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Sample records for salt induced decay

  1. Salt Induced Decay of Masonry and Electrokinetic Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    without increased salt content. The types and concentrations of salts found in relation to building stone vary greatly and depend on the stone type and the environment around the building. In general most common salts are sulphates, chlorides and nitrates. These include CaSO4, Na2SO4, MgSO4,KCl and KNO3...... from brick masonry and also how much the removal rate can be increased by application of the electric field compared to diffusion alone. Some main differences occur between electrokinetic remediation of heavy metal polluted soil and electrokinetic removal of salts from brick masonry. The ions...

  2. Electric field induced salt precipitation into activated carbon air-cathode causes power decay in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingkun; Li, Nan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Lean; Du, Qing; Li, Tian; Wang, Xin

    2017-10-15

    As a promising design for the real application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in wastewater treatment, activated carbon (AC) air-cathode is suffering from a serious power decay after long-term operation. However, the decay mechanism is still not clear because of the complex nature of contaminations. Different from previous reports, we found that local alkalinization and natural evaporation had an ignorable effect on cathode performance (∼2% decay on current densities), while electric field induced salt precipitation (∼53%) and biofouling (∼37%) were dominant according to the charge transfer resistance, which decreased power desities by 36% from 1286 ± 30 to 822 ± 23 mW m -2 in 6 months. Biofouling can be removed by scrapping, however, electric field induced salt precipitation under biofilm still clogged 37% of specific area in catalyst layer, which was even seen to penetrate through the gas diffusion layer. Our findings provided a new insight of AC air-cathode performance decay, providing important information for the improvement of cathodic longevity in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Salt decay of Morley limestone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Salt weathering is one of the main causes of decay of natural stone, and by consequence a major problem to the conservation of cultural heritage. In the present case, the performance of Morley limestone from the Département Meuse, France, as a replacement stone under saltloaded conditions is

  4. Electro-desalination of sulfate contaminated carbonaceous sandstone – risk for salt induced decay during the process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-sulphate is known to cause severe stone damage. This paper is focused on removal of this salt from carbonaceous sandstone by electro-desalination (ED). The research questions are related to possible stone damage during ED and subsequently suction cycles are made in distilled water before......, during and after ED. During suction in water the salts are concentrated in the upper part of the sandstone. After 2 days of treatment the average water soluble SO42- concentration was half the initial and for this sample corners were damaged as was the case for the reference stone. After 4 days of ED...... did not happen, though the data material is too scarce to make a final conclusion. In summary, this investigation did support that ED removes the salts without new damaging side effects in the stone....

  5. Does stress induce salt intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Susan J; Turner, Anne I; Nowson, Caryl A

    2010-06-01

    Psychological stress is a common feature of modern day societies, and contributes to the global burden of disease. It was proposed by Henry over 20 years ago that the salt intake of a society reflects the level of stress, and that stress, through its effect on increasing salt intake, is an important factor in the development of hypertension. This review evaluates the evidence from animal and human studies to determine if stress does induce a salt appetite and increase salt consumption in human subjects. Findings from animal studies suggest that stress may drive salt intake, with evidence for a potential mechanism via the sympatho-adrenal medullary system and/or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. In contrast, in the few laboratory studies conducted in human subjects, none has found that acute stress affects salt intake. However, one study demonstrated that life stress (chronic stress) was associated with increased consumption of snack foods, which included, but not specifically, highly salty snacks. Studies investigating the influence of chronic stress on eating behaviours are required, including consumption of salty foods. From the available evidence, we can conclude that in free-living, Na-replete individuals, consuming Na in excess of physiological requirements, stress is unlikely to be a major contributor to salt intake.

  6. Identification of genes induced by salt stress from Medicago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to identify genes induced during the salt stress response in barrel medic (Medicago truncatula L) seedlings, a cDNA library by salt stress was constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Total RNA from 15-day-old seedlings was used as a 'driver', and total RNA from seedlings induced by salt was ...

  7. In-situ survey of decaying azulejos panels and the presence of salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurdes Esteves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern or figurative azulejos are commonly found decorating the interior of churches, palaces and religious buildings in Portugal, representing local productions from the late 16th century onwards. But not every azulejo reached the present day in good condition.. The aim of this research was the survey of in situ forms of degradation, aimed at eventually establishing a relation between the occurrence of soluble salts and decay. Salt samples and small fragments collected in situ were analysed with a scanning electron microscope with microanalysis unit (SEM-EDS for the identification of saline specimens. NaCl was more abundantly found in near-shore properties, along with trona. Magnesium and calcium sulphate were more common in inland properties.

  8. Decay and microwave power saturation features to determine the radiation-induced radicals of sorbic acid and potassium sorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuner, Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Gamma irradiated sorbic acid (SA) and its potassium salt (KSA) were present complex unresolved Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra. Spectroscopic features and possible structures of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using spectrum simulation calculations according to the microwave power saturations, room and high-temperatures decay findings. It is found that while the radicals decayed in time some of the radicals transferred to another type of radical. The spectrum simulations of SA and KSA were carried out on different spectra recorded in different conditions. Although, most of the radiation-induced radicals of SA and KSA have the similar chemical structures different EPR spectroscopic features were observed. It has been determined that there are three and four different radical species best describe the experimental spectra of SA and KSA, respectively. If the decay rates of the radiation-induced radicals are different, using the information derived from the decay findings present significant information about the spectroscopic features of the existing radicals.

