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Sample records for samarium 145

  1. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  2. Particle-Size-Induced Valence Changes in Samarium Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, M. G.; Lee, S. -T.; Apai, G.; Davis, R. F.; Shirley, D. A.; Franciosi, A.; Weaver, J. H.

    1981-09-01

    Samarium clusters exhibit mixed-valence behavior which is sensitive to particle size. XPS and UPS data show samarium to be primarily divalent (4f{sup 6} ) at small particle size. The trivalent state (4f{sup 5} ) becomes progressively more abundant with increasing s1ze, becoming the dominant state for the bulk metal. These results are interpreted using a model in which band narrowing, due to reduced surface coordination, is more dominant than surface tension effects in establishing the valence of small samarium clusters.

  3. Yellow-green electroluminescence of samarium complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behzad, Sara Karimi; Najafi, Ezzatollah [Department of Chemistry Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, Mostafa M., E-mail: m-pouramini@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janghouri, Mohammad; Mohajerani, Ezeddin [Laser Research Institute Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ng, Seik Weng [Department of Chemistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-12-15

    Four novel samarium complexes were prepared by reacting samarium(III) nitrate with 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline, and 1,10-phenanthroline and utilized as emitting materials in the electroluminescence device. All complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, UV–vis and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopes and the molecular structure of a representative complex, [Sm{sub 2}(Me-HQ){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}] (1), was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Utilization of a π-conjugated (phenanthroline) ligand as a second ligand in the structure of the samarium complexes resulted in red shifts in both absorption and fluorescence spectra of complexes and moderately enhanced the photoluminescence intensity and the fluorescence quantum yield. The maximum emission peaks showed that a good correlation exists between the nature of the substituent group on the 8-hydroxyquinoline and the addition of the π-conjugated ligand in the structure of samarium complexes and emission wavelength. Devices with samarium(III) complexes with structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (90 nm)/PVK:PBD:Sm(III) complexes (75 nm)/Al (180 nm) were fabricated. In the electroluminescence (EL) spectra of the devices, a strong ligand-centered emission and narrow bands arising from the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}→{sup 6}H{sub J} transitions (J=7/2, 9/2, and 11/2) of the samarium ion were observed for the complexes. The electroluminescent spectra of the samarium complexes were red-shifted as compared with the PVK:PBD blend. We believe that the electroluminescence performance of OLED devices based on samarium complexes relies on overlaps between the absorption of the samarium compounds and the emission of PVK:PBD. This revealed that it is possible to evaluate the electroluminescence performance of the samarium compounds-doped OLED devices based on the emission of PVK:PBD and the absorption of the dopants. - Highlights: • Four novel photoluminescence samarium complexes have been synthesized.

  4. Biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in rats treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarim Neto, Arthur; Acucena, Maria Kadja Meneses Torres; Pereira, Kercia Regina Santos Gomes; Rego, Amalia Cinthia Meneses [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Postgraduate Program in Health Sciences; Azevedo, Italo Medeiros; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. of Surgery; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [State University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Biophysics and Biometry

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Many patients with metastatic bone disease have to use radiopharmaceuticals associated with chemotherapy to relieve bone pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of docetaxel on the biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in bones and other organs of rats. Methods: Wistar male rats were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 6 rats each. The DS (docetaxel/samarium) group received docetaxel (15 mg/kg) intraperitoneally in two cycles 11 days apart. The S (samarium/control) group rats were not treated with docetaxel. Nine days after chemotherapy, all the rats were injected with 0.1 ml of samarium-153-EDTMP via orbital plexus (25 {mu} Ci. After 2 hours, the animals were killed and samples of the brain, thyroid, lung, heart, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and both femurs were removed. The percentage radioactivity of each sample (% ATI / g) was determined in an automatic gamma-counter (Wizard-1470, Perkin-Elmer, Finland). Results: On the ninth day after the administration of the second chemotherapy cycle, the rats had a significant weight loss (314.50 +- 22.09 g) compared (p<0.5) to pre-treatment weight (353.66 {+-} 22.8). The % ATI/g in the samples of rats treated with samarium-153-EDTMP had a significant reduction in the right femur, left femur, kidney, liver and lungs of animals treated with docetaxel, compared to the control rats. Conclusion: The combination of docetaxel and samarium-153-EDTMP was associated with a lower response rate in the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical to targeted tissues. Further investigation into the impact of docetaxel on biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP would complement the findings of this study. (author)

  5. The Basis for Developing Samarium AMS for Fuel Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Tumey, S J; Weaver, C J

    2008-10-13

    Modeling of nuclear reactor fuel burnup indicates that the production of samarium isotopes can vary significantly with reactor type and fuel cycle. The isotopic concentrations of {sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, and {sup 151}Sm are potential signatures of fuel reprocessing, if analytical techniques can overcome the inherent challenges of lanthanide chemistry, isobaric interferences, and mass/charge interferences. We review the current limitations in measurement of the target samarium isotopes and describe potential approaches for developing Sm-AMS. AMS sample form and preparation chemistry will be discussed as well as possible spectrometer operating conditions.

  6. Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films deposited by the radio-frequency sputtering technique. A A ATTA M M EL-NAHASS KHALED M ELSABAWY M M ABD EL-RAHEEM A M HASSANIEN A ALHUTHALI ALI BADAWI AMAR MERAZGA. Regular Volume 87 Issue 5 November 2016 Article ID 72 ...

  7. Optical properties of zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium oxide having the chemical composition Sm2O3() ZnO(40-)V2O5(60) (where = 0.1–0.5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. The density of these glasses was measured by Archimedes method; the corresponding molar volumes have also been calculated.

  8. Optical properties of samarium doped zinc–tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Optical properties of samarium doped zinc–tellurite glasses. B ERAIAH. Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003, India. Present address: Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 056, India. MS received 20 March 2006; revised 13 June 2006. Abstract. Glasses with the composition, ...

  9. Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III) dibenzoylmethane complexes: Syntheses, crystal structures, thermal analysis and luminescence study. MUHAMMAD IDIRIS SALEH, MIN YEE CHOO, TAI WEI CHAN and MOHD R RAZALI. ∗. School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, ...

  10. Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 12. Effect of second ligand on the luminescence of Samarium (III) dibenzoylmethane complexes: ... Muhammad Idiris Saleh1 Min Yee Choo1 Tai Wei Chan1 Mohd R Razali1. School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia ...

  11. Dependence of samarium-soil interaction on samarium concentration: Implications for environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Vidal, Miquel; Rigol, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviour of samarium (Sm), an emerging contaminant, was examined in soil samples at varying Sm concentrations. The obtained sorption and desorption parameters revealed that soil possessed a high Sm retention capacity (sorption was higher than 99% and desorption lower than 2%) at low Sm concentrations, whereas at high Sm concentrations, the sorption-desorption behaviour varied among the soil samples tested. The fractionation of the Sm sorbed in soils, obtained by sequential extractions, allowed to suggest the soil properties (pH and organic matter solubility) and phases (organic matter, carbonates and clay minerals) governing the Sm-soil interaction. The sorption models constructed in the present work along with the sorption behaviour of Sm explained in terms of soil main characteristics will allow properly assessing the Sm-soil interaction depending on the contamination scenario under study. Moreover, the sorption and desorption K d values of radiosamarium in soils were strongly correlated with those of stable Sm at low concentrations (r = 0.98); indicating that the mobility of Sm radioisotopes and, thus, the risk of radioactive Sm contamination can be predicted using data from low concentrations of stable Sm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism of the electrochemical deposition of samarium-based coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Edgar J. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Ortega-Borges, Raul [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Godinez, Luis A. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Chapman, Thomas W. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Meas-Vong, Yunny [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: yunnymeas@cideteq.mx

    2006-11-12

    Samarium-based films have been shown to form from aqueous solutions on the surfaces of metallic substrates such as steel or aluminum, and their presence has been reported to decrease substantially the corresponding corrosion rate of the underlying metallic substrate. Based on previous reports on the deposition of oxides or hydroxides of the closely related element cerium, this work demonstrates that samarium films are formed following a similar mechanism, which involves as the fundamental step an increase in interfacial pH resulting from cathodic oxygen-reduction or hydrogen-evolution reactions. With cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements, rotating-disk electrode (RDE) tests, and surface characterization techniques, namely, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray surface microanalysis (EDX), the postulated mechanism was verified, and the surface morphology of the resulting films was correlated with the nature of the reduction reaction that triggers film formation.

  13. Samarium Monosulfide (SmS): Reviewing Properties and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sousanis, Andreas; Smet, Philippe; Poelman, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we give an overview of the properties and applications of samarium monosulfide, SmS, which has gained considerable interest as a switchable material. It shows a pressure-induced phase transition from the semiconducting to the metallic state by polishing, and it switches back to the semiconducting state by heating. The material also shows a magnetic transition, from the paramagnetic state to an antiferromagnetically ordered state. The switching behavior between the semiconducti...

  14. Optical properties of zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Zinc–vanadium glasses doped with samarium oxide having the chemical composition Sm2O3(x). ZnO(40−x)V2O5(60)(where x = 0·1–0·5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching method. The density of these glasses was measured by Archimedes method; the corresponding molar volumes have also been ...

  15. Synthesis of nano-pore samarium (III)-imprinted polymer for preconcentrative separation of samarium ions from other lanthanide ions via solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani-Arani, Simindokht [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tehran, P.O.Box:14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Seyed Javad [Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sjahmadi@aeoi.org.ir; Bahrami-Samani, Ali [Nuclear Engineering and Physics Department, Amir Kabir University, P.O.Box: 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghannadi-Maragheh, Mohammad [Jaber Ibne Hayan Research Laboratories, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box: 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-08-08

    A batch process was developed to separate samarium ions from some lanthanide ions by a novel solid phase which was prepared via the ion-imprinting technique. The samarium (III) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) particles were synthesized by preparing the ternary complex of samarium ions with 5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol (DCQ) and 4-vinylpyridine (VP). Then, thermally copolymerization with styrene (functional monomer, STY) and divinylbenzene (cross-linking monomer, DVB) followed in the presence of 2-methoxy ethanol (porogen) and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator, AIBN). The imprinted ion was removed by stirring the above particles with 50% (v/v) HCl to obtain the leached IIP particles. Moreover, control polymer (CP) particles were similarly prepared without the samarium ions. The unleached and leached IIP particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infra-red spectroscopy (IR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, preconcentration and selectivity studies for samarium and the other lanthanide ions were carried out. The preconcentration of the samarium (III) traces was studied during rebinding with the leached IIP particles as a function of pH, the weight of the polymer material, the preconcentration and the elution times, the eluent volume and the aqueous phase volume. These studies indicated that the samarium (III) amount as low as 1 {mu}g, present in 200 mL, could be preconcentrated into 25 mL of 1.0 M HCl.

  16. Ionization of Samarium by Chemical Releases in the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Caton, R.; Miller, D.; Groves, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The release of Samarium vapor into the upper atmosphere was studied using during the Air Force Research Laboratory sponsored Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) rocket launches in May 2009. The Naval Research Laboratory supported these experiments with 3-D photochemical modeling of the artificial plasma cloud including (1) reactions with atomic oxygen, (2) photo excitation, (3) photoionization, (4) dissociative recombination, and (5) ion and neutral diffusion. NRL provided the experimental diagnostic instrument on the rocket which was a dual frequency radio beacon on the rocket to measure changes in total electron content. The AFRL provided ground based diagnostics of incoherent scatter radar and optical spectroscopy and imagery. The NRL Chemical Release Model (CRM) has over 600 excited states of atomic Samarium neutrals, atomic ions, along with Samarium Oxide Ions and electrons. Diffusive transport of neutrals in cylindrical geometry and ions along magnetic field lines is computed along with the reactive flow to predict the concentrations of Sm, Sm-Ion, Sm0, and SmO Ion. Comparison of the CRM with observations demonstrates that Sm release into the upper atmosphere initially produces enhanced electron densities and SmO-Ions. The diatomic ions recombine with electrons to yield neutral Sm and O. Only the photo ionization of Sm yields a stable atomic ion that does not substantially recombine. The MOSC releases in sunlight yielded long duration ion clouds that can be replicated with the CRM. The CRM predicts that Sm releases in darkness would not produce long duration plasma clouds because of the lack of photo excitation and photoionization.

  17. Reactive Materials for Evaporating Samarium (Pre-Print)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    SUBJECT TERMS energetic materials, heat sources, pyrotechnic charges, easily ionized metals 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...experiments.    Keywords:  energetic  materials, heat sources, pyrotechnic charges, easily ionized metals  1. Introduction Ejection of clouds of...results  were  negatively  affected  by  reduced  efficiency   of  release  and  ionization of samarium [8]. It is possible that not the entire charge of

  18. Implementation of an analytical technique for Samarium; Implementacion de una tecnica analitica para Samario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km. 36.5, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Since the Samarium presents the same chemical properties that the plutonium, it has been used as homologous in studies that allow us to know the behavior that the plutonium presents in solution, with the advantage of working with an inactive and not very dangerous element. At the moment studies of sorption of plutonium or samarium are made on some mineral matrices that present certain surface properties. Due to the low concentrations that are used in the studies of sorption of samarium on those reagent substrates, their detection becomes very difficult for the conventional analysis media. The luminescence is a technique that can detect lower concentrations, smaller at 1 X 10{sup -} {sup 2} M, but when fluorofors are used this limit of detection increases in several orders of magnitude. In this work it has been used the arsenazo-III as fluorofor agent since it reacts in a specific way with the samarium, forming a complex that presents a proportional luminescence to the concentration of the present samarium. The advantage of making the quantification of samarium by luminescence is that it can use the same instrumental equipment to determine the speciation of the samarium sipped in the zircon. (Author)

  19. Cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on $^{nat}$Sm for production of the therapeutic radionuclide $^{145}$Sm and $^{153}$Sm

    OpenAIRE

    Tárkányi, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Csikai, J.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    At present, targeted radiotherapy (TR) is acknowledged to have great potential in oncology. A large list of interesting radionuclides is identified, including several radioisotopes of lanthanides, amongst them $^{145}$Sm and $^{153}$Sm. In this work the possibility of their production at a cyclotron was investigated using a deuteron beam and a samarium target. The excitation functions of the $^{nat}$Sm(d,x)$^{145153}$Sm reactions were determined for deuteron energies up to 50 MeV using the st...

  20. Synthesis of samarium binding bleomycin - a possible NCT radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, B.M., E-mail: bmm@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mendes, T.M.; Campos, T.P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a drug that has attractive features for the development of a new radiopharmaceutical, particularly with regard to neutron capture therapy (NCT) sensitized by Sm-149. It has the ability to chelate many metal ions. In vitro studies have shown that up to 78% of BLM present in a cell is accumulated inside the nucleus or in the nuclear membrane. In addition, this drug has higher affinity for tumor tissues than for normal tissues. Radioactive isotopes carried by this antibiotic would be taken preferentially to one important cellular targets DNA. Besides, BLM displays intrinsic anti-tumor activity - it is a chemotherapic antibiotic clinically used against some cancers. This study aimed to obtain bleomycin molecules bound to samarium (BLM-Sm) for NCT studies in vitro and in vivo. The binding technique employed in this work has great simplicity and low cost. Thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, fast protein liquid chromatography and analysis by ICP-AES were applied to verify the binding molecule. ICP-AES results showed the presence of samarium in the sample peaks related to BLM-Sm. However, efficiency and stability of this bond needs to be investigated. (author)

  1. Luminescent solutions and powders of new samarium complexes with N,N',O,O'-chelating ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Nikolskiy, Kirill S.; Borisova, Nataliya E.; Ivanov, Alexey V.; Reshetova, Marina D.; Yuzhakov, Viktor I.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques in biology and medicine are crucial tools to obtain information on structural and functional properties of living cells and organisms. To fulfill the requirements associated with application of these techniques it appears necessary to design markers with specific characteristics. Luminescent complexes of trivalent lanthanide ions with chelating ligands are of increasing importance in biomedical applications because of their millisecond luminescence lifetime, narrow emission band, high signal-to-noise ratio and minimal photodamage to biological samples. In order to extend the available emission wavelength range the luminescent samarium chelates are highly desirable. In this study the ligands with diamides of 2,2'-bipyridin-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid were used to improve photophysical characteristics of samarium complexes. We report the luminescence characteristics of samarium complexes with novel ligands. All complexes exhibited the characteristic emission of Sm (III) ion with the lines at 565, 597, 605, 645 and 654 nm, the intensity strongly depended on the ligand. Absorption and luminescence excitation spectra of Sm (III) complexes showed main peaks in the UV range demonstrating lanthanide coordination to the ligand. The absolute lumenescence quantum yield was measured for solutions in acetonitrile with excitation at 350 nm. The largest luminescence quantum yield was found for the samarium complex Bipy 6MePy Sm (3%) being much higher that for samarium complexes reported in the literature earlier. These results prove as well that samarium chelates are potential markers for multiparametric imaging techniques.

  2. Australian manufacture of Quadramet{sup TM} (Samarium-153 EDTMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, N.R.; Whitwell, J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Australian Radioisotopes

    1997-10-01

    Quadramet{sup T} (Samarium-153 EDTMP) has been shown overseas to be potentially useful in the palliation of painful osteoblastic skeletal metastases and has been approved this year for general marketing in the USA. Australian Radioisotopes (ARI) has licensed this product from the Australian patent holders, Dow Chemical. Within the facilities of ARI, a hot cell has been dedicated to this product and fitted out to manufacture it weekly on a cycle related to the operating cycle of the Australian reactor HIFAR. Due to neutron flux limitations of HIFAR, the local formulation has an elemental Samarium content up to 200{mu}g/mL whereas the overseas formulation has a level of 20-46{mu}g/mL. All other specifications of the two products are essentially the same. In 1995 and 1996 a small clinical trial with 19 patients was held which demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic behaviour was also essentially the same by measuring blood clearance rates and skeletal uptake dynamics. Soft tissue uptake was also qualitatively determined. The ARI version is now the subject of an application for general marketing within Australia. Some useful characteristics of this agent are: almost complete excretion or fixation in the skeleton within 6 hours, rapid onset of clinical effect, applicability in most cases where an abnormal diagnostic bone scan correlates with painful sites, dosage can be tailored to individual patient uptake due to easy dose measurement and retreatment is quite possible. The use of this class of agents in pain palliation continues to increase. Australian manufacture of Quadramet{sup TM} provides a further option in the management of these difficult cases

  3. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  4. Optical analysis of samarium doped sodium bismuth silicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V; Sofin, R G S; Allen, M; Thomas, H; Biju, P R; Jose, G; Unnikrishnan, N V

    2017-01-15

    Samarium doped sodium bismuth silicate glass was synthesized using the melt quenching method. Detailed optical spectroscopic studies of the glassy material were carried out in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral range. Using the optical absorption spectra Judd-Ofelt (JO) parameters are derived. The calculated values of the JO parameters are utilized in evaluating the various radiative parameters such as electric dipole line strengths (Sed), radiative transition probabilities (Arad), radiative lifetimes (τrad), fluorescence branching ratios (β) and the integrated absorption cross- sections (σa) for stimulated emission from various excited states of Sm3+‡ ion. The principal fluorescence transitions are identified by recording the fluorescence spectrum. Our analysis revealed that the novel glassy system has the optimum values for the key parameters viz. spectroscopic quality factor, optical gain, stimulated emission cross section and quantum efficiency, which are required for a high performance optical amplifier. Calculated chromaticity co-ordinates (0.61, 0.38) also confirm its application potential in display devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Samarium Monosulfide (SmS): Reviewing Properties and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousanis, Andreas; Smet, Philippe F; Poelman, Dirk

    2017-08-16

    In this review, we give an overview of the properties and applications of samarium monosulfide, SmS, which has gained considerable interest as a switchable material. It shows a pressure-induced phase transition from the semiconducting to the metallic state by polishing, and it switches back to the semiconducting state by heating. The material also shows a magnetic transition, from the paramagnetic state to an antiferromagnetically ordered state. The switching behavior between the semiconducting and metallic states could be exploited in several applications, such as high density optical storage and memory materials, thermovoltaic devices, infrared sensors and more. We discuss the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of SmS, its switching behavior, as well as the thin film deposition techniques which have been used, such as e-beam evaporation and sputtering. Moreover, applications and possible ideas for future work on this material are presented. Our scope is to present the properties of SmS, which were mainly measured in bulk crystals, while at the same time we describe the possible deposition methods that will push the study of SmS to nanoscale dimensions, opening an intriguing range of applications for low-dimensional, pressure-induced semiconductor-metal transition compounds.

  6. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, Gurinder Pal [Department of Physics, Khalsa College, Amritsar 143002 (India); Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Singh, D.P., E-mail: dpsinghdr@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV‐Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λ{sub exc}.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO{sub 4} units thus supporting the density results. The UV‐ Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  7. Effect of samarium doping on the dielectric behavior of barium zircomium titanate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badapanda, T., E-mail: badapanda.tanmaya@gmail.com [Department of Physics, C.V. Raman College of Engineering, Bhubaneswar, Odisha-752054 (India); Sarangi, S.; Behera, B. [School of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar Sambalpur, Odisha-768019 (India); Anwar, S. [Colloids and Materials Chemistry, Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar, Odisha-751013 (India); Sinha, T. P. [Department of Physics, Bose Institute, Kolkata-700009 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Samarium doped Barium Zirconium Titanate ceramic with general formula Ba{sub 1−x}Sm{sub 2x/3}Zr{sub 0.05}Ti{sub 0.95}O{sub 3} [x=0.0,0.01,0.02,0.03,0.04] has been prepared by high energy ball milling. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed that these ceramics have a single phase with perovskite-type upto x≤0.03 and a small secondary phase exist at x=0.04. The temperature dependent dielectric study shows a ferroelectric phase transition and transition temperature decreases with an increase in the Samarium content.

  8. Lithium Bromide/Water as Additives in Dearomatizing Samarium-Ketyl (Hetero)Arene Cyclizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chintada Nageswara; Bentz, Christoph; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-02

    New conditions for dearomatizing samarium-ketyl (hetero)arene cyclizations are reported. In many examples of these samarium diiodide-mediated reactions, lithium bromide and water can be used as additives instead of the carcinogenic and mutagenic hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA). The best results were obtained for the cyclizations of N-acylated indole derivatives delivering the expected indolines in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivities. A new type of cyclization delivering indolyl-substituted allene derivatives is also described. The scope and limitations of the lithium bromide/water system are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. One-step synthesis of samarium-doped ceria and its CO catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The samarium-doped ceria (SDC) nanospheres were prepared by the one-step hydrothermal method and characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometer and Raman spectra. According to the ...

  10. A spectroscopic comparison of samarium-doped LiYF4 and KY3F10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J. P. R.; Sugiyama, A.; Han, T. P. J.; Gallagher, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Laser selective excitation and fluorescence has been performed on LiYF4 and KY3F10 doped with samarium ions. In LiYF4, a single, tetragonal symmetry center associated with isovalent substitution of Sm3+ with lattice yttrium ions is present. By contrast, three Sm2+ centres and a single, tetragonal

  11. The Use of a Flexible Calix[4]arene Template to Stabilize a Cyclooctatetraindiyl Samarium-Potassium Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffroy Guillemot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sandwich compound of cyclooctatetraendiyl (COT2− samarium-potassium was synthesized and analyzed using a flexible calix[4]arene dianion. This compound, [p-tBu-calix[4]-(OMe2(O2]arenediyl-samarium-(η8-cyclooctatetraendiyl-potassium (tetrahydrofurane3, is constructed as a linear sequence L-Sm--K-, where L, , and are specific ligands with L = O,O-dimethyl-calix[4]arene2−, = cyclo-octatetraendiyl, and = tetrahydrofurane templates.

  12. Solar nebula heterogeneity in p-process samarium and neodymium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Rasmus; Sharma, Mukul

    2006-11-03

    Bulk carbonaceous chondrites display a deficit of approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) in 144Sm with respect to other meteorites and terrestrial standards, leading to a decrease in their 142Nd/144Nd ratios by approximately 11 ppm. The data require that samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by the p process associated with photodisintegration reactions in supernovae were heterogeneously distributed in the solar nebula. Other samarium and neodymium isotopes produced by rapid neutron capture (r process) in supernovae and by slow neutron capture (s process) in red giants were homogeneously distributed. The supernovae sources supplying the p- and r-process nuclides to the solar nebula were thus disconnected or only weakly connected.

  13. Samarium(II) iodide-mediated reductive annulations of ketones bearing a distal vinyl epoxide moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molander, G.A.; Shakya, S.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-08-23

    It was found that samarium (II) iodide promotes the intramolecular coupling of ketones with distal epoxy olefins while in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide (HPMA). A number of epoxide compounds (1 a-k) fragment to form carbocycles with allylic alcohol side chains with high diastereoselectivity (2 a-k). Substituting tetramethylguanidine for HPMA reduces the diastereoselectivity. Adding Pd(0) as a catalyst reverses the diastereoselective sense. 40 refs., 1 tab.

  14. A temporal three-dimensional simulation of samarium release in the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Sheng; Feng, Jie; Xu, Zheng-Wen; Wu, Jian; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Xu, Bin; Xue, Kun; Xu, Tong; Hu, Yan-Li

    2016-10-01

    For understanding plasma processes of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, the alkali and alkaline-earth metals are usually released in space for artificially increasing the electron density. However, it is a limitation that these releases must be in sunlight where the photoionization can take place. In recent years, the lanthanide metals, such as samarium, have been released to produce electrons in reaction with atomic oxygen in the upper space. The reaction could proceed without sunlight so that the restriction on experimental periods is broken. Unfortunately, any sophisticated models even preliminary ones are unavailable yet in the literature. A temporal three-dimensional model is presented for the samarium release in detail with respect to various altitudes and mass. Especially, the plasma diffusion equation is remarkably extended from 2-D to 3-D by importing the influence of geomagnetic declination, which could be also useful for other chemical releases. The field-aligned terms are brought so as to the presented model can describe the diffusion along the geomagnetic field subtly. On the basis of the presented model, behaviors of radio waves propagating through the release area are simulated by using ray tracing. This model could be as the theoretical support for samarium releases, and it also helpful for the research on the generation and evolution of the ionosphere irregularities.

  15. Liquid–liquid anion exchange extraction studies of samarium(III from salicylate media using high molecular weight amine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha M. Mandhare

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Liquid–liquid extraction and separation of samarium(III were carried out by using 0.025 mol dm−3 2-octylaminopyridine(2-OAP in xylene at 298 K. The extraction behavior of samarium was studied as a function of pH, weak acid concentration, extractant concentration, diluent, and equilibration time. Samarium was quantitatively extracted at pH 7.5 to 10.0 from 0.01 mol dm−3 sodium salicylate solution with 0.025 mol dm−3 2-OAP. The possible composition of the extracted species in organic phase has been determined by using model of slope analysis method and extraction mechanism was found to proceed via an anion exchange mechanism. The stripping efficiency was found to be quantitative in HNO3, HCl and CH3COOH. The robustness of the procedure was demonstrated by the average recoveries obtained (>99.6% for samarium(III extraction in the presence of several cations and anions which are commonly associated with it. The proposed method facilitates the separation and determination of samarium(III from binary and synthetic mixtures. The various thermodynamic functions like free energy (ΔG, enthalpy (ΔH and entropy (ΔS of extraction mechanism were discussed.

  16. 9 CFR 145.82 - Participation.

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    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation. 145.82 Section 145.82 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Meat-Type Chicken Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.82 Participation. Participating flocks of primary...

  17. 9 CFR 145.52 - Participation.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation. 145.52 Section 145.52 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.52 Participation...

  18. 9 CFR 145.32 - Participation.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation. 145.32 Section 145.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Multiplier Meat-Type Chicken Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.32 Participation. Participating flocks of...

  19. 9 CFR 145.72 - Participation.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation. 145.72 Section 145.72 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Egg-Type Chicken Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.72 Participation. Participating flocks of primary...

  20. 9 CFR 145.62 - Participation.

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  1. 9 CFR 145.22 - Participation.

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    2010-01-01

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  2. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation. 145.42 Section 145.42 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs and...

  3. 14 CFR 145.217 - Contract maintenance.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract maintenance. 145.217 Section 145...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.217 Contract maintenance. (a) A certificated repair station may contract a maintenance function pertaining to an article to an...

  4. 24 CFR 700.145 - Cost distribution.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cost distribution. 700.145 Section 700.145 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING PROGRAMS) CONGREGATE HOUSING SERVICES PROGRAM § 700.145 Cost distribution. (a...

  5. 31 CFR 14.5 - Certification.

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    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification. 14.5 Section 14.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury RIGHT TO FINANCIAL PRIVACY ACT § 14.5 Certification. Prior to obtaining the requested records pursuant to a formal written request, an...

  6. 21 CFR 312.145 - Guidance documents.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidance documents. 312.145 Section 312.145 Food... HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Miscellaneous § 312.145 Guidance documents. (a) FDA has made available guidance documents under § 10.115 of this chapter to help you to comply with certain...

  7. 28 CFR 0.145 - Overtime pay.

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    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overtime pay. 0.145 Section 0.145... Respect to Personnel and Certain Administrative Matters § 0.145 Overtime pay. The Director of the Federal... Attorney General may prescribe, authorize overtime pay (including additional compensation in lieu of...

  8. 21 CFR 156.145 - Tomato juice.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tomato juice. 156.145 Section 156.145 Food and... CONSUMPTION VEGETABLE JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Vegetable Juices § 156.145 Tomato juice. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Tomato juice is the food intended for direct consumption, obtained from...

  9. 40 CFR 145.31 - Approval process.

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval process. 145.31 Section 145.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Program Approval, Revision and Withdrawal § 145.31 Approval process. (a...

  10. 19 CFR 145.54 - Alcoholic beverages.

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  11. 7 CFR 14.5 - Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure. 14.5 Section 14.5 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture DETERMINING THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF CERTAIN PAYMENTS FOR FEDERAL TAX PURPOSES § 14.5... be considered— (i) Authorizing legislation, legislative history, administrative regulation...

  12. 22 CFR 145.34 - Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equipment. 145.34 Section 145.34 Foreign..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 145.34 Equipment. (a) Title to equipment acquired by a recipient with Federal funds shall vest in the recipient...

  13. 14 CFR 125.145 - Firewall construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Firewall construction. 125.145 Section 125.145 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Requirements § 125.145 Firewall construction. Each firewall and shroud must— (a) Be so made that no hazardous...

  14. Samarium(II) iodide-mediated intramolecular conjugate additions of alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molander, Gary A; St Jean, David J

    2002-05-31

    Samarium(II) iodide, in the presence of catalytic amounts of nickel(II) iodide, has been used to promote intramolecular conjugate additions of alkyl halides onto alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones. This process has been shown to be applicable to a number of alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones, including tetrasubstituted olefins, and has been demonstrated to be quite general for the formation of saturated bicyclic and tricyclic lactones. The method presented herein provides a mild, efficient process to form structurally complex lactones from simple precursors.

  15. Ekstraksi Pemisahan Neodimium dari Samarium, Itrium dan Praseodimium Memakai Tri Butil Fosfat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Veronica Purwani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Nd(OH3 (neodymium hydroxide concentrate containing Y (yttrium, Sm (samarium and Pr (praseodymium as product of monazite processed has been done. The purpose of this study is to determine the separation of Nd from Y, Pr and Nd Sm in Nd concentrate. The aqueous phase was concentrated Nd (OH3 in HNO3 and extractant while organic phase was Tri Butyl Phosphate (TBP in kerosene. Parameters studied were pH and concentration feed, concentration of TBP in kerosene, extraction time and stirring speed. The result showed that the optimization of separation extraction neodymium from samarium, yttrium and praseodymium in Nd(OH3 concentrated with TBP, obtained the optimum condition of pH = 0.2, concentration of feed 100 g /L, concentration of TBP in kerosene 5%, extraction time 15 minutes and stirring speed 150 rpm. With the conditions, Separation Factor (SF obtained for Nd-Y, Nd-Pr, Nd-Sm are 2.242, 4.811, 4.002 respectively, while D and extraction efficiency of Nd are 0.236 and 19.07%.

  16. X-Band Microwave Reflection Properties of Samarium/Bismuth-Substituted Barium Lanthanum Titanate Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahel, Shalini; Pubby, Kunal; Narang, Sukhleen Bindra

    2017-03-01

    Samarium/bismuth-substituted barium lanthanum titanate ceramics with chemical composition Ba4 (La_{1 - y - z} Smy Biz )_{9.33} Ti_{18} O_{54} ( y = 0.5, 0.7; z = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15), intended as microwave reflecting materials, have been investigated in microwave X-band (8.2 GHz to 12.4 GHz) and the effect of substitution on their dielectric properties, i.e., dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent, has been studied by vector network analyzer. Dielectric analysis showed that the dielectric constant increased with increasing samarium as well as bismuth content. Dielectric relaxation was observed for all samples in the scanned frequency range. Microwave reflection and transmission analysis of ceramic pellets of thickness 4 mm was carried out using two methods, i.e., open- and short-circuit approach, both indicating very high values of reflected power and very low values of transmitted power for all the doped materials in comparison with the base composition. The doped compositions are therefore potential microwave shielding materials for use in anechoic chambers, microwave laboratories, and radar equipment. Double-layer reflectors are also proposed, having better reflection properties (˜99% reflection) compared with single-layer reflectors.

  17. Microstructure and hysteresis curves of samarium-holmium-iron garnet synthesized by coprecipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caffarena Valeska da Rocha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made into the synthesis and magnetic properties of Sm(3-xHo xFe5O12 (samarium-holmium-iron garnet ferrite, as yet absent from the literature. The material in question was synthesized by co-precipitation, starting from hydrated chlorides of rare-earth elements and ferrous sulfate, and the mixed hydroxide co-precipitate was calcined at 1000 °C. Using PVA as a binder, rectangular cross section-shaped compacts were produced by means of steel-die pressing, drying and sintering from 1200 to 1450 °C. The main conclusions of this study were that the coercive force decreases as the sintering temperature increases, and that the effect of substituting holmium for samarium in SmIG is entirely different from that provided by replacing yttrium by gadolinium in YIG, which is the most important result of this work. An in-depth investigation will be necessary to determine the correlation between microstructure/magnetic properties and ceramic processing variables.

  18. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as targeted agents of osteosarcoma: samarium-153-EDTMP and radium-223.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter M; Subbiah, Vivek; Rohren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer characterized by formation of bone by malignant cells. Routine bone scan imaging with Tc-99m-MDP is done at diagnosis to evaluate primary tumor uptake and check for bone metastases. At time of relapse the Tc-99m-MDP bone scan also provides a specific means to assess formation of bone by malignant osteosarcoma cells and the potential for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to deliver radioactivity directly into osteoblastic osteosarcoma lesions. This chapter will review and compare a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical that emits beta-particles, samarium-153-EDTMP, with an alpha-particle emitter, radium-223. The charged alpha particles from radium-223 have far more mass and energy than beta particles (electrons) from Sm-153-EDTMP. Because radium-223 has less marrow toxicity and more radiobiological effectiveness, especially if inside the bone forming cancer cell than samarium-153-EDTMP, radium-223 may have greater potential to become widely used against osteosarcoma as a targeted therapy. Radium-223 also has more potential to be used with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma and bone metastases. Because osteosarcoma makes bone and radium-223 acts like calcium, this radiopharmaceutical could possibly become a new targeted means to achieve safe and effective reduction of tumor burden as well as facilitate better surgery and/or radiotherapy for difficult to resect large, or metastatic tumors.

  19. Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts: fabrication, characterization, and application in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Yunjiao; Wang, Xue; Yang, Chao; Yi, Yanfeng

    2012-11-01

    Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts were synthesized by the in situ chemical oxidative surface polymerization technique based on the self-assembly of pyrrole on the surface of the amine-functionalized Sm2O3 nanobelts. The morphologies of the polypyrrole/samarium oxide (PPy/Sm2O3) nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscope. The UV-vis absorbance of these samples was also investigated, and the remarkable enhancement was clearly observed. The electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Sm2O3 composites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicated that the PPy/Sm2O3 composite electrode was fully reversible and achieved a very fast Faradaic reaction. After being corrected into the weight percentage of the PPy/Sm2O3 composite at a current density of 20 mA cm-2 in a 1.0 M NaNO3 electrolyte solution, a maximum discharge capacity of 771 F g-1 was achieved in a half-cell setup configuration for the PPy/Sm2O3 composites electrode with the potential application to electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

  20. Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts: fabrication, characterization, and application in supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Peng, E-mail: pliu@lzu.edu.cn; Wang Yunjiao; Wang Xue; Yang Chao; Yi Yanfeng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province and State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry (China)

    2012-11-15

    Polypyrrole-coated samarium oxide nanobelts were synthesized by the in situ chemical oxidative surface polymerization technique based on the self-assembly of pyrrole on the surface of the amine-functionalized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobelts. The morphologies of the polypyrrole/samarium oxide (PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscope. The UV-vis absorbance of these samples was also investigated, and the remarkable enhancement was clearly observed. The electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge. The results indicated that the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite electrode was fully reversible and achieved a very fast Faradaic reaction. After being corrected into the weight percentage of the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2} in a 1.0 M NaNO{sub 3} electrolyte solution, a maximum discharge capacity of 771 F g{sup -1} was achieved in a half-cell setup configuration for the PPy/Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites electrode with the potential application to electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors.

  1. Behavior of Samarium III during the sorption process; Comportamiento del Samario-III durante el proceso de sorcion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Garcia G, N.; Garcia R, G. [ININ, Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work the results of the behavior of samarium in solution are presented, in front of a fine powder of zirconium silicate (zircon). For that which is necessary to characterize the zircon, studying the crystallinity, the morphology, the surface area and the isoelectric point. The behavior of samarium in solution is studied by means of the elaboration of isotherm of sorption, using the technique by lots. One observes that to pH values of nearer to the isoelectric point (pH = 7.23) the process of sorption of the samarium begins, reaching a maximum to near pH at 9. The technique of luminescence is used to determine the concentration of the sipped samarium (phosphorescence) and also to make the speciation of the species formed in the surface of the zircon (phosphorescence). The results can be extrapolated with the plutonium when making the modeling of the migration of alpha emitting coming from the repositories of radioactive waste since both they have similar chemical properties (they are homologous). (Author)

  2. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  3. Pemisahan Unsur Samarium dan Yttrium dari Mineral Tanah Jarang dengan Teknik Membran Cair Berpendukung (Supported Liquid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amri Amin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available he increasing use of rare earth elements in high technology industries needs to be supported by developmental work for the separation of elements. The research objective is fiercely attracting and challenging considering the similarity of bath physical and chemical properties among these elements. The rate separation of samarium and yttrium elements using supported liquid membrane has been studied. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with pore size of 0.45 µm has been used as the membrane and di(2-ethylhexyl phosphate (D2EHP in hexane has been used as a carrier and nitric acid solution has been used as receiving phase. Result of experiments showed that the best separation rate of samarium and yttrium elements could be obtained at feeding phase of pH 3.0, di(2-ethylhexyl phosphate (D2EHP concentration of 0.3 M, agitation rate of 700 rpm, agitation time of 2 hours, and nitric acid and its solution concentrations of 1.0 M and 0.1 M, respectively. At this condition, separation rates of samarium and yttrium were 64.4 and 67.6%, respectively.   Keywords: liquid membrane, rare earth elements, samarium, yttrium

  4. 9 CFR 145.3 - Participation.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation. 145.3 Section 145.3... Participation. (a) Any person producing or dealing in products may participate in the Plan when he has...-Typhoid Clean classification. (e) Participation in the Plan shall entitle the participant to use the Plan...

  5. 22 CFR 145.24 - Program income.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 145.24 Section 145.24 Foreign....24 Program income. (a) The Department shall apply the standards set forth in this section in requiring recipient organizations to account for program income related to projects financed in whole or in...

  6. 27 CFR 20.145 - Encased containers.

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    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Encased containers. 20.145... Denatured Alcohol § 20.145 Encased containers. Completely denatured alcohol may be packaged by distributors in unlabeled containers which are completely encased in wood, fiberboard, or similar material so that...

  7. 21 CFR 145.190 - Canned prunes.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned prunes. 145.190 Section 145.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...: (1) Natural and artificial flavors. (2) Spice. (3) Vinegar, lemon juice, or organic acids. (4...

  8. 21 CFR 145.185 - Canned plums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned plums. 145.185 Section 145.185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients: (i) Natural and artificial flavors. (ii) Spice. (iii) Vinegar, lemon juice, or organic acids. (iv...

  9. 21 CFR 145.130 - Canned figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned figs. 145.130 Section 145.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., to which lemon juice, concentrated lemon juice or organic acid(s) is added, when necessary to reduce...

  10. 21 CFR 145.170 - Canned peaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned peaches. 145.170 Section 145.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients: (i) Natural and artificial flavors. (ii) Spice. (iii) Vinegar, lemon juice, or organic acids. (iv...

  11. 21 CFR 145.175 - Canned pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned pears. 145.175 Section 145.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... optional ingredients. (i) Natural and artificial flavors. (ii) Spice. (iii) Vinegar, lemon juice, or...

  12. 21 CFR 145.115 - Canned apricots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned apricots. 145.115 Section 145.115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... and artificial flavors. (ii) Spice. (iii) Vinegar, lemon juice, or organic acids. (iv) Apricot pits...

  13. 24 CFR 901.145 - Improvement Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Improvement Plan shall: (1) Identify baseline data, which should be raw data but may be the PHA's score in... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Improvement Plan. 901.145 Section... PUBLIC HOUSING MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM § 901.145 Improvement Plan. (a) After receipt of the State...

  14. 22 CFR 145.52 - Financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financial reporting. 145.52 Section 145.52....52 Financial reporting. (a) The following forms or such other forms as may be approved by OMB are authorized for obtaining financial information from recipients. (1) SF-269 or SF-269A, Financial Status...

  15. 22 CFR 145.41 - Recipient responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... recipient of the contractual responsibilities arising under its contract(s). The recipient is the... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recipient responsibilities. 145.41 Section 145... HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement...

  16. 22 CFR 145.48 - Contract clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contract clauses. 145.48 Section 145.48 Foreign... contracts or subcontracts exceeding $100,000, the Department may accept the bonding policy and requirements... of making audits, examinations, excerpts and transcriptions. (e) All contracts, including small...

  17. Effects of the atomic environment on the electron binding energies in samarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoyatov, A.Kh., E-mail: inoyatov@jinr.ru [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics, National University, Tashkent, Republic of Uzbekistan (Uzbekistan); Kovalík, A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, CZ-25068 Řež near Prague (Czech Republic); Filosofov, D.V. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ryšavý, M.; Vénos, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, CZ-25068 Řež near Prague (Czech Republic); Yushkevich, Yu.V.; Perevoshchikov, L.L. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Zhdanov, V.S. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Eight different matrices (evaporated and implanted at 30 keV) used. • The greatest average difference in the binding energies amounted to 3.1 ± 0.1 eV. • The presence of trivalent and divalent Sm ions found in some implanted samples. • No significant differences in Sm natural atomic level widths were observed. - Abstract: Effects of the atomic environment on the L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, L{sub 3}, M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}, M{sub 3}, and N{sub 1} electron binding energies in samarium generated in the electron capture decay of radioactive {sup 149}Eu were investigated by means of the internal conversion electron spectroscopy using the conversion electron spectrum of the 22.5 keV M1 + E2 nuclear transition in the daughter {sup 149}Sm. In this investigation, four pairs of {sup 149}Eu sources prepared by vacuum evaporation deposition and by ion implantation at 30 keV with the use of four different source backing materials, namely polycrystalline carbon, aluminium, gadolinium and platinum foils, were employed. The greatest average difference of (3.1 ± 0.1) eV in the L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, L{sub 3}, and M{sub 1} subshell electron binding energies was observed between the {sup 149}Eu sources prepared by ion implantation into the aluminium and platinum substrates. On the other hand, minimal differences in the electron binding energies were generally found between samarium generated in the evaporated layer and in the bulk for the individual investigated source backings with the exception of the gadolinium foil. A doublet structure of all investigated conversion electron lines with the average values of 8.1 ± 0.2 eV and 1.5 ± 0.1 for the separation energy and the intensity ratio of the low-energy to high-energy components, respectively, was observed for the {sup 149}Eu sources prepared by ion implantation into the aluminium and carbon foils. This structure was presumably caused by the presence of both the trivalent and divalent Sm ions in the sources. No

  18. Multiphoton laser wave-mixing absorption spectroscopy for samarium using a graphite furnace atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniaci, Michael J.; Tong, William G. E-mail: william.tong@sdsu.edu

    2004-07-30

    Nonlinear laser wave-mixing optical technique is presented as a sensitive atomic spectroscopic method for the analysis of rare earth elements using an unmodified commercially available graphite furnace (GF) atomizer. A simple nonplanar backward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing optical arrangement offers sub-picogram detection sensitivity with sub-Doppler Lorentzian-broadened resolution. Nonlinear wave mixing is an unusually sensitive absorption-based optical method that offers both excellent detection sensitivity and sub-Doppler spectral resolution. A mass detection limit of 0.7 pg and a concentration detection limit of 70 pg/ml are determined for a rare earth element, samarium, using the 429.7-nm excitation line.

  19. Samarium Doped Cerium Oxide Clusters: a Study on the Modulation of Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Josey E.; Kafader, Jared O.; Marrero-Colon, Vicmarie; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Cerium oxide is known for its use in solid oxide fuel cells due to its high ionic conductivity. The doping of trivalent samarium atoms into cerium oxide is known to enhance the ionic conductivity through the generation of additional oxygen vacancies. This study probes the electronic structure of Sm_{x}Ce_{y}O_{z} (x+y=3, z=2-4) anion and neutral clusters. Anion photoelectron spectra of these mixed metal clusters exhibit additional spectral features not present in the previously studied cerium oxide clusters. Density functional theory calculations have been used to aid interpretation of collected spectra. The results of this work can be used to inform the design of materials used for solid oxide fuel cells.

  20. Chelating Ligand-Mediated Hydrothermal Synthesis of Samarium Orthovanadate with Decavanadate as Vanadium Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanguo Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid- (EDTA- mediated hydrothermal route to prepare chrysanthemum-shaped samarium orthovanadate (SmVO4 nanocrystals with decavanadate (K6V10O28·9H2O as vanadium source has been developed. The present hydrothermal approach is simple and reproducible and employs a relatively mild reaction temperature. The EDTA, pH value, and temperature of the reaction systems play important roles in determining the morphologies and growth process of the SmVO4 products. The products have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, photoluminescence spectra (PL, and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  1. The Magnetocaloric Effect and Heat Capacity of Suspensions of High-Dispersity Samarium Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, V. V.; Aref'ev, I. M.; Ramazanova, A. G.

    2008-02-01

    The magnetocaloric effect and specific heat capacity of an aqueous suspension of samarium ferrite were determined calorimetrically over the temperature range 288-343 K in magnetic fields of 0-0.7 T. The data obtained were used to calculate changes in the magnetic component of the molar heat capacity and entropy of the magnetic phase and changes in the enthalpy of the process under an applied magnetic field. The magnetocaloric effect was found to increase nonlinearly as the magnetic field induction grew. The corresponding temperature dependences contained a maximum at 313 K related to the second-order magnetic phase transition at the Curie point. The field and temperature dependences of heat capacity contained a maximum in fields of 0.4 T and a minimum at the magnetic phase transition temperature.

  2. Preparation of hollow core/shell microspheres of hematite and its adsorption ability for samarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng-Hui; Yao, Qi-Zhi; Zhou, Gen-Tao; Fu, Sheng-Quan

    2014-07-09

    Hollow core/shell hematite microspheres with diameter of ca. 1-2 μm have been successfully achieved by calcining the precursor composite microspheres of pyrite and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in air. The synthesized products were characterized by a wide range of techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) gas sorptometry. Temperature- and time-dependent experiments unveil that the precursor pyrite-PVP composite microspheres finally transform into hollow core/shell hematite microspheres in air through a multistep process including the oxidation and sulfation of pyrite, combustion of PVP occluded in the precursor, desulfation, aggregation, and fusion of nanosized hematite as well as mass transportation from the interior to the exterior of the microspheres. The formation of the hollow core/shell microspheres dominantly depends on the calcination temperature under current experimental conditions, and the aggregation of hematite nanocrystals and the core shrinking during the oxidation of pyrite are responsible for the formation of the hollow structures. Moreover, the adsorption ability of the hematite for Sm(III) was also tested. The results exhibit that the hematite microspheres have good adsorption activity for trivalent samarium, and that its adsorption capacity strongly depends on the pH of the solution, and the maximum adsorption capacity for Sm(III) is 14.48 mg/g at neutral pH. As samarium is a typical member of the lanthanide series, our results suggest that the hollow hematite microspheres have potential application in removal of rare earth elements (REEs) entering the water environment.

  3. The influence of the technological parameters on the ionic conductivity of samarium doped ceria thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantas Sriubas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sm0,20Ce0,80O2 powder was used for the formation of samarium doped cerium oxide (SDC thin films using e-beam. Surface area of powder was 34.9 m2/g and particle size – 0.3-0.5 μm. Thin films were deposited using physical vapor deposition system on SiO2 and Alloy 600 substrates. 2 Å/s – 16 Å/s growth rate and 20 °C – 600 °C substrate temperature were used during the deposition. Ionic conductivity investigation revealed that the maximum ionic conductivity (1.67 S/m has the thin film deposited on 300 °C temperature substrate using 4 Å/s growth rate. Minimum ionic conductivity (0.26 S/m has thin film which was deposited on 20 °C temperature substrate using 8 Å/s growth rate. Vacancy activation energies vary in 0.87 eV – 0.97 eV range. Furthermore the calculations of crystallite size revealed that crystallite size increases with increasing substrate temperature: from 7.50 nm to 46.23 nm on SiO2 substrate and from 9.30 nm to 44.62 nm on Alloy 600 substrate. Molar concentration of samarium in initial evaporated material is 19.38 mol% and varies from 11.37 mol% to 21 mol% in formed thin films depending on technological parameters.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5700

  4. Cross sections of deuteron induced reactions on $^{nat}$Sm for production of the therapeutic radionuclide $^{145}$Sm and $^{153}$Sm

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Ditrói, F; Csikai, J; Ignatyuk, A V

    2014-01-01

    At present, targeted radiotherapy (TR) is acknowledged to have great potential in oncology. A large list of interesting radionuclides is identified, including several radioisotopes of lanthanides, amongst them $^{145}$Sm and $^{153}$Sm. In this work the possibility of their production at a cyclotron was investigated using a deuteron beam and a samarium target. The excitation functions of the $^{nat}$Sm(d,x)$^{145153}$Sm reactions were determined for deuteron energies up to 50 MeV using the stacked-foil technique and high-resolution $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry. The measured cross sections and the contributing reactions were analyzed by comparison with results of the ALICE, EMPIRE and TALYS nuclear reaction codes. A short overview and comparison of possible production routes is given.

  5. Formation of Core-Shell Nanoparticles Composed of Magnetite and Samarium Oxide in Magnetospirillum magneticum Strain RSS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoshige, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Kobayashi, Hideki; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Shimamura, Shigeru; Mizuki, Toru; Inoue, Akira; Maekawa, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) synthesize magnetosomes composed of membrane-enveloped magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) particles in the cells. Recently, several studies have shown some possibilities of controlling the biomineralization process and altering the magnetic properties of magnetosomes by adding some transition metals to the culture media under various environmental conditions. Here, we successfully grow Magnetospirillum magneticum strain RSS-1, which are isolated from a freshwater environment, and find that synthesis of magnetosomes are encouraged in RSS-1 in the presence of samarium and that each core magnetic crystal composed of magnetite is covered with a thin layer of samarium oxide (Sm2O3). The present results show some possibilities of magnetic recovery of transition metals and synthesis of some novel structures composed of magnetic particles and transition metals utilizing MTB.

  6. 27 CFR 44.145 - Special.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PAYMENT OF TAX, OR WITH DRAWBACK OF TAX Operations by Export Warehouse Proprietors Inventories § 44.145 Special. A special inventory shall be made by the export warehouse proprietor whenever required by any...

  7. 9 CFR 145.51 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... purposes of meat or egg production and competitive showing. Game birds. Domesticated fowl such as pheasants... Waterfowl, Exhibition Poultry, and Game Bird Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.51 Definitions. Except where...

