017-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method in structural and functional analysis of macromolecules and has become particularly prevalent in studies of protein structure, function and dynamics. Unique to NMR spectroscopy is the relatively low constraints on sample preparation and the high level of control of sample conditions. Proteins can be studied in a wide range of buffer conditions, e.g. different pHs and variable temperatures, allowing studies of proteins under conditions that are closer to their native environment compared to other structural methods such as X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. The key disadvantage of NMR is the relatively low sensitivity of the method, requiring either concentrated samples or very lengthy data-acquisition times. Thus, proteins that are unstable or can only be studied in dilute solutions are often considered practically unfeasible for NMR studies. Here, we describe a general method, where non-uniform sampling (NUS) allows for signal averaging to be monitored in an iterative manner, enabling efficient use of spectrometer time, ultimately leading to savings in costs associated with instrument and isotope-labelled protein use. The method requires preparation of multiple aliquots of the protein sample that are flash-frozen and thawed just before acquisition of a short NMR experiments carried out while the protein is stable (12 h in the presented case). Non-uniform sampling enables sufficient resolution to be acquired for each short experiment. Identical NMR datasets are acquired and sensitivity is monitored after each co-added spectrum is reconstructed. The procedure is repeated until sufficient signal-to-noise is obtained. We discuss how maximum entropy reconstruction is used to process the data, and propose a variation on the previously described method of automated parameter selection. We conclude that combining NUS with iterative co-addition is a general approach, and particularly powerful when applied to unstable

  19. Statistical inferences for data from studies conducted with an aggregated multivariate outcome-dependent sample design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tsui-Shan; Longnecker, Matthew P; Zhou, Haibo

    2017-03-15

    Outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) scheme is a cost-effective sampling scheme where one observes the exposure with a probability that depends on the outcome. The well-known such design is the case-control design for binary response, the case-cohort design for the failure time data, and the general ODS design for a continuous response. While substantial work has been carried out for the univariate response case, statistical inference and design for the ODS with multivariate cases remain under-developed. Motivated by the need in biological studies for taking the advantage of the available responses for subjects in a cluster, we propose a multivariate outcome-dependent sampling (multivariate-ODS) design that is based on a general selection of the continuous responses within a cluster. The proposed inference procedure for the multivariate-ODS design is semiparametric where all the underlying distributions of covariates are modeled nonparametrically using the empirical likelihood methods. We show that the proposed estimator is consistent and developed the asymptotically normality properties. Simulation studies show that the proposed estimator is more efficient than the estimator obtained using only the simple-random-sample portion of the multivariate-ODS or the estimator from a simple random sample with the same sample size. The multivariate-ODS design together with the proposed estimator provides an approach to further improve study efficiency for a given fixed study budget. We illustrate the proposed design and estimator with an analysis of association of polychlorinated biphenyl exposure to hearing loss in children born to the Collaborative Perinatal Study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Environmental study of two significant solid samples: gravitation dust sediment and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeteiová, Dagmar; Rusnák, Radoslav; Kucanová, Eva; Fióová, Beáta; Ružičková, Silvia; Fekete, Ilona; Horváth, Márk; Dirner, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    In this work are presented results of the complex study of two significant solid environmental samples: gravitation dust sediments (industrial pollutants, potential source of risk elements input to soils) and soils (component of the environment, potential source of risk elements input to food web). The first phase of this study was focused on the study of the significant chemical properties (phase composition, content of organic and inorganic carbon) of the dust and soil samples. In the second phase, the fractionation analysis was used on the evaluation of the mobility of chosen risk elements (Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) in the studied samples. The single-step extractions were applied in the order of the isolation of the element forms (fractions), with different mobilities during defined ecological conditions by utilization of the following reagents: 1 mol dm(-3) NH(4)NO(3) for isolation of the "mobile" fraction, 0.05 mol dm(-3) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 0.43 mol dm(-3) CH(3)COOH for isolation of the "mobilizable" fraction, and 2 mol dm(-3) HNO(3) for isolation of all releasable forms. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, it is possible to state that different origins and positions of solid environmental samples in the environment reflect in different chemical properties of their matrix. The different properties of the sample matrix result in different mobilities of risk elements in these kinds of samples. The fractionation analysis with single-step extraction for isolation element fractions is the method most suitable for easy checking of environmental pollution and for evaluation of risk elements cycle in the environment.

  1. Enhanced procedural blank control for organic geochemical studies of critical sample material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, A; Schumacher, T C; Hallmann, C

    2016-09-01

    Organic contamination of sedimentary rocks can produce artefacts in studies of hydrocarbon composition, and this can have significant negative consequences for interpretations of the geobiological record. False positives - that is cases of non-syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarkers - are common in Precambrian studies, and significant challenges persist despite the intensive effort devoted to these studies. Efforts to standardize the 'burden of proof' for distinguishing between contamination and syngenetic material have to date failed to yield a simple or universal protocol, yet the need remains great, as both bitumen-lean rocks and bitumen-rich samples can be vulnerable to the accumulation of false-positive signals. In an effort to determine the best approach to quality control, we tested the capability of different blank materials to collect ambient contamination by assessing their capacity to adsorb hydrocarbons during storage in plastic bags and found that commonly used Quartz sand does not provide an adequate measure of storage- or laboratory-induced contamination. Brick blanks, having the advantage that they can parallel rock samples even during the sawing process, are characterized by similar poor adsorption properties. Primarily steered by mineralogy, organic carbon content and surface area, model-black shales can adsorb up to 20 times more contaminants than sand blanks and up to 200 times more contaminants than organic-free model-carbonates. This observation provides an explanation for reports and observations of seemingly systematic stratigraphic variation of contaminants, but mostly should raise awareness for the evaluation of procedural blanks, in particular of sample-to-blank ratios, when studying bitumen-lean rock samples of varying lithologies. Additionally, differences between the hydrocarbon profiles in plastic bags and the hydrocarbon signatures transferred to blank materials emphasize difficulties in the unequivocal detection of contamination sources

  2. Validation study of a multi-method integrity test in a Peruvian sample

    OpenAIRE

    Blumen, Sheyla; Bayona, Hugo; Givoli, Simon; Pecker, Gabriela; Fine, Saul

    2016-01-01

    The present study summarizes the validity of a multi-method integrity test developed to measure integrity and counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) in personnel selection of a Peruvian sample. This instrument has been thoroughly studied in other cultural contexts, establishing its validity in predicting counter-productive behaviors. In order to study external validity, two criteria were used: (a) The Counterproductive Work Behavior Checklist (CWB-C) and (b) a supervisor evaluation questionna...

  3. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Sayed, Ahmed A.; Al-Rashoudi, Abdualltef H.; Al-Eisa, Abdulrhman A.; Addar, Abdullah M.; Al-Hargan, Abdullah H.; Al-Jerian, Albaraa A.; Al-Omair, Abdullah A.; Ahmed I. Al-Sheddi; Hussam I. Al-Nowaiser; Al-Kathiri, Omar A.; Al-Hassan, Abdullah H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire fro...

  4. Epidemiological Studies Based on Small Sample Sizes – A Statistician's Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Ersbøll Annette; Ersbøll Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    We consider 3 basic steps in a study, which have relevance for the statistical analysis. They are: study design, data quality, and statistical analysis. While statistical analysis is often considered an important issue in the literature and the choice of statistical method receives much attention, less emphasis seems to be put on study design and necessary sample sizes. Finally, a very important step, namely assessment and validation of the quality of the data collected seems to be completel...

  5. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lijiao; Siegert, Michael; Ivanov, Ivan; Pisciotta, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2 A/m(2) (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients' perspectives on providing a stool sample to their GP: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecky, Donna M; Hawking, Meredith K D; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2014-11-01

    Stool specimen collection is challenging and informal feedback has indicated that participants find the process difficult. Increasing stool specimen returns would improve the investigation of outbreaks of diarrhoeal and food-borne disease. To explore the barriers to stool sample collection and specimen return to ascertain which factors may help to improve the process. Qualitative patient interview study in Gloucester, UK. A two-stage purposive sampling process was used to identify patients who had either previous experience or no experience of collecting a stool sample. The interview schedule, based on the theory of planned behaviour, was used to facilitate interviews with 26 patients. Interview transcripts were analysed using a modified framework analysis. Barriers to collection included embarrassment, fear of results, concerns around hygiene and contamination, discretion and privacy, and lack of information. Personal gain was identified as the main incentive to collecting and returning a stool sample. The need for an information leaflet on stool collection was emphasised by most patients. GPs could make a number of small changes that could make a big difference for patients and potentially increase stool sample return. If they, rather than receptionists, distributed collection kits it may be easier for patients to ask any questions they had regarding collection. In addition, the provision of a stool-collection information leaflet could increase patients' confidence regarding collecting the sample, and providing drop-off boxes for specimens could help prevent patients' embarrassment regarding handing their stool over to a receptionist. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  7. Study on a pattern classification method of soil quality based on simplified learning sample dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiahua; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the massive soil information in current soil quality grade evaluation, this paper constructed an intelligent classification approach of soil quality grade depending on classical sampling techniques and disordered multiclassification Logistic regression model. As a case study to determine the learning sample capacity under certain confidence level and estimation accuracy, and use c-means algorithm to automatically extract the simplified learning sample dataset from the cultivated soil quality grade evaluation database for the study area, Long chuan county in Guangdong province, a disordered Logistic classifier model was then built and the calculation analysis steps of soil quality grade intelligent classification were given. The result indicated that the soil quality grade can be effectively learned and predicted by the extracted simplified dataset through this method, which changed the traditional method for soil quality grade evaluation. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  8. A case study of sample entropy analysis to the fault detection of bearing in wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Ni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rolling bearing is an important and fragile component in the wind turbine transmission system. The failure of rolling bearing is one of the highest risk events which may result in unexpected economic loss. To give a proper condition assessment of rolling bearing, especially for early fault detection, is of great importance and become an urgent issue to the wind energy industry. In this paper, sample entropy is studied through the field data of wind turbine transmission system measured from Lu Nan Wind Farm in China. Compared with several frequently used statistical indicators, sample entropy features advantages in detecting and evaluating the progress of the early faults of the rolling bearing. The studies show that the sample entropy is an effective and practical tool for condition monitoring of rolling bearing for a wind turbine transmission system.

  9. Mars, Phobos, and Deimos Sample Return Enabled by ARRM Alternative Trade Study Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob A.; Vavrina, Matthew; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min; Naasz, Bo J.

    2014-01-01

    The Asteroid Robotic Redirect Mission (ARRM) has been the topic of many mission design studies since 2011. The reference ARRM spacecraft uses a powerful solar electric propulsion (SEP) system and a bag device to capture a small asteroid from an Earth-like orbit and redirect it to a distant retrograde orbit (DRO) around the moon. The ARRM Option B spacecraft uses the same propulsion system and multi-Degree of Freedom (DoF) manipulators device to retrieve a very large sample (thousands of kilograms) from a 100+ meter diameter farther-away Near Earth Asteroid (NEA). This study will demonstrate that the ARRM Option B spacecraft design can also be used to return samples from Mars and its moons - either by acquiring a large rock from the surface of Phobos or Deimos, and or by rendezvousing with a sample-return spacecraft launched from the surface of Mars.

  10. Accuracy of micro four-point probe measurements on inhomogeneous samples: A probe spacing dependence study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a probe spacing dependence study in order to estimate the accuracy of micro four-point probe measurements on inhomogeneous samples. Based on sensitivity calculations, both sheet resistance and Hall effect measurements are studied for samples (e.g. laser annealed samples......) with periodic variations of sheet resistance, sheet carrier density, and carrier mobility. With a variation wavelength of ¿, probe spacings from 0.0012 to 1002 have been applied to characterize the local variations. The calculations show that the measurement error is highly dependent on the probe spacing. When...... the probe spacing is smaller than 1/40 of the variation wavelength, micro four-point probes can provide an accurate record of local properties with less than 1% measurement error. All the calculations agree well with previous experimental results....

  11. Outpatient Tinnitus Clinic, Self-Help Web Platform, or Mobile Application to Recruit Tinnitus Study Samples?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Probst

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For understanding the heterogeneity of tinnitus, large samples are required. However, investigations on how samples recruited by different methods differ from each other are lacking. In the present study, three large samples each recruited by different means were compared: N = 5017 individuals registered at a self-help web platform for tinnitus (crowdsourcing platform Tinnitus Talk, N = 867 users of a smart mobile application for tinnitus (crowdsensing platform TrackYourTinnitus, and N = 3786 patients contacting an outpatient tinnitus clinic (Tinnitus Center of the University Hospital Regensburg. The three samples were compared regarding age, gender, and duration of tinnitus (month or years perceiving tinnitus; subjective report using chi-squared tests. The three samples significantly differed from each other in age, gender and tinnitus duration (p < 0.05. Users of the TrackYourTinnitus crowdsensing platform were younger, users of the Tinnitus Talk crowdsourcing platform had more often female gender, and users of both newer technologies (crowdsourcing and crowdsensing had more frequently acute/subacute tinnitus (<3 months and 4–6 months as well as a very long tinnitus duration (>20 years. The implications of these findings for clinical research are that newer technologies such as crowdsourcing and crowdsensing platforms offer the possibility to reach individuals hard to get in contact with at an outpatient tinnitus clinic. Depending on the aims and the inclusion/exclusion criteria of a given study, different recruiting strategies (clinic and/or newer technologies offer different advantages and disadvantages. In general, the representativeness of study results might be increased when tinnitus study samples are recruited in the clinic as well as via crowdsourcing and crowdsensing.

  12. Analysis of family- and population-based samples in cohort genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manichaikul, Ani; Chen, Wei-Min; Williams, Kayleen; Wong, Quenna; Sale, Michèle M; Pankow, James S; Tsai, Michael Y; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C

    2012-02-01

    Cohort studies typically sample unrelated individuals from a population, although family members of index cases may also be recruited to investigate shared familial risk factors. Recruitment of family members may be incomplete or ancillary to the main cohort, resulting in a mixed sample of independent family units, including unrelated singletons and multiplex families. Multiple methods are available to perform genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of binary or continuous traits in families, but it is unclear whether methods known to perform well on ascertained pedigrees, sibships, or trios are appropriate in analysis of a mixed unrelated cohort and family sample. We present simulation studies based on Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) pedigree structures to compare the performance of several popular methods of GWA analysis for both quantitative and dichotomous traits in cohort studies. We evaluate approaches suitable for analysis of families, and combined the best performing methods with population-based samples either by meta-analysis, or by pooled analysis of family- and population-based samples (mega-analysis), comparing type 1 error and power. We further assess practical considerations, such as availability of software and ability to incorporate covariates in statistical modeling, and demonstrate our recommended approaches through quantitative and binary trait analysis of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) in 2,553 MESA family- and population-based African-American samples. Our results suggest linear modeling approaches that accommodate family-induced phenotypic correlation (e.g., variance-component model for quantitative traits or generalized estimating equations for dichotomous traits) perform best in the context of combined family- and population-based cohort GWAS.

  13. The role of sample preparation in interpretation of trace element concentration variability in moss bioindication studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Lamothe, P.J.; Crock, J.G.; Galuszka, A.; Dolegowska, S.

    2011-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in plant bioindicators are often determined to assess the quality of the environment. Instrumental methods used for trace element determination require digestion of samples. There are different methods of sample preparation for trace element analysis, and the selection of the best method should be fitted for the purpose of a study. Our hypothesis is that the method of sample preparation is important for interpretation of the results. Here we compare the results of 36 element determinations performed by ICP-MS on ashed and on acid-digested (HNO3, H2O2) samples of two moss species (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) collected in Alaska and in south-central Poland. We found that dry ashing of the moss samples prior to analysis resulted in considerably lower detection limits of all the elements examined. We also show that this sample preparation technique facilitated the determination of interregional and interspecies differences in the chemistry of trace elements. Compared to the Polish mosses, the Alaskan mosses displayed more positive correlations of the major rock-forming elements with ash content, reflecting those elements' geogenic origin. Of the two moss species, P. schreberi from both Alaska and Poland was also highlighted by a larger number of positive element pair correlations. The cluster analysis suggests that the more uniform element distribution pattern of the Polish mosses primarily reflects regional air pollution sources. Our study has shown that the method of sample preparation is an important factor in statistical interpretation of the results of trace element determinations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Anxiety and depression in Brazilian orthopaedics inpatients: a cross sectional study with a clinical sample comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Vinícius Ynoe; Jorge, Miguel Roberto; Faloppa, Flávio; Belloti, João Carlos

    2010-03-01

    There are few studies on the development of anxiety and depression in orthopaedics and trauma (O&T) inpatients. We designed a cross-sectional study aimed at comparing the prevalence of depression and anxiety in 100 O&T inpatients and 100 clinical inpatients in the same hospital. O&T patients were divided into subgroups: trauma and non-trauma (arthroplasty, tumour, and infection sub grouping). We measured anxiety and depression by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and co-morbidities by the Charlson age-adjusted comorbidity index (CCI). For the trauma subgroup, AO/OTA fracture classification and Gustillo and Anderson grade of open fractures classification was applied. The prevalence of anxiety and depression was 35% and 28%, respectively for the clinical sample, and 44% and 33% for the O&T sample. Compared with the clinical sample, anxiety scores were higher in the O&T sample (p = .047), and in arthroplasty (p = .020) and trauma subgroups (p = .031). In the O&T sample, high CCI scores were associated with high anxiety scores (p = .033).

  15. DNA sampling from eggshells and microsatellite genotyping in rare tropical birds: Case study on Brazilian Merganser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Augusta Maia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study shows that sampling maternal DNA from hatched and abandoned eggshells is a viable noninvasive strategy for studying the genetics of rare or endangered tropical birds, as exemplified here by the Brazilian Merganser (Mergus octosetaceus. Eighteen microsatellites were isolated from enriched libraries and nine heterologous loci from related species were tested. Seven loci were amplified successfully, with five of them being polymorphic. These loci exhibited amplicons ranging from 110 to 254 bp for 132 samples, with 60 from eggshells and 72 from blood or muscle samples. The number of alleles for M. octosetaceus ranged from one to six (mean = 3.71, which is low compared to M. merganser (1-15 alleles, a ‘least concern’ species. Genetic diversity did not differ significantly between noninvasive and invasive samples (Z(u = 0.31, p = 0.37. Thus, noninvasive sampling, as demonstrated here with eggshells, provides an efficient means to assess genetic diversity in tropical birds without the need to capture and handle them.

  16. Structural and magnetic properties evolution study method using a single ribbon-shaped sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Javier A.

    2017-06-01

    A new type of study is presented for magnetic and structural characterization of amorphous or nanocrystalline metallic alloys in ribbon or wire-shaped samples. A single sample is subjecting to successive steps of flash isocurrent heat treatments with increasing duration in time, followed by a rapid cooling, while magneto-electric properties evolution are scanned in situ at room temperature. When one set of isocurrent heat treatments is finished, the annealing current is increased and a new set of isocurrent treatments starts. The properties studied were the saturation magnetization and the coercive field at 50 Hz, magnetic permeability at 100 kHz and electrical resistance from where we also obtained the crystalline fraction. The method was applied on two samples of Finemet-like alloys and the results were analyzed from the perspective of current literature. With the present method it is possible to obtain a general and meticulous understanding of the structural and magnetic evolution of the samples tested, with a considerable saving of time and samples.

  17. Strategi Program Melalui Penghadiran Kedekatan Dengan Penonton (Studi Kasus Episode “Misteri Pesona Sinden”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donie Fadjar Kurniawan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Opera Van Java is a television comedy drama show that the idea of the show isin the form of modern puppet show. It is said to be modern because the story is generallydeveloped from stories emerging in society. Opera Van Java is a comedy drama full ofartistic-arrangement elements that support the storyline in each episode. Statement ofthe problem in this research is how the setting, makeup and costume drama televisioncomedy Opera Van Java as a programming strategy through presenting closeness withthe audience. The purpose of this study is to describe how the setting, makeup andcostume of television comedy drama Opera Van Java as a programming strategy throughpresenting closeness with the audience. This study used a qualitative descriptive methodand its sample selection using purposive sampling technique. The selected sample wasepisode “Misteri Pesona Sinden”. The selection of episodes based on the local contentthat can be described and analyzed further. The results of the analysis on an episode ofthe television comedy drama “MisteriPesonaSinden” are artistic-arrangement elementslike setting, make up and costumes shown in things and objects are often seen, perceivedand used in everyday society. In the end, the fact is then able to present and bringcloseness with the studio audience and viewers at home. Keywords: setting, makeup, costume, Opera Van Java, Misteri Pesona Sinden

  18. Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Sampling and analysis plan vol 1: Field sampling plan vol II: Quality assurance project plan. Addendum 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisbeck, D.; Thompson, P.; Williams, T.; Ehlers, M.; Eliass, M.

    1996-09-01

    U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an inactive facility pursuant to the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure list. Past investigation activities indicate that polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) are the primary chemicals of concern. This task calls for provision of the necessary staff and equipment to provide remedial investigation/feasibility study support for the USAEC BRAC Program investigation at WRF. This Sampling and Analysis Plan, Addendum 1, Field Sampling Plan presents the sample location and rationale for additional samples required to complete the RI/FS; and the Quality Assurance Project Plan presents any additional data quality objectives and proposed laboratory methods for chemical analysis of samples.

  19. Power and sample size calculations for Mendelian randomization studies using one genetic instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Guy; Cowling, Benjamin J; Schooling, C Mary

    2013-08-01

    Mendelian randomization, which is instrumental variable analysis using genetic variants as instruments, is an increasingly popular method of making causal inferences from observational studies. In order to design efficient Mendelian randomization studies, it is essential to calculate the sample sizes required. We present formulas for calculating the power of a Mendelian randomization study using one genetic instrument to detect an effect of a given size, and the minimum sample size required to detect effects for given levels of significance and power, using asymptotic statistical theory. We apply the formulas to some example data and compare the results with those from simulation methods. Power and sample size calculations using these formulas should be more straightforward to carry out than simulation approaches. These formulas make explicit that the sample size needed for Mendelian randomization study is inversely proportional to the square of the correlation between the genetic instrument and the exposure and proportional to the residual variance of the outcome after removing the effect of the exposure, as well as inversely proportional to the square of the effect size.

  20. Size Distributions and Characterization of Native and Ground Samples for Toxicology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.; Taylor, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation shows charts and graphs that review the particle size distribution and characterization of natural and ground samples for toxicology studies. There are graphs which show the volume distribution versus the number distribution for natural occurring dust, jet mill ground dust, and ball mill ground dust.

  1. Required sample size for monitoring stand dynamics in strict forest reserves: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Van Den Meersschaut; Bart De Cuyper; Kris Vandekerkhove; Noel Lust

    2000-01-01

    Stand dynamics in European strict forest reserves are commonly monitored using inventory densities of 5 to 15 percent of the total surface. The assumption that these densities guarantee a representative image of certain parameters is critically analyzed in a case study for the parameters basal area and stem number. The required sample sizes for different accuracy and...

  2. Results for five sets of forensic genetic markers studied in a Greek population sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Mas, Carmen; Skitsa, I; Steinmeier, E

    2015-01-01

    A population sample of 223 Greek individuals was typed for five sets of forensic genetic markers with the kits NGM SElect™, SNPforID 49plex, DIPplex(®), Argus X-12 and PowerPlex(®) Y23. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed for any of the studied markers after Holm...

  3. Anxiety in High-Functioning Autism: A Pilot Study of Experience Sampling Using a Mobile Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Gracey, Carolyn; Wood, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress are everyday issues for many people with high-functioning autism, and while cognitive-behavioural therapy is the treatment of choice for the management of anxiety, there are challenges in using it with people with high-functioning autism. This study used modified experience sampling techniques to examine everyday anxiety and…

  4. Risk Factors for Severe Inter-Sibling Violence: A Preliminary Study of a Youth Forensic Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Roxanne; Cooke, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The perpetration of severe inter-sibling violence (SISV) remains a largely unexplored area of family violence. This article describes an investigation of risk factors for intentional SISV perpetration. A sample of 111 young people under the care of the Scottish criminal justice or welfare systems was studied. A SISV perpetration interview schedule…

  5. Disadvantaged Youth Report Less Negative Emotion to Minor Stressors When with Peers: An Experience Sampling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uink, Bep Norma; Modecki, Kathryn Lynn; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Previous Experience Sampling Method (ESM) studies demonstrate that adolescents' daily emotional states are heavily influenced by their immediate social context. However, despite adolescence being a risk period for exposure to daily stressors, research has yet to examine the influence of peers on adolescents' emotional responses to stressors…

  6. Detecting evidence for CO2 fertilization from tree ring studies: The potential role of sampling biases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, R.J.W.; Gloor, E.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Tree ring analysis allows reconstructing historical growth rates over long periods. Several studies have reported an increasing trend in ring widths, often attributed to growth stimulation by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, these trends may also have been caused by sampling

  7. Evaluation of HDPE water sample bottles and PVC sampler tubing used in herbicide dissipation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. B. Fischer; J. L. Michael; H. L. Gibbs

    2009-01-01

    The recovery of six herbicides (triclopyr, triclopyr ester, sulfometuron methyl, metsulfuron methyl, imazapyr, and hexazinone) was evaluated in two stream water samples, one from Weogufka Creek in the Alabama Piedmont and one from a stagnant stream in the Escambia Experimental Forest near Florida. Simulated field study conditions were...

  8. Sample Size Determination in a Chi-Squared Test Given Information from an Earlier Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Raphael

    1996-01-01

    A rigorous method is outlined for using information from a previous study and explicitly taking into account the variability of an effect size estimate when determining sample size for a chi-squared test. This approach assures that the average power of all experiments in a discipline attains the desired level. (SLD)

  9. Laboratory performance study for passive sampling of nonpolar chemicals in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.; Smedes, F.; Crum, S.

    2017-01-01

    Two laboratory performance studies with 21 and 11 participants were carried out for passive sampling of nonpolar chemicals in water, using silicone samplers that were deployed for 7 wk and 13 wk at 2 river sites in the Netherlands. Target analytes were polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic

  10. Adaptation of image cytometry methodology for DNA ploidy analysis of cervical epithelium samples: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Eliza Motta Duarte

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Image cytometry of the cervical specimens revealed DNA aneuploidy, most probably resulting from chromosomal alterations and appearing as precancerous lesions in 65% of the cases. The adaptations implemented in this study, enabled the DNA-image cytometry to become more accessible, enhancing its extended use as an adjuvant strategy for the early screening of the cervical epithelium samples during routine analyses.

  11. Lymph node sampling in localized neuroblastoma: a Pediatric Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contador, M P; Johnston, S; Smith, E I; Shuster, J J; Hayes, F A; Castleberry, R P

    1999-06-01

    Lymph node (LN) sampling was required by the Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) staging for neuroblastoma and currently is required as a part of the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS). This retrospective study of planned lymph node sampling in patients with localized neuroblastoma was carried out with the intent of assisting surgeons in carrying out this procedure. The report documents the POG experience where LN, both uninvolved and involved with tumor, were found based on site of primary. From 391 patients with localized neuroblastoma of the abdomen, chest, and neck, 238 patients had LN sampling at the primary operation, and these patients constitute the major part of the study. In addition, 89 patients had a carefully documented search for LN, and 64 had neither search nor biopsy. The operative note, pathology report, and surgical study sheet were used in the 238 patients based on the site of the primary tumor to determine which nodal groups or basins underwent biopsy, and in which groups tumor was found. The pattern of drainage, based on the primary site of abdominal tumors, favored an arterial rather than venous pathway. Primary tumors and metastatic LN were more numerous on the left side. The abdominal drainage followed three pathways: (1) infrarenal tumors from the left and midline were associated with paraaortic LN; (2) right infrarenal tumors were associated with LN in the paracaval basin; (3) with suprarenal primaries and with both adrenals, the superior mesenteric-portal-celiac basins were most productive for nodal sampling. Tumor was found most frequently in the left adrenal-renal basin and in the paraaortic basin. The actual number of LN sampled in a single case varied from 1 to 19 LN, with a mean number of LN based on stage and primary from one to seven LN. The tumor spread in LN was consistent with a "watershed" course, but this was not statistically significant. Patients for whom LN were sought had a better outcome, contrasting with the

  12. Sorption-desorption studies on tuff. II. Continuation of studies with samples from Jackass Flats, Nevada and initial studies with samples from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, E.N.; Aguilar, R.D.; Bayhurst, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    Distruibution coefficients were determined by a static (batch) technique for sorption-desorption of radionuclides between tuffs from drill holes UE25a No. 1 and J-13 at the Nevada Test Site and water from well J-13. Measurements were performed under atmospheric and controlled atmosphere conditions. Under atmospheric conditions tuffs high in zeolite minerals had sorption ratios of {similar_to}10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} ml/g with Sr, Cs, Ba, Ce, Eu, Am, and Pu. For tuffs similar mineralogically to a microgranite the sorption ratios were {similar_to}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} ml/g. Values for U and Tc were obtained under controlled atmosphere (< 0.2 ppM 0{sub 2}) conditions. Studies were also begun to measure distribution ratios by a dynamic (column) technique. The ratios obtained for the elements studied, Sr, Cs, and Ba, were similar to, although lower than, those obtained by batch methods.

  13. A Study of Micro Craters in Material Samples after Long Duration Exposure on ISS Komplast Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaevich, S. K.; Aleksandrov, N. G.; Shumov, A. E.; Novikov, L. S.; Chernik, V. N.; Samokhina, M. S.; Golden, J. L.; Graves, R. F.; Kravchenko, M.; Christiansen, E. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Komplast materials experiment was designed by the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, together with other Russian scientific institutes, and has been carried out by Mission Control Moscow since 1998. Komplast panels fitted with material samples and sensors were located on the International Space Station (ISS) Functional Cargo Block (FGB) module exterior surface. Within the framework of this experiment, the purpose was to study the effect of the low earth orbit (LEO) environment on exposed samples of various materials. The panels were sent into orbit with the FGB when it launched on November 20, 1998. .

  14. Studies on the true coincidence correction in measuring filter samples by gamma spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lian Qi; Chang Yong Fu; Xia Bing

    2002-01-01

    The true coincidence correction in measuring filter samples has been studied by high efficiency HPGe gamma detectors. The true coincidence correction for a specific three excited levels de-excitation case has been analyzed, and the typical analytical expressions of true coincidence correction factors have been given. According to the measured relative efficiency on the detector surface with 8 'single' energy gamma emitters and efficiency of filter samples, the peak and total efficiency surfaces are fitted. The true coincidence correction factors of sup 6 sup 0 Co and sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 Eu calculated by the efficiency surfaces agree well with experimental results

  15. Cigarette smoking initiation during college predicts future alcohol involvement: A matched-samples study

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, MG; Doran, NM; Edland, SD; Amanda Schweizer, C; Wall, TL

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking initiation and subsequent alcohol involvement. To address this question, the present study compared alcohol use between students who initiated smoking during college and a matched sample of never-smoking students. We hypothesized greater increases in alcohol involvement among smoking initiators, mediated by exposure to cigarette use situations. Method: Included in the present study were 104 Chinese American and Korean...

  16. The importance of taxon sampling in genomic studies: an example from the cyclooxygenases of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havird, Justin C; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2010-07-01

    Comparative genomic studies must often rely on single model species and exemplars to represent the genetic variation both within and among different major groups, because of technological, financial, and time constraints. This study of the cyclooxygenases from teleost fishes serves as a reminder that caution is required in these cases, since such incomplete taxon sampling can lead to errors in the interpretation and prediction of genome evolution, function, and structure. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Gridsampler – A Simulation Tool to Determine the Required Sample Size for Repertory Grid Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Heckmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The repertory grid is a psychological data collection technique that is used to elicit qualitative data in the form of attributes as well as quantitative ratings. A common approach for evaluating multiple repertory grid data is sorting the elicited bipolar attributes (so called constructs into mutually exclusive categories by means of content analysis. An important question when planning this type of study is determining the sample size needed to a discover all attribute categories relevant to the field and b yield a predefined minimal number of attributes per category. For most applied researchers who collect multiple repertory grid data, programming a numeric simulation to answer these questions is not feasible. The gridsampler software facilitates determining the required sample size by providing a GUI for conducting the necessary numerical simulations. Researchers can supply a set of parameters suitable for the specific research situation, determine the required sample size, and easily explore the effects of changes in the parameter set.

  18. Age of the moon: An isotopic study of uranium-thorium-lead systematics of lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumoto, M.; Rosholt, J.N.

    1970-01-01

    Concentrations of U, Th, and Pb in Apollo 11 samples studied are low (U. 0.16 to 0.87; Th, 0.53 to 3.4; Pb, 0.29 to 1.7, in ppm) but the extremely radiogenic lead in samples allows radiometric dating. The fine dust and the breccia have a concordant age of 4.66 billion years on the basis of 207Pb/206Pb, 206Pb/238U, 207Pb/235U, and 208Pb/232Th ratios. This age is comparable with the age of meteorites and with the age generally accepted for the earth. Six crystalline and vesicular samples are distinctly younger than the dust and breccia. The 238U/235U ratio is the same as that in earth rocks, and 234U is in radioactive equilibrium with parent 238U.

  19. Preliminary study of Histamine in Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss samples from fish markets in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Mashak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Histidine is one of non-protein nitrogen extractives which found in fish such as Salmonidae family (trout is belonged this family.Members of this family has high amounts of Histidine compared to other foods. Some Salmon microbial flora can decarboxylated Histidine to Histamine and this metabolite is a hazard component for human. Evaluation of Histamine levels in Salmon via a fast and accurate method can be useful for decreasing the intensity of these hazards. In this study evaluated psychrophilic and mesophilic aerobic bacteria and also histamine level in purchased salmon samples from fish markets in Tehran by ELISA method (Rida Screen Histamine Kits. A total of 60 samples of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss purchased from fish markets and assayed for Histamine by using Rida Screen Histamine ELISA Kits. Bacterial enumeration was performed on 10-fold diluted samples at 25°C and 35°C for mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, respectively. The range of Histamine content was 4 to 28mg/100g (14.18mg/100g. 12.50 percent of samples had Histamine content above the international standard level (20mg/100g. Data achieved by bacterial enumeration and ELISA test were analyzed by Pearson correlation test indicated that direct relationship between histamine and the number of bacteria in fish samples is established (p

  20. Technical Basis for the Removal of Unremediated Nitrate Salt Sampling (UNS) to Support LANL Treatment Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    The sampling of unremediated nitrate salts (UNS) was originally proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) (collectively, the Permittees) as a means to ensure adequate understanding and characterization of the problematic waste stream created when the Permittees remediated these nitrate salts-bearing waste with an organic absorbent. The proposal to sample the UNS was driven by a lack of understanding with respect to the radioactive contamination release that occurred within the underground repository at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in February 14, 2014, as well as recommendations made by a Peer Review Team. As discussed, the Permittees believe that current knowledge and understanding of the waste has sufficiently matured such that this additional sampling is not required. Perhaps more importantly, the risk of both chemical and radiological exposure to the workers sampling the UNS drum material is unwarranted. This memo provides the technical justification and rationale for excluding the UNS sampling from the treatment studies.

  1. Relations among questionnaire and experience sampling measures of inner speech: a smartphone app study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson-Day, Ben; Fernyhough, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Inner speech is often reported to be a common and central part of inner experience, but its true prevalence is unclear. Many questionnaire-based measures appear to lack convergent validity and it has been claimed that they overestimate inner speech in comparison to experience sampling methods (which involve collecting data at random timepoints). The present study compared self-reporting of inner speech collected via a general questionnaire and experience sampling, using data from a custom-made smartphone app (Inner Life). Fifty-one university students completed a generalized self-report measure of inner speech (the Varieties of Inner Speech Questionnaire, VISQ) and responded to at least seven random alerts to report on incidences of inner speech over a 2-week period. Correlations and pairwise comparisons were used to compare generalized endorsements and randomly sampled scores for each VISQ subscale. Significant correlations were observed between general and randomly sampled measures for only two of the four VISQ subscales, and endorsements of inner speech with evaluative or motivational characteristics did not correlate at all across different measures. Endorsement of inner speech items was significantly lower for random sampling compared to generalized self-report, for all VISQ subscales. Exploratory analysis indicated that specific inner speech characteristics were also related to anxiety and future-oriented thinking.

  2. Study on sampling of continuous linear system based on generalized Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiguang

    2003-09-01

    In the research of signal and system, the signal's spectrum and the system's frequency characteristic can be discussed through Fourier Transform (FT) and Laplace Transform (LT). However, some singular signals such as impulse function and signum signal don't satisfy Riemann integration and Lebesgue integration. They are called generalized functions in Maths. This paper will introduce a new definition -- Generalized Fourier Transform (GFT) and will discuss generalized function, Fourier Transform and Laplace Transform under a unified frame. When the continuous linear system is sampled, this paper will propose a new method to judge whether the spectrum will overlap after generalized Fourier transform (GFT). Causal and non-causal systems are studied, and sampling method to maintain system's dynamic performance is presented. The results can be used on ordinary sampling and non-Nyquist sampling. The results also have practical meaning on research of "discretization of continuous linear system" and "non-Nyquist sampling of signal and system." Particularly, condition for ensuring controllability and observability of MIMO continuous systems in references 13 and 14 is just an applicable example of this paper.

  3. Visualizing shear bands in 3-D using axisymmetric sample: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Khraisat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study a qualitative description of the occurrence of shear bands produced by a sudden impact on an axisymmetric specimen made of medium carbon steel 0.45% C is given. A simple experiment was developed aimed at producing a pinch shear stress in the front side of the test sample in order to visualize shear bands in 3-D. Curve fitting using MATLAB was employed based on the points taken from the images of the front section of the test sample. The predictions of the curve fitting suggests a hyperbolic section leading to the conclusion that within the sample there is a double cone region of material where the shear band region is located on its outer surface. The formation of the shear band is explained by the fact that the interaction of the stress wave front with the free surface of the test sample produces reflection waves that attenuate the incoming stress wave inwards leading to a stress gradient in the plane of the front side of the specimen that causes shear localization. Also, the progressively increasing cross sectional area of the test sample causes the expansion of the wave front, which also results in a stress gradient in the normal direction of the front side of the specimen. So the formation of shear bands depends not only on the impact momentum and strain rates but also on the sample’s geometry.

  4. Relations among questionnaire and experience sampling measures of inner speech: A smartphone app study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eAlderson-Day

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inner speech is often reported to be a common and central part of inner experience, but its true prevalence is unclear. Many questionnaire-based measures appear to lack convergent validity and it has been claimed that they overestimate inner speech in comparison to experience sampling methods (which involve collecting data at random timepoints. The present study compared self-reporting of inner speech collected via a general questionnaire and experience sampling, using data from a custom-made smartphone app (Inner Life. Fifty-one university students completed a generalized self-report measure of inner speech (the Varieties of Inner Speech Questionnaire, or VISQ and responded to at least 7 random alerts to report on incidences of inner speech over a 2-week period. Correlations and pairwise comparisons were used to compare generalized endorsements and randomly-sampled scores for each VISQ subscale. Significant correlations were observed between general and randomly sampled measures for only 2 of the 4 VISQ subscales, and endorsements of inner speech with evaluative or motivational characteristics did not correlate at all across different measures. Endorsement of inner speech items was significantly lower for random sampling compared to generalized self-report, for all VISQ subscales. Exploratory analysis indicated that specific inner speech characteristics were also related to anxiety and future-oriented thinking.