  9. Dopant-Induced Plasmon Decay in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novko, Dino

    2017-11-01

    Chemically doped graphene could support plasmon excitations up to telecommunication or even visible frequencies. Apart from that, the presence of dopant may influence electron scattering mechanisms in graphene and thus impact the plasmon decay rate. Here I study from first principles these effects in single-layer and bilayer graphene doped with various alkali and alkaline earth metals. I find new dopant-activated damping channels: loss due to out-of-plane graphene and in-plane dopant vibrations, and electron transitions between graphene and dopant states. The latter excitations interact with the graphene plasmon and together they form a new hybrid mode. The study points out a strong dependence of these features on the type of dopants and the number of layers, which could be used as a tuning mechanism in future graphene-based plasmonic devices.

  10. Guanidinium-Induced Denaturation by Breaking of Salt Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Panman, Matthijs R; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-12-07

    Despite its wide use as a denaturant, the mechanism by which guanidinium (Gdm(+) ) induces protein unfolding remains largely unclear. Herein, we show evidence that Gdm(+) can induce denaturation by disrupting salt bridges that stabilize the folded conformation. We study the Gdm(+) -induced denaturation of a series of peptides containing Arg/Glu and Lys/Glu salt bridges that either stabilize or destabilize the folded conformation. The peptides containing stabilizing salt bridges are found to be denatured much more efficiently by Gdm(+) than the peptides containing destabilizing salt bridges. Complementary 2D-infrared measurements suggest a denaturation mechanism in which Gdm(+) binds to side-chain carboxylate groups involved in salt bridges. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Effect of antioxidants supplementations in salt-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with many risk factors including oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. The current work evaluated the effects of antioxidants supplementation on salt-induced dyslipidaemia in albino rats. Rats were divided into 10 groups of 7 rats each. Groups 2-10 were fed 8% salt diets for 5 ...

  12. Numerical simulation of ice-load induced salt movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Joerg; Al-Hseinat, Muayyad; Brandes, Christian; Hampel, Andrea; Hübscher, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    A correlation between salt structures, glacigenic features and faulting of Pleistocene deposits above salt structures has been recognised in many places of the formerly glaciated areas in northern central Europe and attributed to ice-sheet loading. Conceptual models predict that the load applied by an ice sheet will favour ice-marginal salt rise and obstruct salt rise beneath the ice sheet (e.g., Liszkowski, 1993). To test these models, we simulated the response of salt structures to ice-sheet loading using a 2D finite-element model (ABAQUS). The subsurface geometries used in our models are based on regional geological cross-sections and 2D seismic profiles of salt structures in the Central European Basin System. The model layers represent (i) sedimentary rocks of elastoplastic rheology, (ii) a viscoelastic salt structure and (iii) elastoplastic basement rocks. At the model surface a temporarily and spatially variable pressure simulates ice-sheet loading. All our simulations show a response of salt structures to ice-sheet loading, which strongly depends on the location of the ice margin relative to the salt structure. Salt structures rise in front of the ice margin (up to 4 m), if load is applied to the salt source layer. Beneath an ice sheet salt structures are pushed down (up to 36 m). Much of the subglacial downwards displacement is compensated by a reversal of the movement during ice retreat. The resulting surface displacements are therefore rather low and depend on the spatial and temporal configuration of the ice load (Lang et al., 2014). Permanent deformation is restricted to the model layers above the salt structure, which either have a low yield stress to represent the unconsolidated infill of secondary rim-synclines or are dissected by steeply dipping crestal graben faults. Ice-induced salt movements will reactivate faults above the crests of salt structures, although the resulting displacements will be low due to the repeated reversals of the sense of

  13. Guanidinium-induced denaturation by breaking of salt bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuzelaar, H.; Panman, M.R.; Woutersen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite its wide use as a denaturant, the mechanism by which guanidinium (Gdm+) induces protein unfolding remains largely unclear. Herein, we show evidence that Gdm+ can induce denaturation by disrupting salt bridges that stabilize the folded conformation. We study the Gdm+-​induced denaturation of

  14. Is nitrification the only cause of microbiologically induced chloramine decay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawade, Emma; Monis, Paul; Cook, David; Drikas, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia degradation was investigated in three batch reactors with differing initial concentrations of bacteria present in the same filtered water source based on pre-treatment filtration techniques. The potential for the bacterial community to degrade the ammonia present was determined in the absence of monochloramine, simulating a distribution system where a loss of disinfectant residual has occurred. Nitrification was observed in only one of the three batch reactors, whereas rapid microbiologically induced chloramine decay was present in two reactors. Results suggest that the microbial decay factor is not a valid tool for indication of nitrification, but may be used as an indicator of the occurrence of rapid monochloramine decay. Intact bacterial cell numbers did not to correlate with changes in ammonia, nitrite or nitrate concentrations and hence did not correlate with the nitrification observed. Neither use of the microbial decay factor or monitoring of ammonia oxidising prokaryotes provided an early indication for the occurrence of nitrification. Hence, monitoring of ammonia and nitrite would still be the most suitable tool for indicating nitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondrial membranes with mono- and divalent salt: changes induced by salt ions on structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko

    2009-01-01

    We employ atomistic simulations to consider how mono- (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) salt affects properties of inner and outer membranes of mitochondria. We find that the influence of salt on structural properties is rather minute, only weakly affecting lipid packing, conformational ordering......, and membrane electrostatic potential. The changes induced by salt are more prominent in dynamical properties related to ion binding and formation of ion-lipid complexes and lipid aggregates, as rotational diffusion of lipids is slowed down by ions, especially in the case of CaCl(2). In the same spirit, lateral...... diffusion of lipids is slowed down rather considerably for increasing concentration of CaCl(2). Both findings for dynamic properties can be traced to the binding of ions with lipid head groups and the related changes in interaction patterns in the headgroup region, where the binding of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions...