  8. Co-reduction of aluminium and lanthanide ions in molten fluorides: Application to cerium and samarium extraction from nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibilaro, M. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P.; Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-09-01

    This work concerns the method of co-reduction process with aluminium ions in LiF-CaF{sub 2} medium (79-21 mol.%) on tungsten electrode for cerium and samarium extraction. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic and square wave voltammetries, and potentiostatic electrolyses were used to study the co-reduction of CeF{sub 3} and SmF{sub 3} with AlF{sub 3}. For each of these elements, specific peaks of Al-Ce and Al-Sm alloys formation were observed by voltammetry as well as peaks of pure cerium and aluminium, and pure samarium and aluminium respectively. The difference of potential measured between the solvent reduction and the alloy formation suggests expecting an extraction efficiency of 99.99% of each lanthanide by the process. Different intermetallic compounds were obtained for different potentiostatic electrolysis and were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy with EDS probe. The validity of the process was verified by carrying out cerium and samarium extractions in the form of Al-Ln alloy; the extraction efficiency was 99.5% for Ce(III) and 99.4% for Sm(III)

  9. Structural and luminescence properties of samarium doped lead alumino borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaweta; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, D. P.; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-11-01

    The study reports the effect of samarium concentration on the physical, structural and spectroscopic characteristics of samarium doped lead alumino borate glasses having composition 20PbO-(10-x)Al2O3-70B2O3-xSm2O3; x = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol %. The glasses were fabricated by conventional melt-quenching technique and then characterized by XRD, FTIR, optical absorption and fluorescence spectra. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the amorphous nature of the prepared glasses. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of BO3, BO4, AlO6 and a few other structural groups. Various physical properties such as density, molar volume, refractive index, rare earth ion concentration, boron-boron distance and polarizability etc. were determined using conventional methods and standard formulae. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied on the optical absorption spectra of the glasses to evaluate the three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6. The value of Ω2 was found to be highest for glass with 1 mol% Sm2O3 and attributed to the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site and the rare earth oxygen (Sm-O) covalency. The calculated intensity parameters and fluorescence spectra were further used to predict the radiative transition probability (A), radiative lifetime (τR), branching ratio (βR), peak wavelength (λp), effective line widths (Δλeff) and stimulated emission cross-section (σ) for the characteristic 4G5/2 → 6H5/2, 6H7/2 and 6H9/2 transitions of the Sm3+ ion. Concentration quenching was observed for 2 mol% concentration of Sm2O3 and ascribed to energy transfer through various cross-relaxation channels between Sm3+ ions. Reasonably high values of branching ratios and stimulated emission cross-section for the prepared glasses points towards their utility in the development of visible lasers emitting in the reddish-orange spectral region. However, the glass with 1 mol% Sm2O3 was found to show better radiative properties.

  10. Dicty_cDB: CFD145 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CF (Link to library) CFD145 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16560-1 CFD145P (Link to Original site) CFD...145F 118 CFD145Z 496 CFD145P 614 - - Show CFD145 Library CF (Link to library) Clone ID CFD... URL http://dictycdb.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CF/CFD1-B/CFD145Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID CFD...145P (Link to Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CFD145 (CFD145Q) /CSM/CF/CFD1-B/CFD1...ckfl*klslvkplhsklkvvttlrm*kqkfktkkv Homology vs CSM-cDNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value CFD145 (CFD

  11. X-ray Induced Luminescence Spectroscopy of Samarium Doped Barium Sulfate Prepared by Sintering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumeda, T.; Maeda, K.; Shirano, Y.; Fujiwara, K.; Sakai, K.; Ikari, T.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray induced luminescence (XL) properties of phosphor materials made of samarium doped barium sulfate have been investigated. The samples were prepared by sintering method heated at 900-1250 °C for 3 hours in air from the mixture of BaSO4 and Sm2O3. The concentration of Sm were prepared from 0.01-6 at.%. In as-prepared sample, the Sm3+ was detected by photoluminescence (PL). The PL intensity is maximum about 2 at.% with Sm, and then starts decreasing. The PL intensity showed concentration quenching. The XL observed Sm2+ and Sm3+ ions. The XL was shown from the sample sintered up to 1200 °C. The XL intensity increased with Sm concentration up to 1 at.%. The intensity was almost constant larger than 1 at.% Sm. These concentration dependences is different since the X-ray energy absorbed to the host material at once, and the energy transferred to both Sm3+ and Sm2+ ions. Sm doped BaSO4 is found a host for XL phosphor materials.

  12. High-κ Samarium-Based Metal-Organic Framework for Gate Dielectric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Chiou, Guan Ru; Gade, Narsinga Rao; Usman, Muhammad; Mendiratta, Shruti; Luo, Tzuoo-Tsair; Tseng, Tien Wen; Chen, Jenq-Wei; Chen, Fu-Rong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2017-07-05

    The self-assembly of a samarium-based metal-organic framework [Sm2(bhc)(H2O)6]n (1) in good yield was achieved by reacting Sm(NO3)3·6H2O with benzenehexacarboxylic acid (bhc) in a mixture of H2O-EtOH under hydrothermal conditions. A structural analysis showed that compound 1 crystallized in a space group of Pnmn and adopted a 3D structure with (4,8) connected nets. Temperature dependent dielectric measurements showed that compound 1 behaves as a high dielectric material with a high dielectric constant (κ = 45.1) at 5 kHz and 310 K, which is comparable to the values for some of the most commonly available dielectric inorganic metal oxides such as Sm2O3, Ta2O5, HfO2, and ZrO2. In addition, electrical measurements of 1 revealed an electrical conductivity of about 2.15 × 10-7 S/cm at a frequency of 5 kHz with a low leakage current (Ileakage = 8.13 × 10-12 Amm-2). Dielectric investigations of the Sm-based MOF provide an effective path for the development of high dielectric materials in the future.

  13. Pyroelectric properties and electrical conductivity in samarium doped BiFeO 3 ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Yingbang

    2012-06-01

    Samarium (Sm 3+) doped BiFeO 3 (BFO) ceramics were prepared by a modified solid-state-reaction method which adopted a rapid heating as well as cooling during the sintering process. The pyroelectric coefficient increased from 93 to 137 μC/m 2 K as the Sm 3+ doping level increased from 1 mol% to 8 mol%. Temperature dependence of the pyroelectric coefficient showed an abrupt decrease above 80 °C in all samples, which was associated with the increase of electrical conductivity with temperature. This electrical conduction was attributed to oxygen vacancy existing in the samples. An activation energy of ∼0.7 eV for the conduction process was found to be irrespective of the Sm 3+ doping level. On the other hand, the magnetic Néel temperature (T N) decreased with increasing Sm 3+ doping level. On the basis of our results, the effects of Sm doping level on the pyroelectric and electrical properties of the BFO were revealed. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of luminescent samarium doped HfO{sub 2} coatings synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon-Roa, C [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, C.P. 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Guzman-Mendoza, J [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, C.P. 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Aguilar-Frutis, M [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, C.P. 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Hipolito, M [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360 Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Fragoso, O [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-360 Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, A. P. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-01-07

    Trivalent samarium (Sm{sup 3+}) doped hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films were deposited using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The films were deposited on Corning glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550 deg. C using chlorides as raw materials. Films, mostly amorphous, were obtained when deposition temperatures were below 350 deg. C. However, for temperatures higher than 400 deg. C, the films became polycrystalline, presenting the HfO{sub 2} monoclinic phase. Scanning electron microscopy of the films revealed a rough surface morphology with spherical particles. Also, electron energy dispersive analysis was performed on these films. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence characteristics of the HfO{sub 2} : SmCl{sub 3} films, measured at room temperature, exhibited four main bands centred at 570, 610, 652 and 716 nm, which are due to the well-known intra-4f transitions of the Sm{sup 3+} ion. It was found that the overall emission intensity rose as the deposition temperature was increased. Furthermore, a concentration quenching of the luminescence intensity was also observed.

  15. Samarium-153 EDTMP for metastatic bone pain palliation: the impact of europium impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalef-Ezra, J A; Valakis, S T; Pallada, S

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the impact on the radiation protection policies of the radiocontaminants in Samarium-153 ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonate ((153)Sm-EDTMP). The internal contamination of patients treated with (153)Sm-EDMTP for palliation of painful disseminated multiple bone metastases due to long-lived impurities was assessed by direct measurements. These measurements were coupled with dose-rate measurements close to their bodies and spectroscopic analysis of the residual activity in post-treatment radiopharmaceutical vials. Whole-body counting carried out in six patients showed a 30-81-kBq europium -152 plus europium-154 contamination. The 0.85 mean (152)Eu- to -(154)Eu activity ratio obtained by direct counting was similar to that assessed by analysis of post-treatment residual activities in twelve radiopharmaceutical vials following radiopharmaceutical injection. The long-lived radiocontaminants in the patient's bodies and the treatment wastes require modifications of the applicable radiation protection policies. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Luminescence of trivalent samarium ions in silver and tin co-doped aluminophosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José A.; Lysenko, Sergiy; Liu, Huimin; Sendova, Mariana

    2011-06-01

    This work presents the spectroscopic properties of trivalent samarium ions in a melt-quenched aluminophosphate glass containing silver and tin. Addition of 4 mol% of each Ag 2O and SnO into the glass system with 2 mol% Sm 2O 3 results in Sm 3+ ions luminescence under non-resonant UV excitation owing to energy transfer from single silver ions and/or twofold-coordinated Sn centers. Assessment of luminescence spectra and decay dynamics suggest the energy transfer mechanism to be essentially of the resonant radiative type. Moreover, a connection between the luminescent and structural properties of the rare-earth doped glass system was demonstrated. Raman spectroscopy characterization revealed that no significant variation in the glass matrix is induced by Sm 3+ doping at the concentration employed. A comparison was made with a structural study performed on the Eu 3+ doped system (containing 2 mol% Eu 2O 3 along with 4 mol% of each Ag 2O and SnO) where the radiative energy transfer mechanism was previously established. The data appears consistent regarding the lack of variation in glass structure upon the Eu 3+ and Sm 3+ doping in connection with the dominance of the radiative transfer in the matrix. Thermal treatment of the material leads to precipitation of Ag nanoparticles of a broad size range inside the dielectric as observed by transmission electron microspcopy. Assessment of 4G 5/2 excited state decay in Sm 3+ ions shows no influence from the silver particles.

  17. Samarium (III) adsorption on bentonite modified with N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Chang, Xijun; Hu, Zheng; Wang, Qihui; Li, Ruijun; Chai, Xiaoli

    2011-02-15

    A new material has been synthesized using dry process to activate bentonite followed by N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine connecting chlorosilane coupling agent. The synthesized new material was characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and thermogravimetry which proved that bentonite was successfully modified. The most interesting trait of the new material was its selective adsorption for rare earth elements. A variety of conditions of the new material were investigated for adsorption. The optimal conditions were determined with respect to pH and shaking time. Samarium (Sm) was quantitatively adsorbed at pH 4 and shaking time of 2 min onto the new material. Under these conditions the maximum static adsorption capacity of Sm(III) was found to be 17.7 mg g(-1). The adsorbed Sm(III) ion were quantitatively eluted by 2.0 mL 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl and 5% CS (NH(2))(2) solution. According to IUPAC definition, the detection limit (3σ) of this method was 0.60 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) under optimum conditions was less than 3% (n=8). The new material also was applied for the preconcentration of trace Sm(III) in environmental samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 32 CFR 536.145 - Solatia payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Foreign Claims Act § 536.145 Solatia payment. Payment of... States of Micronesia, Japan, Korea, and Thailand. In other countries, the FCC should consult the command..., United States Forces Korea Regulation 526-11 regarding solatia amounts and procedures. ...

  19. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandiwana, Vusani, E-mail: VMandiwana@csir.co.za; Kalombo, Lonji, E-mail: LKalombo@csir.co.za [Centre of Polymers and Composites, CSIR (South Africa); Venter, Kobus, E-mail: Kobus.Venter@mrc.ac.za [South African Medical Research Council (South Africa); Sathekge, Mike, E-mail: Mike.Sathekge@up.ac.za [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine (South Africa); Grobler, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Grobler@nwu.ac.za; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn, E-mail: zeevaart@necsa.co.za [North-West University, DST/NWU Preclinical Drug Development Platform (South Africa)

    2015-09-15

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The {sup 153}Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [{sup 153}Sm]Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  20. Samarium oxide as a radiotracer to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution of PLGA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiwana, Vusani; Kalombo, Lonji; Venter, Kobus; Sathekge, Mike; Grobler, Anne; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2015-09-01

    Developing nanoparticulate delivery systems that will allow easy movement and localization of a drug to the target tissue and provide more controlled release of the drug in vivo is a challenge in nanomedicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution of poly( d, l-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing samarium-153 oxide ([153Sm]Sm2O3) in vivo to prove that orally administered nanoparticles alter the biodistribution of a drug. These were then activated in a nuclear reactor to produce radioactive 153Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, and morphology. The nanoparticles were orally and intravenously (IV) administered to rats in order to trace their uptake through imaging and biodistribution studies. The 153Sm-loaded-PLGA nanoparticles had an average size of 281 ± 6.3 nm and a PDI average of 0.22. The zeta potential ranged between 5 and 20 mV. The [153Sm]Sm2O3 loaded PLGA nanoparticles, orally administered were distributed to most organs at low levels, indicating that there was absorption of nanoparticles. While the IV injected [153Sm]Sm2O3-loaded PLGA nanoparticles exhibited the highest localization of nanoparticles in the spleen (8.63 %ID/g) and liver (3.07 %ID/g), confirming that nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood by the RES, leading to rapid uptake in the liver and spleen. From the biodistribution data obtained, it is clear that polymeric nanoscale delivery systems would be suitable for improving permeability and thus the bioavailability of therapeutic compounds.

  1. Fabrication and properties of samarium doped calcium sulphate thin films using spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reghima, Meriem [Université Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, LR99ES13 Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), 2092 Tunis, Tunisie (Tunisia); Institut d' Electronique et des systèmes, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i) – Université Montpellier, 860 rue de Saint Priest, Bâtiment 5, 34097 Montpellier (France); Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université de Carthage, Zarzouna 7021 (Tunisia); Guasch, Cathy [Institut d' Electronique et des systèmes, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i) – Université Montpellier, 860 rue de Saint Priest, Bâtiment 5, 34097 Montpellier (France); Azzaza, Sonia; Alleg, Safia [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Spectroscopie des Solides (LM2S), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Badji Mokhtar Annaba, B.P. 12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Kamoun-Turki, Najoua [Université Tunis El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, LR99ES13 Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), 2092 Tunis, Tunisie (Tunisia)

    2016-10-01

    Using low cost spray pyrolysis technique, polycrystalline CaSO{sub 4} thin films were successfully grown on a glass substrate with a thickness of about 1 μm. Samarium doping has been performed on CaSO{sub 4} thin films to explore luminescence properties. The characterizations of these films were carried out using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical measurements. The structural analyses reveal the existence of hexagonal CaSO{sub 4} phase with a (200) preferred orientation belonging to CaS compound for substrate temperatures below 350 °C. It is shown that the crystallinity of the sprayed thin films can be improved by increasing substrate temperature up to 250 °C. Warren-Averbach analysis has been applied on X-ray diffractogram to determine structural parameters involving the phase with its amount, the grain size and the lattice parameters using Maud software. The surface topography shows a rough surface covered by densely packed agglomerated clusters having faceted and hexagonal shapes. Energy dispersive microscopy measurements confirm the presence of calcium and sulfur in equal proportions as well as high percentage of oxygen. Photoluminescence at room temperature revealed that luminescence peaks are attributed to the intrinsic emission of pure CaSO{sub 4} phase. - Highlights: • Warren Averbach analysis reveal the presence of hcp structure of CaSO{sub 4} phase. • A mixture of CaSO{sub 4} and CaHO{sub 4.5}S phases has been detected for lower T{sub s}. • For increasing T{sub s}, the CaHO{sub 4.5}S phase has been disappeared. • The origin of PL peaks has been identified.

  2. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 keV. This...

  3. 7 CFR 1703.145 - Application selection provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application selection provisions. 1703.145 Section 1703.145 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan Program § 1703.145...

  4. 14 CFR 145.211 - Quality control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality control system. 145.211 Section 145...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.211 Quality control system. (a) A certificated repair station must establish and maintain a quality control system acceptable to...

  5. 22 CFR 145.37 - Property trust relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Property trust relationship. 145.37 Section 145.37 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF... Standards § 145.37 Property trust relationship. Real property, equipment, intangible property and debt...

  6. 22 CFR 145.42 - Code of conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Code of conduct. 145.42 Section 145.42 Foreign..., HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 145.42 Code of conduct. The recipient shall maintain written standards of conduct governing the performance of its...

  7. 26 CFR 145.4061-1 - Application to manufacturers tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application to manufacturers tax. 145.4061-1...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY EXCISE TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE HIGHWAY REVENUE ACT OF 1982 (PUB. L. 97-424) § 145.4061-1 Application to manufacturers tax. The provisions of § 145.4051-1(e) (1...

  8. 40 CFR 145.22 - Elements of a program submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elements of a program submission. 145.22 Section 145.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS State Program Submissions § 145.22 Elements of a...

  9. 49 CFR 176.145 - Segregation in single hold vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation in single hold vessels. 176.145 Section 176.145 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Segregation § 176.145 Segregation in...

  10. 21 CFR 145.176 - Artificially sweetened canned pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened canned pears. 145.176 Section 145.176 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.176 Artificially sweetened canned pears. ...

  11. 19 CFR 145.2 - Mail subject to Customs examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mail subject to Customs examination. 145.2 Section 145.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS General Provisions § 145.2 Mail subject to Customs...

  12. Optical response and magnetic characteristic of samarium doped zinc phosphate glasses containing nickel nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azmi, Siti Amlah M.; Sahar, M.R., E-mail: mrahim057@gmail.com

    2015-11-01

    A magnetic glass of composition 40ZnO–(58−x) P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–xNiO, with x=0.0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mol% is prepared by melt-quenching technique. The glass is characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. The X-rays diffraction confirms the amorphous nature of the glass while the HRTEM analysis reveals the presence of nickel nanoparticles in the glass samples. High-resolution TEM reveals that the lattice spacing of nickel nanoparticles is 0.35 nm at (100) plane. Photoluminescence emission shows the existence of four peaks that correspond to the transition from the upper level of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} to the lower level of {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 6}H{sub 9/2,} and {sup 6}H{sub 11/2.} It is observed that all peaks experience significant quenching effect with the increasing concentration of nickel nanoparticles, suggesting a strong energy transfer from excited samarium ions to the nickel ions. The glass magnetization and susceptibility at 12 kOe at room temperature are found to be in the range of (3.87±0.17×10{sup −2}–7.19±0.39×10{sup −2}) emu/g and (3.24±0.16×10{sup −6}–5.99±0.29×10{sup −6}) emu/Oe g respectively. The obtained hysteresis curve indicates that the glass samples are paramagnetic materials. The studied glass can be further used towards the development of magneto-optical functional glass. - Highlights: • Sm{sup 3+} doped zinc phosphate glass embedded with Ni NPs has been prepared. • The Laue pattern and lattice spacing of Ni NPs are confirmed by HRTEM image. • The magnetic response of glasses has been studied through VSM analysis. • Enhancement factor and decay half-lifetime are investigated.

  13. Treatment of bone pain secondary to metastases using samarium-153-EDTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Cristina Sá de Camargo Etchebehere

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: More than 50% of patients with prostate, breast or lung cancer will develop painful bone metastases. The purpose of treating bone metastases is to relieve pain, reduce the use of steroids and to maintain motion. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of samarium-153-EDTMP (153Sm-EDTMP for the treatment of bone pain secondary to metastases that is refractory to clinical management. TYPE OF STUDY: Retrospective. SETTING: Division of Nuclear Medicine, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp. METHODS: Fifty-eight patients were studied (34 males with mean age 62 years; 31 patients had prostate cancer, 20 had breast cancer, three had lung cancer, one had lung hemangioendothelioma, one had parathyroid adenocarcinoma, one had osteosarcoma and one had an unknown primary tumor. All patients had multiple bone metastases demonstrated by bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-MDP,and were treated with 153Sm-EDTMP. Response to treatment was graded as good (pain reduction of 50-100%, intermediate (25-49% and poor (0-24%. RESULTS: All patients showed good uptake of 153Sm-EDTMP by bone metastases. Among the patients with prostate cancer, intermediate or good response to therapy occurred in 80.6% (25 patients and poor response in 19.4% (6. Among the patients with breast cancer, 85% (17 showed intermediate or good response to therapy while 15% (3 showed poor response. All three patients with lung cancer showed poor response to treatment. The lung hemangioendothelioma and unknown primary lesion patients showed intermediate response to treatment; the osteosarcoma and parathyroid adenocarcinoma patients showed good response to treatment. No significant myelotoxicity occurred. DISCUSSION: Pain control is important for improving the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers. The mechanism by which pain is relieved with the use of radionuclides is still not yet completely understood, however, the treatment is simple and provides a low risk of mielotoxicity

  14. Anchoring samarium oxide nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide for high-performance supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: ganjali@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular-Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, Hamid Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Samarium oxide nanoparticles have been anchored on the surface of reduced graphene oxide for the first time. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite show high capacitance, good rate and cycling performance. • Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/RGO nanocomposite can serve as efficient electrode material for energy storage. • The best composite electrode exhibits specific capacitance of 321 F g{sup −1} in 2 mV s{sup −1}. - Abstract: We have synthesized Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (SmNs) and anchored them onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) through a self-assembly thereof by utilizing a facile sonochemical procedure. The nanomaterials were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As the next step, the supercapacitive behavior of the resulting nanocomposites were investigated when used as electrode material, through with cyclic voltammetric (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The SmNs decorated RGO (SmN-RGO) nanocomposites were found to possess a specific capacitance (SC) of 321 F g{sup −1} when used in a 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution as an electrolyte, in a scan rate of 2 mV s{sup −1}. The SC of the SmN-RGO based electrodes were also found to be 268 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 2 A g{sup −1} through galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The outstanding properties of the SmN-RGOs were attributed to synergy of the high charge mobility of SmNs and the flexibility of the sheets of RGOs. Additionally, the nano-composite revealed a unique cycling durability (maintaining 99% of its SC even after 4000 cycles).

  15. Effect of Current Density on Thermodynamic Properties of Nanocrystalline Palladium Capped Samarium Hydride Thin Film Switchable Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55 nm samarium film capped with a 10 nm palladium overlayer switched from a metallic reflecting to a semiconducting, transparent in visible state during ex-situ hydrogen loading via electrochemical means in 1 M KOH electrolytic aqueous solution at room temperature. The switching between metal to semiconductor was accompanied by measurement of transmittance during hydrogen loading/unloading. The effect of current density on switching and thermodynamic properties was studied between dihydride state (FCC phase and trihydride state (hexagonal phase. From the plateau of partial pressure of hydrogen at x=2.6, enthalpy of formation was calculated at different current densities. The diffusion coefficients and switching kinetics are shown to depend on applied current density.

  16. Targeted bone marrow radioablation with 153Samarium-lexidronam promotes allogeneic hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific immunologic hyporesponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverardi, Luca; Linetsky, Elina; Pileggi, Antonello; Molano, R Damaris; Serafini, Aldo; Paganelli, Giovanni; Ricordi, Camillo

    2004-03-15

    Transplantation tolerance, defined as acceptance of a graft by an otherwise fully immunocompetent host, has been an elusive goal. Although robust tolerance has been achieved by the induction of stable hematopoietic chimerism after bone marrow transplantation, lethal or sublethal radiation conditioning used to induce long-term chimerism precludes its clinical use. We studied whether targeted delivery of radiation to bone marrow could allow for bone marrow cell (BMC) engraftment, chimerism, and donor-specific tolerance in the absence of the side effects associated with external irradiation. We administered a radioactive bone-seeking compound (Samarium-Lexidronam, Quadramet, Berlex Laboratories, Wayne, NJ) together with transient T-cell costimulatory blockade to recipient mice. Allogeneic BMCs were given 7 or 14 days after preconditioning. Costimulatory blockade was obtained by the use of an anti-CD154 antibody for 4 weeks. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. Mice then received donor-specific and third-party skin grafts. Graft survival was analyzed with mechanisms of donor-specific hyporesponsiveness. High levels of stable chimerism across an allogeneic barrier were achieved in mice by a single administration of Samarium-Lexidronam, transient T-cell costimulatory blockade, and BMC transplantation. A large percentage of chimeric animals retained donor-derived skin grafts for more than 120 days without requiring additional immunosuppression, suggesting that harsh cytotoxic preconditioning is not necessary to achieve stable chimerism and donor specific hyporesponsiveness. Analysis of the T-cell repertoire in chimeras indicates T-cell deletional mechanisms. These data broaden the potential use of BMC transplantation for tolerance induction and argue for its potential in treating autoimmune diseases.

  17. Sorption of samarium in soils: influence of soil properties and Sm concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Salaberria, Aitor; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Due to the fact that barriers of Deep Geological Repositories (DGR) may lose efficiency before the radioisotopes present in the High Level Radioactive Waste (HLRW) completely decay, it is possible that, in the long-term, radioactive leachates may escape from the DGR and reach the soil and water compartments in the biosphere. Therefore, it is required to examine the interaction and mobility of radionuclides present in the HLRW, or their chemical analogues, to predict the impact of their eventual incorporation in the biosphere and to assess the derived risk. Although relevant data have been recently obtained for a few radionuclides in soils, there are still some important gaps for some radionuclides, such us for samarium (Sm). Sm is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in HLRW in the form of the radioactive isotope {sup 151}Sm. The main objective of this work was to obtain sorption data (K{sub d}) of {sup 151}Sm gathered from a set of soil samples physicochemical fully-characterized (pH, texture, cationic exchange capacity, soil solution cationic composition, organic matter, carbonate and metallic oxides content, etc.). Additionally, as an alternative for testing sorption capacity of radionuclides in soils is the use of the corresponding stable isotope or a chemical analogue, the influence of Sm concentration was also checked. To evaluate {sup 151}Sm sorption, batch assays were carried out for each soil sample, which consisted in a pre-equilibration step of 2 g of each soil with 50 ml of double deionised water, and a subsequent equilibration step with the same solution, but labelled with {sup 151}Sm. The activity of {sup 151}Sm in initial and final solutions was measured by liquid scintillation and K{sub d} ({sup 151}Sm) data were calculated. The reversibly sorbed fraction was estimated by the application of a single extraction test, with double deionised water, to soil residues coming from the previous

  18. Crystal growth of semiorganic complex- samarium chloride coordinated thiourea-L-tartaric acid and its studies on structure and optical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slathia, Goldy; Singh, Harjinder; Ramya, E.; Rao, D. Narayana; Bamzai, K. K.

    2017-05-01

    The semi-organic complex of samarium chloride coordinated thiourea-L-tartaric acid (SCTLT) has been grown as a single crystal by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. For structural studies, the grown crystal was subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. Low cut off wavelength and transparent characteristics were explored by UV-VIS optical characterization. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of grown crystal were investigated by Z-scan technique.

  19. Sorption of samarium in iron (II) and (III) phosphates in aqueous systems; Sorcion de samario en fosfatos de hierro (II) y (III) en sistemas acuosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz F, J.C

    2006-07-01

    The radioactive residues that are stored in the radioactive confinements its need to stay isolated of the environment while the radioactivity levels be noxious. An important mechanism by which the radioactive residues can to reach the environment, it is the migration of these through the underground water. That it makes necessary the investigation of reactive materials that interacting with those radionuclides and that its are able to remove them from the watery resources. The synthesis and characterization of materials that can be useful in Environmental Chemistry are very important because its characteristics are exposed and its behavior in chemical phenomena as the sorption watery medium is necessary to use it in the environmental protection. In this work it was carried out the sorption study of the samarium III ion in the iron (II) and (III) phosphate; obtaining the sorption isotherms in function of pH, of the phosphate mass and of the concentration of the samarium ion using UV-visible spectroscopy to determine the removal percentage. The developed experiments show that as much the ferrous phosphate as the ferric phosphate present a great affinity by the samarium III, for what it use like reactive material in contention walls can be very viable because it sorption capacity has overcome 90% to pH values similar to those of the underground and also mentioning that the form to obtain these materials is very economic and simple. (Author)

  20. Trace amounts of rare earth elements in high purity samarium oxide by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after separation by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira, W.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil) and Fundacao Jorge Duprat Figueiredo de Seguranca e Medicina do Trabalho (FUNDACENTRO), 05409-002 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: walter.pedreira@fundacentro.gov.br; Queiroz, C.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abrao, A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.E. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Boaventura, G.R. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Pimentel, M.M. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), 70910-900 Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2006-07-20

    Today there is an increasing need for high purity rare earth compounds in various fields, the optical, the electronics, the ceramic, the nuclear and geochemistry. Samarium oxide has special uses in glass, phosphors, lasers and thermoelectric devices. Calcium chloride crystals treated with samarium have been employed in lasers, which produce light beams intense enough to burn metal. In general, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) presents some advantages for trace element analysis, due to high sensitivity and resolution, when compared with other analytical techniques such as ICP optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In this work, sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used. Sixteen elements (Sc, Y and 14 lanthanides) were determined selectively with the ICP-MS system using a concentration gradient method. The detection limits with the ICP-MS system were about 0.2 (La) pg mL{sup -1} to 8 (Gd) pg mL{sup -1}. The %R.S.D. of the methods varying between 0.9 and 1.5% for a set of five (n = 5) replicates was found for the IPEN's material and for the certificate reference sample. Determination of trace REEs in two high pure samarium oxides samples (IPEN and JMC) was performed. IPEN's material is highly pure (>99.99%) and was successfully analyzed without spectral interference (MO{sup +} and MOH{sup +})

  1. 22 CFR 145.21 - Standards for financial management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for financial management systems. 145... Financial and Program Management § 145.21 Standards for financial management systems. (a) The Department... whenever practical. (b) Recipients' financial management systems shall provide for the following. (1...

  2. 24 CFR 100.145 - Loss of privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DISCRIMINATORY CONDUCT UNDER THE FAIR HOUSING ACT Discrimination in Residential Real Estate-Related Transactions... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loss of privilege. 100.145 Section 100.145 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF...

  3. 34 CFR 303.145 - Description of use of funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of use of funds. 303.145 Section 303.145 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 145 - Legal Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Legal Representation Appendix to Part 145... Part 145—Legal Representation 1. An employee or member of the Armed Forces asked to provide information... personnel practice or other illegal or improper act may obtain legal representation from the Department of...

  5. 9 CFR 145.6 - Specific provisions for participating hatcheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific provisions for participating hatcheries. 145.6 Section 145.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE.... Vaccination equipment should be cleaned and disinfected after each use. Cleaning and disinfection procedures...

  6. 21 CFR 163.145 - Mixed dairy product chocolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mixed dairy product chocolates. 163.145 Section... § 163.145 Mixed dairy product chocolates. (a) Description. Mixed dairy product chocolates are the foods...; or (iv) Malted milk; and (2) The finished mixed dairy product chocolates shall contain not less than...

  7. 40 CFR 46.145 - International travel and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false International travel and work. 46.145... ASSISTANCE FELLOWSHIPS Applying for Fellowships § 46.145 International travel and work. (a) You may use fellowship funds for travel to or work in a foreign country only if the travel or work is approved by the EPA...

  8. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section 145.53 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import...

  9. 24 CFR 1720.145 - Disqualification of administrative law judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) FORMAL PROCEDURES... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disqualification of administrative law judge. 1720.145 Section 1720.145 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  10. 40 CFR 61.145 - Standard for demolition and renovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for demolition and renovation. 61.145 Section 61.145 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... facility components at the beginning, middle, and end of each workday and keep daily temperature records...

  11. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by § 133.144...

  12. 9 CFR 319.145 - Italian sausage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Italian sausage products. 319.145 Section 319.145 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Sausage Generally: Fresh...

  13. 40 CFR 40.145-3 - Projects involving construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Projects involving construction. 40.145-3 Section 40.145-3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER.... Such description shall not, in competitive procurements, contain features which unduly restrict...

  14. 41 CFR 105-53.145 - Federal Supply Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... surplus personal property; managing GSA's Governmentwide transportation, traffic management, travel, fleet... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Supply Service. 105-53.145 Section 105-53.145 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  15. 19 CFR 145.57 - Regulations of other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulations of other agencies. 145.57 Section 145.57 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... of other agencies. Certain types of plants and plant products, food, drugs, cosmetics, hazardous or...

  16. 19 CFR 145.58 - Other restricted and prohibited merchandise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other restricted and prohibited merchandise. 145.58 Section 145.58 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... restricted and prohibited merchandise. Other restrictions and prohibitions pertaining to certain types of...

  17. 21 CFR 145.134 - Canned preserved figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned preserved figs. 145.134 Section 145.134 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... this section, to which citric acid or lemon juice or concentrated lemon juice is added, if necessary...

  18. 33 CFR 145.05 - Classification of fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... extinguishers. 145.05 Section 145.05 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... fire extinguishers. (a) Portable and semi-portable extinguishers shall be classified by a combination... the largest. Sizes I and II are considered portable extinguishers. Sizes III, IV and V are considered...

  19. 22 CFR 145.73 - Collection of amounts due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS After-the-Award Requirements § 145.73... the Federal Government. If not paid within a reasonable period after the demand for payment, the...

  20. Dicty_cDB: VHF145 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHF145 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15430-1 VHF145E (Link...) Clone ID VHF145 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15430-1 Ori...ology vs DNA Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AC116984 |AC116984.2 Dictyos... theta DNA for complete sequence of nucleomorph chromosome 2. 48 2e-07 2 ES451909 | PREDICTED: similar to PI...al 16.0 %: nuclear 8.0 %: vacuolar 8.0 %: endoplasmic reticulum 4.0 %: cytoskeletal >> prediction for VHF145

  1. Effectiveness of radiation synovectomy with samarium-{sup 153} particulate hydroxyapatite in rheumatoid arthritis patients with knee synovitis: a controlled randomized double-blind trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marla Francisca dos; Furtado, Rita Nely Vilar; Konai, Monique Sayuri; Natour, Jamil, E-mail: jnatour@unifesp.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Reumatologia; Castiglioni, Mario Luiz Vieira; Marchetti, Renata Rosa [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Medicina Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    Objectives: the aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite radiation synovectomy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with chronic knee synovitis. Methods: fifty-eight rheumatoid arthritis patients (60 knees) with chronic knee synovitis participated in a controlled double-blinded trial. Patients were randomized to receive either an intra-articular injection with 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide alone (TH group) or 40 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide combined with 15 mCi Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite (Sm/TH group). Blinded examination at baseline (T0) and at 1 (T1), 4 (T4), 12 (T12), 32 (T32), and 48 (T48) weeks post-intervention were performed on all patients and included a visual analog scale for joint pain and swelling as well as data on morning stiffness, flexion, extension, knee circumference, Likert scale of improvement, percentage of improvement, SF-36 generic quality of life questionnaire, Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne index, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or oral corticosteroids, events and adverse effects, calls to the physician, and hospital visits. Results: the sample was homogeneous at baseline, and there were no withdrawals. Improvement was observed in both groups in relation to T0, but no statistically significant differences between groups were observed regarding all variables at the time points studied. The Sm/TH group exhibited more adverse effects at T1 (p<0.05), but these were mild and transitory. No severe adverse effects were reported during follow-up. Conclusion: intra-articular injection of Samarium{sup 153}-particulate hydroxyapatite (15 mCi) with 40 mg of triamcinolone hexacetonide is not superior to triamcinolone hexacetonide alone for the treatment of knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis at 1 y of follow-up. (author)

  2. The properties of samarium-doped zinc oxide/phthalocyanine structure for optoelectronics prepared by pulsed laser deposition and organic molecular evaporation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Michal; Marešová, Eva; Fitl, Přemysl; Vlček, Jan; Bergmann, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Yatskiv, Roman; Bulíř, Jiří; Hubík, Pavel; Hruška, Petr; Drahokoupil, Jan; Abdellaoui, N.; Vrňata, M.; Lančok, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 225. ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG15050; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0958; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14FR010 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : samarium-doped zinc oxide zinc/phthalocyanine deposition * evaporation * pulsed laser deposition * thin films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.455, year: 2016

  3. Neutron Activated Samarium-153 Microparticles for Transarterial Radioembolization of Liver Tumour with Post-Procedure Imaging Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikin, Nurul Ab. Aziz; Yeong, Chai-Hong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Chung, Lip-Yong; Dahalan, Rehir; Perkins, Alan Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Samarium-153 (153Sm) styrene divinylbenzene microparticles were developed as a surrogate for Yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres in liver radioembolization therapy. Unlike the pure beta emitter 90Y, 153Sm possess both therapeutic beta and diagnostic gamma radiations, making it possible for post-procedure imaging following therapy. Methods The microparticles were prepared using commercially available cation exchange resin, Amberlite IR-120 H+ (620–830 μm), which were reduced to 20–40 μm via ball mill grinding and sieve separation. The microparticles were labelled with 152Sm via ion exchange process with 152SmCl3, prior to neutron activation to produce radioactive 153Sm through 152Sm(n,γ)153Sm reaction. Therapeutic activity of 3 GBq was referred based on the recommended activity used in 90Y-microspheres therapy. The samples were irradiated in 1.494 x 1012 n.cm-2.s-1 neutron flux for 6 h to achieve the nominal activity of 3.1 GBq.g-1. Physicochemical characterisation of the microparticles, gamma spectrometry, and in vitro radiolabelling studies were carried out to study the performance and stability of the microparticles. Results Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the Amberlite IR-120 resins showed unaffected functional groups, following size reduction of the beads. However, as shown by the electron microscope, the microparticles were irregular in shape. The radioactivity achieved after 6 h neutron activation was 3.104 ± 0.029 GBq. The specific activity per microparticle was 53.855 ± 0.503 Bq. Gamma spectrometry and elemental analysis showed no radioactive impurities in the samples. Radiolabelling efficiencies of 153Sm-Amberlite in distilled water and blood plasma over 48 h were excellent and higher than 95%. Conclusion The laboratory work revealed that the 153Sm-Amberlite microparticles demonstrated superior characteristics for potential use in hepatic radioembolization. PMID:26382059

  4. Preparation and examination of properties of samarium-153-EDTMP complex; Otrzymywanie chelatu kwasu etylenodiaminotetrametylenofosfonowego (EDTMP) z samarem-153 i badanie jego wlasciwosci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, M. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Garnuszek, P.; Lukasiewicz, A.; Wozniak, I.; Zulczyk, W. [Osrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Izotopow, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Licinska, I. [Instytut Lekow, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Preparation and properties of ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP) as well as some properties of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate have been examined. The chelate formed by samarium-153 (46.3 h, {beta}{sup -}-decay) with EDTMP exhibits high bone uptake and can be used for treatment of disseminated, painful skeletal metastases. The purity and stability of solutions of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate were examined in a broad range of samarium concentration and {sup 153}Sm specific activity. The complex under study was examined by radio-TLC, -electrophoresis and radio-HPLC. The results obtained suggest the small size of molecules of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP chelate as compared with molecules of ``free``EDTMP. The results of biodistribution of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP determined in rats indicate the quick blood clearance, high deposition of radioactivity in bone and quick excretion of radioactivity into urine. No specific uptake of {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP in extra-skeletal organs was found. (author). 42 refs, 13 figs, 22 tabs.

  5. The Level of Europium-154 Contaminating Samarium-153-EDTMP Activates the Radiation Alarm System at the US Homeland Security Checkpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Najeeb Al Hallak

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available 153Sm-EDTMP is a radiopharmaceutical composed of EDTMP (ethylenediamine-tetramethylenephosphonate and Samarium-153 [1]. 153Sm-EDTMP has an affinity for skeletal tissue and concentrates in areas with increased bone turnover; thus, it is successfully used in relieving pain related to diffuse bone metastases [1]. The manufacturing process of 153Sm-EDTMP leads to contamination with 154Eu (Europium-154 [2]. A previous study only alluded to the retention of 154Eu in the bones after receiving treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP [2]. Activation of the alarm at security checkpoints after 153Sm-EDTMP therapy has not been previously reported. Two out of 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center (Fargo, N. Dak., USA activated the radiation activity sensors while passing through checkpoints; one at a US airport and the other while crossing theAmerican-Canadian border. We assume that the 154Eu which remained in the patients’ bones activated the sensors. Methods: In order to investigate this hypothesis, we obtained the consent from 3 of our 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP within the previous 4 months to 2 years, including the patient who had activated the radiation alarm at the airport. The patients were scanned with a handheld detector and a gamma camera for energies from 511 keV to 1.3 MeV. Results: All three patients exhibited identical spectral images, and further analysis showed that the observed spectra are the result of 154Eu emissions. Conclusion: Depending on the detection thresholds and windows used by local and federal authorities, the remaining activity of 154Eu retained in patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP could be sufficient enough to increase the count rates above background levels and activate the sensors. At Roger Maris Cancer Center, patients are now informed of the potential consequences of 153Sm-EDTMP therapy prior to initiating treatment. In addition, patients treated with 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center

  6. The Level of Europium-154 Contaminating Samarium-153-EDTMP Activates the Radiation Alarm System at the US Homeland Security Checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb Al Hallak, Mohammed; McCurdy, Matt; Zouain, Nicolas; Hayes, Justin

    2009-08-28

    (153)Sm-EDTMP is a radiopharmaceutical composed of EDTMP (ethylenediamine-tetramethylenephosphonate) and Samarium-153 [1]. (153)Sm-EDTMP has an affinity for skeletal tissue and concentrates in areas with increased bone turnover; thus, it is successfully used in relieving pain related to diffuse bone metastases [1]. The manufacturing process of (153)Sm-EDTMP leads to contamination with (154)Eu (Europium-154) [2]. A previous study only alluded to the retention of (154)Eu in the bones after receiving treatment with (153)Sm-EDTMP [2]. Activation of the alarm at security checkpoints after (153)Sm-EDTMP therapy has not been previously reported. Two out of 15 patients who received (153)Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center (Fargo, N. Dak., USA) activated the radiation activity sensors while passing through checkpoints; one at a US airport and the other while crossing the American-Canadian border. We assume that the (154)Eu which remained in the patients' bones activated the sensors. METHODS: In order to investigate this hypothesis, we obtained the consent from 3 of our 15 patients who received (153)Sm-EDTMP within the previous 4 months to 2 years, including the patient who had activated the radiation alarm at the airport. The patients were scanned with a handheld detector and a gamma camera for energies from 511 keV to 1.3 MeV. RESULTS: All three patients exhibited identical spectral images, and further analysis showed that the observed spectra are the result of (154)Eu emissions. CONCLUSION: Depending on the detection thresholds and windows used by local and federal authorities, the remaining activity of (154)Eu retained in patients who received (153)Sm-EDTMP could be sufficient enough to increase the count rates above background levels and activate the sensors. At Roger Maris Cancer Center, patients are now informed of the potential consequences of (153)Sm-EDTMP therapy prior to initiating treatment. In addition, patients treated with (153)Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer

  7. 19 CFR 145.55 - Trademarks, trade names, and copyrights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trademarks, trade names, and copyrights. 145.55... Trademarks, trade names, and copyrights. Merchandise bearing a trademark or trade name entitled to protection against imports, merchandise bearing a mark or name that copies or simulates such a trademark or trade...

  8. 24 CFR 200.145 - Property and mortgage assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Property and mortgage assessment... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Mortgage Insurance Procedures and Processing Application for Insurance § 200.145 Property and mortgage assessment. (a) The mortgagor is...

  9. 21 CFR 558.145 - Chlortetracycline, procaine penicillin, and sulfamethazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlortetracycline, procaine penicillin, and... FEEDS Specific New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds § 558.145 Chlortetracycline, procaine penicillin... pound, 4.4 percent (20 grams) of sulfamethazine, and procaine penicillin equivalent in activity to 10...

  10. 22 CFR 145.15 - Metric system of measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Metric system of measurement. 145.15 Section... system of measurement. The Metric Conversion Act, as amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act (15 U.S.C. 205) declares that the metric system is the preferred measurement system for U.S. trade and...

  11. 22 CFR 145.16 - Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 145.16 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS...-580 codified at 42 U.S.C. 6962), any State agency or agency of a political subdivision of a State...-254). Accordingly, State and local institutions of higher education, hospitals, and non-profit...

  12. 9 CFR 145.34 - Terminology and classification; States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Special Provisions for Multiplier Meat-Type Chicken Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.34 Terminology and... found within the preceding 24 months in waterfowl, exhibition poultry, and game bird breeding flocks... State, Meat-Type Chickens. (1) A State will be declared a U.S. M. Gallisepticum Clean State, Meat-Type...

  13. miR-145a-5p Promotes Myoblast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are a class of 18–22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression and have been shown to play an important role during myoblast differentiation. In this study, we found that the expression of miR-145a-5p was gradually increased during C2C12 myoblast differentiation, and miR-145a-5p inhibitors or mimics significantly suppressed or promoted the relative expression of specific myogenesis related marker genes. Moreover, overexpression or inhibition of miR-145a-5p enhanced or repressed the expression of some special genes involved in the endogenous Wnt signaling pathway during C2C12 myoblast differentiation, including Wnt5a, LRP5, Axin2, and β-catenin. These results indicated that miR-145a-5p might be considered as a new myogenic differentiation-associated microRNA that can promote C2C12 myoblast differentiation by enhancing genes related to myoblasts differentiation.

  14. Formation of a new adduct based on fullerene tris-malonate samarium salt C60-[C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A. A.; Keskinov, V. A.; Semenov, K. N.; Charykov, N. A.; Letenko, D. G.; Nikitin, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    Gram quantities of a new adduct based on light fullerene tris-malonate samarium salt C60 [C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2 are obtained via the reaction of ion exchange. The obtained adduct is studied by means of electron and infrared spectroscopy, X-ray and elemental analysis, electron microscopy, and thermogravimetry. The polythermal solubility of [C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2 in water is determined in ampoules via saturation within 20-70°C. The composition of crystalline hydrate [C60(=C(COO)2)3]Sm2 · 36H2O, which exists in equilibrium with the saturated solution, is estimated.

  15. Biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in rats treated with docetaxel Biodistribuição de EDTMP-153-samário em ratos tratados com docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Villarim Neto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Many patients with metastatic bone disease have to use radiopharmaceuticals associated with chemotherapy to relieve bone pain. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of docetaxel on the biodistribution of samarium-153-EDTMP in bones and other organs of rats. METHODS: Wistar male rats were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 6 rats each. The DS (docetaxel/samarium group received docetaxel (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally in two cycles 11 days apart. The S (samarium/control group rats were not treated with docetaxel. Nine days after chemotherapy, all the rats were injected with 0.1ml of samarium-153-EDTMP via orbital plexus (25µCi. After 2 hours, the animals were killed and samples of the brain, thyroid, lung, heart, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and both femurs were removed. The percentage radioactivity of each sample (% ATI/g was determined in an automatic gamma-counter (Wizard-1470, Perkin-Elmer, Finland. RESULTS: On the 9th day after the administration of the 2nd chemotherapy cycle, the rats had a significant weight loss (314.50±22.09g compared (pOBJETIVO: Muitos pacientes com metástases ósseas são tratados com radiofármacos associados com quimioterapia para alívio da dor óssea. O objetivo do trabalho foi estudar a influência do docetaxel na biodistribuição do EDTMP-153-samário nos ossos e outros órgãos de ratos. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar foram aleatoriamente alocados em 2 grupos de 6 animais cada. O grupo DS (docetaxel/samário recebeu docetaxel (15 mg/kg intraperitoneal em dois ciclos com 11 dias de intervalo. Os ratos do grupo S (samário/controle não foram tratados com docetaxel. Nove dias após a quimioterapia, todos os animais receberam 0,1ml de EDTMP-153-samário via plexo orbital (25µCi. Após 2 horas, os animais foram mortos e feitas biópsias de cérebro, tireóide, pulmão, coração, estômago, cólon, fígado, rim e fêmures. O percentual de radioatividade por grama (%ATI/g de tecido de cada bi

  16. Marrow irradiation with high-dose 153Samarium-EDTMP followed by chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell infusion for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Anderson, Peter M; Litzow, Mark R; Erlandson, Linda; Trotz, Barbara A; Arndt, Carola A S; Khan, Shakila P; Wiseman, Gregory A

    2006-08-01

    In four patients, aged 15 - 20 years, with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), high-dose samarium 153-labelled ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP) was used for targeted marrow irradiation before preparative chemotherapy conditioning regimens and allogeneic (three patients) or autologous (one patient) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The dose of 153Sm-EDTMP was 703 MBq/kg (n = 1) or 1110 MBq/kg (n = 3). No side-effects occurred during the 30-min infusion of 153Sm-EDTMP. Samarium - melphalan regimens were given to three patients; one had 153Sm-EDTMP - busulfan + cyclophosphamide. Total body radioactivity was below the 133 MBq safe limit before infusion of stem cells (day 14 after 153Sm-EDTMP). No hemorrhagic cystitis, nephrotoxicity or serious infections occurred. Leukocyte engraftment (white blood cell count >0.5 x 10(9)/l) occurred between 12 and 23 days after stem cell infusion (mean of 17 days). Complete cytogenetic and morphologic remission of AML was evident on follow-up marrow aspirate and biopsy specimens from all patients. In two of the four study patients, the disease remains in complete remission and the patients have an excellent quality of life (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0; no medications) and no organ toxicity more than 2 years and more than 4 years, respectively, after their blood and bone marrow transplantations. Thus, in adolescents and adults, 153Sm-EDTMP may provide a relatively simple and effective means for using irradiation to eliminate AML within the marrow.

  17. Psalm 145: loof Jahwe van A tot Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Prinsloo

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of any clear strophic division, this acrostic is a remarkable poem. The poet employs numerous poetic techniques, notably the repetition of words. Psalm 145 could be described as a hymn. The poetic techniques serve to convey the contents of the psalm. It is a persuasive text in which the poet sets out to persuade his readers or hearers that Yahweh should be praised for his greatness, sovereignty and love.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of neutron capture cross sections for /sup 144/Sm, /sup 145/Sm and /sup 145/Pm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1986-02-13

    We have made preliminary neutron-capture cross-section calculations of the Hauser-Feshbach type for the isotopes /sup 144/Sm, /sup 145/Sm, and /sup 145/Pm to investigate the production of radioactive /sup 145/Pm by neutron capture on the stable isotope /sup 144/Sm. The calculations were made for incident neutron energies from 2.5 MeV to about 1/sup -4/ or 10/sup -5/ MeV, wherever the first unbound resonance was estimated to occur in each case. At that energy, the calculated value was reduced by a somewhat arbitrary factor, and the excitation function extended down to thermal energy using a (E/sub n/)/sup -1/2/ energy dependence. Since very large uncertainties are associated with the position and magnitude of the first unbound resonance and the subsequent extrapolation back to thermal energy, the cross sections in this low-energy region should not be considered more accurate than +- a factor of 10. For incident neutron energies above each step, the calculations represent an average through the separated and overlapping resonance regions and may be accurate to better than +- a factor of 2. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Synthesis of samarium complexes with the derivative binder of Schiff Quinolinic base. Characterization and photophysical study; Sintesis de complejos de samario con el ligante derivado de base de Schiff Quinolinica. Caracterizacion y estudio fotofisico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas H, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we determined the metal: binder stoichiometry of the species formed during the UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration of the derivative binder of Schiff quinolinic base, L1 with the samarium nitrate pentahydrate in methanol. Statistical analysis of the data allowed proposing the metal: binder stoichiometry for the synthesis of the complexes which was one mole of samarium salt by 2.5 moles of binder and thus favor the formation of complexes with 1M: 1L and 1M: 2L stoichiometries. They were synthesized in aqueous-organic medium (water-ethanol), isolated and purified two complexes with stoichiometry 1 Sm: 1 L1, complex 1 and 1 Sm: 2 L1, complex 2. The overall yield of the reaction was 76%. The characterization of the formed complexes was performed by visible ultraviolet spectrometry (UV/Vis), nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S), thermal gravimetric analysis with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC), and radial distribution function. These complexes were studied by fluorescence and emission phosphorescence at variable temperature. Spectroscopic techniques used in both solution and solid demonstrated the formation and stability of these complexes. In addition XP S indicated that in both complexes the samarium retains its oxidation state 3+. Luminescence studies indicated that there is intra-binding charge transfer which decreases the transfer of light energy from the binder to the samarium. Based on the experimental results, L1 binder molecules and complexes 1 and 2 were modeled that demonstrated the proposed Nc for each complex, as well as allowed to visualize the structural arrangement of the molecules, complexes and binder. (Author)

  20. 19 CFR 145.52 - Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... abortion. 145.52 Section 145.52 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... § 145.52 Literature concerning devices for unlawful abortion. Mail articles containing literature or advertisements concerning devices to produce unlawful abortions, are prohibited from the mails by 18 U.S.C. 1461...

  1. 41 CFR 102-85.145 - When are customer agencies responsible for Rent charges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agencies responsible for Rent charges? 102-85.145 Section 102-85.145 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Rent Charges § 102-85.145 When are customer agencies responsible for Rent charges? (a) When a customer agency occupies cancelable space, it is responsible for Rent...

  2. 37 CFR 1.145 - Subsequent presentation of claims for different invention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... claims for different invention. 1.145 Section 1.145 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES... Processing Provisions Joinder of Inventions in One Application; Restriction § 1.145 Subsequent presentation of claims for different invention. If, after an Office action on an application, the applicant...

  3. 19 CFR 145.51 - Articles prohibited by section 305, Tariff Act of 1930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles prohibited by section 305, Tariff Act of 1930. 145.51 Section 145.51 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... § 145.51 Articles prohibited by section 305, Tariff Act of 1930. (a) Types of articles. Various articles...

  4. 27 CFR 70.145 - Purchasers, holders of security interests, mechanic's lienors, and judgment lien creditors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... security interests, mechanic's lienors, and judgment lien creditors. 70.145 Section 70.145 Alcohol, Tobacco... Lien for Taxes § 70.145 Purchasers, holders of security interests, mechanic's lienors, and judgment... in § 70.143(a) of this part), mechanic's lienor (as defined in § 70.143(b) of this part), or judgment...

  5. 14 CFR 145.105 - Change of location, housing, or facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Change of location, housing, or facilities. 145.105 Section 145.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Housing, Facilities, Equipment, Materials, and Data § 145.105 Change of...

  6. 17 CFR 230.145 - Reclassification of securities, mergers, consolidations and acquisitions of assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., mergers, consolidations and acquisitions of assets. 230.145 Section 230.145 Commodity and Securities... § 230.145 Reclassification of securities, mergers, consolidations and acquisitions of assets.... A statutory merger or consolidation or similar plan or acquisition in which securities of such...