  5. Adaptive sampling in two-phase designs: a biomarker study for progression in arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Michael A; Cook, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Response-dependent two-phase designs are used increasingly often in epidemiological studies to ensure sampling strategies offer good statistical efficiency while working within resource constraints. Optimal response-dependent two-phase designs are difficult to implement, however, as they require specification of unknown parameters. We propose adaptive two-phase designs that exploit information from an internal pilot study to approximate the optimal sampling scheme for an analysis based on mean score estimating equations. The frequency properties of estimators arising from this design are assessed through simulation, and they are shown to be similar to those from optimal designs. The design procedure is then illustrated through application to a motivating biomarker study in an ongoing rheumatology research program. Copyright © 2015 © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25951124

  6. Advancing Research on Racial–Ethnic Health Disparities: Improving Measurement Equivalence in Studies with Diverse Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrine, Hope; Corral, Irma

    2014-01-01

    To conduct meaningful, epidemiologic research on racial–ethnic health disparities, racial–ethnic samples must be rendered equivalent on other social status and contextual variables via statistical controls of those extraneous factors. The racial–ethnic groups must also be equally familiar with and have similar responses to the methods and measures used to collect health data, must have equal opportunity to participate in the research, and must be equally representative of their respective populations. In the absence of such measurement equivalence, studies of racial–ethnic health disparities are confounded by a plethora of unmeasured, uncontrolled correlates of race–ethnicity. Those correlates render the samples, methods, and measures incomparable across racial–ethnic groups, and diminish the ability to attribute health differences discovered to race–ethnicity vs. to its correlates. This paper reviews the non-equivalent yet normative samples, methodologies and measures used in epidemiologic studies of racial–ethnic health disparities, and provides concrete suggestions for improving sample, method, and scalar measurement equivalence. PMID:25566524

  7. A Study on Learning Environments of Elementary School Students Taking Social Studies Course: Bursa Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Yadigar; Sezer, Gonul Onur

    2011-01-01

    Schools as educational and instructional institutions are expected to be renewable ones where motivation is increased through establishing relationships between students' interests and needs, and subject matters of social studies lessons are derived from daily life and events. Finalizing any learning activity at school by realizing it as aimed and…

  8. Comparative study on production, purification of penicillin by Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from soil and citrus samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalan, S Anto Jeya; Darwin, Pramod; Prakash, S

    2011-01-01

    To explore various unexplored locations where Penicillium spp. would be available and study the production of penicillin from the isolated Penicillium spp. in different media with altered carbohydrate source. The collected soil samples were screened for the isolation of Penicillium chrysogenum (P. chrysogenum) by soil dilution plate. The isolated Penicillium species were further grown in different production media with changes in the carbohydrate source. The extracted penicillin from various isolates was analyzed by HPLC for the efficacy of the product. Further the products were screened with various bacterial species including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). And the work was extended to find the possible action on MRSA, along with characterization using other pathogens. From the various soil and citrus samples used for analysis, only the soil sample from Government General Hospital of Bangalore, India, and Sanjay Gandhi Hospital, Bangalore, India, showed some potential growth of the desired fungi P. chrysogenum. Different production media showed varied range of growth of Penicillium. Optimum production of penicillin was obtained in maltose which proved maximum zone of inhibition during assay. Characterization of penicillin on pathogens, like wild Escherichia coli strain, Klebsiella spp., and MRSA, gave quite interesting results such as no activity on the later strain as it is resistant. HPLC data provided the analytical and confirmation details of the penicillin produced. Accordingly, the penicillin produced from the soil sample of Government General Hospital had the high milli absorbance unit of 441.5 mAu compared with that of the penicillin produced from Sanjay Gandhi Hospital sample, 85.52 mAu. Therefore, there was a considerable change in quantity of the penicillin produced from both the samples. The Penicillium spp. could be possibly rich in hospital contaminants and its environments. This research focuses on various unexplored sources of

  9. Study of Organochlorinated Pesticide Residues and Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Soil Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Vlora Gashi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and discusses the data obtained for organochlorinated pesticides and their residues in the soil samples of agricultural areas. Soil contamination is one of most important factors influencing the quality of agricultural products. Usage of heavy farm equipment, the land drainage, an exces­sive application of agrochemicals, emissions originating from mining, metallurgical, and chemical and coal power plants and transport, all generate a number of undesired substances (nitric and sulphur oxides, PAHs, heavy metals, pesticides, which after deposition in soil may influence crop quality. Thus, input of these contaminants into the environment should be carefully monitored. Levels of organochlorinated pesticides contamination were evaluated in agriculture areas that are in use. 10 soil samples were taken in agricultural areas  Plane of  Dugagjini , Kosovo. Representa­tive soil samples were collected from 0-30 cm top layer of the soil. In the analytical method we combined ultrasonic bath extraction and a Florisil column for samples clean-up. The analysis of the organochlorinated pesticides in soil samples was performed by gas chromatography technique using electron capture detector (GC/ECD. Optima-5 (low/mid polarity, 5% phenyl methyl siloxane 60 m x 0.33 mm x 0.25μm film capillary column was used for isolation and determination of organochlorinated pesticides. Low concentrations of organochlorinated pesticide and their metabolites were found in the studied samples. The presence of organochlorinated pesticides and their residues is probably resulting of their previous uses for agricultural purposes.

  10. Preliminary study of the EChO data sampling and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Focardi, M.; Pace, E.; Micela, G.; Galli, E.; Giusi, G.; Liu, S. J.; Pezzuto, S.

    2014-08-01

    The EChO Payload is an integrated spectrometer with six different channels covering the spectral range from the visible up to the thermal infrared. A common Instrument Control Unit (ICU) implements all the instrument control and health monitoring functionalities as well as all the onboard science data processing. To implement an efficient design of the ICU on board software, separate analysis of the unit requirements are needed for the commanding and housekeeping collection as well as for the data acquisition, sampling and compression. In this work we present the results of the analysis carried out to optimize the EChO data acquisition and processing chain. The HgCdTe detectors used for EChO mission allow for non-destructive readout modes, such that the charge may be read without removing it after reading out. These modes can reduce the equivalent readout noise and the gain in signal to noise ratio can be computed using well known relations based on fundamental principles. In particular, we considered a multiaccumulation approach based on non-destructive reading of detector samples taken at equal time intervals. All detectors are periodically reset after a certain number of samples have been acquired and the length of the reset interval, as well as the number of samples and the sampling rate can be adapted to the brightness of the considered source. The estimation of the best set of parameters for the signal to noise ratio optimization and of the best sampling technique has been done by taking into account also the needs of mitigating the expected radiation effects on the acquired data. Cosmic rays can indeed be one of the major sources of data loss for a space observatory, and the studies made for the JWST mission allowed us to evaluate the actual need of the implementation of a dedicated deglitching procedure on board EChO.

  11. Preliminary mass spectrometry characterization studies of galectin-3 samples, prior to carbohydrate-binding studies using Affinity mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Marko; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna

    2017-01-15

    Investigation of non-covalent complexes of proteins using Affinity Mass Spectrometry (AMS) represents a major challenge in modern biomedical research. However, many experimental obstacles can make AMS data analysis complex. Additionally, sample purity and size of the protein may still pose significant challenges. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) was used for initial mapping of protein samples. nanoESI (electrospray ionization) quadrupole-time-of-flight (QTOF) MS was used for mapping of protein samples under native conditions and subsequent AMS studies. The human galectin-3 protein sample was expressed in E. coli. Full length galectin-3 was difficult to work with, due to several truncated forms observed after the purification procedures. On the other hand, galectin-3C produced excellent quality nanoESI-MS spectra. A covalent adduct of lactose was found to be located on residue Lys 176. Functional AMS control studies indicated that galectin-3 interactions with oligosaccharides may be dependent on its charge. Mass spectrometry represents a valuable tool that can be efficiently used for structural characterization of protein samples prior to functional analyses. By means of accurate mass measurements, many protein truncations can be identified based on mass alone. Analysis of covalent adducts is more challenging. Finally, for AMS studies, careful use of controls may reveal charge-dependence of protein-oligosaccharide interactions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Designing image segmentation studies: Statistical power, sample size and reference standard quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Eli; Hu, Yipeng; Huisman, Henkjan J; Barratt, Dean C

    2017-12-01

    Segmentation algorithms are typically evaluated by comparison to an accepted reference standard. The cost of generating accurate reference standards for medical image segmentation can be substantial. Since the study cost and the likelihood of detecting a clinically meaningful difference in accuracy both depend on the size and on the quality of the study reference standard, balancing these trade-offs supports the efficient use of research resources. In this work, we derive a statistical power calculation that enables researchers to estimate the appropriate sample size to detect clinically meaningful differences in segmentation accuracy (i.e. the proportion of voxels matching the reference standard) between two algorithms. Furthermore, we derive a formula to relate reference standard errors to their effect on the sample sizes of studies using lower-quality (but potentially more affordable and practically available) reference standards. The accuracy of the derived sample size formula was estimated through Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrating, with 95% confidence, a predicted statistical power within 4% of simulated values across a range of model parameters. This corresponds to sample size errors of less than 4 subjects and errors in the detectable accuracy difference less than 0.6%. The applicability of the formula to real-world data was assessed using bootstrap resampling simulations for pairs of algorithms from the PROMISE12 prostate MR segmentation challenge data set. The model predicted the simulated power for the majority of algorithm pairs within 4% for simulated experiments using a high-quality reference standard and within 6% for simulated experiments using a low-quality reference standard. A case study, also based on the PROMISE12 data, illustrates using the formulae to evaluate whether to use a lower-quality reference standard in a prostate segmentation study. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mercury levels in hair samples of dentists: A comparative study in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekara, Lumbini A; Usoof, Rinzee; Gamage, Sachindra S T; Jayasinghe, Ruwan; Gamage, Nandasena; De Silva, Dileep; Ekanayake, Sagarika

    2017-10-22

    Elemental mercury is widely used in dentistry as dental amalgam. Hair samples constitute preferred biomarkers to determine the index of mercury exposure. In the absence of any published studies, the aim of the present study was to ascertain the level of mercury in a selected sample of dentists and controls in Sri Lanka. Hair samples (.7 g) from dentists working in and around the Colombo district in Sri Lanka (n = 50) and controls (n = 50) were digested with sulfuric acid-potassium permanganate solution, and reduced to metallic mercury with stannous chloride. Digested samples were analyzed for mercury using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The average mercury contents of the test and control samples (n = 50 each) were 5.36 ± 2.64 ppb and 3.1 ± 1.99 ppb, respectively. Based on the estimated ratio of mercury in hair to blood in humans as 250:1, the average content of mercury in the blood of the two groups could be .02 ppb and .01 ppb, respectively. The number of years in dentistry and number of amalgam restorations performed within 1 week were not correlated with the hair concentration of mercury. As the values of both groups were well below 10 ng/mL (10 ppb), within the concentrations considered as normal, mercury use was not considered an occupational hazard for dentists. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Review of sample preparation strategies for MS-based metabolomic studies in industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2016-09-28

    Fermentation and cell culture biotechnology in the form of so-called "cell factories" now play an increasingly significant role in production of both large (e.g. proteins, biopharmaceuticals) and small organic molecules for a wide variety of applications. However, associated metabolic engineering optimisation processes relying on genetic modification of organisms used in cell factories, or alteration of production conditions remain a challenging undertaking for improving the final yield and quality of cell factory products. In addition to genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic workflows, analytical metabolomics continues to play a critical role in studying detailed aspects of critical pathways (e.g. via targeted quantification of metabolites), identification of biosynthetic intermediates, and also for phenotype differentiation and the elucidation of previously unknown pathways (e.g. via non-targeted strategies). However, the diversity of primary and secondary metabolites and the broad concentration ranges encompassed during typical biotechnological processes means that simultaneous extraction and robust analytical determination of all parts of interest of the metabolome is effectively impossible. As the integration of metabolome data with transcriptome and proteome data is an essential goal of both targeted and non-targeted methods addressing production optimisation goals, additional sample preparation steps beyond necessary sampling, quenching and extraction protocols including clean-up, analyte enrichment, and derivatisation are important considerations for some classes of metabolites, especially those present in low concentrations or exhibiting poor stability. This contribution critically assesses the potential of current sample preparation strategies applied in metabolomic studies of industrially-relevant cell factory organisms using mass spectrometry-based platforms primarily coupled to liquid-phase sample introduction (i.e. flow injection, liquid

  15. Association study between the Taq1A (rs1800497 polymorphism and schizophrenia in a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirino Cordeiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe psychotic disorder with recurrent relapse and functional impairment. It results from a poorly understood gene-environment interaction. The Taq1A polymorphism (located in the gene cluster NTAD is a likely candidate for schizophrenia. Its rs1800497 polymorphism was shown to be associated with DRD2 gene expression. Therefore the present work aims to investigate a possible association between schizophrenia and such polymorphism. The compared distribution of the alleles and genotypes of the studied polymorphism was investigated in a Brazilian sample of 235 patients and 834 controls. Genotypic frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was a trend of allelic association between the Taq1A polymorphism (rs1800497 with schizophrenia in the studied sample. However no statistically differences were found between cases and controls when analyzed by gender or schizophrenia subtypes.

  16. Oxide Nanolayers in Stratified Samples Studied by X-Ray Resonant Raman Scattering at Grazing Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Leani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray resonant Raman scattering is applied at grazing incidence conditions with the aim of discriminating and identifying chemical environment of iron in different layers of stratified materials using a low resolution energy dispersive system. The methodology allows for depth studies with nanometric resolution. Nanostratified samples of Fe oxides were studied at the Brazilian synchrotron facility (LNLS using monochromatic radiation and an EDS setup. The measurements were carried out in grazing incident regime with incident photon energy lower than and close to the Fe-K absorption edge. The result allowed for characterizing oxide nanolayers, not observable with conventional geometries, identifying the oxidation state present in a particular depth of a sample surface with nanometric, or even subnanometric, resolution using a low-resolution system.

  17. A multicenter study of viable PCR using propidium monoazide to detect Legionella in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Maria; Fontana, Stefano; Dell'eva, Italo; Helfer, Fabrizia; Marchio, Michele; Stefanetti, Maria Vittoria; Cavallaro, Mario; Miglietta, Marilena; Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cuna, Teresa; Chetti, Leonarda; Sabattini, Maria Antonietta Bucci; Carlotti, Michela; Viggiani, Mariagabriella; Stenico, Alberta; Romanin, Elisa; Bonanni, Emma; Ottaviano, Claudio; Franzin, Laura; Avanzini, Claudio; Demarie, Valerio; Corbella, Marta; Cambieri, Patrizia; Marone, Piero; Rota, Maria Cristina; Bella, Antonino; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Legionella quantification in environmental samples is overestimated by qPCR. Combination with a viable dye, such as Propidium monoazide (PMA), could make qPCR (named then vPCR) very reliable. In this multicentre study 717 artificial water samples, spiked with fixed concentrations of Legionella and interfering bacterial flora, were analysed by qPCR, vPCR and culture and data were compared by statistical analysis. A heat-treatment at 55 °C for 10 minutes was also performed to obtain viable and not-viable bacteria. When data of vPCR were compared with those of culture and qPCR, statistical analysis showed significant differences (P 0.05). Overall this study provided a good experimental reproducibility of vPCR but also highlighted limits of PMA in the discriminating capability of dead and live bacteria, making vPCR not completely reliable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aluminum, iron, and lead content of respirable particulate samples from a personal monitoring study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosteson, T.D.; Spengler, J.D.; Weker, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Samples of respirable particulate matter collected during a personal monitoring study in Topeka, KS, were analyzed for iron, aluminum, and lead content. The sampling protocol and instrumentation are described in detail. Lead indoor concentrations (median = 79 ng/m/sup 3/) were found to be less than both personal (median = 112 ng/m/sup 3/) and outdoor lead concentrations (median = 106 ng/m/sup 3/). The indoor, outdoor, and personal levels of iron and aluminum were not significantly different. In addition, it was determined that outdoor respirable particulate mass does not correlate well with the personal or indoor metal concentrations, and that the amount of time spent in motor vehicles is a relatively good indicator of lead exposures. The relationships between indoor, outdoor, and personal lead are discussed in greater detail, with references to supporting evidence from other studies.

  19. Microbial Safety of Low Water Activity Foods: Study of Simulated and Durban Household Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ijabadeniyi, O. A.; Pillay, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Sixty household low water activity foods were examined and a simulative study was conducted in a high sugar, low aw almond and macadamia butter to determine the survival of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Results obtained from 60 low aw samples collected at household level had some significant differences (P≤0,05) within food categories amongst the various tests. Spices had the highest number of aerobic bacteria, aerobic spore-formers, anaerobic spore-formers, and S. aur...

  20. [Job satisfaction among a sample of Italian nurses: a questionnaire study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella, Massimiliano; Cortes Sosa, Jamy Patricia; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction among staff nurses is an important issue in any healthcare organization because of its possible impact on the quality of patient care. A questionnaire study was performed to identify possible determinants of job satisfaction among a sample of 89 nurses in Piedmont (northern Italy). Participating nurses held jobs in various hospital and ambulatory care units of two local health authorities of the region. Findings indicate that perception of an excessive degree of paperwork is the main factor negatively affecting job satisfaction.

  1. INAPPROPRIATE CONFIDENCE AND RETIREMENT PLANNING: FOUR STUDIES WITH A NATIONAL SAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Andrew M.; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Yoong, Joanne; Willis, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Financial decisions about investing and saving for retirement are increasingly complex, requiring financial knowledge and confidence in that knowledge. Few studies have examined whether direct assessments of individuals’ confidence are related to the outcomes of their financial decisions. Here, we analyzed data from a national sample recruited through RAND’s American Life Panel (ALP), an internet panel of U.S. adults aged 18 to 88. We examined the relationship of confidence with self-reported...

  2. Desert Research and Technology Studies Exposure of Lotus Coated Electrodynamic Shield Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Marcello; Peters, Wanda C.; Straka, Sharon A.; Jones, Craig B.

    2011-01-01

    The Lotus dust mitigation coating and the electrodynamic shield (EDS) are two new technologies currently being developed by NASA as countermeasures for addressing dust accumulation for long-duration human space exploration. These combined technologies were chosen by the Habitation Demonstration Unit (HDU) program for desert dust exposure at the Desert Research and Technologies Studies (D-RaTS) test site in Arizona. Characterization of these samples was performed prior to, during and post D-RaTS exposure.

  3. Gridsampler – A Simulation Tool to Determine the Required Sample Size for Repertory Grid Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Heckmann; Lukas Burk

    2017-01-01

    The repertory grid is a psychological data collection technique that is used to elicit qualitative data in the form of attributes as well as quantitative ratings. A common approach for evaluating multiple repertory grid data is sorting the elicited bipolar attributes (so called constructs) into mutually exclusive categories by means of content analysis. An important question when planning this type of study is determining the sample size needed to a) discover all attribute categories relevant...

  4. Analysis of small sample size studies using nonparametric bootstrap test with pooled resampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Alok Kumar; Mallawaarachchi, Indika; Alvarado, Luis A

    2017-06-30

    Experimental studies in biomedical research frequently pose analytical problems related to small sample size. In such studies, there are conflicting findings regarding the choice of parametric and nonparametric analysis, especially with non-normal data. In such instances, some methodologists questioned the validity of parametric tests and suggested nonparametric tests. In contrast, other methodologists found nonparametric tests to be too conservative and less powerful and thus preferred using parametric tests. Some researchers have recommended using a bootstrap test; however, this method also has small sample size limitation. We used a pooled method in nonparametric bootstrap test that may overcome the problem related with small samples in hypothesis testing. The present study compared nonparametric bootstrap test with pooled resampling method corresponding to parametric, nonparametric, and permutation tests through extensive simulations under various conditions and using real data examples. The nonparametric pooled bootstrap t-test provided equal or greater power for comparing two means as compared with unpaired t-test, Welch t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and permutation test while maintaining type I error probability for any conditions except for Cauchy and extreme variable lognormal distributions. In such cases, we suggest using an exact Wilcoxon rank sum test. Nonparametric bootstrap paired t-test also provided better performance than other alternatives. Nonparametric bootstrap test provided benefit over exact Kruskal-Wallis test. We suggest using nonparametric bootstrap test with pooled resampling method for comparing paired or unpaired means and for validating the one way analysis of variance test results for non-normal data in small sample size studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Preparation of well-defined samples of AlPdMn quasicrystals for surface studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, C. J.; Delaney, D. W.; Bloomer, T. E.; Chang, S.-L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Shen, Z.; Zhang, C.-M.; Thiel, P. A.

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a method for preparing single-grain, quasicrystalline AlPdMn samples for surface studies in ultrahigh vacuum. The main issues of concern are phase purity, the quality of the surface structure, and the surface, and the surface composition. Phase purity is enhanced by annealing the sample in ultra-pure Ar in a sealed quartz ampoule for several days before polishing. Polishing with colloidal silica allows secondary phases to be detected readily with an optical microscope. As a final precaution, phase purity can be checked sensitively with scanning Auger microscopy. After this stage, the sample can be cleaned in ultrahigh vacuum with ion bombardment. Annealing is required after bombardment to restore surface structure and to obtain a low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern of an oriented sample. However, both ion bombardment and heating to temperatures above 870 K in vacuum, produce Pd-rich surfaces. As a final step, for the five-fold surface, we recommend heating briefly to 1050-1100 K and then annealing at 870 K for several hours. This produces both an excellent LEED pattern, and a surface composition close to that of the bulk.

  6. Preliminary study on element mass fraction determination on catfish samples from Paraguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Edson G.; Catharino, Marilia G.M.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A., E-mail: emoreira@ipen.br, E-mail: mbvascon@ipen.br, E-mail: mariliasemmler@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Frutos, Sixto A.; Insaurralde, Mario S., E-mail: tony8013@hotmail.com, E-mail: insaurraldemar9@hotmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Asuncion (FCV/UNA), San Lorenzo (Paraguay). Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias. Departamento de Pesca y Acuicultura

    2013-07-01

    South American catfish (Pseudoplatystoma), commonly known in Spanish as atigrado or surubi and in Portuguese as surubim or pintado is a large fish that typically reaches 1 m long and weighs 60 kg to 80 kg and may be found at the basins of the Amazon, the Sao Francisco and de la Plata rivers, usually in riverbeds and deep wells. Being a much appreciated fish for human consumption, it is quite sought after by fishermen who have been contributing to the reduction of the stocks. This fact attracted the attention of the Paraguayan authorities to the point of imposing restrictions to free fishing and commercialization. This study aims to assist the conservation efforts towards this fish by investigating its exposure to possible pollutants. Preliminary results on element determination on six samples of catfish from Paraguayan rivers are presented. Cs, Co, Fe, Se and Zn were determined by applying an Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis method. While these element levels were lower than the legislation for human consumption, the elements As, Cr e La were not detected in the samples as they are below the detection limit of the method employed. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry was used to investigate the presence of Cd, Hg and Pb in the samples. Hg was detected in the samples while Cd and Pb were below the detection limit of the method. (author)

  7. Identification and Correction of Sample Mix-Ups in Expression Genetic Data: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Karl W; Keller, Mark P; Broman, Aimee Teo; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S; Sen, Śaunak; Attie, Alan D

    2015-08-19

    In a mouse intercross with more than 500 animals and genome-wide gene expression data on six tissues, we identified a high proportion (18%) of sample mix-ups in the genotype data. Local expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL; genetic loci influencing gene expression) with extremely large effect were used to form a classifier to predict an individual's eQTL genotype based on expression data alone. By considering multiple eQTL and their related transcripts, we identified numerous individuals whose predicted eQTL genotypes (based on their expression data) did not match their observed genotypes, and then went on to identify other individuals whose genotypes did match the predicted eQTL genotypes. The concordance of predictions across six tissues indicated that the problem was due to mix-ups in the genotypes (although we further identified a small number of sample mix-ups in each of the six panels of gene expression microarrays). Consideration of the plate positions of the DNA samples indicated a number of off-by-one and off-by-two errors, likely the result of pipetting errors. Such sample mix-ups can be a problem in any genetic study, but eQTL data allow us to identify, and even correct, such problems. Our methods have been implemented in an R package, R/lineup. Copyright © 2015 Broman et al.

  8. A family history study of male sexual orientation using three independent samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J M; Pillard, R C; Dawood, K; Miller, M B; Farrer, L A; Trivedi, S; Murphy, R L

    1999-03-01

    Available evidence suggests that male homosexuality is both familial and somewhat heritable and that some cases may be caused by an X-linked gene. However, most studies have recruited subjects in a relatively unsystematic manner, typically via advertisements, and hence suffer from the potential methodological flaw of ascertainment bias due to volunteer self-selection. In the present study we assessed the familiality of male homosexuality using two carefully ascertained samples and attempted to replicate findings consistent with X-linkage in three samples. The percentage of siblings of the probands rated as either homosexual or bisexual, with a high degree of certainty, ranged from 7 to 10% for brothers and 3 to 4% for sisters. These estimates are higher than recent comparable population-based estimates of homosexuality, supporting the importance of familial factors for male homosexuality. Estimates of lambda s for male homosexuality ranged from 3.0 to 4.0. None of the samples showed a significantly greater proportion of maternal than paternal homosexual uncles or homosexual male maternal first cousins. Although our results differed significantly with those of some prior studies, they do not exclude the possibility of moderate X-linkage for male sexual orientation.

  9. Sampling design for the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite de; Silva, Pedro Luis do Nascimento; Szklo, Moyses; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; Barufaldi, Laura Augusta; Bloch, Katia Vergetti

    2015-05-01

    The Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents (ERICA) aims to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome in adolescents (12-17 years) enrolled in public and private schools of the 273 municipalities with over 100,000 inhabitants in Brazil. The study population was stratified into 32 geographical strata (27 capitals and five sets with other municipalities in each macro-region of the country) and a sample of 1,251 schools was selected with probability proportional to size. In each school three combinations of shift (morning and afternoon) and grade were selected, and within each of these combinations, one class was selected. All eligible students in the selected classes were included in the study. The design sampling weights were calculated by the product of the reciprocals of the inclusion probabilities in each sampling stage, and were later calibrated considering the projections of the numbers of adolescents enrolled in schools located in the geographical strata by sex and age.

  10. Exploring Stochastic Sampling in Nuclear Data Uncertainties Assessment for Reactor Physics Applications and Validation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vasiliev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of uncertainties of various calculation results, caused by the uncertainties associated with the input nuclear data, is a common task in nuclear reactor physics applications. Modern computation resources and improved knowledge on nuclear data allow nowadays to significantly advance the capabilities for practical investigations. Stochastic sampling is the method which has received recently a high momentum for its use and exploration in the domain of reactor design and safety analysis. An application of a stochastic sampling based tool towards nuclear reactor dosimetry studies is considered in the given paper with certain exemplary test evaluations. The stochastic sampling not only allows the input nuclear data uncertainties propagation through the calculations, but also an associated correlation analysis performance with no additional computation costs and for any parameters of interest can be done. Thus, an example of assessment of the Pearson correlation coefficients for several models, used in practical validation studies, is shown here. As a next step, the analysis of the obtained information is proposed for discussion, with focus on the systems similarities assessment. The benefits of the employed method and tools with respect to practical reactor dosimetry studies are consequently outlined.

  11. Sampling design for the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Teixeira Leite de Vasconcellos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents (ERICA aims to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome in adolescents (12-17 years enrolled in public and private schools of the 273 municipalities with over 100,000 inhabitants in Brazil. The study population was stratified into 32 geographical strata (27 capitals and five sets with other municipalities in each macro-region of the country and a sample of 1,251 schools was selected with probability proportional to size. In each school three combinations of shift (morning and afternoon and grade were selected, and within each of these combinations, one class was selected. All eligible students in the selected classes were included in the study. The design sampling weights were calculated by the product of the reciprocals of the inclusion probabilities in each sampling stage, and were later calibrated considering the projections of the numbers of adolescents enrolled in schools located in the geographical strata by sex and age.

  12. Whole genome transcript profiling from fingerstick blood samples: a comparison and feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Adam R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome gene expression profiling has revolutionized research in the past decade especially with the advent of microarrays. Recently, there have been significant improvements in whole blood RNA isolation techniques which, through stabilization of RNA at the time of sample collection, avoid bias and artifacts introduced during sample handling. Despite these improvements, current human whole blood RNA stabilization/isolation kits are limited by the requirement of a venous blood sample of at least 2.5 mL. While fingerstick blood collection has been used for many different assays, there has yet to be a kit developed to isolate high quality RNA for use in gene expression studies from such small human samples. The clinical and field testing advantages of obtaining reliable and reproducible gene expression data from a fingerstick are many; it is less invasive, time saving, more mobile, and eliminates the need of a trained phlebotomist. Furthermore, this method could also be employed in small animal studies, i.e. mice, where larger sample collections often require sacrificing the animal. In this study, we offer a rapid and simple method to extract sufficient amounts of high quality total RNA from approximately 70 μl of whole blood collected via a fingerstick using a modified protocol of the commercially available Qiagen PAXgene RNA Blood Kit. Results From two sets of fingerstick collections, about 70 uL whole blood collected via finger lancet and capillary tube, we recovered an average of 252.6 ng total RNA with an average RIN of 9.3. The post-amplification yields for 50 ng of total RNA averaged at 7.0 ug cDNA. The cDNA hybridized to Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips had an average % Present call of 52.5%. Both fingerstick collections were highly correlated with r2 values ranging from 0.94 to 0.97. Similarly both fingerstick collections were highly correlated to the venous collection with r2 values ranging from 0.88 to 0

  13. The Brown Longitudinal Obsessive Compulsive Study: Clinical Features and Symptoms of the Sample at Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Anthony; Mancebo, Maria C.; Eisen, Jane L.; Pagano, Maria E.; Rasmussen, Steve A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This article describes the method and intake findings of the Brown Longitudinal Obsessive Compulsive Study, the first comprehensive prospective investigation of the naturalistic course of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in a large clinical sample using longitudinal research methodology. Method Intake data, collected between June 2001 and October 2004, are presented for 293 adult participants in a prospective, naturalistic study of OCD. Participants had a primary diagnosis of DSM-IV OCD and had sought treatment for the disorder. Results Our findings indicate that OCD typically has a gradual onset and a continuous course regardless of age at onset. There is a substantial lag between the onset of the disorder and initiation of treatment. OCD, which almost always coexists with other psychiatric symptoms, leads to serious social and occupational impairment. Compared with participants with late-onset OCD, early-onset participants had higher rates of lifetime panic disorder, eating disorders, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. The groups also differed on the types of obsessive-compulsive symptoms that were first noticed, as well as on rates of current obsessions and compulsions. Conclusion The demographics, clinical characteristics, comorbidity rates, and symptom presentation of the sample are consistent with those reported for cross-sectional studies of OCD, including the DSM-IV Field Trial. The current sample has a number of advantages over previously collected prospective samples of OCD in that it is large, diagnostically well characterized, recruited from multiple settings, and treatment seeking. This unique data set will contribute to the identification of meaningful phenotypes in OCD based on stability of symptom dimensions, prospective course patterns, and treatment response. PMID:16841619

  14. Chemical and geotechnical analyses of soil samples from Olkiluoto for studies on sorption in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusa, M.; Aemmaelae, K.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J. (Helsinki Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Lab. of Radiochemistry (Finland)); Lahdenperae, A.-M. (Poeyry Environment Oy, Vantaa (Finland))

    2009-05-15

    The safety assessment of disposal of spent nuclear fuel will include an estimate on the behavior of nuclear waste nuclides in the biosphere. As a part of this estimate also the transfer of nuclear waste nuclides in the soil and sediments is to be considered. In this study soil samples were collected from three excavator pits in Olkiluoto and the geotechnical and chemical characteristics of the samples were determined. In later stage these results will be used in sorption tests. Aim of these tests is to determine the Kd-values for Cs, Tc and I and later for Mo, Nb and Cl. Results of these sorption tests will be reported later. The geotechnical characteristics studied included dry weight and organic matter content as well as grain size distribution and mineralogy analyses. Selective extractions were carried out to study the sorption of cations into different mineral types. The extractions included five steps in which the cations bound to exchangeable, carbonate, oxides of Fe and Mn, organic matter and residual fractions were determined. For all fractions ICPMS analyses were carried out. In these analyses Li, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Cs and Pb were determined. In addition six profiles were taken from the surroundings of two excavator pits for the 137Cs determination. Besides the samples taken for the characterization of soil, supplement samples were taken from the same layers for the separation of soil water. From the soil water pH, DOC, anions (F, Cl, NO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}) and cations (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, S, Cd, Cs, Pb, U) were determined. (orig.)

  15. Genesis Solar Wind Collector Cleaning Assessment: Update on 60336 Sample Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreva, Y. S.; Allums, K. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Jurewicz, A. J.; Burnett, D. S.; Allton, J. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.; Woolum, D.

    2015-01-01

    To maximize the scientific return of Genesis Solar Wind return mission it is necessary to characterize and remove a crash-derived particle and thin film surface contamination. A small subset of Genesis mission collector fragments are being subjected to extensive study via various techniques. Here we present an update on the sample 60336, a Czochralski silicon (Si-CZ) based wafer from the bulk array (B/C). This sample has undergone multiple cleaning steps (see the table below): UPW spin wash, aggressive chemical cleanings (including aqua regia, hot xylene and RCA1), as well as optical and chemical (EDS, ToF-SIMS) imaging. Contamination appeared on the surface of 60336 after the initial 2007 UPW cleaning. Aqua regia and hot xylene treatment (8/13/2013) did little to remove contaminants. The sample was UPW cleaned for the third time and imaged (9/16/13). The UPW removed the dark stains that were visible on the sample. However, some features, like "the Flounder" (a large, 100 micron feature in Fig. 1b) appeared largely intact, resisting all previous cleaning efforts. These features were likely from mobilized adhesive, derived from the Post-It notes used to stabilize samples for transport from Utah after the hard landing. To remove this contamination, an RCA step 1 organic cleaning (RCA1) was employed. Although we are still uncertain on the nature of the Flounder and why it is resistant to UPW and aqua regia/hot xylene treatment, we have found RCA1 to be suitable for its removal. It is likely that the glue from sticky pads used during collector recovery may have been a source for resistant organic contamination [9]; however [8] shows that UPW reaction with crash-derived organic contamination does not make particle removal more difficult.

  16. Free amino acids in the Arctic snow and ice core samples: Potential markers for paleoclimatic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Elena; Spolaor, Andrea; Karroca, Ornela; Park, Ki-Tae; Martma, Tõnu; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Kohler, Jack; Gallet, Jean Charles; Bjorkman, Mats P; Cappelletti, David; Spreen, Gunnar; Zangrando, Roberta; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2017-12-31

    The role of oceanic primary production on climate variability has long been debated. Defining changes in past oceanic primary production can help understanding of the important role that marine algae have in climate variability. In ice core research methanesulfonic acid is the chemical marker commonly used for assessing changes in past primary production. However, other organic compounds such as amino acids, can be produced and emitted into the atmosphere during a phytoplankton bloom. These species can be transported and deposited onto the ice cap in polar regions. Here we investigate the correlation between the concentration of chlorophyll-a, marker of marine primary production, and amino acids present in an ice core. For the first time, free l- and d-amino acids in Arctic snow and firn samples were determined by a sensitive and selective analytical method based on liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The new method for the determination of free amino acids concentrations was applied to firn core samples collected on April 2015 from the summit of the Holtedahlfonna glacier, Svalbard (N 79'08.424, E 13'23.639, 1120m a.s.l.). The main results of this work are summarized as follows: (1) glycine, alanine and proline, were detected and quantified in the firn core samples; (2) their concentration profiles, compared with that of the stable isotope δ18O ratio, show a seasonal cycling with the highest concentrations during the spring and summer time; (3) back-trajectories and Greenland Sea chlorophyll-a concentrations obtained by satellite measurements were compared with the amino acids profile obtained from ice core samples, this provided further insights into the present results. This study suggests that the amino acid concentrations in the ice samples collected from the Holtedahlfonna glaciers could reflect changes in oceanic phytoplankton abundance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and predictors of Video Game Addiction: A study based on a national sample of Gamers.

    OpenAIRE

    Wittek, CT; Finserås, TR; Pallesen, S; Mentzoni, RA; Hanss, D; Griffiths, MD; Molde, H

    2015-01-01

    Video gaming has become a popular leisure activity in many parts of the world, and an increasing number of empirical studies examine the small minority that appears to develop problems as a result of excessive gaming. This study investigated prevalence rates and predictors of video game addiction in a sample of gamers, randomly selected from the National Population Registry of Norway (N?=?3389). Results showed there were 1.4 % addicted gamers, 7.3 % problem gamers, 3.9 % engaged gamers, and 8...

  18. Prediction accuracy of a sample-size estimation method for ROC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dev P

    2010-05-01

    Sample-size estimation is an important consideration when planning a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study. The aim of this work was to assess the prediction accuracy of a sample-size estimation method using the Monte Carlo simulation method. Two ROC ratings simulators characterized by low reader and high case variabilities (LH) and high reader and low case variabilities (HL) were used to generate pilot data sets in two modalities. Dorfman-Berbaum-Metz multiple-reader multiple-case (DBM-MRMC) analysis of the ratings yielded estimates of the modality-reader, modality-case, and error variances. These were input to the Hillis-Berbaum (HB) sample-size estimation method, which predicted the number of cases needed to achieve 80% power for 10 readers and an effect size of 0.06 in the pivotal study. Predictions that generalized to readers and cases (random-all), to cases only (random-cases), and to readers only (random-readers) were generated. A prediction-accuracy index defined as the probability that any single prediction yields true power in the 75%-90% range was used to assess the HB method. For random-case generalization, the HB-method prediction-accuracy was reasonable, approximately 50% for five readers and 100 cases in the pilot study. Prediction-accuracy was generally higher under LH conditions than under HL conditions. Under ideal conditions (many readers in the pilot study) the DBM-MRMC-based HB method overestimated the number of cases. The overestimates could be explained by the larger modality-reader variance estimates when reader variability was large (HL). The largest benefit of increasing the number of readers in the pilot study was realized for LH, where 15 readers were enough to yield prediction accuracy >50% under all generalization conditions, but the benefit was lesser for HL where prediction accuracy was approximately 36% for 15 readers under random-all and random-reader conditions. The HB method tends to overestimate the number of cases

  19. Bovine liver sample preparation and micro-homogeneity study for Cu and Zn determination by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Cassiana S.; Silva, Cíntia S.; Nogueira, Ana R. A.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2005-06-01

    This work describes a systematic study for the bovine liver sample preparation for Cu and Zn determination by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The main parameters investigated were sample drying, grinding process, particle size, sample size, microsample homogeneity, and their relationship with the precision and accuracy of the method. A bovine liver sample was prepared using different drying procedures: (1) freeze drying, and (2) drying in a household microwave oven followed by drying in a stove at 60 °C until constant mass. Ball and cryogenic mills were used for grinding. Less sensitive wavelengths for Cu (216.5 nm) and Zn (307.6 nm), and Zeeman-based three-field background correction for Cu were used to diminish the sensitivities. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures adopted were 1000 °C and 2300 °C for Cu, and 700 °C and 1700 °C for Zn, respectively. For both elements, it was possible to calibrate the spectrometer with aqueous solutions. The use of 250 μg of W + 200 μg of Rh as permanent chemical modifier was imperative for Zn. Under these conditions, the characteristic mass and detection limit were 1.4 ng and 1.6 ng for Cu, and 2.8 ng and 1.3 ng for Zn, respectively. The results showed good agreement (95% confidence level) for homogeneity of the entire material (> 200 mg) when the sample was dried in microwave/stove and ground in a cryogenic mill. The microsample homogeneity study showed that Zn is more dependent on the sample pretreatment than Cu. The bovine liver sample prepared in microwave/stove and ground in a cryogenic mill presented results with the lowest relative standard deviation for Cu than Zn. Good accuracy and precision were observed for bovine liver masses higher than 40 μg for Cu and 30 μg for Zn. The concentrations of Cu and Zn in the prepared bovine liver sample were 223 mg kg - 1 and 128 mg kg - 1, respectively. The relative standard deviations were lower than 6% ( n = 5). The accuracy of the entire

  20. Microbial Safety of Low Water Activity Foods: Study of Simulated and Durban Household Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Ijabadeniyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty household low water activity foods were examined and a simulative study was conducted in a high sugar, low aw almond and macadamia butter to determine the survival of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Results obtained from 60 low aw samples collected at household level had some significant differences (P≤0,05 within food categories amongst the various tests. Spices had the highest number of aerobic bacteria, aerobic spore-formers, anaerobic spore-formers, and S. aureus. Mean aerobic colony counts for nuts and spices were 2.30 log CFU/g and 4.40 log CFU/g, respectively. Pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Cronobacter sakazakii were present in nuts, whilst Salmonella spp. was present in chocolates. This implies that certain low aw foods may present a public health risk. In the simulative study, temperature and high sucrose concentrations played a significant role in the survival of B. cereus and S. aureus ATCC 25923. B. cereus was found to be more osmotolerant at both reduced and elevated temperatures (18°C and 25°C in the 12% sucrose sample in both butters, whilst S. aureus ATCC 25923 seemed to grow better in sucrose-free samples at both temperatures in both butters. This implies that certain low aw foods may present a public health risk. Also, B. cereus, being a spore-forming bacterium, can be osmotolerant at both reduced and elevated temperatures.