  16. Comparative analysis of muscle phosphoproteome induced by salt curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Caixia; Li, Zheng; Shen, Qingwu; Zhang, Dequan

    2017-11-01

    Phosphorylated proteins in ovine muscle induced by salt curing were well investigated. Ten topside muscles of crossbred sheep were ground, mixed and divided into two groups, which were cured for 16h with 0% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Muscle proteins of two cured groups were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with Pro-Q Diamond and SYPRO Ruby staining. The differential phosphorylated proteins were determined using LC-MS/MS and the UniProt database. Ten different phosphoproteins (>1.5 fold) induced by salting were identified, including triosephosphate isomerase, glycogen phosphorylase, creatine kinase M-type, myoglobin, troponin T fast skeletal muscle type, actin, myosin light chain 1/3, tropomyosin beta chain, etc. Most of the different phosphoproteins were involved in glycometabolism, protein function and protein degradation. It is conclusively that salting may influence meat quality through protein phosphorylation, which regulates glycolysis metabolism, protein function and degradation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. High Salt Intake Increases Copeptin but Salt Sensitivity Is Associated with Fluid Induced Reduction of Copeptin in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Tasevska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated if copeptin is affected by high salt intake and whether any salt-induced changes in copeptin are related to the degree of salt sensitivity. The study was performed on 20 men and 19 women. In addition to meals containing 50 mmol NaCl daily, capsules containing 100 mmol NaCl and corresponding placebo capsules were administered during 4 weeks each, in random order. Measurements of 24 h blood pressure, body weight, 24 h urinary volume, and fasting plasma copeptin were performed at high and low salt consumption. Copeptin increased after a high compared to low dietary salt consumption in all subjects 3,59 ± 2,28 versus 3,12 ± 1,95 (P = 0,02. Copeptin correlated inversely with urinary volume, at both low (r = −0,42; P = 0,001 and high (r = −0,60; P < 0,001 salt consumption, as well as with the change in body weight (r = −0,53; P < 0,001. Systolic salt sensitivity was inversely correlated with salt-induced changes of copeptin, only in females (r = −0,58; P = 0,017. As suppression of copeptin on high versus low salt intake was associated with systolic salt sensitivity in women, our data suggest that high fluid intake and fluid retention may contribute to salt sensitivity.

  18. Unique inhibition of bile salt-induced apoptosis by lecithins and cytoprotective bile salts in immortalized mouse cholangiocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komichi, Daisuke; Tazuma, Susumu; Nishioka, Tomoji; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Une, Mizuho; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2003-12-01

    Bile duct epithelium is physiologically exposed to high concentrations of bile salts, suggesting the presence of a cytoprotective mechanism(s). The aim of this study was to clarify whether bile salts cause bile duct cell damage and to elucidate the mechanism(s) providing protection against such an action of bile salts. Immortalized mouse cholangiocytes were incubated with taurocholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC), taurodeoxycholate, and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC), followed by flow-cytometric analysis and caspase activity assay to evaluate the induction of apoptosis. GCDC time-dependently induced caspase 3 (3.4-fold)- and caspase 9 (1.4-fold)-mediated apoptosis of cholangiocytes, but this was inhibited by lecithins and TUDC. Further, expression of cholangiocyte bile salt transporters (apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter [Asbt] and multidrug resistance protein 3 [Mrp3]) was examined by RT-PCR and western blotting, and cholangiocyte bile salt uptake was determined using radiolabeled bile salts. Expression of cholangiocyte Asbt and Mrp3 was increased by bile salts, whereas lecithins interestingly reduced bile salt uptake to inhibit cholangiocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, bile salts themselves cause cholangiocyte apoptosis when absorbed by and retained inside the cell, but this is inhibited by washing out cytotoxic bile salts according to Mrp3, a rescue exporting molecule. Biliary lecithin is seemingly another cytoprotective player against cytotoxic bile salts, reducing their uptake, and this is associated with a reduced expression of Mrp3.

  19. Gypsum-induced decay in granite monuments in Northwestern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hermo, B.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common forms of decay in granite monuments is the detachment of the superficial layer of the stone (plaques, plaquettes and scales. Previous studies of granite monuments in the northwest Iberian Peninsula revealed a direct relation between this type of weathering and the presence of calcium sulphate, and a mechanism whereby the salt causes this type of decay was suggested. In the present study, various hypotheses as regards the origin of the gypsum found in granite monuments are proposed. The study involved analysis of the contents of ions soluble in water, the results of X-ray diffraction analyses and the ratios of CaO/SO3 in samples of stone, mortar and deposits collected from different monuments. It was concluded that in most cases the gypsum originated from old paintworks or/and from the joint mortars, although inputs from other sources cannot be discounted, as discussed

    Una de las formas de deterioro más frecuente en los monumentos graníticos es la separación de la capa superficial de la piedra (placas, plaquetas y escamas. En trabajos anteriores centrados en monumentos del noroeste de la Península Ibérica, se constató la relación directa entre esta forma de alteración y la presencia de sulfato de calcio y se propuso el mecanismo a través del cual esta sal provoca este tipo de deterioro. En este trabajo se plantean varias hipótesis acerca del origen del yeso encontrado en monumentos graníticos. Para ello se comparan los contenidos de iones solubilizados en agua, los resultados de difracción de rayos X y las relaciones OCa/SO3 de muestras de piedra, morteros y depósitos recogidas en diferentes monumentos. Se llega a la conclusión de que en la mayor parte de los casos el yeso procede de antiguas pinturas o de revestimientos superficiales y de los morteros de juntas entre sillares, pero no se puede descartar la contribución de otros aportes, los cuales se discuten también en este artículo.