  7. MiRNA-145 suppresses lung adenocarcinoma cell invasion and migration by targeting N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Dongping; Yang, Daheng; Xiao, Xuelian; Sun, Ruihong; Huang, Lei; Xu, Jian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the roles of miR-145 in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) and to clarify the regulation of N-cadherin by miR-145. In 57 paired clinical LAC tissues, diminished miR-145 was significantly correlated with the lymph node metastasis and was negatively correlated with N-cadherin mRNA level expression. Wound healing and transwell assays revealed a reduced capability of tumor metastasis induced by miR-145 in LAC. miR-145 negatively regulated the invasion of cell lines through targeting N-cadherin by directly binding to its 3'-untranslated region. Silencing of N-cadherin inhibited invasion and migration of LAC cell lines similar to miR-145 overexpression. MiR-145 could inhibit invasion and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines by directly targeting N-cadherin.

  8. miR-145 Inhibits Lung Adenocarcinoma Stem Cells Proliferation by Targeting OCT4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai ZHANG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective MiR-145 functions as a protective miRNA identified in tumor tissues of lung adenocarcinoma patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between miR-145 and proliferation of lung cancer stem cells and involved molecular mechanisms in human lung adenocarcinaoma A549 cell line. Methods MicroRNA microarray technology was conducted to compare miRNA signature between tumor and adjacent normal tissue of lung adenocarcinaoma. The potential target gene of miR-145 was predicted by online bioinformatic softwares. Pre-miR-145 mimics and anti-miR-145 inhibitor were transfected into A549 cell line by lipofectamine 2000. miR-145 expression in each group was detected by real time PCR. The OCT4 protein level was analyzed by Western blot. The predicted miR-145 binding site in OCT4 3’-untranslated region (UTR was validated by dual-luciferase reporter gene assay. CCK-8 assay was employed to observe the proliferation activity of A549 cells. The ratio of CD133 positive cells in each group was analyzed by flow cytometry. Results miR-145 expression was significantly down-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma compared with ajacent normal tissue. OCT4 is a potential target gene of miR-145 predicted by miRanda. Compared with control group, miR-145 was significantly up-regulated and down-regulated in the pre-miR-145 mimics and anti-miR-145 inhibitor groups respectively. Overexpression of miR-145 inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells. Both the OCT4 protein level and CD133 positive ratio were remarkably decreased in the pre-miR-145 mimics group, whereas significantly increased in the anti-miR-145 inhibitor group. Dual-luciferase reporter gene assay validated the predicted miR-145 binding site of OCT4 3’UTR. Conclusion MiR-145 can inhibit the proliferation of lung cancer stem cells in A549 cell line via down-regulating OCT4 expression. MiR-145 is a potential protective miRNA of lung cancer.

  9. Standardization in digital pathology: Supplement 145 of the DICOM standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As digital slides need a lot of storage space, lack of a singular method to acquire and store these large, two-dimensional images has been a major stumbling block in the universal acceptance of this technology. The DICOMS Standard Committee Working Group 26 has put in a tremendous effort to standardize storage methods so that they are more in line with currently available PACS in most hospitals for storage of radiology images. A recent press release (Supplement 145 of these standards was hailed by one and all involved in the field of digital pathology as it will make it easier for hospitals to integrate digital pathology into their already established systems without adding too much overhead costs. Besides, it will enable different vendors developing the scanners to upgrade their products to storage systems that are common across all systems.

  10. MiR-145 functions as a tumor suppressor targeting NUAK1 in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xinkui; Sun, Daoyi; Chai, Hao; Shan, Wengang [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Yue [Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Pu, Liyong [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cheng, Feng, E-mail: docchengfeng@njmu.edu.cn [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-09-18

    The dysregulation of micro (mi)RNAs is associated with cancer development. The miRNA miR-145 is downregulated in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC); however, its precise role in tumor progression has not yet been elucidated. Novel (nua) kinase family (NUAK)1 functions as an oncogene in various cancers and is a putative target of miR-145 regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of NUAK1 by miR-145 in ICC. We found that miR-145 level was significantly decreased in ICC tissue and cell lines, which corresponded with an increase in NUAK1 expression. NUAK1 was found to be a direct target of miR-145 regulation. The overexpression of miR-145 in ICC cell lines inhibited proliferation, growth, and invasion by suppressing NUAK1 expression, which was associated with a decrease in Akt signaling and matrix metalloproteinase protein expression. Similar results were observed by inhibiting NUAK1 expression. These results demonstrate that miR-145 can prevent ICC progression by targeting NUAK1 and its downstream effectors, and can therefore be useful for clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy of ICC. - Highlights: • MiR-145 suppresses ICC proliferation and invasion abilities. • We demonstrated that miR-145 directly targets NUAK1 in ICC. • MiR-145 expression in ICC was associated with Akt signaling and MMPs expression.

  11. Pyrolysis result of polyethylene waste as fuel for solid oxide fuel cell with samarium doped-ceria (SDC)-carbonate as electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahputra, R. J. E.; Rahmawati, F.; Prameswari, A. P.; Saktian, R.

    2017-02-01

    In this research, the result of pyrolysis on polyethylene was used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The pyrolysis result is a liquid which consists of hydrocarbon chains. According to GC-MS analysis, the hydrocarbons mainly consist of C7 to C20 hydrocarbon chain. Then, the liquid was applied to a single cell of NSDC-L | NSDC | NSDC-L. NSDC is a composite SDC (samarium doped-ceria) with sodium carbonate. Meanwhile, NSDC-L is a composite of NSDC with LiNiCuO (LNC). NSDC and LNC were analyzed by X-ray diffraction to understand their crystal structure. The result shows that presence of carbonate did not change the crystal structure of SDC. SEM EDX analysis for fuel cell before and after being loaded with polyethylene oil to get information of element diffusion to the electrolyte. Meanwhile, the conductivity properties were investigated through impedance measurement. The presence of carbonate even increases the electrical conductivity. The single cell test with the pyrolysis result of polyethylene at 300 - 600 °C, found that the highest power density is at 600 °C with the maximum power density of 0.14 mW/cm2 and open circuit voltage of 0.4 Volt. Elemental analysis at three point spots of single cell NDSC-L |NSDC|NSDC-L found that a migration of ions was occurred during fuel operation at 300 - 600 °C.

  12. Effects of some rare earth and carbonate-based co-dopants on structural and electrical properties of samarium doped ceria (SDC) electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mustafa; Khan, Zuhair S.; Mustafa, Kamal; Rana, Akmal

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, samarium doped ceria (SDC) and SDC-based composite with the addition of K2CO3 were prepared by co-precipitation route and effects of pH of the solution and calcination temperature on microstructure of SDC and SDC-K2CO3, respectively, were investigated. Furthermore, experimentation was performed to investigate into the ionic conductivity of pure SDC by co-doping with yttrium i.e., YSDC, XRD and SEM studies show that the crystallite size and particle size of SDC increases with the increase in pH. The SEM images of all the samples of SDC synthesized at different pH values showed the irregular shaped and dispersed particles. SDC-K2CO3 was calcined at 600∘C, 700∘C and 800∘C for 4 h and XRD results showed that crystallite size increases while lattice strain, decreases with the increase in calcination temperature and no peaks were detected for K2CO3 as it is present in an amorphous form. The ionic conductivity of the electrolytes increases with the increase in temperature and SDC-K2CO3 shows the highest value of ionic conductivity as compared to SDC and YSDC. Chemical compatibility tests were performed between the co-doped electrolyte and lithiated NiO cathode at high temperature. It revealed that the couple could be used up to the temperature of 700∘C.

  13. Calculation of the Dose of Samarium-153-Ethylene Diamine Tetramethylene Phosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP as a Radiopharmaceutical for Pain Relief of bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Razghandi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the important applications of nuclear physics in medicine is the use of radioactive elements as radiopharmaceuticals. Metastatic bone disease is the most common form of malignant bone tumors. Samarium-153-ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate (153Sm-EDTMP as a radiopharmaceutical is used for pain palliation. This radiopharmaceutical usually emits beta particles, which have a high uptake in bone tissues. The purpose of this study was to calculate the radiation dose distribution of 153Sm-EDTMP in bone and other tissues, using MCNPX Monte Carlo code in the particle transport model. Materials and Methods Dose delivery to the bone was simulated by seeking radiopharmaceuticals on the bone surface. The phantom model had a simple cylindrical geometry and included bone, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Results The simulation results showed that a significant amount of radiation dose was delivered to the bone by the use of this radiopharmaceutical. Conclusion Thebone acted as a fine protective shield against rays for the bone marrow. Therefore, the trivial absorbed dose by the bone marrow caused less damage to bone-making cells. Also, the high absorbed dose of the bone could destroy cancer cells and relieve the pain in the bone.

  14. Synthesis, quality control and biological evaluation of tris[(1,10-phenanthroline)[{sup 153}Sm]samarium(III)]trithiocyanate complex as a therapeutic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naseri, Z.; Kharat, A. Nemati [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Inorganic Chemistry Dept.; Hakimi, A. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Jalilian, A.R.; Shirvani-Arani, S.; Bahrami-Samani, A.; Ghannadi-Maragheh, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (IR). Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab (RRDL)

    2012-07-01

    Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are designed to deliver high doses of radiation to selected target organs or tissues with an aim of minimizing unwanted radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, [tris(1,10-phenanthroline)[{sup 153}Sm]samarium(III)]trithiocyanate ({sup 153}Sm-TPTTC) was developed for possible therapeutic properties. The cold compound, i.e. {sup nat}Sm-TPTTC was prepared and characterized by IR, UV, mass and {sup 1}H-NMR spectroscopy. {sup 153}Sm-TPTTC was prepared in two steps using [{sup 153}Sm]SmCl{sub 3}, obtained by neutron activation of an enriched {sup 152}Sm sample. Stability tests, partition coefficient determination, toxicity tests and biodistribution studies of the complex in wild-type and fibrosarcoma-bearing mice were determined. The radiolabeled complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (> 99% precipitation method) and specific activity of 278 GBq/mmol and demonstrated significant stability at 4, 25 and 37 C (in presence of human serum). Initial complex biodistribution data showed significant liver accumulation in wild-type mice and significant tumor accumulation in fibrosarcoma-bearing mice with tumor:blood and tumor:muscle ratios of 3.55 (2 h) and 38.26 (96 h) respectively. {sup 153}Sm-TPTTC properties suggest an efficient tumor targeting agent with high tumor-avidity. Further investigation on the therapeutic properties must be conducted. (orig.)

  15. Anticancer activity of midostaurin in hormone refractory human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jun Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We tried a new method of prostate cancer treatment by inducing in vitro differentiation which resulted in reduction of cancer cells growth. A protein kinase inhibitor, midostaurin's ability to trigger the human prostate cancer cell line, DU145 to segregate into nerve cells was studied. Midostaurin (100 nM suppressed the growth of DU145 cells but without change in the number of dead cells. Midostaurin started to extend neurites on DU145 cells after 24 hours and differentiated into nerve cells by 72 hours. The microtubule was stabilized by tau protein and its mRNA expression showed time-dependent increase in midostaurin-treated DU145 cells. At the same time, the amount of acetylcholinesterase was also increased. The midostaurin-treated DU145 cells showed 40% less activity than control in the colony forming assay. The results suggests that midostaurin can induce differentiation of DU145 cells into nerve cells.

  16. 26 CFR 1.45D-1 - New markets tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true New markets tax credit. 1.45D-1 Section 1.45D-1... Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45D-1 New markets tax credit. (a) Table...) Allowance of credit (1) In general (2) Credit allowance date (3) Applicable percentage (4) Amount paid at...

  17. Organizacije za održavanje zrakoplova prema JAR-u 145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Smrečki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issues of aircraft maintenance management per JAR 145. The introduction of JAR 145 has set the requirement for European airlines to adjust to the new system of maintenance and issuance of certificates on completed servicing as required by the Joint Airworthiness Requirements. From JAR 145 standards originate the requirements for personnel and equipment in compliance with ISO 9002, management aspects and types of servicing.

  18. MicroRNA-145 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting IRS1 and its downstream Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yelin [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Hu, Chen; Cheng, Jun [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Binquan [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Ke, Qinghong; Lv, Zhen; Wu, Jian [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Zhou, Yanfeng, E-mail: zyfhdj@yahoo.com [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • MiR-145 expression is down-regulated in HCC tissues and inversely related with IRS1 levels. • MiR-145 directly targets IRS1 in HCC cells. • Restored expression of miR-145 suppressed HCC cell proliferation and growth. • MiR-145 induced IRS1 under-expression potentially reduced downstream AKT signaling. - Abstract: Accumulating evidences have proved that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we showed that miRNA-145 level was significantly decreased in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) tissues and cell lines, and its low expression was inversely associated with the abundance of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a key mediator in oncogenic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. We verified IRS1 as a direct target of miR-145 using Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Further, the restoration of miR-145 in HCC cell lines suppressed cancer cell growth, owing to down-regulated IRS1 expression and its downstream Akt/FOXO1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that miR-145 could inhibit HCC through targeting IRS1 and its downstream signaling, implicating the loss of miR-145 regulation may be a potential molecular mechanism causing aberrant oncogenic signaling in HCC.

  19. Retention capacity of samarium (III) in zircon for it possible use in retaining walls for confinement of nuclear residues; Capacidad de retencion de samario (III) en circon para su posible uso en barreras de contencion para confinamiento de residuos nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N

    2006-07-01

    Mexico, as country that produces part of its electric power by nuclear means, should put special emphasis in the development of technologies guided to the sure and long term confinement of the high level nuclear residuals. This work studies the capacity that has the natural zircon to retain to the samarium (III) in solution, by what due, firstly, to characterize the zircon for technical instrumental to determine the purity and characteristic of the mineral in study. The instrumental techniques that were used to carry out the physicochemical characterization were the neutron activation analysis (NAA), the infrared spectroscopy (IS), the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), semiquantitative analysis, dispersive energy spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and luminescence technique. The characterization of the surface properties carries out by means of the determination of the surface area using the BET multipoint technique, acidity constants, hydration time, the determination of the point of null charge (pH{sub PCN}) and density of surface sites (D{sub s}). The luminescence techniques were useful to determine the optimal point hydration of the zircon and for the quantification of the samarium, for that here intends the development of both analysis techniques. With the adjustment of the titration curves in the FITEQL 4 package the constants of surface acidity in the solid/liquid interface were determined. To the finish of this study it was corroborated that the zircon is a mineral that presents appropriate characteristics to be proposed as a contention barrier for the deep geologic confinement. With regard to the study of adsorption that one carries out the samarium retention it is superior to 90% under the described conditions. This investigation could also be applicable in the confinement of dangerous industrial residuals. (Author)

  20. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sen, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  1. Fabrication of catalytically active nanocrystalline samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO2) thin films using electron beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata; Sutradhar, Narottam; Thangamuthu, R.; Subramanian, B.; Panda, Asit Baran; Jayachandran, M.

    2012-08-01

    Samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO2) thin films were fabricated using electron beam evaporation technique. The synthesized films were deposited either on glass or ITO substrates and studied their nature by annealing at different temperatures. The optical properties and other morphological studies were done by UV-Vis, XRD, XPS, SEM, EDS, and FT-IR analysis. XRD and XPS analysis clearly confirm the presence of Sm in the ceria site. From the SEM study, it was found that after annealing at high temperature ( 300 or 500 °C), the particles size was reduced due to breakdown of large aggregates of particles which is also confirmed from UV-Vis, XPS, and XRD analyses. The FT-IR study proves the presence of -COO-, -OH, or ammonium group on the particles surface. The deposition of Sm-doped CeO2 nanomaterials was found more feasible on ITO substrate compared to that of glass substrate in terms of stability and depth of film thickness. The Sm-doped CeO2 nanomaterial acts as a re-usable catalyst for the reduction of organic dye molecules in the presence of NaBH4. The catalysis rate was compared by considering the electron transfer process during the reduction. The synthesized Sm-doped CeO2 thin films might find wide variety of applications in various emerging fields like solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen sensor or as catalyst in different types of organic and inorganic catalytic reactions. The fabrication process is very simple, straightforward, less time consuming, and cost effective.

  2. Fabrication of catalytically active nanocrystalline samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) thin films using electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Subrata, E-mail: skundu@cecri.res.in [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Electrochemical Materials Science (ECMS) Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute - CECRI (India); Sutradhar, Narottam [G. B. Marg, Central Salt and Marine Chemical Research Institute - CSIR (India); Thangamuthu, R.; Subramanian, B. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Electrochemical Materials Science (ECMS) Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute - CECRI (India); Panda, Asit Baran [G. B. Marg, Central Salt and Marine Chemical Research Institute (CSIR) (India); Jayachandran, M., E-mail: mjayam54@yahoo.com [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Electrochemical Materials Science (ECMS) Division, Central Electrochemical Research Institute - CECRI (India)

    2012-08-15

    Samarium (Sm)-doped cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) thin films were fabricated using electron beam evaporation technique. The synthesized films were deposited either on glass or ITO substrates and studied their nature by annealing at different temperatures. The optical properties and other morphological studies were done by UV-Vis, XRD, XPS, SEM, EDS, and FT-IR analysis. XRD and XPS analysis clearly confirm the presence of Sm in the ceria site. From the SEM study, it was found that after annealing at high temperature ({approx}300 or 500 Degree-Sign C), the particles size was reduced due to breakdown of large aggregates of particles which is also confirmed from UV-Vis, XPS, and XRD analyses. The FT-IR study proves the presence of -COO-, -OH, or ammonium group on the particles surface. The deposition of Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} nanomaterials was found more feasible on ITO substrate compared to that of glass substrate in terms of stability and depth of film thickness. The Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} nanomaterial acts as a re-usable catalyst for the reduction of organic dye molecules in the presence of NaBH{sub 4}. The catalysis rate was compared by considering the electron transfer process during the reduction. The synthesized Sm-doped CeO{sub 2} thin films might find wide variety of applications in various emerging fields like solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen sensor or as catalyst in different types of organic and inorganic catalytic reactions. The fabrication process is very simple, straightforward, less time consuming, and cost effective.Graphical Abstract.

  3. 26 CFR 1.45G-1 - Railroad track maintenance credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Railroad track maintenance credit. 1.45G-1... TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45G-1 Railroad track maintenance credit. (a) In general. For purposes of section 38, the railroad track maintenance credit (RTMC...

  4. Epiphytic survival of Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli O145 on baby spinach plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Non-O157 Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC) have contaminated leafy greens. In early 2010, 26 confirmed illnesses were traced to a multi-state outbreak involving shredded romaine lettuce contaminated with E. coli O145, a STEC. It is possible that the O145 serotype may be suited for gro...

  5. 41 CFR 102-192.145 - Which program levels should have a mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... should have a mail manager? 102-192.145 Section 102-192.145 Public Contracts and Property Management... have a mail manager? Every program level within a Federal agency that generates a significant quantity of outgoing mail should have its own mail manager. Each agency must decide which programs will have a...

  6. 9 CFR 145.15 - Diagnostic surveillance program for low pathogenic avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... low pathogenic avian influenza. 145.15 Section 145.15 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... pathogenic avian influenza. (a) The Official State Agency must develop a diagnostic surveillance program for H5/H7 low pathogenic avian influenza for all poultry in the State. The exact provisions of the...

  7. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-12-08

    Dec 8, 2012 ... Collectively, our findings indicate that human SFMBT2 may regulate cell growth via epigenetic regulation of HOXB13 gene expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. [Lee K, Na W , Maeng J-H, Wu H and Ju B-G 2013 Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with four mbt domains 2. J.

  8. 33 CFR 80.145 - Race Point, MA, to Watch Hill, RI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Race Point, MA, to Watch Hill, RI. 80.145 Section 80.145 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY..., RI. (a) Except inside lines specifically described in this section, the 72 COLREGS shall apply on the...

  9. 21 CFR 14.5 - Purpose of proceedings before an advisory committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose of proceedings before an advisory committee. 14.5 Section 14.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... matters of importance that come before FDA, to review the issues involved, and to provide advice and...

  10. 33 CFR 145.01 - Portable and semi-portable fire extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... extinguishers. 145.01 Section 145.01 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...-portable fire extinguishers. On all manned platforms and on all unmanned platforms where crews are continuously working on a 24-hour basis, approved type portable fire extinguishers and/or approved type semi...

  11. 19 CFR 145.39 - Articles for diplomatic officers, representatives of international organizations, and foreign...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of international organizations, and foreign military personnel. 145.39 Section 145.39 Customs Duties..., representatives of international organizations, and foreign military personnel. Free entry of articles in mail articles addressed to diplomatic officers, representatives of certain international organizations, and...

  12. 9 CFR 145.53 - Terminology and classification; flocks and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and products. 145.53 Section 145.53 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... solely for the production of multiplier breeding flocks, and meets the following specifications as... tested negative for antibodies to the H5 and H7 subtypes of avian influenza by the agar gel...

  13. Methylation of miR-145a-5p promoter mediates adipocytes differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jingjing; Cheng, Xiao; Shen, Linyuan; Tan, Zhendong; Luo, Jia; Wu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Chendong [College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130 (China); Yang, Qiong [Department of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine, Chengdu Agricultural College, Chengdu 611100, Sichuan (China); Jiang, Yanzhi [College of Life and Science, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130 (China); Tang, Guoqing; Li, Xuewei [College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130 (China); Zhang, Shunhua, E-mail: zhangsh1919@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130 (China); Zhu, Li, E-mail: zhuli7508@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130 (China)

    2016-06-17

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miR) play important roles in adipocyte development. Recent studies showed that the expression of several miRNAs is closely related with promoter methylation. However, it is not known whether miRNA mediates adipocytes differentiation by means of DNA methylation. Here, we showed that miR-145a-5p was poorly expressed in adipose tissue from mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). Overexpression or inhibition of miR-145a-5p was unfavorable or beneficial, respectively, for adipogenesis, and these effects were achieved by regulating adipocyte-specific genes involved in lipogenic transcription, fatty acid synthesis, and fatty acid transportation. Particularly, we first suggested that miR-145a-5p mimics or inhibitors promoted or repressed adipocytes proliferation by regulating p53 and p21, which act as cell cycle regulating factors. Surprisingly, the miR-145a-5p-repressed adipocyte differentiation was enhanced or rescued when cells treated with 5-Aza-dC were transfected with miR-145a-5p mimics or inhibitors, respectively. These data indicated that, as a new mean to positively regulate adipocyte proliferation, the process of miR-145a-5p-inhibited adipogenesis may be regulated by DNA methylation. -- Highlights: •MiR-145a-5p promotes adipocytes proliferation. •MiR-145a-5p is negatively correlated with obesity. •MiR-145a-5p mediates adipocytes differentiation via regulating pathway related adipocytes differentiation. MiR-145a-5p mediating adipocytes differentiation was regulated by DNA methylation.

  14. MicroRNA-145 Impedes Thrombus Formation via Targeting Tissue Factor in Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Sahu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, the third leading cardiovascular complication, requires more understanding at molecular levels. Here, we have identified miR-145 as a key molecule for regulating thrombus formation in venous thrombosis (VT employing network based bioinformatics approach and in vivo experiments. Levels of miR-145 showed an inverse correlation with thrombus load determined by coagulation variables. MiRNA target prediction tools and in vitro study identified tissue factor (TF as a target gene for miR-145. The restoration of miR-145 levels in thrombotic animals via in vivo miR-145 mimic delivery resulted in decreased TF level and activity, accompanied by reduced thrombogenesis. MiR-145 levels were also reduced in VT patients and correlated with increased TF levels in patients, thereby, confirming our preclinical findings. Our study identifies a previously undescribed role of miRNA in VT by regulating TF expression. Therefore, restoration of miR-145 levels may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for management of VT.

  15. Crystal structure of monoclinic samarium and cubic europium sesquioxides and bound coherent neutron scattering lengths of the isotopes {sup 154}Sm and {sup 153}Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlmann, Holger [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Hein, Christina; Kautenburger, Ralf [Saarland Univ., Saarbruecken (Germany). Inorganic Solid State Chemistry; Hansen, Thomas C.; Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Doyle, Stephen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS)

    2016-11-01

    The crystal structures of monoclinic samarium and cubic europium sesquioxide, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were reinvestigated by powder diffraction methods (laboratory X-ray, synchrotron, neutron). Rietveld analysis yields more precise structural parameters than previously known, especially for oxygen atoms. Interatomic distances d(Sm-O) in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} range from 226.3(4) to 275.9(2) pm [average 241.6(3) pm] for the monoclinic B type Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} [space group C2/m, a = 1418.04(3) pm, b = 362.660(7) pm, c = 885.48(2) pm, β = 100.028(1) ], d(Eu-O) in Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} from 229.9(2) to 238.8(2) pm for the cubic bixbyite (C) type [space group Ia anti 3, a = 1086.87(1) pm]. Neutron diffraction at 50 K and 2 K did not show any sign for magnetic ordering in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Isotopically enriched {sup 154}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {sup 153}Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for the neutron diffraction work because of the enormous absorption cross section of the natural isotopic mixtures for thermal neutrons. The isotopic purity was determined by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry to be 98.9% for {sup 154}Sm and 99.8% for {sup 153}Eu. Advanced analysis of the neutron diffraction data suggest that the bound coherent scattering lengths of {sup 154}Sm and {sup 153}Eu need to be revised. We tentatively propose b{sub c}({sup 154}Sm) = 8.97(6) fm and b{sub c}({sup 153}Eu) = 8.85(3) fm for a neutron wavelength of 186.6 pm to be better values for these isotopes, showing up to 8% deviation from accepted literature values. It is shown that inaccurate scattering lengths may result in severe problems in crystal structure refinements causing erroneous structural details such as occupation parameters, which might be critically linked to physical properties like superconductivity in multinary oxides.

  16. 36 CFR 14.5 - Nature of interest granted; settlement on right-of-way; rights of ingress and egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nature of interest granted; settlement on right-of-way; rights of ingress and egress. 14.5 Section 14.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RIGHTS-OF-WAY Nature of Interest § 14.5 Nature...

  17. 25 CFR 39.145 - Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school receive both a small school adjustment and a small high school adjustment? 39.145 Section 39.145 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION THE INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Small School Adjustment § 39.145 Can a school...

  18. Repression of RNA polymerase by the archaeo-viral regulator ORF145/RIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Carol; Blombach, Fabian; Belsom, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how archaeal viruses perturb the transcription machinery of their hosts. Here we provide the first example of an archaeo-viral transcription factor that directly targets the host RNA polymerase (RNAP) and efficiently represses its activity. ORF145 from the temperate Acidianus...... two-tailed virus (ATV) forms a high-affinity complex with RNAP by binding inside the DNA-binding channel where it locks the flexible RNAP clamp in one position. This counteracts the formation of transcription pre-initiation complexes in vitro and represses abortive and productive transcription...... initiation, as well as elongation. Both host and viral promoters are subjected to ORF145 repression. Thus, ORF145 has the properties of a global transcription repressor and its overexpression is toxic for Sulfolobus. On the basis of its properties, we have re-named ORF145 RNAP Inhibitory Protein (RIP)....

  19. CALIX[4]ARENE C-145 EFFECTS ON СELLULAR HAEMOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Chernyshenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to study a potential antithrombotic sodium salt of calix[4]arene-methylene-bis-phosphonic acid (С-145 — on activation and aggregation of platelets in vivo, as well as on proliferation and apoptosis of endothelial cells in the cell culture. Effects of calix[4]arene С-145 estimated in vitro after addition to the platelet rich plasma, and in vivo after intravenous injection into rabbit bloodstream in equivalent amounts (46 μM. Aggregation of platelets was induced by adenosine diphosphate and detected using aggregometer Solar AP2110. Platelet shape and cytoplasmic granularity were monitored on COULTER EPICS XL Flow Cytometer. The level of tissuetype plasminogen activator — tPA — was estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISA. Effects of calix[4]arene C-145 on culture of endotelial cells cells was studied using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide — MTT-test. The population of proliferative pool of cells (G2/M+S was determined using flow cytometry. Aggregometry and flow cytometry showed that calix[4]arene C-145 did not activate platelets nor affect their aggregation in vitro. However intravenous injection of calix[4]arene C-145 into the bloodstream of healthy rabbits leads to strong inhibition of platelet aggregation and changes of shape and granularity of most of the platelets after 2 hours of administration. Any additional appearance of endothelial cells activation marker tPA in vivo and any inhibition of calix[4]arene C-145 on proliferation of endothelial cells in cell culture did not observe. So calix[4]arene C-145 had strong anti-platelet effect in vivo that was not a result of their direct action on platelets or endothelial cells in vitro. This allowed to assume the possibility of calix[4]arene C-145 use as an effective antithrombotic agent.

  20. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1-10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates.

  1. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1–10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates. PMID:26000885

  2. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lothar Beutin

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1-10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates.

  3. Hepatitis B surface gene 145 mutant as a minor population in hepatitis B virus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsu Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV can have mutations that include the a determinant, which causes breakthrough infection. In particular, a single mutation at amino acid 145 of the surface protein (G145 is frequently reported in the failure of prophylactic treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the a determinant mutants, especially the G145 variant, in Japan, where universal vaccination has not been adopted. Methods The present study was a retrospective study. The study cohorts were defined as follows: group 1, children with failure to prevent mother-to-child transmission despite immunoprophylaxis (n = 18, male/female = 8/10, age 1-14 years; median 6 years; group 2, HBV carriers who had not received vaccination or hepatitis B immunoglobulin (n = 107, male/female = 107, age 1-52 years; median 16 years. To detect the G145R and G145A mutants in patients, we designed 3 probes for real-time PCR. We also performed direct sequencing and cloning of PCR products. Results By mutant-specific real-time PCR, one subject (5.6% was positive for the G145R mutant in group 1, while the G145 mutant was undetectable in group 2. The a determinant mutants were detected in one (5.6% of the group 1 subjects and 10 (9.3% of the group 2 subjects using direct sequencing, but direct sequencing did not reveal the G145 mutant as a predominant strain in the two groups. However, the subject who was positive according to the mutant-specific real-time PCR in group 1 had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. In group 2, 11 patients had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. Cloning of PCR products allowed detection of the G145R mutant as a minor strain in 7 (group 1: 1 subject, group 2: 6 subjects of 12 subjects who had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. Conclusions The frequency of the a determinant mutants was not high in Japan. However, the G145R mutant was often present as a minor population in

  4. Highly CO2-Tolerant Cathode for Intermediate-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Samarium-Doped Ceria-Protected SrCo0.85Ta0.15O3-δ Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengran; Zhou, Wei; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-25

    Susceptibility to CO2 is one of the major challenges for the long-term stability of the alkaline-earth-containing cathodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. To alleviate the adverse effects from CO2, we incorporated samarium-stabilized ceria (SDC) into a SrCo0.85Ta0.15O3-δ (SCT15) cathode by either mechanical mixing or a wet impregnation method and evaluated their cathode performance stability in the presence of a gas mixture of 10% CO2, 21% O2, and 69% N2. We observed that the CO2 tolerance of the hybrid cathode outperforms the pure SCT15 cathode by over 5 times at 550 °C. This significant enhancement is likely attributable to the low CO2 adsorption and reactivity of the SDC protective layer, which are demonstrated through thermogravimetric analysis, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity study.

  5. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 20 - Quantities 1 of Licensed Material Requiring Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Samarium-151 10 Samarium-153 100 Samarium-155 1,000 Samarium-156 1,000 Europium-145 100 Europium-146 100 Europium-147 100 Europium-148 10 Europium-149 100 Europium-150 (12.62h) 100 Europium-150 (34.2y) 1 Europium-152m 100 Europium-152 1 Europium-154 1 Europium-155 10 Europium-156 100 Europium-157 100 Europium-158 1...

  6. MicroRNA-145 targets YES and STAT1 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Lea H; Jacobsen, Anders B; Frankel, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important gene regulators and are recognized as key players in tumorigenesis. miR-145 is reported to be down-regulated in several cancers, but knowledge of its targets in colon cancer remains limited. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate...... the role of miR-145 in colon cancer, we have employed a microarray based approach to identify miR-145 targets. Based on seed site enrichment analyses and unbiased word analyses, we found a significant enrichment of miRNA binding sites in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of transcripts down-regulated upon......, VANGL1 as well as the transcription factor STAT1. Both YES and STAT1 were verified as direct miR-145 targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study identifies and validates new cancer-relevant direct targets of miR-145 in colon cancer cells and hereby adds important mechanistic understanding of the tumor...

  7. MiR-145 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells by targeting Oct4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Hu

    Full Text Available MiR-145 could regulate tumor growth, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. In our present study, we investigated its role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Expression of miR-145 was decreased in breast tumor tissues at T3&4 stages in comparison with those at T1&2. Over-expression of miR-145 mimics enhanced protein levels of E-cadherin and dampened those of α-SMA and Fibronectin, indicative of its inhibitory role in EMT occurrence. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-145 mimics inhibited Oct4 expression and miR-145 inhibitor enhanced it. Over-expression of Oct4 reversed miR-145-regulated expression of EMT markers, suggesting that Oct4 mediated the inhibitory effects of miR-145. MiR-145 could inhibite the expression of Snail, ZEB1, and ZEB2, while over-expression of Oct4 rescued the effects. Furthermore, Oct-4 induced over-expression of transcription factor Snail, ZEB1 and ZEB2 was mediated by β-catenin. Expression of Slug and Twist were not altered by miR-145/Oct4. Taken together, our results have revealed a novel role of miR-145 on EMT. It inhibits EMT by blocking the expression of Oct4, and downstream transcriptional factors, Snail, ZEB1 and ZEB2.

  8. [The role of micro-RNA/143/145 in evolution of intra-stent restenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, I M

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of neointima formation and hyperplasia in restenosis remain non-elucidated yet. Because micro-ribonucleic acids/143/145(micro-RNA/143 and micro-RNA/145) participate in the regulation and sustaining of the genotype of mature vascular myocytes we have measured their expression in tissue content of restenoses taken postmortem from 5 patients who underwent angioplasty and subsequently died, and studied its association with actin quantity and fibrillar collagen type I degradation degree. It has been found that during restenosis progression quantity of micro-RNA/143 and micro-RNA/145 decreases in media and intima of coronary artery. This finding has been associated with appearance in coronary intima of coronary myocytes with reduced size likely of secretory phenotype, diminution of number of myocytes with contractile phenotype, and increase of quantity of denaturized collagen type I-phenomena characteristic for neointima hyperplasia, a substrate of intra-stent restenosis.

  9. Ferrites Ni{sub 0,5}Zn{sub 0,5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} doped with samarium: structural analysis, morphological and electromagnetic; Ferritas Ni{sub 0,5}Zn{sub 0,5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} dopada com samario: analise estrutural, morfologica e eletromagnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A.C.F.M.; Diniz, A.P., E-mail: anacristina@dema.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academinca de Engenharia de Materiais; Viana, K.M.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, PE (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Cornejo, D.R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Kiminami, R.H.G.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes to investigate the sintering at 1200 deg C/2h of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2-x}Sm{sub x}O{sub 4} ferrite doped with 0.05; 0.075 e 0.1 mol of Sm synthesized by combustion reaction to evaluate the performance materials as absorbers of electromagnetic radiation. The influence of the concentration of samarium on the structure, morphology and electromagnetic properties of ferrites was studied. The resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements and reflectivity measurements in the frequency range between 8-12 GHz. The results showed that increasing the concentration of samarium caused a decrease in particle size of the samples, encouraging, therefore, to obtain materials with better values of magnetization and reflectivity, allowing for use as absorbers in narrow-band frequency between 9-10 GHz. (author)

  10. 40 CFR 40.145-2 - Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Water Pollution Control Act. 40... FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.145-2 Federal Water Pollution Control Act. (a... or control of acid or other mine water pollution; and (2) That the State shall provide legal and...

  11. B1 but not B2 bradykinin receptor agonists promote DU145 prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is an endogenous pathway involved in angiogenesis and tumourigenesis, both vital for cancer growth and progression. Objectives: To investigate the effect of two bradykinin receptor (B1R and B2R) agonists on growth and motility of prostate tumour (DU145) and ...

  12. Complete genome sequences of two Escherichia coli O145:H28 outbreak strains of food origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although serotype O157:H7 is the predominant enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), outbreaks of non-O157 EHEC that cause severe foodborne illness, including hemolytic uremic syndrome have increased worldwide. O145 is recognized as one of the six non-O157 serotypes that are most frequently assoc...

  13. 19 CFR 145.72 - Delivery to Customs custody for exportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delivery to Customs custody for exportation. 145... custody for exportation. In certain cases where merchandise has not been in continuous Government custody, delivery to Customs custody is appropriate before exportation by mail, as set forth in the following...

  14. 14 CFR 145.205 - Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed for certificate holders under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.205 Maintenance, preventive.... (a) A certificated repair station that performs maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alterations...

  15. 14 CFR 145.213 - Inspection of maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection of maintenance, preventive... Rules § 145.213 Inspection of maintenance, preventive maintenance, or alterations. (a) A certificated repair station must inspect each article upon which it has performed maintenance, preventive maintenance...

  16. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using DU145 prostate cancer cells as a model, we showed that SFMBT2 has a transcriptional repression activity on HOXB13 gene expression. In addition, occupancy of SFMBT2 coincided with enrichment of diand tri-methylated H3K9 and H4K20 as well as tri-methylated H3K27 at the HOXB13 gene promoter.

  17. 40 CFR 300.145 - Special teams and other assistance available to OSCs/RPMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special teams and other assistance... SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY PLAN Responsibility and Organization for Response § 300.145 Special teams and other assistance available to OSCs/RPMs. (a) The NSF is a special team established by the USCG...

  18. 14 CFR 382.145 - What records concerning training must carriers retain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... retain for three years individual employee training records demonstrating that all persons required to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What records concerning training must... TRAVEL Training and Administrative Provisions § 382.145 What records concerning training must carriers...

  19. 26 CFR 1.145-2 - Application of private activity bond regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the private business use test and the private security or payment test mean “5 percent” and “net... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of private activity bond regulations... Bonds § 1.145-2 Application of private activity bond regulations. (a) In general. Except as provided in...

  20. 9 CFR 145.43 - Terminology and classification; flocks and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.43 Terminology and classification... of progeny of a primary breeding flock which is intended solely for the production of multiplier... flock composed of progeny of a primary breeding flock which is intended solely for the production of...

  1. A partner monoclonal antibody to Moab 730 kills 100% of DU145 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    cytolytic to androgen-independent DU145 and PC3 human prostatic carcinoma cells; Prostate 46 207–213. Vyas H K, Pal R, Vishwakarma R, Lohiya N K and Talwar G P 2009. Selective killing of leukemia and lymphoma cells expressing ectopically hCGβ by a conjugate of curcumin with an antibody against hCGβ subunit ...

  2. 42 CFR 84.145 - Motor-operated blower test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor-operated blower test; minimum requirements... Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.145 Motor-operated blower test; minimum requirements. (a) Motor-operated... connection between the motor and the blower shall be so constructed that the motor may be disengaged from the...

  3. B1 but not B2 bradykinin receptor agonists promote DU145 prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    both vital for cancer growth and progression. Objectives: To investigate the effect of two bradykinin receptor (B1R and B2R) agonists on growth and motility of prostate tumour (DU145) and micro-vascular endothelial cells (dMVECs). Methods: Increasing concentrations of selective B1R and B2R agonists were added to ...

  4. 40 CFR 145.56 - Request by an Indian Tribe for a determination of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that a Tribe has met the prerequisites that make it eligible to assume a role similar to that of a State as provided by statute under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, or the Clean Air... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Indian Tribes § 145.56 Request by an...

  5. 21 CFR 1311.145 - Digitally signing the prescription with the individual practitioner's private key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.145 Digitally signing the prescription with the individual practitioner's... digital certificate. (b) The electronic prescription application must require the individual practitioner...

  6. Multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O145 infections associated with romaine lettuce consumption, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E V; Nguyen, T A; Machesky, K D; Koch, E; Sotir, M J; Bohm, S R; Folster, J P; Bokanyi, R; Kupper, A; Bidol, S A; Emanuel, A; Arends, K D; Johnson, S A; Dunn, J; Stroika, S; Patel, M K; Williams, I

    2013-06-01

    Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can cause severe illness, including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). STEC O145 is the sixth most commonly reported non-O157 STEC in the United States, although outbreaks have been infrequent. In April and May 2010, we investigated a multistate outbreak of STEC O145 infection. Confirmed cases were STEC O145 infections with isolate pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns indistinguishable from those of the outbreak strain. Probable cases were STEC O145 infections or HUS in persons who were epidemiologically linked. Case-control studies were conducted in Michigan and Ohio; food exposures were analyzed at the restaurant, menu, and ingredient level. Environmental inspections were conducted in implicated food establishments, and food samples were collected and tested. To characterize clinical findings associated with infections, we conducted a chart review for case patients who sought medical care. We identified 27 confirmed and 4 probable cases from five states. Of these, 14 (45%) were hospitalized, 3 (10%) developed HUS, and none died. Among two case-control studies conducted, illness was significantly associated with consumption of shredded romaine lettuce in Michigan (odds ratio [OR] = undefined; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to undefined) and Ohio (OR = 10.9; 95% CI = 3.1 to 40.5). Samples from an unopened bag of shredded romaine lettuce yielded the predominant outbreak strain. Of 15 case patients included in the chart review, 14 (93%) had diarrhea and abdominal cramps and 11 (73%) developed bloody diarrhea. This report documents the first foodborne outbreak of STEC O145 infections in the United States. Current surveillance efforts focus primarily on E. coli O157 infections; however, non-O157 STEC can cause similar disease and outbreaks, and efforts should be made to identify both O157 and non-O157 STEC infections. Providers should test all patients with bloody diarrhea for both non-O157 and O157 STEC.

  7. On a possible cometary origin of the object 2015TB145

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhirova, G. I.; Babadzhanov, P. B.; Khamroev, U. H.

    2017-09-01

    The Earth-crossing asteroid 2015TB145 was discovered on 10 October 2015 and on 31 October 2015 it already approached close to the Earth at the minimal distance. On the base of obtained radio images of the asteroid, the value of an albedo has estimated as p=0.06. Coming from the albedo value and the comet-like orbit, it was suggested, that the object is a dead comet. In order to verify the supposition, the orbital evolution of 2015TB145 was investigated under the perturbing action of major planets for the time interval of 50 kyrs. As a result, it was found that one cycle of variations of the argument of perihelion is equal to nearly 40 kyrs and during this period the object intersects the Earth's orbit eight times, i.e. it is the octuple crosser. Consequently, if the object has a cometary origin, then it can be associated with a meteoroid stream producing eight meteor showers which should be observable on the Earth. Features of the predicted meteor showers, theoretically associated with 2015TB145, were calculated and a search for observable showers identical to predicted ones was realized using all published catalogues. It turned out, that seven of eight predicted showers were identified with the active observable meteor showers. So, comet-like orbit, low value of an albedo and association with the meteoroid stream producing identified showers are strong evidences pointing that 2015TB145 is really inactive comet. A conclusion was made that the potentially hazardous object 2015TB145 is very likely extinct nucleus of a parent comet of the found meteoroid stream.

  8. 145 | Page

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    Such a reconstruction holds the key to stability of legal norms at international ... 146 | P a g e. ALISIGWE: Reconstructing the Doctrine of Stare Decisis as a Stabiliser in the Development of International Legal Norms .... decision in the Anglo-Norwegian Fisheries Case9 wherein the statement on the criteria for the recognition ...

  9. 145 | Page

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    international political system and the structures of global capitalism are in a state of flux.1 The global system is ... involvement of new actors in global governance and the expansion of inter-state modes of governance; the move ..... This divergence has necessitated a call for judicial dialogue among international courts on.

  10. T145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Ch. Sim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High dose IL-2 (HD IL-2 has been extensively used as an immunotherapy against metastatic melanoma However, why HD IL-2 is effective only in a subset of patients and whether predictive biomarkers, before or early during the course of therapy, can be used to improve response rates remain unresolved. In addition, it has been found that IL-2 therapy potently expands CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs but how Treg cell levels, phenotype, and function change and whether specific subsets of Tregs are activated and expanded during HD IL-2 therapy is remain unclear. In this study, we performed comprehensive multi-parameter FACS analysis of patient blood before and two days after the last bolus of IL-2 infusion during cycle 1 of HD IL-2 therapy. Two lymphocyte subsets were found to expand the most during the first cycle of IL-2 therapy: CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs expressing an activation marker, inducible costimulator (ICOS, and CD3-CD56hiCD16loPerforin+ NK cells. ICOS+ Tregs expressed significantly higher levels of CD25, Foxp3 and had a more activated phenotype than ICOS− Tregs as indicated by lower levels of CD45RA and CD127 expression. Further phenotypic characterization revealed a more suppressive phenotype on ICOS+ Treg with higher expression levels of CD39, CD73, and TGF-β/LAP than ICOS− Treg. ICOS+ Tregs were also the predominant Treg cells that secreted IL-10 and have potent T-cell suppressor function. Majority of ICOS+ Tregs from HD IL-2-treated patients were Ki67+ and exhibited an enhanced proliferative response to IL-2 ex vivo relative to ICOS− Tregs. Functional analysis revealed that ICOS+ Tregs secreted little IFN- and IL-2 in comparison to CD4+Foxp3 – cells. Furthermore, analysis on 38 IL-2-treated patients at MD Anderson, we found that non-responders had a significantly higher degree of ICOS+ Treg expansion than responders during the first cycle of IL-2 therapy, while no significant changes in the ICOS− or bulk Treg population. In conclusion, our data suggests that tracking changes in ICOS+ Tregs early during the course of HD IL-2 therapy may be a new predictive biomarker of clinical outcome.

  11. MiR-145 inhibits metastasis by targeting fascin actin-bundling protein 1 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Qin Li

    Full Text Available Based on our recent microarray analysis, we found that miR-145 was obviously downregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC tissues. However, little is known about its function and mechanism involving in NPC development and progression.Quantitative RT-PCR was used to detect miR-145 expression in NPC cell lines and clinical samples. Wound healing, Transwell migration and invasion, three-dimension spheroid invasion assays, and lung metastasis model were performed to test the migratory, invasive, and metastatic ability of NPC cells. Luciferase reporter assay, quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blotting were used to verify the target of miR-145.MiR-145 was obviously decreased in NPC cell lines and clinical samples (P<0.01. Ectopic overexpression of miR-145 significantly inhibited the migratory and invasive ability of SUNE-1 and CNE-2 cells. In addition, stably overexpressing of miR-145 in SUNE-1 cells could remarkably restrain the formation of metastatic nodes in the lungs of mice. Furthermore, fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1 was verified as a target of miR-145, and silencing FSCN1 with small RNA interfering RNA could suppress NPC cell migration and invasion.Our findings demonstrated that miR-145 function as a tumor suppressor in NPC development and progression via targeting FSCN1, which could sever as a potential novel therapeutic target for patients with NPC.

  12. Differential expression of miR-145 in children with Kawasaki disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Shimizu

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of childhood that can result in structural damage to the coronary arteries. Previous studies have implicated the TGF-β pathway in disease pathogenesis and generation of myofibroblasts in the arterial wall. microRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and can be transported between cells in extracellular vesicles. To understand the role that microRNAs play in modifying gene expression in Kawasaki disease, we studied microRNAs from whole blood during the acute and convalescent stages of the illness.RNA isolated from the matched whole blood of 12 patients with acute and convalescent Kawasaki disease were analyzed by sequencing of small RNA. This analysis revealed six microRNAs (miRs-143, -199b-5p, -618, -223, -145 and -145* (complementary strand whose levels were significantly elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease. The result was validated using targeted qRT-PCR using an independent cohort (n = 16. miR-145, which plays a critical role in the differentiation of neutrophils and vascular smooth muscle cells, was expressed at high levels in blood samples from acute Kawasaki disease but not adenovirus-infected control patients (p = 0.005. miR-145 was also detected in small extracellular vesicles isolated from acute Kawasaki disease plasma samples. Pathway analysis of the predicted targets of the 6 differentially expressed microRNAs identified the TGF-β pathway as the top pathway regulated by microRNAs in Kawasaki disease.Sequencing of small RNA species allowed discovery of microRNAs that may participate in Kawasaki disease pathogenesis. miR-145 may participate, along with other differentially expressed microRNAs, in regulating expression of genes in the TGF-β pathway during the acute illness. If the predicted target genes are confirmed, our findings suggest a model of Kawasaki disease pathogenesis whereby miR-145 modulates TGF

  13. A qualitative phenomenological study: Enhanced, risk-based FAA oversight on part 145 maintenance practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bryan G.

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine the phenomenon of enhanced, risk-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight of Part 145 repair stations that performed aircraft maintenance for Part 121 air carriers between 2007 and 2014 in Oklahoma. Specifically, this research was utilized to explore what operational changes have occurred in the domestic Part 145 repair station industry such as variations in management or hiring practices, training, recordkeeping and technical data, inventory and aircraft parts supply-chain logistics, equipment, and facilities. After interviewing 12 managers from Part 145 repair stations in Oklahoma, six major theme codes emerged from the data: quality of oversight before 2007, quality of oversight after 2007, advantages of oversight, disadvantages of oversight, status quo of oversight, and process improvement . Of those six major theme codes, 17 subthemes appeared from the data that were used to explain the phenomenon of enhanced oversight in the Part 145 repair station industry. Forty-two percent of the participants indicated a weak FAA oversight system that has hindered the continuous process improvement program in their repair stations. Some of them were financially burdened after hiring additional full-time quality assurance inspectors to specifically manage enhanced FAA oversight. Notwithstanding, the participants of the study indicated that the FAA must apply its surveillance on a more standardized and consistent basis. They want to see this standardization in how FAA inspectors interpret regulations and practice the same quality of oversight for all repair stations, particularly those that are repeat violators and fail to comply with federal aviation regulations. They believed that when the FAA enforces standardization on a consistent basis, repair stations can become more efficient and safer in the performance of their scope of work for the U.S. commercial air transportation industry.

  14. TEM-145 and TEM-146 β-lactamases produced by Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-05

    Mar 5, 2007 ... The β-lactamases with pI values of 6.0 and 6.6 could be identified as transcripts of. TEM β-lactamase genes and those with pI values of 7.8 and 8.6 as transcripts of the E. coli chromosomal AmpC genes. The TEM-β-lactamase enzymes showed the following changes compared to TEM-1: TEM-145 had two.

  15. First isolation of the enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O145:H- from cattle in feedlot in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etcheverría Analía I

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is considered to be common cause of haemorrhagic colitis (HC, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS in humans. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that EHEC are commonly found in the intestines of livestock. Infections in humans are, in part, a consequence of consumption of undercooked meat or raw milk. Argentina has one of the highest records of HUS (300–400 cases/year; 22/100,000 children under 4 years of age. The aim of this work is to communicate the first isolation of O145:H-from cattle in this country and characterize the virulence cassette, providing useful information to evaluate the risk of foodborne transmission of this emergent non-O157:H7 serotype. Results EHEC O145:H- was isolated from cattle in an Argentinian feedlot. Pheno- and genotype of nine strains were characterized, corresponding to several virulence cassettes: VT2+eaeA+ Mp+ (n = 5, VT2+eaeA+ (n = 1, VT1+eaeA+ Mp+ (n = 2, and VT1+eaeA+ (n = 1. Strains isolated from the same animal were considered only when they showed a different virulence pattern. The clonal relationship was studied by RAPD. Strains were distributed in two RAPD profiles, which corresponded to the presence of either, VT1+ or VT2+ genotype. No difference was detected by RAPD analysis between Mp+ or Mp- strains. Conclusions This was the first isolation of EHEC O145:H- serotype in Argentina enlarging the list of non-O157:H7 serotypes isolated from cattle in this country by us. All O145:H-strains carried several virulence factors which allow us to predict their potential ability to develop haemolytic uraemic syndrome in humans.