  1. Studies on spectral analysis of randomly sampled signals: Application to laser velocimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree, David

    1992-01-01

    Spectral analysis is very useful in determining the frequency characteristics of many turbulent flows, for example, vortex flows, tail buffeting, and other pulsating flows. It is also used for obtaining turbulence spectra from which the time and length scales associated with the turbulence structure can be estimated. These estimates, in turn, can be helpful for validation of theoretical/numerical flow turbulence models. Laser velocimetry (LV) is being extensively used in the experimental investigation of different types of flows, because of its inherent advantages; nonintrusive probing, high frequency response, no calibration requirements, etc. Typically, the output of an individual realization laser velocimeter is a set of randomly sampled velocity data. Spectral analysis of such data requires special techniques to obtain reliable estimates of correlation and power spectral density functions that describe the flow characteristics. FORTRAN codes for obtaining the autocorrelation and power spectral density estimates using the correlation-based slotting technique were developed. Extensive studies have been conducted on simulated first-order spectrum and sine signals to improve the spectral estimates. A first-order spectrum was chosen because it represents the characteristics of a typical one-dimensional turbulence spectrum. Digital prefiltering techniques, to improve the spectral estimates from randomly sampled data were applied. Studies show that the spectral estimates can be increased up to about five times the mean sampling rate.

  2. Organic Compounds Detected in Deciduous Teeth: A Replication Study from Children with Autism in Two Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond F. Palmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological samples are an important part of investigating toxic exposures and disease outcomes. However, blood, urine, saliva, or hair can only reflect relatively recent exposures. Alternatively, deciduous teeth have served as a biomarker of early developmental exposure to heavy metals, but little has been done to assess organic toxic exposures such as pesticides, plastics, or medications. The purpose of our study was to determine if organic chemicals previously detected in a sample of typically developing children could be detected in teeth from a sample of children with autism. Eighty-three deciduous teeth from children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD were chosen from our tooth repository. Organic compounds were assessed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography methods. Consistent with a prior report from Camann et al., (2013, we have demonstrated that specific semivolatile organic chemicals relevant to autism etiology can be detected in deciduous teeth. This report provides evidence that teeth can be useful biomarkers of early life exposure for use in epidemiologic case-control studies seeking to identify differential unbiased exposures during development between those with and without specific disorders such as autism.

  3. A detailed study of the performance of the uranium-gas sampling calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arefiev, A.; Burov, S.; Chumakov, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Gorodkov, Yu.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Klimentov, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kunin, A.; Malinin, A.; Morgunov, V.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Rozhkov, A.; Savin, A.; Shevchenko, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shmakov, K.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Tarkovsky, E.; Tchoudakov, V.; Vorobiev, I. (Institut Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental' noj Fiziki, Moscow (USSR)); Azemoon, T.; Bal, R.; Capell, M.; Goldfarb, S.; Jones, L.W.; Mills, G.B.; Roe, B.P. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA)); Chen, H.S.; Lu, Y.S.; Tung, K.L. (Academia Sinica, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics); Chen, M.; Ting, S.C.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (USA)); Gong, Z.F. (CCAST World Lab., Beijing, BJ (China) China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH); Lecomte, P.; LeCoultre, P.; Lettry, J.; Lin, Z.R.; Spiess, B. (Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)); Ulbricht, J. (Paul Scherrer Inst., Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)); L3 Collaboration

    1989-12-20

    Results of experimental studies of the performance of the uranium calorimeter with gas sampling detectors are presented. There is further evidence showing the importance of the contribution of the neutron component of a hadronic shower to the detected signal. The response and the resolution of the uranium calorimeter are measured in the momentum range 0.3-0.6 GeV/c for the different incident particles and different gases that are used in the detectors. For a calorimeter structure with double-gas-detector layers, the correlation between signals from two calorimeters formed by chambers filled with different gas mixtures is measured. The topics that are relevant to the performance of the L3 uranium-gas sampling calorimeter - such as its operation in the magnetic field, the energy dependence of muon response, the uranium noise, as well as the electronics optimization - are discussed. (orig.).

  4. Preparation of Samples for Leaf Architecture Studies, A Method for Mounting Cleared Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Vasco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Several recent waves of interest in leaf architecture have shown an expanding range of approaches and applications across a number of disciplines. Despite this increased interest, examination of existing archives of cleared and mounted leaves shows that current methods for mounting, in particular, yield unsatisfactory results and deterioration of samples over relatively short periods. Although techniques for clearing and staining leaves are numerous, published techniques for mounting leaves are scarce. Methods and Results: Here we present a complete protocol and recommendations for clearing, staining, and imaging leaves, and, most importantly, a method to permanently mount cleared leaves. Conclusions: The mounting protocol is faster than other methods, inexpensive, and straightforward; moreover, it yields clear and permanent samples that can easily be imaged, scanned, and stored. Specimens mounted with this method preserve well, with leaves that were mounted more than 35 years ago showing no signs of bubbling or discoloration.

  5. Mind Wandering in Chinese Daily Lives – An Experience Sampling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolan; Wang, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Mind wandering has recently received extensive research because it reveals an important characteristic of our consciousness: conscious experience can arise internally and involuntarily. As the first attempt to examine mind wandering in a non-western population, the present study used experience-sampling method to collect the daily momentary mind wandering episodes in a Chinese sample. The results showed that mind wandering was also a ubiquitous experience among the Chinese population, and, instead of emerging out of nowhere, it was often elicited by external or internal cues. Furthermore, most of the mind wandering episodes involved prospective thinking and were closely related to one’s personal life. Finally, the frequency of mind wandering was influenced by some contextual factors. These results taken together suggest that mind wandering plays an important role in helping people to maintain a continuous feeling of “self” and to prepare them to cope with the upcoming events. PMID:22957071

  6. A study of high-redshift AGN feedback in SZ cluster samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bîrzan, L.; Rafferty, D. A.; Brüggen, M.; Intema, H. T.

    2017-10-01

    We present a study of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback at higher redshifts (0.3 HERGs) in massive clusters at z > 0.6, implying a transition from HERG-mode accretion to lower power low-excitation radio galaxy (LERG)-mode accretion at intermediate redshifts. Additionally, we use local radio-to-jet power scaling relations to estimate feedback power and find that half of the CF systems in our sample probably have enough heating to balance cooling. However, we postulate that the local relations are likely not well suited to predict feedback power in high-luminosity HERGs, as they are derived from samples composed mainly of lower luminosity LERGs.

  7. Municipal solid waste composition: Sampling methodology, statistical analyses, and case study evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Vincent Maklawe Essonanawe; Jensen, Morten Bang; Götze, Ramona

    2015-01-01

    stratification parameter. Separating food leftovers from food packaging during manual sorting of the sampled waste did not have significant influence on the proportions of food waste and packaging materials, indicating that this step may not be required. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......Sound waste management and optimisation of resource recovery require reliable data on solid waste generation and composition. In the absence of standardised and commonly accepted waste characterisation methodologies, various approaches have been reported in literature. This limits both...... comparability and applicability of the results. In this study, a waste sampling and sorting methodology for efficient and statistically robust characterisation of solid waste was introduced. The methodology was applied to residual waste collected from 1442 households distributed among 10 individual sub...

  8. Study of carbon compounds in Apollo 12 and 14 lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, P. T.; Simoneit, B. R.; Wszolek, P. C.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    The results of gas-chromatography and high-resolution mass spectroscopy studies of gases released on deuterium fluoride dissolution of Apollo 12 and 14 lunar samples are reported. The results confirm previous observations that CH4 and C2H6 are released as well as CD4, C2D4, C2D6, and higher deuterated hydrocarbons. The yields correlate with the total carbon content of the samples, and the CH4 and C2H6 released may be regarded as indigenous, while the deuterated products result from hydrolysis of carbide material. The results provide the first experimental confirmation of the hypothesis that the CH4 derives from solar wind interactions.

  9. A comparison of different estimation methods for simulation-based sample size determination in longitudinal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahçecitapar, Melike Kaya

    2017-07-01

    Determining sample size necessary for correct results is a crucial step in the design of longitudinal studies. Simulation-based statistical power calculation is a flexible approach to determine number of subjects and repeated measures of longitudinal studies especially in complex design. Several papers have provided sample size/statistical power calculations for longitudinal studies incorporating data analysis by linear mixed effects models (LMMs). In this study, different estimation methods (methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) and restricted ML) with different iterative algorithms (quasi-Newton and ridge-stabilized Newton-Raphson) in fitting LMMs to generated longitudinal data for simulation-based power calculation are compared. This study examines statistical power of F-test statistics for parameter representing difference in responses over time from two treatment groups in the LMM with a longitudinal covariate. The most common procedures in SAS, such as PROC GLIMMIX using quasi-Newton algorithm and PROC MIXED using ridge-stabilized algorithm are used for analyzing generated longitudinal data in simulation. It is seen that both procedures present similar results. Moreover, it is found that the magnitude of the parameter of interest in the model for simulations affect statistical power calculations in both procedures substantially.

  10. Conditions Affecting the Accuracy of Classical Equating Methods for Small Samples under the NEAT Design: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnassee, Devdass

    2011-01-01

    Small sample equating remains a largely unexplored area of research. This study attempts to fill in some of the research gaps via a large-scale, IRT-based simulation study that evaluates the performance of seven small-sample equating methods under various test characteristic and sampling conditions. The equating methods considered are typically…

  11. Psychometric properties of the Icelandic NEO-FFI in a general population sample compared to a sample recruited for a study on the genetics of addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Jonsson, Fridrik H.; Hansdottir, Ingunn

    2014-01-01

    . Icelandic norms were compared to American norms and language translations selected for geographical and cultural proximity to Iceland. Multiple discriminant function analysis using NEO-FFI trait scores and gender as independent variables predicted membership in recruitment groups for 47.3% of addiction....... We present results of psychometric testing of the Icelandic NEO-FFI in a population sample (N= 657) and a sample recruited for a study on addiction genetics (N= 3804). The Icelandic NEO-FFI demonstrated internal consistency and temporal stability. Factor analyses supported the five-factor structure...

  12. Economic and Humanistic Burden of Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review of Large Sample Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Kovic, Bruno; Jin, Xuejing; He, Xiaoning; Wang, Mengxiao; Silvestre, Camila

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) consumes a significant amount of healthcare resources, and impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients. Previous reviews have consistently found substantial variations in the costs of OA across studies and countries. The comparability between studies was poor and limited the detection of the true differences between these studies. To review large sample studies on measuring the economic and/or humanistic burden of OA published since May 2006. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases using comprehensive search strategies to identify studies reporting economic burden and HRQoL of OA. We included large sample studies if they had a sample size ≥1000 and measured the cost and/or HRQoL of OA. Reviewers worked independently and in duplicate, performing a cross-check between groups to verify agreement. Within- and between-group consolidation was performed to resolve discrepancies, with outstanding discrepancies being resolved by an arbitrator. The Kappa statistic was reported to assess the agreement between the reviewers. All costs were adjusted in their original currency to year 2015 using published inflation rates for the country where the study was conducted, and then converted to 2015 US dollars. A total of 651 articles were screened by title and abstract, 94 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included in the final review. The Kappa value was 0.794. Twenty studies reported direct costs and nine reported indirect costs. The total annual average direct costs varied from US$1442 to US$21,335, both in USA. The annual average indirect costs ranged from US$238 to US$29,935. Twelve studies measured HRQoL using various instruments. The Short Form 12 version 2 scores ranged from 35.0 to 51.3 for the physical component, and from 43.5 to 55.0 for the mental component. Health utilities varied from 0.30 for severe OA to 0.77 for mild OA. Per-patient OA costs are considerable and a patient's quality of life remains poor. Variations in

  13. Environmental monitoring study of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates and insoluble soap in Spanish sewage sludge samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, Samuel; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Ballesteros, Oscar; Navalón, Alberto; Reis, Marco S; Saraiva, Pedro M; Vílchez, José L

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a monitoring study of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) and insoluble soap performed on Spanish sewage sludge samples. This work focuses on finding statistical relations between LAS concentrations and insoluble soap in sewage sludge samples and variables related to wastewater treatment plants such as water hardness, population and treatment type. It is worth to mention that 38 samples, collected from different Spanish regions, were studied. The statistical tool we used was Principal Component Analysis (PC), in order to reduce the number of response variables. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and a non-parametric test such as the Kruskal-Wallis test were also studied through the estimation of the p-value (probability of obtaining a test statistic at least as extreme as the one that was actually observed, assuming that the null hypothesis is true) in order to study possible relations between the concentration of both analytes and the rest of variables. We also compared LAS and insoluble soap behaviors. In addition, the results obtained for LAS (mean value) were compared with the limit value proposed by the future Directive entitled "Working Document on Sludge". According to the results, the mean obtained for soap and LAS was 26.49 g kg(-1) and 6.15 g kg(-1) respectively. It is worth noting that LAS mean was significantly higher than the limit value (2.6 g kg(-1)). In addition, LAS and soap concentrations depend largely on water hardness. However, only LAS concentration depends on treatment type.

  14. Observed mass distribution of spontaneous fission fragments from samples of lime - an SSNTD study

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, D; Ghose, D; Sastri, R C

    1999-01-01

    SSNTD is one of the most commonly used detectors in the studies involving nuclear phenomena. The ease of registration of the presence of alpha particles and fission fragments has made it particularly suitable in studies where stable long exposures are needed to extract reliable information. Studies on the presence of alpha emitting nuclides in the environment assume importance since they are found to be carcinogenic. Lime samples from Silchar in Assam of Eastern India have shown the presence of spontaneous fission fragments besides alphas. In the present study we look at the ratio of the average mass distribution of these fission fragments, that gives us an indication of the presence of the traces of transuranic elements.

  15. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the

  16. A general method to determine sampling windows for nonlinear mixed effects models with an application to population pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Lee Kien; McGree, James; Duffull, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Optimal design methods have been proposed to determine the best sampling times when sparse blood sampling is required in clinical pharmacokinetic studies. However, the optimal blood sampling time points may not be feasible in clinical practice. Sampling windows, a time interval for blood sample collection, have been proposed to provide flexibility in blood sampling times while preserving efficient parameter estimation. Because of the complexity of the population pharmacokinetic models, which are generally nonlinear mixed effects models, there is no analytical solution available to determine sampling windows. We propose a method for determination of sampling windows based on MCMC sampling techniques. The proposed method attains a stationary distribution rapidly and provides time-sensitive windows around the optimal design points. The proposed method is applicable to determine sampling windows for any nonlinear mixed effects model although our work focuses on an application to population pharmacokinetic models. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Collection, storage, and filtration of in vivo study samples using 96-well filter plates to facilitate automated sample preparation and LC/MS/MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, M; Murphy, A T; Wilken, B; Ackermann, B

    2002-03-01

    The benefits of high-throughput bioanalysis within the pharmaceutical industry are well established. One of the most significant bottlenecks in bioanalysis is transferring in vivo-generated study samples from their collection tubes during sample preparation and extraction. In most cases, the plasma samples must be stored frozen prior to analysis, and the freeze/thaw (F/T) process introduces thrombin clots that are capable of plugging pipets and automated liquid-transfer systems. A new approach to dealing with this problem involves the use of Ansys Captiva 96-well 20-microm polypropylene filter plates to collect, store frozen, and filter plasma samples prior to bioanalysis. The samples are collected from the test subjects, and the corresponding plasma samples are placed directly into the wells of the filter plate. Two Duoseal (patent pending) covers are used to seal the top and bottom of the plate, and the plate is stored at down to -70 degrees C. Prior to sample analysis, the seals are removed and the plate is placed in a 96-well SPE manifold. As the plasma thaws, it passes (by gravity or mild vacuum) through the polypropylene filter into a 96-well collection plate. A multichannel pipet or automated liquid-transfer system is used to transfer sample aliquots without fear of plugging. A significant advantage of this approach is that, unlike other methods, issues related to incomplete pipetting are virtually eliminated. The entire process is rapid since thawing and filtering take place simultaneously, and if a second F/T cycle is required for reanalysis, it is not necessary to refilter the samples (additional clotting was not observed after three F/T cycles). This technique was tested using monkey, rat, and dog plasma and sodium heparin and EDTA anticoagulants. To assess the possibility of nonspecific binding to the polypropylene filter, a variety of drug candidates from diverse drug classes were studied. Validation data generated for two Lilly compounds from distinct

  18. Abortion experiences among Zanzibari women: a chain-referral sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Alison; Harrington, Bryna J; Grossman, Daniel; Hemed, Maryam; Hindin, Michelle J

    2016-03-11

    In Zanzibar, a semi-autonomous region of Tanzania, induced abortion is illegal but common, and fewer than 12% of married reproductive-aged women use modern contraception. As part of a multi-method study about contraception and consequences of unwanted pregnancies, the objective of this study was to understand the experiences of Zanzibari women who terminated pregnancies. The cross-sectional study was set in Zanzibar, Tanzania. Participants were a community-based sample of women who had terminated pregnancies. We carried out semi-structured interviews with 45 women recruited via chain-referral sampling. We report the characteristics of women who have had abortions, the reasons they had abortions, and the methods used to terminate their pregnancies. Women in Zanzibar terminate pregnancies that are unwanted for a range of reasons, at various points in their reproductive lives, and using multiple methods. While clinical methods were most effective, nearly half of our participants successfully terminated a pregnancy using non-clinical methods and very few had complications requiring post abortion care (PAC). Even in settings where abortion is illegal, some women experience illegal abortions without adverse health consequences, what we might call 'safer' unsafe abortions; these kinds of abortion experiences can be missed in studies about abortion conducted among women seeking PAC in hospitals.

  19. [Identification and sampling of people with migration background for epidemiological studies in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, K; Makarova, N; Spallek, J; Zeeb, H; Razum, O

    2013-06-01

    In 2009, 19.6% of the population of Germany either had migrated themselves or were the offspring of people with migration experience. Migrants differ from the autochthonous German population in terms of health status, health awareness and health behaviour. To further investigate the health situation of migrants in Germany, epidemiological studies are needed. Such studies can employ existing databases which provide detailed information on migration status. Otherwise, onomastic or toponomastic procedures can be applied to identify people with migration background. If migrants have to be recruited into an epidemiological study, this can be done register-based (e. g., data from registration offices or telephone lists), based on residential location (random-route or random-walk procedure), via snowball sampling (e. g., through key persons) or via settings (e. g., school entry examination). An oversampling of people with migration background is not sufficient to avoid systematic bias in the sample due to non-participation. Additional measures have to be taken to increase access and raise participation rates. Personal contacting, multilingual instruments, multilingual interviewers and extensive public relations increase access and willingness to participate. Empirical evidence on 'successful' recruitment strategies for studies with migrants is still lacking in epidemiology and health sciences in Germany. The choice of the recruitment strategy as well as the measures to raise accessibility and willingness to participate depend on the available resources, the research question and the specific migrant target group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. The Study of Suicidal Behaviors Rates in the Community Sample of Karaj City in 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Malakouti

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Although many studies have been conducted in Iran, but because of the importance of suicide problem in the mental health programs, it is still necessary to do some epidemiologic study. This study has addressed to suicidal behaviors rates in a community sample of Karaj city.Materials & Methods: Karaj with 1,000,000 population was selected as the environment of study. Our subjects (no=2300 were 15 years and older that were selected by randomized sampling. SUPRE-MISS questionnaire was employed in this survey.Results: 65% of the subjects were female, 57.2% of them were married , and most of them had high school level of education (48%. Housewife women were the most common category among occupational groups (43.3%. According to the results the prevalence of positive history for suicide behaviors (idea, plan, attempt were 12.7%, 6.2% & 3.3% respectively, and for current year were 5.7%, 2.9% & 1%.Conclusion: Suicidal behaviors in Iran, in spite of suicide leading to death, have similar prevalence to western countries.

  1. Impact of Freezing Delay Time on Tissue Samples for Metabolomic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukaas, Tonje H; Moestue, Siver A; Vettukattil, Riyas; Sitter, Beathe; Lamichhane, Santosh; Segura, Remedios; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic profiling of intact tumor tissue by high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS) MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides important biological information possibly useful for clinical diagnosis and development of novel treatment strategies. However, generation of high-quality data requires that sample handling from surgical resection until analysis is performed using systematically validated procedures. In this study, we investigated the effect of postsurgical freezing delay time on global metabolic profiles and stability of individual metabolites in intact tumor tissue. Tumor tissue samples collected from two patient-derived breast cancer xenograft models (n = 3 for each model) were divided into pieces that were snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen at 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after surgical removal. In addition, one sample was analyzed immediately, representing the metabolic profile of fresh tissue exposed neither to liquid nitrogen nor to room temperature. We also evaluated the metabolic effect of prolonged spinning during the HR MAS experiments in biopsies from breast cancer patients (n = 14). All samples were analyzed by proton HR MAS MRS on a Bruker Avance DRX600 spectrometer, and changes in metabolic profiles were evaluated using multivariate analysis and linear mixed modeling. Multivariate analysis showed that the metabolic differences between the two breast cancer models were more prominent than variation caused by freezing delay time. No significant changes in levels of individual metabolites were observed in samples frozen within 30 min of resection. After this time point, levels of choline increased, whereas ascorbate, creatine, and glutathione (GS) levels decreased. Freezing had a significant effect on several metabolites but is an essential procedure for research and biobank purposes. Furthermore, four metabolites (glucose, glycine, glycerophosphocholine, and choline) were affected by prolonged HR MAS experiment time possibly caused by

  2. Impact of freezing delay time on tissue samples for metabolomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonje Husby Haukaas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metabolic profiling of intact tumor tissue by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS MR spectroscopy (MRS provides important biological information possibly useful for clinical diagnosis and development of novel treatment strategies. However, generation of high-quality data requires that sample handling from surgical resection until analysis is performed using systematically validated procedures. In this study, we investigated the effect of post-surgical freezing delay time on global metabolic profiles and stability of individual metabolites in intact tumor tissue.Materials and methods: Tumor tissue samples collected from two patient derived breast cancer xenograft models (n=3 for each model were divided into pieces that were snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen at 0, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after surgical removal. In addition, one sample was analysed immediately, representing the metabolic profile of fresh tissue exposed neither to liquid nitrogen nor to room temperature. We also evaluated the metabolic effect of prolonged spinning during the HR MAS experiments in biopsies from breast cancer patiens (n=14. All samples were analyzed by proton HR MAS MRS on a Bruker Avance DRX600 spectrometer, and changes in metabolic profiles were evaluated using multivariate analysis and linear mixed modeling (LMM. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the metabolic differences between the two breast cancer models were more prominent than variation caused by freezing delay time. No significant changes in levels of individual metabolites were observed in samples frozen within 30 minutes of resection. After this time point, levels of choline increased whereas ascorbate, creatine and glutathione (GS levels decreased. Freezing had a significant effect on several metabolites, but is an essential procedure for research and biobank purposes. Furthermore, four metabolites (glucose, glycine, glycerophosphocholine and choline were affected by

  3. Magnetic Study on Environmental Samples from Guadalajara Mexico for Monitoring of Atmospheric Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, B.; Cejudo, R.; Bogalo, M. F.; Rosas-Elguera, J.; Quintana, P.; Bautista, F.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Morales, J.

    2013-05-01

    Guadalajara is the second bigger city in Mexico, catalogued as critical zone because of atmospheric pollution levels. The magnetic methodology has been largely used as an alternative way to evaluate the pollution levels as well as identify the critical points in a given area. In this work, results from chemical analyses and magnetic measurements are presented in order to show the correlation between magnetic signal and the pollution level. We analyzed three kinds of environmental samples: urban soils, urban dust and leaves from ficus benjamina. Samples were taken in 30 sites distributed along a main avenue and two secondary avenues, including three points with very poor traffic influence. We determined a ferromagnetic carrier in most of samples, magnetite probably, since the Tc calculated from the thermomagnetic curves is around 580 °C. The magnetic susceptibility (Xlf) as well as the Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (SIRM) correlate well with the heavy metals content, specially Pb in urban dusts. These results allowed us to identify the most affected points, by vehicular traffic and industrial emissions. Furthermore, the values obtained for these magnetic parameters are above of those found in other studies for polluted cities in Europe and Asia.

  4. Bosco: Boosting Corrections for Genome-Wide Association Studies With Imbalanced Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Feng; Deng, Yue; Zhao, Yanyu; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2017-01-01

    In genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the acquired sequential data may exhibit imbalance structure: abundant control vs. limited case samples. Such sample imbalance issue is particularly serious when investigating rare diseases or common diseases on rare populations. Conventional GWAS methods may suffer from severe statistic biases to the major group, leading to power losses in uncovering true suspicious loci. We introduce a boosting correction method termed as Bosco to deal with such imbalanced problem. Bosco is motivated by the boost learning theory in machine learning and is implemented in a coarse-to-fine learning framework: the coarse step assigns importance scores for all samples in the major group and the fine step calculates P -values by a weighted logistic regression. On simulated data sets, we demonstrate the proposed methods can dramatically improve the discovery power even on extremely imbalanced datasets, with well controlling the false positives. The Bosco is also applied to a genome-scale gastric cancer data set to conduct genome-wide analysis. Our method replicates existing reported findings (from the likelihood ratio test) with high statistical significance and shows the ability to identify new suspicious SNPs.

  5. Performance of a Brazilian population sample in the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radanovic

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian researchers and health professionals often face the challenge of having to use tests developed in foreign languages and standardized for populations of other countries, especially in the fields of Neuropsychology and Neurolinguistics. This fact promotes a feeling that some scoring systems may be inadequate for our sociocultural reality. In the present study, we describe the performance of a Brazilian population sample submitted to a translated and adapted version of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE. Sixty normal volunteers (21 men and 39 women, all Portuguese native speakers, ranging in age from 15 to 78 years (average 43.7 and with an educational level of 2 to 16 years (average 9.9, were tested using a translated and adapted Portuguese version of the BDAE. Cut-off scores are suggested for our population and the performance of the Brazilian sample is compared to that of American and Colombian samples, with the results being closely similar in all tasks. We also performed a correlation analysis between age, gender and educational level and the influence of these variables on the performance of the subjects. We found no statistically significant differences between genders. Educational level correlated positively with performance, especially in the subtests involving reading and writing. There was a negative correlation between age and performance in two subtests (Visual Confrontation Naming and Sentences to Dictation, but a coexisting effect of educational level could not be ruled out.

  6. Performance of a Brazilian population sample in the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radanovic, M; Mansur, L L

    2002-03-01

    Brazilian researchers and health professionals often face the challenge of having to use tests developed in foreign languages and standardized for populations of other countries, especially in the fields of Neuropsychology and Neurolinguistics. This fact promotes a feeling that some scoring systems may be inadequate for our sociocultural reality. In the present study, we describe the performance of a Brazilian population sample submitted to a translated and adapted version of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE). Sixty normal volunteers (21 men and 39 women), all Portuguese native speakers, ranging in age from 15 to 78 years (average 43.7) and with an educational level of 2 to 16 years (average 9.9), were tested using a translated and adapted Portuguese version of the BDAE. Cut-off scores are suggested for our population and the performance of the Brazilian sample is compared to that of American and Colombian samples, with the results being closely similar in all tasks. We also performed a correlation analysis between age, gender and educational level and the influence of these variables on the performance of the subjects. We found no statistically significant differences between genders. Educational level correlated positively with performance, especially in the subtests involving reading and writing. There was a negative correlation between age and performance in two subtests (Visual Confrontation Naming and Sentences to Dictation), but a coexisting effect of educational level could not be ruled out.

  7. Conceptual study and key technology development for Mars Aeroflyby sample collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K.; Ozawa, T.; Okudaira, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Suzuki, T.; Takayanagi, H.; Tsuda, Y.; Ogawa, N.; Tachibana, S.; Satoh, T.

    2014-01-01

    Conceptual study of Mars Aeroflyby Sample Collection (MASC) is conducted as a part of the next Mars exploration mission currently entertained in Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. In the mission scenario, an atmospheric entry vehicle is flown into the Martian atmosphere, collects the Martian dust particles as well as atmospheric gases during the guided hypersonic flight, exits the Martian atmosphere, and is inserted into a parking orbit from which a return system departs for the earth to deliver the dust and gas samples. In order to accomplish a controlled flight and a successful orbit insertion, aeroassist orbit transfer technologies are introduced into the guidance and control system. System analysis is conducted to assess the feasibility and to make a conceptual design, finding that the MASC system is feasible at the minimum system mass of 600 kg approximately. The aerogel, which is one of the candidates for the dust sample collector, is assessed by arcjet heating tests to examine its behavior when exposed to high-temperature gases, as well as by particle impingement tests to evaluate its dust capturing capability.

  8. SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION IN NON-RADOMIZED SURVIVAL STUDIES WITH NON-CENSORED AND CENSORED DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S FAGHIHZADEH

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In survival analysis, determination of sufficient sample size to achieve suitable statistical power is important .In both parametric and non-parametric methods of classic statistics, randomn selection of samples is a basic condition. practically, in most clinical trials and health surveys randomn allocation is impossible. Fixed - effect multiple linear regression analysis covers this need and this feature could be extended to survival regression analysis. This paper is the result of sample size determination in non-randomnized surval analysis with censored and non -censored data. Methods: In non-randomnized survival studies, linear regression with fixed -effect variable could be used. In fact such a regression is conditional expectation of dependent variable, conditioned on independent variable. Likelihood fuction with exponential hazard constructed by considering binary variable for allocation of each subject to one of two comparing groups, stating the variance of coefficient of fixed - effect independent variable by determination coefficient , sample size determination formulas are obtained with both censored and non-cencored data. So estimation of sample size is not based on the relation of a single independent variable but it could be attain the required power for a test adjusted for effect of the other explanatory covariates. Since the asymptotic distribution of the likelihood estimator of parameter is normal, we obtained the variance of the regression coefficient estimator formula then by stating the variance of regression coefficient of fixed-effect variable, by determination coefficient we derived formulas for determination of sample size in both censored and non-censored data. Results: In no-randomnized survival analysis ,to compare hazard rates of two groups without censored data, we obtained an estimation of determination coefficient ,risk ratio and proportion of membership to each group and their variances from

  9. MarcoPolo-R: Near Earth Asteroid Sample Return Mission in ESA assessment study phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, M. A.; Michel, P.; Cheng, A.; Böhnhardt, H.; Brucato, J. R.; Dotto, E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Franchi, I. A.; Green, S. F.; Lara, L. M.; Marty, B.; Koschny, D.

    2012-04-01

    MarcoPolo-R is a sample return mission to a primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) selected in February 2011 for the Assessment Study Phase in the framework of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2 program. MarcoPolo-R is a European-led mission with a proposed NASA contribution. MarcoPolo-R takes advantage of three industrial studies completed as part of the previous Marco Polo mission (see ESA/SRE (2009)3). The aim of the new Assessment Study is to reduce the cost of the mission while maintaining its high science level, on the basis of advanced studies and technologies, optimization of the mission, and consolidation of the collaboration with other partners (NASA, AEB…). The main goal of the MarcoPolo-R mission is to return unaltered NEA material for detailed analysis in ground-based laboratories. The limited sampling provided by meteorites does not offer the most primitive material available in near-Earth space. More primitive material, having experienced less alteration on the asteroid, will be more friable and would not survive atmospheric entry in any discernible amount. Only in Earth laboratories can instruments measure the individual components of the complex mixture of materials that forms an asteroid regolith with the necessary precision and sensitivity to determine their precise chemical and isotopic composition. Such measurements are vital for revealing the evidence of stellar, interstellar medium, pre-solar nebula and parent body processes that are retained in primitive asteroidal material, unaltered by atmospheric entry or terrestrial contamination. It is no surprise therefore that sample return missions are considered a priority by a number of the leading space agencies. MarcoPolo-R will rendezvous with a unique kind of target, a primitive binary NEA, scientifically characterize it at multiple scales, and return a unique pristine sample to Earth unaltered by the atmospheric entry process or terrestrial weathering. The baseline target of MarcoPolo-R is the primitive

  10. Importance of sampling design and analysis in animal population studies: a comment on Sergio et al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kery, M.; Royle, J. Andrew; Schmid, Hans

    2008-01-01

    community studied and the sampling fraction among communities compared should be the same on average, otherwise formal estimation approaches must be applied to avoid misleading inference.

  11. Measurement of Beryllium in Biological Samples by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: Applications for Studying Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarappa-Zucca, M L; Finkel, R C; Martinelli, R E; McAninch, J E; Nelson, D O; Turtletaub, K W

    2004-04-15

    A method using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has been developed for quantifying attomoles of beryllium (Be) in biological samples. This method provides the sensitivity to trace Be in biological samples at very low doses with the purpose of identifying the molecular targets involved in chronic beryllium disease. Proof of the method was tested by administering 0.001, 0.05, 0.5 and 5.0 {micro}g {sup 9}Be and {sup 10}Be by intraperitoneal injection to male mice and removing spleen, liver, femurs, blood, lung, and kidneys after 24 h exposure. These samples were prepared for AMS analysis by tissue digestion in nitric acid, followed by further organic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and ammonium persulfate and lastly, precipitation of Be with ammonium hydroxide, and conversion to beryllium oxide at 800 C. The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio of the extracted beryllium oxide was measured by AMS and Be in the original sample was calculated. Results indicate that Be levels were dose-dependent in all tissues and the highest levels were measured in the spleen and liver. The measured {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratios spanned 4 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -14}, with a detection limit of 3.0 x 10{sup -14}, which is equivalent to 0.8 attomoles of {sup 10}Be. These results show that routine quantification of nanogram levels of Be in tissues is possible and that AMS is a sensitive method that can be used in biological studies to understand the molecular dosimetry of Be and mechanisms of toxicity.

  12. Sampling design considerations for demographic studies: a case of colonial seabirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, William L; Converse, Sarah J; Doherty, Paul F; Naughton, Maura B; Anders, Angela; Hines, James E; Flint, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    For the purposes of making many informed conservation decisions, the main goal for data collection is to assess population status and allow prediction of the consequences of candidate management actions. Reducing the bias and variance of estimates of population parameters reduces uncertainty in population status and projections, thereby reducing the overall uncertainty under which a population manager must make a decision. In capture-recapture studies, imperfect detection of individuals, unobservable life-history states, local movement outside study areas, and tag loss can cause bias or precision problems with estimates of population parameters. Furthermore, excessive disturbance to individuals during capture-recapture sampling may be of concern because disturbance may have demographic consequences. We address these problems using as an example a monitoring program for Black-footed Albatross (Phoebastria nigripes) and Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) nesting populations in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. To mitigate these estimation problems, we describe a synergistic combination of sampling design and modeling approaches. Solutions include multiple capture periods per season and multistate, robust design statistical models, dead recoveries and incidental observations, telemetry and data loggers, buffer areas around study plots to neutralize the effect of local movements outside study plots, and double banding and statistical models that account for band loss. We also present a variation on the robust capture-recapture design and a corresponding statistical model that minimizes disturbance to individuals. For the albatross case study, this less invasive robust design was more time efficient and, when used in combination with a traditional robust design, reduced the standard error of detection probability by 14% with only two hours of additional effort in the field. These field techniques and associated modeling approaches are applicable to studies of

  13. Sampling design considerations for demographic studies: a case of colonial seabirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, William L.; Converse, Sarah J.; Doherty, Paul F.; Naughton, Maura B.; Anders, Angela; Hines, James E.; Flint, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    For the purposes of making many informed conservation decisions, the main goal for data collection is to assess population status and allow prediction of the consequences of candidate management actions. Reducing the bias and variance of estimates of population parameters reduces uncertainty in population status and projections, thereby reducing the overall uncertainty under which a population manager must make a decision. In capture-recapture studies, imperfect detection of individuals, unobservable life-history states, local movement outside study areas, and tag loss can cause bias or precision problems with estimates of population parameters. Furthermore, excessive disturbance to individuals during capture?recapture sampling may be of concern because disturbance may have demographic consequences. We address these problems using as an example a monitoring program for Black-footed Albatross (Phoebastria nigripes) and Laysan Albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) nesting populations in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. To mitigate these estimation problems, we describe a synergistic combination of sampling design and modeling approaches. Solutions include multiple capture periods per season and multistate, robust design statistical models, dead recoveries and incidental observations, telemetry and data loggers, buffer areas around study plots to neutralize the effect of local movements outside study plots, and double banding and statistical models that account for band loss. We also present a variation on the robust capture?recapture design and a corresponding statistical model that minimizes disturbance to individuals. For the albatross case study, this less invasive robust design was more time efficient and, when used in combination with a traditional robust design, reduced the standard error of detection probability by 14% with only two hours of additional effort in the field. These field techniques and associated modeling approaches are applicable to studies of

  14. Rugae pattern in a sample of population of Meerut - An institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwath, S; Chandra, L

    2014-05-01

    Many studies on rugae pattern have been done on various samples of population, but no study has so far been done to assess the rugae pattern of population of western Uttar radesh, especially Meerut. This study was aimed to assess the rugae pattern in males and females of a sample of population of Meerut, which may be an additional method of determining gender when dealing with any crime or with mutilated bodies that have undergone damage beyond recognition. A total of 100 Class I dentulous subjects, 50 male and 50 female patients reporting to the outpatient department of Kalka Dental College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh were randomly selected with an age range between 20-30 years. Exclusion criteria were subjects >14 years of age, congenital malformations, previous orthognathic surgery, allergy to impression material, bony and soft tissue protuberances, active lesions, deformity or scars and trauma of the palate. Prior approval from the Institutional Ethical Committee was taken. Alginate impressions of palate of selected patients were poured in dental stone and rugae pattern was identified and analyzed by a single rater employing Thomas and Kotze's (1983) method. Two-sample t-test and Chi-Square tests were used for comparison of means and relationship between the attributes. A significance level of 5% was considered as critical value. No significant difference was noted in total number or length of rugae between the genders. However, statistically significant difference in the circular type in males and converge type in females was observed. Rugae pattern can be used as a method of differentiation between males and females to corroborate the findings of other methods such as anthropometric evaluation of the cranium and dental characteristics.

  15. Resistive Micromegas for sampling calorimetry, a study of charge-up effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chefdeville, M., E-mail: chefdevi@lapp.in2p3.fr [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Karyotakis, Y. [LAPP, Université de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Geralis, T. [INP, NCSR Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Titov, M. [IRFU, Saclay CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-07-11

    Micromegas, as a proportional and compact gaseous detector, is well suited for sampling calorimetry. The limitation of occasional sparking has now been lifted by means of resistive electrodes but at the cost of current-dependent charge-up effects. These effects are studied in this contribution, with an emphasis on gain variations during operation at high particle rate and under heavy ionisation. Results are reproduced by a simple model of charging-up which will be used for detector design optimisation in the future.

  16. Intercomparison NaI(Tl) and HPGe spectrometry to studies of natural radioactivity on geological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Quoc; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Vuong, Le Quang; Thanh, Tran Thien; Tao, Chau Van

    2016-11-01

    In this study, in situ gamma spectra using NaI(Tl) detector have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detector on geological samples. The results for measuring naturally occurring terrestrial gamma radiation of 40K and the decay series of 232Th and, 238U respectively of both detectors show a maximum deviation about 5%. The mass activities series from both detectors were checked for coherence using proficiency test procedure from the International Atomic Energy Agency. The reliability and precision pass for final scores for all the analytical determinations of are received "acceptable" for all radionuclides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fear, Anger, and Risk Preference Reversals: An Experimental Study on a Chinese Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxiang She

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fear and anger are basic emotions of the same valence which differ in terms of their certainty and control dimensions according to the Appraisal Tendency Framework, a theory addressing the relationship between specific emotions, and judgments and choices. Past research based on the Appraisal Theory revealed contradictory results for risky choice decision-making. However, these conclusions were drawn from Western samples (e.g., North American. Considering potential cultural differences, the present study aims to investigate whether the Appraisal Tendency hypothesis yields the same results in a Chinese sample. Our first study explores how dispositional fear and anger influence risk preferences through a classic virtual “Asia Disease Problem” task and the second study investigates how induced fear and anger influence risk preferences through an incentive-compatible task. Consistent with previous research, our results reveal that induced fear and anger have differential effects on risky decisions: angry participants prefer the risk-seeking option, whereas fearful participants prefer a risk-averse option. However, we find no associations between dispositional fear (or anger and risky decisions.