  20. Salt-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in Dahl salt-sensitive rats is dependent on elevated blood pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Liu, F.Q.; Ren, K.Y.; Xiao, H.Y. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Cardiovascular Department, Xi' an, China, Cardiovascular Department, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi' an, China, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi' an (China); Yang, Z. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Pathology, Xi' an, China, Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Yuan, Z.Y. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Cardiovascular Department, Xi' an, China, Cardiovascular Department, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi' an, China, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi' an (China)

    2014-03-03

    Dietary salt intake has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence has indicated that salt-sensitive individuals on high salt intake are more likely to develop renal fibrosis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) participates in the development and progression of renal fibrosis in humans and animals. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of a high-salt diet on EMT in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Twenty-four male SS and consomic SS-13{sup BN} rats were randomized to a normal diet or a high-salt diet. After 4 weeks, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and albuminuria were analyzed, and renal fibrosis was histopathologically evaluated. Tubular EMT was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR with E-cadherin and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). After 4 weeks, SBP and albuminuria were significantly increased in the SS high-salt group compared with the normal diet group. Dietary salt intake induced renal fibrosis and tubular EMT as identified by reduced expression of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of α-SMA in SS rats. Both blood pressure and renal interstitial fibrosis were negatively correlated with E-cadherin but positively correlated with α-SMA. Salt intake induced tubular EMT and renal injury in SS rats, and this relationship might depend on the increase in blood pressure.

  1. Regulation of mRNA decay in plant responses to salt and osmotic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawa, D.; Testerink, C.

    Plant acclimation to environmental stresses requires fast signaling to initiate changes in developmental and metabolic responses. Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors and protein kinases acting upstream are important elements of responses to salt and drought. Gene expression can be

  2. Decay of granite monuments due to salt crystallization in a non-polluted urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Talegón, J.

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of salt crystallization on granite (s.l rocks used as building material in an urban environment with low atmospheric pollution was studied. The manners of salt crystallization and the subsequent deterioration caused were analyzed in unweathered granite and other fades which had undergone strong transformations in quarries before being used as stone materials, "alterites".

    Se estudia el efecto de la cristalización de sales solubles en rocas graníticas s.l empleadas como materiales de construcción, en ambiente urbano con baja contaminación atmosférica. Las formas en que cristalizan las sales y el deterioro asociado a su presencia son analizados en granitos sanos y en otras facies que han sufrido fuertes transformaciones en cantera previas a su empleo como materiales de construcción ("alteritas".

  3. Light meson decays from photon-induced reactions with CLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunkel Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoproduction experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer CLAS at the Thomas Jefferson National Facility produce data sets with competitive statistics of light mesons. With these data sets, measurements of transition form factors for η, ω, and η′ mesons via conversion decays can be performed using the invariant mass distribution of the final state dileptons. Tests of fundamental symmetries and information on the light quark mass difference can be performed using a Dalitz plot analysis of the meson decay. An overview of preliminary results, from existing CLAS data, and future prospects within the newly upgraded CLAS12 apparatus are given.

  4. Response of Tomato Genotypes to Induced Salt Stress | Agong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirteen tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) genotypes were subjected to salt treatment under hydroponics and their responses monitored in a set of two experiments with the objective of advancing them as potential salt tolerant tomato scion and/or rootstocks. Salt applications ranged from 0 to 2% NaCl, with the resultant ...

  5. Effects of jet decay rate on jet induced loads on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Warcup, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental modelling of the interaction between a jet and an aircraft wing or fuselage in VTOL aircraft was undertaken using a cold jet exiting perpendicular to a flat plate in a uniform cross-flow. Effects of jet decay rate and jet-to-cross-flow velocity ratio, R, on the induced load distribution were investigated. Jet decay rate was increased by using cylindrical centerbodies submerged in the jet nozzle, which caused nonuniform initial jet velocity profiles. Quicker jet decay rate, corresponding to the presence of a centerbody, resulted in as much as 50% reduction in the induced pressure loads on the plate. This has implications in interpretation of results from earlier VTOL model studies of jet induced loads, where the jets have often had relatively slow decay rates due to uniform initial velocity profiles

  6. Induced chirality of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous bile salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.; Williamson, C.K.; McGown, L.B. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We will discuss the effects of organized bile salt phases on the chirality of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as investigated by transmission circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD). Amphiphilic bile salt monomers form chiral micellar aggregates and should induce interesting changes in the chirality of the PAH probes. The high sensitivity of FDCD allows us to examine the effects of the organized bile salt media on the probe molecule over a large range of concentrations both above and below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the bile salt. The use of chiral bile salt media for FDCD determination of fluorescent analytes will be discussed.