  16. Retrospective evaluation of bone pain palliation after samarium-153-EDTMP therapy Avaliação retrospectiva do tratamento da dor óssea metastática com Samário-153-EDTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tatit Sapienza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of metastatic bone pain palliation and medullar toxicity associated with samarium-153-EDTMP treatment. METHODS: Seventy-three patients with metastatic bone pain having previously undergone therapy with samarium-153-EDTMP (1 mCi/kg were retrospectively evaluated. Routine follow-up included pain evaluation and blood counts for 2 months after treatment. Pain was evaluated using a subjective scale (from 0 to 10 before and for 8 weeks after the treatment. Blood counts were obtained before treatment and once a week for 2 months during follow-up. Dosimetry, based upon the urinary excretion of the isotope, was estimated in 41 individuals, and the resulting radiation absorbed doses were correlated with hematological data. RESULTS: Reduction in pain scores of 75% to 100% was obtained in 36 patients (49%, with a decrease of 50% to 75%, 25% to 50%, and 0% to 25% in, respectively, 20 (27%, 10 (14%, and 7 (10% patients. There was no significant relationship between the pain response and location of the primary tumor (breast or prostate cancer. Mild to moderate myelosuppression was noted in 75.3% of patients, usually with hematological recovery at 8 weeks. The mean bone marrow dose was 347 ± 65 cGy, and only a weak correlation was found between absorbed dose and myelosuppression (Pearson coefficient = .4. CONCLUSIONS: Samarium-153-EDTMP is a valuable method for metastatic bone pain palliation. A mild to moderate and transitory myelosuppression is the main toxicity observed after samarium therapy, showing a weak correlation with dosimetric measures.OBJETIVO: O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito paliativo da dor e a toxicidade medular associados ao tratamento com Samário-153-EDTMP em pacientes com metástases ósseas. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi realizado de forma retrospectiva, a partir do levantamento de prontuário de 178 pacientes submetidos a tratamento com 1mCi/kg de 153Sm

  17. The dynamics of the laser-induced metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS); Die Dynamik des laserinduzierten Metall-Halbleiter-Phasenuebergangs von Samariumsulfid (SmS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaempfer, Tino

    2009-12-15

    The present thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of the metal-semiconductor phase transition of samarium sulfide (SmS): Temperature- and time-resolved experiments on the characterization of the phase transition of mixed-valence SmS samples (M-SmS) are presented. The measurement of the dynamics of the laser-induced phase transition pursues via time-resolved ultrashort-time microscopy and by X-ray diffraction with sub-picosecond time resolution. The electronic and structural processes, which follow an excitation of M-SmS with infrared femtosecond laser pulses, are physically interpreted on the base of the results obtained in this thesis and model imaginations. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit ist der experimentellen Untersuchung des Metall-Halbleiter-Phasenuebergangs von Samariumsulfid (SmS) gewidmet. Es werden temperatur- und zeitaufgeloeste Experimente zur Charakterisierung des Phasenuebergangs gemischt-valenter SmS Proben (M-SmS) vorgestellt. Die Messung der Dynamik des laserinduzierten Phasenuebergangs erfolgt ueber zeitaufgeloeste Ultrakurzzeit-Mikroskopie und durch Roentgenbeugung mit subpikosekunden Zeitaufloesung. Die elektronischen und strukturellen Prozesse, welche einer Anregung von M-SmS mit infraroten Femtosekunden-Laserpulsen folgen, werden auf der Basis der in dieser Arbeit gewonnenen Ergebnisse und Modellvorstellungen physikalisch interpretiert. (orig.)

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.145 - What information must a Federal agency submit to GSA after the agency has identified a need for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What information must a... public building? 102-74.145 Section 102-74.145 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Facility Management Asset Services § 102-74.145 What information must a Federal agency submit to GSA after...

  19. Effects of simulated weightlessness on cellular morphology and biological characteristics of cell lines SGC-7901 and HFE-145

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, M; Jin, X W; Wu, B Y; Nie, J L; Li, Y H

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of simulated weightlessness on cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of the human gastric carcinoma cell line SGC-7901 and the human gastric normal cell line HFE-145...

  20. The epigenetic regulation of SOX9 by miR-145 in human chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Isabella W Y; Singh, Shalini; Turcotte, Robert; Ghert, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy in the adult population with a high rate of pulmonary metastasis. Chondrosarcoma is managed with surgical excision as the tumors do not respond well to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Thus, there exists a dire need to develop systemic treatment options to target chondrosarcoma cells for metastatic spread. We hypothesized that the expression of miR-145 is low in chondrosarcoma, leading to decreased transcriptional control of SOX9 (the master regulator of chondrogenesis), and downstream activation of the transcription factor ETV5. We have previously shown that ETV5 activates MMP-2 expression in chondrosarcoma, which in turn increases local bone matrix resorption. In this study, we confirm high expression of SOX9 in human chondrosarcoma using real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence. An ETV5 promoter-reporter plasmid was transfected into chondrosarcoma cells to determine if SOX9 directly regulates the expression of ETV5. Co-transfection of the ETV5 promoter-plasmid with SOX9 lentivirus significantly increased the luciferase activity derived from the ETV5 promoter, from which the regulatory relationship between SOX9 and ETV5 is established. MiR-145 was found to be down-regulated in chondrosarcoma cell lines, patient samples, and further confirmed with a public sarcoma database. After stable miR-145 lentiviral transfection, the subsequent mRNA expression levels of SOX9, ETV5, and MMP-2 were significantly decreased in chondrosarcoma cells. The results generated by this study may have important clinical significance in the treatment of patients with chondrosarcoma in that targeted miRNA may have the potential to downregulate the upstream activators of proteases such as MMP-2. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Computer-assisted assessment of ultrasound real-time elastography: Initial experience in 145 breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xue; Xiao, Yang [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Zeng, Jie [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Qiu, Weibao; Qian, Ming; Wang, Congzhi [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Zheng, Rongqin, E-mail: zhengronggin@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zheng, Hairong, E-mail: hr.zheng@siat.ac.cn [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computer-assisted method of quantifying five-point elasticity scoring system based on ultrasound real-time elastography (RTE), for classifying benign and malignant breast lesions, with pathologic results as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Conventional ultrasonography (US) and RTE images of 145 breast lesions (67 malignant, 78 benign) were performed in this study. Each lesion was automatically contoured on the B-mode image by the level set method and mapped on the RTE image. The relative elasticity value of each pixel was reconstructed and classified into hard or soft by the fuzzy c-means clustering method. According to the hardness degree inside lesion and its surrounding tissue, the elasticity score of the RTE image was computed in an automatic way. Visual assessments of the radiologists were used for comparing the diagnostic performance. Histopathologic examination was used as the reference standard. The Student's t test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. Results: Considering score 4 or higher as test positive for malignancy, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 93.8% (136/145), 92.5% (62/67), 94.9% (74/78), 93.9% (62/66), and 93.7% (74/79) for the computer-assisted scheme, and 89.7% (130/145), 85.1% (57/67), 93.6% (73/78), 92.0% (57/62), and 88.0% (73/83) for manual assessment. Area under ROC curve (A{sub z} value) for the proposed method was higher than the A{sub z} value for visual assessment (0.96 vs. 0.93). Conclusion: Computer-assisted quantification of classical five-point scoring system can significantly eliminate the interobserver variability and thereby improve the diagnostic confidence of classifying the breast lesions to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  2. MicroRNA-145 suppresses ROS-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload of cardiomyocytes by targeting CaMKIIδ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Min-Ji [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin-Kyung [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 HyoChangWon-Gil, Yongsan-ku, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Onju; Song, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Se-Yeon [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Yeon; Park, Jun-Hee [Department of Integrated Omics for Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eunhyun [Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University Health System, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Woo-min [Department of Animal Resource, Sahmyook University, Seoul 139-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hye Jin [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun-Taek [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 HyoChangWon-Gil, Yongsan-ku, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •CaMKIIδ mediates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. •miR-145 can inhibit Ca{sup 2+} overload. •A luciferase assay confirms that miR-145 functions as a CaMKIIδ-targeting miRNA. •Overexpression of miR-145 regulates CaMKIIδ-related genes and ameliorates apoptosis. -- Abstract: A change in intracellular free calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) is a common signaling mechanism of reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte death. Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a critical regulator of Ca{sup 2+} signaling and mediates signaling pathways responsible for functions in the heart including hypertrophy, apoptosis, arrhythmia, and heart disease. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are involved in the regulation of cell response, including survival, proliferation, apoptosis, and development. However, the roles of miRNAs in Ca{sup 2+}-mediated apoptosis of cardiomyocytes are uncertain. Here, we determined the potential role of miRNA in the regulation of CaMKII dependent apoptosis and explored its underlying mechanism. To determine the potential roles of miRNAs in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated Ca{sup 2+} overload, we selected and tested 6 putative miRNAs that targeted CaMKIIδ, and showed that miR-145 represses CaMKIIδ protein expression and Ca{sup 2+} overload. We confirmed CaMKIIδ as a direct downstream target of miR-145. Furthermore, miR-145 regulates Ca{sup 2+}-related signals and ameliorates apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-145 regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. Thus, miR-145 affects ROS-mediated gene regulation and cellular injury responses.

  3. Interaction of lincRNA ROR and p53/miR-145 correlates with lung cancer stem cell signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fan; Xiong, Ye; Li, Qiang

    2017-05-18

    ROR is one of large intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) and acts as a strong negative regulator of p53 and a sponge for miR-145 to regulate diverse cancer progression. However, the interaction of ROR, p53 and miR-145 in lung cancer and its correlation with lung cancer stem cell (LCSC) signatures were not fully understood. Here, qRT-PCR analysis revealed that p53 and ROR were upregulated while miR-145 was downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and LCSCs compared to their paired adjacent normal tissues and lung cancer cells (LCCs). Besides, high p53 level, low miR-145 level, and high ROR level were associated with poor prognosis in NSCLC. Then, we found that silencing ROR failed to change p53 mRNA level but promoted p53 protein level, suggesting a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism involved in si-ROR-mediated promotion of p53. While silencing p53 moderately downregulated ROR. Additionally, silencing ROR or p53 upregulated miR-145. However, silencing both ROR and p53 failed to make obvious change to miR-145 mRNA level and p53 protein level. And interestingly, miR-145 negatively regulated Oct4 and Sox2. We also found that silencing ROR and (or) p53 suppressed in vitro cell proliferation, migration and invasion in LCSCs and LCCs. And suppression of endogenous ROR reduced the in vivo tumor growth and metastasis of LCSCs. Our study demonstrated that ROR and p53/miR-145 correlated with prognosis in NSCLC as well as cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity of LCSCs, shedding new light on novel therapeutic options in lung cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Exposure-related effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) on juvenile unionid mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kerry L.; Luoma, James A.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.; Eckert, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The exposure-related effects of a commercially prepared spray-dried powder (SDP) or freeze-dried powder (FDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) on the survival of seven species of newly metamorphosed (randomly distributed to test chambers and each species independently exposed for 24 hours to a static dose of either SDP (four species: Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Lampsilis higginsii, andLigumia recta) or FDP (three species: Obovaria olivaria, Actinonaias ligamentina, andMegalonaias nervosa).

  5. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop an efficacious and environmentally safe method for managing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and quaggamussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, we initiated a research project investigating the potential use of bacteria and their naturalmetabolic products as biocontrol agents. This project resulted in the discovery of an environmental isolate lethal to dreissenid mussels,Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A. In previous published reports we have demonstrated that: 1 Pf-CL145A’s mode ofaction is intoxication (not infection; 2 natural product within ingested bacterial cells lyse digestive tract epithelial cells leading to dreisseniddeath; and 3 high dreissenid kill rates (>90% are achievable following treatment with Pf-CL145A cells, irrespective of whether thebacterial cells are dead or alive. Investigating the environmental safety of Pf-CL145A was also a key element in our research efforts, andherein, we report the results of non-target trials demonstrating Pf-CL145A’s high specificity to dreissenids. These acute toxicity trials weretypically single-dose, short-term (24-72 h exposures to Pf-CL145A cells under aerated conditions at concentrations highly lethal todreissenids (100 or 200 mg/L. These trials produced no evidence of mortality among the ciliate Colpidium colpoda, the cladoceran Daphniamagna, three fish species (Pimephales promelas, Salmo trutta, and Lepomis macrochirus, and seven bivalve species (Mytilus edulis,Pyganodon grandis, Pyganodon cataracta, Lasmigona compressa, Strophitus undulatus, Lampsilis radiata, and Elliptio complanata. Lowmortality (3-27% was recorded in the amphipod Hyalella azteca, but additional trials suggested that most, if not all, of the mortality couldbe attributed to some other unidentified factor (e.g., possibly particle load or a water quality issue rather than Pf-CL145A’s dreissenidkillingnatural product. In terms of potential environmental safety, the results of

  6. The XMM Cluster Survey: A Massive Galaxy Cluster at z = 1.45

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, S A; Romer, A K; Sabirli, K; Davidson, M; Hilton, M; Viana, P P; Collins, C A; Kay, S T; Liddle, A R; Mann, R G; Miller, C J; Nichol, R C; West, M J; Conselice, C J; Spinrad, H; Stern, D; Bundy, K

    2006-05-24

    We report the discovery of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738, a massive galaxy cluster at z = 1.45, which was found in the XMM Cluster Survey. The cluster candidate was initially identified as an extended X-ray source in archival XMM data. Optical spectroscopy shows that 6 galaxies within a {approx}60 arcsec diameter region lie at z = 1.45 {+-} 0.01. Model fits to the X-ray spectra of the extended emission yield kT = 7.4{sub -1.8}{sup +2.7} keV (90% confidence); if there is an undetected central X-ray point source then kT = 6.5{sub -1.8}{sup +2.6} keV. The bolometric X-ray luminosity is L{sub x} = 4.4{sub -0.6}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup 44} ergs s{sup -1} over a 2 Mpc radial region. The measured T{sub x}, which is the highest for any known cluster at z > 1, suggests that this cluster is relatively massive for such a high redshift. The redshift of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 is the highest currently known for a spectroscopically-confirmed cluster of galaxies.

  7. Retinoic Acid Induces Apoptosis of Prostate Cancer DU145 Cells through Cdk5 Overactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chih Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA has been believed to be an anticancer drug for a long history. However, the molecular mechanisms of RA actions on cancer cells remain diverse. In this study, the dose-dependent inhibition of RA on DU145 cell proliferation was identified. Interestingly, RA treatment triggered p35 cleavage (p25 formation and Cdk5 overactivation, and all could be blocked by Calpain inhibitor, Calpeptin (CP. Subsequently, RA-triggered DU145 apoptosis detected by sub-G1 phase accumulation and Annexin V staining could also be blocked by CP treatment. Furthermore, RA-triggered caspase 3 activation and following Cdk5 over-activation were destroyed by treatments of both CP and Cdk5 knockdown. In conclusion, we report a new mechanism in which RA could cause apoptosis of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells through p35 cleavage and Cdk5 over-activation. This finding may contribute to constructing a clearer image of RA function and bring RA as a valuable chemoprevention agent for prostate cancer patients.

  8. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narod, S.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada); Ford, D. [Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom); Devilee, P. [Univ. of Leiden (United Kingdom); Barkardottir, R.B. [University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Lynch, H.T. [Creighton Univ. School of Medicine, Omaha, NE (United States); Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Weber, B.L. [Univ. of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garber, J.E. [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Birch, J.M. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Association of miR-145 With Statin-Induced Skeletal Muscle Toxicity in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma RD Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shun; Nakanishi, Takeo; Shirasaki, Yuma; Nakajima, Miki; Tamai, Ikumi

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle toxicity including rhabdomyolysis in severe case is a major side effect of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. We, therefore, aimed at exploring microRNA (miRNA) expression to understand molecular mechanism of statin-induced toxicity. miRNA expression profiling assay for cerivastatin (1 μM for 48 h)-treated RD cells showed more than 2-fold decrease in 26 miRNA expressions with miR-145 being downregulated prominently. When RD cells were treated with cerivastatin at 10 μM for 36 h, mitochondrial dysfunction was observed in 49.6% of the population without causing apoptosis, whereas 82% underwent apoptosis when treated at 10 μM for 48 h. In RD cells treated under the same condition (10 μM for 48 h), miR-145 expression and mRNA expressions of proapoptotic APAF1 and CASP10 genes, potential targets of miR-145, significantly decreased and increased, respectively. Moreover, enforced expression of miR-145 reduced apoptotic cell population of cerivastatin-treated RD cells (10 μM for 36 h). Because miR-145 increased in extracellular medium from cerivastatin-treated RD cells, miR-145 was suggested to be secreted in response to statin-induced toxicity. These results provide a new rationale for statin's toxicity that statin-induced apoptosis is caused by enhanced expression of proapoptotic genes mediated by decreased intracellular miR-145 due to statin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cycles revealed in Jurassic paleoclimatic data (ca. 200-145 Ma B.P.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, P. B.; Dergachev, V. A.; Tyasto, M. I.; Blagoveshchenskaya, E. E.

    2016-12-01

    Limestone varves from the Todilto Basin, New Mexico (United States), are studied. These deposits cover a time interval of 1592 years and belong to the Jurassic (ca. 200-145 Ma B.P.). Via the construction of a combined spectral periodogram, quasiharmonic components are revealed in the initial data. The periods of these components are close to the basic contemporary solar activity cycles: the periods of 13 and 20 years agree with the Schwabe and Hale cycles; that of 78 years is in accord with the Gleissberg cycle (with both branches of 69 and 105 years represented); and the components of 179 and 235 years can be probably related to the Suess or de Vries cycles. The results indicate the influence of solar activity on the terrestrial climate in the geological past.

  11. Redetermination of the borax structure from laboratory X-ray data at 145 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Higham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, sodium tetraborate decahydrate (mineral name: borax, Na2[B4O5(OH4]·8H2O, has been studied previously using X-ray [Morimoto (1956. Miner. J. 2, 1–18] and neutron [Levy & Lisensky (1978. Acta Cryst. B34, 3502–3510] diffraction data. The structure contains tetraborate anions [B4O5(OH4]2− with twofold rotation symmetry, which form hydrogen-bonded chains, and [Na(H2O6] octahedra that form zigzag chains [Na(H2O4/2(H2O2/1]. The O—H bond distances obtained from the present redetermination at 145 K are shorter than those in the neutron study by an average of 0.127 (19 Å.

  12. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from platelet plasma membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengasamy, A.; Feinberg, H.

    1988-02-15

    A platelet membrane preparation, enriched in plasma membrane markers, took up /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in exchange for intravesicular Na+ and released it after the addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The possibility that contaminating dense tubular membrane (DTS) vesicles contributed the Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was eliminated by the addition of vanadate to inhibit Ca/sup +/-ATPase-mediated DTS Ca/sup 2 +/ sequestration and by the finding that only plasma membrane vesicles exhibit Na/sup +/-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was dependent on low extravesicular Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations. IP3-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ release was additive to that released by Na/sup +/ addition while GTP or polyethylene glycol (PEG) had no effect. These results strongly suggest that IP3 facilitates extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ influx in addition to release from DTS membranes.

  13. Estrogen stimulates osteoprotegerin expression via the suppression of miR-145 expression in MG-63 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Zeng, Xiantie; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is implicated in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, and other metabolic bone diseases caused by estrogen deficiency. Previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen may stimulate OPG expression in osteoblast cells at the transcriptional level; however, whether estrogen can regulate OPG expression at a post-transcriptional level remains elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA (miRNA) in estrogen‑mediated OPG production in human osteoblast‑like MG‑63 cells. The results from ELISA, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) confirmed that estrogen may upregulate OPG expression. Mechanistic studies indicated that estrogen increased the activity of a luciferase reporter harboring the OPG 3'‑untranslated region (3'‑UTR). Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that there is a potential targeting site in the OPG 3'‑UTR for miRNA (miR)‑145, which is associated with osteoblast differentiation. The results of an RT‑qPCR suggested that estrogen suppressed miR‑145 expression. In addition, dual‑luciferase assay, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis indicated that miR‑145 directly targets and negatively regulates OPG expression. Furthermore, transfection of cells with miR‑145 mimics was able to partially inhibit the induction of OPG expression by estrogen, thus confirming the role of miR‑145 in estrogen‑mediated OPG induction. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrated that estrogen may post-transcriptionally regulate OPG expression through suppression of miR-145 expression.

  14. MicroRNAs regulate human adipocyte lipolysis: effects of miR-145 are linked to TNF-α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lorente-Cebrián

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have multiple effects in various tissues including adipose inflammation, a condition characterized by increased local release of the pro-lipolytic cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. Whether miRNAs regulate adipocyte lipolysis is unknown. We set out to determine whether miRNAs affect adipocyte lipolysis in human fat cells. To this end, eleven miRNAs known to be present in human adipose tissue were over-expressed in human in vitro differentiated adipocytes followed by assessments of TNF-α and glycerol levels in conditioned media after 48 h. Three miRNAs (miR-145, -26a and let-7d modulated both parameters in parallel. However, while miR-26a and let-7d decreased, miR-145 increased both glycerol release and TNF-α secretion. Further studies were focused therefore on miR-145 since this was the only stimulator of lipolysis and TNF-α secretion. Time-course analysis demonstrated that miR-145 over-expression up-regulated TNF-α expression/secretion followed by increased glycerol release. Increase in TNF-α production by miR-145 was mediated via activation of p65, a member of the NF-κB complex. In addition, miR-145 down-regulated the expression of the protease ADAM17, resulting in an increased fraction of membrane bound TNF-α, which is the more biologically active form of TNF-α. MiR-145 overexpression also increased the phosphorylation of activating serine residues in hormone sensitive lipase and decreased the mRNA expression of phosphodiesterase 3B, effects which are also observed upon TNF-α treatment in human adipocytes. We conclude that miR-145 regulates adipocyte lipolysis via multiple mechanisms involving increased production and processing of TNF-α in fat cells.

  15. Determination of the nuclear magnetic moments of 145–148Eu by low-temperature nuclear orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. van den Berg

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear orientation measurements down to 2 mK have been performed on sources of 145–148Eu in SmFe2. The gamma-ray anisotropy yields the nuclear magnetic moments of the europium nuclei with A = 145, 146, 147and148 to be 1.1 ± 0.3 μN, 0.70 ± 0.07 μN, 1.0 ± 0.1 μN and 1.33 ± 0.06 μN, respectively.

  16. 42 CFR 435.145 - Children for whom adoption assistance or foster care maintenance payments are made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Coverage of the Categorically Needy Mandatory Coverage of Adoption Assistance and Foster Care Children § 435.145 Children for whom adoption assistance or foster care maintenance payments are made. The agency must provide Medicaid to children for whom adoption assistance or foster care maintenance payments are...

  17. Results of NOPHO ALL2008 treatment for patients aged 1-45 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, N; Birgens, H; Abrahamsson, J

    2018-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) do worse than children. From 7/2008 to 12/2014, Nordic and Baltic centers treated 1509 consecutive patients aged 1-45 years with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL according to the NOPHO ALL2008 without cranial irradiation. Overall, 1022 patients w...

  18. Role of IGF-1/IGF-1R in regulation of invasion in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setya Hemani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer progression to androgen independence is the primary cause of mortality by this tumor type. The IGF-1/IGF-1R axis is well known to contribute to prostate cancer initiation, but its contribution to invasiveness and the downstream signalling mechanisms that are involved are unclear at present. Results We examined the invasive response of androgen independent DU145 prostate carcinoma cells to IGF-1 stimulation using Matrigel assays. We then examined the signaling mechanisms and protease activities that are associated with this response. IGF-1 significantly increased the invasive capacity of DU145 cells in vitro, and this increase was inhibited by blocking IGF-1R. We further demonstrated that specific inhibitors of the MAPK and PI3-K pathways decrease IGF-1-mediated invasion. To determine potential molecular mechanisms for this change in invasive capacity, we examined changes in expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We observed that IGF-1 increases the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in DU145 cells. These changes in activity are due to differences in expression in the case of MMP-9 but not in the case of MMP-2. This observation is corroborated by the fact that correlated changes of expression in a regulator of MMP-2, TIMP-2, were also seen. Conclusion This work identifies a specific effect of IGF-1 on the invasive capacity of DU145 prostate cancer cells, and furthermore delineates mechanisms that contribute to this effect.

  19. A Novel, Phospholipase C-independent Pathway of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Formation in Dictyostelium and Rat Liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, Peter van; Haas, Jan-Roelof de; Craxton, Andrew; Erneux, Christophe; Shears, Stephen B.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    In an earlier study a mutant Dictyostelium cell-line (plc(-)) was constructed in which all phospholipase C activity was disrupted and nonfunctional, yet these cells had nearly normal Ins(1,4,5)P-3 levels (Drayer, A. L., Van Der Kaay, J., Mayr, G. W, Van Haastert, P. J. M. (1990) EMBO J. 13,

  20. c-Met inhibitor SU11274 enhances the response of the prostate cancer cell line DU145 to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongliang; Li, Xiaoying; Sun, Shaoqian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, Beijing (China); Gao, Xianshu, E-mail: xsgao777@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University First Hospital, Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhou, Demin, E-mail: deminzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-Met inhibition could significantly enhance the radiosensitivity of DU145 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanisms of the radiosensitization effect of c-Met inhibition on DU145 cells were also presented in this paper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study demonstrating the effectiveness of c-Met inhibition on treating HRPC cells with radiotherapy. -- Abstract: Hormone-refractory prostate cancer shows substantial resistance to most conventional therapies including radiotherapy, constitutes a key impediment to curing patients with the disease. c-Met overexpression plays a key role in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that c-Met inhibition by SU11274 could significantly suppress cell survival and proliferation as well as enhance the radiosensitivity of DU145 cells. The underlying mechanisms of the effects of SU11274 on DU145 cells may include the inhibition of c-Met signaling, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, impairment of DNA repair function, abrogation of cell cycle arrest, and enhancement of cell death. Our study is the first to show the effectiveness of combining c-Met inhibition with ionizing radiation to cure hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  1. 41 CFR 102-38.145 - Must we allow for inspection of the personal property to be sold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 38-SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Sales Process Pre-Sale Activities § 102-38.145 Must we allow for... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must we allow for...

  2. 26 CFR 145.4051-1 - Imposition of tax on heavy trucks and trailers sold at retail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imposition of tax on heavy trucks and trailers... THE HIGHWAY REVENUE ACT OF 1982 (PUB. L. 97-424) § 145.4051-1 Imposition of tax on heavy trucks and...) Automobile truck chassis and bodies; (ii) Truck trailer and semitrailer chassis and bodies; and (iii...

  3. Hypoacetylation, hypomethylation, and dephosphorylation of H2B histones and excessive histone deacetylase activity in DU-145 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, Shundong; Xu, Xiaobin; Ma, Yuehua; Liu, Delong; Chiao, J W

    2016-01-12

    Hypoacetylation on histone H3 of human prostate cancer cells has been described. Little is known about the modifications of other histones from prostate cancer cells. Histones were isolated from the prostate cancer cell line DU-145 and the non-malignant prostatic cell line RC170N/h. Post-translational modifications of histone H2B were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The histone H2B of the prostate cancer cell line DU-145 was found to have hypoacetylation, hypomethylation, and dephosphorylation as compared to the non-malignant prostatic cell line RC170N/h. H2B regained acetylation on multiple lysine residues, phosphorylation on Thr19, and methylation on Lys23 and Lys43 in the DU-145 cells after sodium butyrate treatment. The histone H2B of DU-145 prostate cancer cells are hypoacetylated, hypomethylated, and dephosphorylated. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reversed this phenotype. Epigenetic agent may therefore be useful for prostate cancer therapy and worth further investigation.

  4. Hypoacetylation, hypomethylation, and dephosphorylation of H2B histones and excessive histone deacetylase activity in DU-145 prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shundong Cang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoacetylation on histone H3 of human prostate cancer cells has been described. Little is known about the modifications of other histones from prostate cancer cells. Methods Histones were isolated from the prostate cancer cell line DU-145 and the non-malignant prostatic cell line RC170N/h. Post-translational modifications of histone H2B were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Results The histone H2B of the prostate cancer cell line DU-145 was found to have hypoacetylation, hypomethylation, and dephosphorylation as compared to the non-malignant prostatic cell line RC170N/h. H2B regained acetylation on multiple lysine residues, phosphorylation on Thr19, and methylation on Lys23 and Lys43 in the DU-145 cells after sodium butyrate treatment. Conclusions The histone H2B of DU-145 prostate cancer cells are hypoacetylated, hypomethylated, and dephosphorylated. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reversed this phenotype. Epigenetic agent may therefore be useful for prostate cancer therapy and worth further investigation.

  5. 75 FR 27403 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model EMB-135 and -145...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ...-041-AD; Amendment 39-16290; AD 2010-10-11] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira... the following new AD: 2010-10-11 Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER): Amendment 39-16290... Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model EMB-135BJ, -135ER, -135KE, -135KL, -135LR, -145...

  6. Neurological findings in complex regional pain syndromes--analysis of 145 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklein, F; Riedl, B; Sieweke, N; Weber, M; Neundörfer, B

    2000-04-01

    Early diagnosis is a prerequisite for a successful treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In order to describe neurological symptoms which characterize CRPS, we evaluated 145 patients prospectively. Two-thirds of these were women, the mean age at time of investigation was 50.4 years. CRPS followed limb trauma, surgery and nerve lesion. Employing the current IASP criteria 122 patients were classified as CRPS I and 23 as CRPS II. All patients were assessed clinically pain was quantified using the McGill pain questionnaire, skin temperature was measured by an infrared thermometer and a subgroup of 57 patients was retested in order to determine thermal thresholds (QST). Of our patients 42% reported stressful life events in a close relationship to the onset of CRPS and 41% had a history of chronic pain before CRPS. The latter group of patients gave a higher rating of CRPS pain (PCRPS. Skin temperature was warmer in acute and colder in chronic stages (PCRPS could help physicians early to recognize the disease and thus to improve therapy outcome.

  7. Environmental conditions and human drivers for changes to north Ethiopian mountain landscapes over 145 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyssen, Jan; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Hurni, Hans; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crummey, Donald; Ritler, Alfons; Portner, Brigitte; Nievergelt, Bernhard; Moeyersons, Jan; Munro, Neil; Deckers, Jozef; Billi, Paolo; Poesen, Jean

    2014-07-01

    As quantitative or spatially distributed studies of environmental change over truly long-term periods of more than 100 years are extremely rare, we re-photographed 361 landscapes that appear on historical photographs (1868-1994) within a 40,000 km(2) study area in northern Ethiopia. Visible evidence of environmental changes apparent from the paired photographs was analyzed using an expert rating system. The conditions of the woody vegetation, soil and water conservation structures and land management were worse in the earlier periods compared to their present conditions. The cover by indigenous trees is a notable exception: it peaked in the 1930s, declined afterwards and then achieved a second peak in the early 21st century. Particularly in areas with greater population densities, there has been a significant increase in woody vegetation and soil and water conservation structures over the course of the study period. We conclude that except for an apparent upward movement of the upper tree limit, the direct human impacts on the environment are overriding the effects of climate change in the north Ethiopian highlands and that the northern Ethiopian highlands are currently greener than at any other time in the last 145 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of proliferation of prostate cancer cell line DU-145 in vitro and in vivo using Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Syn Ha, U; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Kim, Sae Woong

    2017-03-23

    To investigate the antiproliferative activity of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. (SM) on the castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell line DU-145, in vitro and in vivo. Prostate cancer cell line (DU-145) and normal prostate cell line (RWPE-1) were treated with SM at different concentrations (3.125, 12.5, 25 and 50 μg/mL) to investigate the antiproliferative effects. DNA laddering analysis was performed to investigate the apoptosis of DU-145 cells. Molecular mechanism was investigated by Western blot analysis of p53, Bcl-2, prostate specific antigen (PSA), and androgen receptor (AR). Six-week-old male BALB/c nude mice were randomly divided into normal control group (n=101) and treated group (n=101) which administered 500 mg/kg SM for 2 weeks. Tumor volumes were measured. Treatment with SM resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell number of DU-145 cells in comparison with RWPE-1. DNA laddering analysis indicated the apoptosis of DU-145 cells. Treatment with SM increased the expression of p53 and reduced the expression of Bcl-2 proteins. The levels of PSA were considerably reduced in SM-treated group compared to the controls, and a decrease in AR expression was observed when cells were treated with SM in the same pattern as a reduction in PSA. In the tumour xenograft study, SM given once a day for 2 weeks significantly inhibited tumour growth. SM might contribute to the anticancer actions such as induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation of prostate cancer cells.

  9. A dataset on 145 chemicals tested in alternative assays for skin sensitization undergoing prevalidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsch, Andreas; Ryan, Cindy A; Foertsch, Leslie; Emter, Roger; Jaworska, Joanna; Gerberick, Frank; Kern, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Skin sensitization is a key endpoint for cosmetic ingredients, with a forthcoming ban for animal testing in Europe. Four alternative tests have so far been submitted to ECVAM prevalidation: (i) MUSST and (ii) h-Clat assess surface markers on dendritic cell lines, (iii) the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) measures reactivity with model peptides and (iv) the KeratinoSens(TM) assay which is based on detection of Nrf2-induced luciferase. It is anticipated that only an integrated testing strategy (ITS) based on a battery of tests might give a full replacement providing also a sensitization potency assessment, but this concept should be tested with a data-driven analysis. Here we report a database on 145 chemicals reporting the quantitative endpoints measured in a U937- test, the DPRA and KeratinoSens(TM) . It can serve to develop data-driven ITS approaches as we show in a parallel paper and provides a view as to the current ability to predict with in vitro tests as we are entering 2013. It may also serve as reference database when benchmarking new molecules with in vitro based read-across and find use as a reference database when evaluating new tests. The tests and combinations thereof were evaluated for predictivity, and overall a similar predictivity was found as before on three-fold smaller datasets. Analysis of the dose-response parameters of the individual tests indicates a correlation to sensitization potency. Detailed analysis of chemicals false-negative and false-positive in two tests helped to define limitations in the tests but also in the database derived from animal studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Outcome of retinal reattachment surgery in dogs: a retrospective study of 145 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Kirsten A; Sisler, Steve; Gerding, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    To summarize the clinical outcomes and complications of pars plana vitrectomy with perfluoro-n-octane (PFO)-silicone oil exchange and endolaser retinopexy for treatment of retinal detachment (RD) in dogs, at one surgical center. Records of 145 dogs (168 eyes) that underwent retinal reattachment surgery (RR) between 2005 and 2009 were reviewed. All surgeries were performed by the same surgeon (SS). Data collected from the medical records included signalment, duration of time from diagnosis of RD to surgical intervention, if prior lensectomy was performed, time from surgery to restoration of vision, and postoperative complications. The data was analyzed to test the effect of breed, prior lensectomy, and time from diagnosis to surgery on visual outcome, tendency for complications, and time of complication onset. One hundred thirty pure-bred dogs (36 breeds) and 15 mixed-breed dogs were represented. One hundred fifty-five of 168 eyes (92%) were visual after surgery. Six of 155 eyes (3.8%) were visual before the procedure and retained vision; one hundred forty-nine of 155 eyes (96%) were nonvisual before and regained vision afterward. Thirteen of 168 eyes (8%) that were nonvisual prior to the procedure did not regain vision. The most common complications in order of occurrence included: cataract development, silicone prolapse into the anterior chamber, corneal ulceration, retinal degeneration, glaucoma, and uveitis. Pars plana vitrectomy with PFO-silicone oil exchange and endolaser retinopexy for treatment of RD in dogs is highly successful and associated with overall good visual outcome. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  11. Phenotypic profiling of parents with cryptic nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia: findings in 145 unrelated families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopal, Radha; Sinaii, Ninet; Avila, Nilo A; Van Ryzin, Carol; Chen, Wuyan; Finkielstain, Gabriela P; Mehta, Sneha P; McDonnel, Nazli B; Merke, Deborah P

    2012-01-01

    Objective To comprehensively phenotype parents identified with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH) by family genetic studies, termed here as cryptic NCCAH and to define the incidence of cryptic NCCAH in the parents of a large cohort of patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Design Genotyping was performed on 249 parents of 145 unrelated congenital adrenal hyperplasia CAH) patients. Parents with two CYP21A2 mutations underwent extensive evaluation. Results Of the 249 parents, ten (4%; seven females and three males) were identified as having cryptic NCCAH. The majority was of ethnicities previously reported to have a higher incidence of NCCAH. Cosyntropin stimulation performed in eight parents provided biochemical confirmation (17-hydroxyprogesterone range 56–364 nmol/l) and cortisol response was % 500 nmol/l in three parents (38%). Of the seven women (27–54 years) with cryptic NCCAH, four had prior infertility, two reported irregular menses, two had treatment for hirsutism, one had androgenic alopecia. Men were asymptomatic. All cryptic NCCAH parents reported normal puberty and had normal height. Adrenal hypertrophy and a small adrenal myelolipoma were observed in two parents; testicular adrenal rest tissue was not found. Conclusions Parents diagnosed with NCCAH by genetic testing are mostly asymptomatic. Temporary female infertility and suboptimal cortisol response were commonly observed. Ongoing glucocorticoid therapy is not indicated in adults with CAH identified by family genotype studies unless symptomatic, but glucocorticoid stress coverage should be considered in select cases. Parents of a child with CAH have a 1:25 risk of having NCCAH; if the mother of a child with CAH has infertility, evaluation for NCCAH is indicated. PMID:21444649

  12. The neutron electric form factor to Q² = 1.45 (GeV/c)²

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaster, Bradley [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The nucleon elastic electromagnetic form factors are fundamental quantities needed for an understanding of nucleon and nuclear electromagnetic structure. The evolution of the Sachs electric and magnetic form factors with Q2, the square of the four-momentum transfer, is related to the distribution of charge and magnetization within the nucleon. High precision measurements of the nucleon form factors are essential for stringent tests of our current theoretical understanding of confinement within the nucleon. Measurements of the neutron form factors, in particular, those of the neutron electric form factor, have been notoriously difficult due to the lack of a free neutron target and the vanishing integral charge of the neutron. Indeed, a precise measurement of the neutron electric form factor has eluded experimentalists for decades; however, with the advent of high duty-factor polarized electron beam facilities, experiments employing polarization degrees of freedom have finally yielded the first precise measurements of this fundamental quantity. Following a general overview of the experimental and theoretical status of the nucleon form factors, a detailed description of an experiment designed to extract the neutron electric form factor from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in quasielastic 2H(e, e')1H scattering is presented. The experiment described here employed the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's longitudinally polarized electron beam, a magnetic spectrometer for detection of the scattered electron, and a neutron polarimeter designed specifically for this experiment. Measurements were conducted at three Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)2, and the final results extracted from an analysis of the data acquired in this experiment are reported and compared with recent theoretical predictions for the nucleon form factors.

  13. lincRNA-RoR and miR-145 regulate invasion in triple-negative breast cancer via targeting ARF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eades, Gabriel; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhang, Yongshu; Li, Qinglin; Yao, Yuan; Zhou, Qun

    2015-02-01

    Triple-negative (ER(-), HER2(-), PR(-)) breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis with no available molecularly targeted therapy. Silencing of microRNA-145 (miR-145) may be a defining marker of TNBC based on molecular profiling and deep sequencing. Therefore, the molecular mechanism behind miR-145 downregulation in TNBC was examined. Overexpression of the long intergenic noncoding RNA regulator of reprogramming, lincRNA-RoR, functions as a competitive endogenous RNA sponge in TNBC. Interestingly, lincRNA-RoR is dramatically upregulated in TNBC and in metastatic disease and knockdown restores miR-145 expression. Previous reports suggest that miR-145 has growth-suppressive activity in some breast cancers; however, these data in TNBC indicate that miR-145 does not affect proliferation or apoptosis but instead, miR-145 regulates tumor cell invasion. Investigation of miR-145-regulated pathways involved in tumor invasion revealed a novel target, the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6). Subsequent analysis demonstrated that ARF6, a known regulator of breast tumor cell invasion, is dramatically upregulated in TNBC and in breast tumor metastasis. Mechanistically, ARF6 regulates E-cadherin localization and affects cell-cell adhesion. These results reveal a lincRNA-RoR/miR-145/ARF6 pathway that regulates invasion in TNBCs. The lincRNA-RoR/miR-145/ARF6 pathway is critical to TNBC metastasis and could serve as biomarkers or therapeutic targets for improving survival. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. The role of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) in signal transduction of the metabolic neuropeptide Mem-CC in the cetoniid beetle, Pachnoda sinuata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerswald, Lutz; Gäde, Gerd

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated the role of inositol triphosphate, Ins(1,4,5)P(3), in the transduction of the hypertrehalosaemic and hyperprolinaemic signal of the endogenous neuropeptide Mem-CC in the cetoniid beetle Pachnoda sinuata. Flight and injection of Mem-CC into the haemocoel of the beetle induce an increase of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels in the fat body of the beetle. When Mem-CC is co-injected with U 73122, which is an inhibitor of phospholipase C, this effect is abolished. Mem-CC also elevates Ins(1,4,5)P(3) concentration in fat body pieces in vitro. The increase in Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels is tissue-specific and does not occur in brain and flight muscles. Elevation of the Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels upon injection of Mem-CC is time- and dose-dependent: the maximum response is reached after 3 min and a dose of 10 pmol is needed. Compounds that mimic the action of cAMP (cpt-cAMP, forskolin) do not influence the concentration of Ins(1,4,5)P(3), while those that stimulate G-proteins (aluminium fluoride and cholera toxin) cause an increase of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels. The application (in vivo and in vitro) of F-Ins(1,4,5)P(3), an Ins(1,4,5)P(3) analogue that penetrates the cell membrane, causes a mobilisation of carbohydrate reserves via the activation of glycogen phosphorylase but does not stimulate proline synthesis. In addition, U 73122 abolishes the hypertrehalosaemic but not the hyperprolinaemic effect of Mem-CC. The results suggest that the hypertrehalosaemic signal of Mem-CC is mediated via an increase of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels in the fat body of P. sinuata.

  15. Rancang Bangun Demodulator FSK pada Frekuensi 145,9 MHz untuk Perangkat Receiver Satelit ITS-SAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Respati Loy Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Setelah mengembangkan satelit nano IINUSAT-01 dan IINUSAT-02 bersama INSPIRE, ITS memulai kemandirian dalam membuat satelit yang dinamakan ITS-SAT. Salah satu fungsi satelit ini adalah melakukan pengiriman data teks pada lintasan uplink 145,9 MHz. Agar pengiriman data teks dapat berjalan dibutuhkan demodulator FSK pada frekuensi 145,9 MHz yang berfungsi untuk mendemodulasikan informasi awal. Demodulator FSK dirancang menggunakan IC Si4464 yang terintegrasi dengan Low Noise Amplifier serta Down Converter sehingga menjadi perangkat receiver terpadu. Rangkaian demodulator yang dirancang memiliki ukuran 3,9 x 2,1 cm. Hasil pengujian dan pengukuran perangkat menunjukkan bahwa demodulator FSK mampu bekerja dengan laju data 1200 baud. Frekuensi keluaran modulator FSK adalah 600 Hz dengan power spectral 24,87 dBm. Demodulator ini ditempatkan pada payload satelit ITS-SAT yang akan diintegrasikan dengan perangkat transceiver lainnya.

  16. Fabrication of an optimized hexapole magnet for a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Byung-Hoon; Seo, Chang Seog; In, Sang-Ryul; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2010-02-01

    A hexapole magnet for a 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, where the maximum radial field on the wall of the plasma chamber is higher than 1.1 T, has been designed and fabricated. The size of the outer diameter and the number of the sector of the hexapole are optimized for a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source with the help of a three-dimensional field calculation code. Moreover, to make a strong and long-life magnet against the demagnetic field on the hexapole multilayered structure in radial and axial directions is considered in the design. The distributions of the demagnetic fields are estimated by the calculation of the radial field in a hexapole magnet and the axial field from the solenoid coils. Proper grades of magnetic materials depending on the strength of the demagnetic field are applied for the different layers. The magnetic fields of the measured and calculated ones have been compared.

  17. Sphingosine Kinase-1 Involves the Inhibitory Action of HIF-1α by Chlorogenic Acid in Hypoxic DU145 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung-Sun Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia enhances cancer development in a solid tumor. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α is a transcription factor that is dominantly expressed under hypoxia in solid tumor cells and is a key factor that regulates tumor. HIF-1α regulates several target genes involved in many aspects of cancer progression, including angiogenesis, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and cell proliferation as well as imparts resistance to cancer treatment. In this study, we assessed Crataegus Pinnatifida Bunge var. typical Schneider ethanol extract (CPE for its anti-cancer effects in hypoxia-induced DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. CPE decreased the abundance of HIF-1α and sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK-1 in hypoxia-induced prostate cancer DU145 cells. CPE decreased HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity. Chlorogenic acid (CA is one of four major compounds of CPE. Compared to CPE, CA significantly decreased the expression of HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity in hypoxia-induced DU145 cells. Furthermore, CA decreased phosphorylation AKT and GSK-3β, which are associated with HIF-1α stabilization and affected SPHK-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. We confirmed the mechanism of CA-induced inhibition of HIF-1α by SPHK-1 signaling pathway using SPHK-1 siRNA and SPHK inhibitor (SKI. CA decreased the secretion and cellular expression of VEGF, thus inhibiting hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Treatment of DU145cells with SPHK1 siRNA and CA for 48 h decreased cancer cell growth, and the inhibitory action of SPHK siRNA and CA on cell growth was confirmed by decrease in the abundance of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  19. Cyclic AMP directs inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate-evoked Ca2+ signalling to different intracellular Ca2+ stores

    OpenAIRE

    Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol depletion reversibly abolishes carbachol-evoked Ca2+ release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores, without affecting the distribution of IP3 receptors (IP3R) or endoplasmic reticulum, IP3 formation or responses to photolysis of caged IP3. Receptors that stimulate cAMP formation do not alone evoke Ca2+ signals, but they potentiate those evoked by carbachol. We show that these potentiated signals are entirely unaffected by cholesterol depletion and that, within...

  20. Trichostatin A (TSA) sensitizes the human prostatic cancer cell line DU145 to death receptor ligands treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghiyev, Agshin F; Guseva, Natalya V; Sturm, Mary T; Rokhlin, Oskar W; Cohen, Michael B

    2005-04-01

    The human prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145 has previously been found to be resistant to treatment with TNF-family ligands. However, TRAIL, TNF-alpha and anti-Fas antibodies (Ab) treatment in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) converted the phenotype of DU145 from resistant to sensitive. TSA induced 15% cell death but simultaneous treatment with TRAIL, TNF-alpha and anti-Fas Ab resulted in 55%, 70% and 40% cell death, respectively. Simultaneous treatment did not increase the level of TSA-induced histone acetylation, but induced the release of acetylated histones from chromatin into the cytosol. This release was caspase dependent since it was abrogated by Z-VAD-fmk. In addition, treatment with TSA induced caspase-9 activation and resulted in the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria. To further investigate the role of caspase-9 in TSA-mediated apoptosis we used two different approaches: (1) cells were pretreated with the caspase-9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-fmk, and (2) cells were transfected with a dominant-negative form of caspase-9. Both approaches gave similar results: cells became resistant to treatment with TSA. These data indicate that TSA mediates its effect via the mitochondrial pathway. This was confirmed by examining DU145 overexpressing Bcl-2. These transfectants were resistant to TSA treatment. Taken together, our data shows that only simultaneous treatment with TNF-family ligands and TSA in DU145 resulted in caspase activity sufficient to induce apoptosis. The combination of TSA and TNF-family ligands could potentially be the basis for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to test substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Severson, Todd J.; Weber, Kerry L.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    A mobile bioassay trailer was used to assess the efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) spray dried powder (SDP) formulation for controlling zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) from two midwestern lakes: Lake Carlos (Alexandria, Minnesota) and Shawano Lake (Shawano, Wisconsin). The effects of SDP exposure concentration and exposure duration on zebra mussel survival were evaluated along with the evaluation of a benthic injection application technique to reduce the amount of SDP required to induce zebra mortality.

  2. Cigarette smoke condensate promotes pro-tumourigenic stromal-epithelial interactions by suppressing miR-145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A; Melling, G; Hinsley, E E; Kabir, T D; Colley, H E; Murdoch, C; Lambert, D W

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to factors released from tobacco during chewing or smoking is recognized as a major risk factor for oral carcinogenesis and influences the phenotype of oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts within the underlying stroma. Micro(mi)RNA can regulate the expression of genes within cells, and previous studies show that tobacco products can alter the miRNA profiles in lung epithelial cells. However, the molecular alterations occurring in oral fibroblasts exposed to tobacco constituents remain to be elucidated. Oral fibroblasts were exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and miRNA expression compared to untreated controls using tiling low-density arrays (TLDA). Expression of miRNA-145 was confirmed by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. The effect of CSC on fibroblast cell viability, motility and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression was measured using MTS, a wound scratch assay and qRT-PCR, respectively. Oral cancer cell migration in response to culture supernatants from mock, control or pre-miR-145-transfected CSC-treated fibroblasts was analysed by chemotaxis assay. TLDA analysis identified widespread changes in the miRNA expression profile of fibroblasts exposed to CSC. Pri-, pre- and mature miRNA-145 were significantly down-regulated in response to CSC, and this was accompanied by up-regulated expression of MMP-2 and increased migration of fibroblasts compared to untreated controls. Re-expression of miR-145 abrogated the ability of fibroblasts to promote oral cancer cell chemotaxis in response to CSC. These findings suggest that tobacco constituents influence the expression of miRNA within oral fibroblasts promoting a phenotype that increases oral cancer migration and sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying oral cancer pathogenesis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A NOVEL SAMARIUM COMPLEX WITH INTERESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Fluorescent materials, particularly blue fluorescent materials have gained strong interest because ... emitting complexes in different technical applications, such as emitting materials for organic light emitting ..... properties of three novel two-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with mixed aromatic ...

  4. Pyroelectric Ferroelectric and Resistivity Studies on Samarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barium Strontium Sodium Niobate (Ba1-xSrx)2NaNb5O15 (BSNN) belongs to tungsten bronze ferroelectric morphotrophic phase boundary (MPB) system at x = 0.6, having large spontaneous polarisation, pyroelectric coefficient and low dielectic constant and is expected to be applicable for piezoceramic filter and ...

  5. A NOVEL SAMARIUM COMPLEX WITH INTERESTING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emitting complexes in different technical applications, such as emitting materials for organic light emitting diodes, sensitizers in solar energy conversion, chemical sensors and so forth [6-9]. The ability of bipy to act as a rigid ..... properties of three-dimensional organic-inorganic hybrids based on α-metatungstate. Inorg. Chim.

  6. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with four mbt domains 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwanghyun; Na, Wonho; Maeng, Je-Heon; Wu, Hongjin; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian SFMBTs have been considered to be polycomb group repressors. However, molecular mechanisms underlying mammalian SFMBTs-mediated gene regulation and their biological function have not been characterized. In the present study, we identified YY1 and methylated histones as interacting proteins of human SFMBT2. We also found that human SFMBT2 binds preferentially to methylated histone H3 and H4 that are associated with transcriptional repression. Using DU145 prostate cancer cells as a model, we showed that SFMBT2 has a transcriptional repression activity on HOXB13 gene expression. In addition, occupancy of SFMBT2 coincided with enrichment of diand tri-methylated H3K9 and H4K20 as well as tri-methylated H3K27 at the HOXB13 gene promoter. When SFMBT2 was depleted by siRNA in DU145 prostate cancer cells, significant up-regulation of HOXB13 gene expression and decreased cell growth were observed. Collectively, our findings indicate that human SFMBT2 may regulate cell growth via epigenetic regulation of HOXB13 gene expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells.

  7. Role of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor/Ca2+-release channel in autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parys Jan B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autophagy is an important cell-biological process responsible for the disposal of long-lived proteins, protein aggregates, defective organelles and intracellular pathogens. It is activated in response to cellular stress and plays a role in development, cell differentiation, and ageing. Moreover, it has been shown to be involved in different pathologies, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. It is a long standing issue whether and how the Ca2+ ion is involved in its regulation. The role of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, the main intracellular Ca2+-release channel, in apoptosis is well recognized, but its role in autophagy only recently emerged and is therefore much less well understood. Positive as well as negative effects on autophagy have been reported for both the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and Ca2+. This review will critically present the evidence for a role of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor/Ca2+-release channel in autophagy and will demonstrate that depending on the cellular conditions it can either suppress or promote autophagy. Suppression occurs through Ca2+ signals directed to the mitochondria, fueling ATP production and decreasing AMP-activated kinase activity. In contrast, Ca2+-induced autophagy can be mediated by several pathways including calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase β, calmodulin-dependent kinase I, protein kinase C θ, and/or extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

  8. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  9. GPNMB/OA protein increases the invasiveness of human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 through MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Bodei, Serena; Bedussi, Francesca; Fragni, Martina; Bonini, Sara Anna [Section of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, V.le Europa 11, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Simeone, Claudio; Zani, Danilo [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Berruti, Alfredo [Medical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Radiology, and Public Health, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili 1, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Missale, Cristina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, PierFranco [Section of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, V.le Europa 11, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Sigala, Sandra, E-mail: sigala@med.unibs.it [Section of Pharmacology, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, V.le Europa 11, 25124 Brescia (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Non-metastatic glycoprotein melanoma protein B (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin (OA) is expressed in a wide array of tumors and represents an emerging target for drug development. In this study, we investigated the role of GPNMB/OA in the progression of human metastatic DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. GPNMB/OA contribution in PCa malignant phenotype has been analyzed by small interfering RNA-induced GPNMB/OA silencing. We found that following GPNMB/OA silencing the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells, evaluated by using in vitro invasivity assay, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were equally strongly inhibited. By contrast knocking down GPNMB/OA weakly attenuated cell proliferation rate of DU145, an effect that paralleled with an increase number of apoptotic cells. However, PC3 cell growth seems to be not affected by GPNMB/OA. Together, these data reveal that GPNMB/OA acts as a critical molecular mediator promoting the acquisition of the more aggressive, pro-metastatic phenotype distinctive of human DU145 and PC3 cell lines. - Highlights: • GPNMB/OA expression correlates with DU145 and PC3 cells malignant phenotype. • GPNMB/OA silencing affects the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells. • GPNMB/OA increases invasiveness by up-regulating MMPs activity. • GPNMB/OA promotes DU145 and PC3 cells progression into a more aggressive phenotype.