  18. Intensity and prevalence of depressive states in cancer inpatients: a large sample descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzatti, B; Mella, S; Bomben, F; Flaiban, C; Gipponi, K; Piccinin, M; Busato, S; Annunziata, M A

    2016-06-30

    In cancer patients, depression causes suffering during the whole disease trajectory and it also influences the personal perception of well-being as well as treatment adherence. Consequently, its better definition is needed for planning more tailored supportive programmes. This study was aimed to provide information on depressive state intensity and prevalence in an heterogeneous sample of cancer inpatients. In addition, associations were studied between depressive state and different socio-demographic and clinical factors. A total of 1,147 consecutive adult cancer inpatients completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Scale on Depression together with a form for collecting socio-demographic and clinical data. The mean score of depression was 16.9 (SD = 9.3). There were differences in depression intensity associated with gender (p < .001), age (p = .001) and cancer type (p < .001), but not with education level (p = .282) or marital status (p = .436). Of the entire sample 13.9% had depressive states; this percentage raised to 26.2% if a less stringent criterion was used. These data reinforce the importance of a clinical and research focus on depression in oncology. As differences according to gender, age and diagnosis exist in depression prevalence and intensity, tailored supportive intervention should be planned and verified for effectiveness and efficacy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Ex post-facto study of long term stress in a sample of adoptees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the impact of relinquishment and the adoption process in posttraumatic symptoms in a group of 55 adults that were adopted as children before 1970. The effects of institutionalization, maltreatment, traumatic revelation of the adopted status and stressful life events have also been studied. No significant differences were found between institutionalized and non-institutionalized adoptees in posttraumatic symptomatology. However, adoptees who suffered maltreatment, traumatic revelation and high level of stressful life events scored significantly higher in intrusion and arousal than those adoptees non-maltreated, without traumatic revelation and with low level of stressful life events respectively. Traumatic revelation, alone or in association with maltreatment, seems to play an important role in posttraumatic symptoms in the sample studied.

  20. Self-regulated learning and self-directed study in a pre-college sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Beau; Loken, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) is a multi-dimensional construct that has been difficult to operationalize using traditional, variable-centered methodologies. The current paper takes a person-centered approach to the study of SRL in a sample of 205 high-school students. Using latent profile analysis on self-reports of seven aspects of SRL, three groups were identified: high SRL, low SRL, and average SRL. Student self-reports of goal orientation were used as validation for the profile solution, with the high academic self- regulation group reporting the highest levels of mastery orientation while the low self-regulation group reported highest levels of avoidant orientation. Profiles were also compared on independently collected, behavioral measures of study behaviors, with the highly self-regulated group tending to study more material and for a longer time than less self-regulated individuals.

  1. Concept study for a low cost near-term Mars surface sample return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, C.; Kemble, S.; Parkinson, R.; Smith, M.; Thatcher, J.; Reedman, T.; Sallaberger, C.; Pillinger, C.; Sims, M.

    Man has always had a fascination with the red planet and the quest to reveal its secrets. Although in the past this ques t has been confined to observation from afar and in-situ analysis by dated technology, the chance now exists to extract far more from the Martian surface than ever before - by bringing it home. The idea of a Mars Sample Return mission is not a new phenomenon and plans have been in existence for the last 30 years. The trouble is that these have always been restricted on the grounds of technology, politics and, more predominantly, cost. Many such missions have been estimated at well over 1billion, with huge development times and multiple launches for various mission stages. Plans for direct return missions from the Martian surface had the drawbacks of (a) being too expensive in terms of the launch costs required to lift the propellant needed for return and (b) being too slow if an in-situ resource propellant production technique was used. The alternative solution was to return via a rendezvous in Mars orbit, thus reducing the mass to be transported to and from the Martian surface. The most popular of the orbital rendezvous options involved the launch of a combined Mars Ascent Vehicle/Mars Rover mission to gather samples in readiness for a subsequent return to Earth via a second mission that would deliver an Earth Return Vehicle into Mars orbit with which to transport the samples back. This method had the disadvantages of incurring large costs from the prolonged stay at Mars and high launch costs due to the necessity of two separate launches. The concept of this study is to utilise the orbital rendezvous method but incorporate each of the elements into a single mission (i.e. one launch) using mature and affordable lander technology to return a small regolith core sample. This not only reduces launch and development costs, making the mission more `affordable', but also lowers the risk of mission failure compared to the two-launch method. An

  2. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Abbaszade, G.; Alves, C.; Bjerke, A.; Bonnier, N.; Bossi, R.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wildfire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for BB particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), four used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and six resorted to gas chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 20%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e. for 33% of the

  3. Can we rely on out-of-hospital blood samples? A prospective interventional study on the pre-analytical stability of blood samples under prehospital emergency medicine conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prottengeier, Johannes; Jess, Nicola; Harig, Frank; Gall, Christine; Schmidt, Joachim; Birkholz, Torsten

    2017-03-04

    Prehospital intravenous access provides the opportunity to sample blood from an emergency patient at the earliest possible moment in the course of acute illness and in a state prior to therapeutic interventions. Our study investigates the pre-analytical stability of biomarkers in prehospital emergency medicine and will answer the question whether an approach of blood sampling out in the field will deliver valid laboratory results. We prepared pairs of blood samples from healthy volunteers and volunteering patients post cardio-thoracic surgery. While one sample set was analysed immediately, the other one was subjected to a worse-than-reality treatment of 60 min time-lapse and standardized mechanical forces outside of the hospital through actual ambulance transport. We investigated 21 parameters comprising blood cells, coagulation tests, electrolytes, markers of haemolysis and markers of cardiac ischemia. Bland-Altman analysis was used to investigate differences between test groups. Differences between test groups were set against the official margins of test accuracy as given by the German Requirements for Quality Assurance of Medical Laboratory Examinations. Agreement between immediate analysis and our prehospital treatment is high as demonstrated by Bland-Altman plotting. Mechanical stress and time delay do not produce a systematic bias but only random inaccuracy. The limits of agreement for the tested parameters are generally within clinically acceptable ranges of variation and within the official margins as set by the German Requirements for Quality Assurance of Medical Laboratory Examinations. We subjected blood samples to a standardized treatment marking a worse-than-reality scenario of prehospital time delay and transport. Biomarkers including indicators of myocardial ischemia showed high pre-analytical stability. We conclude the validity of blood samples from a prehospital environment.

  4. Physiological oral melanin pigmentation in a South African sample: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilana, Aubrey; Khammissa, Razia A G; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2017-11-01

    Physiological oral melanin pigmentation is genetically determined, more frequently affecting people with darker skin. It can involve any oral mucosal site, but predominantly the gingiva. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and to characterize the clinical features of physiological oral melanin pigmentation in a South African population sample. A trainee in the discipline of periodontology and oral medicine interviewed all participants and examined the oral soft tissues. The diagnosis of physiological oral melanin pigmentation was based on clinical findings and on the history reported by the patient. A predetermined list of exclusion criteria was applied. The study population comprised 430 participants, of whom 319 (74%) were black, 55 (13%) Indian, 54 (12.5%) white, and two (0.5%) were mixed race. A total of 182 participants were diagnosed with physiological oral melanin pigmentation. The overall prevalence of physiological oral melanin pigmentation in the ethnically-mixed study population was 42%: 54% of blacks were affected, 16% of Indians, and 21% of whites. The female (101): male (81) ratio was 1.2:1; the gingiva was the site most frequently affected (73%). The total number of oral mucosal sites with physiological oral melanin pigmentation in the study population was 263; 68% of participants had one, 22% had two, 7% had three, and 3% had four sites affected. There was no significant association between the number of sites affected and sex or age. In this study of a South African population sample, the prevalence of physiological oral melanin pigmentation was higher in blacks than in Indians or whites, and the gingiva was the oral mucosal site most frequently affected. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Clinical syndromes, personality and recovery from stress: A study in occupational samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Rodríguez Molina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stress manifests itself with different intensity and effects on different people. In many cases it leads to serious health problems or may worsen the prognosis of certain diseases. Stress has been linked to many conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. The workplace can be a source of chronic stress. Many variables have been described that allegedly modulate stress response. Aim. To rank the relationship between some of these variables. A model is presented in this study whereby psychopathological personality traits should be related to one of those modulating variables and thus, with the subject's ability to recover from stress. Design. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Participants. The sample consisted of 108 volunteers: 15 drivers of Madrid city buses, 44 Iberia flight attendants and 49 waiters in bars in the Community of Madrid. Only 4 bus drivers refused to participate. All flight attendants and waiters consented to be included in the study. Intervention. Tests RESTQ-WORK of Kallus and Jiménez and MCMI of Millon were applied to a sample of 108 workers (bus drivers, bar tender and flight attendants. Outcomes. The hypothesis was verified through Hierarchical Multiple Regression Analysis for each dependant variable.

  6. Simplified platelet sample preparation for SDS-PAGE-based proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicheltová, Zuzana; Májek, Pavel; Riedel, Tomáš; Suttnar, Jiří; Dyr, Jan E

    2012-08-01

    The goal of this study was to design an easy and simple protocol for platelet isolation and sample preparation for proteomic studies based on 2DE (IEF-SDS-PAGE) followed by Coomassie blue staining. Blood was collected by venipuncture into tubes coated with EDTA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was immediately obtained by centrifugation. PRP was stored refrigerated in closed Falcon tubes for 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days and platelets were isolated by centrifugation. 2DE gels were stained with colloidal Coomassie blue stain and evaluated using the Progenesis SameSpots software. Spots that differed significantly in the gels of fresh and stored platelet samples were excised, digested with trypsin, and further analyzed using nanoLC-MS/MS. During the 7-day follow-up period, we found 20 spots that differed significantly (ANOVA p investigations, whenever it is not feasible to prepare washed platelets immediately after blood collection, the EDTA-anticoagulated PRP can be stored in test tubes at 4°C for up to 2 days for the platelet proteome investigation. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Negative affect, interpersonal perception, and binge eating behavior: An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambwani, Suman; Roche, Michael J; Minnick, Alyssa M; Pincus, Aaron L

    2015-09-01

    Etiological and maintenance models for disordered eating highlight the salience of negative affect and interpersonal dysfunction. This study employed a 14-day experience sampling procedure to assess the impact of negative affect and interpersonal perceptions on binge eating behavior. Young adult women (N = 40) with recurrent binge eating and significant clinical impairment recorded their mood, interpersonal behavior, and eating behaviors at six stratified semirandom intervals daily through the use of personal digital assistants. Although momentary negative affect was associated with binge eating behavior, average levels of negative affect over the experience sampling period were not, and interpersonal problems moderated the relationship between negative affect and binge eating. Interpersonal problems also intensified the association between momentary interpersonal perceptions and binge eating behavior. Lagged analyses indicated that previous levels of negative affect and interpersonal style also influence binge eating. The study findings suggest there may be important differences in how dispositional versus momentary experiences of negative affect are associated with binge eating. Results also highlight the importance of interpersonal problems for understanding relationships among negative affect, interpersonal perception, and binge eating behavior. These results offer several possibilities for attending to affective and interpersonal functioning in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Petrophysical studies of north American carbonate rock samples and evaluation of pore-volume compressibility models

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gilberto Peixoto; Franco, Daniel R.; Stael, Giovanni C.; da Costa de Oliveira Lima, Maira; Sant'Anna Martins, Ricardo; de Moraes França, Olívia; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate two pore volume compressibility models that are currently discussed in the literature (Horne, 1990; Jalalh, 2006b). Five groups of carbonate rock samples from the three following sedimentary basins in North America that are known for their association with hydrocarbon deposits were selected for this study: (i) the Guelph Formation of the Michigan Basin (Middle Silurian); (ii) the Edwards Formation of the Central Texas Platform (Middle Cretaceous); and (iii) the Burlington-Keokuk Formation of the Mississippian System (Lower Mississippian). In addition to the evaluation of the compressibility model, a petrophysical evaluation of these rock samples was conducted. Additional characterizations, such as grain density, the effective porosity, absolute grain permeability, thin section petrography, MICP and NMR, were performed to complement constant pore-pressure compressibility tests. Although both models presented an overall good representation of the compressibility behavior of the studied carbonate rocks, even when considering their broad porosity range (~ 2-38%), the model proposed by Jalalh (2006b) performed better with a confidence level of 95% and a prediction interval of 68%.

  9. Stability of DREEM in a Sample of Medical Students: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Saiful Bahri Yusoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over the last 15 year, DREEM was applied in various educational settings to appraise educational climate. So far, none of article reported its stability in Malaysian medical students. Objective. To determine stability of the DREEM to measure educational climate at different time and occasions using a sample of medical students. Methodology. A prospective cohort study was done on 196 first year medical students. It was administered to the medical students at four different intervals. The Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation analysis were applied to measure internal consistency and agreement level across the intervals. The analysis was done using SPSS 18. Result. A total of 186 (94.9% medical students responded completely to the DREEM inventory. The overall Cronbach's alpha value of the DREEM at the four measurements ranged between 0.91 and 0.94. The average Cronbach's alpha values of the five subscales ranged between 0.45 and 0.83. The ICC coefficient values for the DREEM total score was 0.67 and its subscales ranged between 0.51 and 0.62. Conclusion. This study supported satisfactory levels of stability and internal consistency of the DREEM to measure educational climate over multiple observations in a sample of Malaysian medical students. Continued research is required to optimise its psychometric credential across educational settings.

  10. Internet addiction among elementary and middle school students in China: a nationally representative sample study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajun; Zhang, Xinghui; Lu, Furong; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Yun

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of Internet addiction in a nationally representative sample of Chinese elementary and middle school students and to investigate Internet addiction among Internet users with different usages. The data were from the National Children's Study of China (NCSC) in which 24,013 fourth- to ninth-grade students were recruited from 100 counties in 31 provinces in China. Only 54.2% of the students had accessed the Internet. According to the criteria of Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire (YDQ), an eight-item instrument, the prevalence of Internet addiction in the total sample was 6.3%, and among Internet users was 11.7%. Among the Internet users, males (14.8%) and rural students (12.1%) reported Internet addiction more than females (7.0%) and urban students (10.6%). The percentage of Internet addicts in elementary school students (11.5%) was not significantly lower than the percentage of middle school students (11.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four geographical regions (9.6%, 11.5%, 12.3%, 11.1%) characterized by different levels of economy, health, education, and social environment. As the frequency of Internet use and time spent online per week increased, the percentage of Internet addicts increased. When considering the location and purpose of Internet use, the percentage of Internet addicts was highest in adolescents typically surfing in Internet cafes (18.1%) and playing Internet games (22.5%).

  11. A Study of the Distribution of Sample Coefficient Alpha with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist: Bootstrap versus Asymptotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Guarnaccia, Charles A.; Hayslip, Bert, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the sample coefficient alpha for each of the five subscales of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSL; L. Derogaitis and others, 1974) in a sample of 419 adults. Findings show that the normal-theory-based distribution has a systematic bias in describing the behavior of the sample coefficient alpha. (SLD)

  12. Environmental and mental conditions predicting the experience of involuntary musical imagery: An experience sampling method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floridou, Georgia A; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    An experience sampling method (ESM) study on 40 volunteers was conducted to explore the environmental factors and psychological conditions related to involuntary musical imagery (INMI) in everyday life. Participants reported 6 times per day for one week on their INMI experiences, relevant contextual information and associated environmental conditions. The resulting data was modeled with Bayesian networks and led to insights into the interplay of factors related to INMI experiences. The activity that a person is engaged was found to play an important role in the experience of mind wandering, which in turn enables the experience of INMI. INMI occurrence is independent of the time of the day while the INMI trigger affects the subjective evaluation of the INMI experience. The results are compared to findings from earlier studies based on retrospective surveys and questionnaires and highlight the advantage of ESM techniques in research on spontaneous experiences like INMI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A study of diabetes mellitus within a large sample of Australian twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Condon, Julianne; Shaw, Joanne E; Luciano, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Twin studies of diabetes mellitus can help elucidate genetic and environmental factors in etiology and can provide valuable biological samples for testing functional hypotheses, for example using expression and methylation studies of discordant pairs. We searched the volunteer Australian Twin....... Weight differences between affected and unaffected cotwins from monozygotic (MZ) discordant pairs were large for T2D and GD, but much larger again for discordant dizygotic (DZ) pairs. The bivariate genetic analysis (under the multifactorial threshold model) estimated the genetic correlation between body...... Registry (19,387 pairs) for twins with diabetes using disease checklists from nine different surveys conducted from 1980-2000. After follow-up questionnaires to the twins and their doctors to confirm diagnoses, we eventually identified 46 pairs where one or both had type 1 diabetes (T1D), 113 pairs...

  14. The prevalence of workaholism: a survey study in a nationally representative sample of Norwegian employees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Schou Andreassen

    Full Text Available Workaholism has become an increasingly popular area for empirical study. However, most studies examining the prevalence of workaholism have used non-representative samples and measures with poorly defined cut-off scores. To overcome these methodological limitations, a nationally representative survey among employees in Norway (N = 1,124 was conducted. Questions relating to gender, age, marital status, caretaker responsibility for children, percentage of full-time equivalent, and educational level were asked. Workaholism was assessed by the use of a psychometrically validated instrument (i.e., Bergen Work Addiction Scale. Personality was assessed using the Mini-International Personality Item Pool. Results showed that the prevalence of workaholism was 8.3% (95% CI  = 6.7-9.9%. An adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that workaholism was negatively related to age and positively related to the personality dimensions agreeableness, neuroticism, and intellect/imagination. Implications for these findings are discussed.

  15. MetSizeR: selecting the optimal sample size for metabolomic studies using an analysis based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nyamundanda, Gift; Gormley, Isobel Claire; Fan, Yue; Gallagher, William M.; Brennan, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Determining sample sizes for metabolomic experiments is important but due to the complexity of these experiments, there are currently no standard methods for sample size estimation in metabolomics. Since pilot studies are rarely done in metabolomics, currently existing sample size estimation approaches which rely on pilot data can not be applied. Results: In this article, an analysis based approach called MetSizeR is developed to estimate sample size for metabolomic experime...

  16. [Epidemiological study of dental and facial asymmetries in a sample of preschool subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Marina Consuelo; Barbieri, Federica; Ricotta, Riccardo; Arpesella, Marisa; Emanuelli, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    to identify the typologies of facial and dental asymmetries in a sample of children aged between 3 and 6 years and to correlate these asymmetries with possible morphological and functional situations. cross-sectional observational study. sample of 95 subjects aged between 3 and 6 years. Clinical data were collected in 10 sessions conducted during school hours in April 2013 by a doctor of Dentistry at two preschools in the city of Sanremo (Liguria Region, Northern Italy) and a kindergarten in the city of Pavia (Lombardy Region, Northern Italy). To collect the data, a weighted clinical questionnaire was used. presence and type of bad habit, type of breathing, presence and type of facial asymmetry, dental formula, presence of diastema, presence and type of occlusal asymmetries, presence and type of dental malocclusions. analysed sample consisted of 53.7% (51/95) of males and 46.3 % (44/95) females; the mean age was 4.3 ± 0.9 years. Most frequent facial asymmetry is orbits asymmetry (35%, 33/95); dental malocclusions are detected in 70%(67/95) of cases. High percentage of subjects (69.5%, 66/95) presents displacement between superior dental midline (SDM) and inferior dental midline (IDM). Several statistically significant associations are observed: in particular, asymmetry of molar ratios is linked to asymmetry of the cheekbones and displacement of the SDM; facial midline has statistical association with asymmetry of the cheekbones (p habits observed and the close correlation between: the presence of dental malocclusions and the presence of compromising habits, the presence of dental malocclusions and the presence of oral breathing.

  17. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity in a healthy adult sample: The ELSA-Brasil study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Cunha, Roberto S; Molina, Maria Del Carmen B; Chór, Dora; Griep, Rosane H; Duncan, Bruce B; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Barreto, Sandhi M; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Mill, José Geraldo

    2018-01-15

    Aging declines essential physiological functions, and the vascular system is strongly affected by artery stiffening. We intended to define the age- and sex-specific reference values for carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) in a sample free of major risk factors. The ELSA-Brasil study enrolled 15,105 participants aged 35-74years. The healthy sample was achieved by excluding diabetics, those over the optimal and normal blood pressure levels, body mass index ≤18.5 or ≥25kg/m2, current and former smokers, and those with self-report of previous cardiovascular disease. After exclusions, the sample consisted of 2158 healthy adults (1412 women). Although cf-PWV predictors were similar between sex (age, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate), cf-PWV was higher in men (8.74±1.15 vs. 8.31±1.13m/s; adjusted for age and MAP, PBrasil population (n=15,105) increased by twice the age-related slope of cf-PWV growth, regardless of sex (0.0919±0.182 vs. 0.0504±0.153m/s per year for men, 0.0960±0.173 vs. 0.0606±0.139m/s per year for women). cf-PWV is different between men and women and even in an optimal and normal range of MAP and free of other classical risk factors for arterial stiffness, reference values for cf-PWV should take into account MAP levels. Also, the presence of major risk factors in the general population doubles the age-related rise in cf-PWV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of radioactivity levels in detergent powders samples by gamma spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Abojassim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the evaluation of the natural radioactivity levels in ten samples of the detergent powders that available in Iraqi markets. We have determined the specific activities of uranium, thorium and potassium using gamma spectroscopy and calculation of radiation hazard indices. The results of the activities of radionuclides (238U, 232Th, 40K for detergent powders samples, are found that the 238U specific activities were varied from (11.489 ± 2.089 Bq/kg to (36.062 ± 2.478 Bq/kg, while the 232th specific activities were varied from (1.411 ± 0.609 Bq/kg to (9.272 ± 1.642 Bq/kg and 40K were varied from (8.189 ± 2.339 Bq/kg to (91.888 ± 4.164 Bq/kg. These values are always lower than those of raw materials, what is explained by the conservation of radioactive material throughout the manufacturing process. The radium equivalent activity Raeq, the external hazard index Hex and the internal hazard index Hin dose due to natural radioactivity estimated below the regulatory standard recommended which are (370 Bq/kg, 1 and 1 according to OECD 1979 and ICRP 2000, allows us to show that Detergent powders samples products are not contaminated by radioactivity, are healthy and do not have harmful radiological impact on the consumer.

  19. Inflammatory Biomarkers and Risk of Schizophrenia: A 2-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Borges, Maria Carolina; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George

    2017-12-01

    Positive associations between inflammatory biomarkers and risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, have been reported in observational studies. However, conventional observational studies are prone to bias, such as reverse causation and residual confounding, thus limiting our understanding of the effect (if any) of inflammatory biomarkers on schizophrenia risk. To evaluate whether inflammatory biomarkers have an effect on the risk of developing schizophrenia. Two-sample mendelian randomization study using genetic variants associated with inflammatory biomarkers as instrumental variables to improve inference. Summary association results from large consortia of candidate gene or genome-wide association studies, including several epidemiologic studies with different designs, were used. Gene-inflammatory biomarker associations were estimated in pooled samples ranging from 1645 to more than 80 000 individuals, while gene-schizophrenia associations were estimated in more than 30 000 cases and more than 45 000 ancestry-matched controls. In most studies included in the consortia, participants were of European ancestry, and the prevalence of men was approximately 50%. All studies were conducted in adults, with a wide age range (18 to 80 years). Genetically elevated circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and soluble interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R). Risk of developing schizophrenia. Individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders were included as cases. Given that many studies contributed to the analyses, different diagnostic procedures were used. The pooled odds ratio estimate using 18 CRP genetic instruments was 0.90 (random effects 95% CI, 0.84-0.97; P = .005) per 2-fold increment in CRP levels; consistent results were obtained using different mendelian randomization methods and a more conservative set of instruments. The odds ratio for sIL-6R was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.12; P = .02

  20. The effect of a biological explanation on attitudes towards homosexual persons. A Swedish national sample study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landén, Mikael; Innala, Sune

    2002-01-01

    Studies assessing attitudes towards homosexuals have revealed widespread homophobia. The first aim of this study was to assess potential changes in public attitudes after important legislative changes related to homosexuals in Sweden. The second aim was to test whether the attitudes differ: 1) between people who believe in biological vs. people who believe in psychological theories in explanation of homosexuality, 2) between men and women, and 3) between the older and younger age groups. To this end, a questionnaire survey of a representative, randomly selected, national sample of 992 adult Swedish residents was carried out. The response rate was 67%, which is considered high in this context. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a clear-cut change towards more tolerant attitudes towards homosexual men and women compared to earlier studies. The reasons for this change is discussed; among factors of importance are anti-discrimination legislation, increased visibility of homosexual people, and that more people currently regard homosexuality as a biologically determined, natural variant of human sexuality than was the case 10 years ago. In accordance, this study gave further support to the notion that those who believe that homosexuality is caused by biological factors have a less restrictive view on homosexuality than do people who hold a psychological view.

  1. Racial Differences in Serum Adipokine and Insulin Levels in a Matched Osteoarthritis Sample: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In an attempt to correlate biomarkers with disease, serum-based biomarkers often are compared between individuals with osteoarthritis (OA and control subjects. However, variable results have been reported. Some studies have suggested an association between certain adipokines and insulin and OA. We know that there are racial differences in OA prevalence and incidence, and from general population-based studies, those of Asian race consistently demonstrate a unique adipokine/insulin serum concentration profile as compared to Caucasians. Whether similar racial differences exist within OA samples is unknown and may have implications for selecting appropriate controls in comparative studies. Methods. Serum levels of adipokines, leptin, and adiponectin, along with insulin, were determined by ELISA in patients scheduled for total hip or knee replacement surgery for OA. Fifteen Asian patients were matched 1 : 1 on age (±2 years, gender, body mass index (±1.5 kg/m2, and surgical joint with Caucasian patients. Differences in serum concentrations were tested using paired t-tests. Results. Serum leptin and insulin levels were significantly higher in Asians compared to Caucasians (p<0.05. While serum adiponectin levels were lower among Asians, the difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.12. Conclusion. Findings from this work suggest that when studying serum biomarker concentrations in OA versus controls, race may be an important factor to consider. Our findings warrant confirmation in larger studies.

  2. The CAMELS data set: catchment attributes and meteorology for large-sample studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addor, Nans; Newman, Andrew J.; Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn P.

    2017-10-01

    We present a new data set of attributes for 671 catchments in the contiguous United States (CONUS) minimally impacted by human activities. This complements the daily time series of meteorological forcing and streamflow provided by Newman et al. (2015b). To produce this extension, we synthesized diverse and complementary data sets to describe six main classes of attributes at the catchment scale: topography, climate, streamflow, land cover, soil, and geology. The spatial variations among basins over the CONUS are discussed and compared using a series of maps. The large number of catchments, combined with the diversity of the attributes we extracted, makes this new data set well suited for large-sample studies and comparative hydrology. In comparison to the similar Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) data set, this data set relies on more recent data, it covers a wider range of attributes, and its catchments are more evenly distributed across the CONUS. This study also involves assessments of the limitations of the source data sets used to compute catchment attributes, as well as detailed descriptions of how the attributes were computed. The hydrometeorological time series provided by Newman et al. (2015b, https://doi.org/10.5065/D6MW2F4D" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.5065/D6MW2F4D) together with the catchment attributes introduced in this paper (https://doi.org/10.5065/D6G73C3Q" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.5065/D6G73C3Q) constitute the freely available CAMELS data set, which stands for Catchment Attributes and MEteorology for Large-sample Studies.

  3. A work sampling study of provider activities in school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavis, Brian; Pearson, Rachel; Stewart, Gail; Keefe, Carole

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe provider activities in a convenience sample of School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs). The goal was to determine the relative proportion of time that clinic staff engaged in various patient care and non-patient care activities. All provider staff at 4 urban SBHCs participated in this study; 2 were in elementary schools, 1 in a middle school, and 1 in a school with kindergarten through grade 8. The study examined provider activity from 6 days sampled at random from the school year. Participants were asked to document their activities in 15-minute intervals from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. A structured recording form was used that included 35 activity categories. Overall, 1492 records were completed, accounting for 2708 coded activities. Almost half (48%) of all staff activities were coded as direct patient contact, with clinic operations the second largest category. Limited variations in activities were found across clinic sites and according to season. A significant amount of provider activity was directed at the delivery of health care; direct patient care and clinic operations combined accounted for approximately 75% of clinic activity. Patient, classroom, and group education activities, as well as contacts with parents and school staff accounted for 20% of all clinic activity and represent important SBHC functions that other productivity measures such as billing data might not consistently track. Overall, the method was acceptable to professional staff as a means of tracking activity and was adaptable to meet their needs.

  4. The estrogen hypothesis of Schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism: Association study in three independent samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timm Sally

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a highly heritable complex psychiatric disorder with an underlying pathophysiology that is still not well understood. Metaanalyses of schizophrenia linkage studies indicate numerous but rather large disease-associated genomic regions, whereas accumulating gene- and protein expression studies have indicated an equally large set of candidate genes that only partially overlap linkage genes. A thorough assessment, beyond the resolution of current GWA studies, of the disease risk conferred by the numerous schizophrenia candidate genes is a daunting and presently not feasible task. We undertook these challenges by using an established clinical paradigm, the estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia, as the criterion to select candidates among the numerous genes experimentally implicated in schizophrenia. Bioinformatic tools were used to build and priorities the signaling networks implicated by the candidate genes resulting from the estrogen selection. We identified ten candidate genes using this approach that are all active in glucose metabolism and particularly in the glycolysis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that variants of the glycolytic genes are associated with schizophrenia or at least with gender-associated aspects of the illness. Results We genotyped 185 SNPs in three independent case-control samples of Scandinavian origin (a total of 765 patients and 1274 control subjects. Variants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 gene (MAPK14 and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1 and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase (FBP1 were nominal significantly associated with schizophrenia, and several haplotypes within enolase 2 gene (ENO2 consist of the same SNP allele having elevated risk of schizophrenia. Importantly, we find no evidence of stratification due to nationality or gender. Conclusion Several gene variants in the Glycolysis were associated with schizophrenia in three independent samples. However, the

  5. Does body satisfaction influence self-esteem in adolescents' daily lives? An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; McCabe, Marita; Skouteris, Helen; Richardson, Ben; Nihill, Kristy; Watson, Brittany; Solomon, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study examined, within the context of the Contingencies of Self-Worth model, state-based associations between self-esteem and body satisfaction using the experience sampling method. One hundred and forty-four adolescent girls (mean age = 14.28 years) completed up to 6 assessments per day for one week using Palm Digital Assistants, in addition to baseline measures of trait body satisfaction and self-esteem. Results showed considerable variation in both state-based constructs within days, and evidence of effects of body satisfaction on self-esteem, but not vice versa. Although these state-based associations were small in size and weakened as the time lag between assessments increased for the sample as a whole, individual differences in the magnitude of these effects were observed and predicted by trait self-esteem and body satisfaction. Collectively, these findings offer support for key tenets of the Contingencies of Self-Worth model. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Software engineering the mixed model for genome-wide association studies on large samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Buckler, Edward S; Casstevens, Terry M; Bradbury, Peter J

    2009-11-01

    Mixed models improve the ability to detect phenotype-genotype associations in the presence of population stratification and multiple levels of relatedness in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but for large data sets the resource consumption becomes impractical. At the same time, the sample size and number of markers used for GWAS is increasing dramatically, resulting in greater statistical power to detect those associations. The use of mixed models with increasingly large data sets depends on the availability of software for analyzing those models. While multiple software packages implement the mixed model method, no single package provides the best combination of fast computation, ability to handle large samples, flexible modeling and ease of use. Key elements of association analysis with mixed models are reviewed, including modeling phenotype-genotype associations using mixed models, population stratification, kinship and its estimation, variance component estimation, use of best linear unbiased predictors or residuals in place of raw phenotype, improving efficiency and software-user interaction. The available software packages are evaluated, and suggestions made for future software development.

  7. Study of different ablation models by use of high-speed-sampling photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltauf, Guenther; Reichel, Erich; Schmidt-Kloiber, Heinz

    1992-08-01

    In our study we investigated the ablation characteristics of an aqueous dye solution with a defined absorption coefficient, irradiated by short (8 ns) and long (100 microsecond(s) ) pulses from a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength: 1064 nm). The experimental technique was schlieren photography with a second Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm as a light source and with a variable delay between the two laser pulses. With a special arrangement of the laser beams and the sample effects below and above the surface of the liquid could be simultaneously observed. We could distinguish three ablation mechanisms, depending on the pulse duration and the incident fluence. With short pulses and a fluence below the vaporization threshold the tensile pulse from the bipolar thermoelastic wave, propagating from the liquid-air interface into the sample, caused rupture and spallation of the liquid. At fluences generating a surface temperature in excess of 100 degree(s)C the short pulses caused explosive vaporization, characterized by shock wave emission both in air and in liquid. At the same fluence the long pulses caused slow vaporization, meaning that vapor and liquid ejection started during the laser pulse and was less violent than with the 8 ns pulses.

  8. Polysomnographic study of the prevalence of sleep bruxism in a population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluly, M; Andersen, M L; Dal-Fabbro, C; Garbuio, S; Bittencourt, L; de Siqueira, J T T; Tufik, S

    2013-07-01

    The goal of the current study was to estimate the prevalence of sleep bruxism (SB) in the general population using a representative sample of 1,042 individuals who answered questionnaires and underwent polysomnography (PSG) examinations. After PSG, the individuals were classified into 3 groups: absence of SB, low-frequency SB, and high-frequency SB. The results indicated that the prevalence of SB, indicated by questionnaires and confirmed by PSG, was 5.5%. With PSG used exclusively as the criterion for diagnosis, the prevalence was 7.4% regardless of SB self-reported complaints. With questionnaires alone, the prevalence was 12.5%. Of the 5.5% (n = 56) with confirmed SB, 26 were classified as low-frequency SB, and 30 as high-frequency. The episodes of SB were more frequent in stage 2 sleep, and the phasic bruxism events were more frequent than tonic or mixed events in all sleep stages in individuals with SB. A positive association was observed between SB and insomnia, higher degree of schooling, and a normal/overweight body mass index (BMI). These findings demonstrate the prevalence of SB in a population sampled by PSG, the gold standard methodology in the investigation of sleep disorders, combined with validated questionnaires.

  9. Prevalence study of compulsive buying in a sample with low individual monthly income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Priscilla Lourenço; Silva, Adriana Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Compulsive buying can be characterized as an almost irresistible impulse to acquire various items. This is a current issue and the prevalence rate in the global population is around 5 to 8%. Some surveys indicate that the problem is growing in young and low-income populations. To evaluate the prevalence of compulsive buying among people with low personal monthly incomes and analyze relationships with socio-demographic data. The Compulsive Buying Scale was administered to screen for compulsive buying and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression in a sample of 56 participants. Pearson coefficients were used to test for correlations. The results indicated that 44.6% presented an average family income equal to or greater than 2.76 minimum wages. It is possible that compulsive buying is not linked to the purchasing power since it was found in a low-income population. Despite the small sample, the results of this study are important for understanding the problem in question.

  10. Prevalence study of compulsive buying in a sample with low individual monthly income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Lourenço Leite

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Compulsive buying can be characterized as an almost irresistible impulse to acquire various items. This is a current issue and the prevalence rate in the global population is around 5 to 8%. Some surveys indicate that the problem is growing in young and low-income populations. Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of compulsive buying among people with low personal monthly incomes and analyze relationships with socio-demographic data. Methods: The Compulsive Buying Scale was administered to screen for compulsive buying and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression in a sample of 56 participants. Pearson coefficients were used to test for correlations. Results: The results indicated that 44.6% presented an average family income equal to or greater than 2.76 minimum wages. It is possible that compulsive buying is not linked to the purchasing power since it was found in a low-income population. Conclusion: Despite the small sample, the results of this study are important for understanding the problem in question.

  11. Hydrothermal Prospecting and Petrological Sampling in the Lau Basin: Background Data for the Integrated Study Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.; German, C.; Michael, P.; Yoerger, D. R.; Fornari, D. J.; Shank, T. M.; Asimow, P. D.; Edmonds, H. N.; L 2 Team

    2004-12-01

    In the spring of 2004, Martinez and others (this meeting) carried out an extensive mapping program of the southern Lau Basin spreading centers with high resolution bathymetry and sidescan data. They were also defined the overall distribution of mantle plumes along the ridges using miniature autonomous plume recorders and CTD tow-yos. These important new data were the first step of an integrated RIDGE 2000 program of four cruises to identify the overall tectonic, petrological, hydrothermal and biological characteristics of the spreading centers to permit a well informed selection of targets for more focussed studies in coming years. During September and October of 2004, on board R/V Kilo Moana, we are carrying out the second phase of investigations, with the aim of identifying specific hydrothermal sites and providing regional sampling of lavas from the region. The primary tools of investigation for hydrothermal site discovery are the autonomous benthic explorer (ABE) as well as CTD's and bottom towed cameras. Making use of new CTD data to verify the plumes identified in the Martinez et al cruise, ABE is being used in three different modes. Phase I focusses on the water column at the level of the neutrally buoyant plume. These results enable planning of the more focussed Phase II, closer to the bottom, to provide high resolution bathymetry and characterization of the buoyant plume. Phase III provides photographic coverage of even more limited regions focussed on the vent fields defined in Phase II. Camera tows using TOWCAM are planned to provide the highest resolution images of new hydrothermal sites. This cruise represents the first attempt to use ABE in such a staged and systematic program of regional vent site discovery. Since the ship is free to carry out other investigations during the ABE dives, which can be 24 hours or more in length, high density sampling of the various Lau Spreading Centers will be carried out at the same time as the hydrothermal

  12. IMPROVING THE ECOLOGICALAND ECONOMIC INDICES OFTHE COMPANY ON THE BASIS OFTHE BESTAVAILABLE TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gunkova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the modern society pays much attention to the issue of environmental security. On the basis of literary sources it is noted that there is a trend to strengthening the role of environmentally oriented management methods, guidelines for the modernization of production, implementation of environmental management systems and environmental certification. Environmental certification helps the company to properly allocate resources for environmental protection and provides the state with the accurate data and the receipt of payments in budgets of all levels for negative impact on the environment. The structural changes are based on the requirements of the environmental legislation, new requirements to ecological regulation. The authors confirm the need for transition to the Best available techniques (BAT, which significantly improve environmental and economic performance of the enterprise. Implementation of BAT requires the effective replacement of obsolete resource-intensive production and modern technology. Such transitions affect the size of payments for negative impact on the environment and the volume of economic incentives from the state. It is noted that Russia applies the European experience as a basis of creating guidebooks on the best available techniques. The definition of technology as the best available techniques is determined by the resolution of the Government of the Russian Federation. Indicators and information generated in the BREF are also required in carrying out the environmental monitoring and control. Changes in these indicators reflect the quality of the technology used. Implementation of BAT requires significant investments, the priority should be conservation projects that eliminate the most acute environmental problems and maximize environmental benefits. The increased interest of enterprises in the application of environmental technologies is not only based on obtaining favorable conditions for state support, but are also aimed at improving the company’s image, increasing economic capacity and competitiveness.

  13. Automatic sampling for unbiased and efficient stereological estimation using the proportionator in biological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2008-01-01

    and feature detection is clearly biased, the estimator is strictly unbiased. The proportionator is compared to the commonly applied sampling technique (systematic uniform random sampling in 2D space or so-called meander sampling) using three biological examples: estimating total number of granule cells in rat...

  14. A Monte Carlo Study of the Sampling Distribution of the Congruence Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broodbooks, Wendy J.; Elmore, Patricia B.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of sample size, number of variables, and population value of the congruence coefficient on the sampling distribution of the congruence coefficient were examined. Sample data were generated on the basis of the common factor model, and principal axes factor analyses were performed. (Author/LMO)

  15. Empirically simulated study to compare and validate sampling methods used in aerial surveys of wildlife populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaemba, W.M.; Stein, A.; Rasch, D.; Leeuw, de J.; Georgiadis, N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the distribution, sampling and estimation of abundance for two animal species in an African ecosystem by means of an intensive simulation of the sampling process under a geographical information system (GIS) environment. It focuses on systematic and random sampling designs,

  16. Gambling problems in the family – A stratified probability sample study of prevalence and reported consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øren Anita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior studies on the impact of problem gambling in the family mainly include help-seeking populations with small numbers of participants. The objective of the present stratified probability sample study was to explore the epidemiology of problem gambling in the family in the general population. Methods Men and women 16–74 years-old randomly selected from the Norwegian national population database received an invitation to participate in this postal questionnaire study. The response rate was 36.1% (3,483/9,638. Given the lack of validated criteria, two survey questions ("Have you ever noticed that a close relative spent more and more money on gambling?" and "Have you ever experienced that a close relative lied to you about how much he/she gambles?" were extrapolated from the Lie/Bet Screen for pathological gambling. Respondents answering "yes" to both questions were defined as Concerned Significant Others (CSOs. Results Overall, 2.0% of the study population was defined as CSOs. Young age, female gender, and divorced marital status were factors positively associated with being a CSO. CSOs often reported to have experienced conflicts in the family related to gambling, worsening of the family's financial situation, and impaired mental and physical health. Conclusion Problematic gambling behaviour not only affects the gambling individual but also has a strong impact on the quality of life of family members.