  7. Amplification of salt-induced polymer diffusiophoresis by increasing salting-out strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Michele S; Zhang, Huixiang; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2014-10-21

    The role of salting-out strength on (1) polymer diffusiophoresis from high to low salt concentration, and (2) salt osmotic diffusion from high to low polymer concentration was investigated. These two cross-diffusion phenomena were experimentally characterized by Rayleigh interferometry at 25 °C. Specifically, we report ternary diffusion coefficients for polyethylene glycol (molecular weight, 20 kg·mol(-1)) in aqueous solutions of several salts (NaCl, KCl, NH4Cl, CaCl2, and Na2SO4) as a function of salt concentration at low polymer concentration (0.5% w/w). We also measured polymer diffusion coefficients by dynamic light scattering in order to discuss the interpretation of these transport coefficients in the presence of cross-diffusion effects. Our cross-diffusion results, primarily those on salt osmotic diffusion, were utilized to extract N(w), the number of water molecules in thermodynamic excess around a macromolecule. This preferential-hydration parameter characterizes the salting-out strength of the employed salt. For chloride salts, changing cation has a small effect on N(w). However, replacing NaCl with Na2SO4 (i.e., changing anion) leads to a 3-fold increase in N(w), in agreement with cation and anion Hofmeister series. Theoretical arguments show that polymer diffusiophoresis is directly proportional to the difference N(w) - n(w), where n(w) is the number of water molecules transported by the migrating macromolecule. Interestingly, the experimental ratio, n(w)/N(w), was found to be approximately the same for all investigated salts. Thus, the magnitude of polymer diffusiophoresis is also proportional to salting-out strength as described by N(w). A basic hydrodynamic model was examined in order to gain physical insight on the role of n(w) in particle diffusiophoresis and explain the observed invariance of n(w)/N(w). Finally, we consider a steady-state diffusion problem to show that concentration gradients of strong salting-out agents such as Na2SO4 can

  8. Salt-induced release of lipase from polyelectrolyte complex micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, Saskia; de Vries, Renko; Schweins, Ralf; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem

    2009-01-01

    With the aim to gain insight into the possible applicability of protein-filled polyelectrolyte complex micelles under physiological salt conditions, we studied the behavior of these micelles as a function of salt concentration. The micelles form by electrostatically driven co-assembly from strong

  9. Attenuation of salt-induced hypertension by aqueous calyx extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The MAP of salt+HS and control rats did not differ significantly and the effect of HS was comparable to furosemide. The pressor response to noradrenalin or vasodilator response to acetylcholine remained similar in all groups. These results suggest that HS attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension and this ...

  10. Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water

    CERN Document Server

    Barmina, E V; Timashev, S F; Shafeev, G A

    2013-01-01

    The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 10E10-10E13 Watts per square centimeter. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

  11. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  12. Free radical scavenging reverses fructose-induced salt-sensitive hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenner ZP

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary P Zenner, Kevin L Gordish, William H Beierwaltes Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Research Division, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: We have previously reported that a moderate dietary supplementation of 20% fructose but not glucose leads to a salt-sensitive hypertension related to increased proximal sodium–hydrogen exchanger activity and increased renal sodium retention. We also found that while high salt increased renal nitric oxide formation, this was retarded in the presence of fructose intake. We hypothesized that at least part of the pathway leading to fructose-induced salt-sensitive hypertension could be due to fructose-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and inappropriate stimulation of renin secretion, all of which would contribute to an increase in blood pressure. We found that both 20% fructose intake and a high-salt diet stimulated 8-isoprostane excretion. The superoxide dismutase (SOD mimetic tempol significantly reduced this elevated excretion. Next, we placed rats on a high-salt diet (4% for 1 week in combination with normal rat chow or 20% fructose with or without chronic tempol administration. A fructose plus high-salt diet induced a rapid increase (15 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and reversed high salt suppression of plasma renin activity. Tempol treatment reversed the pressor response and restored high salt suppression of renin. We conclude that fructose-induced salt-sensitive hypertension is driven by increased renal reactive oxygen species formation associated with salt retention and an enhanced renin–angiotensin system. Keywords: reactive oxygen species, tempol, sodium, renin, oxidative stress

  13. Interannual Variability of the Sea-Ice-Induced Salt Flux in the Greenland Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Coon, M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The Greenland Sea is one of the few places in the World Ocean where deep convection takes place. The convection process is initiated by a density increase originating from rapid cooling and/or a salt flux to the upper layer of the ocean due to brine rejection from ice formation (Rudels, 1990......; Visbeck and others, 1995). The predominant ice types in the Greenland Sea arc frazil/grease ice and pancake ice. A numerical model has been developed relating ice formation and decay of these ice types as observed by the SMMR and SSM/I microwave radiometers and evaluating their contribution to salt...... redistribution in the Greenland Sea. The model has been used to calculate spatial distribution of the annual integrated net salt flux to the Greenland Sea from ice production and advection for the period 1979-97....

  14. Characterization of Salt-Induced Epigenetic Segregation by Genome-Wide Loss of Heterozygosity and its Association with Salt Tolerance in Rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In a breeding effort to develop salt tolerant (ST rice varieties by designed QTL pyramiding, large numbers of progenies derived from four crosses between salt- or drought- tolerant BC2F5 IR64 introgression lines, were subjected to severe salt stress, resulting in 422 ST plants. The progeny testing of the selected F3 lines under more severe salt stress resulted in identification of 16 promising homozygous lines with high levels of ST. Genetic characterization of the 422 ST F3 progeny and 318 random F2 plants from the same four crosses using 105 segregating SSR markers lead to three interesting discoveries: (1 salt stress can induce genome-wide epigenetic segregation (ES characterized by complete loss of heterozygosity (LOH and nearly complete loss of an allele (LOA in the F3 progenies of four rice populations in a single generation; (2 ∼25% of the stress-induced ES loci were transgenerational and inherited from their salt- and drought- selected parents; and (3 the salt-induced LOH and LOA loci (regions appeared to contain genes/alleles associated with ST and/or drought tolerance. 32 genomic regions that showed one or more types of salt-induced ES in the random and salt-selected progenies from these crosses. The same or different types of ES were detected with two large genomic regions on chromosomes 1 and 6 where more and the strongest ES were found across different populations. 14 genomic regions were found where the salt-induced ES regions were overlapping with QTL affecting ST related traits. The discovery of the three types of salt-induced ES showed several interesting characteristics and had important implications in evolution and future breeding for developing stress-resilient rice and crops.