  10. Comparative genomics of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O145:H28 demonstrates a common evolutionary lineage with Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kerry K; Mandrell, Robert E; Louie, Jacqueline W; Korlach, Jonas; Clark, Tyson A; Parker, Craig T; Huynh, Steven; Chain, Patrick S; Ahmed, Sanaa; Carter, Michelle Qiu

    2014-01-10

    Although serotype O157:H7 is the predominant enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), outbreaks of non-O157 EHEC that cause severe foodborne illness, including hemolytic uremic syndrome have increased worldwide. In fact, non-O157 serotypes are now estimated to cause over half of all the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cases, and outbreaks of non-O157 EHEC infections are frequently associated with serotypes O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145. Currently, there are no complete genomes for O145 in public databases. We determined the complete genome sequences of two O145 strains (EcO145), one linked to a US lettuce-associated outbreak (RM13514) and one to a Belgium ice-cream-associated outbreak (RM13516). Both strains contain one chromosome and two large plasmids, with genome sizes of 5,737,294 bp for RM13514 and 5,559,008 bp for RM13516. Comparative analysis of the two EcO145 genomes revealed a large core (5,173 genes) and a considerable amount of strain-specific genes. Additionally, the two EcO145 genomes display distinct chromosomal architecture, virulence gene profile, phylogenetic origin of Stx2a prophage, and methylation profile (methylome). Comparative analysis of EcO145 genomes to other completely sequenced STEC and other E. coli and Shigella genomes revealed that, unlike any other known non-O157 EHEC strain, EcO145 ascended from a common lineage with EcO157/EcO55. This evolutionary relationship was further supported by the pangenome analysis of the 10 EHEC str ains. Of the 4,192 EHEC core genes, EcO145 shares more genes with EcO157 than with the any other non-O157 EHEC strains. Our data provide evidence that EcO145 and EcO157 evolved from a common lineage, but ultimately each serotype evolves via a lineage-independent nature to EHEC by acquisition of the core set of EHEC virulence factors, including the genes encoding Shiga toxin and the large virulence plasmid. The large variation between the two EcO145 genomes suggests a distinctive

  11. The analysis of microRNAs miR-200C and miR-145 expression in colorectal cancer of different molecular subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelygin, Y A; Shubin, V P; Frolov, S A; Achkasov, S I; Sushkov, O I; Tsukanov, A S; Kashnikov, V N; Pospekhova, N I

    2015-01-01

    The expression levels of microRNAs miR-200c and miR-145 in two groups of colorectal cancer differing by the presence/absence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMF) were studied. In the EMF-positive cancer, the level of miR-145 is increased, whereas the level of miR-200c is reduced. The reverse situation is observed in the EMI-negative cancer. MiR-145 can serve as a marker of the mesenchymal subtype of cancer. Gene expression profiles and microRNAs allow prognostically unfavorable tumors of the mesenchymal subtype to be distinguished.

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, pH, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING KEO_145E_32N and MOORING_KEO_145E_32N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-09-26 to 2014-06-26 (NODC Accession 0100071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100071 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING KEO_145E_32N and MOORING_KEO_145E_32N in the North...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING PAPA_145W_50N and MOORINGS_PAPA_145W_50N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-06-15 to 2014-06-19 (NODC Accession 0100074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100074 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING PAPA_145W_50N and MOORINGS_PAPA_145W_50N in the North...

  14. miR-145 induces caspase-dependent and -independent cell death in urothelial cancer cell lines with targeting of an expression signature present in Ta bladder tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Lamy, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Downregulation of miR-145 in a variety of cancers suggests a possible tumor suppressor function for this microRNA. Here, we show that miR-145 expression is reduced in bladder cancer and urothelial carcinoma in situ, compared with normal urothelium, using transcription profiling and in situ...... by the pharmacological inhibitor zVAD-fmk and ectopic expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, indicating the activation of an alternative caspase-independent death pathway. Microarray analysis of transcript levels in T24 cells, before the onset of cell death, showed destabilization of mRNAs enriched for miR-145 7mer target...... data indicate that reduction in miR-145 expression may provide bladder cancer cells with a selective advantage by inhibition of cell death otherwise triggered in malignant cells....

  15. A receptor tyrosine kinase, UFO/Axl, and other genes isolated by a modified differential display PCR are overexpressed in metastatic prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A N; Kalapurakal, J; Davidson, W R; Kandpal, G; Dunson, N; Prashar, Y; Kandpal, R P

    1999-01-01

    We have used a modified differential display PCR protocol for isolating 3' restriction fragments of cDNAs specifically expressed or overexpressed in metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line DU145. Several cDNA fragments were identified that matched to milk fat globule protein, UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, human homologue of a Xenopus maternal transcript, laminin and laminin receptor, human carcinoma-associated antigen, and some expressed sequence tags. The transcript for milk fat globule protein, a marker protein shown to be overexpressed in breast tumors, was elevated in DU145 cells. The expression of UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was considerably higher in DU145 cells as compared to normal prostate cells and prostatic carcinoma cell line PC-3. The overexpression of UFO oncogene in DU145 cells is discussed in the context of prostate cancer metastasis.

  16. Effect of the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 monoclonal antibody, AMG 145, in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Evan A; Honarpour, Narimon; Wasserman, Scott M; Xu, Feng; Scott, Rob; Raal, Frederick J

    2013-11-05

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia is a rare, serious disorder with a substantial reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor function, severely elevated LDL cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, and often death in childhood. Response to conventional drug therapies is modest. Monoclonal antibodies to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) reduce LDL cholesterol in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. The effect in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia is unknown and uncertain. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of AMG 145 in an open-label, single-arm, multicenter, dose-scheduling pilot study in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Eight patients with LDL receptor-negative or -defective homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia on stable drug therapy were treated with subcutaneous 420 mg AMG 145 every 4 weeks for ≥12 weeks, followed by 420 mg AMG 145 every 2 weeks for an additional 12 weeks. All patients completed both treatment periods. Mean change from baseline in LDL cholesterol at week 12 was -16.5% (range, 5.2% to -43.6%; P=0.0781) and -13.9% (range, 39.9% to -43.3%; P=0.1484) with 4- and 2-week dosing, respectively. No reduction was seen in the 2 receptor-negative patients. Over the treatment periods, mean±SD LDL cholesterol reductions in the 6 LDL receptor-defective patients were 19.3±16% and 26.3±20% with 4- and 2-week dosing, respectively (P=0.0313 for both values), ranging from 4% to 48% with 2-week dosing. No serious side effects were reported. This study demonstrates significant and dose-related LDL cholesterol lowering with a PCSK9 monoclonal antibody in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients with defective LDL receptor activity but no reduction in those who were receptor negative.

  17. Curcumin suppresses proliferation and in vitro invasion of human prostate cancer stem cells by ceRNA effect of miR-145 and lncRNA-ROR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Te; Chi, Huiying; Chen, Jiulin; Chen, Chuan; Huang, Yongyi; Xi, Hao; Xue, Jun; Si, Yibing

    2017-10-05

    Many studies have demonstrated that curcumin can effectively inhibit the proliferation, invasion, and tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, CD44+/CD133+ human prostate cancer stem cells (HuPCaSCs) were isolated from the prostate cancer cell lines Du145 and 22RV1. Curcumin treatment of these cells resulted in the inhibition of in vitro proliferation and invasion, and cell cycle arrest. The expression levels of cell cycle proteins (Ccnd1 and Cdk4) and stem cell markers (Oct4, CD44, and CD133) were decreased in curcumin-treated HuPCaSCs. Microarray analysis and northern blotting assays indicated that miR-145 was overexpressed in curcumin-treated HuPCaSCs. Insights of the mechanism of competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) were gained from bioinformatic analysis, bioinformatics analysis and luciferase activity assays showed that the lncRNA-ROR and Oct4 mRNA both contain miR-145 binding sites, and Oct4 and lncRNA-ROR directly compete for microRNA binding. Curcumin induced high miR-145 expression and inhibited the expression of lncRNA-ROR. The tumorigenicity of curcumin- treated HuPCaSCs in nude mice was significantly reduced. In summary, reducing the expression of endogenous lncRNA-ROR could effectively increase the available concentration of miR-145 in HuPCaSCs, where miR-145 prevents cell proliferation by decreasing Oct4 expression. In particular, we hypothesized that lncRNA-ROR may act as a ceRNA, effectively becoming a sink for miR-145, thereby activating the derepression of core transcription factors Oct4. Thus, curcumin suppresses the proliferation, in vitro invasion, and tumorigenicity of HuPCaSCs through ceRNA effect of miR-145 and lncRNA-ROR caused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Linc-RNA-RoR acts as a "sponge" against mediation of the differentiation of endometrial cancer stem cells by microRNA-145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi; Gao, Qin; Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Kaige; Duan, Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Recently, large intergenic non-coding ribonucleic acids-RoR (linc-RoR) was reported to regulate expression of core stem cell transcription factors (TFs), but its role in endometrial tumorsphere is still unknown. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to characterize linc-RoR expression in ETs. After construction of adenovirus vectors carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP), these vectors were transfected into ETs to estimate the effects of overexpression or knocked down expression of miR-145, linc-RoR or Dicer. Flow cytometry was employed to ascertain transfection efficiency, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to compare their levels. Colony formation was analyzed using cultured gelatin-coated tissue cultures. miR-145 potential targeting sites in linc-RoR were mutated using a site-directed mutagenesis kit to verify its competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) effects. Expression of linc-RoR and core stem cell TFs was associated with the pluripotent state of ETs, whereas miR-145 expression increased after ET differentiation. Greater expression of miR-145 could lead to down-regulation of linc-RoR and core TFs, and decreased colony formation. Converse effects could be achieved after knocked-down miR-145 expression. The effects of miR-145 could be eliminated after increasing the expression of linc-RoR in ETs or mutated targeted sequences in linc-RoR. Knocked-down Dicer expression could improve the expression of linc-RoR and core TFs. Linc-RoR is a ceRNA and acts as a miR-145 "sponge" to inhibit mediation of the differentiation of ETs by miR-145. These results suggest that linc-RoR has an important role during endometrial carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 45 CFR 309.145 - What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part? Federal funds are available for costs of operating a... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part? 309.145 Section 309.145 Public Welfare Regulations Relating...

  20. Long Non-Coding RNA lincRNA-ROR Promotes the Progression of Colon Cancer and Holds Prognostic Value by Associating with miR-145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Sun, Lixia; Liu, Danfeng; Liu, Changkuo; Sun, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Large intergenic non-coding RNA ribonucleic acids-ROR (lincRNA-ROR) has been reported to exert impacts on the maintenance of induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells, and play important roles in human hepatocellular cancer. It contributes to tumorigenesis and metastasis and functions as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) by sponging miR-145 in breast cancer. However, its clinical significance and prognostic value in colon cancer remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinicopathological role and prognostic value of lincRNA-ROR and miR-145 in colon cancer. In the present study, qRT-PCR was performed to measure the expression levels of lincRNA-ROR in colon cancer tissues and cell lines. Then, the clinicopathological significance and prognostic value of lincRNA-ROR were analyzed. LincRNA-ROR expression correlated with pT stage, pN stage, AJCC stage and vascular invasion. Knockdown of lincRNA-ROR restored the expression of miR-145, and had a significant influence on colon cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Patients of the high lincRNA-ROR/low miR-145 group had significantly poorer outcomes than those of the low lincRNA-ROR/high miR-145 group. Taken together, Overexpression of lincRNA-ROR combined with depletion of miR-145 may exert crucial impact on colon cancer prognosis evaluation and treatment.

  1. MicroRNA-145 Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion and Regulates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) by Targeting Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang; Zhang, Hua-Yong; Zhong, Bei-Long; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Hua

    2016-10-23

    BACKGROUND This study investigated the mechanism of miR-145 in targeting connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), which affects the proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of ESCC cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 50 ESCC tissues and their corresponding normal adjacent esophageal tissue samples were collected. Then, miR-145 expression in both ESCC clinical specimens and cell lines was detected using quantitative real-time PCR. CTGF protein was detected using immunohistochemistry. Dual luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to assess the effect of miR-145 on the 3'UTR luciferase activity of CTGF. Eca109 cells were transfected with miR-145 mimics and CTGF siRNA, respectively, and changes in cellular proliferation, migration, and invasion were detected via MTT assay, wound-healing assay, and Transwell assay, respectively. Western blotting assay was used to detect the expression of marker genes related to EMT. RESULTS MiR-145 was significantly down-regulated in ESCC tissues and cell lines compared with normal tissues and cell lines (Ptissues was than in normal adjacent esophageal tissues (Ptissues and cell lines, while the protein expression of CTGF exhibited the opposite trend. MiR-145 inhibited the proliferation, migration, invasiveness, and the EMT process of ESCC cells through targeted regulation of CTGF expression.

  2. 21 CFR 145.145 - Canned grapefruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...°) and section 52.015 (Refractive indices of invert sugar solutions), which is incorporated by reference.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html), but without correction for invert sugar...

  3. 14.5 GHz passive harmonic mode-locking in a dispersion compensated Tm-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Li, Jianfeng; Mo, Kundong; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Fei; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-10

    We demonstrate a high repetition rate passive harmonic mode-locking (HML) based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique in a Tm-doped ring fiber laser cavity. Small net anomalous cavity dispersion based on dispersion compensation benefited the generation of high repetition rate HML due to the low soliton splitting threshold. Stable HML with a repetition rate of up to 14.5 GHz and a super-mode suppression (SSR) of 19 dB was obtained at the center wavelength of 1982.3 nm, which is about ten times of state of the art at 2 μm band mode-locking fiber laser to our best knowledge. The repetition rate was selectable between 1 GHz to 14.5 GHz through changing the pump power and intra-cavity polarization state, and the SSR better than 25 dB was obtained as the repetition rate less than 5 GHz.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist inhibits collagen synthesis in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts by targeting Smad3 via miR-145

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hua-Yu; Li, Chao; Zheng, Zhao; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Su, Lin-Lin; Han, Jun-Tao; Zhu, Xiong-Xiang; Wang, Shu-yue; Li, Jun, E-mail: lijunfmmu@163.com; Hu, Da-Hai, E-mail: hudahaifmmu@aliyun.com

    2015-03-27

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) functions to regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Recently, its agonist has been documented to regulate extracellular matrix production in human dermal fibroblasts. This study explored the underlying molecular mechanisms and gene interactions in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFBs) in vitro. HSFBs were cultured and treated with or without PPAR-γ agonist or antagonist for gene expression. Bioinformatical analysis predicted that miR-145 could target Smad3 expression. Luciferase assay was used to confirm such an interaction. The data showed that PPAR-γ agonist troglitazone suppressed expression of Smad3 and Col1 in HSFBs. PPAR-γ agonist induced miR-145 at the gene transcriptional level, which in turn inhibited Smad3 expression and Col1 level in HSFBs. Furthermore, ELISA data showed that Col1 level in HSFBs was controlled by a feedback regulation mechanism involved in PPAR-γ agonist and antagonist-regulated expression of miR-145 and Smad3 in HSFBs. These findings indicate that PPAR-γ-miR-145-Smad3 axis plays a role in regulation of collagen synthesis in HSFBs. - Highlights: • PPAR-γ agonist inhibits collagen synthesis in HSFBs. • Smad3 and type I collagen expression are decreased by PPAR-γ agonist. • miR-145 expression is increased by PPAR-γ agonist in HSFBs. • Increased miR-145 inhibits collagen synthesis by targeting Smad3. • miR-145 regulates collagen synthesis.

  5. Evaluation of the G145R Mutant of the Hepatitis B Virus as a Minor Strain in Mother-to-Child Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Komatsu

    Full Text Available The role of the hepatitis B virus (HBV mutant G145R, with a single change in amino acid 145 of the surface protein, as a minor population remains unknown in mother-to-child transmission. The minor strain as well as the major strain of the G145R mutant were evaluated in three cohorts using a locked nucleic acid probe-based real-time PCR. The breakthrough cohort consisted of children who were born to HBV carrier mothers and became HBV carriers despite immnoprophylaxis (n = 25. The control cohort consisted of HBV carriers who had no history of receiving the hepatitis B vaccine, hepatitis B immunoglobulin or antiviral treatment (n = 126. The pregnant cohort comprised pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (n = 31. In the breakthrough cohort, 6 showed positive PCR results (major, 2; minor, 4. In the control cohort, 13 showed positive PCR results (major, 0; minor, 13. HBeAg-positive patients were prone to have the G145R mutant as a minor population. Deep sequencing was performed in a total of 32 children (PCR positive, n = 13; negative, n = 19. In the breakthrough cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.54% to 6.58%. In the control cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.42% to 4.1%. Of the 31 pregnant women, 4 showed positive PCR results (major, n = 0; minor, n = 4. All of the pregnant women were positive for HBeAg and showed a high viral load. Three babies born to 3 pregnant women with the G145R mutant were evaluated. After the completion of immunoprophylaxis, 2 infants became negative for HBsAg. The remaining infant became negative for HBsAg after the first dose of HB vaccine. G145R was detected in one-fourth of the children with immunoprophylaxis failure. However, the pre-existence of the G145R mutant as a minor population in pregnant women does not always cause breakthrough infection in infants.

  6. Determination of specific radioactivity of samarium-153 product. 1. Quantitative determination of samarium by spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumo, Mishiroku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nemoto, Masahiro [Tokyo Nuclear Service Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    On the specific radioactivity of Sm-153 for the radiotherapy of cancers, a simple method for determination of the amount of Sm was described. The method used Arsenazo III as a colorimetric reagent. The sample irradiated in the reactor was dissolved in 1M HCl solution. A small part of it was taken and mixed with Arsenazo III at pH 3.2, and the amount of Sm was determined by the spectrophotometric method at a wavelength of 652 nm. The molar absorptivity of Sm at 652 nm was 6.6x10{sup 3} m{sup -1}{center_dot}mm{sup -1}. The error of measurement in the partial different conditions was about 2% of the value determined. The effects of impurities, Fe, Zn and Cu mixing in the Sm during operation, were clarified. (author)

  7. A(n (ImPossible Interpretation on Article 145, Paragraph (2, Second Thesis, Civil Procedure Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ROŞU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have analysed the answers which the following questions might receive: Can the Court invested with solving a motion to change venue decide on solving a trial already solved? Which could be the consequences of crediting the idea that the answer is in the affirmative in any situation, without any distinction? The law issue submitted to the analysis was generated by the circumstance that the civil Courts when they are invested with solving a case whose venue changing is requested, either decide to suspend the case until the motion to change venue is solved, or give a hearing date in order to solve this request. In our opinion, it is necessary an intervention of the legislator, as in practice, art. 145, paragraph (2, Civil Procedure Code was interpreted differently.

  8. Exposure-related effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Denise A. Mayer,

    2015-01-01

    The exposure-related effects of a commercially prepared spray-dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, were evaluated on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. Nine species of young-of-the-year fish were exposed to SDP for 24 hours by using continuous-flow, serial-dilution exposure systems at temperatures of 12 degrees Celsius (°C; 2 species; Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout] and Salvelinus fontinalis [brook trout]), 17 °C (3 species; Perca flavescens [yellow perch], Sander vitreus [walleye], and Acipenser fulvescens [lake sturgeon]), or 22 °C (4 species; Micropterus salmoides [largemouth bass], Micropterus dolomieu [smallmouth bass], Lepomis macrochirus [bluegill sunfish], and Ictalurus punctatus [channel catfish]).

  9. Exposure-related effects of formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A to glochidia from seven unionid mussel species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.; Eckert, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The study was completed to evaluate the exposure-related effects of a biopesticide for dreissenid mussel (Dreissena polymorpha, zebra mussel and Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, quagga mussel) control on glochidia from unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. The commercially prepared biopesticide was either a spray-dried powder (SDP) or freeze-dried powder (FDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A. Glochidia of the unionid mussel species Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea,Lampsilis higginsii, Ligumia recta, Obovaria olivaria, and Actinonaias ligamentina were exposed to SDP-formulated P. fluorescens andLampsilis cardium and Megalonaias nervosa were exposed to FDP-formulated P. fluorescens.

  10. Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) Bill of Materials (BOM) for FEMIS version 1.4.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fangman, P.M.; Gerhardstein, L.H.; Homer, B.J. [and others

    1998-06-05

    This document describes the hardware and software required for the Federal Emergency Management Information System version 1.4.5 (FEMIS v1.4.5). The FEMIS system is designed for a single Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) site that has multiple Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). Each EOC has personal computers (PCs) that emergency planners and operations personnel use to do their jobs. These PCs are connected via a local area network (LAN) to servers that provide EOC-wide services. Each EOC is interconnected to other EOCs via a Wide Area Network (WAN). A UNIX server provides a platform to support the Oracle relational database management system (RDBMS) distributed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), ARC/INFO geographic information system (GIS) capabilities (optional), basic file management services, the evacuation model (ESIM), the data exchange interface (DEI), and the notification service. FEMIS is a client/server system where much of the application software is located in the client PC. This client software includes the FEMIS application, government furnished dispersion and evacuation models, and Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) software applications, including the ArcView GIS and Microsoft Project (electronic planning). Several configurations are possible at a CSEPP site. In this document, a site is understood to include several installations of FEMIS, including the Depot, surrounding Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) and Protective Action Zone (PAZ) counties, and one or more state EOCs. In general, the main differences between possible configurations are the numbers of PC workstations at an installation, the location of the UNIX server(s), and the WAN links between installations.

  11. Biological and physicochemical characterization of the major (1.40) and minor (1.45) component of infectious avian adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, H J; Schneider, R; Gelderblom, H R; Lurz, R; Friehmelt, V; Monreal, G

    1991-01-01

    Two infectious components with buoyant densities of 1.40 g/cm3 and 1.45 g/cm3, designated as major (1.40) and minor (1.45) component, were detected by banding avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) isopycnically in CsCl. In metrizamide, however, infectious AAAV banded only as a single peak at a density of 1.32 g/cm3. Biological as well as physicochemical properties of the two AAAV components recovered from CsCl density gradient were described. Concerning the minor (1.45) component, three experimental findings may suggest that the capsid structure of this AAAV population is altered in comparison with that of the major (1.40) component: (i) the sedimentation pattern characterized by an additional peak containing slower-sedimenting noninfectious material (16 S); (ii) the specific infectivity decreased by the 3.5 fold; (iii) the ready disintegration when exposed to gently denaturing conditions.

  12. miR-145 and miR-143 Regulate Odontoblast Differentiation through Targeting Klf4 and Osx Genes in a Feedback Loop*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Lin, Heng; Zhang, Li; Sun, Qin; Yuan, Guohua; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Dentin tissue is derived from mesenchymal cells induced into the odontoblast lineage. The differentiation of odontoblasts is a complex process regulated by several transcriptional factor signaling transduction pathways. However, post-translational regulation of these factors during dentinogenesis remains unclear. To further explore the mechanisms, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) during odontoblast differentiation. We profiled the miRNA expression pattern during mouse odontoblast differentiation using a microarray assay and identified that miR-145 and miR-143 were down-regulated during this process. In situ hybridization verified that the two miRNAs were gradually decreased during mouse odontoblast differentiation. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments revealed that down-regulation of miR-145 and miR-143 could promote odontoblast differentiation and increased Dspp and Dmp1 expression in mouse primary dental pulp cells and vice versa. We found that miR-145 and miR-143 controlled odontoblast differentiation through several mechanisms. First, KLF4 and OSX bind to their motifs in Dspp and Dmp1 gene promoters and up-regulate their transcription thereby inducing odontoblast differentiation. The miR-145 binds to the 3′-UTRs of Klf4 and Osx genes, inhibiting their expression. Second, KLF4 repressed miR-143 transcription by binding to its motifs in miR-143 regulatory regions as detected by ChIP assay and dual luciferase reporter assay. Third, miR-143 regulates odontoblast differentiation in part through miR-145 pathway. Taken together, we for the first time showed that the miR-143 and miR-145 controlled odontoblast differentiation and dentin formation through KLF4 and OSX transcriptional factor signaling pathways. PMID:23430263

  13. Identification of miRs-143 and -145 that is associated with bone metastasis of prostate cancer and involved in the regulation of EMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Guo, Wei; Liu, Tiejian; Wang, Xi; Tu, Xiang'an; Xiong, Dafu; Chen, Song; Lai, Yingrong; Du, Hong; Chen, Guangfu; Liu, Guanglin; Tang, Yubo; Huang, Shuai; Zou, Xuenong

    2011-01-01

    The principal problem arising from prostate cancer (PCa) is its propensity to metastasize to bone. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in many tumor metastases. The importance of miRNAs in bone metastasis of PCa has not been elucidated to date. We investigated whether the expression of certain miRNAs was associated with bone metastasis of PCa. We examined the miRNA expression profiles of 6 primary and 7 bone metastatic PCa samples by miRNA microarray analysis. The expression of 5 miRNAs significantly decreased in bone metastasis compared with primary PCa, including miRs-508-5p, -145, -143, -33a and -100. We further examined other samples of 16 primary PCa and 13 bone metastases using real-time PCR analysis. The expressions of miRs-143 and -145 were verified to down-regulate significantly in metastasis samples. By investigating relationship of the levels of miRs-143 and -145 with clinicopathological features of PCa patients, we found down-regulations of miRs-143 and -145 were negatively correlated to bone metastasis, the Gleason score and level of free PSA in primary PCa. Over-expression miR-143 and -145 by retrovirus transfection reduced the ability of migration and invasion in vitro, and tumor development and bone invasion in vivo of PC-3 cells, a human PCa cell line originated from a bone metastatic PCa specimen. Their upregulation also increased E-cadherin expression and reduced fibronectin expression of PC-3 cells which revealed a less invasive morphologic phenotype. These findings indicate that miRs-143 and -145 are associated with bone metastasis of PCa and suggest that they may play important roles in the bone metastasis and be involved in the regulation of EMT Both of them may also be clinically used as novel biomarkers in discriminating different stages of human PCa and predicting bone metastasis.

  14. Identification of miRs-143 and -145 that is associated with bone metastasis of prostate cancer and involved in the regulation of EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinsheng Peng

    Full Text Available The principal problem arising from prostate cancer (PCa is its propensity to metastasize to bone. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a crucial role in many tumor metastases. The importance of miRNAs in bone metastasis of PCa has not been elucidated to date. We investigated whether the expression of certain miRNAs was associated with bone metastasis of PCa. We examined the miRNA expression profiles of 6 primary and 7 bone metastatic PCa samples by miRNA microarray analysis. The expression of 5 miRNAs significantly decreased in bone metastasis compared with primary PCa, including miRs-508-5p, -145, -143, -33a and -100. We further examined other samples of 16 primary PCa and 13 bone metastases using real-time PCR analysis. The expressions of miRs-143 and -145 were verified to down-regulate significantly in metastasis samples. By investigating relationship of the levels of miRs-143 and -145 with clinicopathological features of PCa patients, we found down-regulations of miRs-143 and -145 were negatively correlated to bone metastasis, the Gleason score and level of free PSA in primary PCa. Over-expression miR-143 and -145 by retrovirus transfection reduced the ability of migration and invasion in vitro, and tumor development and bone invasion in vivo of PC-3 cells, a human PCa cell line originated from a bone metastatic PCa specimen. Their upregulation also increased E-cadherin expression and reduced fibronectin expression of PC-3 cells which revealed a less invasive morphologic phenotype. These findings indicate that miRs-143 and -145 are associated with bone metastasis of PCa and suggest that they may play important roles in the bone metastasis and be involved in the regulation of EMT Both of them may also be clinically used as novel biomarkers in discriminating different stages of human PCa and predicting bone metastasis.

  15. Double-negative feedback loop between ZEB2 and miR-145 regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell properties in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dong; Wang, Min; Guo, Wei; Huang, Shuai; Wang, Zeyu; Zhao, Xiaohui; Du, Hong; Song, Libing; Peng, Xinsheng

    2014-12-01

    The invasion and metastasis of tumors are triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). EMT also promotes malignant tumor progression and the maintenance of the stem cell property, which endows cancer cells with the capabilities of self-renewal and immortalized proliferation. The transcriptional repressor zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2), as an EMT activator, might be an important promoter of metastasis in some tumors. Here, we report that ZEB2 directly represses the transcription of miR-145, which is a strong repressor of EMT. In turn, ZEB2 is also a direct target of miR-145. Further, our findings show that the downregulation of ZEB2 not only represses invasion, migration, EMT, and the stemness of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also suppresses the capability of PC-3 cells to invade bone in vivo. Importantly, the expression level of ZEB2 as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis is positively correlated to bone metastasis, the serum free PSA level, the total PSA level, and the Gleason score in PCa patients and is negatively correlated with miR-145 expression in primary PCa specimens. Thus, our findings demonstrate a double-negative feedback loop between ZEB2 and miR-145 and indicate that the ZEB2/miR-145 double-negative feedback loop plays a significant role in the control of EMT and stem cell properties during the bone metastasis of PCa cells. These results suggest that the double-negative feedback loop between ZEB2 and miR-145 contributes to PCa progression and metastasis and might have therapeutic relevance for the bone metastasis of PCa.

  16. Benzene Polyphosphates as Tools for Cell Signalling: Inhibition of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate 5-Phosphatase and Interaction with the PH Domain of Protein Kinase Bα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephen J; Vandeput, Fabrice; Trusselle, Melanie N.; Safrany, Stephen T.; Erneux, Christophe; Potter, Barry V. L.

    2009-01-01

    Novel benzene polyphosphates were synthesised as inositol polyphosphate mimics and evaluated against both type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase, which only binds soluble inositol polyphosphates, and the PH domain of protein kinase Bα (PKBα), which can bind both soluble inositol polyphosphates and inositol phospholipids. The most potent trisphosphate 5-phosphatase inhibitor is benzene 1,2,4-trisphosphate 2, (IC50 of 14 μm) a potential mimic of d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and the most potent tetrakisphosphate Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase inhibitor is benzene 1,2,4,5-tetrakisphosphate, with an IC50 of 4 μm. Biphenyl 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentakisphosphate 4 was the most potent inhibitor evaluated against type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase (IC50 of 1 μm). All new benzene polyphosphates are resistant to dephosphorylation by type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase. Unexpectedly, all benzene polyphosphates studied bind to the PH domain of PKBα with apparent higher affinity than type 1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase. The most potent ligand for PKBα PH domain is biphenyl 2,3′,4,5′,6-pentakisphosphate 4 (Ki = 27 nm), measured by inhibition of biotinylated diC8-PtdIns(3,4)P2 binding. The ca 80-fold enhancement of binding relative to parent benzene trisphosphate is rationalised by the involvement of a cation–π interaction. These new molecular tools will be of potential use in structural and cell signalling studies. PMID:18574825

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC No. 1 and Addendum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Strand

    2006-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145, Wells and Storage Holes in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the six CASs within CAU 145. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 1, 2005, through November 8, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 145 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Analytes detected during the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) were evaluated against appropriate final action levels to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at one of the six CASs in CAU 145 and required the evaluation of corrective action alternatives. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 145 revealed the following: CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13 do not contain contamination; and CAS 03-25-01 has pentachlorophenol and arsenic contamination in the subsurface soils. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the six CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 145. No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13. Close in place is the preferred corrective action

  18. Human amniotic epithelial cell feeder layers maintain human iPS cell pluripotency via inhibited endogenous microRNA-145 and increased Sox2 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Te, E-mail: liute79@yahoo.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Shanghai Geriatric Institute of Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200031 (China); Cheng, Weiwei [International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Huang, Yongyi [Laboratoire PROTEE, Batiment R, Universite du Sud Toulon-Var, 83957 LA GARDE Cedex (France); Huang, Qin; Jiang, Lizhen [Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Guo, Lihe, E-mail: liute79@yahoo.com [Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Currently, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated from patient or disease-specific sources and share the same key properties as embryonic stem cells. This makes them attractive for personalized medicine, drug screens or cellular therapy. Long-term cultivation and maintenance of normal iPS cells in an undifferentiated self-renewing state are a major challenge. Our previous studies have shown that human amniotic epithelial cells (HuAECs) could provide a good source of feeder cells for mouse and human embryonic stem cells, or spermatogonial stem cells, but the mechanism for this is unknown. Here, we examined the effect of endogenous microRNA-145 regulation on Sox2 expression in human iPS cells by HuAECs feeder cells regulation, and in turn on human iPS cells pluripotency. We found that human IPS cells transfected with a microRNA-145 mutant expressed Sox2 at high levels, allowing iPS to maintain a high level of AP activity in long-term culture and form teratomas in SCID mice. Expression of stem cell markers was increased in iPS transfected with the microRNA-145 mutant, compared with iPS was transfected with microRNA-145. Besides, the expression of Drosha proteins of the microRNA-processor complex, required for the generation of precursor pre-miRNA, was significantly increased in human iPS cells cultured on MEF but not on HuAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that endogenous Sox2 expression may be regulated by microRNA-145 in human iPS cells with HuAECs feeder cells, and Sox2 is a crucial component required for maintenance of them in an undifferentiated, proliferative state capable of self-renewal. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer microRNA-145 inhibits Sox2 expression in human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer microRNA-145 suppresses the self-renewal and pluripotency of human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HuAECs regulate expression of microRNA-145 and Sox2 in human iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HuAECs feeder

  19. Controlled Release of LL-37-Derived Synthetic Antimicrobial and Anti-Biofilm Peptides SAAP-145 and SAAP-276 Prevents Experimental Biomaterial-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; de Boer, Leonie; Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Cordfunke, Robert A.; Cohen, Or; Malanovic, Nermina; Emanuel, Noam; Lohner, Karl; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Nibbering, Peter H.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to develop an implant coating releasing novel antimicrobial agents to prevent biomaterial-associated infections. The LL-37-derived synthetic antimicrobial and anti-biofilm peptides (SAAP)-145 and SAAP-276 exhibit potent bactericidal and anti-biofilm activities against clinical

  20. EPA provides $145K to the Cut Bank Area Chamber of Commerce to advance the cleanup and revitalization of the Public Drug Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    (Denver, Colo. - May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded the Cut Bank Area Chamber of Commerce $145K in Brownfields grant funding to clean up and redevelop the Public Drug Building on Main Street in Cut Bank, Montana. Today

  1. Poly(I:C) inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication in MARC-145 cells via activation of IFIT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Liu, Jie; Bai, Juan; Du, Yijun; Wang, Xiaoye; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Ping

    2013-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major cause of heavy economic losses in many swine-producing regions. Current vaccination strategies and antiviral drugs provide only limited protection. Interferon (IFN)-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 3 (IFIT3) has been characterized as the product of a novel antiviral gene and as an important modulator in innate immunity. However, the role of IFIT3 in PRRSV infection is scarcely understood. In this study, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) inhibited PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells, following the appearance of increased IFIT3. Overexpression of porcine IFIT3 resulted in a decrease of PRRSV. Knockdown of IFIT3 in MARC-145 cells increased PRRSV replication and impaired the antiviral activity mediated by poly(I:C). Moreover, in the presence or absence of IFIT3, poly(I:C)-induced IFN-β promoter activity was significantly boosted or crippled, respectively. IFIT3, TBK1 and phosphorylation of IRF3 were activated in poly(I:C)-transfected MARC-145 cells. It demonstrated that IFIT3 plays an important role in IFN-β induction in MARC-145 cells, and, when activated, it can inhibit PRRSV replication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Exportin 1 (XPO1) inhibition leads to restoration of tumor suppressor miR-145 and consequent suppression of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Asfar S; Li, Yiwei; Muqbil, Irfana; Aboukameel, Amro; Senapedis, William; Baloglu, Erkan; Landesman, Yosef; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G; Philip, Philip A; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2017-10-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a majority of these patients dying from aggressively invasive and metastatic disease. There is growing evidence that suggests an important role for microRNAs (miRNAs) in the pathobiology of aggressive PDAC. In this study, we found that the expression of miR-145 was significantly lower in PDAC cells when compared to normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells. Here we show that inhibition of the nuclear exporter protein exportin 1 (XPO1; also known as chromosome maintenance region 1 [CRM1]) by siRNA knockdown or by the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compound (KPT-330; selinexor) increases miR-145 expression in PDAC cells resulting in the decreased cell proliferation and migration capacities. A similar result was obtained with forced expression of miR-145 in PDAC cells. To this end, SINE compound treatment mediated the down-regulation of known miR-145 targets genes including EGFR, MMP1, MT-MMP, c-Myc, Pak4 and Sox-2. In addition, selinexor induced the expression of two important tumor suppressive miRNAs miR-34c and let-7d leading to the up-regulation of p21WAF1. These results are the first to report that targeted inhibition of the nuclear export machinery could restore tumor suppressive miRNAs in PDAC that warrants further clinical investigations.

  3. Reconstitution of the type-1 active site of the H145G/A variants of nitrite reductase by ligand insertion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Boulanger, MJ; Molon, A; Fittipaldi, M; Huber, M; Murphy, MEP; Verbeet, MP; Canters, GW

    2003-01-01

    Variants of the copper-containing nitrite reductase (NiR) of Alcaligenes faecalis S6 were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis, by which the C-terminal histidine ligand (His145) of the Cu in the type-1 site was replaced by an alanine or a glycine. The type-1 sites in the NiR variants as

  4. [Culture of human fibroblasts transfected by human telomerase reverse transcriptase eucaryotic expression plasmid pGRN145 and their biological characteristics in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui-qi; Yang, Zhi-ming; Qu, Yi

    2002-05-01

    To analysis the biological characteristics of human fibroblasts transfected by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) eucaryotic expression plasmid pGRN145. Fibroblasts from children's foreskin were isolated and cultured in vitro, and the fibroblasts were transfected by pGRN145 with Lipofec-tAMINE PLUS Reagent. After strict screening of hygromycin B, the positive clones were subcultured. The telomerase activity was detected by RT-PCR and TRAP-PCR technique. The cell generation cycle and apoptosis rate were detected by flow cytometry to investigate the proliferative characteristics after transfection, and the chromosome karyotype of transformed cells was analyzed. The collagen secreted by transformed cells was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The morphological properties of fibroblasts did not change obviously after transfection. There were telomerase activity in transfected fibroblasts, while it could not be detected in pre-transfection fibroblasts. The cell generation cycle had no obvious changes between pre-transfection and post-transfection. However, the apoptosis rate of transfected fibroblasts were decreased compared with that of pre-transfection. The fibroblasts transfected by pGRN145 maintained the normal diploid karyotype, as well as the cells could normally secret type I and III collagen. The human fibroblasts transfected by pGRN145 has telomerase activity with prolonged life span of culture, which preliminarily proves the availability of establishing standard seeding cell lines of tissue engineering by hTERT plasmid transfection techniques.

  5. Magnetic-Field-Induced Soft-Mode Quantum Phase Transition in the High-Temperature Superconductor La1.855Sr0.145CuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Christensen, Niels Bech; Niedermayer, C.

    2009-01-01

    Inelastic neutron-scattering experiments on the high-temperature superconductor La1.855Sr0.145CuO4 reveal a magnetic excitation gap Delta that decreases continuously upon application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the CuO2 planes. The gap vanishes at the critical field required to induce long...

  6. Amygdalin induces apoptosis through regulation of Bax and Bcl-2 expressions in human DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Shin, Mal-Soon; Yang, Hye-Young; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young-Sick; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Kim, Jullia; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common non-skin cancers in men. Amygdalin is one of the nitrilosides, natural cyanide-containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that have been used to treat cancers and relieve pain. In particular, D-amygdalin (D-mandelonitrile-beta-D-gentiobioside) is known to exhibit selective killing effect on cancer cells. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is an important mechanism in cancer treatment. In the present study, we prepared the aqueous extract of the amygdalin from Armeniacae semen and investigated whether this extract induces apoptotic cell death in human DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. In the present results, DU145 and LNCaP cells treated with amygdalin exhibited several morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Treatment with amygdalin increased expression of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, decreased expression of Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, and increased caspase-3 enzyme activity in DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Here, we have shown that amygdalin induces apoptotic cell death in human DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells by caspase-3 activation through down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax. The present study reveals that amygdalin may offer a valuable option for the treatment of prostate cancers.

  7. Type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors mediate UTP-induced cation currents, Ca2+ signals, and vasoconstriction in cerebral arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.J.; Adebiyi, A.; Blaskova, E.; Xi, Q.; Jaggar, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)Rs) regulate diverse physiological functions, including contraction and proliferation. There are three IP(3)R isoforms, but their functional significance in arterial smooth muscle cells is unclear. Here, we investigated relative expression and

  8. Oral vitamins C and E as additional treatment in patients with acute anterior uveitis: a randomised double masked study in 145 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Rooij (Jeroen); S.G. Schwartzenberg; G.S. Baarsma (Seerp); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To investigate the effect of additional oral vitamins C and E on acute anterior uveitis. METHODS: A placebo controlled double masked study on the effect of vitamin C 500 mg in combination with vitamin E 100 mg twice daily in 145 patients with acute

  9. Specific expression and function of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) in wild type and knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoumanne, Ariane; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia; Monteyne, Daniel; Perez-Morga, David; Erneux, Christophe; Schurmans, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) is the last identified member of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinases family which phosphorylates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate into inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate. Although expression and function of the two other family members ITPKA and ITPKB are rather well characterized, similar information is lacking for ITPKC. Here, we first defined the expression of Itpkc mRNA and protein in mouse tissues and cells using in situ hybridization and new antibodies. Surprisingly, we found that cells positive for ITPKC in the studied tissues express either a multicilium (tracheal and bronchial epithelia, brain ependymal cells), microvilli forming a brush border (small and large intestine, and kidney proximal tubule cells) or a flagellum (spermatozoa), suggesting a role for ITPKC either in the development or the function of these specialized cellular structures. Given this surprising expression, we then analyzed ITPKC function in multiciliated tracheal epithelial cells and sperm cells using our Itpkc knock-out mouse model. Unfortunately, no significant difference was observed between control and mutant mice for any of the parameters tested, leaving the exact in vivo function of this third Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase still open. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic engineering of EcoRI mutants with altered amino acid residues in the DNA binding site: physicochemical investigations give evidence for an altered monomer/dimer equilibrium for the Gln144Lys145 and Gln144Lys145Lys200 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, R; Rüter, T; Alves, J; Fliess, A; Wolfes, H; Pingoud, V; Urbanke, C; Maass, G; Pingoud, A; Düsterhöft, A

    1989-03-21

    We have genetically engineered the Arg200----Lys mutant, the Glu144Arg145----GlnLys double mutant, and the Glu144Arg145Arg200----GlnLysLys triple mutant of the EcoRI endonuclease in extension of previously published work on site-directed mutagenesis of the EcoRI endonuclease in which Glu144 had been exchanged for Gln and Arg145 for Lys [Wolfes et al. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 9063]. All these mutants carry modifications in the DNA binding site. Mutant EcoRI proteins were purified to homogeneity and characterized by physicochemical techniques. All mutants have a very similar secondary structure composition. However, whereas the Lys200 mutant is not impaired in its capacity to form a dimer, the Gln144Lys145 and Gln144Lys145Lys200 mutants have a very much decreased propensity to form a dimer or tetramer depending on concentration as shown by gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation. This finding may explain the results of isoelectric focusing experiments which show that these two mutants have a considerably more basic pI than expected for a protein in which an acidic amino acid was replaced by a neutral one. Furthermore, while wild-type EcoRI and the Lys200 mutant are denatured in an irreversible manner upon heating to 60 degrees C, the thermal denaturation process as shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy is fully reversible with the Gln144Lys145 double mutant and the Gln144Lys145Lys200 triple mutant. All EcoRI endonuclease mutants described here have a residual enzymatic activity with wild-type specificity, since Escherichia coli cells overexpressing the mutant proteins can only survive in the presence of EcoRI methylase. The detailed analysis of the enzymatic activity and specificity of the purified mutant proteins is the subject of the accompanying paper [Alves et al. (1989) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)].

  11. Expression of oncogenic miR-17-92 and tumor suppressive miR-143-145 clusters in basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Michael; Hessam, Schapoor; Amur, Susanne; Skrygan, Marina; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Gambichler, Thilo; Bechara, Falk G

    2017-05-01

    A variety of cancers are associated with the expression of the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster (Oncomir-1) and tumor suppressor miR-143-5p/miR-145-5p. Epidermal skin cancer has not been investigated for the expression of miR-17-92 and miR-143-145 clusters, despite being extensively studied regarding global microRNA profiles. The goal of this study was to investigate the expression and possible correlation of expression of miR17-92 and miR-143-145 cluster members in epidermal skin cancer. We evaluated punch biopsies from patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC, n=15) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC, n=16), along with control specimens from non-lesional epidermal skin (n=16). Expression levels of the miR17-92 cluster (including miR-17-5p, miR-17-3p, miR-18a-3p, miR-18a-5p, miR-19a-3p, miR-19a-5p, miR-19b-3p, miR-19b-1-5p, miR-20a-3p, miR-20a-5p, miR-92a-3p, and miR-92a-5p) and the tumor-suppressive cluster miR-143-145 (including miR-143-5p and miR-145-5p) were detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We noted a highly significant increased expression of the miR-17-92 members miR-17-5p, miR-18a-5p, miR19a-3p, and miR-19b-3p and tumor suppressor miR-143-5p (p<0.01) in cSCC. miR-145-5p had a significantly decreased expression (p<0.05) for in BCC. A correlation analysis revealed multiple correlating miRNA-pairs within and between the investigated clusters. This study marks the first evidence for the participation of members of the miR-17-92 cluster in cSCC and miR-143-145 cluster in BCC. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mesozoic fossils (>145 Mya) suggest the antiquity of the subgenera of Daphnia and their coevolution with chaoborid predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Alexey A; Taylor, Derek J

    2011-05-19

    The timescale of the origins of Daphnia O. F. Mueller (Crustacea: Cladocera) remains controversial. The origin of the two main subgenera has been associated with the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea. This vicariance hypothesis is supported by reciprocal monophyly, present day associations with the former Gondwanaland and Laurasia regions, and mitochondrial DNA divergence estimates. However, previous multilocus nuclear DNA sequence divergence estimates at fossils from a Mesozoic Mongolian site, in hopes of gaining insights into the timescale of the evolution of Daphnia. We describe new fossils of ephippia from the Khotont site in Mongolia associated with the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary (about 145 MYA) that are morphologically similar to several modern genera of the family Daphniidae, including the two major subgenera of Daphnia, i.e., Daphnia s. str. and Ctenodaphnia. The daphniid fossils co-occurred with fossils of the predaceous phantom midge (Chaoboridae). Our findings indicate that the main subgenera of Daphnia are likely much older than previously known from fossils (at least 100 MY older) or from nuclear DNA estimates of divergence. The results showing co-occurrence of the main subgenera far from the presumed Laurasia/Gondwanaland dispersal barrier shortly after formation suggests that vicariance from the breakup of Pangaea is an unlikely explanation for the origin of the main subgenera. The fossil impressions also reveal that the coevolution of a dipteran predator (Chaoboridae) with the subgenus Daphnia is much older than previously known -- since the Mesozoic.

  13. A CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase purified from a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) synthetase was found in a crude extract prepared from Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, a marine bacterium that also produces a β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase. The CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase was purified from the crude extract of the cells by a combination of anion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band (60 kDa) on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of the enzyme was maximal at 35 °C at pH 9.0, and the synthetase required Mg(2+) for activity. Although these properties are similar to those of other CMP-Neu5Ac synthetases isolated from bacteria, this synthetase produced not only CMP-Neu5Ac from cytidine triphosphate and Neu5Ac, but also CMP-N-glycolylneuraminic acid from cytidine triphosphate and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, unlike CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase purified from Escherichia coli.

  14. Volcanic synchronisation between the EPICA Dome C and Vostok ice cores (Antarctica 0–145 kyr BP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Udisti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at refining the synchronisation between the EPICA Dome C (EDC and Vostok ice cores in the time interval 0–145 kyr BP by using the volcanic signatures. 102 common volcanic events were identified by using continuous electrical conductivity (ECM, di-electrical profiling (DEP and sulfate measurements while trying to minimize the distortion of the glaciological chronologies. This is an update and a continuation of previous works performed over the 0–45 kyr interval that provided 56 tie points to the ice core chronologies (Udisti et al., 2004. This synchronisation will serve to establish Antarctic Ice Core Chronology 2012, the next synchronised Antarctic dating. A change of slope in the EDC-depth/Vostok-depth diagram is probably related to a change of accumulation regime as well as to a change of ice thickness upstream of the Lake Vostok, but we did not invoke any significant temporal change of surface accumulation at EDC relative to Vostok. No significant phase difference is detected between the EDC and Vostok isotopic records, but depth shifts between the Vostok 3G and 5G ice cores prevent from looking at this problem accurately. Three possible candidates for the Toba volcanic super-eruption ~73 kyr ago are suggested in the Vostok and EDC volcanic records. Neither the ECM, DEP nor the sulfate fingerprints for these 3 events are significantly larger than many others in the records.

  15. Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting Parasite Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Inhibits Mammalian Host Cell Invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Hirawake, Hiroko; Morales, Jorge; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an intracellular parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi. As there are no highly effective drugs against this agent that also demonstrate low toxicity, there is an urgent need for development of new drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have previously demonstrated that the parasite inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) is crucial for invasion of the mammalian host cell by T. cruzi. Here, we report that TcIP3R is a short-lived protein and that its expression is significantly suppressed in trypomastigotes. Treatment of trypomastigotes, an infective stage of T. cruzi, with antisense oligonucleotides specific to TcIP3R deceased TcIP3R protein levels and impaired trypomastigote invasion of host cells. Due to the resulting instability and very low expression level of TcIP3R in trypomastigotes indicates that TcIP3R is a promising target for antisense therapy in Chagas disease.

  16. Diverse Phenotypic Expression of Cardiomyopathies in a Family with TNNI3 p.Arg145Trp Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Won; Jang, Mi-Ae; Jang, Shin Yi; Seo, Soo Hyun; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2017-03-01

    Genetic diagnosis of cardiomyopathies is challenging, due to the marked genetic and allelic heterogeneity and the lack of knowledge of the mutations that lead to clinical phenotypes. Here, we present the case of a large family, in which a single TNNI3 mutation caused variable phenotypic expression, ranging from restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP) to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) to near-normal phenotype. The proband was a 57-year-old female with HCMP. Examining the family history revealed that her elder sister had expired due to severe RCMP. Using a next-generation sequencing-based gene panel to analyze the proband, we identified a known TNNI3 gene mutation, c.433C>T, which is predicted to cause an amino acid substitution (p.Arg145Trp) in the highly conserved inhibitory region of the cardiac troponin I protein. Sanger sequencing confirmed that six relatives with RCMP or near-normal phenotypes also carried this mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first genetically confirmed family with diverse phenotypic expression of cardiomyopathies in Korea. Our findings demonstrate familial implications, where a single mutation in a sarcomere protein can cause diverse phenotypic expression of cardiomyopathies.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  18. Low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure modulates weight gain and eliminates fractalkine expression in e14.5 mouse embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordyn Karliner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD is caused by maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and often leads to long-lasting developmental symptoms, including increased microglial migration and increased release of the chemokine, fractalkine, both of which play a role in embryonic brain development. However, the effects of low-dose alcohol exposure on microglia and fractalkine embryonically are not well documented. This study addresses this gap by using the voluntary drinking paradigm, Drinking in the Dark (DiD, to expose mice to acute doses of alcohol from embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5 to E14.5. Maternal mice and embryo analyses revealed increased embryo weights and a trend of increased gestational weight gain in alcohol-exposed mice compared to water-exposed mice. After quantifying soluble fractalkine concentrations through Western Blots, results indicated decreased fractalkine in alcohol-exposed mice compared to water-exposed. Overall, our data suggest that exposure to low doses of alcohol inhibits fractalkine release, which may affect microglial function.

  19. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  20. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signalling regulates the avoidance response to nose touch in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise S Walker

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When Caenorhabditis elegans encounters an unfavourable stimulus at its anterior, it responds by initiating an avoidance response, namely reversal of locomotion. The amphid neurons, ASHL and ASHR, are polymodal in function, with roles in the avoidance responses to high osmolarity, nose touch, and both volatile and non-volatile repellents. The mechanisms that underlie the ability of the ASH neurons to respond to such a wide range of stimuli are still unclear. We demonstrate that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3R, encoded by itr-1, functions in the reversal responses to nose touch and benzaldehyde, but not in other known ASH-mediated responses. We show that phospholipase Cbeta (EGL-8 and phospholipase Cgamma (PLC-3, which catalyse the production of IP(3, both function upstream of ITR-1 in the response to nose touch. We use neuron-specific gene rescue and neuron-specific disruption of protein function to show that the site of ITR-1 function is the ASH neurons. By rescuing plc-3 and egl-8 in a neuron-specific manner, we show that both are acting in ASH. Imaging of nose touch-induced Ca(2+ transients in ASH confirms these conclusions. In contrast, the response to benzaldehyde is independent of PLC function. Thus, we have identified distinct roles for the IP(3R in two specific responses mediated by ASH.

  1. 1.45 Å resolution structure of SRPN18 from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meekins, David A.; Zhang, Xin; Battaile, Kevin P.; Lovell, Scott; Michel, Kristin (Kansas); (KSU); (HWMRI)

    2016-11-19

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) in insects function within development, wound healing and immunity. The genome of the African malaria vector,Anopheles gambiae, encodes 23 distinct serpin proteins, several of which are implicated in disease-relevant physiological responses.A. gambiaeserpin 18 (SRPN18) was previously categorized as non-inhibitory based on the sequence of its reactive-center loop (RCL), a region responsible for targeting and initiating protease inhibition. The crystal structure ofA. gambiaeSRPN18 was determined to a resolution of 1.45 Å, including nearly the entire RCL in one of the two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure reveals that the SRPN18 RCL is extremely short and constricted, a feature associated with noncanonical inhibitors or non-inhibitory serpin superfamily members. Furthermore, the SRPN18 RCL does not contain a suitable protease target site and contains a large number of prolines. The SRPN18 structure therefore reveals a unique RCL architecture among the highly conserved serpin fold.