  17. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Al-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs.

  18. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, Ahmed A; Al-Rashoudi, Abdualltef H; Al-Eisa, Abdulrhman A; Addar, Abdullah M; Al-Hargan, Abdullah H; Al-Jerian, Albaraa A; Al-Omair, Abdullah A; Al-Sheddi, Ahmed I; Al-Nowaiser, Hussam I; Al-Kathiri, Omar A; Al-Hassan, Abdullah H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs.

  19. A genome-wide association study of neuroticism in a population-based sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico C F Calboli

    Full Text Available Neuroticism is a moderately heritable personality trait considered to be a risk factor for developing major depression, anxiety disorders and dementia. We performed a genome-wide association study in 2,235 participants drawn from a population-based study of neuroticism, making this the largest association study for neuroticism to date. Neuroticism was measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. After Quality Control, we analysed 430,000 autosomal SNPs together with an additional 1.2 million SNPs imputed with high quality from the Hap Map CEU samples. We found a very small effect of population stratification, corrected using one principal component, and some cryptic kinship that required no correction. NKAIN2 showed suggestive evidence of association with neuroticism as a main effect (p < 10(-6 and GPC6 showed suggestive evidence for interaction with age (p approximately = 10(-7. We found support for one previously-reported association (PDE4D, but failed to replicate other recent reports. These results suggest common SNP variation does not strongly influence neuroticism. Our study was powered to detect almost all SNPs explaining at least 2% of heritability, and so our results effectively exclude the existence of loci having a major effect on neuroticism.

  20. Situational runaway adolescents. A study on risk factors from a Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Demet M; Demir, Nilüfer Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on a sample of 726 non-clinical adolescents (aged 17-18 years) from high schools in Ankara, Turkey, this paper primarily aims to identify the risk factors related to situational run away behavior. This study was based on an ecological risk factors model and tried to discover the associations for runaways. Run away behavior is one of the problematic behaviors very commonly seen among Turkish adolescents. Regression analyses revealed that predictors for runaway behavior differed due to gender; while, delinquency, sexual intercourse, substance use, parental separation and suicidal ideation were the significant predictors for girl adolescent runaway behaviors, while lack of parental support and depression were the significant predictors for boy adolescent runaway behavior.

  1. Thermal Stability and Kinetic Study of Fluvoxamine Stability in Binary Samples with Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Ghaderi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present study the incompatibility of FLM (fluvoxamine with lactose in solid state mixtures was investigated. The compatibility was evaluated using different physicochemical methods such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Methods: Non-Isothermally stressed physical mixtures were used to calculate the solid–state kinetic parameters. Different thermal models such as Friedman, Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose (KAS were used for the characterization of the drug-excipient interaction. Results: Overall, the incompatibility of FLM with lactose as a reducing carbohydrate was successfully evaluated and the activation energy of this interaction was calculated. Conclusion: In this research the lactose and FLM Maillard interaction was proved using physicochemical techniques including DSC and FTIR. It was shown that DSC- based kinetic analysis provides fast and versatile kinetic comparison of Arrhenius activation energies for different pharmaceutical samples.

  2. Supporting Opportunities for Context-Aware Social Matching: An Experience Sampling Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Julia; Barkhuus, Louise; Hiltz, Starr Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    opportunities to map out the design space of opportunistic social matching systems. We contribute insights gained from a study combining Experience Sampling Method (ESM) with 85 students of a U.S. university and interviews with 15 of these participants. A generalized linear mixed model analysis (n=1704) showed......Mobile social matching systems aim to bring people together in the physical world by recommending people nearby to each other. Going beyond simple similarity and proximity matching mechanisms, we explore a proposed framework of relational, social and personal context as predictors of match...... that personal context (mood and busyness) as well as sociability of others nearby are the strongest predictors of contextual match interest. Participant interviews suggest operationalizing relational context using social network rarity and discoverable rarity, and incorporating skill level and learning...

  3. Generating samples for association studies based on HapMap data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Chen, Yixuan

    2008-01-24

    With the completion of the HapMap project, a variety of computational algorithms and tools have been proposed for haplotype inference, tag SNP selection and genome-wide association studies. Simulated data are commonly used in evaluating these new developed approaches. In addition to simulations based on population models, empirical data generated by perturbing real data, has also been used because it may inherit specific properties from real data. However, there is no tool that is publicly available to generate large scale simulated variation data by taking into account knowledge from the HapMap project. A computer program (gs) was developed to quickly generate a large number of samples based on real data that are useful for a variety of purposes, including evaluating methods for haplotype inference, tag SNP selection and association studies. Two approaches have been implemented to generate dense SNP haplotype/genotype data that share similar local linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns as those in human populations. The first approach takes haplotype pairs from samples as inputs, and the second approach takes patterns of haplotype block structures as inputs. Both quantitative and qualitative traits have been incorporated in the program. Phenotypes are generated based on a disease model, or based on the effect of a quantitative trait nucleotide, both of which can be specified by users. In addition to single-locus disease models, two-locus disease models have also been implemented that can incorporate any degree of epistasis. Users are allowed to specify all nine parameters in a 3 x 3 penetrance table. For several commonly used two-locus disease models, the program can automatically calculate penetrances based on the population prevalence and marginal effects of a disease that users can conveniently specify. The program gs can effectively generate large scale genetic and phenotypic variation data that can be used for evaluating new developed approaches. It is freely

  4. Parametric and nonparametric two-sample tests for feature screening in class comparison: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Landoni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The identification of a location-, scale- and shape-sensitive test to detect differentially expressed features between two comparison groups represents a key point in high dimensional studies. The most commonly used tests refer to differences in location, but general distributional discrepancies might be important to reveal differential biological processes.                                                         Methods. A simulation study was conducted to compare the performance of a set of two-sample tests, i.e. Student's t, Welch's t, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney, Podgor-Gastwirth PG2, Cucconi, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS, Cramer-von Mises (CvM, Anderson-Darling (AD and Zhang tests (ZK, ZC and ZA which were investigated under different distributional patterns. We applied the same tests to a real data example.                   Results. AD, CvM, ZA and ZC tests proved to be the most sensitive tests in mixture distribution patterns, while still maintaining a high power in normal distribution patterns. At best, the AD test showed a loss in power of ~ 2% in the comparison of two normal distributions, but a gain of ~ 32% with mixture distributions respect to the parametric tests. Accordingly, the AD test detected the greatest number of differentially expressed features in the real data application.   Conclusion. The tests for the general two-sample problem introduce a more general concept of 'differential expression', thus overcoming the limitations of the other tests restricted to specific moments of the feature distributions. In particular, the AD test should be considered as a powerful alternative to the parametric tests for feature screening in order to keep as many discriminative features as possible for the class prediction analysis.

  5. Internet Addiction Among Elementary and Middle School Students in China: A Nationally Representative Sample Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajun; Zhang, Xinghui; Lu, Furong; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of Internet addiction in a nationally representative sample of Chinese elementary and middle school students and to investigate Internet addiction among Internet users with different usages. The data were from the National Children's Study of China (NCSC) in which 24,013 fourth- to ninth-grade students were recruited from 100 counties in 31 provinces in China. Only 54.2% of the students had accessed the Internet. According to the criteria of Young's Diagnostic Questionnaire (YDQ), an eight-item instrument, the prevalence of Internet addiction in the total sample was 6.3%, and among Internet users was 11.7%. Among the Internet users, males (14.8%) and rural students (12.1%) reported Internet addiction more than females (7.0%) and urban students (10.6%). The percentage of Internet addicts in elementary school students (11.5%) was not significantly lower than the percentage of middle school students (11.9%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four geographical regions (9.6%, 11.5%, 12.3%, 11.1%) characterized by different levels of economy, health, education, and social environment. As the frequency of Internet use and time spent online per week increased, the percentage of Internet addicts increased. When considering the location and purpose of Internet use, the percentage of Internet addicts was highest in adolescents typically surfing in Internet cafes (18.1%) and playing Internet games (22.5%). PMID:23971432

  6. Accuracy, precision and robustness of different methods to obtain samples from silages in fermentation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo da Costa Gomes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate accuracy, precision and robustness of two methods to obtain silage samples, in comparison with extraction of liquor by manual screw-press. Wet brewery residue alone or combined with soybean hulls and citrus pulp were ensiled in laboratory silos. Liquor was extracted by a manual screw-press and a 2-mL aliquot was fixed with 0.4 mL formic acid. Two 10-g silage samples from each silo were diluted in 20 mL deionized water or 17% formic acid solution (alternative methods. Aliquots obtained by the three methods were used to determine the silage contents of fermentation end-products. The accuracy of the alternative methods was evaluated by comparing mean bias of estimates obtained by manual screw-press and by alternative methods, whereas precision was assessed by the root mean square prediction error and the residual error. Robustness was determined by studying the interaction between bias and chemical components, pH, in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD and buffer capacity. The 17% formic acid method was more accurate for estimating acetic, butyric and lactic acids, although it resulted in low overestimates of propionic acid and underestimates of ethanol. The deionized water method overestimated acetic and propionic acids and slightly underestimated ethanol. The 17% formic acid method was more precise than deionized water for estimating all organic acids and ethanol. The robustness of each method with respect to variation in the silage chemical composition, IVDMD and pH is dependent on the fermentation end-product at evaluation. The robustness of the alternative methods seems to be critical at the determination of lactic acid and ethanol contents.

  7. Sample correlations of infinite variance time series models: an empirical and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Cohen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available When the elements of a stationary ergodic time series have finite variance the sample correlation function converges (with probability 1 to the theoretical correlation function. What happens in the case where the variance is infinite? In certain cases, the sample correlation function converges in probability to a constant, but not always. If within a class of heavy tailed time series the sample correlation functions do not converge to a constant, then more care must be taken in making inferences and in model selection on the basis of sample autocorrelations. We experimented with simulating various heavy tailed stationary sequences in an attempt to understand what causes the sample correlation function to converge or not to converge to a constant. In two new cases, namely the sum of two independent moving averages and a random permutation scheme, we are able to provide theoretical explanations for a random limit of the sample autocorrelation function as the sample grows.

  8. Studies with sample conductivity, insertion rates, and particle deflection in a continuous flow electrophoresis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous flow electrophoresis system makes electrophoresis possible in a free-flowing film of aqueous electrolyte medium. The sample continuously enters the electrolyte at the top of the chamber and is subjected to the action of a lateral dc field. This divides the sample into fractions since each component has a distinctive electrophoretic mobility. Tests were made using monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres to determine optimum sample conductivity, insertion rates and optimum electric field applications as baseline data for future STS flight experiments. Optimum sample flow rates for the selected samples were determined to be approximately 26 micro-liters/min. Experiments with samples in deionized water yielded best results and voltages in the 20 V/cm to 30 V/cm range were optimum. Deflections of formaldehyde fixed turkey and bovine erythrocytes were determined using the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The effects of particle interactions on sample resolution and migration in the chamber was also evaluated.

  9. The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) study: methods of data collection and characteristics of study sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T; Felli, Vanda E; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H; Felknor, Sarah A; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Serra, Consol; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R; Sadeghian, Farideh; Kadir, Masood; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S P; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H; Sarquis, Leila M; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V; Quintana, Leonardo A; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J; Harris, E Clare; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, J Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M; Pesatori, Angela C; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kelsall, Helen L; Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Derrett, Sarah; Derett, Sarah; McBride, David; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) study was established to explore the hypothesis that common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and associated disability are importantly influenced by culturally determined health beliefs and expectations. This paper describes the methods of data collection and various characteristics of the study sample. A standardised questionnaire covering musculoskeletal symptoms, disability and potential risk factors, was used to collect information from 47 samples of nurses, office workers, and other (mostly manual) workers in 18 countries from six continents. In addition, local investigators provided data on economic aspects of employment for each occupational group. Participation exceeded 80% in 33 of the 47 occupational groups, and after pre-specified exclusions, analysis was based on 12,426 subjects (92 to 1018 per occupational group). As expected, there was high usage of computer keyboards by office workers, while nurses had the highest prevalence of heavy manual lifting in all but one country. There was substantial heterogeneity between occupational groups in economic and psychosocial aspects of work; three- to five-fold variation in awareness of someone outside work with musculoskeletal pain; and more than ten-fold variation in the prevalence of adverse health beliefs about back and arm pain, and in awareness of terms such as "repetitive strain injury" (RSI). The large differences in psychosocial risk factors (including knowledge and beliefs about MSDs) between occupational groups should allow the study hypothesis to be addressed effectively.

  10. The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) Study: Methods of Data Collection and Characteristics of Study Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T.; Felli, Vanda E.; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H.; Felknor, Sarah A.; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Serra, Consol; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R.; Sadeghian, Farideh; Kadir, Masood; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S. P.; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R.; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H.; Sarquis, Leila M.; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V.; Quintana, Leonardo A.; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J.; Harris, E. Clare; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, J. Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G.; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J.; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A. Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kelsall, Helen L.; Hoe, Victor C. W.; Urquhart, Donna M.; Derett, Sarah; McBride, David; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Background The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) study was established to explore the hypothesis that common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and associated disability are importantly influenced by culturally determined health beliefs and expectations. This paper describes the methods of data collection and various characteristics of the study sample. Methods/Principal Findings A standardised questionnaire covering musculoskeletal symptoms, disability and potential risk factors, was used to collect information from 47 samples of nurses, office workers, and other (mostly manual) workers in 18 countries from six continents. In addition, local investigators provided data on economic aspects of employment for each occupational group. Participation exceeded 80% in 33 of the 47 occupational groups, and after pre-specified exclusions, analysis was based on 12,426 subjects (92 to 1018 per occupational group). As expected, there was high usage of computer keyboards by office workers, while nurses had the highest prevalence of heavy manual lifting in all but one country. There was substantial heterogeneity between occupational groups in economic and psychosocial aspects of work; three- to five-fold variation in awareness of someone outside work with musculoskeletal pain; and more than ten-fold variation in the prevalence of adverse health beliefs about back and arm pain, and in awareness of terms such as “repetitive strain injury” (RSI). Conclusions/Significance The large differences in psychosocial risk factors (including knowledge and beliefs about MSDs) between occupational groups should allow the study hypothesis to be addressed effectively. PMID:22792189

  11. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void - I. Sample description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Tepliakova, A. L.

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of galaxies is influenced by the environment in which they reside. This effect should be strongest for the lowest-mass and -luminosity galaxies. To study dwarf galaxies in extremely low density environments, we have compiled a deep catalogue of dwarf galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. This void hosts some of the most metal-poor dwarfs known to date. It borders the Local Volume at negative supergalactic Z(SGZ) coordinates and has a size of more than 16 Mpc. With a distance to its centre of only 18 Mpc, it is close enough to allow a search for the faintest dwarfs. Within the void 75 dwarf (-11.9 > MB > -18.0) and four subluminous (-18.0 > MB > -18.4) galaxies have been identified. We present the parameters of the void galaxies and a detailed analysis of the completeness of the catalogue as a function of magnitude and surface brightness. The catalogue appears almost complete to MB < -14 mag, but misses part of the fainter low surface brightness (LSB) face-on galaxies. This sample of void galaxies builds the basis of forthcoming observational studies that will provide insight into the main stellar population, H I mass-to-light ratio, metallicity and age for comparison with dwarfs in higher density regions. We briefly summarize the information on the unusual objects in the void and conclude that their concentration hints that voids are environments that are favourable for finding and studying unevolved dwarf galaxies.

  12. The dynamics of attachment insecurity and paranoid thoughts: An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Katarzyna; Varese, Filippo; Sellwood, William; Hammond, Amy; Bentall, Richard

    2016-12-30

    It has been proposed that insecure attachment can have adverse effects on the course of psychosis once symptoms have emerged. There is longitudinal evidence that increased insecure attachment is associated with increased severity of psychotic symptoms. The present study examined whether in the flow of daily life attachment insecurity fluctuates, whether elevated stress precedes the occurrence of attachment insecurity, and whether elevated attachment insecurity precedes the occurrence of paranoia. Twenty clinical participants with a psychosis-spectrum diagnosis and twenty controls were studied over six consecutive days using the experience sampling method (ESM). The findings revealed that fluctuations in attachment insecurity were significantly higher in the clinical group, that elevated stress predicted a subsequent increase in attachment insecurity, and that elevated attachment insecurity predicted a subsequent increase in paranoia; this effect was not observed in auditory hallucinations once co-occurring symptoms were controlled for. Finally, although previous ESM studies have shown that low self-esteem precedes the occurrence of paranoia, attachment insecurity continued to predict paranoia even when self-esteem was controlled for. The findings suggest that attachment security may be associated with a lower risk of paranoia, and that psychological interventions should address attachment beliefs and work towards establishing a sense of attachment security. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. The role of experiential avoidance in paranoid delusions: an experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udachina, Alisa; Varese, Filippo; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Bentall, Richard P

    2014-11-01

    The study examined (1) the role of experiential avoidance (EA), conceptualized as intolerance towards aversive mental states, in paranoid delusions and (2) the mechanisms underlying EA. A 6-day prospective momentary assessment study. Paranoid patients (N = 41) were studied using the experience sampling method (ESM), a structured diary technique, assessing psychopathology and current context in daily life. The results showed that both low self-esteem and EA contributed to paranoid thinking. The relationship between low self-esteem and paranoia was partially mediated by EA and the relationship between EA and paranoia was partially mediated by low self-esteem. The detrimental effect of EA on self-esteem was more pronounced under high activity-related stress. Both EA and social stress were independently associated with low self-esteem. EA was associated with self-esteem instability. Our results implicate mental control strategies in the development of paranoia and are compatible with the attributional model of paranoia, which suggests that persecutory delusions arise as a result of dysfunctional attempts to avoid unpleasant thoughts about the self. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  14. A study of verbal memory in a sample of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Laura; de la Vega, Irene; Torrijos, Sergio; Barabash, Ana; Ancín, Inés; Peláez, Jose C; López-Ibor, Juan J; Cabranes, José A

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed the presence of cognitive impairment in euthymic patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD). A significant relationship between memory difficulties and poor psychosocial adjustment has also been found in these subjects. While some studies suggest that these memory deficits may be secondary to executive functioning instead of being directly related to a primary impairment of the memory systems, others suggest that these memory deficits may be secondary to clinical symptoms. Some authors reject the existence of any relationship between clinical state and neurocognitive impairments and suggest that this relationship may be mediated by other factors. The goal of this research was to replicate the findings of verbal memory impairment in euthymic patients with Bipolar Disorder and relate these impairments with neocortex structures. We carried out a cross-sectional study. The sample was made up of 44 BDI and 9 BDII euthymic patients and 32 healthy subjects, aged 18-65 years. Both groups were evaluated with the California Verbal Learning Test. Both bipolar patients performed worse than healthy control subjects in most memory measures and showed difficulties in components of memory that are associated with both frontal (semantic organization) and temporal lobe function (recall and recognition). We have hypothesized that verbal memory could be a trait marker of bipolar disorder.

  15. Cigarette smoking initiation during college predicts future alcohol involvement: a matched-samples study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mark G; Doran, Neal M; Edland, Steven D; Schweizer, C Amanda; Wall, Tamaral L

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking initiation and subsequent alcohol involvement. To address this question, the present study compared alcohol use between students who initiated smoking during college and a matched sample of never-smoking students. We hypothesized greater increases in alcohol involvement among smoking initiators, mediated by exposure to cigarette use situations. Included in the present study were 104 Chinese American and Korean American undergraduates who at baseline (freshman year) reported never having smoked a cigarette. Subjects were drawn from 433 participants in a naturalistic longitudinal study of tobacco use who were assessed annually each year in college. Cigarette smoking status was assessed annually as part of a structured interview. Initiators and never-smokers were matched on gender, ethnicity, baseline alcohol use, parental smoking status, and behavioral undercontrol. As predicted, participants who initiated smoking during college reported significantly greater increases in the number of past-30-day total drinks consumed (p alcohol consumption over and above the effect of exposure. Students who initiate smoking during college appear at risk for increased alcohol involvement. Part of this risk is explained by environmental contextual factors, specifically exposure to situations involving other smokers that also may result in greater exposure to alcohol use.

  16. Chemical process based reconstruction of exposures for an epidemiological study. III. Analysis of industrial hygiene samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Thomas A; Esmen, Nurtan A; Jones, Elizabeth P; Basara, Heather; Phillips, Margaret L; Marsh, Gary M; Youk, Ada O; Buchanich, Jeanine M; Leonard, Robin C

    2007-03-20

    As part of an historical cohort study to investigate the mortality experience of industrial workers exposed to chloroprene (beta-CD) and other substances, all available industrial hygiene exposure monitoring data were collected and summarized. From discussions with on-site industrial hygiene personnel, it was apparent that these data were not collected for epidemiological purposes and, therefore, their use in characterization of exposures was problematic as the data mostly pertained to samples collected to investigate the performance of specific tasks. These data were, however, informative for validating the exposure modeling process used to estimate historical exposures. The data summarized below clearly indicate that exposures to beta-CD were lowered across the time period of this study. Typically, the exposures recorded were less than the occupational exposure limits of the periods in which the exposures were recorded. Additionally, exposure measurements recorded in the recent past do not represent the exposure actually experienced by the worker as a strict personal protective equipment use program has been in place for the facilities studied since the mid-1980s.

  17. Venous Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck to help locate abnormally functioning glands or pituitary adenoma . This test is most often used after an unsuccessful neck exploration. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling , in which blood samples are taken from veins that drain the pituitary gland to study disorders related to pituitary hormone ...

  18. Sampling Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  19. Estimation of the Coefficient of Variation with Minimum Risk: A Sequential Method for Minimizing Sampling Error and Study Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Bhargab; Kelley, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The coefficient of variation is an effect size measure with many potential uses in psychology and related disciplines. We propose a general theory for a sequential estimation of the population coefficient of variation that considers both the sampling error and the study cost, importantly without specific distributional assumptions. Fixed sample size planning methods, commonly used in psychology and related fields, cannot simultaneously minimize both the sampling error and the study cost. The sequential procedure we develop is the first sequential sampling procedure developed for estimating the coefficient of variation. We first present a method of planning a pilot sample size after the research goals are specified by the researcher. Then, after collecting a sample size as large as the estimated pilot sample size, a check is performed to assess whether the conditions necessary to stop the data collection have been satisfied. If not an additional observation is collected and the check is performed again. This process continues, sequentially, until a stopping rule involving a risk function is satisfied. Our method ensures that the sampling error and the study costs are considered simultaneously so that the cost is not higher than necessary for the tolerable sampling error. We also demonstrate a variety of properties of the distribution of the final sample size for five different distributions under a variety of conditions with a Monte Carlo simulation study. In addition, we provide freely available functions via the MBESS package in R to implement the methods discussed.

  20. Craniometric analysis for estimation of stature in Nepalese population--A study on an autopsy sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rijen; Shrestha, Pramod Kumar; Wasti, Harihar; Kadel, Tulsi; Kanchan, Tanuj; Krishan, Kewal

    2015-03-01

    Establishing the identity of the deceased becomes essential when highly decomposed bodies, mutilated body parts or skeletal remains are recovered from mass fatality sites. In these situations, estimation of stature along with other parameters such as age, sex and race/ethnicity becomes important to establish the biological profile of the deceased. Following the Maoist insurgency in Nepal, there have been numerous discoveries of unidentified human remains in mass graves or otherwise. No systemic studies and anthropological data on the Nepalese population however, is available posing problems in anthropologic evaluation of the remains. The sample of the present study consisted of 200 autopsied cases (148 males and 52 female adult cadavers). During the autopsy, the scalp was reflected after giving a coronal incision extending from one mastoid to the other exposing the cranium in each case. Maximum cranial length (MCL), maximum cranial breadth (MCB), bi-zygomatic breadth (BZB), minimum frontal breadth (MFB) and length of parietal chord (PC) were then measured. Stature was measured as the length of the body from head to heel in centimeters with the heel, buttocks, back of the shoulders and the head in contact with the autopsy table. Linear and stepwise multiple regression models were derived for estimation of stature from cranial measurements. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate regression models show statistically significant correlation between stature and the cranial measurements. The present study opines that the stature estimation from cranial dimensions using multivariate linear regression models is more accurate than those of the univariate and bivariate regression models. This study presents a rare data from Nepalese population that show typical Asian features and thus, is significant from anthropologic and genetic point of view. The study observations further contribute a baseline data bank for forensic pathologists and specialists. Copyright © 2014

  1. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: Factor Validity and Reliability in a French Sample of Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Begarie, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the factor validity and reliability of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) within a sample of adolescents with mild to moderate Intellectual Disability (ID). A total sample of 189 adolescents (121 boys and 68 girls), aged between 12 and 18 years old, with mild to moderate ID were…

  2. Parental rearing and individual vulnerability to drug addiction: a controlled study in a Swedish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, P; Eisemann, M

    2003-01-01

    In a convenience sample of 81 healthy subjects vs. a group of 81 heroin addicts from the Methadone program in Stockholm, Sweden, the hypothesis of a possible link between experiences of dysfunctional parental rearing and the subsequent development of dysfunctional assumptions concerning self and others was tested. The subjects (n=162) completed the EMBU to report perceptions of parental rearing behaviour, two measures of dysfunctional assumptions and dysfunctional working models, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) and the DWM-S, and the Screening Drug Career Questionnaire (SDCQ) for assessing different aspects of the drug career in the sample of addicts. Four predictions were made: 1) parental emotional warmth should be negatively correlated with DAS and DWM-S scores; 2) experiences of dysfunctional parental rearing activities should be correlated with high scores on the DAS and the DWM-S; 3) there should be significant differences between the group of addicts and the control group on the EMBU first-order factors Rejection, Emotional warmth, Overprotection, and on the EMBU midparent subscale and finally 4) the results should support the hypothesis of an overprotecting mother and a rejecting father. The four predictions were supported by the results. The inter-group differences in quality of rearing shown in this study support the assumption of the impact of parental rearing on the development of dysfunctional working models of self and others. Accordingly, the presented data confirm that a parental rearing behaviour perceived both as Rejecting and Overprotective represents a link between dysfunctional parenting and the development of maladaptive psychosocial behaviour like drug addiction.

  3. Investigation of nurses' intention to leave: a study of a sample of UK nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Andrew; Robson, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the key antecedents of leave intention demonstrated by nurses employed in UK National Health Service (NHS). Survey assessment of a sample of 433 nurses employed within the NHS was undertaken, potential relationships relating to both affective commitment and leave intention and work-place experiences assessed through leader-member exchange (LMX) and perceived organisational support (POS) have been evaluated quantitatively, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equations modelling (SEM). The study indicates that both LMX and POS act as direct antecedents to nurses' leave intention. Additionally, both LMX and POS in combination, significantly effect employees' affective commitment, the latter further impacting on employee leave intention. This would suggest that both LMX and POS have a significant role to play in employee leave intention that is partially mediated by affective commitment, further analysis confirming this to be the case. Research limitations/implications - The sample of nurses is large in absolute terms, permitting the CFA/SEM analysis undertaken, although the data represented only two NHS trusts, hence generalisation across the NHS should be done so cautiously. Various other drivers of leave intention, personal and organisational, have not been assessed here. The implications of these results are that to safeguard nurse retention, appropriate line manager engagement is crucial, but this requires organisational support that is recognised by the employees, especially to enhance their levels of affective commitment. This is given by providing NHS-based assessment of the role of both POS and LMX in the realisation of both affective commitment and desire to remain with their current organisations amongst members of the UK nursing profession.

  4. Using dynamic factor analysis to provide insights into data reliability in experience sampling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Hartley-Clark, Linda; Cummins, Robert A; Tomyn, Adrian J; Weinberg, Melissa K; Richardson, Ben

    2017-09-01

    The past 2 decades have seen increasing use of experience sampling methods (ESMs) to gain insights into the daily experience of affective states (e.g., its variability, as well as antecedents and consequences of temporary shifts in affect). Much less attention has been given to methodological challenges, such as how to ensure reliability of test scores obtained using ESM. The present study demonstrates the use of dynamic factor analysis (DFA) to quantify reliability of test scores in ESM contexts, evaluates the potential impact of unreliable test scores, and seeks to identify characteristics of individuals that may account for their unreliable test scores. One hundred twenty-seven participants completed baseline measures (demographics and personality traits), followed by a 7-day ESM phase in which positive and negative state affect were measured up to 6 times per day. Analyses showed that although at the sample level, scores on these affect measures exhibited adequate levels of reliability, up to one third of participants failed to meet conventional standards of reliability. Where these low reliability estimates were not significantly associated with personality factors, they could-in some cases-be explained by model misspecification where a meaningful alternative structure was available. Despite these potential differences in factor structure across participants, subsequent modeling with and without these "unreliable" cases showed similar substantive results. Hence, the present findings suggest typical analyses based on ESM data may be robust to individual differences in data structure and/or quality. Ways to augment the DFA approach to better understand unreliable cases are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Beam studies of the segmented resistive WELL: A potential thin sampling element for digital hadron calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arazi, Lior, E-mail: lior.arazi@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Davide Rocha Azevedo, Carlos [I3N—Physics Department, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Breskin, Amos; Bressler, Shikma; Moleri, Luca [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Natal da Luz, Hugo [University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveri, Eraldo [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Pitt, Michael; Rubin, Adam [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Marques Ferreira dos Santos, Joaquim [University of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Filipe Calapez de Albuquerque Veloso, João [I3N—Physics Department, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Paul White, Andrew [University of Texas, Arlington (United States)

    2013-12-21

    Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) have the potential of constituting thin, robust sampling elements in Digital Hadron Calorimetry (DHCAL) at future colliders. We report on recent beam studies of new single- and double-THGEM-like structures: the multiplier is a Segmented Resistive WELL (SRWELL) – a single-faced THGEM in contact with a segmented resistive layer inductively coupled to readout pads. Several 10×10 cm{sup 2} configurations with a total thickness of 5–6 mm (excluding electronics) with 1 cm{sup 2} pads were investigated with muons and pions. The pads were coupled to a scalable readout system APV chip, APV-SRS (Raymond et al. [22]). Detection efficiencies in the 98% range were recorded with an average pad-multiplicity of ∼1.1. The resistive anode resulted in efficient discharge damping, with potential drops of a few volts; the discharge probabilities were ∼10{sup −7} for muons and ∼10{sup −6} for pions, at rates of a few kHz/cm{sup 2} and for detectors in the double-stage configuration. Further optimization work and research on larger detectors are underway. -- Highlights: •THGEM-based detectors with resistive anodes are proposed as DHCAL sampling elements. •Single- and double-stage detectors were successfully tested with muons and pions. •Detectors were 10×10 cm{sup 2} in size, 5–6 mm thick (excluding electronics). •Readout provided by SRS-APV chip coupled to 64 1×1 cm{sup 2} pads. •Detectors efficiencies were >97% at 1.1 multiplicity with effective spark damping.

  6. [Achondroplasia: a pilot study on the psychosocial and medical features of a sample in Puerto Rico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gomez, José; Aldarondo, Ariadna; Vidot, Frances; Quiñones, Ana; Rivera, Maily; Cintrón, Eledy; Gonzilez, Natalie; Trujillo, Rodolfo F; Lopez-Cordova, Nanet M; Colón, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the psychological wellbeing of twenty-two (n = 22) adults with achondroplasia. The sample was composed of seven (n = 7) males and fifteen (n = 15) females between the ages of 21 and 75 (mean age = 39.6). Each individual completed four self-administered questionnaires: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-l), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and Derogatis Symptom Check-list-90-Revisited (SCL-90-R). They also filled out a socio-demographic questionnaire. We found that 31.8% of the sample reported at least one comorbid condition such as, hypertension, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, scoliosis, thyroid problems, neuropathy, psoriasis, gastritis and/or sleep apnea; 32% reported mild to severe depressive symp- toms; 55% reported mild to severe symptoms associated to anxiety and 18% reported mild to severe symptoms associated with hopelessness; 22.7% reported mild to severe symptoms in at least one of the sub-scales in Derogatis Symptom Checklist-90-Revisited (SCL-90-R) particularly the obsessive-compulsive, paranoid and depressive subscales. Chi Square correlations (X2) were made to observe if there was interdependence between the socio-demographic variables and the administered tests. In general, no significant correlations were found between BDI-Il, BAI, BHS, SCL-90-R and civil status, gender, income and age. However, a significant correlation was found between age and the somatization sub-scale of the SCL-90-R (rs = 0.510, p achondroplasia. The development of preventive and cultural sensitive interventions is suggested in order to protect and treat individuals with the condition.

  7. Unsatisfactory rate in liquid-based cervical samples as compared to conventional smears: A study from tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Developed countries adopted liquid-based cytology (LBC cervical cytology, partly because of its lower proportions of unsatisfactory (U/S/inadequate samples. This study was carried out to evaluate effect on the rate of U/S samples after introduction of LBC in our laboratory. Materials and Methods: An audit of U/S cervical samples was performed, which included split samples (n = 1000, only conventional Pap smear (CPS smears (n = 1000, and only LBC samples (n = 1000. The smears were reviewed by two observers independently, and adequacy for the samples was assessed as per The Bethesda System 2001. The reasons for U/S rate in split samples were categorized into various cytologic and/or technical reasons. Results: U/S rate was far less in only LBC samples (1.2% as compared to only CPS (10.5% cases. Cases in the satisfactory but limited category were also less in only LBC (0.4% as compared to only CPS (3.2% samples. The main reasons for U/S smears in split samples were low cell count (37.2% in CPS; 58.8% in LBC. The second main reason was low cellularity with excess blood and only excess blood in CPS samples. Conclusion: There was a significant reduction of U/S rate in LBC samples as compared to CPS samples, and the difference was statistically significant. The main cause of U/S samples in LBC was low cellularity indicating a technical fault in sample collection. The main cause of U/S rate in CPS was low cellularity followed by low cellularity with excess blood. Adequate training of sample takers and cytologists for the precise cell count to determine adequacy in smears can be of great help in reducing U/S rate.

  8. Unsatisfactory rate in liquid-based cervical samples as compared to conventional smears: A study from tertiary care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nalini; Bhar, Vikrant S.; Rajwanshi, Arvind; Suri, Vanita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Developed countries adopted liquid-based cytology (LBC) cervical cytology, partly because of its lower proportions of unsatisfactory (U/S)/inadequate samples. This study was carried out to evaluate effect on the rate of U/S samples after introduction of LBC in our laboratory. Materials and Methods: An audit of U/S cervical samples was performed, which included split samples (n = 1000), only conventional Pap smear (CPS) smears (n = 1000), and only LBC samples (n = 1000). The smears were reviewed by two observers independently, and adequacy for the samples was assessed as per The Bethesda System 2001. The reasons for U/S rate in split samples were categorized into various cytologic and/or technical reasons. Results: U/S rate was far less in only LBC samples (1.2%) as compared to only CPS (10.5%) cases. Cases in the satisfactory but limited category were also less in only LBC (0.4%) as compared to only CPS (3.2%) samples. The main reasons for U/S smears in split samples were low cell count (37.2% in CPS; 58.8% in LBC). The second main reason was low cellularity with excess blood and only excess blood in CPS samples. Conclusion: There was a significant reduction of U/S rate in LBC samples as compared to CPS samples, and the difference was statistically significant. The main cause of U/S samples in LBC was low cellularity indicating a technical fault in sample collection. The main cause of U/S rate in CPS was low cellularity followed by low cellularity with excess blood. Adequate training of sample takers and cytologists for the precise cell count to determine adequacy in smears can be of great help in reducing U/S rate. PMID:27382408

  9. Dieting and the self-control of eating in everyday environments: an experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Wilhelm; Adriaanse, Marieke; Vohs, Kathleen D; Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-09-01

    .g., differences in desire frequency, desire strength, motivation, executive functions). What does this study add? A novel four-step conceptual model of self-control is applied to eating behaviour in everyday life. This model allows a fine-grained look at the self-control process in restrained eaters (dieters) as compared to non-dieters. Dieters and non-dieters do not differ in desire frequency and strength (they are not simply more tempted). Dieters high (as compared to low) in inhibitory control are more likely to engage in self-control. Dieters high (as compared to low) in inhibitory control are more likely to resist unhealthy food desires. Dieters high (as compared to low) in inhibitory control are more likely to loose weight over a 4-month period. Together, the study shows clear differences among successful and unsuccessful dieters that can be linked to differences in executive functioning (inhibitory control). The present article is one of the first studies combining a conceptual model with smartphone experience sampling to study weight control and thus paradigmatic from a methodological perspective. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  10. A Case control study to evaluate oxidative stress in plasma samples of oral malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Chandan Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imbalances between the oxidant -antioxidant status have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in the venous blood samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients of different Clinicopathologic stages in comparison with the healthy controls. Setting and Design: A Case control study was designed in a hospital (Rajah Muthiah Dental College and Hospital, Annamalai University based setting. Materials and Methods: Twenty new histopathologically proven oral carcinoma patients, and equal number of age, sex and habit matched healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Their blood samples were subjected to evaluation of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS and antioxidant enzymes, namely, superoxide dismutase (SOD, Catalase (CAT reduced glutathione (GSH and glutathione peroxidase (GPx using spectrophotometric methods. Statistical Analysis: The data are expressed as mean±SD. The statistical comparisons were performed by independent Student′s t-test and One Way ANOVA. P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Karl Pearson correlation was performed for the biochemical parameters within the group and between the groups. For statistically significant correlations, linear regression was performed. Results: Significant enhanced lipid peroxidation (P<0.001 with decrease in antioxidants (P<0.001 was observed in the venous blood of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients as compared with the healthy controls. Accordingly, significant (P<0.001 pattern of progression in TBARS levels was observed at various clinical stages of patients. (GSH showed significant (P<0.01 negative correlation with TBARS and positive correlation (P<0.001 with SOD. On linear regression analysis, GSH showed significance for SOD (P<0.001, GPx, CAT and TBARS (P<0.01. It was also found that, 70% of variance in SOD can be

  11. 60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-05

    Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.

  12. A sample holder for in-house X-ray powder diffraction studies of protein powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Harris, Pernille; Ståhl, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    A sample holder for handling samples of protein for in-house X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis has been made and tested on lysozyme. The use of an integrated pinhole reduced the background, and good signal-to-noise ratios were obtained from only 7 l of sample, corresponding to approximately...... 2-3 mg of dry protein. The sample holder is further adaptable to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Both XRPD and XAS at the Zn K-edge were tested with hexameric Zn insulin....

  13. Prediction of BMI at age 11 in a longitudinal sample of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Viola; Wabitsch, Martin; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Brenner, Hermann; Schimmelmann, Benno G.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges in the world with childhood prevalence rates between 20–26% and numerous associated health risks. The aim of the current study was to analyze the 11-year follow-up data of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study (UBCS), to identify whether abnormal eating behavior patterns, especially restrained eating, predict body mass index (BMI) at 11 years of age and to explore other factors known to be longitudinally associated with it. Of the original UBCS, n = 422 children (~ 40% of the original sample) and their parents participated in the 11-year follow-up. BMI at age 8 and 11 as well as information on restrained eating, psychological problems, depressive symptoms, lifestyle, and IQ at age 8 were assessed. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to predict children’s BMI scores at age 11. PLS-SEM explained 68% of the variance of BMI at age 11, with BMI at age 8 being the most important predictor. Restrained eating, via BMI at age 8 as well as parental BMI, had further weak associations with BMI at age 11; no other predictor was statistically significant. Since established overweight at age 8 already predicts BMI scores at age 11 longitudinally, obesity interventions should be implemented in early childhood. PMID:28832593

  14. Opioid use among interscholastic sports participants: an exploratory study from a sample of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz, Philip; Epstein-Ngo, Quyen; Austic, Elizabeth; Boyd, Carol; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2015-06-01

    Involvement in sports increases the risk for injury and the risk for prescription opioid use and misuse. This was an exploratory retrospective study to examine if previous involvement in interscholastic sports was associated with a greater lifetime prevalence of medical prescription opioid use, lifetime risk for diverting prescribed opioids, and lifetime risk for nonmedical prescription opioid use. A Web-based survey was self-administered to a sample of 4,187 full-time undergraduate students at a large public university located in the Midwest. Student demographics, involvement in interscholastic sports during high school, lifetime medical prescription opioid use, lifetime risk for diverting prescribed opioids, and lifetime risk for nonmedical prescription opioid use were measured and analyzed for this study. Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that those who participated in at least 1 interscholastic sport during high school had greater odds for lifetime medical prescription opioid use on multiple occasions and greater odds for being approached to divert their prescribed opioid medications on multiple occasions when compared with their peers who did not participate in interscholastic sports during high school. The findings indicate some association between previous involvement in interscholastic sports and prescription opioid use and misuse. These findings further suggest that greater awareness should be instilled in parents and coaches regarding this form of substance misuse.