  15. The role of chemokine ligand 16 in high salt induced myocardial remodeling in salt sensitive hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-li LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16 in high salt induced myocardial remodeling in salt sensitive hypertensive rats. Methods Sixty-four Dahl salt sensitive (Dahl-SS rats were randomly divided into normal salt (NS, 0.3% NaCl and high salt (HS, 8.0% NaCl group, 32 rats for each group. Blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff method every week. Hearts were harvested and the expression of CXCL16 in heart tissues was detected by Western blotting at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week after NS or HS feeding. Immunofluorescence double staining was used to detect the colocalization of CXCL16 with both cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical staining were used to detect the expression of CXCL16 and the biomarker of macrophage in the myocardial tissue after 6 week and 8 week of NS or HS feeding. Myocardial fibrosis was evaluated by HE and Masson trichrome staining. Results Compared with that in NS group, the systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in HS group increased significantly after 1 week of HS feeding (147.10±3.67mmHg vs128.57±6.32mmHg, P<0.01 and 110.86±4.24mmHg vs90.69±4.51mmHg, P<0.01, respectively. HS feeding significantly increased the myocardial CXCL16 expression in rats of HS group at the 6th week (1.18±0.05 vs0.58±0.02, P<0.05, and the expression of CXCL16 was further up-regulated at the 8th week (1.43±0.06 vs0.67±0.03, P<0.05. At the 8th week, obvious fibrosis remodeling and macrophage infiltration appeared in the myocardial tissue of the rats in HS group. Conclusion High salt intervention could up-regulate the expression of CXCL16 in salt sensitive hypertensive myocardial remodeling, which may promote macrophage infiltration and participate in the pathological process of myocardial fibrosis accordingly. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.11.04

  16. Prevention of salt induced hypertension in rats by oral administration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A high salt diet can elevate blood pressure in humans and other susceptible animal species. A high proportion of our indigenous foods are fermented products and. Lactobacillus species have been reported to be the predominant flora in many of our indigenous fermentation processes. In this study, the effect of concurrent ...

  17. Identification of genes induced by salt stress from Medicago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... BADH, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. salinity. Increased salinization of arable land is expected expected to have devastating global effects, with predictions of 30% land loss within the next 25 years, and up to 50% by the year 2050 (Wang et al., 2003).This has led to the research of salt stress with the ...

  18. Attenuation of salt-induced changes in photosynthesis by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In parallel, NO application in salt-stressed plants attenuated the decrease in the photosynthetic parameters such as leaf chlorophyll, net photosynthetic rate (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration rate (E), the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence (Fv/Fm), electron transport rate (ETR), the efficiency of excitation ...

  19. Salt stress induced changes in germination, lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seeds of four lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) genotypes viz., Great Lakes (GL), Paris Island cos, Kagraner Sommer (KS) and Isadora were assessed for their response to salt at the germination and seedling stages. The germination rate of the four varieties was comparatively studied under 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mM sodium ...

  20. Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increase in Na+ was positively related to total soluble sugars, resulting in an osmotic adjustment of the membrane that maintained water availability. The accumulation of sugars in PT1 roots may be a primary salt-defense mechanism and may function as an osmotic control. Key words: Mannitol, membrane injury, ...

  1. Identification of salt-stress induced differentially expressed genes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the identification of some novel genes – such as SnRK1-type protein kinase; 17 kDa, class I, small heat shock protein; and RNase S-like protein precursor genes – may offer a new avenue for better understanding the salt stress response in plants, knowledge which might be helpful for developing future strategies.

  2. Mechanisms of radiation induced cationic polymerization in the presence of onium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, E.; Sundell, P. E.; Hult, A.; Jönsson, S. E.

    1995-11-01

    Cationic polymerization of various monomers in the presence of onium salts were induced by hv, EB and γ irradiation. The mechanism for the initiation process involves the photoreduction of onium salts by a direct photolysis or by an indirect redox reaction from organic free radicals or solvated electrons depending on the reduction potentials of the onium salts. For EB and γ irradiation only solvated electrons were capable of reducing the onium salts with reduction potentials lower than approximately -100 kJ/mol. An enhanced production of protons and/or carbenium ions takes place if the reduction potentials of the onium salts are higher than -60 kJ/mol. This paper will give some indications of useful onium structures that fulfill the needs in EB and γ induced cationic polymerization. Typical examples are fragmenting type of dialkylphenacyl and cyclic ringopening phenacylic sulfonium salts. The influence of typical "polymer or monomer backbone" structural groups, such as esters and ethers on the proton formation under high energy irradiation, was studied by UV spectroscopy at 540 nm. The formation of acid was monitored in the presence of various onium salts, and α-naphtylred was used as an indicator. By comparing aromatic versus aliphatic structural group influences on the generation of protons and carbenium ions a good correlation was found between experimental data and theoretical calculations on nucleophilicity, electron charge density distributions and electron scavenging effects by the use of simplified Hückel calculations (SHMO).

  3. Electrolyte content of serum, erythrocyte, kidney and heart tissue in salt induced hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, T; Mumtaz, M; Haleem, M A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of salt load on the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and electrolyte levels of serum, erythrocyte, kidney and heart tissue was studied in rats. NaCl treatment increased sodium (5.69 +/- 0.4 mmol/L p electrolyte levels of erythrocytes, serum, heart and kidney tissues in NaCl loaded rats may play a definite role in the development of salt induced hypertension.