  2. Hormone-Induced Calcium Oscillations Depend on Cross-Coupling with Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence D. Gaspers

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-mediated oscillations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i could originate either directly from an autonomous Ca2+ feedback oscillator at the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 receptor or as a secondary consequence of IP3 oscillations driven by Ca2+ feedback on IP3 metabolism. It is challenging to discriminate these alternatives, because IP3 fluctuations could drive Ca2+ oscillations or could just be a secondary response to the [Ca2+]i spikes. To investigate this problem, we constructed a recombinant IP3 buffer using type-I IP3 receptor ligand-binding domain fused to GFP (GFP-LBD, which buffers IP3 in the physiological range. This IP3 buffer slows hormone-induced [IP3] dynamics without changing steady-state [IP3]. GFP-LBD perturbed [Ca2+]i oscillations in a dose-dependent manner: it decreased both the rate of [Ca2+]i rise and the speed of Ca2+ wave propagation and, at high levels, abolished [Ca2+]i oscillations completely. These data, together with computational modeling, demonstrate that IP3 dynamics play a fundamental role in generating [Ca2+]i oscillations and waves.

  3. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C(4+) beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C(4+) was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C(4+) beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10(-7) mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C(4+) beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed.

  4. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binds to a specific receptor and releases microsomal calcium in the arterior pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, G.; Balla, T.; Baukal, A.J.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The properties of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/) receptor sites in the anterior pituitary were evaluated by binding studies with InsP/sub 3/ labeled with /sup 32/P to high specific radioactivity. Specific binding of Ins(/sup 32/P)P/sub 3/ was demonstrable in pituitary membrane preparations and was linearly proportional to the amount of membrane added over the range 0.5-2 mg of protein. Kinetic studies showed that specific InsP/sub 3/ binding was half-maximal in about 40 sec and reached a plateau after 15 min at 0/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data was consistent with a single set of high affinity sites. The specificity of Ins(/sup 32/P)P/sub 3/ binding to these sites was illustrated by the much weaker affinity for structural analogs such as inositol 1-phosphate, phytic acid, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. To assess the functional relevance of the InsP/sub 3/ binding sites, the Ca/sup 2 +/-releasing activity of InsP/sub 3/ was measured in pituitary membrane preparations. Under physiological conditions within the cytosol, the high-affinity InsP/sub 3/ binding sites characterized in pituitary membranes could serve as the putative receptors through which InsP/sub 3/ triggers Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in the anterior pituitary gland.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor C-terminal fragment in a Huntington's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Shan; Guo, Caixia; Wang, Hongyu; Chen, Xi; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2009-02-04

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin protein (Htt). Medium spiny striatal neurons (MSNs) are primarily affected in HD. Mutant huntingtin protein (Htt(exp)) specifically binds to and activates type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP(3)R1), an intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. Htt(exp)-InsP(3)R1 association is mediated by a cytosolic C-terminal tail of InsP(3)R1 (a 122-aa-long IC10 fragment). To evaluate an importance of Htt(exp) association with InsP(3)R1 for HD pathology, we generated lentiviral and adeno-associated viruses expressing GFP-IC10 fusion protein and performed a series of experiments with YAC128 HD transgenic mouse. Infection with Lenti-GFP-IC10 virus stabilized Ca(2+) signaling in cultured YAC128 MSNs and protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate-induced apoptosis. Intrastriatal injections of AAV1-GFP-IC10 significantly alleviated motor deficits and reduced MSN loss and shrinkage in YAC128 mice. Our results demonstrate an importance of InsP(3)R1-Htt(exp) association for HD pathogenesis and suggested that InsP(3)R1 is a potential therapeutic target for HD. Our data also support potential use of IC10 peptide as a novel HD therapeutic agent.

  6. Identification of a hypoxia-regulated miRNA signature in bladder cancer and a role for miR-145 in hypoxia-dependent apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, C; Ramachandran, A; McCormick, R; Wigfield, S; Cranston, D; Catto, J; Harris, A L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia leads to the stabilisation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factor that drives the expression of target genes including microRNAs (miRNAs). MicroRNAs are known to regulate many genes involved in tumourigenesis. The aim of this study was to identify hypoxia-regulated miRNAs (HRMs) in bladder cancer and investigate their functional significance. Methods: Bladder cancer cell lines were exposed to normoxic and hypoxic conditions and interrogated for the expression of 384 miRNAs by qPCR. Functional studies were carried out using siRNA-mediated gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitations. Apoptosis was quantified by annexin V staining and flow cytometry. Results: The HRM signature for NMI bladder cancer lines includes miR-210, miR-193b, miR-145, miR-125-3p, miR-708 and miR-517a. The most hypoxia-upregulated miRNA was miR-145. The miR-145 was a direct target of HIF-1α and two hypoxia response elements were identified within the promoter region of the gene. Finally, the hypoxic upregulation of miR-145 contributed to increased apoptosis in RT4 cells. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the hypoxic regulation of a number of miRNAs in bladder cancer. We have shown that miR-145 is a novel, robust and direct HIF target gene that in turn leads to increased cell death in NMI bladder cancer cell lines. PMID:26196183

  7. 145 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    factor for kidney disease (7), hypertension (8), diabetes (9), UTI (10 ),etc., Diabetes to little knowledge is just an ..... pathogenesis and treatment. International journal of antimicrobial agents. 2008 Feb. 29;31:54- .... Kuylenstierna J, Oliver RC, Periodontitis TT,. Seppala B. Infections associated with diabetes mellitus. N Engl J ...

  8. UL145/ORF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    inhibitor and its N-terminal fragment on follicle-stimulating hormone-induced progesterone secretion by granulosa cells in vitro. 1185. Wagh Ulhas V see Sumantran Venil N. 299, 755. Wang Wei. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in disturbed and undisturbed grassland communities, north east.

  9. 145 - 147 Chonoko

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    2011-06-01

    Jun 1, 2011 ... ABSTRACT. Phytochemical screening and antibacterial activity of the extracts of Cucurbita pepo (backpeel and seeds) against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi were carried out using standard procedures. The extraction was achieved using percolation method with ethanol and methanol as.

  10. 145 - 155 Abdulrahman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... High percentages of organic pollution indicators. Oscillatoria spp and Microcystis ... stakeholders should strengthen their legislation against indiscriminate and improper waste disposal along water-ways, dams inclusive. ... highly contaminated with both organic and inorganic pollutants (Imam, 2010).

  11. 145 - 155 Abdulrahman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... Determination of Nitrate. Ten millilitre (10ml) of the sample was added into distillation tubes and 10ml of 40% sodium hydroxide. (NaOH) was also added into the distillation tube. One gram (1g) of devardas alloy powder was added into the distillation tube. Ten millilitre (10ml) of 2% boric acid was placed ...

  12. Extracellular Disposal of Tumor-Suppressor miRs-145 and -34a via Microvesicles and 5-FU Resistance of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Akao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA expression causes various kinds of diseases. Especially, alterations in miRNA expression levels are frequently observed in human tumor cells and are associated with cancer pathogenesis. Earlier we established Fluorouracil (5-FU-resistant human colon cancer DLD-1 cells (DLD-1/5FU from parental 5-FU- sensitive DLD-1 cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of miRNA in each cell line and in its extracellular microvesicles (MVs before and after treatment with 5-FU. The nascent RNAs of anti-oncogenic miR-34a and -145 labeled with EU in both cells were proved to be transferred into MVs in both cell lines. The levels of miR-34a and -145 in the cells and in their MVs were not largely different in the two cell lines, and a substantial amount of both miRNAs was secreted by both cell lines even in the steady-state condition. The exposure of both cell lines to 5-FU significantly increased the intracellular levels of miR-145 and miR-34a in the 5-FU-sensitive DLD-1 cells, whereas the level of neither miR was elevated in the DLD-1/5FU cells. Interestingly, the amount of miR-145 detected in the small MVs shed into the medium of the parental cells was reduced after the treatment with 5-FU. On the other hand, the intracellular expression of miR-34a in the DLD-1/5FU cells was down-regulated compared with that in the parental DLD-1 cells even in the steady-state condition. As to the miR-34a secreted into MVs, the increase in the level in DLD-1/5FU cells was greater than that in the parental DLD-1 cells after the treatment with 5-FU. Thus, the intra- and extracellular miR-145 and -34a were closely associated with 5-FU resistance, and the resistance was in part due to the enhanced secretion of miR-145 and -34a via MVs, resulting in low intracellular levels of both miRNAs.

  13. Phenotypes of dnaXE145A Mutant Cells Indicate that the Escherichia coli Clamp Loader Has a Role in the Restart of Stalled Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flåtten, Ingvild; Helgesen, Emily; Pedersen, Ida Benedikte; Waldminghaus, Torsten; Rothe, Christiane; Taipale, Riikka; Johnsen, Line; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2017-12-15

    The Escherichia colidnaXE145A mutation was discovered in connection with a screen for multicopy suppressors of the temperature-sensitive topoisomerase IV mutation parE10 The gene for the clamp loader subunits τ and γ, dnaX, but not the mutant dnaXE145A , was found to suppress parE10(Ts) when overexpressed. Purified mutant protein was found to be functional in vitro, and few phenotypes were found in vivo apart from problems with partitioning of DNA in rich medium. We show here that a large number of the replication forks that initiate at oriC never reach the terminus in dnaXE145A mutant cells. The SOS response was found to be induced, and a combination of the dnaXE145A mutation with recBC and recA mutations led to reduced viability. The mutant cells exhibited extensive chromosome fragmentation and degradation upon inactivation of recBC and recA, respectively. The results indicate that the dnaXE145A mutant cells suffer from broken replication forks and that these need to be repaired by homologous recombination. We suggest that the dnaX-encoded τ and γ subunits of the clamp loader, or the clamp loader complex itself, has a role in the restart of stalled replication forks without extensive homologous recombination.IMPORTANCE The E. coli clamp loader complex has a role in coordinating the activity of the replisome at the replication fork and loading β-clamps for lagging-strand synthesis. Replication forks frequently encounter obstacles, such as template lesions, secondary structures, and tightly bound protein complexes, which will lead to fork stalling. Some pathways of fork restart have been characterized, but much is still unknown about the actors and mechanisms involved. We have in this work characterized the dnaXE145A clamp loader mutant. We find that the naturally occurring obstacles encountered by a replication fork are not tackled in a proper way by the mutant clamp loader and suggest a role for the clamp loader in the restart of stalled replication forks

  14. Comparable Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of Oligomeric Forms of a Novel, Acute HIV-1 Subtype C gp145 Envelope for Use in Preclinical and Clinical Vaccine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Lindsay; Krebs, Shelly J; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi; Whitney, Stephen; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Moscoso, Carlos G; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Williams, Constance; Slike, Bonnie; Molnar, Sebastian; Dussupt, Vincent; Alam, S Munir; Chenine, Agnes-Laurence; Tong, Tina; Hill, Edgar L; Liao, Hua-Xin; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Haynes, Barton F; Pensiero, Michael; McCutchan, Francine; Malek-Salehi, Shawyon; Cheng, R Holland; Robb, Merlin L; VanCott, Thomas; Michael, Nelson L; Marovich, Mary A; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R; Rao, Mangala; Polonis, Victoria R

    2015-08-01

    Eliciting broadly reactive functional antibodies remains a challenge in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine development that is complicated by variations in envelope (Env) subtype and structure. The majority of new global HIV-1 infections are subtype C, and novel antigenic properties have been described for subtype C Env proteins. Thus, an HIV-1 subtype C Env protein (CO6980v0c22) from an infected person in the acute phase (Fiebig stage I/II) was developed as a research reagent and candidate immunogen. The gp145 envelope is a novel immunogen with a fully intact membrane-proximal external region (MPER), extended by a polylysine tail. Soluble gp145 was enriched for trimers that yielded the expected "fan blade" motifs when visualized by cryoelectron microscopy. CO6980v0c22 gp145 reacts with the 4E10, PG9, PG16, and VRC01 HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), as well as the V1/V2-specific PGT121, 697, 2158, and 2297 MAbs. Different gp145 oligomers were tested for immunogenicity in rabbits, and purified dimers, trimers, and larger multimers elicited similar levels of cross-subtype binding and neutralizing antibodies to tier 1 and some tier 2 viruses. Immunized rabbit sera did not neutralize the highly resistant CO6980v0c22 pseudovirus but did inhibit the homologous infectious molecular clone in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay. This Env is currently in good manufacturing practice (GMP) production to be made available for use as a clinical research tool and further evaluation as a candidate vaccine. At present, the product pipeline for HIV vaccines is insufficient and is limited by inadequate capacity to produce large quantities of vaccine to standards required for human clinical trials. Such products are required to evaluate critical questions of vaccine formulation, route, dosing, and schedule, as well as to establish vaccine efficacy. The gp145 Env protein presented in this study forms physical trimers, binds to many of the

  15. Regulation of Ca2+ Signaling in Rat Bile Duct Epithelia by Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Keiji; Dufour, Jean-François; Shibao, Kazunori; Knickelbein, Roy; O'Neill, Allison F.; Bode, Hans-Peter; Cassio, Doris; St-Pierre, Marie V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Leite, M. Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai2+) regulates secretion of bicarbonate and other ions in the cholangiocyte. In other cell types, this second messenger acts through Ca2+ waves, Ca2+ oscillations, and other subcellular Ca2+ signaling patterns, but little is known about the subcellular organization of Ca2+ signaling in cholangiocytes. Therefore, we examined Ca2+ signaling and the subcellular distribution of Ca2+ release channels in cholangiocytes and in a model cholangiocyte cell line. The expression and subcellular distribution of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) isoforms and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) were determined in cholangiocytes from normal rat liver and in the normal rat cholangiocyte (NRC) polarized bile duct cell line. Subcellular Ca2+ signaling in cholangiocytes was examined by confocal microscopy. All 3 InsP3R isoforms were expressed in cholangiocytes, whereas RyR was not expressed. The type III InsP3R was the most heavily expressed isoform at the protein level and was concentrated apically, whereas the type I and type II isoforms were expressed more uniformly. The type III InsP3R was expressed even more heavily in NRC cells but was concentrated apically in these cells as well. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which increases Ca2+ via InsP3 in cholangiocytes, induced Ca2+ oscillations in both cholangiocytes and NRC cells. Acetylcholine (ACh) induced apical-to-basal Ca2+ waves. In conclusion, Ca2+ signaling in cholangiocytes occurs as polarized Ca2+ waves that begin in the region of the type III InsP3R. Differential subcellular localization of InsP3R isoforms may be an important molecular mechanism for the formation of Ca2+ waves and oscillations in cholangiocytes. Because Cai2+ is in part responsible for regulating ductular secretion, these findings also may have implications for the molecular basis of cholestatic disorders. PMID:12143036

  16. Regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in rat bile duct epithelia by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Keiji; Dufour, Jean-François; Shibao, Kazunori; Knickelbein, Roy; O'Neill, Allison F; Bode, Hans-Peter; Cassio, Doris; St-Pierre, Marie V; Larusso, Nicholas F; Leite, M Fatima; Nathanson, Michael H

    2002-08-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+)) regulates secretion of bicarbonate and other ions in the cholangiocyte. In other cell types, this second messenger acts through Ca(2+) waves, Ca(2+) oscillations, and other subcellular Ca(2+) signaling patterns, but little is known about the subcellular organization of Ca(2+) signaling in cholangiocytes. Therefore, we examined Ca(2+) signaling and the subcellular distribution of Ca(2+) release channels in cholangiocytes and in a model cholangiocyte cell line. The expression and subcellular distribution of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptor (InsP(3)R) isoforms and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) were determined in cholangiocytes from normal rat liver and in the normal rat cholangiocyte (NRC) polarized bile duct cell line. Subcellular Ca(2+) signaling in cholangiocytes was examined by confocal microscopy. All 3 InsP(3)R isoforms were expressed in cholangiocytes, whereas RyR was not expressed. The type III InsP(3)R was the most heavily expressed isoform at the protein level and was concentrated apically, whereas the type I and type II isoforms were expressed more uniformly. The type III InsP(3)R was expressed even more heavily in NRC cells but was concentrated apically in these cells as well. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which increases Ca(2+) via InsP(3) in cholangiocytes, induced Ca(2+) oscillations in both cholangiocytes and NRC cells. Acetylcholine (ACh) induced apical-to-basal Ca(2+) waves. In conclusion, Ca(2+) signaling in cholangiocytes occurs as polarized Ca(2+) waves that begin in the region of the type III InsP(3)R. Differential subcellular localization of InsP(3)R isoforms may be an important molecular mechanism for the formation of Ca(2+) waves and oscillations in cholangiocytes. Because Ca(i)(2+) is in part responsible for regulating ductular secretion, these findings also may have implications for the molecular basis of cholestatic disorders.

  17. MicroRNA-145 ModulatesN6-Methyladenosine Levels by Targeting the 3'-Untranslated mRNA Region of theN6-Methyladenosine Binding YTH Domain Family 2 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Li, Jiong; Feng, Guoxing; Gao, Shan; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Shuqin; Liu, Yunxia; Ye, Lihong; Li, Yueguo; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-03-03

    N 6 -Methyladenosine (m 6 A) is a prevalent modification present in the mRNAs of higher eukaryotes. YTH domain family 2 (YTHDF2), an m 6 A "reader" protein, can recognize mRNA m 6 A sites to mediate mRNA degradation. However, the regulatory mechanism of YTHDF2 is poorly understood. To this end, we investigated the post-transcriptional regulation of YTHDF2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the microRNA miR-145 might target the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of YTHDF2 mRNA. The levels of miR-145 were negatively correlated with those of YTHDF2 mRNA in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and immunohistochemical staining revealed that YTHDF2 was closely associated with malignancy of HCC. Interestingly, miR-145 decreased the luciferase activities of 3'-UTR of YTHDF2 mRNA. Mutation of predicted miR-145 binding sites in the 3'-UTR of YTHDF2 mRNA abolished the miR-145-induced decrease in luciferase activity. Overexpression of miR-145 dose-dependently down-regulated YTHDF2 expression in HCC cells at the levels of both mRNA and protein. Conversely, inhibition of miR-145 resulted in the up-regulation of YTHDF2 in the cells. Dot blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining revealed that the overexpression of miR-145 strongly increased m 6 A levels relative to those in control HCC cells, and this increase could be blocked by YTHDF2 overexpression. Moreover, miR-145 inhibition strongly decreased m 6 A levels, which were rescued by treatment with a small interfering RNA-based YTHDF2 knockdown. Thus, we conclude that miR-145 modulates m 6 A levels by targeting the 3'-UTR of YTHDF2 mRNA in HCC cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Search for a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass in the range 145 to 1000 GeV at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Selvaggi, Michele; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Tikvica, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Heine, Kristin; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Saxena, Pooja; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fantinel, Sergio; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; De Remigis, Paolo; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Grigelionis, Ignas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Wolszczak, Weronika; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; 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Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-06-14

    A search for a standard-model-like Higgs boson in the H $\\to$ WW and H $\\to$ ZZ decay channels is reported, for Higgs boson masses in the range 145 < $m_H$ < 1000 GeV. The search is based upon proton-proton collision data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 inverse femtobarns at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and up to 5.3 inverse femtobarns at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The combined upper limits at 95% confidence level on products of the cross section and branching fractions exclude a standard-model-like Higgs boson in the range 145 < $m_H$ < 710 GeV, thus extending the mass region excluded by CMS from 127-600 GeV up to 710 GeV.

  19. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  20. Low miR-143/miR-145 Cluster Levels Induce Activin A Overexpression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas, Which Contributes to Poor Prognosis.

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    Andreia Bufalino

    Full Text Available Deregulated expression of activin A is reported in several tumors, but its biological functions in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC are unknown. Here, we investigate whether activin A can play a causal role in OSCCs. Activin A expression was assessed by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in OSCC tissues. Low activin A-expressing cells were treated with recombinant activin A and assessed for apoptosis, proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Those phenotypes were also evaluated in high activin A-expressing cells treated with follistatin (an activin A antagonist or stably expressing shRNA targeting activin A. Transfections of microRNA mimics were performed to determine whether the overexpression of activin A is regulated by miR-143/miR-145 cluster. Activin A was overexpressed in OSCCs in comparison with normal oral mucosa, and high activin A levels were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, tumor differentiation and poor survival. High activin A levels promoted multiple properties associated with malignant transformation, including decreased apoptosis and increased proliferation, migration, invasion and EMT. Both miR-143 and miR-145 were markedly downregulated in OSCC cell lines and in clinical specimens, and inversely correlated to activin A levels. Forced expression of miR-143 and miR-145 in OSCC cells significantly decreased the expression of activin A. Overexpression of activin A in OSCCs, which is controlled by downregulation of miR-143/miR-145 cluster, regulates apoptosis, proliferation and invasiveness, and it is clinically correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival.

  1. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Mallory, E-mail: m.gough1@lancaster.ac.uk; Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee, E-mail: s.blanthorn-hazell@lancaster.ac.uk; Delury, Craig, E-mail: c.delury@lancaster.ac.uk; Parkin, Edward, E-mail: e.parkin@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  2. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  3. Correlating the deep inferior epigastric artery branching pattern with type of abdominal free flap performed in a series of 145 breast reconstruction patients

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, AR; Jones, ME; Hazari, A; Francis, I; Nduka, C

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap is currently viewed as the gold standard in autologous breast reconstruction. We studied three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (CTA) in 145 patients undergoing free abdominal flap breast reconstruction to try to correlate deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) branching pattern with the type of flap performed and patient outcome. Today, reconstructive breast surgeons have become more experienced in raising DIEP flaps...

  4. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection Induces Stress Granule Formation Depending on Protein Kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) in MARC-145 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanrong; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are sites of mRNA storage that are formed in response to various conditions of stress, including viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an Arterivirus that has been devastating the swine industry worldwide since the late 1980s. In this study, we found that infection of PRRSV strain WUH3 (genotype 2 PRRSV) induced stable formation of robust SGs in MARC-145 cells, as demonstrated by the recruitment of marker proteins of SGs, includ...

  5. Classificação dos linfomas não-Hodgkin: estudo morfológico e imunoistoquímico de 145 casos Classification of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: morphological and immunological study of 145 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Bedran Milito

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A classificação dos linfomas não-Hodgkin tem sido, ao longo dos últimos trinta anos, motivo de controvérsia. Várias classificações têm sido propostas em busca de um consenso entre patologistas e clínicos. Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar criticamente três destas classificações através do estudo retrospectivo de 145 casos de linfomas primários de gânglio linfático selecionados do Serviço de Anatomia Patológica do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, entre 1979 e 1995. Os casos revistos foram classificados pelas propostas da Working Formulation, de Kiel e da Real. Testes imunoistoquímicos com os anticorpos anti-CD45, anti-CD20, anti-CD45RO e anti-CD30 foram realizados. Cento e sete casos (73,7% apresentaram fenótipo B; 33 casos (22,7%, fenótipo T; e quatro casos foram nulos (linfoma anaplásico de grandes células. Foi possível prever o fenótipo pela morfologia em 89,4% dos casos. Os linfomas de alto grau predominaram (59,2%, sendo o linfoma centroblástico o de maior freqüência (31,7% . Os linfomas foliculares representaram 29 casos (20%, com maior incidência dos de grandes células (31% do que dos de pequenas células (27,5%. Quando comparadas as três classificações, observamos que determinados grupos da Working Formulation abrigam múltiplas entidades. Isto se deve ao fato de a classificação da Working Formulation ser baseada somente em achados morfológicos e, por isso, deve ter seu uso desaconselhado. Já a classificação de Kiel e a da Real devem ter o seu emprego estimulado, pois apresentam, além de uma boa análise histopatológica, um estudo imunológico que define entidades biológicas correlacionando-se, quando possível, com a célula de origem.The non-Hodgkin's lymphomas classifications have been a controversial reason for the last thirty years. Many classifications have been proposed trying to achieve a consensus among pathologists and clinicians. The objective of this study was

  6. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-06

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk.

  7. Profile of vintafolide (EC145 and its use in the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyckx M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mathieu Luyckx,1,2 Raffaella Votino,1 Jean-Luc Squifflet,1,2 Jean-François Baurain2,31Gynecology and Andrology Unit, 2Centre du cancer, Gynecologic Oncology Group, 3Medical Oncology Unit, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, BelgiumObjective: Our aim was to review the profile of vintafolide (EC145 and its rationale for use in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. First we investigated the folate receptors (FRs, folate's pathway into cells, and its expression in normal and cancerous cells, before detailing the mechanism of action of vintafolide, its clinical applications, and the results of different study phases.Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted through Pubmed/Medline, Google, ClinicalTrials.gov and websites of pharmaceutical companies. Only articles in English were selected. All articles investigating folate receptor expression in ovarian cancer were selected first, than articles reviewing platinum resistance. Papers about vintafolide were collected, while those talking about synthesis and biochemistry concerns were excluded. The different Phase I and II studies were read, and an update on the website of pharmaceuticals companies were added.Results: FR is a bundle-membrane receptor that is expressed normally in some normal tissues on the apical surface of cells, but highly expressed in ovarian cancer cells (>80%. It collects folate through endocytosis. Chemotherapy does not modify its expression in ovarian cancer cells, and its expression appears to be mostly associated with a poor prognosis and platinum resistance. Vintafolide is a folate-desacetylvinblastine monohydrazide conjugate, allowing a liberation of the drug into the cytoplasm of cancerous cells via the FR-α (FR α and endocytosis, with high specificity. Phase I studies showed a 2.5 mg bolus dose to be nontoxic, with moderately adverse events. Phase II clinical trials for the first time demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in disease

  8. Stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 receptor subtypes by adenophostin A and its analogues.

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    Huma Saleem

    Full Text Available Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R are intracellular Ca(2+ channels. Most animal cells express mixtures of the three IP3R subtypes encoded by vertebrate genomes. Adenophostin A (AdA is the most potent naturally occurring agonist of IP3R and it shares with IP3 the essential features of all IP3R agonists, namely structures equivalent to the 4,5-bisphosphate and 6-hydroxyl of IP3. The two essential phosphate groups contribute to closure of the clam-like IP3-binding core (IBC, and thereby IP3R activation, by binding to each of its sides (the α- and β-domains. Regulation of the three subtypes of IP3R by AdA and its analogues has not been examined in cells expressing defined homogenous populations of IP3R. We measured Ca(2+ release evoked by synthetic adenophostin A (AdA and its analogues in permeabilized DT40 cells devoid of native IP3R and stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP3R. The determinants of high-affinity binding of AdA and its analogues were indistinguishable for each IP3R subtype. The results are consistent with a cation-π interaction between the adenine of AdA and a conserved arginine within the IBC α-domain contributing to closure of the IBC. The two complementary contacts between AdA and the α-domain (cation-π interaction and 3″-phosphate allow activation of IP3R by an analogue of AdA (3″-dephospho-AdA that lacks a phosphate group equivalent to the essential 5-phosphate of IP3. These data provide the first structure-activity analyses of key AdA analogues using homogenous populations of all mammalian IP3R subtypes. They demonstrate that differences in the Ca(2+ signals evoked by AdA analogues are unlikely to be due to selective regulation of IP3R subtypes.

  9. Permeant calcium ion feed-through regulation of single inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channel gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vais, Horia; Foskett, J. Kevin; Ullah, Ghanim; Pearson, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) Ca2+ release channel plays a central role in the generation and modulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals, and is intricately regulated by multiple mechanisms including cytoplasmic ligand (InsP3, free Ca2+, free ATP4−) binding, posttranslational modifications, and interactions with cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal proteins. However, regulation of InsP3R channel activity by free Ca2+ in the ER lumen ([Ca2+]ER) remains poorly understood because of limitations of Ca2+ flux measurements and imaging techniques. Here, we used nuclear patch-clamp experiments in excised luminal-side-out configuration with perfusion solution exchange to study the effects of [Ca2+]ER on homotetrameric rat type 3 InsP3R channel activity. In optimal [Ca2+]i and subsaturating [InsP3], jumps of [Ca2+]ER from 70 nM to 300 µM reduced channel activity significantly. This inhibition was abrogated by saturating InsP3 but restored when [Ca2+]ER was raised to 1.1 mM. In suboptimal [Ca2+]i, jumps of [Ca2+]ER (70 nM to 300 µM) enhanced channel activity. Thus, [Ca2+]ER effects on channel activity exhibited a biphasic dependence on [Ca2+]i. In addition, the effect of high [Ca2+]ER was attenuated when a voltage was applied to oppose Ca2+ flux through the channel. These observations can be accounted for by Ca2+ flux driven through the open InsP3R channel by [Ca2+]ER, raising local [Ca2+]i around the channel to regulate its activity through its cytoplasmic regulatory Ca2+-binding sites. Importantly, [Ca2+]ER regulation of InsP3R channel activity depended on cytoplasmic Ca2+-buffering conditions: it was more pronounced when [Ca2+]i was weakly buffered but completely abolished in strong Ca2+-buffering conditions. With strong cytoplasmic buffering and Ca2+ flux sufficiently reduced by applied voltage, both activation and inhibition of InsP3R channel gating by physiological levels of [Ca2+]ER were completely abolished

  10. Atlantic meridional overturning transport at 14.5° N and 24.5° N during 1989-1992 and 2013-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao; Karstensen, Johannes; Brandt, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) from transatlantic sections along 14.5° N, occupied in 1989 and 2013, in combination with data along a section at 24.5° N, occupied in 1992 and 2015. By applying a box inverse model, volume, salt, and heat conservation in layers, defined by neutral density surfaces, was applied. Considering direct and indirect Ekman transport estimates and specific transport features, such as the deep western boundary current, as constraints, the reference velocity for each station pair and the dianeutral velocity for each property across neutral density surfaces was determined. Our analysis shows that the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) has become significantly warmer and saltier along the 14.5° N section, while the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) has become colder and fresher at both sections. At 24.5° N, the water mass transport from the inverse model is in good agreement with that from the RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS arrays. At 14.5° N, we observed a decent of the upper boundary of the northward flowing Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) by one density layer (from 28.141 to 28.154 kg m-3). The AMOC was generally stronger in 1989/1992 than in 2013/2015 (19.3±6.8 Sv versus 16.5±7.1 Sv at 14.5° N, and 20.3±5.2 Sv versus 18.8±5.8 Sv at 24.5° N, respectively). In the inverse model solution the transport changes are caused by a reduction of the northward AAIW and AABW transport and a corresponding reduction of the southward NADW transport at both sections. Comparison between our AMOC estimates at 14.5° N and results from the GECCO2 ocean synthesis data shows that the observed changes between the two time periods could be explained by the seasonal cycle and interannual changes found in GECCO2. Heat and freshwater fluxes through each section were estimated using the inverse results.

  11. Glycoprotein 5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain SD16 inhibits viral replication and causes G2/M cell cycle arrest, but does not induce cellular apoptosis in Marc-145 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Yang, E-mail: muyang@nwsuaf.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Liangliang, E-mail: lifeiyang2007@126.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Zhang, Beibei, E-mail: diana851218@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Huang, Baicheng, E-mail: hbch228@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Gao, Jiming, E-mail: jimingao2006@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); and others

    2015-10-15

    Cell apoptosis is common after infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). PRRSV GP5 has been reported to induce cell apoptosis. To further understand the role of GP5 in PRRSV induced cell apoptosis, we established Marc-145 cell lines stably expressing full-length GP5, GP5{sup Δ84-96} (aa 84-96 deletion), and GP5{sup Δ97-119} (aa 97-119 deletion). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis and virus replication in these cell lines were evaluated. Neither truncated nor full-length GP5 induced cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells. However, GP5{sup Δ97-119}, but not full-length or GP5{sup Δ84-96}, induced a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase resulting in a reduction in the growth of Marc-145 cells. Additionally, GP5{sup Δ84-96} inhibited the replication of PRRSV in Marc-145 cells through induction of IFN-β. These findings suggest that PRRSV GP5 is not responsible for inducing cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells under these experimental conditions; however it has other important roles in virus/host cell biology. - Highlights: • Marc-145 cell lines stable expression PRRSV GP5 or truncated GP5 were constructed. • GP5{sup Δ97-119} expression in Marc-145 cell induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. • Expression of GP5 and truncated GP5 could not induce Marc-145 cells apoptosis. • PRRSV replication in Marc-145-GP5{sup Δ84-96} was significantly inhibited.

  12. Effects of AMG 145 on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels: results from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose phase 1 studies in healthy volunteers and hypercholesterolemic subjects on statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Clapton S; Shaywitz, Adam J; Wasserman, Scott M; Smith, Brian P; Gao, Bing; Stolman, Dina S; Crispino, Caroline P; Smirnakis, Karen V; Emery, Maurice G; Colbert, Alexander; Gibbs, John P; Retter, Marc W; Cooke, Blaire P; Uy, Stephen T; Matson, Mark; Stein, Evan A

    2012-11-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and effects of AMG 145 on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects on statin therapy. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) down-regulates surface expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R), increasing serum LDL-C. AMG 145, a fully human monoclonal antibody to PCSK9, prevents PCSK9/LDL-R interaction, restoring LDL-R recycling. Healthy adults (phase 1a) were randomized to 1 dose of AMG 145: 7, 21, 70, 210, or 420 mg SC; 21 or 420 mg IV; or matching placebo. Hypercholesterolemic adults (phase 1b) receiving low- to moderate-dose statins were randomized to multiple SC doses of AMG 145: 14 or 35 mg once weekly (QW) ×6, 140 or 280 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) ×3, 420 mg every 4 weeks ×2, or matching placebo. Eleven subjects receiving high-dose statins and 6 subjects with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia were randomized to SC AMG 145 140 mg or placebo Q2W ×3. In the trials (AMG 145 n = 85, placebo n = 28), AMG 145 reduced LDL-C up to 64% (p AMG 145 versus placebo groups: 69% versus 71% (phase 1a); 65% versus 64% (phase 1b). In phase 1 studies, AMG 145 significantly reduced serum LDL-C in healthy and hypercholesterolemic statin-treated subjects, including those with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or taking the highest doses of atorvastatin or rosuvastatin, with an overall AE profile similar to placebo. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jia-Xuan Qiu,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou, 3,4 Zhi-Xu He,4 Ruan Jin Zhao,5 Xueji Zhang,6 Lun Yang,7 Shu-Feng Zhou,3,4 Zong-Fu Mao11School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China; 5Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sarasota, FL, USA; 6Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Plumbagin (PLB has exhibited a potent anticancer effect in preclinical studies, but the molecular interactome remains elusive. This study aimed to compare the quantitative proteomic responses to PLB treatment in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells using the approach of stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. The data were finally validated using Western blot assay. First, the bioinformatic analysis predicted that PLB could interact with 78 proteins that were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis, immunity, and signal transduction. Our quantitative proteomic study using SILAC revealed that there were at least 1,225 and 267 proteins interacting with PLB and there were 341 and 107 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by PLB in PC-3 and DU145 cells, respectively. These proteins and pathways played a

  14. Radiolesão vascular como efeito deletério da braquiterapia intra-arterial com dose elevada de Samário-153 em coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos Vascular radiolesion as a deleterious effect of high-dose-rate intraarterial brachytherapy with Samarium-153 in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Bertolim Précoma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo tem por objetivo avaliar as alterações vasculares morfológicas e morfométricas induzidas pela braquiterapia com Samário-153 (153 Sm em coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos, com doses elevadas. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 43 coelhos hipercolesterolêmicos, brancos, da raça New Zealand, e o total de 86 artérias ilíacas submetidas a lesão por balão de angioplastia. Divididos em três grupos: dois (GI irradiados com as doses de 15Gy (n=14 e 60Gy (n=36 e um grupo controle (n=36. Foram realizadas avaliação histológica morfométrica e análise histológica qualitativa para análise tecidual. RESULTADOS: Foram observadas uma redução significativa da neoproliferação intimal (NPI no GI 15 Gy (pOBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate vascular morphological and morphometric changes induced by brachytherapy with samarium-153 (Sm-153 at high doses in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. METHODS: Forty-three New Zealand White hypercholesterolemic rabbits were analyzed, and the total of 86 iliac arteries underwent balloon angioplasty injury. The rabbits were divided into three different groups: two irradiation groups (IG assigned to 15 Gy (n=14 and 60 Gy (n=36 irradiation doses, respectively, and a control group (n = 36. Histomorphometric and qualitative histological analyses were performed for tissue evaluation. RESULTS: Significant reductions were found in neointimal proliferation (NIP (p< 0.0001, media area (MA (p<0.0001 and percent stenosis (p<0.0001 in the 15-Gy IG, compared to the other groups. The 60-Gy IG had the higher rate of NIP, increase in media and vessel areas (VA and percent stenosis. The 60-Gy IG also showed the greatest number of xanthomatous cells (60-Gy IG: 86.11% and 15-Gy IG: 14.29%, p<0.0001 and the highest amount of hyaline amorphous tissue (60-Gy IG:58.33% and 15-Gy IG:0%, p=0.0001 and vascular proliferation (60-Gy IG:30.56% and 15-Gy IG:0%, p=0.0221. No statistically significant differences were found

  15. MicroRNA-145 inhibits the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway to suppress the proliferation and invasion of invasive pituitary adenoma cells by targeting AKT3 in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou K

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kai Zhou, Yan-Dong Fan, Peng-Fei Wu, Serick Duysenbi, Zhao-Hai Feng, Guo-Jia Du, Ting-Rong Zhang Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, People’s Republic of China Purpose: This study was designed to explore how miR-145 regulates the mTOR signaling pathway in invasive pituitary adenoma (IPA by targeting AKT3.Methods: A total of 71 cases of IPA tissues and 66 cases of non-IPA tissues were obtained in this study. In vitro, the IPA cells were assigned into blank control, empty plasmid, miR-145 mimic, miR-145 inhibitor, miR-145 mimic + rapamycin, miR-145 inhibitor + rapamycin and rapamycin groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect the protein expressions of PI3K, AKT3, mTOR mRNA and the mRNA expression of miR-145 both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, the S6K and RPS6 mRNA and protein expressions as well as the relative phosphorylation levels were determined in vitro. MTT assay, flow cytometry and transwell assay were used to testify the cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion ability, respectively.Results: The IPA tissues exhibited significantly lower expression of miR-145 but higher PI3K, AKT3 and mTOR mRNA and protein expressions when compared with the non-IPA tissues. Compared with the blank control and empty plasmid groups, the miR-145 mimic group showed significantly decreased PI3K, AKT3, mTOR, S6K and RPS6 mRNA and protein expressions as well as phosphorylation levels; besides, the IPA cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability were strongly inhibited, accompanied with the increased number of apoptotic cells. In the miR-145 inhibitor group, the PI3K, AKT3, mTOR, S6K and RPS6 mRNA and protein expressions as well as the phosphorylation levels were significantly increased; cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability were remarkably elevated, accompanied with reduced apoptotic cell number

  16. Fate of Escherichia coli O145 present naturally in bovine slurry applied to vegetables before harvest, after washing and simulated wholesale and retail distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, M L; Harrison, D; Heath, J F; Monaghan, J M

    2017-12-01

    To determine the fate of Escherichia coli on vegetables that were processed through commercial wash treatments and stored under simulated retail conditions at 4°C or wholesale at fluctuating ambient temperatures (0-25°C, dependent on season). Bovine slurry that was naturally contaminated with E. coli O145 was applied without dilution or diluted 1:10 using borehole water to growing potatoes, leeks or carrots. Manure was applied 1 week prior to harvest to simulate a near-harvest contamination event by manure deposition or an application of contaminated water to simulate a flooding event or irrigation from a contaminated water source. At harvest, crops were contaminated at up to 2 log cfu g -1 . Washing transferred E. coli into the water of a flotation tank used for potato washing and did not completely remove all traces of contamination from the crop. Manure-contaminated potatoes were observed to contain 0·72 cfu E. coli O145 g -1 after processing and retail storage. Manure-contaminated leeks harboured 0·73-1·55 cfu E. coli O145 g -1 after washing and storage. There was no cross-contamination when leeks were spray washed. Washing in an abrasive drum resulted in less than perfect decontamination for manure-contaminated carrots. There were five post-distribution isolations from carrots irrigated with contaminated water 24 h prior to harvest. Standard commercial washing and distribution conditions may be insufficient to reliably control human pathogenic E. coli on fresh produce. Previous speculation that the cause of a UK foodborne disease outbreak was soil from imperfectly cleaned vegetables is plausible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. The long noncoding RNA-ROR promotes the resistance of radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells by targeting the p53/miR-145 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengxiang; Yang, Yue; An, Weiwei; Xu, Jianyu; Zhang, Gan; Jie, Jing; Zhang, Qingyuan

    2017-04-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) have critical roles in elevating efficacy of anticancer therapy and tumor progression. Recent studies show that Regulator of Reprogramming (ROR) is aberrantly expressed in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Radiotherapy is considered as a standard preoperative treatment. However, a considerable number of CRCs are resistant to radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the role of lincRNA-ROR in radiotherapy for CRC and detected the underlying molecular mechanism. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to quantify the expression level of lincRNA-ROR in different CRC cell lines and tissue samples. Cell viability and apoptosis assays were used to confirm the radiotherapy-mediated effects by lincRNA-ROR altered expression. The direct impact of lincRNA-ROR on the expression of p53/miR-145 by loss-of-function and gain-of-function strategy was also analyzed. A xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate the role of linc-ROR in CRC treatment. We discovered that lincRNA-ROR was upregulated in CRC cell lines and tissue samples. We further showed that knockdown of lincRNA-ROR enhanced the sensitivity to radiotherapy for CRC by inhibiting cell viability and promoting apoptosis. Activity of the p53/miR-145 pathway may help explain the role of lincRNA-ROR for stress-induced regulation in CRC therapy. Combined specific knockdown of lincRNA-ROR and radiotherapy treatment in xenograft model resulted in a significant reduction in the tumor growth. LincRNA-ROR decreases sensitivity to radiotherapy via the negative regulation of p53/miR-145 and may represent a potential target for the treatment of CRC. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Apoptosis Induction of Human Prostate Carcinoma DU145 Cells by Diallyl Disulfide via Modulation of JNK and PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Hyun Yoo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS, a sulfur compound derived from garlic, has various biological properties, such as anticancer, antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms of action underlying the compound's anticancer activity have not been fully elucidated. In this study, the apoptotic effects of DADS were investigated in DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells. Our results showed that DADS markedly inhibited the growth of the DU145 cells by induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was accompanied by modulation of Bcl-2 and inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family proteins, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm and proteolytic activation of caspases. We also found that the expression of death-receptor 4 (DR4 and Fas ligand (FasL proteins was increased and that the level of intact Bid proteins was down-regulated by DADS. Moreover, treatment with DADS induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, including extracellular-signal regulating kinase (ERK, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. A specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125, significantly blocked DADS-induced-apoptosis, whereas inhibitors of the ERK (PD98059 and p38 MAPK (SB203580 had no effect. The induction of apoptosis was also accompanied by inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt and the PI3K inhibitor LY29004 significantly increased DADS-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence demonstrating that the proapoptotic effect of DADS is mediated through the activation of JNK and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in DU145 cells.

  19. Prevalence and pathogen load of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157/O145 serogroup in sheep faeces collected at sale yards and in abattoir effluent in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Abraham, S; Gardner, G E; Ryan, U; Jacobson, C

    2017-05-01

    Develop a multiplex quantitative PCR assay to investigate the prevalence and shedding of Escherichia coli O157/O145, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. in sheep at sale yards and abattoirs. A qPCR for E. coli O157/O145 was developed, validated and multiplexed with an existing qPCR for Campylobacter and Salmonella enterica. The absolute numbers of E. coli O157/O145, Campylobacter and Salmonella in control samples was determined using droplet digital PCR. These were then used as the controls in the multiplex qPCR on a total of 474 sheep faecal samples collected from two saleyards over a 4-month period (April-July 2014) and 96 effluent samples from an abattoir. The mutiplex qPCR was specific with a sensitivity of 5 organisms/μL faecal DNA extract for Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145 in faecal samples was 5.7%, 3.6% and 8.4% and in effluent samples was 18.8%, 6.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The pathogen loads of Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145 in faecal and effluent samples was also determined via mutiplex qPCR. The overall prevalences of Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145 were generally low (<6%), but point prevalences ranged considerably in healthy sheep (up to 26% for E. coli O157/O145). Further work to determine risk factors for shedding of bacterial organisms in meat sheep in the pre-slaughter period (on-farm, sale yards and lairage at abattoirs) could further reduce the risk of contamination of meat products. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. Amino acid substitutions at positions 122 and 145 of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) determine the antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBsAg and influence in vivo HBsAg clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunchen; Deng, Wanyu; Deng, Liu; Cao, Liang; Qin, Bo; Li, Songxia; Wang, Yun; Pei, Rongjuan; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2012-04-01

    A variety of amino acid substitutions, such as K122I and G145R, have been identified around or within the a determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), impair HBsAg secretion and antibody binding, and may be responsible for immune escape in patients. In this study, we examined how different substitutions at amino acid positions 122 and 145 of HBsAg influence HBsAg expression, secretion, and recognition by anti-HBs antibodies. The results showed that the hydrophobicity, the presence of the phenyl group, and the charges in the side chain of the amino acid residues at position 145 reduced HBsAg secretion and impaired reactivity with anti-HBs antibodies. Only the substitution K122I at position 122 affected HBsAg secretion and recognition by anti-HBs antibodies. Genetic immunization in mice demonstrated that the priming of anti-HBs antibody response was strongly impaired by the substitutions K122I, G145R, and others, like G145I, G145W, and G145E. Mice preimmunized with wild-type HBsAg (wtHBsAg) or variant HBsAg (vtHBsAg) were challenged by hydrodynamic injection (HI) with a replication-competent hepatitis B virus (HBV) clone. HBsAg persisted in peripheral blood for at least 3 days after HI in mice preimmunized with vtHBsAg but was undetectable in mice preimmunized with wtHBsAg, indicating that vtHBsAgs fail to induce proper immune responses for efficient HBsAg clearance. In conclusion, the biochemical properties of amino acid residues at positions 122 and 145 of HBsAg have a major effect on antigenicity and immunogenicity. In addition, the presence of proper anti-HBs antibodies is indispensable for the neutralization and clearance of HBsAg during HBV infection.

  1. Ins(1,4,5)P{sub 3} facilitates ATP accumulation via phosphocreatine/creatine kinase in the endoplasmic reticulum extracted from MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jing [Medical Research Center, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Department of Dental Implantology, School of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Ogata, Shigenori [Joint Laboratory for Frontier Medical Science, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Segawa, Masaru [Central Laboratory for Pathology and Morphology, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Usune, Sadaharu [Research Laboratory of Biodynamics, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Zhao, Yumei [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry of Shanghai Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Katsuragi, Takeshi, E-mail: katsurag@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Medical Research Center, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan)

    2010-07-02

    So far, the content and accumulation of ATP in isolated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are little understood. First, we confirmed using electron microscopic and Western blotting techniques that the samples extracted from MDCK cells are endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The amounts of ATP in the extracted ER were measured from the filtrate after a spinning down of ultrafiltration spin column packed with ER. When the ER sample (5 {mu}g) after 3 days freezing was suspended in intracellular medium (ICM), 0.1% Triton X and ultrapure water (UPW), ATP amounts from the ER with UPW were the highest and over 10 times compared with that from the control with ICM, indicating that UPW is the most effective tool in destroying the ER membrane. After a 10-min-incubation with ICM containing phosphocreatine (PCr)/creatine kinase (CK) of the fresh ER. ATP amounts in the filtrate obtained by spinning down were not changed from that in the control (no PCr/CK). However, ATP amounts in the filtrate from the second spinning down of the ER (treated with PCr/CK) suspended in UPW became over 10-fold compared with the control. When 1 {mu}M inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P{sub 3}) was added in the incubation medium (ICM with PCr/CK), ATP amounts from the filtrate after the second spinning down were further enhanced around three times. This enhancement was almost canceled by Ca{sup 2+}-removal from ICM and by adding thapsigargin, a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase inhibitor, but not by 2-APB and heparin, Ins(1,4,5)P{sub 3} receptor antagonists. Administration of 500 {mu}M adenosine to the incubation medium (with PCr/CK) failed to enhance the accumulation of ATP in the ER. These findings suggest that the ER originally contains ATP and ATP accumulation in the ER is promoted by PCr/CK and Ins(1,4,5)P{sub 3}.

  2. Safety of spray-dried powder formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A exposure to subadult/adult unionid mussels during simulated open-water treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Waller, Diane L.; Wise, Jeremy K.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The exposure effects of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation ofPseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) on the survival of seven species of unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins was evaluated in this study. The study exposures were completed within replicated 350-liter test tanks contained within a mobile bioassay laboratory sited on the shores of the Black River near La Crosse, Wisconsin. The test tanks were supplied with flowing, filtered river water which was interrupted during the exposure period.

  3. Carbon-flux distribution within Streptomyces coelicolor metabolism: a comparison between the actinorhodin-producing strain M145 and its non-producing derivative M1146.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Coze

    Full Text Available Metabolic Flux Analysis is now viewed as essential to elucidate the metabolic pattern of cells and to design appropriate genetic engineering strategies to improve strain performance and production processes. Here, we investigated carbon flux distribution in two Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2 strains: the wild type M145 and its derivative mutant M1146, in which gene clusters encoding the four main antibiotic biosynthetic pathways were deleted. Metabolic Flux Analysis and (13C-labeling allowed us to reconstruct a flux map under steady-state conditions for both strains. The mutant strain M1146 showed a higher growth rate, a higher flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and a higher flux through the anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. In that strain, glucose uptake and the flux through the Krebs cycle were lower than in M145. The enhanced flux through the pentose phosphate pathway in M1146 is thought to generate NADPH enough to face higher needs for biomass biosynthesis and other processes. In both strains, the production of NADPH was higher than NADPH needs, suggesting a key role for nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase for redox homeostasis. ATP production is also likely to exceed metabolic ATP needs, indicating that ATP consumption for maintenance is substantial.Our results further suggest a possible competition between actinorhodin and triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathways for their common precursor, acetyl-CoA. These findings may be instrumental in developing new strategies exploiting S. coelicolor as a platform for the production of bio-based products of industrial interest.

  4. Pseudogene OCT4-pg4 functions as a natural micro RNA sponge to regulate OCT4 expression by competing for miR-145 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Zhang-Yan; Zhang, Rui; Xin, Bo; Chen, Rui; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Tao; Wen, Wei-Hong; Jia, Lin-Tao; Yao, Li-Bo; Yang, An-Gang

    2013-08-01

    The POU transcription factor OCT4 is a pleiotropic regulator of gene expression in embryonic stem cells. Recent studies demonstrated that OCT4 is aberrantly expressed in multiple types of human cancer; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that OCT4-pg4, a pseudogene of OCT4, is abnormally activated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The expression level of OCT4-pg4 is positively correlated with that of OCT4, and both gene transcripts can be directly targeted by a tumor-suppressive micro RNA miR-145. We find that the non-coding RNA OCT4-pg4 is biologically active, as it can upregulate OCT4 protein level in HCC. Mechanistic analysis revealed that OCT4-pg4 functions as a natural micro RNA sponge to protect OCT4 transcript from being inhibited by miR-145. In addition, our study also showed that OCT4-pg4 can promote growth and tumorigenicity of HCC cells, thus exerting an oncogenic role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, survival analysis suggests that high OCT4-pg4 level is significantly correlated with poor prognosis of HCC patients. Taken together, our finding adds a new layer of post-transcriptional regulation of OCT4 and sheds new light on the treatment of human HCC.

  5. Measurement of keV-neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra of {sup 143,145,146}Nd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veerapaspong, T.; Igashira, Masayuki; Mizuno, Satoshi; Hori, Jun-ichi; Ohsaki, Toshiro [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    The neutron capture cross sections and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of {sup 143,145,146}Nd were measured in the neutron energy region of 10 to 90 keV and at 550 keV. A neutron time-of-flight method was adopted with a 1.5-ns pulsed neutron source by the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction and with a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) {gamma}-ray spectrometer. A pulse-height weighing technique was applied to observed capture {gamma}-ray pulse-height spectra to derive capture yields. The capture cross sections were obtained with the error of about 5% by using the standard capture section of {sup 197}Au. The evaluated values of JENDL-3.2 and previous measurements were compared with the present results. The capture {gamma}-ray spectra were obtained by unfolding the observed capture {gamma}-ray pulse-height spectra. An anomalous shoulder was observed around 2 MeV in the {gamma}-ray spectra of {sup 145,146}Nd, and the energy position of the shoulder was consistent with the systematics obtained in our previous work. (author)

  6. The Aqueous Soluble Polyphenolic Fraction of Psidium guajava Leaves Exhibits Potent Anti-Angiogenesis and Anti-Migration Actions on DU145 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Chi Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract of Psidium guajava budding leaves (PE bears an extremely high content of polyphenolic and isoflavonoids. Whether it could be used as an anti-tumor chemopreventive in view of anti-angiogenesis and anti-migration, we performed the assay methods including the MTT assay to examine the cell viability; the ELISA assay to test the expressions of VEGF, IL-6 and IL-8; the western blot analysis to detect TIMP-2; the gelatinolytic zymography to follow the expression of MMPs; the wound scratch assay to examine the migration capability; and the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay to detect the suppressive angiogenesis. Results indicated that the IC50 of PE for DU145 cells was ∼0.57 mg ml−1. In addition, PE effectively inhibited the expressions of VEGF, IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines, and MMP-2 and MMP-9, and simultaneously activated TIMP-2 and suppressed the cell migration and the angiogenesis. Conclusively, PE potentially possesses a strong anti-DU145 effect. Thus, clinically it owns the potential to be used as an effective adjuvant anti-cancer chemopreventive.