  15. Prediction of BMI at age 11 in a longitudinal sample of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Hanna; Brandt, Stephanie; Walter, Viola; Wabitsch, Martin; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Brenner, Hermann; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Hirsch, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges in the world with childhood prevalence rates between 20-26% and numerous associated health risks. The aim of the current study was to analyze the 11-year follow-up data of the Ulm Birth Cohort Study (UBCS), to identify whether abnormal eating behavior patterns, especially restrained eating, predict body mass index (BMI) at 11 years of age and to explore other factors known to be longitudinally associated with it. Of the original UBCS, n = 422 children (~ 40% of the original sample) and their parents participated in the 11-year follow-up. BMI at age 8 and 11 as well as information on restrained eating, psychological problems, depressive symptoms, lifestyle, and IQ at age 8 were assessed. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to predict children's BMI scores at age 11. PLS-SEM explained 68% of the variance of BMI at age 11, with BMI at age 8 being the most important predictor. Restrained eating, via BMI at age 8 as well as parental BMI, had further weak associations with BMI at age 11; no other predictor was statistically significant. Since established overweight at age 8 already predicts BMI scores at age 11 longitudinally, obesity interventions should be implemented in early childhood.

  16. Bioindicators in the MIDUS National Study: Protocol, Measures, Sample, and Comparative Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Gayle Dienberg; Seeman, Teresa E.; Weinstein, Maxine; Ryff, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives MIDUS is a national study of health and aging among individuals aged 25 to 74 at baseline(1995/96). Longitudinal survey assessments (2004/05), were followed by biological assessments on a subsample aged 35–85. To facilitate public use, we describe the protocol, measures, and sample. Methods Respondents traveled to clinics for a two-day data collection protocol that included fasting blood specimens, 12-hour urine specimen, medical history, physical exam, bone densitometry, a laboratory challenge (heart rate variability, blood pressure, respiration, salivary cortisol). Results Response rates for the biological protocol (N = 1,255) were 39.3%, or 43.1% (adjusting for those who could not be located or contacted). Reasons for non-participation were travel, family obligations, and being too busy. Respondents were comparable to the recruitment pool on most demographic characteristics and health assessments. Discussion Strengths of the protocol vis-à-vis other similar studies include opportunities to link biological factors with diverse content from other MIDUS projects. PMID:20876364

  17. Definitions of love in a sample of British women: an empirical study using Q methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Simon; Stenner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Social psychological research has increasingly acknowledged that any pretensions to a singular theory of love should be replaced with a concern about its affirmation and what people actually say and do in love's name. Lee's (1977) love styles research and Sternberg's (1995) theory of love as a story are prime examples. Despite traditional definitions of love in western cultures being dominated by feminine images and tales of gender difference, however, the personal definitions and experiences of women have received comparatively little empirical attention, particularly in recent years and despite some well-documented changes in their cultural circumstances. This study remedies that situation through presentation of a Q methodological study in which a convenience sample of 59 British women were asked to Q sort 54 single-word descriptors of love to define love as they had experienced it. Factor analysis of the resulting Q sorts revealed six distinct definitions of love, interpreted as 'attraction, passion & romance', 'unconditional love', 'sex & fun', 'friendship & spirituality', 'a permanent commitment', and 'separate people, separate lives'. The six definitions are then discussed in terms of their allegiance to traditionally feminine and/or masculine values and as a means of highlighting the changing face of Britain's relational culture. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Toward an Enhanced Sampling Molecular Dynamics Method for Studying Ligand-Induced Conformational Changes in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ole Juul; Grouleff, Julie; Needham, Perri; Walker, Ross C; Jensen, Frank

    2015-11-19

    Current enhanced sampling molecular dynamics methods for studying large conformational changes in proteins suffer from certain limitations. These include, among others, the need for user defined collective variables, the prerequisite of both start and end point structures of the conformational change, and the need for a priori knowledge of the amount by which to boost specific parts of the potential. In this paper, a framework is proposed for a molecular dynamics method for studying ligand-induced conformational changes, in which the nonbonded interactions between the ligand and the protein are used to calculate a biasing force. The method requires only a single input structure, and does not entail the use of collective variables. We provide a proof-of-concept for accelerating conformational changes in three simple test molecules, as well as promising results for two proteins known to undergo domain closure upon ligand binding. For the ribose-binding protein, backbone root-mean-square deviations as low as 0.75 Å compared to the crystal structure of the closed conformation are obtained within 50 ns simulations, whereas no domain closures are observed in unbiased simulations. A skewed closed structure is obtained for the glutamine-binding protein at high bias values, indicating that specific protein-ligand interactions might suppress important protein-protein interactions.

  19. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Minako

    2013-10-18

    Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (pprogramming group than the performance-based IG programming (pprogramming group than the social-oriented IG programming group (pIntergenerational programs with preschool children brought smiles and conversation to older adults. The social-oriented IG program allowed older adults to play more roles than the performance-based IG program. The intergenerational programs provide opportunities to fulfil

  20. Comparison of Sampling Designs for Estimating Deforestation from Landsat TM and MODIS Imagery: A Case Study in Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanyou Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sampling designs are commonly used to estimate deforestation over large areas, but comparisons between different sampling strategies are required. Using PRODES deforestation data as a reference, deforestation in the state of Mato Grosso in Brazil from 2005 to 2006 is evaluated using Landsat imagery and a nearly synchronous MODIS dataset. The MODIS-derived deforestation is used to assist in sampling and extrapolation. Three sampling designs are compared according to the estimated deforestation of the entire study area based on simple extrapolation and linear regression models. The results show that stratified sampling for strata construction and sample allocation using the MODIS-derived deforestation hotspots provided more precise estimations than simple random and systematic sampling. Moreover, the relationship between the MODIS-derived and TM-derived deforestation provides a precise estimate of the total deforestation area as well as the distribution of deforestation in each block.

  1. Comparison of sampling designs for estimating deforestation from landsat TM and MODIS imagery: a case study in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shanyou; Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Ronggao; Cao, Yun; Zhang, Guixin

    2014-01-01

    Sampling designs are commonly used to estimate deforestation over large areas, but comparisons between different sampling strategies are required. Using PRODES deforestation data as a reference, deforestation in the state of Mato Grosso in Brazil from 2005 to 2006 is evaluated using Landsat imagery and a nearly synchronous MODIS dataset. The MODIS-derived deforestation is used to assist in sampling and extrapolation. Three sampling designs are compared according to the estimated deforestation of the entire study area based on simple extrapolation and linear regression models. The results show that stratified sampling for strata construction and sample allocation using the MODIS-derived deforestation hotspots provided more precise estimations than simple random and systematic sampling. Moreover, the relationship between the MODIS-derived and TM-derived deforestation provides a precise estimate of the total deforestation area as well as the distribution of deforestation in each block.

  2. Generating samples for association studies based on HapMap data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yixuan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the HapMap project, a variety of computational algorithms and tools have been proposed for haplotype inference, tag SNP selection and genome-wide association studies. Simulated data are commonly used in evaluating these new developed approaches. In addition to simulations based on population models, empirical data generated by perturbing real data, has also been used because it may inherit specific properties from real data. However, there is no tool that is publicly available to generate large scale simulated variation data by taking into account knowledge from the HapMap project. Results A computer program (gs was developed to quickly generate a large number of samples based on real data that are useful for a variety of purposes, including evaluating methods for haplotype inference, tag SNP selection and association studies. Two approaches have been implemented to generate dense SNP haplotype/genotype data that share similar local linkage disequilibrium (LD patterns as those in human populations. The first approach takes haplotype pairs from samples as inputs, and the second approach takes patterns of haplotype block structures as inputs. Both quantitative and qualitative traits have been incorporated in the program. Phenotypes are generated based on a disease model, or based on the effect of a quantitative trait nucleotide, both of which can be specified by users. In addition to single-locus disease models, two-locus disease models have also been implemented that can incorporate any degree of epistasis. Users are allowed to specify all nine parameters in a 3 × 3 penetrance table. For several commonly used two-locus disease models, the program can automatically calculate penetrances based on the population prevalence and marginal effects of a disease that users can conveniently specify. Conclusion The program gs can effectively generate large scale genetic and phenotypic variation data that can be

  3. Municipal solid waste composition: Sampling methodology, statistical analyses, and case study evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe, E-mail: vine@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Jensen, Morten Bang; Götze, Ramona; Pivnenko, Kostyantyn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus [Econet AS, Omøgade 8, 2.sal, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Tiered approach to waste sorting ensures flexibility and facilitates comparison of solid waste composition data. • Food and miscellaneous wastes are the main fractions contributing to the residual household waste. • Separation of food packaging from food leftovers during sorting is not critical for determination of the solid waste composition. - Abstract: Sound waste management and optimisation of resource recovery require reliable data on solid waste generation and composition. In the absence of standardised and commonly accepted waste characterisation methodologies, various approaches have been reported in literature. This limits both comparability and applicability of the results. In this study, a waste sampling and sorting methodology for efficient and statistically robust characterisation of solid waste was introduced. The methodology was applied to residual waste collected from 1442 households distributed among 10 individual sub-areas in three Danish municipalities (both single and multi-family house areas). In total 17 tonnes of waste were sorted into 10–50 waste fractions, organised according to a three-level (tiered approach) facilitating comparison of the waste data between individual sub-areas with different fractionation (waste from one municipality was sorted at “Level III”, e.g. detailed, while the two others were sorted only at “Level I”). The results showed that residual household waste mainly contained food waste (42 ± 5%, mass per wet basis) and miscellaneous combustibles (18 ± 3%, mass per wet basis). The residual household waste generation rate in the study areas was 3–4 kg per person per week. Statistical analyses revealed that the waste composition was independent of variations in the waste generation rate. Both, waste composition and waste generation rates were statistically similar for each of the three municipalities. While the waste generation rates were similar for each of the two housing types (single

  4. Respondent-driven sampling for an adolescent health study in vulnerable urban settings: a multi-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michele R; Marshall, Beth Dail; Emerson, Mark; Kalamar, Amanda; Covarrubias, Laura; Astone, Nan; Wang, Ziliang; Gao, Ersheng; Mashimbye, Lawrence; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Acharya, Rajib; Olumide, Adesola; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Blum, Robert W; Sonenstein, Freya L

    2014-12-01

    The global adolescent population is larger than ever before and is rapidly urbanizing. Global surveillance systems to monitor youth health typically use household- and school-based recruitment methods. These systems risk not reaching the most marginalized youth made vulnerable by conditions of migration, civil conflict, and other forms of individual and structural vulnerability. We describe the methodology of the Well-Being of Adolescents in Vulnerable Environments survey, which used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to recruit male and female youth aged 15-19 years and living in economically distressed urban settings in Baltimore, MD; Johannesburg, South Africa; Ibadan, Nigeria; New Delhi, India; and Shanghai, China (migrant youth only) for a cross-sectional study. We describe a shared recruitment and survey administration protocol across the five sites, present recruitment parameters, and illustrate challenges and necessary adaptations for use of RDS with youth in disadvantaged urban settings. We describe the reach of RDS into populations of youth who may be missed by traditional household- and school-based sampling. Across all sites, an estimated 9.6% were unstably housed; among those enrolled in school, absenteeism was pervasive with 29% having missed over 6 days of school in the past month. Overall findings confirm the feasibility, efficiency, and utility of RDS in quickly reaching diverse samples of youth, including those both in and out of school and those unstably housed, and provide direction for optimizing RDS methods with this population. In our rapidly urbanizing global landscape with an unprecedented youth population, RDS may serve as a valuable tool in complementing existing household- and school-based methods for health-related surveillance that can guide policy. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Large sample area and size are needed for forest soil seed bank studies to ensure low discrepancy with standing vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-xin Shen

    Full Text Available A large number of small-sized samples invariably shows that woody species are absent from forest soil seed banks, leading to a large discrepancy with the seedling bank on the forest floor. We ask: 1 Does this conventional sampling strategy limit the detection of seeds of woody species? 2 Are large sample areas and sample sizes needed for higher recovery of seeds of woody species? We collected 100 samples that were 10 cm (length × 10 cm (width × 10 cm (depth, referred to as larger number of small-sized samples (LNSS in a 1 ha forest plot, and placed them to germinate in a greenhouse, and collected 30 samples that were 1 m × 1 m × 10 cm, referred to as small number of large-sized samples (SNLS and placed them (10 each in a nearby secondary forest, shrub land and grass land. Only 15.7% of woody plant species of the forest stand were detected by the 100 LNSS, contrasting with 22.9%, 37.3% and 20.5% woody plant species being detected by SNLS in the secondary forest, shrub land and grassland, respectively. The increased number of species vs. sampled areas confirmed power-law relationships for forest stand, the LNSS and SNLS at all three recipient sites. Our results, although based on one forest, indicate that conventional LNSS did not yield a high percentage of detection for woody species, but SNLS strategy yielded a higher percentage of detection for woody species in the seed bank if samples were exposed to a better field germination environment. A 4 m2 minimum sample area derived from power equations is larger than the sampled area in most studies in the literature. Increased sample size also is needed to obtain an increased sample area if the number of samples is to remain relatively low.

  6. [Study of dissociative disorders and depersonalization in a sample of young adult French population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, O; Claudon, P; Colin, V; Svatos, J; Thiébaut, E

    2001-01-01

    Questioned by several researches about dissociative disorders, the authors study differences established on the nosographic register, through a quantitative study and a psychodynamic argumentation in a sample of french population. From the utilisation of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) created by Bernstein E and Putnam FW (1986), which is an excellent screening tool for dissociative disorders and constructed on DSM II diagnostic criterions, the authors will show the interest of a psychodynamic analysis of dissociative disorders, in the face of the diagnostic difficulty in relation to several approaches of this concept. This difficulty is studied giving the background to dissociative disorders and depersonalization. Ionescu (1999) shows that between 1890 and 1910 dissociation represents one of major themes of psychology, psychopathology and psychiatry. Then, this interest about dissociation decreases and will be almost non-existent in the middle of the twentieth century. The interest for dissociative disorder will grow in the eighties with north-american studies about multiple personality disorders. Until 1980, dissociative disorders exist in DSM II as a list of symptoms included into hysterical neurosis, among the conversive disorders. In 1980, the publication of DSM III replaces the notion of hysteria with the notion of dissociative disorder. In this way, we can see on the one hand somatoform disorders quarterly corresponding to the ancient version of conversive hysteria, and on the other hand dissociative disorders characterized by a perturbation of consciousness, memory, identity or perception of environment. In 1994, The DSM IV delete the notion of hysteria and neurosis and keeps only the notion of dissociative disorders. They include now the five following categories: dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (including derealization

  7. STUDY OF SAMPLE AND HOLD DIGITAL-ANALOG CONVERTER WITH HIGH ORDER JITTER NOISE SHAPING

    OpenAIRE

    北原, 義大; KITAHARA, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, present sample hold DAC with high order jitter noise shaping using 2nd order architecture or feed-forward 2nd order architecture. Performance improvements of sample hold DAC can be expected by using higher order jitter noise shaping. The effectiveness of presented architecture is confirmed by MATLAB simulation results and SPICE simulation results.

  8. A sample holder for the study of isothermal heat of hydration of cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    Different techniques for measuring heat of hydration of cement are discussed, and a sample holder designed specially for measuring isothermal heat of hydration is described. A particular characteristic of the sample holder is the vacuum mixing technique which ensures a momentary and homogeneous...

  9. Comparative Studies of Gasoline Samples Used in Nigeria *1U.Z ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    17, Yola Road, Adamawa State. 3Sokoto Energy Research ... The liquid chamber of the RVP kits apparatus was filled with a gasoline sample that ... The machine was programmed to scan between 400 and 4000 cm-1 at resolution of 4 cm-1. The background spectrum was then scanned and saved. The sample was smeared.

  10. Study of changes in bacterial and viral abundance in formaldehyde - Fixed water samples by epifluorescence microscopy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Sajila, M.P.; Jacob, B.

    of bacteria and viruses in water samples from Cochin Backwater was determined by SYBR Green I staining and epifluorescence microscopy. The counts were determined for 45 days in samples fixed with 1–6% formaldehyde. The results suggest rapid decline in counts...

  11. Nutrition and health - the association between eating behavior and various health parameters: a matched sample study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie T Burkert

    Full Text Available Population-based studies have consistently shown that our diet has an influence on health. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyze differences between different dietary habit groups in terms of health-related variables. The sample used for this cross-sectional study was taken from the Austrian Health Interview Survey AT-HIS 2006/07. In a first step, subjects were matched according to their age, sex, and socioeconomic status (SES. After matching, the total number of subjects included in the analysis was 1320 (N = 330 for each form of diet - vegetarian, carnivorous diet rich in fruits and vegetables, carnivorous diet less rich in meat, and carnivorous diet rich in meat. Analyses of variance were conducted controlling for lifestyle factors in the following domains: health (self-assessed health, impairment, number of chronic conditions, vascular risk, health care (medical treatment, vaccinations, preventive check-ups, and quality of life. In addition, differences concerning the presence of 18 chronic conditions were analyzed by means of Chi-square tests. Overall, 76.4% of all subjects were female. 40.0% of the individuals were younger than 30 years, 35.4% between 30 and 49 years, and 24.0% older than 50 years. 30.3% of the subjects had a low SES, 48.8% a middle one, and 20.9% had a high SES. Our results revealed that a vegetarian diet is related to a lower BMI and less frequent alcohol consumption. Moreover, our results showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with poorer health (higher incidences of cancer, allergies, and mental health disorders, a higher need for health care, and poorer quality of life. Therefore, public health programs are needed in order to reduce the health risk due to nutritional factors.

  12. Arm retraction dynamics of entangled star polymers: A forward flux sampling method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Likhtman, Alexei E; Wang, Zuowei

    2017-07-28

    The study of dynamics and rheology of well-entangled branched polymers remains a challenge for computer simulations due to the exponentially growing terminal relaxation times of these polymers with increasing molecular weights. We present an efficient simulation algorithm for studying the arm retraction dynamics of entangled star polymers by combining the coarse-grained slip-spring (SS) model with the forward flux sampling (FFS) method. This algorithm is first applied to simulate symmetric star polymers in the absence of constraint release (CR). The reaction coordinate for the FFS method is determined by finding good agreement of the simulation results on the terminal relaxation times of mildly entangled stars with those obtained from direct shooting SS model simulations with the relative difference between them less than 5%. The FFS simulations are then carried out for strongly entangled stars with arm lengths up to 16 entanglements that are far beyond the accessibility of brute force simulations in the non-CR condition. Apart from the terminal relaxation times, the same method can also be applied to generate the relaxation spectra of all entanglements along the arms which are desired for the development of quantitative theories of entangled branched polymers. Furthermore, we propose a numerical route to construct the experimentally measurable relaxation correlation functions by effectively linking the data stored at each interface during the FFS runs. The obtained star arm end-to-end vector relaxation functions Φ(t) and the stress relaxation function G(t) are found to be in reasonably good agreement with standard SS simulation results in the terminal regime. Finally, we demonstrate that this simulation method can be conveniently extended to study the arm-retraction problem in entangled star polymer melts with CR by modifying the definition of the reaction coordinate, while the computational efficiency will depend on the particular slip-spring or slip-link model

  13. STUDY ON OXYTETRACYCLINE RESIDUES IN COW’S MILK SAMPLES COLLECTED IN TETOVO, MACEDONIA FROM 2012 TO 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Kamberi, Mensur; Sulaj, Kapllan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the oxytetracycline residues in cow’s milk collected in farms of Tetovo in Macedonia. The cow’s milk samples produced in this area are controlled applying qualitative analytical tests for oxitetracycline residues in 262 milk samples through specific ELISA test. After this control positive milk samples were kept in freezing conditions to be analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method in order to perform qualitative evaluation of...

  14. Beam Studies of the Segmented Resistive WELL: a Potential Thin Sampling Element for Digital Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Arazi, Lior; Breskin, Amos; Bressler, Shikma; Moleri, Luca; Natal da Luz, Hugo; Oliveri, Eraldo; Pitt, Michael; Rubin, Adam; Marques Ferreira dos Santos, Joaquim; Calapez Albuquerque Veloso, João Filipe; White, Andrew Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) have the potential of constituting thin, robust sampling elements in Digital Hadron Calorimetry (DHCAL) in future colliders. We report on recent beam studies of new single- and double-THGEM-like structures; the multiplier is a Segmented Resistive WELL (SRWELL) - a single-faced THGEM in contact with a segmented resistive layer inductively coupled to readout pads. Several 10$\\times$10 cm$^2$ configurations with a total thickness of 5-6 mm (excluding electronics) with 1 cm$^2$ pads coupled to APV-SRS readout were investigated with muons and pions. Detection efficiencies in the 98$%$ range were recorded with average pad-multiplicity of $\\sim$1.1. The resistive anode resulted in efficient discharge damping, with potential drops of a few volts; discharge probabilities were $\\sim10^{-7}$ for muons and $\\sim10^{-6}$ for pions in the double-stage configuration, at rates of a few kHz/cm$^2$. Further optimization work and research on larger detectors are underway.

  15. [Trajectories of aging in a sample of elderly people: a longitudinal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Elena; Calero, María Dolores; Becerra-Reina, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The present study analyzes variables associated with different trajectories of aging, and the level of cognitive functioning in a sample of older adults. Although this work is part of a broader investigation where initially 141 people were assessed, this paper only discusses the cognitive functioning and cognitive development of 64 older people who have been followed up four years after the initial assessment, with a mean age of 83.84 years (age range 65 to 99 years). In the initial assessment all the participants were assessed with a psychological battery that included the MEC, the verbal fluency task FVS, a sustained attention task, a working memory test, a Quality of Life Questionnaire, a scale of dependency, and the AVLT-Learning Potential test. In the follow up assessment, participants have been assessed with the MEC, the verbal fluency task FVS, and the verbal memory test AVLT-PA. the results show relatively stable trajectories of aging and that the variables that better predict cognitive evolution of the elderly are working memory and post-test score in the AVLT-LP. Despite the time lapse between the two assessments and the age of the participants, older adults have remained relatively stable in their cognitive functioning, which in part contradicts the idea that--especially after 80 years--a general decline of cognitive functioning occurs in old age. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. A study of correlations between crude oil spot and futures markets: A rolling sample test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Wan, Jieqiu

    2011-10-01

    In this article, we investigate the asymmetries of exceedance correlations and cross-correlations between West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot and futures markets. First, employing the test statistic proposed by Hong et al. [Asymmetries in stock returns: statistical tests and economic evaluation, Review of Financial Studies 20 (2007) 1547-1581], we find that the exceedance correlations were overall symmetric. However, the results from rolling windows show that some occasional events could induce the significant asymmetries of the exceedance correlations. Second, employing the test statistic proposed by Podobnik et al. [Quantifying cross-correlations using local and global detrending approaches, European Physics Journal B 71 (2009) 243-250], we find that the cross-correlations were significant even for large lagged orders. Using the detrended cross-correlation analysis proposed by Podobnik and Stanley [Detrended cross-correlation analysis: a new method for analyzing two nonstationary time series, Physics Review Letters 100 (2008) 084102], we find that the cross-correlations were weakly persistent and were stronger between spot and futures contract with larger maturity. Our results from rolling sample test also show the apparent effects of the exogenous events. Additionally, we have some relevant discussions on the obtained evidence.

  17. Genetic susceptibility and periodontal disease: a retrospective study on a large italian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettamanti, L; Gaudio, R M; Iapichino, A; Mucchi, D; Tagliabue, A

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a multifactorial illness in which environment and host interact. The genetic component plays a key role in the onset of PD. In fact the genetic compound can modulate the inflammation of the mucous membranes and the loss of alveolar bone. The genetics of PD is not well understood. Previous studies suggest a strong association between PD occurrence and individual genetic profile. The role of genetic susceptibility could impact on the clinical manifestations of PD, and consequently on prevention and therapy. Genetic polymorphisms of VRD, IL6 and IL10 were investigated in Italian adults affected by PD. 571 cases classified according the criteria of the American Academy of Periodontology were included. All patients were Italian coming from three areas according to italian institute of statistics (ISTAT) (www.istat.it/it/archivio/regioni). The sample comprised 379 patients from North (66%), 152 from Central (26%) and 40 of South (8%). No significant differences were found among allele distribution. Chronic PD is a complex disease caused by a combination of genetic susceptibility, patients habits (oral hygiene, smoking, alcohol consumption) and oral pathogens. In our report no differences were detected among three Italian regions in allele distribution.

  18. Studies on voltammetric determination of cadmium in samples containing native and digested proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz, E-mail: mariusz@ch.pw.edu.pl; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Proteins exhibit diverse impact on the DPASV cadmium signals. • Proteins subjected to HNO{sub 3} introduce less interference, than the native ones. • Optimal amount of SDS depends on the kind of protein. • Presence of thiolated coating agents of QDs do not influence the analysis. - Abstract: This work focuses on determination of cadmium ions using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on thin film mercury electrode in conditions corresponding to those obtained after digestion of cadmium-based quantum dots and their conjugates. It presents the impact of selected proteins, including potential receptors and surface blocking agents on the voltammetric determination of cadmium. Experiments regarding elimination of interferences related to proteins presence using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are also shown. Effect of SDS on selected analytical parameters and simplicity of analyses carried out was investigated in the framework of current studies. The significant differences of influence among tested proteins on ASV cadmium determination, as well as the variability in SDS effectiveness as the antifouling agent were observed and explained. This work is especially important for those, who design new bioassays and biosensors with a use of quantum dots as electrochemical labels, as it shows what problems may arise from presence of native and digested proteins in tested samples.

  19. Age and perceived effects of erotica-pornography: a national sample study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, C G; Gerstl, J E; LoSciuto, L A

    1975-11-01

    In the spring of 1970, a national sample survey of 2486 adults (aged 20-80) was studied to ascertain U.S. public attitudes toward and experience with erotic materials. Twelve items measured whether or not those interviewed believed that looking at or reading sexual materials had certain effects on themselves or others. Initial description of the results revealed a considerable diversity of opinion. This report provides a multistage typology of those item responses, beginning with characterization of items as positive, neutral, or negative in effect. Striking age gradients were observed at each stage in the typology formation. At first glance, these results are hardly surprising, yet introduction of controls for level of education, gender, and reported previous levels of actual exposure to erotica did not appreciably change the age-graded response pattern. The last stage in the typology contained four levels and showed an attribute solely desirable and/or neutral effects to erotica. Those who expressed neutral and mixed (strongly positive and negative) views were somewhat older. The next age norms about explicit sexual materials took on a perception of no effects or a position of uncertainty. Finally, those who believed that pornography has largely or solely undesirable effects on its consumers were oldest. The replicability of the pattern suggests a specific order in the underlying process of change in values (historical and/or intraindividual).

  20. Sampling Ozone Exposure of Canadian Forests at Different Scales: Some Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Cox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of passive samplers in extensive monitoring, such as that used in national forest health monitoring plots, indicates that these devices are able to determine both spatial and temporal differences in ozone exposure of the plots. This allows for categorisation of the plots and the potential for cause-effect analysis of certain forest health responses. Forest exposure along a gradient of air pollution deposition demonstrates large variation in accumulated exposures. The efficacy of using passive samplers for in situ monitoring of forest canopy exposure was also demonstrated. The sampler data produced weak relationships with ozone values from the nearest �continuous� monitor, even though data from colocated samplers showed strong relationships. This spatial variation and the apparent effect of elevation on ozone exposure demonstrate the importance of topography and tree canopy characteristics in plant exposure on a regional scale. In addition, passive sampling may identify the effects of local pollutant gases, such as NO, which may scavenge ozone locally only to increase the production of this secondary pollutant downwind, as atmospheric reactions redress the equilibrium between concentrations of this precursor and those of the generated ozone. The use of passive samplers at the stand level is able to resolve vertical profiles within the stand and edge effects that are important in exposure of understorey and ground flora. Recent case studies using passive samplers to determine forest exposure to ozone indicate a great potential for the development of spatial models on a regional, landscape, and stand level scale.

  1. The relationship between bipolar disorder and cannabis use in daily life: an experience sampling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Tyler

    Full Text Available Although cannabis use is common in bipolar disorder and may contribute to worse clinical outcomes, little is understood about the relationship between this drug and bipolar disorder over the course of daily life. The aim of study was to examine the effect of cannabis on affect and bipolar symptoms in a group of individuals with bipolar disorder.Twenty-four participants with bipolar disorder type I or type II completed diaries for 6 days using Experience Sampling Methodology to investigate the temporal associations between cannabis, affect and bipolar disorder symptoms.The results indicated that higher levels of positive affect increase the odds of using cannabis (OR:1.25 ,CI:1.06-1.47, P=0.008. However, neither negative affect, manic nor depressive symptoms predicted the use of cannabis. Cannabis use was associated with subsequent increases in positive affect (β=0.35, CI:0.20-0.51, P=0.000, manic symptoms (β=0.20,CI:0.05-0.34, P=0.009 and depressive symptoms (β= 0.17,CI:0.04-0.29, P=0.008.The findings indicate that cannabis use is associated with a number of subsequent psychological effects. However there was no evidence that individuals with BD were using cannabis to self-medicate minor fluctuations in negative affect or bipolar disorder symptoms over the course of daily life. The findings in relation to existing literature and clinical implications are discussed.

  2. Molecular-beam sampling study of extinguishment of methane-air flames by dry chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, E. L.; Ni, W.-F.; Seeger, C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of Al2O3, NaHCO3, KHCO3, NH4H2PO4 and KCl powders for the inhibition of a methane/oxygen diffusion flame is studied through measurement of composition and temperature profiles, using a molecular beam mass spectrometer sampling system. In order to obtain significant inhibition without extinguishing the flame, a powder feeding rate of 2 mg/liter of gas was used for KCl and Al2O3, and of 3 mg/liter of gas for the remaining powders. CH4, O2, N2, H2O and CO2 concentrations were measured by the mass spectrometer, while temperature was measured by the time-of-flight technique. For the powder feeding rates used, Al2O3 was the least and KCl and NH2H4PO2 the most effective in reducing temperature; in reaction-inhibition effectiveness, Al2O3 was again lowest while KCl was superior to all others. Because the KCl concentration was only 2/3 that of NH4H2PO4, it is recommended as the most effective temperature reducer and reaction inhibitor.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of humic acids from subsurface sediment samples collected across the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. SAKELLARIADOU

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural humic acids are biogenic, structurally complex and heterogeneous, refractory, acidic, yellow-to black-coloured organic polyelectrolytes of relatively high molecular weight. They occur in all soils, sediments, fresh waters, and seawaters. Humic acids represent the largest portion of nonliving soil organic matter. In the present paper, humic substances were isolated from marine subsurface sediment samples collected across the Aegean sea (in Greece and especially from a marine area extending northwards of the Samothraki plateau towards the north-eastern part of the island of Crete. In a following step, humic preparations were studied using infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy (emission, excitation and synchronous-scan excitation spectra were obtained. The infrared spectra suggested functional chemical groups such as as OH-, C-H aliphatic, C=C, C=O/COO-, salts of carboxylic acids, and also, in some cases, silicate anions or C-O from alcohols, esters and ethers. Fluorescence emission, excitation and synchronous scan excitation provided some valuable information concerning a probable origin (marine and/or terrestrial for the isolated humics.

  4. Sample size for regression analyses of theory of planned behaviour studies: case of prescribing in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Miles, Jeremy; Russell, Daphne; Russell, Ian

    2006-11-01

    Interest has been growing in the use of the theory of planned behaviour (TBP) in health services research. The sample sizes range from less than 50 to more than 750 in published TPB studies without sample size calculations. We estimate the sample size for a multi-stage random survey of prescribing intention and actual prescribing for asthma in British general practice. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic attempt to determine sample size for a TPB survey. We use two different approaches: reported values of regression models' goodness-of-fit (the lambda method) and zero-order correlations (the variance inflation factor or VIF method). Intra-cluster correlation coefficient (ICC) is estimated and a socioeconomic variable is used for stratification. We perform sensitivity analysis to estimate the effects of our decisions on final sample size. The VIF method is more sensitive to the requirements of a TPB study. Given a correlation of .25 between intention and behaviour, and of .4 between intention and perceived behavioural control, the proposed sample size is 148. We estimate the ICC for asthma prescribing to be around 0.07. If 10 general practitioners were sampled per cluster, the sample size would be 242. It is feasible to perform sophisticated sample size calculations for a TPB study. The VIF is the appropriate method. Our approach can be used with adjustments in other settings and for other regression models.

  5. Children are safer in states with strict firearm laws: a National Inpatient Sample study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Arash; Rhee, Peter; Pandit, Viraj; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Aziz, Hassan; Green, Donald; O'Keeffe, Terence; Vercruysse, Gary; Friese, Randall S; Joseph, Bellal

    2014-01-01

    Firearm control laws vary across the United States and remain state specific. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between variation in states' firearm control laws and the risk of firearm-related injuries in pediatric population. We hypothesized that strict firearm control laws impact the incidence of pediatric firearm injury. All patients with trauma Ecodes and those 18 years or younger were identified from the 2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Individual states' firearm control laws were evaluated and scored based on background checks on firearm sales, permit requirements, assault weapon and large-capacity magazine ban, mandatory child safety lock requirements, and regulations regarding firearms in college and workplaces. States were then dichotomized into strict firearm laws (SFLs) and non-strict firearm laws (non-SFLs) state based on median total score. The primary outcome measure was incidence of firearm injury. Data were compared between the two groups using simple linear regression analysis. A total of 60,224 pediatric patients with trauma-related injuries across 44 states were included. Thirty-three states were categorized as non-SFL and 11 as SFL. Two hundred eighty-six (0.5%) had firearm injuries, of which 31 were self-inflicted. Mean firearm injury rates per 1,000 trauma patients was higher in the non-SFL states (mean [SD]: SFL, 2.2 [1.6]; non-SFL, 5.9 [5.6]; p = 0. 001). Being in a non-SFL state increased the mean firearm injury rate by 3.75 (β coefficient, 3.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-7.25; p = 0.036). Children living in states with strict firearm legislation are safer. Efforts to improve and standardize national firearm control laws are warranted. Prognostic study, level III.

  6. Characterization of Complex Fractionated Atrial Electrograms by Sample Entropy: An International Multi-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Cirugeda–Roldán

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most commonly clinically-encountered arrhythmia. Catheter ablation of AF is mainly based on trigger elimination and modification of the AF substrate. Substrate mapping ablation of complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAEs has emerged to be a promising technique. To improve substrate mapping based on CFAE analysis, automatic detection algorithms need to be developed in order to simplify and accelerate the ablation procedures. According to the latest studies, the level of fractionation has been shown to be promisingly well estimated from CFAE measured during radio frequency (RF ablation of AF. The nature of CFAE is generally nonlinear and nonstationary, so the use of complexity measures is considered to be the appropriate technique for the analysis of AF records. This work proposes the use of sample entropy (SampEn, not only as a way to discern between non-fractionated and fractionated atrial electrograms (A-EGM, Entropy 2015, 17 7494 but also as a tool for characterizing the degree of A-EGM regularity, which is linked to changes in the AF substrate and to heart tissue damage. The use of SampEn combined with a blind parameter estimation optimization process enables the classification between CFAE and non-CFAE with statistical significance (p < 0:001, 0.89 area under the ROC, 86% specificity and 77% sensitivity over a mixed database of A-EGM combined from two independent CFAE signal databases, recorded during RF ablation of AF in two EU countries (542 signals in total. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, it can be suggested that the use of SampEn is suitable for real-time support during navigation of RF ablation of AF, as only 1.5 seconds of signal segments need to be analyzed.

  7. A study on determination of potentially hazardous plutonium isotopes in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of stable plutonium isotopes, and the high mobility as well as long half-life, plutonium is considered one of the most important radioelement in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity and nuclear waste management. A number of analytical methods have been developed over the past decades for determination of plutonium in environmental samples. The article discusses different analytical techniques and presents the results of plutonium isotopes determination by alpha spectrometry and accelerator mass spectrometry in environmental samples. The concentrations of plutonium isotopes in analyzed samples indicates its measurement is of great importance for environmental and safety assessment, especially in contaminated areas.

  8. Daily Stressful Experiences Precede But Do Not Succeed Depressive Symptoms : Results from a Longitudinal Experience Sampling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brose, Annette; Wichers, Marieke; Kuppens, Peter

    This study investigates the proposition that micro-level experiences in the realm of stress (e.g., daily stress exposure) are among the building blocks of maladjustment, in particular, depression. Data were collected with experience sampling methods and in the lab. A sample of 202 students who had

  9. Comparison study of two different procedures for the determination of drugs of abuse in postmortem brain samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Karen Marie Dollerup; Reiter, Birgit; Skov, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two routine solid phase extraction methods for the analysis of body-fluids and tissue samples; a routine method developed in Vienna for tissue samples compared to a routine method developed in Copenhagen for blood. Our approach was to simply exchange the matri......, diazepam and 7-aminoflunitrazepam) in 19 brain homogenates of authentic cases were conducted....

  10. Replicability and generalizability of PTSD networks: A cross-cultural multisite study of PTSD symptoms in four trauma patient samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fried, Eiko I.; Eidhof, Marloes B.; Palic, Sabina

    2018-01-01

    The growing literature conceptualizing mental disorders like Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) asnetworks of interacting symptoms faces three key challenges. Prior studies predominantly used (a)small samples with low power for precise network estimation, (b) non-clinical samples, and (c...

  11. Use of Medicines Among a Brazilian Elderly Sample: A Cross-sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Mathias Pereira da Silva Marchini

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: In this Brazilian elderly sample, the most widely used medicines were antihypertensives, diuretics, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and institutionalized used more medications than community-dwelling elderly.

  12. External validity study of a personality disorders screening test in a community sample

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Lucas de Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background A screening test for personality disorders was recently developed in Brazil, the Dimensional Clinical Personality Inventory – screening version (IDCP-SV). However, no relationship between this screening measure and other scales or external criteria was tested. Objective To seek for validity evidence based on related criteria (e.g., other psychological tests) and external criteria (e.g., sample demographics). Methods Sample comprised 804 participants from São Paulo (B...

  13. Analysis of a copper sample for the CLIC ACS study in a field emission scanning microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Muranaka, Tomoko; Leifer, Klaus; Ziemann, Volker; Navitski, Aliaksandr; Müller, Günter

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements on a diamond turned Copper sample of material intended for the CLIC accelerating structures. The first part of the measurements was performed at Bergische Universität Wuppertal using a field emission scanning microscope to localize and characterize strong emission sites. In a second part the sample was investigated in an optical microscope, a white-light profilometer and scanning electron microscope in the microstructure laboratory in Uppsala to attempt to identify the features responsible for the field emission.

  14. Study on the Personal Submission of Agricultural Product Samples for Quality and Safety Inspection

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO, Dan; WANG, Yan; ZHANG, Yongzhi; CUI, Yehan; LIU, Pengcheng; ZHOU, Yunlong; LI, Yueru

    2015-01-01

    This paper carries out a questionnaire survey on 30 quality inspection institutions at the level of the Ministry of Agriculture, and based on systematic analysis, analyzes the causes of difficulties in personal submission of samples for inspection from six aspects in order to meet the real needs of personal submission of agricultural product samples for inspection under the new situation. In accordance with the actual situation of China's current regulatory system and quality control system, ...