  4. Reactions of gem-Difluorinated Phosphonium Salts Induced by Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panferova, Liubov I; Tsymbal, Artem V; Levin, Vitalij V; Struchkova, Marina I; Dilman, Alexander D

    2016-03-04

    gem-Difluorinated phosphonium salts, which are readily obtained from aldehydes and difluoromethylene phosphobetaine, can serve as a source of radicals under reductive conditions. An iridium complex or Hantzsch ester was used as a one-electron reducing agent when irradiated with visible light. The fluorinated radicals were trapped with various alkenes, leading to products either via a photoredox cycle (for the iridium catalyst) or via a hydrogen atom transfer (for the Hantzsch ester).

  5. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

  6. Attenuation of salt-induced hypertension by aqueous calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojiminiyi, F B O; Audu, Z; Etuk, E U; Ajagbonna, O P

    2012-12-18

    The aqueous calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) has a folk reputation as an antihypertensive agent. On account of its antioxidant properties and probably high K+ concentration, we hypothesized that HS may attenuate the development of salt-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8 each) were treated for 12 weeks as follows: control (normal diet + water), salt-loaded (8% salt diet + water), HS (normal diet + 6 mg/ml HS), salt+HS (8% salt diet + 6 mg/ml HS) and furosemide (normal diet+ 0.25mg/Kg furosemide). Their blood pressure and heart rates were measured and responses to noradrenalin and acetylcholine (0.01 mg/kg respectively) were estimated. The cationic concentration of 6 mg/ml HS was determined. The Na+ and K+ concentrations of 6 mg/ml HS were 3.6 and 840 mmol/l respectively. The mean arterial pressure (MAP±SEM; mmHg) of salt loaded rats (184.6±29.8) was significantly higher than control (113.2±3.0; P<0.05), HS (90.0±7.4; P<0.001) salt+HS (119.4±8.9; P<0.05) and furosemide (94.9±11.5; P<0.01). The MAP of salt+HS and control rats did not differ significantly and the effect of HS was comparable to furosemide. The pressor response to noradrenalin or vasodilator response to acetylcholine remained similar in all groups. These results suggest that HS attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension and this attenuation may be associated with its high K+ content or high potassium: sodium ratio and not with altered pressor/depressor response to noradrenalin or acetylcholine. Also the effects of HS and furosemide on blood pressure are comparable.

  7. Inducing salt tolerance in sweet corn by magnetic priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Karimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates seed germination and growth of sweet corn under NaCl stress (0, 50, and 100 mM, after exposing the seeds to weak (15 mT or strong (150 mT magnetic fields (MF for different durations (0, 6, 12, and 24 hours. Salinity reduced seed germination and plant growth. MF treatments enhanced rate and percentage of germination and improved plant growth, regardless of salinity. Higher germination rate was obtained by the stronger MF, however, the seedling were more vigorous after priming with 15 mT MF. Proline accumulation was observed in parallel with the loss of plant water content under 100 mM NaCl stress. MF prevented proline accumulation by improving water absorption. Positive correlation between H2O2 accumulation and membrane thermostability (MTI was found after MF treatments, which revealed that MF primed the plant for salinity by H2O2 signaling. However, over-accumulation of H2O2 after prolonged MF exposure adversely affected MTI under severe salt stress. In conclusion, magnetic priming for 6 hours was suggested for enhancing germination and growth of sweet corn under salt stress.

  8. Hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Hong-Ying

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. Salvianolic acid B and Matrine has long been used to treat liver fibrosis. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt is a new compound containing Salvianolic acid B and Matrine. Hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4 was studied in animal models using Wistar rats. Organ coefficient, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, hexadecenoic acid (HA, laminin (LN, hydroxyproline (Hyp, and glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD in liver tissues were measured, respectively. Histopathological changes in the livers were studied by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining and Masson Trichrome (MT examination. The expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was observed by immunohistochemical analysis. A significant reduction in serum levels of AST, ALT, HA, LN and Hyp was observed in the Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treated groups, suggesting that the salt had hepatoprotective effects. The depletion of GSH and SOD, as well as MDA accumulation in liver tissues was suppressed by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt too. The expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA measured by immunohistology was significantly reduced by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt in a dose-dependent manner. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treatment attenuated the necro-inflammation and fibrogenesis induced by CCl4 injection, and thus it is promising as a therapeutic anti-fibrotic agent against hepatic fibrosis.

  9. Microwave-induced Bismuth Salts-mediated Synthesis of Molecules of Medicinal Interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Chavez, Ashlee; Banik, Bimal K

    2017-01-01

    Bismuth salts-mediated reactions have become a powerful tool for the synthesis of diverse medicinally-significant compounds because of their low-toxicity (non-toxic) and Lewis acidic capacity. In fact, LD50 of bismuth nitrate is lower than table salt. On the other hand, microwave-induced chemical synthesis is considered as a major greener route in modern chemistry. A total of 139 publications (including a few authentic web links) have been reviewed mainly to discuss bismuth salts-induced electrophilic aromatic substitution, protection-deprotection chemistry of carbonyl compounds, enamination, oxidation, carbohydrate chemistry, hydrolysis, addition-elimination route, Paal-Knorr reaction, Clauson-kaas synthesis, Michael addition, aza-Michael addition, Hantzsch reaction, Biginelli reaction, Ferrier rearrangement, Pechmann condensation, Diels-Alder and aza-Diels- Alder reactions, as well as effects of microwave irradiation in a wide range of chemical transformations. Bismuth salts-mediated reactions are developed for the synthesis of diverse organic molecules of medicinal significance. Reactions conducted with bismuth salts are environmentally benign, economical, rapid and high yielding. Microwave irradiation has accelerated these reactions significantly. It is believed that bismuth salts released corresponding acids in the media during the reaction. However, a coordination of bismuth salt to the electronegative atom is also observed in the NMR study. Bismuth has much less control (less attractive forces) over anions (for example, halides, nitrate, sulfate and triflates) compared to alkali metals. Therefore, it forms weak bond with electronegative atoms more readily and facilitates the reactions significantly. Many products obtained via bismuth salts-mediated reactions are medicinally active or intermediate for the synthesis of biologically active molecules including antifungal, anti-parasitic, anticancer and antibacterial agents, as well as agents to prevent