  7. The grape component piceatannol induces apoptosis in DU145 human prostate cancer cells via the activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Park, Heesook; Park, So Young; Jun, Jong-Gab; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-10-01

    Piceatannol (trans-3,4,3',5'-tetrahydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol that is found in grapes, red wine, Rheum undulatum, and the seeds of Euphorbia lagascae. It has been previously reported that piceatannol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of cancer cell types. In the present study, we assessed the effects of piceatannol on the growth of androgen-insensitive DU145 prostate cancer cells at concentrations of 1-10 micromol/L. Piceatannol reduced the viable numbers and increased the numbers of apoptotic DU145 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis revealed that piceatannol increased the protein levels of cleaved caspase-8, -9, -7, and -3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Piceatannol increased mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria to the cytosol. Piceatannol induced an increase in the levels of truncated Bid, Bax, Bik, Bok, and Fas but caused a decrease in the levels of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL. Caspase-8 and -9 inhibitors mitigated piceatannol-induced apoptosis. The caspase-8 inhibitor suppressed the piceatannol-induced cleavage of Bid, caspase-3, and PARP. These results indicate that piceatannol induces apoptosis via the activation of the death receptor and mitochondrial-dependent pathways in prostate cancer cells.

  8. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection Induces Stress Granule Formation Depending on Protein Kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) in MARC-145 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanrong; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are sites of mRNA storage that are formed in response to various conditions of stress, including viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an Arterivirus that has been devastating the swine industry worldwide since the late 1980s. In this study, we found that infection of PRRSV strain WUH3 (genotype 2 PRRSV) induced stable formation of robust SGs in MARC-145 cells, as demonstrated by the recruitment of marker proteins of SGs, including TIA1, G3BP1, and eIF3η. Treatment with specific inhibitors or siRNAs against the stress kinases that are involved in SG formation revealed that PRRSV induced SG formation through a PERK (protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase)-dependent mechanism. Impairment of SG assembly by concomitant knockdown of the SG marker proteins (TIA1, G3BP1, and TIAR) did not affect PRRSV growth, while significantly enhanced PRRSV-induced NF-κB subunit p65 phosphorylation and inflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PRRSV induces SG formation via a PERK-dependent pathway and that SGs are involved in the signaling pathway of the PRRSV-induced inflammatory response in MARC-145 cells.

  9. Changes in starch and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate levels and auxin transport are interrelated in graviresponding oat (Avena sativa) shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hye Sup; Joo, Se-Hwan; Kaufman, Peter B; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kirakosyan, Ara; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Kim, Seong-Ki; Chang, Soo Chul

    2006-11-01

    This study was conducted to unravel a mechanism for the gravitropic curvature response in oat (Avena sativa) shoot pulvini. For this purpose, we examined the downward movement of starch-filled chloroplast gravisensors, differential changes in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) levels, transport of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gravitropic curvature. Upon gravistimulation, the ratio for IAA levels in lower halves versus those in upper halves (L/U) increased from 1.0 at 0 h and reached a maximum value of 1.45 at 8 h. When shoots were grown in the dark for 10 d, to deplete starch in the chloroplast, the gravity-induced L/U of IAA was reduced to 1.0. N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), both auxin transport inhibitors, significantly reduced the amount of gravitropic curvature and gravity-induced lateral IAA transport, but did not reduce the gravity-induced late change in the L/U ratio of IP(3) levels. U73122, a specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, decreased gravity-induced curvature. Because U73122 reduced the ratio of L/U of IAA imposed by gravistimulation, it is clear that IAA transport is correlated with changes in IP(3) levels upon gravistimulation. These results indicate that gravistimulation-induced differential lateral IAA transport may result from the onset of graviperception in the chloroplast gravisensors coupled with gravity-induced asymmetric changes in IP(3) levels in oat shoot pulvini.

  10. Forced expression of miR-143 represses ERK5/c-Myc and p68/p72 signaling in concert with miR-145 in gut tumors of Apc(Min) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Yuji; Shimizu, Yuko; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Ouchi, Yasuo; Qiao, Shanlou; Nagahara, Miki; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Adachi, Koichi; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Iwamoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, miR-143 and miR-145 have been shown to belong to a subset of microRNAs whose expression is controlled by a complex of a tumor suppressor p53 and DEAD-box RNA helicase subunits p68/p72. While accumulating studies have acknowledged that both miRNAs function as tumor suppressors and are similarly regulated, evidence of their coordinated action against tumorigenesis has been poorly presented. Herein, we establish transgenic mice that express miR-143 under the control of the CAG regulatory unit. When crossbred with Apc(Min/+) mice, the development of tumors in the small intestines is significantly attenuated. In the transgenic small intestine tumors, the endogenous miR-145 is also enhanced and the expression of c-Myc and p68/p72, both of which have been reported to be pivotal for gut tumor development, is suppressed, corresponding to the downregulation of ERK5. We demonstrate that the combination of miR-143 and miR-145 inhibits the expression of c-Myc in human colon cancer cells, whereas miR-145 retards that of p72. Moreover, we show the possibilities that miR-145 modulates p72 expression through its 3' untranslated region and that c-Myc downregulation is involved in both p68 suppression and miR-145 induction. These findings suggest that forced expression of miR-143, probably interacting with endogenous miR-145, inhibits ERK5/c-Myc and p68/p72/β-catenin signaling and hampers small intestine tumor development in Apc(Min/+) mice. This unique cascade, in turn, may prevent overproduction of a subset of tumor suppressive miRNAs by repressing their own modulators, p68/p72.

  11. Forced expression of miR-143 represses ERK5/c-Myc and p68/p72 signaling in concert with miR-145 in gut tumors of Apc(Min mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Takaoka

    Full Text Available Recently, miR-143 and miR-145 have been shown to belong to a subset of microRNAs whose expression is controlled by a complex of a tumor suppressor p53 and DEAD-box RNA helicase subunits p68/p72. While accumulating studies have acknowledged that both miRNAs function as tumor suppressors and are similarly regulated, evidence of their coordinated action against tumorigenesis has been poorly presented. Herein, we establish transgenic mice that express miR-143 under the control of the CAG regulatory unit. When crossbred with Apc(Min/+ mice, the development of tumors in the small intestines is significantly attenuated. In the transgenic small intestine tumors, the endogenous miR-145 is also enhanced and the expression of c-Myc and p68/p72, both of which have been reported to be pivotal for gut tumor development, is suppressed, corresponding to the downregulation of ERK5. We demonstrate that the combination of miR-143 and miR-145 inhibits the expression of c-Myc in human colon cancer cells, whereas miR-145 retards that of p72. Moreover, we show the possibilities that miR-145 modulates p72 expression through its 3' untranslated region and that c-Myc downregulation is involved in both p68 suppression and miR-145 induction. These findings suggest that forced expression of miR-143, probably interacting with endogenous miR-145, inhibits ERK5/c-Myc and p68/p72/β-catenin signaling and hampers small intestine tumor development in Apc(Min/+ mice. This unique cascade, in turn, may prevent overproduction of a subset of tumor suppressive miRNAs by repressing their own modulators, p68/p72.

  12. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC, a subset of cervical cancer (CxC. Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7 includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18 targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1 of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1. Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent

  13. Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-07

    Oct 7, 2016 ... 1Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Taif University, Taif 888, Saudi Arabia. 2Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy 11757, Cairo, Egypt. 3Materials Science Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, 31725 Tanta, Egypt. 4Department of ...

  14. Optical properties of lead–tellurite glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The optical properties of a new family of Sm2O3–(40–)PbO–60TeO2 glasses are investigated. The optical absorption spectra were recorded at ... The refractive index, molar refraction and polarizability of oxide ions have been calculated by using Lorentz–Lorentz relations. The non-linear variations of the above optical ...

  15. Optical properties of lead–tellurite glasses doped with samarium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The optical properties of a new family of xSm2O3–(40–x)PbO–60TeO2 glasses are investigated. The optical absorption spectra were recorded at room temperature in the UV-visible region. From the absorption edge studies, the values of optical bandgap energies have been evaluated. The refractive index, molar ...

  16. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... In this paper, we report the investigations of lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level 19009.52 cm. −1 .... introduced by an electronic delay generator between the two Q-switch pulses of Nd-YAG laser. The slope of the .... Our values of the lifetimes are free from the common systematic errors. Thus ...

  17. A novel samarium complex with interesting photoluminescence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 4,4'-Hbipy moieties, isolated nitrates and [Sm(H2O)4(NO3)3] species are held together via hydrogen bonds and p…p interactions to form a 3-D supramolecular framework. Luminescent investigation reveals a strong emission in blue region. Optical absorption spectrum of 1 reveals the presence of an optical gap of 3.60 ...

  18. Lithium samarium polyphosphate, LiSm(PO34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The mixed-metal rare-earth polyphosphate LiSm(PO34 consists of a three-dimensional framework in which zigzag [(PO3n]n− chains with a periodicity of four PO4 tetrahedra are connected through Li+ and Sm3+ ions (both with 2. symmetry.

  19. Sodium samarium tetrakis(polyphosphate, NaSm(PO34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available NaSm(PO34 has been prepared by solid state reactions. It belongs to type II of the structural family of MILnIII(PO34 compounds (MI = alkali metal and LnIII = rare earth metal and is composed of ∞(PO3n]n− polyphosphate chains with a repeating unit of four PO4 tetrahedra. The chains extend parallel to [100] and share O atoms with irregular SmO8 polyhedra, forming a three-dimensional framework which delimits tunnels occupied by Na+ cations in a distorted octahedral environment.

  20. Isotopic Ratios of Samarium by TIMS for Nuclear Forensic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis Jean, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inglis, Jeremy David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    The isotopic ratio of Nd, Sm, and Gd can provide important information regarding fissile material (nuclear devices, reactors), neutron environment, and device yield. These studies require precise measurement of Sm isotope ratios, by either TIMS or MC-ICP-MS. There has been an increasing trend to measure smaller and smaller quantities of Sm bearing samples. In nuclear forensics 10-100 ng of Sm are needed for precise measurement. To measure sub-ng Sm samples using TIMS for nuclear forensic analysis.

  1. Synthesis of copper, silver, and samarium chalcogenides by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, T.; Maruyama, K.; Ohshima, K. [Okayama Univ. of Science (Japan). Lab. for Solid State Chemistry

    1997-03-01

    CuInX{sub 2} (X = S, Se, Te), Ag{sub 2}S, Ag{sub 2}Se, Ag{sub 3}Te{sub 2}, Ag{sub 1.9}Te, AgCuSe, Sm{sub 3}Se{sub 4}, Sm{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, and SmTe were synthesized by a mechanical alloying method, using a high-energy planetary ball mill. The compounds were obtained by milling mixtures of the elements with desired ratios in agate or Cu-Be vials for 60--180 min.

  2. Oriented growth of thin films of samarium oxide by MOCVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Thin films of Sm2O3 have been grown on Si(100) and fused quartz by low-pressure chemical va- pour deposition using an adducted β-diketonate precursor. The films on quartz are cubic, with no preferred orientation at lower growth temperatures (~ 550°C), while they grow with a strong (111) orientation as the.

  3. 150 KVA Samarium Cobalt VSCF Starter Generator Electrical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    considerable hand labor. Addition of a provision for suitable electrical connection by the SCR manufacturer wou;d be desirable for production runs. Predicted...licen- sing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permission to manufacture , use, or sell any patented invent,’n...tesile strength to contain the magnets and pole pieces up through the overspeed rating of the rotor. The cho.;en process uses maraging steel as the

  4. Optical properties of samarium doped zinc–tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Glasses with the composition, (Sm2O3)(ZnO)(40–)(TeO2)(60), were prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The density, molar volume, and optical energy band gap of these glasses have been measured. The refractive index, molar refraction and polarizability of oxide ion have been calculated by using ...

  5. Virulence profiling and quantification of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O145:H28 and O26:H11 isolated during an ice cream-related hemolytic uremic syndrome outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvens, Glenn; Possé, Björn; De Schrijver, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Lauwers, Sabine; Piérard, Denis

    2011-03-01

    In September-October 2007, a mixed-serotype outbreak of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O145:H28 and O26:H11 occurred in the province of Antwerp, Belgium. Five girls aged between 2 and 11 years developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, and seven other coexposed persons with bloody diarrhea were identified. Laboratory confirmation of O145:H28 infection was obtained for three hemolytic uremic syndrome patients, one of whom was coinfected with O26:H11. The epidemiological and laboratory investigations revealed ice cream as the most likely source of the outbreak. The ice cream was produced at a local dairy farm using pasteurized milk. VTEC of both serotypes with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were isolated from patients, ice cream, and environmental samples. Quantitative analysis of the ice cream indicated concentrations of 2.4 and 0.03 CFU/g for VTEC O145 and O26, respectively. Virulence typing revealed that the repertoire of virulence genes carried by the O145:H28 outbreak strain was comparable to that of O157 VTEC and more exhaustive as compared to the O26:H11 outbreak strain and nonrelated clinical strains belonging to these serotypes. Taken together, these data suggest that O145:H28 played the most important role in this outbreak.

  6. 3-(2-amino-ethyl)-5-[3-(4-butoxyl-phenyl)-propylidene]-thiazolidine-2,4-dione (K145) ameliorated dexamethasone induced hepatic gluconeogenesis through activation of Akt/FoxO1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanan; Qiao, Jiayun; Mu, Biao; Zuo, Bingfeng; Yuan, Jihong

    2017-11-04

    3-(2-amino-ethyl)-5-[3-(4-butoxyl-phenyl)-propylidene]-thiazolidine-2,4-dione (K145) is identified as a selective SphK2 inhibitor. It was previously reported as an anti-tumor agent, in this study we demonstrated that K145 was able to regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis and improve glucose intolerance in mice. C57BL/6 mice treated with dexamethasone injection were used as experimental animals, which exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and increased gluconeogenetic enzymes. After K145 treatment, we found that the impairment of glucose tolerance and gluconeogenetic genes mRNA expression were improved. Besides, both in vivo and in votro studies suggested that K145 stimulated insulin dependent Akt phosphorylation and subsequently activates FoxO1 phosphorylation therefore inhibited gluconeogenetic genes expression including PEPCK and G6pase. Our study figures out a potential extent increase the value of developing K145 as therapeutic candidate for diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase (PI3K)-Delta and Gamma Inhibitor, IPI-145, Overcomes Signals from the PI3K/AKT/S6 Pathway and Promotes Apoptosis in CLL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, K; Peluso, M; Fu, M; Rosin, NY; Burger, JA; Wierda, WG; Keating, MJ; Faia, K; O’Brien, S; Kutok, JL; Gandhi, V

    2015-01-01

    The functional relevance of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and the evolution of protein kinases as therapeutic targets have recently shifted the paradigm for treatment of B-cell malignancies. Inhibition of p110δ with idelalisib has shown clinical activity in CLL. The dynamic interplay of isoforms p110δ and p110γ in leukocytes support the hypothesis that dual blockade may provide a therapeutic benefit. IPI-145, an oral inhibitor of p110δ and p110γ isoforms, sensitizes BCR- stimulated and/or stromal co-cultured primary CLL cells to apoptosis (median 20%, n=57; pCLL cells with an IC50 in sub-nanomolar range. A corresponding dose responsive inhibition of pAKTSer473 is observed with an IC50 of 0.36 nM. IPI-145 diminishes the BCR- induced chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 secretion to 17% and 37% respectively. Pre-treatment with 1 μM IPI-145 inhibits the chemotaxis towards CXCL12; reduces pseudoemperipolesis to median 50%, inferring its ability to interfere with homing capabilities of CLL cells. BCR- activated signaling proteins AKTSer473, BADSer112, ERKThr202/Tyr204 and S6Ser235/236 are mitigated by IPI-145. Importantly, for clinical development in hematological malignancies, IPI-145 is selective to CLL B-cells, sparing normal B- and T-lymphocytes. PMID:25917267

  8. Search for a Higgs boson in the mass range from 145 to 1000 GeV decaying to a pair of W or Z bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; 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Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Ali, Ahmed; Aly, Reham; Aly, Shereen; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Lotfy, Ahmad; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Masod, Rehab; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Pekkanen, Juska; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; 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Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; 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Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sudhakar, Katta; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Puggelli, Andrea; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Michelotto, Michele; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Ramirez Sanchez, Gabriel; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Myagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Ferro, Cristina; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Günaydin, Yusuf Oguzhan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Hu, Zhen; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Yin, Hang; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Wang, Sean-jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mareskas-palcek, Darren; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Sen, Sercan; Snyder, Christina; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Mcginn, Christopher; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Demortier, Luc; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Christian, Allison; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Gomber, Bhawna; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-10-22

    A search for a heavy Higgs boson in the $\\mathrm{H \\to WW}$ and $\\mathrm{H \\to ZZ}$ decay channels is reported. The search is based upon proton-proton collision data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. Several final states of the $\\mathrm{H \\to WW}$ and $\\mathrm{H \\to ZZ}$ decays are analyzed. The combined upper limit at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross section and branching fraction exclude a Higgs boson with standard model-like couplings and decays in the $m_{\\mathrm{H}}$ range from 145 to 1000 GeV. We also interpret the results in the context of an electroweak singlet extension of the standard model.

  9. Cholestéatome de l'oreille moyenne - étude rétrospective à propos de 145 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaity, Brahim; Chihani, Mehdi; Nadour, Karim; Moujahid, Mountassir; Touati, Mliha; Darouassi, Youssef; Ammar, Haddou

    2014-01-01

    L'otite moyenne chronique cholestéatomateuse représente une entité fréquente et dangereuse en chirurgie otologique, mettant en jeu le pronostic fonctionnel auditif et exposant à des complications redoutables justifiant pleinement le recours exclusif à un traitement chirurgical et à un suivi post-opératoire rigoureux. Dans le but de mettre le point sur les caractéristiques épidémiologiques, cliniques, thérapeutiques et évolutives de cette pathologie, nous avons mené une étude rétrospective, étalée sur 11 ans et portant sur 145 cas de cholestéatome de l'oreille moyenne opérés au sein du service d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et chirurgie cervico-faciale de l'hôpital militaire Avicenne de Marrakech. PMID:25120876

  10. The lincRNA-ROR/miR-145 axis promotes invasion and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma via induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition by targeting ZEB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Lu, Lu; Feng, Bing; Zhang, Kai; Han, Siqi; Hou, Daorong; Chen, Longbang; Chu, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Rui

    2017-07-05

    Emerging evidence show that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in tumor development. LincRNA-ROR (linc-ROR) is known to promote tumor progress in several human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nevertheless, the roles of linc-ROR in HCC metastasis and its underlying mechanisms remain fully unclear. In the present study, we showed that linc-ROR was upregulated in HCC tissues and high linc-ROR expression level predicted poor prognosis. Functionally, linc-ROR significantly induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and increased in vitro invasion and in vivo metastasis of HCC cells. Mechanistically, linc-ROR acted as a sponge for miR-145 to de-repress the expression of target gene ZEB2, thereby inducing EMT and promoting HCC metastasis. Collectively, our research indicates the potential of linc-ROR as a vital therapeutic target for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic HCC.

  11. Comment on: "Corrections to the Mathematical Formulation of a Backwards Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model" by Gibson and Sailor (2012: Boundary-Layer Meteorology 145, 399-406)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckl, Stefan; Rotach, Mathias W.; Kljun, Natascha

    2017-10-01

    We discuss the results of Gibson and Sailor (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 145:399-406, 2012) who suggest several corrections to the mathematical formulation of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model of Rotach et al. (Q J R Meteorol Soc 122:367-389, 1996). While most of the suggested corrections had already been implemented in the 1990s, one suggested correction raises a valid point, but results in a violation of the well-mixed criterion. Here we improve their idea and test the impact on model results using a well-mixed test and a comparison with wind-tunnel experimental data. The new approach results in similar dispersion patterns as the original approach, while the approach suggested by Gibson and Sailor leads to erroneously reduced concentrations near the ground in convective and especially forced convective conditions.

  12. Exchange bias behavior in Ni{sub 50.0}Mn{sub 35.5} In{sub 14.5} ribbons annealed at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, T. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Sato Turtelli, R.; Groessinger, R. [Institut fur Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Wien, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Sanchez, M.L.; Santos, J.D.; Rosa, W.O.; Prida, V.M. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Escoda, Ll.; Sunol, J.J. [Campus de Montilivi, Universidad de Girona, edifici PII, Lluis Santalo s/n. 17003 Girona (Spain); Koledov, V. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Hernando, B., E-mail: grande@uniovi.es [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Heusler alloy Ni{sub 50.0}Mn{sub 35.5}In{sub 14.5} ribbons were prepared by melt-spinning technique. Several short time annealings were carried out in order to enhance the exchange bias effect in this alloy ribbon. The magnetic transition temperature increases with the annealing, compared to the as-spun sample, however no significant differences in respective Curie temperatures were observed for austenite and martensite phases in such annealed samples. Exchange bias effect is observed at low temperatures for all samples and practically vanishes at 60 K for the as-spun sample, whereas for the annealed ribbons it vanishes at 100 K.

  13. Using multi-parameter flow cytometry to monitor the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis CCMI 145 batch growth and oil production towards biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Teresa Lopes; Feijão, Daniela; Reis, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to monitor cell intrinsic light scatter, viability, and lipid content of Rhodotorula glutinis CCMI 145 cells grown in shake flasks. Changes in the side light scatter and forward light scatter were detected during the yeast batch growth, which were attributed to the different yeast growth phases. A progressive increase in the proportion of cells stained with PI (cells with permeabilized cytoplasmic membrane) was observed during the yeast growth, attaining 79% at the end of the fermentation. A high correlation between the Nile Red fluorescence intensity measured by flow cytometry and total lipid content assayed by the traditional gravimetric lipid analysis was found for this yeast, making this method a suitable and quick technique for the screening of yeast strains for lipid production and optimization of biofuel production bioprocesses. Medium growth optimization for enhancement of the yeast oil production is now in progress.

  14. A Novel Combination RNAi toward Warburg Effect by Replacement with miR-145 and Silencing of PTBP1 Induces Apoptotic Cell Death in Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Takai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to control. We explored the use of a novel RNA-interference method for a driver oncogene regulating cancer specific energy metabolism by the combination treatment with a small interfering RNA (siRNA and a microRNA. After transfection of T24 and 253JB-V cells with miR-145 and/or siR-PTBP1, we examined the effects of cell growth and gene expression by performing the trypan blue dye exclusion test, Western blot, Hoechst 33342 staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and electron microscopy. The anti-cancer effects of xenograft model mice with miR-145 and/or siR-PTBP1 were then assessed. The combination treatment induced the deeper and longer growth inhibition and reduced the levels of both mRNA and protein expression of c-Myc and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1 more than each single treatment. Notably, the combination treatment not only impaired the cancer specific energy metabolism by inhibiting c-Myc/PTBP1/PKMs axis but also inactivated MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways examined in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the combination treatment induced apoptosis or autophagy; but, in some cells, apoptotic cell death was accompanied by autophagy, because the condensation of chromatin and many autophagosomes were coexistent. This combination treatment could be a novel RNA-interference strategy through the systemic silencing of the Warburg effect-promoting driver oncogene PTBP1 in bladder cancer cells.

  15. The Bcl-2 gene polymorphism rs956572AA increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated endoplasmic reticulum calcium release in subjects with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Yuan, Peixiong; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Rulun; Zarate, Carlos A; Drevets, Wayne C; Brantner, Christine A; Baum, Amber; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J; Chen, Guang; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K; Andrews, S Brian

    2011-02-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is characterized by altered intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis. Underlying mechanisms involve dysfunctions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, potentially mediated by B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), a key protein that regulates Ca(2+) signaling by interacting directly with these organelles, and which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of BPD. Here, we examined the effects of the Bcl-2 gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs956572 on intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in patients with BPD. Live cell fluorescence imaging and electron probe microanalysis were used to measure intracellular and intra-organelle free and total calcium in lymphoblasts from 18 subjects with BPD carrying the AA, AG, or GG variants of the rs956572 SNP. Analyses were carried out under basal conditions and in the presence of agents that affect Ca(2+) dynamics. Compared with GG homozygotes, variant AA-which expresses significantly reduced Bcl-2 messenger RNA and protein-exhibited elevated basal cytosolic Ca(2+) and larger increases in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, the latter in parallel with enhanced depletion of the ER Ca(2+) pool. The aberrant behavior of AA cells was reversed by chronic lithium treatment and mimicked in variant GG by a Bcl-2 inhibitor. In contrast, no differences between SNP variants were found in ER or mitochondrial total Ca(2+) content or in basal store-operated Ca(2+) entry. These results demonstrate that, in patients with BPD, abnormal Bcl-2 gene expression in the AA variant contributes to dysfunctional Ca(2+) homeostasis through a specific ER inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlating the deep inferior epigastric artery branching pattern with type of abdominal free flap performed in a series of 145 breast reconstruction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, A R; Jones, M E; Hazari, A; Francis, I; Nduka, C

    2012-10-01

    The deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap is currently viewed as the gold standard in autologous breast reconstruction. We studied three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (CTA) in 145 patients undergoing free abdominal flap breast reconstruction to try to correlate deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) branching pattern with the type of flap performed and patient outcome. Today, reconstructive breast surgeons have become more experienced in raising DIEP flaps and operative times are becoming more acceptable. However, there remains significant interest in finding ways to aid this challenging dissection. We retrospectively evaluated consecutive patients between January 2007 and August 2008. CTAs were analysed using the Moon and Taylor (1988) classification of the DIEA branching pattern. Data gathered included pre-operative morbidity, type of abdominal wall free flap performed, length of operation, length of stay and complications. Some 150 breast reconstructions were performed in 145 patients. There were 67 DIEP flaps, 69 MS-2 transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flaps and 14 MS-1 TRAM flaps (where MS-1 spares the lateral muscle and MS-2 spares both lateral and medial segments). Proportionally more DIEP flaps were performed in patients with a type 2 branching pattern. There was one flap loss (0.67%). In this large CTA series, we found a type 1 (single artery) DIEA pattern most frequently, in contrast to the predominance of the type 2 bifurcating pattern observed previously. The higher proportion of DIEP flaps performed in the type 2 pattern patients is consistent with the documented shorter intramuscular course in this group. We have found CTA useful for faster selection of the best hemiabdomen for dissection and flap loss rates in our unit have reduced from 1.5% to 0.67%.

  17. 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin shows high anti-proliferative activity on DU145 cells under both UVA and blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miolo, G; Sturaro, G; Cigolini, G; Menilli, L; Tasso, A; Zago, I; Conconi, M T

    2018-01-10

    Furocoumarins (psoralens and angelicins) have been already used under ultraviolet A light (UVA) for the treatment of skin diseases and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Besides their high anti-proliferative activity, some severe long-term side effects have been observed, for example genotoxicity and mutagenicity, likely strictly related to the formation of crosslinks. It has been demonstrated that blue light (BL) activation of 8-methoxypsoralen, an FDA-approved drug, leads to less mutagenic monoadducts in the DNA. So far, in this work the less toxic and more penetrating BL is proposed to activate 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin (TMA), an already known UVA photoactivatable compound. Photocleavage, crosslink formation and oxidative damage were detected in pBR322 plasmid DNA treated with 300.0 μmol/L TMA activated with various exposures of BL. Anti-proliferative activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and activation status of some signalling pathways involved in cell growth and apoptosis were verified on DU145 cells treated with 5.0 μmol/L TMA plus 2.0 J/cm2 of BL. Under BL-TMA, no mutagenic crosslinks, no photocleavage and neither photooxidative lesions were detected on isolated plasmid DNA. TMA showed high anti-proliferative activity on DU145 cells through induction of apoptosis. Besides ROS generation, the proapoptotic effect seemed to be related to activation of p38 and inhibition of p44/42 phosphorylation. Interestingly, the decrease in nuclear β-catenin was coupled with a significant dropping of CD44-positive cells. Overall, our results indicate that TMA can be activated by BL and may be considered for targeted phototherapy of prostate cancer lesions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Agonist induced formation of myoinositol 1,4,5-P/sub 3/, myoinositol 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ and myoinositol-P/sub 4/ in rat liver parenchymal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackmore, P.F.; Bocckino, S.; Jiang, H.; Exton, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of hepatocytes with vasopressin (10/sup -7/ M) resulted in a rapid and large (approximately 7-fold) increase in myoinositol 1,4,5-P/sub 3/ (I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/) at 10 s which slowly declined over the next 30 s to reach a steady level (approximately 2-fold increase). IP/sub 4/ also increased (approximately 4-fold) at 10 s. The level of I 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ also increased approximately 100% at 2 min after a lag of approximately 20 s. The increase in I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/ correlates temporally with the increase in cytosolic free Ca/sup 2 +/. The dose response curves of vasopressin to increase I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/, I 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ and IP/sub 4/ measured at 1 min were similar. Other Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilizing agonists (ATP, angiotensin II, epinephrine, AlF/sub 4//sup -/ and glucagon) also increased I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/, I 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ and IP/sub 4/ to varying degrees. Incubation of permeabilized hepatocytes with (2-/sup 3/H)I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/ in the presence of MgATP resulted in the formation of (/sup 3/H)IP/sub 4/ and (/sup 3/H)I 1,3,4-P/sub 3/. Also I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/ was converted to (/sup 32/P)IP/sub 4/ in the presence of (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. Phosphorylation of I 1,4,5-P/sub 3/ to I 1,3,4,5-P/sub 4/, followed by dephosphorylation could result in the formation of I 1,3,4-P/sub 3/ and would account for the formation of these compounds following hormone stimulation of hepatocytes.

  19. Bridge-Induced Translocation betweenNUP145andTOP2Yeast Genes Models the Genetic Fusion between the Human Orthologs Associated With Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, Valentina; West, Nicole; Zrimec, Jan; Nikitin, Dmitri V; Del Sal, Giannino; Marano, Roberto; Breitenbach, Michael; Bruschi, Carlo V

    2017-01-01

    In mammalian organisms liquid tumors such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are related to spontaneous chromosomal translocations ensuing in gene fusions. We previously developed a system named bridge-induced translocation (BIT) that allows linking together two different chromosomes exploiting the strong endogenous homologous recombination system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The BIT system generates a heterogeneous population of cells with different aneuploidies and severe aberrant phenotypes reminiscent of a cancerogenic transformation. In this work, thanks to a complex pop-out methodology of the marker used for the selection of translocants, we succeeded by BIT technology to precisely reproduce in yeast the peculiar chromosome translocation that has been associated with AML, characterized by the fusion between the human genes NUP98 and TOP2B . To shed light on the origin of the DNA fragility within NUP98 , an extensive analysis of the curvature, bending, thermostability, and B-Z transition aptitude of the breakpoint region of NUP98 and of its yeast ortholog NUP145 has been performed. On this basis, a DNA cassette carrying homologous tails to the two genes was amplified by PCR and allowed the targeted fusion between NUP145 and TOP2 , leading to reproduce the chimeric transcript in a diploid strain of S. cerevisiae . The resulting translocated yeast obtained through BIT appears characterized by abnormal spherical bodies of nearly 500 nm of diameter, absence of external membrane and defined cytoplasmic localization. Since Nup98 is a well-known regulator of the post-transcriptional modification of P53 target genes, and P53 mutations are occasionally reported in AML, this translocant yeast strain can be used as a model to test the constitutive expression of human P53 . Although the abnormal phenotype of the translocant yeast was never rescued by its expression, an exogenous P53 was recognized to confer increased vitality to the translocants, in spite of its

  20. The HLA-net GENE[RATE] pipeline for effective HLA data analysis and its application to 145 population samples from Europe and neighbouring areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J M; Buhler, S; Roessli, D; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we present for the first time an integrated version of the Gene[rate] computer tools which have been developed during the last 5 years to analyse human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data in human populations, as well as the results of their application to a large dataset of 145 HLA-typed population samples from Europe and its two neighbouring areas, North Africa and West Asia, now forming part of the Gene[va] database. All these computer tools and genetic data are, from now, publicly available through a newly designed bioinformatics platform, HLA-net, here presented as a main achievement of the HLA-NET scientific programme. The Gene[rate] pipeline offers user-friendly computer tools to estimate allele and haplotype frequencies, to test Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium, to recode HLA data, to convert file formats, to display population frequencies of chosen alleles and haplotypes in selected geographic regions, and to perform genetic comparisons among chosen sets of population samples, including new data provided by the user. Both numerical and graphical outputs are generated, the latter being highly explicit and of publication quality. All these analyses can be performed on the pipeline after scrupulous validation of the population sample's characterisation and HLA typing reporting according to HLA-NET recommendations. The Gene[va] database offers direct access to the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1 and -DPB1 frequencies and summary statistics of 145 population samples having successfully passed these HLA-NET 'filters', and representing three European subregions (South-East, North-East and Central-West Europe) and two neighbouring areas (North Africa, as far as Sudan, and West Asia, as far as South India). The analysis of these data, summarized in this review, shows a substantial genetic variation at the regional level in this continental area. These results have main implications for population genetics

  1. Evidence that generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate are rapid responses following addition of fungal elicitor which induces phytoalexin synthesis in lucerne (Medicago sativa) suspension culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, T J; Cooke, C J; Newton, R P; Smith, C J

    1993-05-01

    Treatment of lucerne suspension culture cells with glycoprotein elicitor from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium albo-atrum R & B triggers Ca(2+)-mediated induction of antimicrobial secondary metabolites termed phytoalexins. The present study investigated the possible role of polyphosphoinositide signal transduction in phytoalexin elicitation. Within 1 min of addition of elicitor to lucerne suspension culture cells we found a 100-160% (15-25 pmol/g fresh wt) increase in the level of compound with chromatographic and electrophoretic properties expected for an inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) and which was strongly bound by an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3)-specific binding protein; after 3 min the level of this compound had fallen below that observed prior to elicitor challenge. In 32P-prelabelled cells, the relative proportion of radioactivity which cochromatographed with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) was found to have decreased by 48% 1 min after elicitor addition and that rapid depletion of membrane lipid radioactivity was specific to this lipid fraction. The rapid, transient increase in level of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and concomitant fall in PtdIns(4,5)P2 suggests that Ins(1,4,5)P3 generated by hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 may provide a Ca(2+)-mobilizing signal in phytoalexin elicitation in lucerne.

  2. Commentary on "T.G. Ritto, M.R. Escalante, Rubens Sampaio, M.B. Rosales, Drill-string horizontal dynamics with uncertainty on the frictional force, Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (2013) 145-153"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritto, T. G.; Sampaio, Rubens; Rosales, M. B.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this article is to clarify some points of the formulation presented in the "T.G. Ritto, M.R. Escalante, Rubens Sampaio, M.B. Rosales, Drill-string horizontal dynamics with uncertainty on the frictional force, Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (2013) 145-153".

  3. Monitoring Rhodotorula glutinis CCMI 145 physiological response and oil production growing on xylose and glucose using multi-parameter flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Teresa Lopes; Feijão, Daniela; Roseiro, José Carlos; Reis, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Flow cytometry was used to monitor the lipid content, viability and intrinsic light scatter properties of Rhodotorula glutinis CCMI 145 cells growing on batch cultures using xylose and glucose as carbon sources. The highest lipid content was observed for cells grown on glucose, at the end of the exponential phase (17.8% w/w). The proportion of cells stained with PI attaining 77% at the end of the glucose growth. Cells growing on xylose produced a maximum lipid content of 10.6% (w/w), at the stationary phase. An increase in the proportion of cells stained with PI was observed, reaching 29% at the end of xylose growth. Changes in the side and forward light scatter detected during the yeast batch cultures supported that R. glutinis cells grown on glucose experienced harsher conditions, resulting in a high level of cytoplasmic membrane damage, which did not occur when R. glutinis cells grew on xylose. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sporadic infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by missense mutations of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Ohba, Chihiro; Iai, Mizue; Hirabayashi, Shinichi; Osaka, Hitoshi; Hiraide, Takuya; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene (ITPR1) have been identified in families with early-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 (SCA29) and late-onset SCA15, but have not been found in sporadic infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia. We examined if mutations of ITPR1 are also involved in sporadic infantile-onset SCA. Sixty patients with childhood-onset cerebellar atrophy of unknown etiology and their families were examined by whole-exome sequencing. We found de novo heterozygous ITPR1 missense mutations in four unrelated patients with sporadic infantile-onset, nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia. Patients displayed nystagmus, tremor, and hypotonia from very early infancy. Nonprogressive ataxia, motor delay, and mild cognitive deficits were common clinical findings. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy. ITPR1 missense mutations cause infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia. ITPR1-related SCA includes sporadic infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia as well as SCA15 and SCA29.

  5. Enhancing photoluminescent behavior of 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,4,5-triphenyl-1H-imidazole by ZnO and Bi2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, C; Jayabharathi, J; Kalaiarasi, V; Jayamoorthy, K

    2014-01-24

    A fluorophore 2-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1,4,5-triphenyl-1H-imidazole [NTI] has been designed, synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, mass and single crystal XRD. Absorption, emission, lifetime and cyclic voltammetry have been made to deduce the interaction between NTI and ZnO and Bi2O3 nanocrystals. NTI act as a new host for ZnO and Bi2O3 nanocrystals that enhance its luminescence. The apparent binding constant has been obtained. Adsorption of the NTI on ZnO and Bi2O3 nanocrystals lowers the HOMO energy level of the NTI. The strong adsorption of the NTI on the surface of ZnO and Bi2O3 nanocrystals is likely due to the chemical affinity of the nitrogen atom of the NTI to the zinc ion on the surface of nanocrystals. SEM and EDS spectra confirmed the adsorption of NTI on the surface of nanocrystals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated endogenous C-terminal Tagging of Trypanosoma cruzi Genes Reveals the Acidocalcisome Localization of the Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Noelia; Chiurillo, Miguel A; Storey, Melissa; Vercesi, Anibal E; Docampo, Roberto

    2016-12-02

    Methods for genetic manipulation of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, have been highly inefficient, and no endogenous tagging of genes has been reported to date. We report here the use of the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated gene 9) system for endogenously tagging genes in this parasite. The utility of the method was established by tagging genes encoding proteins of known localization such as TcFCaBP (flagellar calcium binding protein) and TcVP1 (vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase), and two proteins of undefined or disputed localization, the TcMCU (mitochondrial calcium uniporter) and TcIP 3 R (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor). We confirmed the flagellar and acidocalcisome localization of TcFCaBP and TcVP1 by co-localization with antibodies to the flagellum and acidocalcisomes, respectively. As expected, TcMCU was co-localized with the voltage-dependent anion channel to the mitochondria. However, in contrast to previous reports and our own results using overexpressed TcIP 3 R, endogenously tagged TcIP 3 R showed co-localization with antibodies against VP1 to acidocalcisomes. These results are also in agreement with our previous reports on the localization of this channel to acidocalcisomes of Trypanosoma brucei and suggest that caution should be exercised when overexpression of tagged genes is done to localize proteins in T. cruzi. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Site directed mutagenesis experiments suggest that Glu 111, Glu 144 and Arg 145 are essential for endonucleolytic activity of EcoRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfes, H; Alves, J; Fliess, A; Geiger, R; Pingoud, A

    1986-11-25

    We have constructed a plasmid (pRIF 309+) carrying the EcoRI restriction endonuclease gene and the f1 origin of replication. Upon transformation of this plasmid into E. coli and infection with bacteriophage f1 single stranded plasmids are produced which can be used for sequencing and site directed mutagenesis. Using this single stranded DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides we have introduced point mutations at defined positions of the EcoRI gene. Since in pRIF309+ the EcoRI gene is under the control of the pL-promoter, high level expression of the mutated EcoRI gene could be obtained upon induction. Mutant EcoRI enzymes were purified to homogeneity and characterized in structural and functional terms. Our results demonstrate that the Glu 111----Gln, Glu 144----Gln and Arg 145----Lys -mutants adopt a very similar conformation as the wild type enzyme, but have by two orders of magnitude smaller specific activities than the wild type enzyme, mainly due to a reduction of the Vmax-value.

  8. [Solanine inhibits prostate cancer Du145 xenograft growth in nude mice by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1/S phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei-Feng; Liu, Si-Ping; Pan, Bin; Tang, Zhao-Feng; Zhong, Jin-Guang; Zhou, Fang-Jian

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effect of solanine on the growth of human prostate cancer cell xenograft in nude mice. Human prostate cancer Du145 cells were injected into the subcutaneous layers on the back of nude mice. After a week, the mice bearing subcutaneous tumor graft were randomly divided into solanine treatment group and saline control group for treatment for 3 weeks. The tumor grafts were then harvested to evaluate the inhibition rate. The mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle-related genes in the tumors were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively, and tumor cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL method. The tumor growth rate in solanine-treated group was significantly slower than that in the control group (Psolanine. Solanine significantly up-regulated p21 mRNA and protein expression in the tumors and induced a higher apoptosis rate of the tumor cells than saline (Psolanine is probably mediated by regulating the expressions of genes related with G1/S cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis.

  9. Measurements of the effective cumulative fission yields of 143Nd, 145Nd, 146Nd, 148Nd and 150Nd for 235U in the PHENIX fast reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privas Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective Neodymium cumulative fission yields for 235U have been measured in the fast reactor PHENIX relatively to the 235U fission cross-section. The data were derived from isotope-ratio measurements obtained in the frame of the PROFIL-1, PROFIL-2A and PROFIL-2B programs. The interpretations of the experimental programs were performed with the ERANOS code in association with the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion library JEFF-3.1.1. Final results for 143Nd, 145Nd, 146Nd, 148Nd and 150Nd were 5.61%, 3.70%, 2.83%, 1.64% and 0.66%, respectively. The relative uncertainties attached to each of the cumulative fission yields lie between 2.1% and 2.4%. The main source of uncertainty is due to the fluence scaling procedure (<2%. The uncertainties on the Neodymium capture cross-sections provide a contribution lower than 1%. The energy dependence of the fission yields was studied with the GEF code from the thermal energy to 20 MeV. Neutron spectrum average corrections, deduced from GEF calculations, were applied to our effective fission yields with the aim of estimating fission yields at 400 keV and 500 keV, as given in the International Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (JEFF, ENDF/B and JENDL. The neutron spectrum average correction calculated for the PROFIL results remains lower than 1.5%.

  10. Bcl-2 regulation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor and calcium signaling in normal and malignant lymphocytes: potential new target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Edward F; Lavik, Andrew R; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2014-10-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 is a versatile regulator of cell survival. Its interactions with its own pro-apoptotic family members are widely recognized for their role in promoting the survival of cancer cells. These interactions are thus being targeted for cancer treatment. Less widely recognized is the interaction of Bcl-2 with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R), an InsP3-gated Ca(2+) channel located on the endoplasmic reticulum. The nature of this interaction, the mechanism by which it controls Ca(2+) release from the ER, its role in T-cell development and survival, and the possibility of targeting it as a novel cancer treatment strategy are summarized in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium signaling in health and disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to native unionid mussels within field enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) was evaluated for removing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) adhering to a population of unionid mussels in Lake Darling (Alexandria, Minnesota). Two groups of unionid mussels were used in the study. Unionid mussels were collected near the test area, weighed, photographed, individually tagged, and randomly allocated to one of nine test enclosures in equal proportions and then divided into two groups. The first group of unionid mussels (Group 1, n = 5 per test enclosure) were indiscriminately selected from each test enclosure and used to estimate the number of zebra mussels adhering to unionid mussels prior to exposure. The second group of unionid mussels (Group 2, n = 22 per test enclosure) were used to evaluate the efficacy of SDP for removal of adhering zebra mussels. Both Group 1 and Group 2 mussels were used to evaluate the effects of SDP exposure on unionid mussel survival.

  12. STIM1 positively regulates the Ca2+ release activity of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Béliveau

    Full Text Available The endothelium is actively involved in many functions of the cardiovascular system, such as the modulation of arterial pressure and the maintenance of blood flow. These functions require a great versatility of the intracellular Ca2+ signaling that resides in the fact that different signals can be encoded by varying the frequency and the amplitude of the Ca2+ response. Cells use both extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ pools to modulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In non-excitable cells, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R, located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, is responsible for the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular store. The proteins STIM1 and STIM2 are also located on the ER and they are involved in the activation of a store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE. Due to their Ca2+ sensor property and their close proximity with IP3Rs on the ER, STIMs could modulate the activity of IP3R. In this study, we showed that STIM1 and STIM2 are expressed in bovine aortic endothelial cells and they both interact with IP3R. While STIM2 appears to play a minor role, STIM1 plays an important role in the regulation of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization in BAECs by a positive effect on both the SOCE and the IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release.

  13. STIM1 positively regulates the Ca2+ release activity of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béliveau, Éric; Lessard, Vincent; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is actively involved in many functions of the cardiovascular system, such as the modulation of arterial pressure and the maintenance of blood flow. These functions require a great versatility of the intracellular Ca2+ signaling that resides in the fact that different signals can be encoded by varying the frequency and the amplitude of the Ca2+ response. Cells use both extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ pools to modulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In non-excitable cells, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is responsible for the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular store. The proteins STIM1 and STIM2 are also located on the ER and they are involved in the activation of a store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Due to their Ca2+ sensor property and their close proximity with IP3Rs on the ER, STIMs could modulate the activity of IP3R. In this study, we showed that STIM1 and STIM2 are expressed in bovine aortic endothelial cells and they both interact with IP3R. While STIM2 appears to play a minor role, STIM1 plays an important role in the regulation of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization in BAECs by a positive effect on both the SOCE and the IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release.

  14. Hole-Transporting Layer Treatment of Planar Hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS Solar Cells with Power Conversion Efficiency up to 14.5%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematical investigation was carried out into the effects of the hole-transporting layer treatment of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS on the performance of planar hybrid n-Si/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. Triton X-100 and ethylene glycol (EG were chosen to improve the conductivity and surface morphology of the PEDOT:PSS film. It was found that the annealing temperature has a great influence on the PEDOT:PSS material properties and the corresponding device performance. By optimizing the annealing temperature, the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS film doped with Triton X-100 and EG could be enhanced by a factor of more than three orders. And the corresponding device also shows record power conversion efficiency as high as 14.5% with an open circuit voltage of 0.627 V, a short circuit current of 32.6 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 70.7%.

  15. Boric acid induces cytoplasmic stress granule formation, eIF2α phosphorylation, and ATF4 in prostate DU-145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kimberly A; Kobylewski, Sarah E; Yamada, Kristin E; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2015-02-01

    Dietary boron intake is associated with reduced prostate and lung cancer risk and increased bone mass. Boron is absorbed and circulated as boric acid (BA) and at physiological concentrations is a reversible competitive inhibitor of cyclic ADP ribose, the endogenous agonist of the ryanodine receptor calcium (Ca(+2)) channel, and lowers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) [Ca(2+)]. Low ER [Ca(2+)] has been reported to induce ER stress and activate the eIF2α/ATF4 pathway. Here we report that treatment of DU-145 prostate cells with physiological levels of BA induces ER stress with the formation of stress granules and mild activation of eIF2α, GRP78/BiP, and ATF4. Mild activation of eIF2α and its downstream transcription factor, ATF4, enables cells to reconfigure gene expression to manage stress conditions and mild activation of ATF4 is also required for the differentiation of osteoblast cells. Our results using physiological levels of boric acid identify the eIF2α/ATF pathway as a plausible mode of action that underpins the reported health effects of dietary boron.

  16. Bioenergetic and Antiapoptotic Properties of Mitochondria from Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cell Lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexander; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC), metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA) the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca2+ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP) when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca2+-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca2+. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia. PMID:23951286

  17. PRECEDENT: a randomized phase II trial comparing vintafolide (EC145) and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) in combination versus PLD alone in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, R Wendel; Coleman, Robert L; Burger, Robert A; Sausville, Edward A; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Ghamande, Sharad A; Gabrail, Nashat Y; Depasquale, Stephen E; Nowara, Elzbieta; Gilbert, Lucy; Gersh, Robert H; Teneriello, Michael G; Harb, Wael A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Penson, Richard T; Symanowski, James T; Lovejoy, Chandra D; Leamon, Christopher P; Morgenstern, David E; Messmann, Richard A

    2013-12-10

    Vintafolide (EC145) is a folic acid-desacetylvinblastine conjugate that binds to the folate receptor (FR), which is expressed on the majority of epithelial ovarian cancers. This randomized phase II trial evaluated vintafolide combined with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) compared with PLD alone. The utility of an FR-targeted imaging agent, (99m)Tc-etarfolatide (EC20), in selecting patients likely to benefit from vintafolide was also examined. Women with recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer who had undergone ≤ two prior cytotoxic regimens were randomly assigned at a 2:1 ratio to PLD (50 mg/m(2) intravenously [IV] once every 28 days) with or without vintafolide (2.5 mg IV three times per week during weeks 1 and 3). Etarfolatide scanning was optional. The primary objective was to compare progression-free survival (PFS) between the groups. The intent-to-treat population comprised 149 patients. Median PFS was 5.0 and 2.7 months for the vintafolide plus PLD and PLD-alone arms, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.96; P = .031). The greatest benefit was observed in patients with 100% of lesions positive for FR, with median PFS of 5.5 compared with 1.5 months for PLD alone (HR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.85; P = .013). The group of patients with FR-positive disease (10% to 90%) experienced some PFS improvement (HR, 0.873), whereas patients with disease that did not express FR experienced no PFS benefit (HR, 1.806). Vintafolide plus PLD is the first combination to demonstrate an improvement over standard therapy in a randomized trial of patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Etarfolatide can identify patients likely to benefit from vintafolide.

  18. ROR functions as a ceRNA to regulate Nanog expression by sponging miR-145 and predicts poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Wang, Peng; Hua, Yongqiang; Xi, Hao; Meng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Te; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Luming

    2016-01-12

    lncRNAs have emerged as key regulators of tumor development and progression. ROR is a typical lncRNA that plays important regulatory roles in the pathogenesis and progression of tumors. Nevertheless, current understanding of the involvement of ROR in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumorigenesis remains limited. In this study, we measured ROR in 61 paired cancerous and noncancerous tissue samples by qRT-PCR and investigated the biological role of ROR on the phenotypes of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in vitro and in vivo. The effects of ROR on PCSCs were studied by RNA interference approaches in vitro and in vivo. Insights of the mechanism of competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) were gained from bioinformatic analysis, luciferase assays and RNA binding protein immunoprecipitation. The positive ROR/Nanog interaction was identified and verified by immunohistochemistry assay. Compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, ROR was up-regulated in most tumor tissues. Knockdown of ROR by RNA interference in PCSCs inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis and decreased migration. Moreover, ROR silencing resulted in significantly decreased tumourigenicity of PCSCs in nude mice than controls. In particular, ROR may act as a ceRNA, effectively becoming a sink for miR-145, thereby activating the derepression of core transcription factors Nanog. In conclusions, we demonstrated that decreased ROR expression could inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and tumourigenicity by modulating Nanog. Therefore, ROR is a potential novel prognostic marker to predict the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer patients after surgery and may be a rational target for therapy.

  19. Bioenergetic and antiapoptotic properties of mitochondria from cultured human prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU145 and LNCaP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Panov

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to reveal the metabolic features of mitochondria that might be essential for inhibition of apoptotic potential in prostate cancer cells. We studied mitochondria isolated from normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC, metastatic prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC-3, DU145; and non-prostate cancer cells - human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells; and normal human lymphoblastoid cells. PrEC cells contained 2 to 4 times less mitochondria per gram of cells than the three PC cell lines. Respiratory activities of PrEC cell mitochondria were 5-20-fold lower than PC mitochondria, depending on substrates and the metabolic state, due to lower content and lower activity of the respiratory enzyme complexes. Mitochondria from the three metastatic prostate cancer cell lines revealed several features that are distinctive only to these cells: low affinity of Complex I for NADH, 20-30 mV higher electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ. Unprotected with cyclosporine A (CsA the PC-3 mitochondria required 4 times more Ca²⁺ to open the permeability transition pore (mPTP when compared with the PrEC mitochondria, and they did not undergo swelling even in the presence of alamethicin, a large pore forming antibiotic. In the presence of CsA, the PC-3 mitochondria did not open spontaneously the mPTP. We conclude that the low apoptotic potential of the metastatic PC cells may arise from inhibition of the Ca²⁺-dependent permeability transition due to a very high ΔΨ and higher capacity to sequester Ca²⁺. We suggest that due to the high ΔΨ, mitochondrial metabolism of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is predominantly based on utilization of glutamate and glutamine, which may promote development of cachexia.

  20. Gamma-Glutamylpolyamine Synthetase GlnA3 Is Involved in the First Step of Polyamine Degradation Pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor M145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces coelicolor M145 was shown to be able to grow in the presence of high concentrations of polyamines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, or spermine, as a sole nitrogen source. However, hardly anything is known about polyamine utilization and its regulation in streptomycetes. In this study, we demonstrated that only one of the three proteins annotated as glutamine synthetase-like protein, GlnA3 (SCO6962, was involved in the catabolism of polyamines. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of glnA3 was strongly induced by exogenous polyamines and repressed in the presence of ammonium. The ΔglnA3 mutant was shown to be unable to grow on defined Evans agar supplemented with putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, and spermine as sole nitrogen source. HPLC analysis demonstrated that the ΔglnA3 mutant accumulated polyamines intracellularly, but was unable to degrade them. In a rich complex medium supplemented with a mixture of the four different polyamines, the ΔglnA3 mutant grew poorly showing abnormal mycelium morphology and decreased life span in comparison to the parental strain. These observations indicated that the accumulation of polyamines was toxic for the cell. An in silico analysis of the GlnA3 protein model suggested that it might act as a gamma-glutamylpolyamine synthetase catalyzing the first step of polyamine degradation. GlnA3-catalyzed glutamylation of putrescine was confirmed in an enzymatic in vitro assay and the GlnA3 reaction product, gamma-glutamylputrescine, was detected by HPLC/ESI-MS. In this work, the first step of polyamine utilization in S. coelicolor has been elucidated and the putative polyamine utilization pathway has been deduced based on the sequence similarity and transcriptional analysis of homologous genes expressed in the presence of polyamines.