  15. SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION IN NON-RADOMIZED SURVIVAL STUDIES WITH NON-CENSORED AND CENSORED DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Faghihzadeh, S.; M. Rahgozar

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: In survival analysis, determination of sufficient sample size to achieve suitable statistical power is important .In both parametric and non-parametric methods of classic statistics, randomn selection of samples is a basic condition. practically, in most clinical trials and health surveys randomn allocation is impossible. Fixed - effect multiple linear regression analysis covers this need and this feature could be extended to survival regression analysis. This paper is the resul...

  16. Concept Study For A Near-term Mars Surface Sample Return Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. F.; Thatcher, J.; Sallaberger, C.; Reedman, T.; Pillinger, C. T.; Sims, M. R.

    The return of samples from the surface of Mars is a challenging problem. Present mission planning is for complex missions to return large, focused samples sometime in the next decade. There is, however, much scientific merit in returning a small sample of Martian regolith before the end of this decade at a fraction of the cost of the more ambitious missions. This paper sets out the key elements of this concept that builds on the work of the Beagle 2 project and space robotics work in Canada. The paper will expand the science case for returning a regolith sample that is only in the range of 50-250g but would nevertheless include plenty of interesting mate- rial as the regolith comprises soil grains from a wide variety of locations i.e. nearby rocks, sedimentary formations and materials moved by fluids, winds and impacts. It is possible that a fine core sample could also be extracted and returned. The mission concept is to send a lander sized at around 130kg on the 2007 or 2009 opportunity, immediately collect the sample from the surface, launch it to Mars orbit, collect it by the lander parent craft and make an immediate Earth return. Return to Earth orbit is envisaged rather than direct Earth re-entry. The lander concept is essen- tially a twice-size Beagle 2 carrying the sample collection and return capsule loading equipment plus the ascent vehicle. The return capsule is envisaged as no more than 1kg. An overall description of the mission along with methods for sample acquisition, or- bital rendezvous and capsule return will be outlined and the overall systems budgets presented. To demonstrate the near term feasibility of the mission, the use of existing Canadian and European technologies will be highlighted.

  17. Data-driven soft sensor design with multiple-rate sampled data: a comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Bao; Recke, Bodil; Schmidt, Torben M.

    2009-01-01

    Multirate systems are common in industrial processes where quality measurements have slower sampling rates than other process variables. Since intersample information is desirable for effective quality control, different approaches have been reported to estimate the quality between samples......, including the numerical interpolation, polynomial transformation, data lifting, and weighted partial least squares (WPLS). Two modifications to the original data lifting approach are proposed in this paper: reformulating the extraction of a fast model as an optimization problem and ensuring the desired...

  18. How Does Sampling Methodology Influence Molecular Detection and Isolation Success in Influenza A Virus Field Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Avril, Alexis; Tolf, Conny; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-12-11

    Wild waterfowl are important reservoir hosts for influenza A virus (IAV) and a potential source of spillover infections in other hosts, including poultry and swine. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, such as H5N1 and H5N8, and subsequent spread along migratory flyways prompted the initiation of several programs in Europe, North America, and Africa to monitor circulation of HPAI and low-pathogenicity precursor viruses (low-pathogenicity avian influenza [LPAI] viruses). Given the costs of maintaining such programs, it is essential to establish best practice for field methodologies to provide robust data for epidemiological interpretation. Here, we use long-term surveillance data from a single site to evaluate the influence of a number of parameters on virus detection and isolation of LPAI viruses. A total of 26,586 samples (oropharyngeal, fecal, and cloacal) collected from wild mallards were screened by real-time PCR, and positive samples were subjected to isolation in embryonated chicken eggs. The LPAI virus detection rate was influenced by the sample type: cloacal/fecal samples showed a consistently higher detection rate and lower cycle threshold (Ct) value than oropharyngeal samples. Molecular detection was more sensitive than isolation, and virus isolation success was proportional to the number of RNA copies in the sample. Interestingly, for a given Ct value, the isolation success was lower in samples from adult birds than in those from juveniles. Comparing the results of specific real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCRs and of isolation, it was clear that coinfections were common in the investigated birds. The effects of sample type and detection methods warrant some caution in interpretation of the surveillance data. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Analysis Of Condensate Samples In Support Of The Antifoam Degradation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-12

    The degradation of Antifoam 747 to form flammable decomposition products has resulted in declaration of a Potential Inadequacy in the Safety Analysis (PISA) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) testing with simulants showed that hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), and 1-propanal are formed in the offgas from the decomposition of the antifoam. A total of ten DWPF condensate samples from Batch 735 and 736 were analyzed by SRNL for three degradation products and additional analytes. All of the samples were analyzed to determine the concentrations of HMDSO, TMS, and propanal. The results of the organic analysis found concentrations for propanal and HMDSO near or below the detection limits for the analysis. The TMS concentrations ranged from below detection to 11 mg/L. The samples from Batch 736 were also analyzed for formate and oxalate anions, total organic carbon, and aluminum, iron, manganese, and silicon. Most of the samples contained low levels of formate and therefore low levels of organic carbon. These two values for each sample show reasonable agreement in most cases. Low levels of all the metals (Al, Fe, Mn, and Si) were present in most of the samples.

  20. ANALYSIS OF CONDENSATE SAMPLES IN SUPPORT OF THE ANTIFOAM DEGRADATION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-29

    The degradation of Antifoam 747 to form flammable decomposition products has resulted in declaration of a Potential Inadequacy in the Safety Analysis (PISA) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) testing with simulants showed that hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), and 1-propanal are formed in the offgas from the decomposition of the antifoam. A total of ten DWPF condensate samples from Batch 735 and 736 were analyzed by SRNL for three degradation products and additional analytes. All of the samples were analyzed to determine the concentrations of HMDSO, TMS, and propanal. The results of the organic analysis found concentrations for propanal and HMDSO near or below the detection limits for the analysis. The TMS concentrations ranged from below detection to 11 mg/L. The samples from Batch 736 were also analyzed for formate and oxalate anions, total organic carbon, and aluminum, iron, manganese, and silicon. Most of the samples contained low levels of formate and therefore low levels of organic carbon. These two values for each sample show reasonable agreement in most cases. Low levels of all the metals (Al, Fe, Mn, and Si) were present in most of the samples.

  1. Factorial composition of the Aggression Questionnaire: a multi-sample study in Greek adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoratou, Silia; Ntzoufras, Ioannis; Smyrnis, Nikolaos; Stefanis, Nicholas C

    2009-06-30

    The primary aim of the current article was the evaluation of the factorial composition of the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ(29)) in the Greek population. The translated questionnaire was administered to the following three heterogeneous adult samples: a general population sample from Athens, a sample of young male conscripts and a sample of individuals facing problems related to substance use. Factor analysis highlighted a structure similar to the one proposed by Buss and Perry [Buss, A.F., Perry, M., 1992. The Aggression Questionnaire. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 63, 452-459]. However, the refined 12-item version of Bryant and Smith [Bryant, F.B., Smith, B.D., 2001. Refining the architecture of aggression: a measurement model for the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire. Journal of Research in Personality 35, 138-167] provided a better fit to our data. Therefore, the refined model was implemented in further analysis. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis was applied in order to assess the variability of the 12-item AQ across gender and samples. The percentage of factor loading invariance between males and females and across the three samples defined above was high (higher than 75%). The reliability (internal consistency) of the scale was satisfactory in all cases. Content validity of the 12-item AQ was confirmed by comparison with the Symptom Check-List 90 Revised.

  2. Review of the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS) family of studies: a comprehensively examined sample for genetic and epidemiological studies of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Donald W; Cox, Amanda J; Freedman, Barry I; Hugenschimdt, Christina E; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Herrington, David; Agarwal, Subhashish; Register, Thomas C; Maldjian, Joseph A; Ng, Maggie C-Y; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Langefeld, Carl D; Williamson, Jeff D; Carr, J Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The Diabetes Heart Study (DHS) is a genetic and epidemiological study of 1,443 European American and African American participants from 564 families with multiple cases of type 2 diabetes. Initially, participants were comprehensively examined for measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) including computed tomography measurement of vascular calcified plaque, ultrasound imaging of carotid artery wall thickness, and electrocardiographic intervals. Subsequent studies have investigated the relationship between bone mineral density and vascular calcification, measures of adiposity, and biomarkers. Ongoing studies are carrying out an extensive evaluation of cerebrovascular disease using magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive assessment. A second, parallel study, the African American DHS, has expanded the sample of African Americans to investigate marked racial differences in subclinical CVD between European Americans and African Americans. Studies in development will evaluate the impact of social stress during the lifecourse on CVD risk, and the prevalence of gastroparesis in this diabetes enriched sample. In addition, the ongoing high mortality rate in DHS participants provides novel insights into the increased risks for type 2 diabetes affected individuals. A comprehensive genetic analysis of the sample is underway using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach. Data from this GWAS survey will complement prior family-based linkage data in the analysis of genetic contributors to the wide range of traits in the sample. To our knowledge the DHS family of studies has created the most comprehensively examined sample of individuals with type 2 diabetes yet available, and represents a unique resource for the study people with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this review is to provide a collective overview of the major results from the DHS family of studies, and relate them to the larger body of biomedical investigations of diabetes and its complications.

  3. Risk factors for breast cancer: a systematic review of studies with female samples among the general population in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinho Valéria Fernandes de Souza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review of studies was conducted to determine the characteristics of epidemiological research on risk factors for breast cancer in female samples from the general population in Brazil. Of the 23 articles identified, only 14 were selected for review. Most of the studies were from Southeast Brazil. Three were cross-sectional, conducted in specific populations, and 11 used case-control designs. The sample sizes varied from 40 to 164,269 women. Twenty-nine risk factors were researched, and among these, 11 were investigated in four or more studies. Nulliparity was the most frequent factor, found in 12 of the studies. Prevalence of the factors varied widely among the samples, and since the samples were heterogeneous and the studies presented several methodological limitations, a summary mean was not calculated.

  4. Evaluation of exposure-specific risks from two independent samples: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, William M; Gagnon, David; Horsburgh, C Robert; Losina, Elena

    2011-01-05

    Previous studies have proposed a simple product-based estimator for calculating exposure-specific risks (ESR), but the methodology has not been rigorously evaluated. The goal of our study was to evaluate the existing methodology for calculating the ESR, propose an improved point estimator, and propose variance estimates that will allow the calculation of confidence intervals (CIs). We conducted a simulation study to test the performance of two estimators and their associated confidence intervals: 1) current (simple product-based estimator) and 2) proposed revision (revised product-based estimator). The first method for ESR estimation was based on multiplying a relative risk (RR) of disease given a certain exposure by an overall risk of disease. The second method, which is proposed in this paper, was based on estimates of the risk of disease in the unexposed. We then multiply the updated risk by the RR to get the revised product-based estimator. A log-based variance was calculated for both estimators. Also, a binomial-based variance was calculated for the revised product-based estimator. 95% CIs were calculated based on these variance estimates. Accuracy of point estimators was evaluated by comparing observed relative bias (percent deviation from the true estimate). Interval estimators were evaluated by coverage probabilities and expected length of the 95% CI, given coverage. We evaluated these estimators across a wide range of exposure probabilities, disease probabilities, relative risks, and sample sizes. We observed more bias and lower coverage probability when using the existing methodology. The revised product-based point estimator exhibited little observed relative bias (max: 4.0%) compared to the simple product-based estimator (max: 93.9%). Because the simple product-based estimator was biased, 95% CIs around this estimate exhibited small coverage probabilities. The 95% CI around the revised product-based estimator from the log-based variance provided better

  5. Evaluation of exposure-specific risks from two independent samples: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have proposed a simple product-based estimator for calculating exposure-specific risks (ESR, but the methodology has not been rigorously evaluated. The goal of our study was to evaluate the existing methodology for calculating the ESR, propose an improved point estimator, and propose variance estimates that will allow the calculation of confidence intervals (CIs. Methods We conducted a simulation study to test the performance of two estimators and their associated confidence intervals: 1 current (simple product-based estimator and 2 proposed revision (revised product-based estimator. The first method for ESR estimation was based on multiplying a relative risk (RR of disease given a certain exposure by an overall risk of disease. The second method, which is proposed in this paper, was based on estimates of the risk of disease in the unexposed. We then multiply the updated risk by the RR to get the revised product-based estimator. A log-based variance was calculated for both estimators. Also, a binomial-based variance was calculated for the revised product-based estimator. 95% CIs were calculated based on these variance estimates. Accuracy of point estimators was evaluated by comparing observed relative bias (percent deviation from the true estimate. Interval estimators were evaluated by coverage probabilities and expected length of the 95% CI, given coverage. We evaluated these estimators across a wide range of exposure probabilities, disease probabilities, relative risks, and sample sizes. Results We observed more bias and lower coverage probability when using the existing methodology. The revised product-based point estimator exhibited little observed relative bias (max: 4.0% compared to the simple product-based estimator (max: 93.9%. Because the simple product-based estimator was biased, 95% CIs around this estimate exhibited small coverage probabilities. The 95% CI around the revised product

  6. Job satisfaction among hospital doctors in Norway and Germany. A comparative study on national samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Judith; Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf G

    2009-07-01

    To compare German and Norwegian hospital doctors on 10 different aspects of job satisfaction and general life satisfaction. The study population consisted of a representative sample of 1,448 German and 484 Norwegian hospital doctors aged 33-65 years (n = 1,932), selected from nationwide postal surveys in 2006. The questionnaires contained items on subjective life satisfaction and the validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale. Each item was scored on a seven-point Likert scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). A mean sum score was calculated, ranging from 1 to 7. Regression analyses and generalized-linear-model-estimated means controlled for age and gender with 95% confidence intervals were used for comparison. Norwegian hospital doctors had significantly higher life satisfaction (mean 5.31 vs. 5.15) and job satisfaction (mean 5.09 vs. 4.55) than their German colleagues. Item by item, doctors in Norway were significantly more content with seven aspects of their work: "Freedom to choose your own methods of working'' (mean 5.00 vs. 4.72), "opportunities to use your skills'' (mean 5.49 vs. 5.01), "physical working conditions'' (mean 4.62 vs. 4.08), "recognition you get for good achievements'' (mean 4.83 vs. 4.26), "overall job situation'' (mean 5.57 vs. 4.64), "work hours'' (mean 4.39 vs. 3.39), "ate of pay'' (mean 4.70 vs. 3.70). General life satisfaction and age, but not gender, were positively associated with job satisfaction in both countries. Norwegian hospital doctors enjoy a higher level of life and job satisfaction than German hospital doctors. The most likely reasons for this are more acceptable work hours, salary and control over clinical work in Norway.

  7. Randomised prospective study compares efficacy of five different stomach tubes for rumen fluid sampling in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S; Neidl, A; Linhart, N; Tichy, A; Gasteiner, J; Gallob, K; Baumgartner, W; Wittek, T

    2015-01-10

    The objective of the study was to compare the performance of five types of stomach tubes for rumen fluid sampling. Rumen fluid was sampled in rumen fistulated cows assigned to a 5×5 Latin square study design. The pH values of samples taken by stomach tubes and via fistulas were measured; the results were compared with indwelling sensor measurements. The practicability of the stomach tubes for regular use was tested in the field. Rumen fluid samples were obtained rapidly. Volumes for transfaunation could be obtained. The pH-values of samples taken with the four out of the five tubes (Dirksen, Geishauser, tube 4 and a simple water hose used with a gag) did not show significant differences to samples taken via rumen fistulas. Mean differences ranged between -0.02 and +0.09. Samples taken with tube 4 and the water hose showed also no significant differences to pH-sensor measurements. This study demonstrates that stomach tubes are suitable for rumen fluid sampling. Tube 4 seems to be the best probe for work in the field. It was well tolerated by the animals, saliva contamination is negligible. We, therefore, conclude that the evaluation of rumen acid base status in the field is possible. British Veterinary Association.

  8. Flow cytometry for feline lymphoma: a retrospective study about pre-analytical factors possibly affecting the quality of samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Bernardi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Flow cytometry (FC is an increasingly required technique on which veterinary oncologists rely to have an accurate, fast, minimally invasive lymphoma or leukemia diagnosis. FC has been studied and applied with great results in canine oncology, whereas in feline oncology the use of this technique is still to be experienced. This is mainly due to a supposed discomfort in sampling, because of the high prevalence of intra-abdominal lymphomas. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether any pre-analytical factor might affect the quality of suspected feline lymphoma samples for FC analysis. Methods 97 consecutive samples of suspected feline lymphoma were retrospectively selected from the authors’ institution FC database. The referring veterinarians were recalled and interrogated about several different variables, including signalling, features of the lesion, features of the sampling procedure and the experience of veterinarians performing the sampling. Statistical analyses were performed to assess the possible influence of these variables on the cellularity of the samples and the likelihood of being finally processed for FC. Results None of the investigated variables significantly influenced the quality of the submitted samples, but the needle size, with 21G needles providing the highest cellularity (Table 1. Notably, the samples quality did not vary between peripheral and intra-abdominal lesions. Sample cellularity alone influenced the likelihood of being processed. About a half of the cats required pharmacological restraint. Side effects were reported in one case only (transient swelling after peripheral lymph node sampling. Conclusions FC can be safely applied to cases of suspected feline lymphomas, even for intra-abdominal lesions. 21G needle should be preferred for sampling. This study provides the bases for the spread of this minimally invasive, fast and cost-effective technique in feline medicine.

  9. SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION IN CLINICAL TRIALS BASED ON APPROXIMATION OF VARIANCE ESTIMATED FROM LIMITED PRIMARY OR PILOT STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B SOLEYMANI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In many casses the estimation of variance which is used to determine sample size in clinical trials, derives from limited primary or pilot studies in which number of samples is small. since in such casses the estimation of variance may be much far from the real variance, the size of samples is suspected to be less or more than what is really needed. In this article an attempt has been made to give a solution to this problem. in the case of normal distribution. Based on distribution of (n-1 S2/?2 which is chi-square for normal variables, an appropriate estimation of variance is determined an used to calculate sample size. Also, total probability to ensure specific precision and power has been achived. In method presented here, The probability for getting desired precision and power is more than that of usual method, but results of two methods get closer when sample size increases in primary studies.

  10. Optical properties and mineralogical composition of different Saharan mineral dust samples: a laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Linke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In aerosol chamber experiments optical properties of resuspended mineral dust samples of defined size distributions were measured. Extinction coefficients (bext and mass specific extinction cross sections (σext were determined for Saharan dust samples from different locations. The results for σext were not very sensitive to the type of dust and varied at λ=550 nm between 3.3±0.4 m2 g−1 and 3.7±0.4 m2 g−1. The absorption coefficients (babs and mass specific absorption cross sections (σabs were determined with a novel multi-wavelength photo-acoustic absorption spectrometer (PAS. The single scattering albedo was close to 1 (0.98 to 0.99 at 532 nm and 1064 nm, but significantly lower (0.63 to 0.76 at 266 nm. Additionally the chemical and mineralogical composition of the dust samples were analysed with special regard to the iron oxide phases hematite and goethite. At λ=266 nm the mineral dust sample without any detectable iron oxides showed a significantly higher SSA compared to the sample with a hematite content of 0.6 wt-%.

  11. Observations from a 4-Year Contamination Study of a Sample Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski,Jan; Steele, Andrew

    2007-05-01

    Morphological, compositional, and biological evidence indicates the presence of numerous well-developed microbial hyphae structures distributed within four different sample splits of the Nakhla meteorite obtained from the British Museum (allocation BM1913,25). By examining depth profiles of the sample splits over time, morphological changes displayed by the structures were documented, as well as changes in their distribution on the samples, observations that indicate growth, decay, and reproduction of individual microorganisms. Biological staining with DNA-specific molecular dyes followed by epifluorescence microscopy showed that the hyphae structures contain DNA. Our observations demonstrate the potential of microbial interaction with extraterrestrial materials, emphasize the need for rapid investigation of Mars return samples as well as any other returned or impactor-delivered extraterrestrial materials, and suggest the identification of appropriate storage conditions that should be followed immediately after samples retrieved from the field are received by a handling/curation facility. The observations are further relevant in planetary protection considerations as they demonstrate that microorganisms may endure and reproduce in extraterrestrial materials over long (at least 4 years) time spans. The combination of microscopy images coupled with compositional and molecular staining techniques is proposed as a valid method for detection of life forms in martian materials as a first-order assessment. Time-resolved in situ observations further allow observation of possible (bio)dynamics within the system.

  12. Sample size for equivalence trials: a case study from a vaccine lot consistency trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Jitendra; Izu, Allen; Anemona, Alessandra

    2008-08-30

    For some trials, simple but subtle assumptions can have a profound impact on the size of the trial. A case in point is a vaccine lot consistency (or equivalence) trial. Standard sample size formulas used for designing lot consistency trials rely on only one component of variation, namely, the variation in antibody titers within lots. The other component, the variation in the means of titers between lots, is assumed to be equal to zero. In reality, some amount of variation between lots, however small, will be present even under the best manufacturing practices. Using data from a published lot consistency trial, we demonstrate that when the between-lot variation is only 0.5 per cent of the total variation, the increase in the sample size is nearly 300 per cent when compared with the size assuming that the lots are identical. The increase in the sample size is so pronounced that in order to maintain power one is led to consider a less stringent criterion for demonstration of lot consistency. The appropriate sample size formula that is a function of both components of variation is provided. We also discuss the increase in the sample size due to correlated comparisons arising from three pairs of lots as a function of the between-lot variance.

  13. Determination of Acyclovir in Human Plasma Samples by HPLC Method with UV Detection: Application to Single-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Zendelovska

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: Good precision, accuracy, simplicity, sensitivity and shorter time of analysis of the method makes it particularly useful for processing of multiple samples in a limited period of time for pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir.

  14. Self-sampling for human papillomavirus DNA detection: a preliminary study of compliance and feasibility in BOLIVIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surriabre, Pedro; Allende, Gustavo; Prado, Marcela; Cáceres, Leyddy; Bellot, Diego; Torrico, Andrea; Ustariz, Karina; Rojas, Shirley; Barriga, Jaime; Calle, Pamela; Villarroel, Ligia; Yañez, Rosse Mary; Baay, Marc; Rodriguez, Patricia; Fontaine, Véronique

    2017-12-22

    Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates in Bolivia are among the highest in Latin America. This investigation aims to evaluate the possibility of using simple devices, e.g. a cotton swab and a glass slide, for self-sampling in order to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by PCR in cervico-vaginal cells. In the first phase of our study we evaluated the use of a glass slide as a transport medium for cervical cells. A physician took paired-cervical samples from 235 women. One sample was transported in Easyfix® solution and the other sample was smeared over a glass slide. Both were further analyzed and compared for human DNA recovery and HPV detection. A kappa value was determined to evaluate the agreement between the HPV DNA detection rates. In the second phase of the study, 222 women from the urban, peri-urban and rural regions of Cochabamba were requested to perform self-sampling using the following devices: a cotton swab combined with a glass slide, and a vaginal tampon. Women gave their opinion about the self-sampling technique. Finally, the agreement for high risk-HPV detection between self- and physician-collected samples was performed in 201 samples in order to evaluate the self-sampling technique. Firstly, the comparison between Easyfix® solution and the glass slide to transport clinical samples gave a good agreement for HPV DNA detection (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.60-0.81). Secondly, self-sampling, especially with cotton swab combined with glass slide, would generally be preferred over clinician sampling for a screening program based on HPV detection. Finally, we showed a good agreement between self- and physician collected samples for high risk-HPV detection (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.88). Simple devices such as a cotton swab and a glass slide can be used to perform self-sampling and HPV DNA detection. Furthermore, most Bolivian women preferred self-sampling over clinician-sampling for cervical cancer screening.

  15. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural pathogens. Collection, preservation and analysis of samples for both organic compounds and microbial characterization add a great degree of complication to the sampling and preservation protocols and a significant increase to the cost for a continental-scale survey. Both these issues must be

  16. Study of nitrogen losses at the microcosm in undisturbed soil samples subjected to thermal shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cancelo-González

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory thermal shocks of different intensity and rainfall simulations were performed in undisturbed Leptic Umbrisol soil samples. Samples were collected in field using specially designed lysimeter boxes to allow sampling, thermal shocks and surface runoff and subsurface flow water collection during the rainfall simulations. Temperature was recorded during heating and degree-hours of accumulated heat were calculated and nitrogen losses in surface and subsurface water collected after two rainfall simulations were determined. Results show losses of total nitrogen from treatments 200 oC and 67 degrees-hours heat supplied in the leachate obtained after 150 mm of simulated rainfall compared with non-heat treated soils. Is remarkable that soils subjected to higher intensity heat treatments (400 oC and 278 67 degrees-hours show greater losses of N-Nitrate and N-Ammonia by subsurface flow, while this behavior was not observed in the other heat treatments.

  17. A Study of Assimilation Bias in Name-Based Sampling of Migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnell Rainer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of personal names for screening is an increasingly popular sampling technique for migrant populations. Although this is often an effective sampling procedure, very little is known about the properties of this method. Based on a large German survey, this article compares characteristics of respondents whose names have been correctly classified as belonging to a migrant population with respondentswho aremigrants and whose names have not been classified as belonging to a migrant population. Although significant differences were found for some variables even with some large effect sizes, the overall bias introduced by name-based sampling (NBS is small as long as procedures with small false-negative rates are employed.

  18. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia, E-mail: e.vasileva-veleva@iaea.org

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6–4.3%), repeatability (4–9%), reproducibility (9–11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as

  19. Sample size determination for a t test given a t value from a previous study: A FORTRAN 77 program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, R

    2001-11-01

    When uncertain about the magnitude of an effect, researchers commonly substitute in the standard sample-size-determination formula an estimate of effect size derived from a previous experiment. A problem with this approach is that the traditional sample-size-determination formula was not designed to deal with the uncertainty inherent in an effect-size estimate. Consequently, estimate-substitution in the traditional sample-size-determination formula can lead to a substantial loss of power. A method of sample-size determination designed to handle uncertainty in effect-size estimates is described. The procedure uses the t value and sample size from a previous study, which might be a pilot study or a related study in the same area, to establish a distribution of probable effect sizes. The sample size to be employed in the new study is that which supplies an expected power of the desired amount over the distribution of probable effect sizes. A FORTRAN 77 program is presented that permits swift calculation of sample size for a variety of t tests, including independent t tests, related t tests, t tests of correlation coefficients, and t tests of multiple regression b coefficients.

  20. A shared frailty model for case-cohort samples: parent and offspring relations in an adoption study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    probability weighting to account for the sampling in a conditional, shared frailty Poisson model and to use the robust variance estimator proposed by Moger et al. (Statist. Med. 2008; 27:1062-1074).To explore the performance of the estimation procedure, a simulation study was conducted. We studied situations......The Danish adoption register contains data on the 12 301 Danish nonfamilial adoptions during 1924-1947. From that register a case-cohort sample was selected consisting of all case adoptees, that is those adoptees dying before age 70 years, and a random sample of 1683 adoptees. The survival data...

  1. Studies on thermal neutron perturbation factor needed for bulk sample activation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Csikai, J; Sanami, T; Michikawa, T

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution of thermal neutrons produced by an Am-Be source in a graphite pile was measured via the activation foil method. The results obtained agree well with calculated data using the MCNP-4B code. A previous method used for the determination of the average neutron flux within thin absorbing samples has been improved and extended for a graphite moderator. A procedure developed for the determination of the flux perturbation factor renders the thermal neutron activation analysis of bulky samples of unknown composition possible both in hydrogenous and graphite moderators.

  2. Studies of erosion of solar max samples of Kapton and Teflon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristrom, R. M.; Benson, R. C.; Bargeron, C. B.; Phillips, T. E.; Vest, C. E.; Hoshall, C. H.; Satkiewicz, F. G.; Uy, O. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several samples of Kapton and Teflon which was exposed to solar radiation were examined. The samples represent material behavior in near Earth space. Clues to the identity of erosive processes and the responsible species were searched for. Interest centered around oxygen atoms which are ubiquitous at these altitudes and are known to erode some metal surfaces. Three diagnostic methods were employed: optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two types of simulation were used: a flow containing low energy oxygen atoms and bombardment with 3000 volt Ar ions. Results and conclusions are presented.

  3. Lifetime Prevalence of Suicide Attempts Among Sexual Minority Adults by Study Sampling Strategies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottes, Travis Salway; Bogaert, Laura; Rhodes, Anne E; Brennan, David J; Gesink, Dionne

    2016-05-01

    Previous reviews have demonstrated a higher risk of suicide attempts for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) persons (sexual minorities), compared with heterosexual groups, but these were restricted to general population studies, thereby excluding individuals sampled through LGB community venues. Each sampling strategy, however, has particular methodological strengths and limitations. For instance, general population probability studies have defined sampling frames but are prone to information bias associated with underreporting of LGB identities. By contrast, LGB community surveys may support disclosure of sexuality but overrepresent individuals with strong LGB community attachment. To reassess the burden of suicide-related behavior among LGB adults, directly comparing estimates derived from population- versus LGB community-based samples. In 2014, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Scopus databases for articles addressing suicide-related behavior (ideation, attempts) among sexual minorities. We selected quantitative studies of sexual minority adults conducted in nonclinical settings in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression assessed for a difference in prevalence of suicide-related behavior by sample type, adjusted for study or sample-level variables, including context (year, country), methods (medium, response rate), and subgroup characteristics (age, gender, sexual minority construct). We examined residual heterogeneity by using τ(2). We pooled 30 cross-sectional studies, including 21,201 sexual minority adults, generating the following lifetime prevalence estimates of suicide attempts: 4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3%, 5%) for heterosexual respondents to population surveys, 11% (95% CI = 8%, 15%) for LGB respondents to population surveys, and 20% (95% CI = 18%, 22%) for LGB respondents to community surveys (Figure 1). The difference in LGB estimates by sample

  4. Study of Usage Areas of Clay Samples of Asphaltite Quarries in Sirnak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Oyku

    2017-12-01

    The asphaltite of Sirnak, Turkey are in the form of 12 veins and their total reserves are anticipated to be approximately 200 million tons in a field of 25.000 hectares. The asphaltites at the Sirnak region are in the form of fault and crack fillings and take place together with clay minerals at their side rock. The main raw materials used in the production of cement are limestone, clay and marn known as sedimentary rocks. Limestone for CaO and clay minerals for SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, which are the main compounds of clinker production, are the main raw materials. Other materials containing these four oxides like marn are also used as cement raw material. Conformity levels of the raw materials to be used in cement production vary according to their chemical compounds. The rocks to be used as clay mineral are evaluated by taking the rate of silicate and alumina into consideration. The soils suitable for brick-tile productions are named as sandy clay. Their difference from the ceramic clays is that they are richer in terms of iron, silica and carbonate. These soils are also known under the names such as clay, arid, alluvium, silt, loam and argil. Inside these soils, minerals such as quartz, montmorillonite, kaolinite, calcite, limonite, hidromika, sericite, illite, and chlorite are available. Some parts of the soils consist of clays in amorphous structure. Limestone parts, gypsums, organic substances and bulky rock residuals spoil the quality. The soils suitable for brick production may not be suitable for tile production. In this case, their sandy soils should be mixed up with the clays with fine granule structure which is high in plasticity. During asphaltite mining in Sirnak region, clays forming side rock are gathered at dump sites. In this study; SQX analyses of the clay samples taken from Avgamasya, Seridahli and Segürük asphaltite veins run in Sirnak region are carried out and their usage areas are searched.

  5. Use of space-filling curves to select sample locations in natural resource monitoring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Lister; Charles T. Scott

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of several large area monitoring networks over the past few decades has led to increased research into ways to spatially balance sample locations across the landscape. Many of these methods are well documented and have been used in the past with great success. In this paper, we present a method using geographic information systems (GIS) and fractals...

  6. Protein Profile study of clinical samples using Laser Induced Fluorescence as the detection method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Raja, Sujatha N.; Rai, Lavanya

    2009-01-01

      Protein profiles of tissue homogenates were recorded using HPLC separation and LIF detection method. The samples were collected from volunteers with clinically normal or cervical cancer conditions. It is shown that the protein profile can be classified as belonging to malignant or normal state ...

  7. Sampling design for compliance monitoring of surface water quality: A case study in a Polder area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Knotters, M.

    2008-01-01

    International agreements such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) ask for efficient sampling methods for monitoring natural resources. In this paper a general methodology for designing efficient, statistically sound monitoring schemes is described. An important decision is the choice between a

  8. 1979 Reserve Force Studies Surveys: Survey Design, Sample Design and Administrative Procedures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Dental Service 17 Reception Cnt. 11Other 46 Total 2914 The heterogeneity of the units poses a problem for a unit sampling plan. Namely, if the...regular schoel or collae 04. What is tha ZIP Code ZIP Cods thats you think you will ama c0oMsil In tha futura? If af tha placa whare your highest grade

  9. Determination of Sr-90 in milk samples from the study of statistical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otero-Pazos Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of 90Sr in milk samples is the main objective of radiation monitoring laboratories because of its environmental importance. In this paper the concentration of activity of 39 milk samples was obtained through radiochemical separation based on selective retention of Sr in a cationic resin (Dowex 50WX8, 50-100 mesh and subsequent determination by a low-level proportional gas counter. The results were checked by performing the measurement of the Sr concentration by using the flame atomic absorption spectroscopy technique, to finally obtain the mass of 90Sr. From the data obtained a statistical treatment was performed using linear regressions. A reliable estimate of the mass of 90Sr was obtained based on the gravimetric technique, and secondly, the counts per minute of the third measurement in the 90Sr and 90Y equilibrium, without having to perform the analysis. These estimates have been verified with 19 milk samples, obtaining overlapping results. The novelty of the manuscript is the possibility of determining the concentration of 90Sr in milk samples, without the need to perform the third measurement in the equilibrium.

  10. Crystallization history of lunar picritic basalt sample 12002 - Phase-equilibria and cooling-rate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental crystallization of a lunar picrite composition (sample 12002) at controlled linear cooling rates produces systematic changes in the temperature at which crystalline phases appear, in the texture, and in crystal morphology as a function of cooling rate. Phases crystallize in the order olivine, chromium spinel, pyroxene, plagioclase, and ilmenite during equilibrium crystallization, but ilmenite and plagioclase reverse their order of appearance and silica crystallizes in the groundmass during controlled cooling experiments. The partition of iron and magnesium between olivine and liquid is independent of cooling rate, temperature, and pressure. Comparison of the olivine nucleation densities in the lunar sample and in the experiments indicates that the sample began cooling at about 1 deg C/hr. Pyroxene size, chemistry, and growth instability spacings, as well as groundmass coarseness, all suggest that the cooling rate subsequently decreased by as much as a factor of 10 or more. The porphyritic texture of this sample, then, is produced at a decreasing, rather than a discontinuously increasing, cooling rate.

  11. ANALISA PRODUKTIFITAS PEKERJA DENGAN METODE WORK SAMPLING STUDI KASUS PADA PROYEK X DAN Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Andi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods that can be employed to measure construction labor productivity. However it is difficult to measure accurately the labor productivity. Work sampling is a relatively easy- to-use method for measuring productivity. The main objective of this research is to analyze labor productivity on projects X and Y utilizing work sampling method. The productivity measure obtained from the analysis is labor utilization rate (LUR. Besides, this research is intended to investigate factors influencing the LUR in both projects by way of questionnaire. The work sampling analysis shows that in overall LUR of project X and Y was 55.13% and 44.45% respectively. Comparison of LUR on the same types of works indicates that productivity of project X was higher. The questionnaire analysis further confirms that in general the conditions of the influencing factors in project X were better that those in project Y, and that three factors were found significantly different, i.e. material, scaffolding and schedule. The research also details LUR analyses based on the labor working hours (morning, noon, and afternoon. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Terdapat banyak metode yang bisa digunakan untuk mengukur produktivitas tenaga kerja di lapangan. Namun, pengukuran produktivitas tenaga kerja secara akurat sulit dilakukan. Work sampling adalah salah satu metode pendekatan yang bisa digunakan untuk mengukur produktivitas dengan cukup mudah. Tujuan utama dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menganalisa produktivitas pekerja pada proyek X dan Y dengan metode work sampling. Ukuran produktivitas yang didapat dari analisa ini adalah labor utilization rate (LUR. Selain itu, penelitian ini juga meninjau faktor-faktor yang dapat mempengaruhi LUR di kedua proyek tersebut dengan cara kuesioner. Hasil analisa work sampling menunjukkan bahwa secara keseluruhan LUR pada proyek X dan Y adalah 55,13% dan 44,45%, secara berturut-turut. Perbandingan nilai LUR pada jenis pekerjaan

  12. Personality disorders in a sample of paraphilic and nonparaphilic child molesters: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Stefan; Daalder, Annelies; Vanheule, Stijn; Desmet, Mattias; Leeuw, Frans

    2008-02-01

    This article renders the results of research that investigated personality disorders in a sample of paraphilic and nonparaphilic child molesters. The sample contained 36 paraphilic child molesters and a matched comparison group of 34 nonparaphilic child molesters. The analyses of the research results show that four personality disorders discriminate between both groups. Only the obsessive-compulsive personality disorder contributes significantly to the explanation of paraphilic child molestation. This result also contributes to the development and differentiation of the treatment of paraphilia-related disorders. For several child molesters, psychological approaches to the treatment of sexual offending (e.g., cognitive-behavioral treatment, psychotherapy in general) are limited and cannot be expected to immediately reduce risk. Interest has been expressed in medical approaches to reduce recidivism, in combination with psychotherapy.

  13. In vitro studies on flubromazolam metabolism and detection of its metabolites in authentic forensic samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noble, Carolina; Mardal, Marie; Holm, Niels Bjerre

    2017-01-01

    -resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). In vitro investigations were carried out in pooled human liver microsomes (pHLM) and recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP)-enzymes. To confirm those metabolites detected in vitro, authentic samples obtained from two forensic cases were also analyzed by LC-HRMS. Additionally......, determination of the unbound fraction of flubromazolam in pHLM and in plasma was performed by equilibrium dialysis with subsequent prediction of its hepatic clearance (CLH ) using well-stirred and parallel-tube models. Additional findings obtained by routine screening methods of these forensic cases are also......-stirred and parallel-tube models were 0.42 and 0.43 mL/min/kg, respectively. Based on the data presented here, flubromazolam is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4/5 with a high protein-binding and a predicted low clearance. Analysis of authentic samples suggested that analytical targets for flubromazolam should...

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy for the study of paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy constitute promising technique for biomedical applications as a complementary and powerful tool for diseases screening specially for early cancer diagnostic. The THz radiation is not harmful to biological tissues. As increased blood supply in cancer-affected tissues and consequent local increase in tissue water content makes THz technology a potentially attractive. In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The work shows the capability of the technique to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  15. Comparative study of sampling strategies for sparse photon multispectral lidar imaging: towards mosaic filter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Rachael; Altmann, Yoann; Ren, Ximing; McCarthy, Aongus; Lamb, Robert A.; McLaughlin, Stephen; Buller, Gerald S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the recovery of range and spectral profiles associated with remote three-dimensional scenes sensed via single-photon multispectral lidar (MSL). We consider two different spatial/spectral sampling strategies and compare their performance for a similar overall number of detected photons. For a regular spatial grid of pixels, the first strategy consists of sampling all the spatial locations of the grid for each of the L wavelengths. The second strategy is consistent with the use of mosaic filter-based arrays and consists of acquiring only one wavelength (out of L) per spatial location. Despite the reduction of spectral content observed in each location, the second strategy has clear potential advantages for fast multispectral imaging using only a single frame read out. We propose a fully automated computational method, adapted for each of the two sampling strategies in order to recover the target range profile, as well as the reflectivity profiles associated with the different wavelengths. These strategies were also assessed with high ambient background. The performance of the two sampling strategies is illustrated using a single-photon MSL system with L = 4 wavelengths (473, 532, 589 and 640 nm). The results presented demonstrate that although the first strategy usually provides more accurate results, the second strategy does not exhibit a significant performance degradation, particularly for sparse photon data (down to 1 photon per pixel on average). These results suggest a way forward for the integration of single-photon detector arrays with mosaic filters for use in a range of emerging photon-starved two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging applications.