  1. Inhibitory effect of diazepam on muscarinic receptor-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in rat parotid acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujirai, Masao; Sawaki, Kohei; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the effect of diazepam (DZP) on phosphoinositide turnover, which plays an important role in the regulation of salivary secretion, in rat parotid acinar cells. DZP (10−9 M to 10−5 M), a potent agonist of both central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, dose-dependently decreased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production stimulated by carbachol, a muscarinic receptor agonist, in the cells. DZP produced a maximum inhibitory response at a concentration of 10−5 M, with IP3 production decreased to 63% of maximal levels. The concentration inducing half maximal inhibition of IP3 production was approximately 3.5×10−8 M. An inhibitory response to DZP was produced by a short-term pretreatment (benzodiazepine receptors, flumazenil and PK 11195, respectively. DZP showed a non-competitive inhibition of carbachol-stimulated IP3 production. It did not directly inhibit the activities of GTP-binding regulatory proteins and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in the parotid gland membranes, though choline chloride inhibited PLC activity. DZP (10−5 M) attenuated the increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the cells following stimulation of the muscarinic and α1-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that in the parotid acinar cells, DZP inhibits muscarinic receptor-stimulated IP3 production through benzodiazepine receptors and that PLC activity which produces IP3 is inhibited by chloride. The decreases in IP3 and [Ca2+]i in the cells may be connected with the suppression of salivary secretion induced by DZP. PMID:12429566

  2. Expression of miR-15a, miR-145, and miR-182 in granulosa-lutein cells, follicular fluid, and serum of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Mohammad; Nekoonam, Saeid; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Arefian, Ehsan; Mahdian, Reza; Azizi, Elham; Shabani Nashtaei, Maryam; Amidi, Fardin

    2018-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinopathies that affects women in reproductive age. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in normal function of female reproductive system and folliculogenesis. Deregulated expression of miRNAs in PCOS condition may be significantly implicated in the pathogenesis of PCOS. We determined relative expression of miR-15a, miR-145, and miR-182 in granulosa-lutein cells (GLCs), follicular fluid (FF), and serum of PCOS patients. Human subjects were divided into PCOS (n = 20) and control (n = 21) groups. GLCs, FF, and serum were isolated and stored. RNA isolation was performed and cDNA was reversely transcribed using specific stem-loop RT primers. Relative expression of miRNAs was calculated after normalization against U6 expression. Correlation of miRNAs' expression level with basic clinical features and predictive value of miRNAs in FF and serum were appraised. Relative expression of miR-145 and miR-182 in GLCs was significantly decreased in PCOS, but miR-182 in FF of PCOS patients revealed up-regulated levels. Significant correlations between level of miRNAs in FF and serum and hormonal profile of subjects were observed. MiR-182 in FF showed a significant predictive value with AUC of 0.73, 76.4% sensitivity, and 70.5% specificity which was improved after combination of miR-182 and miR-145. A significant dysregulation of miR-145 and miR-182 in GLCs of PCOS may indicate their involvement in pathogenesis of PCOS. Differential up-regulation of miR-182 in FF of PCOS patients with its promising predictive values for discrimination of PCOS reinforced the importance of studying miRNAs' profile in FF.

  3. Proanthocyanidins from the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Induce Cell Cycle Alterations in DU145 Human Prostate Cancer Cells in Vitro by Affecting the Expression of Cell Cycle-Associated Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. There are genetic and environmental factors that can potentially impact the development and progression of many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. As a consequence of environmental factors, such as diet having a potential effect on the development of prostate cancer, considerable interest in the possible health benefits associated with the inclusion and consumption of certain foods in the diet exists. Context and purpose of this study: This study describes the effects of a proanthocyanidinenriched fraction (PACs isolated from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon on the behaviour of androgen-refractory (insensitive DU145 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: Following treatment of DU145 human prostate cancer cells with 25 µg/mL of PACs for six hours, PACs significantly decreased the cellular viability of DU145 cells. PACs treatment (25 µg/mL for 6 hours of DU145 cells increased the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and decreased the proportion of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These alterations were associated with changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins and other cell cycle associated proteins. PACs increased the expression of cyclin E, cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4, and decreased the expression of cyclin A and cyclin B1. The protein expression level of p27 increased, and the protein expression levels of p16INK4a, p21, and pRBp107 decreased in response to PACs treatment. The protein expression level of pRBp130 was unchanged in Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2014; 4(2:130- 146 Page 131 of 146 response to PACs treatment. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that proanthocyanidins from the American cranberry can affect the behaviour of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and further support the potential health benefits associated with cranberries.

  4. Retraction notice to: Influence of external disturbances to dynamic balance of the semi-anthropomimetic robot [Serb. Jour. of elect. Eng., Vol. 11, no. 1, feb. 2014, pp. 145-158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to technical errors the article entitled „Influence of External Disturbances to Dynamic Balance of the Semi-Anthropomimetic Robot“, by authors Vladimir M. Petrović, Kosta Jovanović, Veljko Potkonjak, published in Serbian journal of Electrical Engineering, Vol. 11, No. 1, February 2014, pp. 145-158, has been retracted from the Journal. Link to the retracted article 10.2298/SJEE131014013P

  5. Antibiotic-Mediated Inhibition of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection: A Novel Quinolone Function Which Potentiates the Antiviral Cytokine Response in MARC-145 Cells and Pig Macrophages

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    William A. Cafruny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an economically significant agent for which there currently are no effective treatments. Development of antiviral agents for PRRSV as well as many other viruses has been limited by toxicity of known antiviral compounds. In contrast, antibiotics for non-virus microbial infections have been widely useful, in part because of their acceptable toxicity in animals. We report here the discovery that the quinolonecontaining compound Plasmocin™, as well as the quinolones nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, have potent anti-PRRSV activity in vitro. PRRSV replication was inhibited by these antibiotics in both cultured MARC-145 cells and cultured primary alveolar porcine macrophages (PAMs. Furthermore, sub-optimal concentrations of nalidixic acid synergized with antiviral cytokines (AK-2 or IFN-γ to quantitatively and qualitatively inhibit PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells or PAMs. The antiviral activity of Plasmocin and nalidixic acid correlated with reduced actin expression in MARC-145 cells. Replication of the related lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV was also inhibited in primary mouse macrophages by Plasmocin. These results are significant to the development of antiviral strategies with potentially reduced toxicity, and provide a model system to better understand regulation of arterivirus replication.

  6. Caffeine protects against experimental acute pancreatitis by inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Cane, Matthew C; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Szatmary, Peter; Zhang, Xiaoying; Elliott, Victoria; Ouyang, Yulin; Chvanov, Michael; Latawiec, Diane; Wen, Li; Booth, David M; Haynes, Andrea C; Petersen, Ole H; Tepikin, Alexei V; Criddle, David N; Sutton, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Caffeine reduces toxic Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells via inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated signalling, but effects of other xanthines have not been evaluated, nor effects of xanthines on experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We have determined effects of caffeine and its xanthine metabolites on pancreatic acinar IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and experimental AP. Isolated pancreatic acinar cells were exposed to secretagogues, uncaged IP3 or toxins that induce AP and effects of xanthines, non-xanthine phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP/cGMP) determined. The intracellular cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]C), mitochondrial depolarisation and necrosis were assessed by confocal microscopy. Effects of xanthines were evaluated in caerulein-induced AP (CER-AP), taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate-induced AP (TLCS-AP) or palmitoleic acid plus ethanol-induced AP (fatty acid ethyl ester AP (FAEE-AP)). Serum xanthines were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Caffeine, dimethylxanthines and non-xanthine PDE inhibitors blocked IP3-mediated Ca(2+) oscillations, while monomethylxanthines had little effect. Caffeine and dimethylxanthines inhibited uncaged IP3-induced Ca(2+) rises, toxin-induced Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial depolarisation and necrotic cell death pathway activation; cAMP/cGMP did not inhibit toxin-induced Ca(2+) rises. Caffeine significantly ameliorated CER-AP with most effect at 25 mg/kg (seven injections hourly); paraxanthine or theophylline did not. Caffeine at 25 mg/kg significantly ameliorated TLCS-AP and FAEE-AP. Mean total serum levels of dimethylxanthines and trimethylxanthines peaked at >2 mM with 25 mg/kg caffeine but at Caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites reduced pathological IP3R-mediated pancreatic acinar Ca(2+) signals but only caffeine ameliorated experimental AP. Caffeine is a suitable

  7. An inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-IP3 receptor pathway is required for insulin-stimulated glucose transporter 4 translocation and glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Ferrat, A E; Toro, B; Bravo, R; Parra, V; Vásquez, C; Ibarra, C; Mears, D; Chiong, M; Jaimovich, E; Klip, A; Lavandero, S

    2010-10-01

    Intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) and glucose uptake are central to cardiomyocyte physiology, yet connections between them have not been studied. We investigated whether insulin regulates [Ca2+]i in cultured cardiomyocytes, the participating mechanisms, and their influence on glucose uptake via SLC2 family of facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were preloaded with the Ca2+ fluorescent dye fluo3-acetoxymethyl ester compound (AM) and visualized by confocal microscopy. Ca2+ transport pathways were selectively targeted by chemical and molecular inhibition. Glucose uptake was assessed using [3H]2-deoxyglucose, and surface GLUT4 levels were quantified in nonpermeabilized cardiomyocytes transfected with GLUT4-myc-enhanced green fluorescent protein. Insulin elicited a fast, two-component, transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Nifedipine and ryanodine prevented only the first component. The second one was reduced by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-receptor-selective inhibitors (xestospongin C, 2 amino-ethoxydiphenylborate), by type 2 IP3 receptor knockdown via small interfering RNA or by transfected Gβγ peptidic inhibitor βARKct. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was prevented by bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid-AM, 2-amino-ethoxydiphenylborate, and βARK-ct but not by nifedipine or ryanodine. Similarly, insulin-dependent exofacial exposure of GLUT4-myc-enhanced green fluorescent protein was inhibited by bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid-AM and xestospongin C but not by nifedipine. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt were also required for the second phase of Ca2+ release and GLUT4 translocation. Transfected dominant-negative phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ inhibited the latter. In conclusion, in primary neonatal cardiomyocytes, insulin induces an important component of Ca2+ release via IP3 receptor. This component signals to glucose uptake via GLUT4, revealing a so-far unrealized

  8. A dominant negative form of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor induces metacyclogenesis and increases mitochondrial density in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki, E-mail: muneaki@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Enomoto, Masahiro, E-mail: menomoto@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, M5G1L7, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kurebayashi, Nagomi, E-mail: nagomik@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsutaka, E-mail: myoshida@juntendo.ac.jp [Laboratoly of Morphology and Image Analysis, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Sakurai, Takashi, E-mail: tsakurai@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Mita, Toshihiro, E-mail: tmita@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8421 (Japan); Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko, E-mail: mikosiba@brain.riken.jp [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Calcium Oscillation Project, International Cooperative Research Project and Solution-Oriented Research for Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP{sub 3}R) is a key regulator of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration that release Ca{sup 2+} from Ca{sup 2+} stores in response to various external stimuli. IP{sub 3}R also works as a signal hub which form a platform for interacting with various proteins involved in diverse cell signaling. Previously, we have identified an IP{sub 3}R homolog in the parasitic protist, Trypanosoma cruzi (TcIP{sub 3}R). Parasites expressing reduced or increased levels of TcIP{sub 3}R displayed defects in growth, transformation, and infectivity. In the present study, we established parasitic strains expressing a dominant negative form of TcIP{sub 3}R, named DN-TcIP{sub 3}R, to further investigate the physiological role(s) of TcIP{sub 3}R. We found that the growth of epimastigotes expressing DN-TcIP{sub 3}R was significantly slower than that of parasites with TcIP{sub 3}R expression levels that were approximately 65% of wild-type levels. The expression of DN-TcIP{sub 3}R in epimastigotes induced metacyclogenesis even in the normal growth medium. Furthermore, these epimastigotes showed the presence of dense mitochondria under a transmission electron microscope. Our findings confirm that TcIP{sub 3}R is crucial for epimastigote growth, as previously reported. They also suggest that a strong inhibition of the IP{sub 3}R-mediated signaling induces metacyclogenesis and that mitochondrial integrity is closely associated with this signaling. - Highlights: • We established T. cruzi strains expressing a dominant negative form of the TcIP{sub 3}R. • DN-TcIP{sub 3}R expression inhibits epimastigote growth and induces metacyclogenesis. • Microscopic analysis indicated TcIP{sub 3}R role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. • Growth, but not microbial density, was altered by mammalian IP{sub 3}R inhibitor (2-APB).

  9. Calcium signalling from the type I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is required at early phase of liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Andrade, Viviane A; Guimarães, Erika S; Florentino, Rodrigo M; Sousa, Pedro A; Marques, Pedro E; Melo, Flávia M; Ortega, Miguel J; Menezes, Gustavo B; Leite, M Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Liver regeneration is a multistage process that unfolds gradually, with different mediators acting at different stages of regeneration. Calcium (Ca(2+) ) signalling is essential for liver regeneration. In hepatocytes, Ca(2+) signalling results from the activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3 R) of which two of the three known isoforms are expressed (InsP3 R-I and InsP3 R-II). Here, we investigated the role of the InsP3 R-I-dependent Ca(2+) signals in hepatic proliferation during liver regeneration. Partial hepatectomy (HX) in combination with knockdown of InsP3 R-I (AdsiRNA-I) was used to evaluate the role of InsP3 R-I on liver regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation, as assessed by liver to body mass ratio, PCNA expression, immunoblots and measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. AdsiRNA-I efficiently infected the liver as demonstrated by the expression of β-galactosidase throughout the liver lobules. Moreover, this construct selectively and efficiently reduced the expression of InsP3 R-I, as evaluated by immunoblots. Expression of AdsiRNA-I in liver decreased peak Ca(2+) amplitude induced by vasopressin in isolated hepatocytes 2 days after HX. Reduced InsP3 R-I expression prior to HX also delayed liver regeneration, as measured by liver to body weight ratio, and reduced hepatocyte proliferation, as evaluated by PCNA staining, at the same time point. At later stages of regeneration, control hepatocytes showed a decreased expression of InsP3 R, as well as reduced InsP3 R-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, events that did not affect liver growth. Together, these results show that InsP3 R-I-dependent Ca(2+) signalling is an early triggering pathway required for liver regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor is localized on specialized sub-regions of the endoplasmic reticulum in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lièvremont, J P; Hill, A M; Hilly, M; Mauger, J P

    1994-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) is involved in the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular non-mitochondrial stores. In rat liver, it has been shown that the InsP3-binding site co-purifies with the plasma membrane. This suggests that in the liver the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) associates with plasma membrane. We studied the subcellular distribution of the liver InsP3R by measuring the maximal binding capacity of [3H]InsP3 and using antibodies against the 14 C-terminal residues of the type 1 InsP3R. The antibodies recognized a large amount of an InsP3R protein of 260 kDa in a membrane fraction which is also enriched with [3H]InsP3-binding sites and with markers of the basal, the lateral and the bile-canalicular membrane and the plasma-membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). The fractions enriched in markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Ca2+ pump of the ER (SERCA2b) contained low levels of InsP3 receptors. The immunofluorescent labelling of cultured hepatocytes with anti-InsP3R antibodies indicated that the receptor is concentrated in the perinuclear area and in some regions near the plasma membrane. The fraction enriched with InsP3R is also contaminated with markers of the ER and with SERCA2b. It was exposed to alkaline medium (pH 10.5) to extract endogenous actin and membrane-associated proteins before being subfractionated by Percoll-gradient centrifugation. The alkaline treatment allowed partial separation of the markers of the ER from the markers of the plasma membrane. The InsP3R was recovered in the heavy subfraction, which was also enriched with markers for the ER and with the SERCA2b and contained low levels of markers of the plasma membrane. These data indicate that the InsP3R is neither localized on the plasma membrane itself nor homogeneously distributed on the ER membrane. This supports the view that part of the receptor is localized on a specialized sub-region of the ER which interacts with the plasma membrane. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure

  11. Efficacy of spray –Dried Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A (Zequanox®), for controlling Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within Lake Minnetonka, MN enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Severson, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of whole water column and subsurface applications of the biopesticide Zequanox®, a commercially prepared spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A), were evaluated for controlling zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within 27-m2 enclosures in Lake Minnetonka (Deephaven, Minnesota). Five treatments consisting of (1) two whole water column Zequanox applications, (2) two subsurface Zequanox applications, and (3) an untreated control were completed on each of three independent treatment days during September 2014. The two types of samplers used in the study were (1) type 1 samplers, which were custom built multi-plate samplers (wood, perforated aluminum, and tile substrates) that were placed into Robinson’s Bay in June of 2013 to allow for natural colonization by zebra mussels, and (2) type 2 samplers, which consisted of zebra mussels adhering to perforated aluminum trays that were placed into mesh containment bags. One day prior to treatment, three individual samplers of each type were distributed to test enclosures and exposed to a randomly assigned treatment. Sampling to determine the zebra mussel biomass adhering to type 1 samplers and the survival assessments for zebra mussels contained in type 2 samplers were completed ~40 days after exposure. The zebra mussel biomass adhering to type 1 samplers and the survival of zebra mussels contained in type 2 samplers were significantly less in groups treated with the highest Zequanox concentrations and in groups that received whole water column applications than comparable groups treated with lower Zequanox concentrations and subsurface applications. However, standardization of biomass and survival results to the amount of Zequanox applied showed that the lower concentrations and subsurface applications were more cost efficient, with respect to product used, at reducing zebra mussel biomass and for inducing zebra mussel mortality. Although the subsurface application methods

  12. Investigation of an Escherichia coli O145 outbreak in a child day-care centre - extensive sampling and characterization of eae- and stx1-positive E. coli yields epidemiological and socioeconomic insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruheim Torkjel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On October 29th 2009 the health authorities in the city of Trondheim, Norway were alerted about a case of Shiga toxin-positive E. coli (STEC O145 in a child with bloody diarrhoea attending a day-care centre. Symptomatic children in this day-care centre were sampled, thereby identifying three more cases. This initiated an outbreak investigation. Methods A case was defined as a child attending the day-care centre, in whom eae- and stx1- but not stx2-positive E. coli O145:H28 was diagnosed from a faecal sample, with multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA profile identical to the index isolate. All 61 children, a staff of 14 in the day-care centre, and 74 close contacts submitted faecal samples. Staff and parents were interviewed about cases' exposure to foods and animals. Faecal samples from 31 ewes from a sheep herd to which the children were exposed were analyzed for E. coli O145. Results Sixteen cases were identified, from which nine presented diarrhoea but not haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The attack rate was 0.26, and varied between age groups (0.13-0.40 and between the three day-care centre departments (0.20-0.50, and was significantly higher amongst the youngest children. Median duration of shedding was 20 days (0-71 days. Children were excluded from the day-care centre during shedding, requiring parents to take compassionate leave, estimated to be a minimum total of 406 days for all cases. Atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC were detected among 14 children other than cases. These isolates were genotypically different from the outbreak strain. Children in the day-care centre were exposed to faecal pollution from a sheep herd, but E. coli O145 was not detected in the sheep. Conclusions We report an outbreak of stx1- and eae-positive STEC O145:H28 infection with mild symptoms among children in a day-care centre. Extensive sampling showed occurrence of the outbreak strain as well as other STEC and

  13. AMG145, a Monoclonal Antibody Against Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9, Significantly Reduces Lipoprotein(a) in Hypercholesterolemic Patients Receiving Statin Therapy: An Analysis From the LDL-C Assessment With Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9 Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition Combined With Statin Therapy (LAPLACE)–Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 57 Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desai, Nihar R; Kohli, Payal; Giugliano, Robert P; O’Donoghue, Michelle L; Somaratne, Ransi; Zhou, Jing; Hoffman, Elaine B; Huang, Fannie; Rogers, William J; Wasserman, Scott M; Scott, Robert; Sabatine, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    .... Currently, there are few available therapies to lower Lp(a). We sought to evaluate the impact of AMG145, a monoclonal antibody against proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9), on Lp...

  14. Salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORINGS_PAPA_145W_50N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-06-08 to 2014-11-06 (NCEI Accession 0160486)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160486 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORINGS_PAPA_145W_50N in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  15. Salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORINGS_KEO_145E_32N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2011-11-08 to 2016-08-02 (NCEI Accession 0160545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160545 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORINGS_KEO_145E_32N in the North Pacific Ocean from...

  16. miR-145 modulates lncRNA-ROR and Sox2 expression to maintain human amniotic epithelial stem cell pluripotency and β islet-like cell differentiation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Gang; Liu, Te; Guo, Lihe; Huang, Yongyi; Feng, Ya; Huang, Qin; Duan, Tao

    2016-10-10

    In this study, we observed a great reduction in the expression of the endogenous long noncoding RNA ROR (lncRNA-ROR) and the stem cell transcription factor Sox2, in contrast to a marked increase in miR-145 expression, during the course of in vitro induced differentiation of human amniotic epithelial stem cells (HuAECs). Bioinformatics analysis and the luciferase reporter assay revealed binding of miR-145 to specific sites in lncRNA-ROR and Sox2, silencing their expression. Overexpression of a lncRNA-ROR-specific siRNA effectively downregulated the expression levels of Sox2 and other stem cell markers in HuAECs while weakening the efficiency of HuAEC differentiation into β islet-like cells. Moreover, the in vitro response of HuAEC-derived β islet-like cells to extracellular stimuli and C-peptide release by these cells were markedly weakened in the siRNA-ROR transfection group. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of β islet-like cell biomarkers was substantially reduced in HuAECs in the siRNA-ROR transfection group, and their in vivo β islet-like cell differentiation and insulin release capacities were reduced in a streptozocin-induced diabetic rat model. The experimental results indicate that lncRNA-ROR effectively maintains Sox2 gene expression through competitive binding to miR-145, achieving pluripotency maintenance in HuAECs and regulation of their directed β islet-like cell differentiation efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mid-Mesozoic (Mid-Jurassic to Early Cretaceous) evolution of the Georges Bank Basin, U.S. North Atlantic outer continental shelf: Sedimentology of the Conoco 145-1 well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W.; Stanton, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Conoco 145-1 exploratory well, located in the southeastern portion of the Georges Bank Basin, was drilled to a total depth of 4303 m below the sea floor. The oldest sedimentary rocks sampled are of Middle Jurassic age (Late Bathonian-Callovian). A dolomite-limestone-evaporite sequence dominates the section below 3917 m; limestone is the predominant lithology in the intervals of 3271-3774 m, 2274-3158 m, and 1548-1981 m. Siliciclastics dominate the remainder of the drilled section. Calcite tightly cements most of the rocks below 1548 m; dolomite, silica, siderite, and diagenetic clay cements are locally important. Restricted inner marine environments, representing lagoonal and tidal flat conditions, prevailed at the wellsite during much of the deposition recorded by the Callovian-Bathonian age Iroquois Formation. These environments gave way to a carbonate platform, which formed part of the > 5,000 km long Bahama-Grand Banks gigaplatform that lasted through the end of the Late Jurassic (encompassing the uppermost portion of the Iroquois Formation and the Scatarie Limestone and Bacarro Limestone Members of the Abenaki Formation). The absence of a skeletal-reef association and the dominance of muddy limestone fabrics are evidence that the 145-1 wellsite was located on the platform interior. Major periods of siticiclastic deposition interrupted carbonate deposition, and they are recorded by stratigraphic equivalents of the Mohican Formation, Misaine Shale Member of the Abenaki Formation, and the Mohawk and Mic Mac Formations. A series of sustained prograding delta systems, the earliest of which is preserved as the Missisauga Formation, buried the carbonate platform following its drowning in the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian). The sparser, primarily allochthonous lignite content and better-sorted, glauconite-bearing sands of the Missisauga strata at the 145-1 wellsite suggest that shallow marine or barrier-bar environments were more prevalent than the low

  18. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel Alter the Expression Pattern of miR-143/145 and miR-183/96/182 Clusters in T24 Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Emmanuel I; Scorilas, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Although cisplatin-based chemotherapy is considered to be the treatment of choice for metastatic bladder cancer, its efficacy and tolerability has proven to be limited. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs, whose genes are frequently organized in clusters. These molecules constitute posttranscriptional regulators of mRNA expression and are claimed to be deregulated in cancer. miR-143/145 and miR-183/96/182 clusters have been extensively studied in bladder cancer cells. Herein, we tried to add up to this knowledge by assessing the expression levels of the five mature microRNAs derived from the aforementioned clusters in T24 bladder cancer cells exposed to either cisplatin or paclitaxel. For both compounds, the viability of treated T24 cells was estimated via the MTT colorimetric assay and the Trypan Blue exclusion method, while a fraction of the cells was left to recover. The expression levels of all mature microRNAs were finally quantified both in treated and in recovered cells by performing real-time PCR. According to our data, cisplatin and paclitaxel strongly decreased T24 cells' viability, showing in parallel the ability to significantly down-regulate miR-143 levels, and up-regulate the expression levels of miR-145, miR-183, miR-96, and miR-182, which, in their total, demonstrated case-specific variations after recovery period. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering effects of AMG 145, a monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 serine protease in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: the Reduction of LDL-C with PCSK9 Inhibition in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Disorder (RUTHERFORD) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raal, Frederick; Scott, Rob; Somaratne, Ransi; Bridges, Ian; Li, Gang; Wasserman, Scott M; Stein, Evan A

    2012-11-13

    Despite statin treatment, many patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia do not reach desired low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets. AMG 145, a fully human monoclonal antibody against proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) serine protease, demonstrated significant reductions in LDL-C in phase 1 studies. This phase 2, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging study evaluated the efficacy and safety of AMG 145 in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients. Patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia diagnosed by Simon Broome criteria with LDL-C ≥2.6 mmol/L (100 mg/dL) despite statin therapy with or without ezetimibe were randomized 1:1:1 to AMG 145 350 mg, AMG 145 420 mg, or placebo-administered subcutaneously every 4 weeks. The primary end point was percentage change from baseline in LDL-C at week 12. Of 168 patients randomized, 167 received investigational product and were included in the full analysis set (mean [SD] age, 50 [13] years; 47% female; 89% white; mean [SD] baseline LDL-C, 4.0 [1.1] mmol/L (156 [42] mg/dL)). At week 12, LDL-C reduction measured by preparative ultracentrifugation (least squares mean [standard error (SE)]) was 43 (3)% and 55 (3)% with AMG 145 350 mg and 420 mg, respectively, compared with 1 (3)% increase with placebo (P<0.001 for both dose groups). Serious adverse events (not considered treatment-related) occurred in 2 patients on AMG 145. AMG 145 administered every 4 weeks yielded rapid and substantial reductions in LDL-C in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients despite intensive statin use, with or without ezetimibe, with minimal adverse events and good tolerability. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01375751.

  20. Ethyl acetate fraction from methanol extraction of Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana induced G0 /G1 phase arrest via inhibition of cyclins D and E and induction of apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent pathways in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsin; Chan, Hsiao-Sung; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng; Funayama, Shinji; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-09-22

    Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana (VTT) is a wild grape native to Taiwan, belonging to the Vitaceae family and Vitis genus, and widely used as folk herbal medicine. It is traditionally used for the treatment of diarrhea, hypertension, neuroprotection, jaundice, and arthritis. We used the wild-collected VTT and sterilized them to establish the plant tissue culture, and then took the leaves for DNA sequencing to determine its original base. We use methanol to extract VTT in four different solvents: 1-butanol, n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and water. These four preliminary extracts were used to treat human prostate cancer DU145 cells in vitro. We use the flow cytometry to check the cell survival situation. Finally, we found the ethyl acetate layer roughing product (referred VTEA) in human prostate cancer apoptotic effects of cell line DU-145. In the present studies, we use the crude extract of VTT to examine whether or not it can induce apoptosis of DU145 cells in vitro. Viability assays for extracts of VTT treatment showed that it had dose-dependent effect on human prostate cancer DU145 cells. We also found that the extract of VTT induces time-dependent mitochondrial and intrinsic-dependent apoptosis pathways. The in vitro cytotoxic effects were investigated by cell cycle analysis and the determination of apoptotic DNA fragmentation in DU145 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that extracts of VTT induced a significant increase in the number of cells in G0 /G1 phase. The extract of VTT induced chromatin changes and apoptosis of DU145 cells also were confirmed by DAPI and PI staining that were measured by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. Finally, the expression of relevant proteins was analyzed by Western blot analysis. These results promoted us to further evaluate apoptosis associated proteins and elucidate the possible signal pathway in DU-145 cells after treated with the extract of VTT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Prevalence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 on Hides and Preintervention Carcass Surfaces of Feedlot Cattle at Harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Zachary R; Baumann, Nicholas W; Lewis, Gentry L; Sevart, Nicholas J; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Renter, David G; Marx, David B; Phebus, Randall K; Moxley, Rodney A

    2015-07-01

    Cattle hides are a main source of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) contamination of beef carcasses. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the prevalence of "top 6" non-O157 plus O157:H7 EHEC (EHEC-7) on feedlot cattle hides and their matched preintervention carcasses; (2) assess the agreement among detection methods for these matrices; and (3) conduct a molecular risk assessment of EHEC-7 isolates. Samples from 576 feedlot cattle were obtained at a commercial harvest facility and tested for EHEC-7 by a culture-based method and the polymerase chain reaction/mass spectrometry-based NeoSEEK(™) STEC Detection and Identification test (NS). Prevalence data were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models. The cumulative prevalence of EHEC-7 in hide samples as detected by NS was 80.7%, with a distribution of 49.9%, O145; 37.1%, O45; 12.5%, O103; 11.0%, O157; 2.2%, O111; 2.0%, O121; and 0.2%, O26. In contrast, the cumulative prevalence of EHEC-7 in hide samples by culture was 1.2%, with a distribution of 0.6%, O157; 0.4%, O26; 0.2%, O145; and 0%, O45, O103, O111, and O121. The cumulative prevalence of EHEC-7 on matched preintervention carcasses as detected by NS was 6.0%, with a distribution of 2.8%, O157; 1.6%, O145; 1.2%, O103; 1.1%, O45; 0.2%, O26; and 0.0%, O111 and O121. Although the culture-based method detected fewer positive hide samples than NS, it detected EHEC in five hide samples that tested negative for the respective organism by NS. McNemar's chi-square tests indicated significant (pEHEC-7 isolates recovered from hides were seropathotype A or B, with compatible virulence gene content. This study indicates that "top 6" and O157:H7 EHEC are present on hides, and to a lesser extent, preintervention carcasses of feedlot cattle at harvest. However, continued improvement in non-O157 detection methods is needed for accurate estimation of prevalence, given the discordant results across protocols.

  2. Plasma miR-145, miR-20a, miR-21 and miR-223 as novel biomarkers for screening early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Mao, Feng; Shen, Tuyang; Luo, Qingquan; Ding, Zhengping; Qian, Liqiang; Huang, Jia

    2017-02-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Late diagnosis is one of the most significant reasons for the high mortality rate of lung cancer. The identification of microRNAs (miRNAs) has opened a new field for molecular diagnosis of cancer. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether plasma miRNAs may be used as biomarkers for early-stage NSCLC. A total of 232 participants, including 149 NSCLC patients and 83 healthy controls, were recruited between July 2012 and May 2014. We measured the levels of 10 miRNAs (miR-30d, miR-383, miR-20a, miR-145, miR-221, miR-25, miR-223, miR-21, miR-126 and miR-210) in plasma samples of 40 individuals (20 patients and 20 matched healthy controls) at the point of identification of disease, and 129 NSCLC patients and 83 healthy controls at the validation stage using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were generated for each possible combination of the miRNAs. We observed that the expression of plasma miR-145, miR-20a, miR-21 and miR-223 was significantly increased in the early-stage NSCLC samples compared with controls. miRNAs have significant diagnostic value for early-stage NSCLC. Combined ROC analyses using these four miRNAs revealed an elevated area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.897, with a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8 and 90.1%, respectively. This AUC helped in distinguishing early-stage NSCLC. Furthermore, the levels of the four plasma miRNAs were significantly decreased following surgery (Pearly-stage NSCLC.

  3. Contribution to the study of samarium-151 excited levels; Contribution a l'etude des niveaux excites du samarium-151

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locard, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1967-07-01

    The nucleus of {sup 151}Sm, which has 89 neutrons, happens to be on the lower edge of the deformed nuclei of region II. Therefore, the study of its levels is very interesting for the verification of the goodness of the collective models for deformed nuclei when the deformation is small (we introduce these models in the first chapter). {sup 151}Sm has often been studied, but the direct gamma spectrum measured with a lithium drift-germanium detector (chapter 3) shows many high energy transitions which did not appear in the previous level schemes. In order to settle these transitions, we have undertaken gamma-gamma coincidence spectra (as well as sum-coincidence spectra) experiments with a scintillation spectrometer designed in our laboratory (chapter 2). The investigation of the intensities of these coincidences leads us to modify the last proposed level schemes: we suppress the levels at 405,5 and 650 keV, we add levels at 245,6 - 306,6 - 522 - 952 and 962 keV. We have also verified the multipolarities of the main transitions and measured the half-lives of a few levels (chapter 3) (we find a half-life of 1.1 {+-} 0.5 nanosecond for the level at 167,7 keV). In chapter 4, we compare our results to the predictions of the models described in chapter 1. (author) [French] Le noyau de {sup 151}Sm, qui possede 89 neutrons, se trouve a la limite inferieure des noyaux deformes de la region II. L'etude de ses niveaux excites est donc d'un interet tout particulier pour la verification de la validite des differents modeles collectifs pour les noyaux deformes, lorsque la deformation est petite (nous introduisons ces modeles dans un premier chapitre). Le {sup 151}Sm a deja fait l'objet de nombreuses etudes, mais le spectre gamma direct fait avec une jonction de germanium compense au lithium (chapitre 3), nous a montre l'existence d'un grand nombre de transitions de hautes energies qui ne sont pas placees dans les schemas proposes jusqu'a ce jour. Pour preciser la place de ces transitions, nous avons donc entrepris des experiences de coincidences gamma-gamma (et de ''spectre de somme'') a l'aide d'un ensemble de spectrometrie a scintillation realise au laboratoire (chapitre 2). L'etude des intensites de ces coincidences (chapitre 3) nous amene a modifier le dernier schema propose: nous supprimons les niveaux a 405,5 et 650 keV, nous ajoutons des niveaux a 245,6 - 306,6 - 522 - 952 et 962 keV. Nous avons egalement verifie la multipolarite des principales transitions et mesure la duree de vie de certains des niveaux (chapitre 3) (nous trouvons une periode de 1,1 {+-} 0,5) nanoseconde pour le niveau a 167,7 keV). Le chapitre 4 est enfin consacre a la comparaison de nos resultats avec les predictions des differents modeles decrits au chapitre 1. (auteur)

  4. Sea testing and optimisation of power production on a scale 1:4.5 test rig of the offshore wave energy converter wave dragon. Summary of final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-06-15

    The 4-11 MW Wave Dragon is a slack moored device that can be deployed in large parks wherever a sufficient wave climate and a water depth of more than 20 m is found--typically this is the case in the North Sea and in the Atlantic, offering significant economic and environmental benefits for the EU. The primary objective of the project was to establish the scientific knowledge base needed for deploying a full-scale prototype of the overtopping wave energy converter Wave Dragon. This has been obtained through long-term field-testing on a test rig with all systems installed. The scale 1:4.5 prototype has an installed power of 20 kW corresponding to 4 MW in full-scale with full-turbine deployment and is grid connected. The scale 1:4.5 prototype has been designed based on the conclusions from a previous EU Craft project. The basic test rig construction is provided through a project sponsored by the Danish Energy Authority. The test site is in protected waters in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, where the wave climate resembles North Sea conditions (scale 1:4.5) which in accordance with model law resembles a power scale of 1:200. The test results after more than 20,000 hours of operation cover: Long-term field testing of turbine operation, control strategy testing and optimisation, power monitoring and evaluation, stress and strain measurements and analysis, and mooring and cable systems analysis. The model tools developed in the previous EU Craft project have been validated and slightly modified based on the measured data. A Life Cycle Analysis and Finite Element Modelling have been performed. A report on market analysis, economic risk assessment and job creation potential has also been carried out. The project has established the necessary scientific and technical knowledge base for engaging in the establishment of a full-scale prototype in exposed waters. This includes the existence of a well-established design basis and documentation of technical viability through long

  5. Activation of the EIF2α/ATF4 and ATF6 Pathways in DU-145 Cells by Boric Acid at the Concentration Reported in Men at the US Mean Boron Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylewski, Sarah E; Henderson, Kimberly A; Yamada, Kristin E; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2017-04-01

    Fruits, nuts, legumes, and vegetables are rich sources of boron (B), an essential plant nutrient with chemopreventive properties. Blood boric acid (BA) levels reflect recent B intake, and men at the US mean intake have a reported non-fasting level of 10 μM. Treatment of DU-145 prostate cancer cells with physiological concentrations of BA inhibits cell proliferation without causing apoptosis and activates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). EIF2α induces cell differentiation and protects cells by redirecting gene expression to manage endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our objective was to determine the temporal expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-activated genes in DU-145 prostate cells treated with 10 μM BA. Immunoblots showed post-treatment increases in eIF2α protein at 30 min and ATF4 and ATF6 proteins at 1 h and 30 min, respectively. The increase in ATF4 was accompanied by an increase in the expression of its downstream genes growth arrest and DNA damage-induced protein 34 (GADD34) and homocysteine-induced ER protein (Herp), but a decrease in GADD153/CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), a pro-apoptotic gene. The increase in ATF6 was accompanied by an increase in expression of its downstream genes GRP78/BiP, calreticulin, Grp94, and EDEM. BA did not activate IRE1 or induce cleavage of XBP1 mRNA, a target of IRE1. Low boron status has been associated with increased cancer risk, low bone mineralization, and retinal degeneration. ATF4 and BiP/GRP78 function in osteogenesis and bone remodeling, calreticulin is required for tumor suppressor p53 function and mineralization of teeth, and BiP/GRP78 and EDEM prevent the aggregation of misfolded opsins which leads to retinal degeneration. The identification of BA-activated genes that regulate its phenotypic effects provides a molecular underpinning for boron nutrition and biology.

  6. Intracellular Secretory Leukoprotease Inhibitor Modulates Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Generation and Exerts an Anti-Inflammatory Effect on Neutrophils of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer P. Reeves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI is an anti-inflammatory protein present in respiratory secretions. Whilst epithelial cell SLPI is extensively studied, neutrophil associated SLPI is poorly characterised. Neutrophil function including chemotaxis and degranulation of proteolytic enzymes involves changes in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+ levels which is mediated by production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 in response to G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the intracellular function of SLPI and the mechanism-based modulation of neutrophil function by this antiprotease. Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (n=10, individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF (n=5 or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (n=5. Recombinant human SLPI significantly inhibited fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP and interleukin(IL-8 induced neutrophil chemotaxis (P<0.05 and decreased degranulation of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9, hCAP-18, and myeloperoxidase (MPO (P<0.05. The mechanism of inhibition involved modulation of cytosolic IP3 production and downstream Ca2+ flux. The described attenuation of Ca2+ flux was overcome by inclusion of exogenous IP3 in electropermeabilized cells. Inhibition of IP3 generation and Ca2+ flux by SLPI may represent a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism, thus strengthening the attractiveness of SLPI as a potential therapeutic molecule in inflammatory airway disease associated with excessive neutrophil influx including CF, non-CF bronchiectasis, and COPD.

  7. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli colony check assay for the identification of serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 colonies isolated on plating media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Burton; Deschênes, Mylène; Huszczynski, George; Gauthier, Martine

    2014-07-01

    A simple immunoenzymatic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) colony check (ECC) assay was developed for the presumptive identification of priority EHEC colonies isolated on plating media from enrichment broth cultures of foods. With this approach, lipopolysaccharide extracted from a colony is spotted on the grid of a polymyxin-coated polyester cloth strip, and bound E. coli serogroup O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157 antigens are subsequently detected by sequential reactions with a pool of commercially available peroxidase-conjugated goat antibodies and tetramethylbenzidine substrate solution. Each strip can accommodate up to 15 colonies, and test results are available within 30 min. Assay performance was verified using colonies from a total of 73 target EHEC isolates covering the range of designated priority serogroups (all of which were reactive), 41 nontarget E. coli isolates including several nontarget Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serogroups (all unreactive), and 33 non-E. coli strains (all unreactive except two bacterial strains possessing O-antigenic structures in common with those of the priority EHEC). The ECC assay was reactive with target colonies grown on several types of selective and nonselective plating media designed for their cultivation. These results support the use of the ECC assay for high-throughput screening of colonies isolated on plating media for detecting priority EHEC strains in foods.

  8. Morpholino antisense oligo inhibits trans-splicing of pre-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor mRNA of Trypanosoma cruzi and suppresses parasite growth and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Mita, Toshihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Morpholino antisense oligos (MAOs) are used to investigate physiological gene function by inhibiting gene translation or construction of specific alternative splicing variants by blocking cis-splicing. MAOs are attractive drug candidates for viral- and bacterial-infectious disease therapy because of properties such as in vivo stability and specificity to target genes. Recently, we showed that phosphorothioate antisense oligos against Trypanosoma cruzi inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP(3)R) mRNA inhibit the parasite host cell infection. In the present study, we identified the spliced leader (SL) acceptor of pre-TcIP(3)R mRNA and synthesized MAO, which inhibited trans-splicing of the transcript (MAO-1). MAO-1 was found to inhibit the addition of SL-RNA to pre-TcIP(3)R mRNA by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Treatment of the parasites with MAO-1 significantly impaired the growth and infectivity into host cells. These results indicate that MAO-1 is a potential novel drug for Chagas disease and that MAOs inhibiting trans-splicing can be used to investigate the physiology of trypanosomal genes leading to the development of novel drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution Profile of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor/Ca2+ Channels in α and β Cells of Pancreas: Dominant Localization in Secretory Granules and Common Error in Identification of Secretory Granule Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yong Suk; Yoo, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The α and β cells of pancreatic islet release important hormones in response to intracellular Ca increases that result from Ca releases through the inositol 1,4,5-trisphoshate receptor (IP3R)/Ca channels. Yet no systematic studies on distribution of IP3R/Ca channels have been done, prompting us to investigate the distribution of all 3 IP3R isoforms. Immunogold electron microscopy was performed to determine the presence and the relative concentrations of all 3 IP3R isoforms in 2 major organelles secretory granules (SGs) and the endoplasmic reticulum of α and β cells of rat pancreas. All 3 IP3R isoforms were present in SG membranes of both cells, and the IP3R concentrations in SGs were ∼2-fold higher than those in the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, large halos shown in the electron microscope images of insulin-containing SGs of β cells were gap spaces that resulted from separation of granule membranes from the surrounding cytoplasm. These results strongly suggest the important roles of SGs in IP3-induced, Ca-dependent regulatory secretory pathway in pancreas. Moreover, the accurate location of SG membranes of β cells was further confirmed by the location of another integral membrane protein synaptotagmin V and of membrane phospholipid PI(4,5)P2.

  10. Publications | Page 145 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through books, articles, research publications, and studies, we aim to widen the impact of our investment and advance development research. ... In building a culture of evidence-based planning, NEHSI has integrated information and communication technologies (ICTs) to help improve service delivery, build local capacity ...

  11. Reference: 145 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mediating seedling deetiolation. In summary, our results support the notion that FRS family members play distinct roles...g nuclear gene expression. Arabidopsis FHY3/FAR1 gene family and distinct roles of its members in light cont

  12. Retrospective study of 145 supernumerary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Montenegro, Paula; Valmaseda Castellón, E.; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The goal of the present retrospective study is to describe the distribution of the supernumerary teeth in a population of patients that have been attended at the Public Clinic of the Department of Oral Surgery. Background: Supernumerary teeth and multiple hyperdontia are usually associated with different syndromes, such as Gardner syndrome, or with facial fissures; however, they can appear in patients without any pathology. Their prevalence oscillates to 0.5-3.8% in patients wi...

  13. 14 CFR 145.59 - Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hydraulic servo units. (2) Class 2: An electrical accessory that depends on electrical energy for its... or system using gyroscopic principles and motivated by air pressure or electrical energy, including...

  14. 22 CFR 145.22 - Payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... construction agreement, or if the major portion of the construction project is accomplished through private market financing or Federal loans, and the Federal assistance constitutes a minor portion of the project... the SF-270 for construction programs in lieu of the SF-271, “Outlay Report and Request for...

  15. 22 CFR 145.32 - Real property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION..., such requirements, at a minimum, shall contain the following: (a) Title to real property shall vest in... needed as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b), the recipient shall request disposition instructions from...

  16. GPCR Interaction: 145 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ET (SRET) Radioligand binding, Measurement of cAMP accumulation, Immunoprecipitation, Western Immunoblotting..., Immunocytochemistry Staining and Fluorescent Imaging, Measurement of ERK phosphorylation NP_000786.1 ...

  17. 21 CFR 145.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... reducing sugars calculated as anhydrous dextrose. (e) The term invert sugar sirup means an aqueous solution... correction for invert sugar or other substances. Copies of the material incorporated by reference may be... contain not less than 40 percent by weight of reducing sugars calculated as anhydrous dextrose. (b) The...

  18. 21 CFR 145.110 - Canned applesauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and artificial flavoring. (viii) Either of the following: (a) Erythorbic acid or ascorbic acid as an antioxidant preservative in an amount not to exceed 150 parts per million; or (b) Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in...: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (2) Optional...

  19. 145-IJBCS-Article-Prof Amani

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    Swelling power and solubility pattern of starch increase with tuber maturation. Starch ... Keywords: Precocious yam, tuber, vegetable cycle, harvested period, functional properties. ... monocotyledon tuber-bearing plant belonging to the family ...

  20. Estudio retrospectivo de 145 dientes supernumerarios

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Montenegro, Paula; Valmaseda Castellón, Eduardo; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2006-01-01

    Objetivo: El presente estudio retrospectivo pretende describir la distribución de los dientes supernumerarios en una población de pacientes que acuden a una Unidad ambulatoria de Cirugía Bucal. Introducción: Los dientes supernumerarios y la hiperodoncia múltiple se asocian normalmente con diferentes síndromes como el de Gardner o con fisuras faciales; sin embargo, pueden aparecer en pacientes sin ningún tipo de patología. Su prevalencia oscila entre el 0,5 y el 3,8% en la dentición permane...

  1. Retrospective study of 145 supernumerary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Montenegro, Paula; Valmaseda Castellón, Eduardo; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The goal of the present retrospective study is to describe the distribution of the supernumerary teeth in a population of patients that have been attended at the Public Clinic of the Department of Oral Surgery. Background: Supernumerary teeth and multiple hyperdontia are usually associated with different syndromes, such as Gardner syndrome, or with facial fissures; however, they can appear in patients without any pathology. Their prevalence oscillates to 0.5-3.8% in patients with p...

  2. Publications | Page 145 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through books, articles, research publications, and studies, we aim to widen the impact of our investment and advance development research. We share the ... Promoting rural income from sustainable aquaculture through social learning in Sri Lanka : final technical report (August 2010 - December 2012) (open access).

  3. 145-IJBCS-Article-Prof Amani

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    could be harvested six month after planting during the vegetable cycle. .... rotor was fixed at 75 rpm and the rate of heating and cooling was ... 6) regular evolution characteristic of yam starch. Starch of the four developmental stages showed the same initial pasting temperature (76 °C). The peak of viscosity increased slowly ...

  4. QTL Information Table: 145 [Q-TARO

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available qPL-6 Morphological trait Panicle/flower panicle length RFLP C)Interval BIL Koshihi...kari Kasalath B C556 jsa Yamamoto, T., Taguchi-Shiobara, F., Ukai, Y., Sasaki, T., and Yano, M. (2001). Mapping Quantitative Trai

  5. 22 CFR 145.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION... or excluded from the unit acquisition cost in accordance with the recipient's regular accounting... Agreement Act (31 U.S.C. 6306), for property acquired under an award to conduct basic or applied research by...

  6. Publications | Page 145 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC works with developing-country researchers and institutions to build local capacity through funding, knowledge sharing, and training. Through books, articles, research publications, and studies, we aim to widen the impact of our investment and advance development research. We share the results of our funded ...

  7. 21 CFR 145.180 - Canned pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredients referred to in paragraph (a)(3)(i) of this section are: (a) Sugar. (b) Invert sugar sirup. (c) Any... surface of the unit: deep fruit eyes, pieces of shell, brown spots, bruised portions, and other...

  8. 40 CFR 145.23 - Program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... description of and schedule for the State's program to ban Class IV wells prohibited under § 144.13; and (11) A description of and schedule for the State's program to establish an inventory of Class V wells and... water to contamination from Class V injection wells when developing their plan. Within the schedule for...

  9. 40 CFR 52.145 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... made part of the applicable plan for the State of Arizona. (c) Long-term strategy. The provisions of...) of this section, the owner or operator: (i) Shall furnish the Administrator written notification of... effect on October 3, 1991. (ii) Shall furnish the Administrator written notification of the daily...

  10. 14 CFR 145.163 - Training requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certificated repair station must have an employee training program approved by the FAA that consists of initial... certificate was issued. (b) The training program must ensure each employee assigned to perform maintenance... employee training required under paragraph (a) of this section. These training records must be retained for...

  11. 9 CFR 145.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Requirements which are equal to or exceed the program, conditions, criteria, or classifications with which they... kind of mating (breed and variety or combination of stocks) and of one classification on one farm; (2..., surveillance, and diagnostics. The committee consists of representatives from the poultry and egg industries...

  12. 22 CFR 145.44 - Procurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Recipients avoid purchasing unnecessary items. (2) Where appropriate, an analysis is made of lease and purchase alternatives to determine which would be the most economical and practical procurement for the... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER...

  13. 32 CFR 145.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., religion, sex, national origin, age, handicapping condition, marital status, or political affiliation, as... Federal employment who discloses information he or she reasonably believes evidences: (a) A violation of...

  14. 21 CFR 145.125 - Canned cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Natural and artificial flavors. (ii) Spice. (iii) Vinegar, lemon juice, or organic acids. Such food is... lemon juice”. When two or more of the optional ingredients specified in paragraph (a)(1) (ii) and (iii...

  15. 7 CFR 987.145 - Withholding obligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC DATES PRODUCED OR PACKED... including souring, mold, fermentation, insect infestation, or foreign material. (g) Substitution. Any...

  16. 22 CFR 145.36 - Intangible property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... when: (A) Research findings are published in a peer-reviewed scientific or technical journal; or (B) A... set forth in paragraph (d)(1) of this section do not apply to commercial organizations. (e) Title to...

  17. 9 CFR 145.14 - Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or clinically ill birds. (i) The real time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) assay. (A) The RRT-PCR tests must be conducted using reagents approved by the Department and the Official State Agency. The RRT-PCR must be conducted using the National Veterinary Services Laboratories...

  18. 21 CFR 189.145 - Dulcin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (15 FR 321). (c) The analytical methods used for detecting dulcin in food are in sections 20.173-20.176 of the “Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists,” 13th Ed... natural products at levels detectable by the official methodology, and has been proposed for use as an...

  19. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... specifications for such cloth set forth under “2.38 mm (No. 8)” in “Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists,” 13th Ed. (1980), Table 1, “Nominal Dimensions of Standard Test... container. (2) Water capacity of containers is determined by the general method provided in § 130.12(a) of...

  20. Prevalence of carriage of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8, and O145:H28 among slaughtered adult cattle in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbal, Delphine; Loukiadis, Estelle; Kérourédan, Monique; Ferré, Franck; Dilasser, Françoise; Peytavin de Garam, Carine; Cartier, Philippe; Oswald, Eric; Gay, Emilie; Auvray, Frédéric; Brugère, Hubert

    2015-02-01

    The main pathogenic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are defined as Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli (STEC) belonging to one of the following serotypes: O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8, and O145:H28. Each of these five serotypes is known to be associated with a specific subtype of the intimin-encoding gene (eae). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of bovine carriers of these “top five” STEC in the four adult cattle categories slaughtered in France. Fecal samples were collected from 1,318 cattle, including 291 young dairy bulls, 296 young beef bulls, 337 dairy cows, and 394 beef cows. A total of 96 E. coli isolates, including 33 top five STEC and 63 atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) isolates, with the same genetic characteristics as the top five STEC strains except that they lacked an stx gene, were recovered from these samples.O157:H7 was the most frequently isolated STEC serotype. The prevalence of top five STEC (all serotypes included) was 4.5% in young dairy bulls, 2.4% in young beef bulls, 1.8% in dairy cows, and 1.0% in beef cows. It was significantly higher in young dairy bulls (P<0.05) than in the other 3 categories. The basis for these differences between categories remains to be elucidated. Moreover,simultaneous carriage of STEC O26:H11 and STEC O103:H2 was detected in one young dairy bull. Lastly, the prevalence of bovine carriers of the top five STEC, evaluated through a weighted arithmetic mean of the prevalence by categories, was estimated to 1.8% in slaughtered adult cattle in France.