  16. A factor-analytic study of the multidimensional sense of humor scale with a portuguese sample

    OpenAIRE

    José, Helena; Parreira, Pedro; James A. Thorson; Allwardt, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Sense of humor has been recognized as an important adaptive mechanism as well as a great strength in dealing with adversity. Individual sense of humor is a multidimensional construct, intimately connected with peoples’ well-being. The purpose of this paper is to validate the use of the Multidimensional Sense of Humor Scale (MSHS) with a Portuguese sample using the principal components factor analysis with Varimax rotation and a correlational analysis. Our findings support a ...

  17. Quality assessment of lymph node sampling in rhabdomyosarcoma: A surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobeck, Inna; Dupree, Phylicia; Karns, Rebekah; Rodeberg, David; von Allmen, Daniel; Dasgupta, Roshni

    2017-04-01

    Lymph node sampling is integral in the management of extremity and paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). The aim of this study was to determine overall surgical compliance with treatment protocols and impact of nodal sampling outcomes in these tumors. A query of the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program (SEER) database was performed from 2003 to 2008 for patients sampling. Analysis was performed utilizing chi-squared, Kaplan-Meier and hazard ratio modeling. Of 537 patients with extremity RMS, nodal sampling was performed in 25.7% (n=138). This lack of nodal sampling had a negative outcome on survival (p=0.004). Sixty five patients with paratesticular RMS aged greater than 10 were identified and also displayed low rates of lymph node sampling (47.7%, n=31). For paratesticular patients, a similar increase in survival was seen in patients who underwent nodal evaluation (p=0.024). Lymph node sampling is the standard of care in RMS. However, surgical compliance with treatment protocols is poor. Nodal evaluation correlated significantly with overall survival. These findings suggest a need for improved education among surgeons and oncologists regarding the need lymph node assessment in pediatric oncology patients. Evidence rating/classification: Prognosis study, Level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. External validity study of a personality disorders screening test in a community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas de Francisco Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A screening test for personality disorders was recently developed in Brazil, the Dimensional Clinical Personality Inventory – screening version (IDCP-SV. However, no relationship between this screening measure and other scales or external criteria was tested. Objective To seek for validity evidence based on related criteria (e.g., other psychological tests and external criteria (e.g., sample demographics. Methods Sample comprised 804 participants from São Paulo (Brazil, most female and college students, with mean age equal to 29.65 (SD = 10.73. They answered the IDCP-SV and another screening for personality disorders (IPDS, a depression measure (EBADEP-screening, a scale assessing reasoning for living (EMVIVER, and a self-report for personality disorders categories assessment (SCID-II-PQ. Results IDCP-SV identified 46.4% of community sample as positive for personality disorders. The positive group showed the great mean for almost all comparisions, including psychological tests and the demographics characteristics, including large expressive effect sizes. Discussion Data suggest that the IDCP-SV discriminates a similar percentage of people from the community to what was reported previously using other screening measures; besides, the mean comparisons between groups showed good discriminative capacity by IDCP-SV items.

  19. Compressive Sampling for Efficient Astrophysical Signals Digitizing: From Compressibility Study to Data Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Yosra; Petit, Hervé; Loumeau, Patrick; Cecconi, Baptiste; Desgreys, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The design of a new digital radio receiver for radio astronomical observations in outer space is challenged with energy and bandwidth constraints. This paper proposes a new solution to reduce the number of samples acquired under the Shannon-Nyquist limit while retaining the relevant information of the signal. For this, it proposes to exploit the sparsity of the signal by using a compressive sampling process (also called Compressed Sensing (CS)) at the Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) to reduce the amount of data acquired and the energy consumption. As an example of an astrophysical signal, we have analyzed a real Jovian signal within a bandwidth of 40MHz. We have demonstrated that its best sparsity is in the frequency domain with a sparsity level of at least 10% and we have chosen, through a literature review, the Non-Uniform Sampler (NUS) as the receiver architecture. A method for evaluating the reconstruction of the Jovian signal is implemented to assess the impact of CS compression on the relevant information and to calibrate the detection threshold. Through extensive numerical simulations, and by using Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) as the reconstruction algorithm, we have shown that the Jovian signal could be sensed by taking only 20% of samples at random, while still recovering the relevant information.

  20. Study on natural radionuclide activities in meat samples consumed in Sao Paulo City, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Mychelle M.L.; Taddei, Maria HelenaT. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Avegliano, Roseane P.; Maihara, Vera A., E-mail: mychelle@cnen.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Consumption of food is usually the most important route by which natural and artificial radionuclides can enter the human body. An assessment of radionuclide levels in different foods and diets is therefore important to estimate the intake of these radionuclides by man. The contamination by radionuclides can occur via the food chain (soil, root, plant and animal), with emphasis to the long half-life radionuclides, which can also have their transfer through the animal meat. The inclusion of meat in human nutrition is important because it is an excellent source of high quality protein, nutrient related to construction and cell regeneration. This work aims the determination of natural radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 228}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb) in meat samples. Five groups of samples were analyzed, such as cattle meat (beef), fish, pork, poultry, and processed meat, after radiochemical separation followed by alpha or alpha beta spectrophotometry, and total count quantification. The determination of these radionuclides is very important because they are products of the natural decay series of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, being easily found in meat samples. (author)

  1. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  2. Metabonomics-Based Study of Clinical Urine Samples in Suboptimal Health with Different Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Zhen Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the urinary biochemistry features of syndromes of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM such as syndrome of stagnation of liver Qi, spleen deficiency, liver Qi stagnation, and spleen deficiency (LSSDS in sub-optimal health status (SHS. Methods. 12 cases for each syndrome group in SHS were selected, 12 subjects were used as a normal control group, and 1H NMR detection was, respectively, carried out, and the data was corrected by the orthogonal signal correction (OSC and then adopted a partial least squares (PLS method for discriminate analysis. Results. The OSC-PLS (ctr analysis results of the nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY detection indicated that the syndromes in SHS could be differentiated, and there were significant differences in the levels of metabolites of the urine samples of the four groups; the biomarkers of LSSDS in SHS were found out. The contents of citric acid (2.54 and 2.66, trimethylamineoxide (3.26, and hippuric acid (3.98, 7.54, 7.58, 7.62, 7.66, 7.82, and 7.86 in the urine samples of LSSDS group were lower than that of the normal control group. Conclusion. There are differences in the 1H-NMR metabolic spectrum of the urine samples of the four groups, and the specific metabolic products of the LSSDS in SHS can be identified from metabonomics analysis.

  3. Retrospective study of noroviruses in samples of diarrhoea from cattle, using the Veterinary Laboratories Agency's Farmfile database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milnes, A S; Binns, S H; Oliver, S L; Bridger, J C

    2007-03-10

    A collaborative study was undertaken by the Veterinary Laboratories Agency (vla) and the Royal Veterinary College (rvc) to determine the prevalence of bovine noroviruses in cattle with diarrhoea. Samples of bovine diarrhoea were provided by the vla from routine diagnostic submissions and a reverse transcription-pcr was used by the rvc to detect the viruses. Epidemiological information about the samples was provided retrospectively by the Farmfile database. Noroviruses were detected in 44 (11 per cent) of the 398 samples tested, and Farmfile data were used to investigate the differences between the positive and negative animals.

  4. Fluorometric quantification of protoporphyrin IX in biological skin samples from in vitro penetration/permeation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábia Cristina Rossetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluorometric analytical method was developed for quantification of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX in skin samples and receptor phase solution after in vitro cutaneous penetration/permeation studies. Analytical conditions used were: excitation and emission wavelengths: 400 nm and 632 nm; bandwidth: 0.5 nm; excitation and emission slits: 10/10. PpIX was recovered from two different layers of skin, the stratum corneum (SC and the epidermis plus dermis ([E+D], by vortex homogenization, probe and bath sonication, using DMSO as an extraction solvent. The detection and quantification limits were 0.002 and 0.005 μg/mL, respectively. The assay was linear from 0.005 - 0.5 μg/mL. The within-day and between-day assay precision and accuracy in DMSO and receptor phase solution were each studied at the two concentration levels 0.04 and 0.2 μg/mL, and 0.01 and 0.08 μg/mL, respectively. The coefficients of variation and deviation from the theoretical values were lower than 5%. The skin recovery of PpIX from SC and [E+D] layers using two different concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 μg/mL were all above 90.0%. The method described has potential application to in vitro penetration/permeation studies of PpIX using porcine skin as a biological membrane model.Um método analítico por espectrofluorimetria foi desenvolvido para quantificar a protoporfirina IX (Pp IX em amostras de pele e fase receptora após a realização de testes in vitro de penetração/permeação cutâneas. As condições analíticas utilizadas foram: comprimentos de onda de excitação e emissão: 400 nm e 632 nm; largura de banda: 0,5 nm; fendas de excitação e emissão: 10/10. A PpIX foi extraída de amostras de estrato córneo (EC e da epiderme sem estrato córneo + derme ([E+D] através da agitação em vórtex e sonicação por haste e banho, utilizando-se o DMSO como solvente extrator. O limite de detecção e quantificação foram, respectivamente, de 0,002 e 0,005 μg/mL. O método mostrou

  5. Determination of total mercury for marine environmental monitoring studies by solid sampling continuum source high resolution atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandjukov, Petko; Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The most critical step in almost all commonly used analytical procedures for Hg determination is the sample preparation due to its extreme volatility. One of the possible solutions of this problem is the application of methods for direct analysis of solid samples. The possibilities for solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) determination of total mercury in various marine environmental samples e.g. sediments and biota are object of the present study. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signal. A calibration technique based on the use of solid standard certified reference materials similar to the nature of the analyzed sample was developed and applied to various CRMs and real samples. This technique allows simple and reliable evaluation of the uncertainty of the result and the metrological characteristics of the method. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines was followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range (0.06 to 25 ng for biota and 0.025 to 4 ng for sediment samples, expressed as total Hg) linearity (confirmed by Student's t-test), bias (1.6-4.3%), repeatability (4-9%), reproducibility (9-11%), and absolute limit of detection (0.025 ng for sediment, 0.096 ng for marine biota) were systematically assessed using solid CRMs. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at 15% for sediment sample and 8.5% for marine biota sample (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results is also presented. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on solid sampling HR CS AAS technique was demonstrated by direct analysis of sea sediments form the Caribbean region and various CRMs. Overall, the use of solid sampling HR CS AAS permits obtaining significant advantages for the determination of this complex analyte in marine samples, such as straightforward

  6. A method for under-sampled ecological network data analysis: plant-pollination as case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B. Sorensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a method, termed the Interaction Distribution (ID method, for analysis of quantitative ecological network data. In many cases, quantitative network data sets are under-sampled, i.e. many interactions are poorly sampled or remain unobserved. Hence, the output of statistical analyses may fail to differentiate between patterns that are statistical artefacts and those which are real characteristics of ecological networks. The ID method can support assessment and inference of under-sampled ecological network data. In the current paper, we illustrate and discuss the ID method based on the properties of plant-animal pollination data sets of flower visitation frequencies. However, the ID method may be applied to other types of ecological networks. The method can supplement existing network analyses based on two definitions of the underlying probabilities for each combination of pollinator and plant species: (1, pi,j: the probability for a visit made by the i’th pollinator species to take place on the j’th plant species; (2, qi,j: the probability for a visit received by the j’th plant species to be made by the i’th pollinator. The method applies the Dirichlet distribution to estimate these two probabilities, based on a given empirical data set. The estimated mean values for pi,j and qi,j reflect the relative differences between recorded numbers of visits for different pollinator and plant species, and the estimated uncertainty of pi,j and qi,j decreases with higher numbers of recorded visits.

  7. Study of DNA damage with a new system for irradiation of samples in a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: mrgual@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, InSTEC, Avenida Salvador Allende y Luaces, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza de la Revolucion, Havana, AP 6163 (Cuba); Milian, Felix M. [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, UESC (Brazil); Deppman, Airton [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, no. 187, Ciudade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, Paulo R.P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we report results of a quantitative analysis of the effects of neutrons on DNA, and, specifically, the production of simple and double breaks of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of free-radical scavengers. The radiation damage to DNA was evaluated by electrophoresis through agarose gels. The neutron and gamma doses were measured separately with thermoluminescent detectors. In this work, we have also demonstrated usefulness of a new system for positioning and removing samples in channel BH3 of the IEA-R1 reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Brazil) without necessity of interrupting the reactor operation.

  8. Sampling theory applied to measurement and analysis of temperature for climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howard B.

    1987-01-01

    Of all the errors discussed in climatology literature, aliasing errors caused by undersampling of unsmoothed or improperly smoothed temperature data seem to be completely overlooked. This is a serious oversight in view of long-term trends of 1 K or less. Adequate sampling of properly smoothed data is demonstrated with a Hamming digital filter. It is also demonstrated that hourly temperatures, daily averages, and annual averages free of aliasing errors can be obtained by use of a microprocessor added to standard weather sensors and recorders.

  9. Chapter A10. Lakes and reservoirs: Guidelines for study design and sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, William R.; Robertson, Dale M.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2015-09-29

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual, NFM) is an online report with separately published chapters that provides the protocols and guidelines by which U.S. Geological Survey personnel obtain the data used to assess the quality of the Nation’s surface-water and groundwater resources. Chapter 10 reviews limnological principles, describes the characteristics that distinguish lakes from reservoirs, and provides guidance for developing temporal and spatial sampling strategies and data-collection approaches to be used in lake and reservoir environmental investigations.

  10. Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions. To evaluate the potential environment on the surface of the canisters, SNL is working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to collect and analyze dust samples from the surface of in-service SNF storage canisters. In FY 13, SNL analyzed samples from the Calvert Cliffs Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI); here, results are presented for samples collected from two additional near-marine ISFSI sites, Hope Creek NJ, and Diablo Canyon CA. The Hope Creek site is located on the shores of the Delaware River within the tidal zone; the water is brackish and wave action is normally minor. The Diablo Canyon site is located on a rocky Pacific Ocean shoreline with breaking waves. Two types of samples were collected: SaltSmart™ samples, which leach the soluble salts from a known surface area of the canister, and dry pad samples, which collected a surface salt and dust using a swipe method with a mildly abrasive ScotchBrite™ pad. The dry samples were used to characterize the mineralogy and texture of the soluble and insoluble components in the dust via microanalytical techniques, including mapping X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. For both Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon canisters, dust loadings were much higher on the flat upper surfaces of the canisters than on the vertical sides. Maximum dust sizes collected at both sites were slightly larger than 20 μm, but Phragmites grass seeds ~1 mm in size, were observed on the tops of the Hope Creek canisters

  11. Quantification of damage in DNA recovered from highly degraded samples – a case study on DNA in faeces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveson J Paige

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poorly preserved biological tissues have become an important source of DNA for a wide range of zoological studies. Measuring the quality of DNA obtained from these samples is often desired; however, there are no widely used techniques available for quantifying damage in highly degraded DNA samples. We present a general method that can be used to determine the frequency of polymerase blocking DNA damage in specific gene-regions in such samples. The approach uses quantitative PCR to measure the amount of DNA present at several fragment sizes within a sample. According to a model of random degradation the amount of available template will decline exponentially with increasing fragment size in damaged samples, and the frequency of DNA damage (λ can be estimated by determining the rate of decline. Results The method is illustrated through the analysis of DNA extracted from sea lion faecal samples. Faeces contain a complex mixture of DNA from several sources and different components are expected to be differentially degraded. We estimated the frequency of DNA damage in both predator and prey DNA within individual faecal samples. The distribution of fragment lengths for each target fit well with the assumption of a random degradation process and, in keeping with our expectations, the estimated frequency of damage was always less in predator DNA than in prey DNA within the same sample (mean λpredator = 0.0106 per nucleotide; mean λprey = 0.0176 per nucleotide. This study is the first to explicitly define the amount of template damage in any DNA extracted from faeces and the first to quantify the amount of predator and prey DNA present within individual faecal samples. Conclusion We present an approach for characterizing mixed, highly degraded PCR templates such as those often encountered in ecological studies using non-invasive samples as a source of DNA, wildlife forensics investigations and ancient DNA research. This method will

  12. Citizenship among a Sample of Hearing and Hearing Impaired Kindergarten's Children in Al-Riyadh Saudi Arabia "Comparative Study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkestani, Maryam Hafez; Bahatheg, Raja' Omar

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying statistically significant differences in citizenship between Saudi hearing and hearing impaired children. The study sample consisted of (167) hearing and (42) hearing impaired children at public kindergartens in Al-Riyadh city, (82) of whom were males and (127) were female children. Data was collected using…

  13. Cellulose Acetate Replica Cleaning Study of Genesis Non-Flight Sample 3CZ00327

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Schmeling, M.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allton, J. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind and brought it back to Earth in order to provide precise knowledge of solar isotopic and elemental compositions. The ions in the solar wind were stopped in the collectors at depths on the order of 10 to a few hundred nanometers. This shallow implantation layer is critical for scientific analysis of the composition of the solar wind and must be preserved throughout sample handling, cleaning, processing, distribution, preparation and analysis. We are working interactively with the community of scientists analyzing Genesis samples, using our unique laboratory facilities -- and, where needed, our unique cleaning techniques -- to significantly enhance the science return from the Genesis mission. This work is motivated by the need to understand the submicron contamination on the collectors in the Genesis payload as recovered from the crash site in the Utah desert, and -- perhaps more importantly -- how to remove it. That is, we are evaluating the effectiveness of the wet-chemical "cleaning" steps used by various investigators, to enable them to design improved methods of stripping terrestrial contamination from surfaces while still leaving the solar-wind signal intact.

  14. Determining {sup 241}Pu in environmental samples. Case studies in alpine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcho Alvarado, J.A.; Chawla, F.; Froidevaux, P. [Lausanne Univ. Hospital Center (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiation Physics

    2011-07-01

    A procedure was developed for determining {sup 241}Pu activity in environmental samples. This beta emitter isotope of plutonium was measured by ultra low level liquid scintillation, after several separation and purification steps that involved the use of a highly selective extraction chromatographic resin (Eichrom-TEVA). Due to the lack of reference material for {sup 241}Pu, the method was nevertheless validated using four IAEA reference sediments with information values for {sup 241}Pu. Next, the method was used to determine the {sup 241}Pu activity in alpine soils of Switzerland and France. The {sup 241}Pu/{sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239,240}Pu activity ratios confirmed that Pu contamination in the tested alpine soils originated mainly from global fallout from nuclear weapon tests conducted in the fifties and sixties. Estimation of the date of the contamination, using the {sup 241}Pu/{sup 241}Am age-dating method, further confirmed this origin. However, the {sup 241}Pu/{sup 241}Am dating method was limited to samples where Pu-Am fractionation was insignificant. If any, the contribution of the Chernobyl accident is negligible. (orig.)

  15. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample. A 753 cases study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasis-Sarmiento, Luis; Portilla-Robertson, Javier; Melendez-Ocampo, Arcelia; Gaitan-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Leyva-Huerta, Elba-Rosa

    2017-04-01

    Odontogenic cysts (OC) are the most frequent lesions of the jaws and their constant epidemiological update is necessary and indispensable. Therefore the principal objective of this report was To determine prevalence and clinical-demographical characteristics of OC in a Mexican sample. 753 cases of OC coming from the archive of a head and neck histopathological teaching service, from January 2000 to December 2013, were included. OC cases were re-assessed according 2005 WHO classification. Chi square test was used to establish possible associations (pRadicular cysts were more frequent in maxillary anterior zone of females (p 0.0002) at their fourth decade of life. Dentigerous cysts were more frequent in the mandibular posterior zone of males (p 0.0000) in their second decade of life. Six cases of periodontal lateral cyst; 4 cases of paradental cysts; 4 eruption cysts and 4 cases of adult gingival cyst, as well were identified. Radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst are the most prevalent odontogenic cyst in this Mexican sample. Due to their etiology, dental pulpar necrosis and impacted teeth, radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst could be prevenible. Therefore, it is necessary to establish preventive strategies to diminish dental decay and programs of prophylactic extractions of impacted teeth, to in consequence decrease the prevalence of odontogenic cysts. Key words:Cyst, dentigerous cyst, mexican, odontogenic cyst, radicular cyst.

  16. Photoacoustic as a unique tool for studying multicomponent gas transport processes through rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    András Simon, Károly; Puskás, Sándor; Ricza, Tamás; Bozóki, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Improvement of natural gas extraction is one of the constant challenges of gas industry. Gas transport through the material of the reservoir is driven by two forces. Conventional diffusion driven by the concentration gradient and the Darcy flow driven by the differential pressure at the two ends of the material. Their segregated yield and their interrelation is largely influenced by the intrinsic structure of the sample so their measurement can yield important information There are multiple methods for measuring these parameters (Sander et al, 2017). We present a measurement set-up which uses photoacoustic spectroscopy for the detection of the transported components. It is a highly sensitive and selective measurement method (Bozóki et al., 2011) and can be used to measure concentration through 4-5 orders of magnitudes. Furthermore it can be operated fully automatically, has response time in the second range and outstanding long term stability. This allows us to perform measurements on a wide variety of samples either in static or in dynamic mode under different conditions and various analytes. Furthermore transport of several gas components can be measured simultaneously. Our set-up facilities measurements in a wide pressure, temperature and concentration range. Bozóki Z., Pogány A., Szabó G. (2011), Applied Spectroscopy Reviews 46, 1-37 Sander, R., Pan, Z. and Connell, Luke D. (2017), Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering 37, 248-279.

  17. A non-destructive sampling protocol for field studies of seed dispersal by fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, S B; Anderson, J T

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a standardized protocol for the non-lethal capture of fishes, sampling of stomach contents and quantification of seed dispersal efficiency by frugivorous fishes. Neotropical pacu Piaractus mesopotamicus individuals were collected with fruit-baited hooks. The diets of 110 fish were sampled using a lavage method, which retrieved >90% of stomach contents of both juveniles and adults and allowed individuals to recover within 5 min of treatment. The proportional volume of six food categories was similar for stomachs and whole digestive tracts retrieved by dissection. Fruit pulp was proportionally lower in the stomach. The abundance and species richness of intact seeds increased with fish size independent of whether only stomachs or whole digestive tracts were analysed. The analysis of stomach contents accounted for 62·5% of the total species richness of seeds dispersed by P. mesopotamicus and 96% of common seeds (seed species retrieved from more than one fish). Germination trials revealed that seed viability was similar for seeds collected from the stomach via lavage and seeds that passed through the entire digestive tract. Therefore, stomach contents provide an unbiased representation of the dietary patterns and seed dispersal of frugivorous fishes. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. Metacognitive training in patients recovering from a first psychosis: an experience sampling study testing treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pos, Karin; Meijer, Carin J; Verkerk, Oukje; Ackema, Onno; Krabbendam, Lydia; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation in patients with recent onset psychosis in a powerful experience sampling design. 50 patients between the age of 18 and 35 were included in a single-blind, parallel group RCT comparing MCT with occupational therapy (OT) as an active control condition. We assessed via questionnaires and experience sampling treatment effects on paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, the cognitive bias jumping to conclusion (JTC), and cognitive insight, as well as treatment effects on associations between negative affect, negative self-esteem and paranoid ideation. Patients in the MCT group did not show a decrease in paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, JTC-bias or an increase in cognitive insight compared with OT. However, negative affect showed a weaker association with paranoid ideation post-treatment in the MCT condition. In the OT condition, this association was stronger post-treatment. We tentatively suggest that patients with an early psychosis seemed to benefit from MCT in emotional learning compared with the OT condition. Despite the fact that the group training is well-received by patients, subsequent individual MCT (MCT+) may be indicated for stronger favorable effects on paranoid ideation.

  19. Multi-spectral study of a new sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Doublier, V; Comte, G

    1999-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.124, no.3, p.405-24 (1997). We present the results of surface photometry on a new sample of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs), in continuation to a previous paper (Doublier et al. 1997). The 22 galaxies $9 (plus two companions) discussed in the present paper have been selected in the Southern Hemisphere, from several lists. An atlas containing isophotal maps, surface brightnesses and B-R color profiles of the sample is given, together $9 with the tables containing the photometric parameters. The results are consistent with those for objects selected from the Byurakan surveys in the Northern Hemisphere. Similarly, we find about one fourth of the BCDGs showing a $9 dominant r/sup 1/4/ brightness distribution component, one fourth of the BCDGs showing a dominant exponential surface brightness profile, and about half of them show composite brightness distributions. Integrated properties, colors, $9 mean surface brightnesses and luminosity-radius relations are investigated and discussed f...

  20. Performance evaluation of continuous blood sampling system for PET study. Comparison of three detector-systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, K; Sakamoto, S; Senda, M; Yamamoto, S; Tarutani, K; Minato, K

    2002-01-01

    To measure cerebral blood flow with sup 1 sup 5 O PET, it is necessary to measure the time course of arterial blood radioactivity. We examined the performance of three different types of continuous blood sampling system. Three kinds of continuous blood sampling system were used: a plastic scintillator-based beta detector (conventional beta detector (BETA)), a bismuth germinate (BGO)-based coincidence gamma detector (Pico-count flow-through detector (COINC)) and a Phoswich detector (PD) composed by a combination of plastic scintillator and BGO scintillator. Performance of these systems was evaluated for absolute sensitivity, count rate characteristic, sensitivity to background gamnra photons, and reproducibility for nylon tube geometry. The absolute sensitivity of the PD was 0.21 cps/Bq for sup 6 sup 8 Ga positrons at the center of the detector. This was approximately three times higher than BETA, two times higher than COINC. The value measured with BETA was stable, even when background radioactivity was incre...

  1. A simulation study of control sampling methods for nested case-control studies of genetic and molecular biomarkers and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Hsi; Shugart, Yin Yao; Cole, Stephen R; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2009-03-01

    Incidence density sampling is typically the least biased efficient method for control sampling in nested case-control studies. However, in studies of genetic variants and prostate cancer progression, some argue that controls should be sampled from men who did not progress by end of follow-up. Thus, we examined the validity of relative risk (RR) estimates of prostate cancer progression using three methods for control sampling from cohorts of men with prostate cancer generated by Monte Carlo simulation. Data were simulated for nine scenarios for combinations of genotype frequency (10%, 30%, and 50%) and association (RR, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) using prostate progression rates from Johns Hopkins Hospital. RRs estimated from conditional logistic regression for the genetic association from case-control studies nested in the nine cohort scenarios using three control sampling methods, (a) incidence density sampling, (b) incidence density sampling without replacement of selected controls, and (c) "pure" control sampling (i.e., men who did not progress by end of long-term follow-up), were compared with the true RRs. Use of controls selected by incidence density sampling produced unbiased RR estimates of progression. In our setting, only a slight bias was produced by use of incidence density sampling without replacement. In contrast, use of controls selected by pure control sampling produced biased RR estimates, except when there was no association; extent of bias increased with increasing size of the association and duration of follow-up. Nested case-control studies designed to estimate the association of genetic variants with risk of prostate cancer progression should use incidence density sampling to provide a valid RR estimate.

  2. RNA pre-amplification enables large-scale RT-qPCR gene-expression studies on limiting sample amounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Joëlle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR is a widely utilized method for gene-expression analysis. However, insufficient material often compromises large-scale gene-expression studies. The aim of this study is to evaluate an RNA pre-amplification method to produce micrograms of cDNA as input for qPCR. Findings The linear isothermal Ribo-SPIA pre-amplification method (WT-Ovation; NuGEN was first evaluated by measuring the expression of 20 genes in RNA samples from six neuroblastoma cell lines and of 194 genes in two commercially available reference RNA samples before and after pre-amplification, and subsequently applied on a large panel of 738 RNA samples extracted from neuroblastoma tumours. All RNA samples were evaluated for RNA integrity and purity. Starting from 5 to 50 nanograms of total RNA the sample pre-amplification method was applied, generating approximately 5 microgams of cDNA, sufficient to measure more than 1000 target genes. The results obtained from this study show a constant yield of pre-amplified cDNA independent of the amount of input RNA; preservation of differential gene-expression after pre-amplification without introduction of substantial bias; no co-amplification of contaminating genomic DNA; no necessity to purify the pre-amplified material; and finally the importance of good RNA quality to enable pre-amplification. Conclusion Application of this unbiased and easy to use sample pre-amplification technology offers great advantage to generate sufficient material for diagnostic and prognostic work-up and enables large-scale qPCR gene-expression studies using limited amounts of sample material.

  3. Comparative study of methods for DNA preparation from olive oil samples to identify cultivar SSR alleles in commercial oil samples: possible forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Catherine; Claux, Delphine; Metton, Isabelle; Skorski, Gilbert; Bervillé, André

    2004-02-11

    Virgin olive oil is made from diverse cultivars either mixed or single. Those ensure different tastes and typicity, and these may be also enhanced by the region of production of cultivars. The different olive oil labels correspond to their chemical composition and acidity. Labels also may correspond to a protected origin indication, and thus, such oils contain a given composition in cultivars. To verify the main cultivars used at the source of an olive oil sample, our method is based on DNA technology. DNA is present in all olive oil samples and even in refined oil, but the quantity may depend on the oil processing technology and oil conservation conditions. Thus, several supports were used to retain DNA checking different techniques (silica extraction, hydroxyapatite, magnetic beads, and spun column) to prepare DNA from variable amounts of oil. At this stage, it was usable for amplification through PCR technology and especially with the magnetic beads, and further purification processes were checked. Finally, the final method used magnetic beads. DNA is released from beads in a buffer. Once purified, we showed that it did not contain compounds inhibiting PCR amplification using SSR primers. Aliquot dilution fractions of this solution were successfully routinely used through PCR with different SSR primer sets. This enables confident detection of eventual alien alleles in oil samples. First applied to virgin oil samples of known composition, either single cultivars or mixtures of them, the method was verified working on commercial virgin oil samples using bottles bought in supermarkets. Last, we defined a protocol starting from 2 x 40 mL virgin olive oil, and DNA was prepared routinely in about 5 h. It was convenient to genotype together several loci per sample to check whether alleles were in accordance with those of expected cultivars. Thus, forensic applications of our method are expected. However, the method needs further improvement to work on all oil samples.

  4. Study of DNA damage with a new system for irradiation of samples in a nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gual, Maritza R; Milian, Felix M; Deppman, Airton; Coelho, Paulo R P

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we report results of a quantitative analysis of the effects of neutrons on DNA, and, specifically, the production of simple and double breaks of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of free-radical scavengers. The radiation damage to DNA was evaluated by electrophoresis through agarose gels. The neutron and gamma doses were measured separately with thermoluminescent detectors. In this work, we have also demonstrated usefulness of a new system for positioning and removing samples in channel BH#3 of the IEA-R1 reactor at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (Brazil) without necessity of interrupting the reactor operation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein-ligand docking using FFT based sampling: D3R case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhorny, Dzmitry; Hall, David R.; Mirzaei, Hanieh; Mamonov, Artem B.; Moghadasi, Mohammad; Alekseenko, Andrey; Beglov, Dmitri; Kozakov, Dima

    2017-11-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) based approaches have been successful in application to modeling of relatively rigid protein-protein complexes. Recently, we have been able to adapt the FFT methodology to treatment of flexible protein-peptide interactions. Here, we report our latest attempt to expand the capabilities of the FFT approach to treatment of flexible protein-ligand interactions in application to the D3R PL-2016-1 challenge. Based on the D3R assessment, our FFT approach in conjunction with Monte Carlo minimization off-grid refinement was among the top performing methods in the challenge. The potential advantage of our method is its ability to globally sample the protein-ligand interaction landscape, which will be explored in further applications.

  6. Moganite in selected Polish chert samples: the evidence from MIR, Raman and X-ray studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitarz, M; Wyszomirski, P; Handke, B; Jeleń, P

    2014-03-25

    The authors discuss the results of structural investigations (XRD, MIR, Raman) of Polish cherts from different geological formations. The X-ray diffraction analyses explicitly confirmed the presence of moganite, which was identified on the basis of satellite XRD peaks positioned/occurring close to the quartz reflections and the additional reflections with the dhkl values 4.456 and 3.101 Ǻ, and established its amounts as varying between about 1 and above 17 wt%. The mid-infrared and Raman spectroscopy also proved the presence of moganite, indicated by the 695 and 560-555 cm(-)(1) bands, respectively. These analytical finds allow to identify moganite in samples containing various SiO2 polymorphs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein–ligand docking using FFT based sampling: D3R case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhorny, Dzmitry; Hall, David R.; Mirzaei, Hanieh; Mamonov, Artem B.; Moghadasi, Mohammad; Alekseenko, Andrey; Beglov, Dmitri; Kozakov, Dima

    2018-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) based approaches have been successful in application to modeling of relatively rigid protein-protein complexes. Recently, we have been able to adapt the FFT methodology to treatment of flexible protein-peptide interactions. Here, we report our latest attempt to expand the capabilities of the FFT approach to treatment of flexible protein-ligand interactions in application to the D3R PL-2016-1 challenge. Based on the D3R assessment, our FFT approach in conjunction with Monte Carlo minimization off-grid refinement was among the top performing methods in the challenge. The potential advantage of our method is its ability to globally sample the protein-ligand interaction landscape, which will be explored in further applications.

  8. Protein-ligand docking using FFT based sampling: D3R case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhorny, Dzmitry; Hall, David R; Mirzaei, Hanieh; Mamonov, Artem B; Moghadasi, Mohammad; Alekseenko, Andrey; Beglov, Dmitri; Kozakov, Dima

    2018-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) based approaches have been successful in application to modeling of relatively rigid protein-protein complexes. Recently, we have been able to adapt the FFT methodology to treatment of flexible protein-peptide interactions. Here, we report our latest attempt to expand the capabilities of the FFT approach to treatment of flexible protein-ligand interactions in application to the D3R PL-2016-1 challenge. Based on the D3R assessment, our FFT approach in conjunction with Monte Carlo minimization off-grid refinement was among the top performing methods in the challenge. The potential advantage of our method is its ability to globally sample the protein-ligand interaction landscape, which will be explored in further applications.

  9. Comprehensive study of unexpected microscope condensers formed in sample arrangements commonly used in optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Darshan B; Aldawsari, Mabkhoot Mudith S; Alharbi, Bandar Mohammed H; Sen, Sanchari; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We show that various setups for optical microscopy which are commonly used in biomedical laboratories behave like efficient microscope condensers that are responsible for observed subwavelength resolution. We present a series of experiments and simulations that reveal how inclined illumination from such unexpected condensers occurs when the sample is perpendicularly illuminated by a microscope's built-in white-light source. In addition, we demonstrate an inexpensive add-on optical module that serves as an efficient and lightweight microscope condenser. Using such add-on optical module in combination with a low-numerical-aperture objective lens and Fourier plane imaging microscopy technique, we demonstrate detection of photonic crystals with a period nearly eight times smaller than the Rayleigh resolution limit.

  10. Social Representations of Hero and Everyday Hero: A Network Study from Representative Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keczer, Zsolt; File, Bálint; Orosz, Gábor; Zimbardo, Philip G

    2016-01-01

    The psychological investigation of heroism is relatively new. At this stage, inductive methods can shed light on its main aspects. Therefore, we examined the social representations of Hero and Everyday Hero by collecting word associations from two separate representative samples in Hungary. We constructed two networks from these word associations. The results show that the social representation of Hero is more centralized and it cannot be divided into smaller units. The network of Everyday Hero is divided into five units and the significance moves from abstract hero characteristics to concrete social roles and occupations exhibiting pro-social values. We also created networks from the common associations of Hero and Everyday Hero. The structures of these networks show a moderate similarity and the connections are more balanced in case of Everyday Hero. While heroism in general can be the source of inspiration, the promotion of everyday heroism can be more successful in encouraging ordinary people to recognize their own potential for heroic behavior.

  11. Mixing studies in lupus anticoagulant testing are required at least in some type of samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devreese, K M J; de Laat, B

    2015-08-01

    According to the ISTH guidelines for lupus anticoagulant (LAC) testing, the second step in the three-step procedure (screening, mixing, and confirmation) is the mixing test, which improves the discrimination between the presence of an inhibitor and coagulation factor deficiencies such as those occurring in patients receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). From a retrospective analysis of dilute Russell viper venom (dRVVT) results, we evaluated the impact of the mixing test result on the interpretation of LAC positivity. We interpreted the dRVVT clotting times with and without taking into account the results of the mixing test in a patient population with prolonged screening test (n = 267) with special attention to the patients receiving VKAs. The number of samples classified as 'LAC positive' differed substantially depending on the method of interpretation; 170 and 235 of 267 samples were classified as LAC positive with the three- and two-step procedure, respectively. Discrepancy between the two-step (without mixing step) and the three-step procedure was due to not including a mixing test and was more pronounced in the VKA patient population. Screen/confirm ratios carried out on a 1:1 mix of patient and normal pooled plasma (NPP) gave a lower incidence of 59 of 267. We advise continuing to perform mixing test to avoid false-positives. In patients with discrepant results between the two- and three-step dRVVT interpretation, mainly observed in VKA-treated patients, we advise retesting of the patients preferable beyond the period of anticoagulant therapy and additional testing for anti-beta2GPI and/or anti-cardiolipin antibodies. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies: Comparing lipids and metabolites in serum and DBS samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Jennifer E. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Casey, Cameron P. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Stratton, Kelly G. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Zink, Erika M. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Kim, Young-Mo [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Zheng, Xueyun [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Monroe, Matthew E. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Weitz, Karl K. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Bloodsworth, Kent J. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Orton, Daniel J. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Ibrahim, Yehia M. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Moore, Ronald J. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Lee, Christine G. [Department of Medicine, Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA; Research Service, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland OR USA; Pedersen, Catherine [Department of Medicine, Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA; Orwoll, Eric [Department of Medicine, Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA; Smith, Richard D. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Baker, Erin S. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-02-05

    The use of dried blood spots (DBS) has many advantages over traditional plasma and serum samples such as smaller blood volume required, storage at room temperature, and ability for sampling in remote locations. However, understanding the robustness of different analytes in DBS samples is essential, especially in older samples collected for longitudinal studies. Here we analyzed DBS samples collected in 2000-2001 and stored at room temperature and compared them to matched serum samples stored at -80°C to determine if they could be effectively used as specific time points in a longitudinal study following metabolic disease. Four hundred small molecules were identified in both the serum and DBS samples using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS) and LC-ion mobility spectrometry-MS (LC-IMS-MS). The identified polar metabolites overlapped well between the sample types, though only one statistically significant polar metabolite in a case-control study was conserved, indicating degradation occurs in the DBS samples affecting quantitation. Differences in the lipid identifications indicated that some oxidation occurs in the DBS samples. However, thirty-six statistically significant lipids correlated in both sample types indicating that lipid quantitation was more stable across the sample types.

  13. A Sample Application for Use of Biography in Social Studies; Science, Technology and Social Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Harun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opinions of social studies teacher candidates on use of biography in science, technology and social change course given in the undergraduate program of social studies education. In this regard, convergent parallel design as a mixed research pattern was used to make use of both qualitative and quantitative…

  14. Assessing study skills among a sample of university students: an Iranian survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Didarloo

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: Although the majority of the participants had moderate study skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above.

  15. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A.; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far. Objective Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon. Results Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE) were analyzed by LC–QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01). The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones. Conclusions The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied

  16. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far. Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon. Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE) were analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01). The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones. The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied conditions, liophilization provides extracts

  17. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Ledesma-Escobar

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far.Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon.Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE, ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE were analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01. The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01 showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones.The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied conditions, liophilization provides

  18. An empirical examination of respondent driven sampling design effects among HIV risk groups from studies conducted around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lisa G; Chen, Yea-Hung; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Raymond, H Fisher

    2013-07-01

    For studies using respondent driven sampling (RDS), the current practice of collecting a sample twice as large as that used in simple random sampling (SRS) (i.e. design effect of 2.00) may not be sufficient. This paper provides empirical evidence of sample-to-sample variability in design effects using data from nine studies in six countries among injecting drug users, female sex workers, men who have sex with men and male-to-female transgender (MTF) persons. We computed the design effect as the variance under RDS divided by the variance under SRS for a broad range of demographic and behavioral variables in each study. We also estimated several measures for each variable in each study that we hypothesized might be related to design effect: the number of waves needed for equilibrium, homophily, and mean network size. Design effects for all studies ranged from 1.20 to 5.90. Mean design effects among all studies ranged from 1.50 to 3.70. A particularly high design effect was found for employment status (design effect of 5.90) of MTF in Peru. This may be explained by a "bottleneck"--defined as the occurrence of a relatively small number of recruitment ties between two groups in the population. A design effect of two for RDS studies may not be sufficient. Since