  10. Bath Salt-Induced Psychosis: Nursing Assessment, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Brandie Marie; Fish, Anne F; Cook, Cynthia A; Silva, Victor

    2016-01-01

    To review what is known about the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of patients with bath salt-induced psychosis. Comprehensive review and synthesis of research, case reports, and state-level data. Of the 42 case reports found, only 18 confirmed the presence of bath salts through laboratory testing. Twelve of the confirmed cases died. In most of the case reports, law enforcement was involved prior to hospitalization due to bizarre behaviors, delusions, and hallucinations. Due to the severity of both physical and psychological symptoms in patients in bath salt-induced psychosis, nurses, other healthcare providers, police, and hospital security personnel must work collaboratively to provide safe care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distribution after shutdown in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Koichi [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Research Lab.; Satoh, Satoshi; Hayashi, Katsumi; Yamada, Koubun; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1997-03-01

    Induced activity, decay heat and dose rate distributions after shutdown were estimated for 1MWa/m{sup 2} operation in ITER. The activity in the inboard blanket one day after shutdown is 1.5x10{sup 11}Bq/cm{sup 3}, and the average decay heating rate 0.01w/cm{sup 3}. The dose rate outside the 120cm thick concrete biological shield is two order higher than the design criterion of 5{mu}Sv/h. This indicates that the biological shield thickness should be enhanced by 50cm in concrete, that is, total thickness 170cm for workers to enter the reactor room and to perform maintenance. (author)

  12. Search for Perturbations of Nuclear Decay Rates Induced by Reactor Electron Antineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, V E; Bryan, C D; Cinko, N; Deichert, G G; Gruenwald, J T; Heim, J M; Kaplan, H B; LaZur, R; Neff, D; Nistor, J M; Sahelijo, N; Fischbach, E

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment conducted near the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, designed to address the question of whether a flux of reactor-generated electron antineutrinos can alter the rates of weak nuclear interaction-induced decays for Mn-54, Na-22, and Co-60. This experiment, while quite sensitive, cannot exclude perturbations less than one or two parts in $10^4$ in $\\beta$ decay (or electron capture) processes, in the presence of an antineutrino flux of $3\\times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The present experimental methods are applicable to a wide range of isotopes. Improved sensitivity in future experiments may be possible if we can understand and reduce the dominant systematic uncertainties.

  13. Attenuation of salt-induced hypertension by aqueous calyx extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: The aqueous calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) has a folk reputation as an antihypertensive agent. On account of its antioxidant properties and probably high K+ concentration, we hypothesized that HS may attenuate the development of salt-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8 each) were ...

  14. Interactions of PPAR α and GLUT4 in DOCA/salt-induced renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    resistance and reduce capacity for glucose uptake in muscles. The present study was designed to evaluate the interactions of PPARα and GLUT4 in a model of hypertensive renal injury by studying deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt induced hypertension in wild-type (WT) and PPARα knockout (KO) mice. PPARα WT ...

  15. On the salt-induced activation of lyophilized enzymes in organic solvents: Effect of salt kosmotropicity on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, M.T.; Hirokane, S.Y.; Lo, A.S.; Dordick, J.S.; Reimer, J.A.; Clark, D.S.

    2000-03-01

    The dramatic activation of enzymes in nonaqueous media upon co-lyophilization with simple inorganic salts has been investigated as a function of the Jones-Dole B coefficient, a thermodynamic parameter for characterizing the salt's affinity for water and its chaotropic (water-structure breaking) or kosmotropic (water-structure making) character. In general, the water content, active-site content, and transesterification activity of freeze-dried subtilisin Carlsberg preparations containing >96% w/w salt increased with increasing kosmotropicity of the activating salt. Degrees of activation relative to the salt-free enzyme ranged from 33-fold for chaotropic sodium iodide to 2,480-fold for kosmotropic sodium acetate. Exceptions to the general trend can be explained by the mechanical properties and freezing characteristics of the salts undergoing lyophilization. The profound activating effect can thus be attributed in part to the stabilizing (salting-out) effect of kosmotropic salts and the phenomenon of preferential hydration.

  16. Search for X-ray induced decay of the 31-yr isomer of 178Hf using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I; Banar, J C; Becker, J A; Bredeweg, T A; Cooper, J R; Gemmell, D S; Kraemer, A; Mashayekhi, A; McNabb, D P; Miller, G G; Moore, E F; Palmer, P; Pangault, L N; Rundberg, R S; Schiffer, J P; Shastri, S D; Wang, T F; Wilhelmy, J B

    2004-09-13

    Isomeric {sup 178}Hf (t{sub 1/2} = 31 yr, E{sub x} = 2.446 MeV, J{sup {pi}} = 16{sup +}) was bombarded by a white beam of x-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. A search was made for x-ray induced decay of the isomer by detecting prompt and delayed {gamma} rays associated with the decay. No induced decay was observed. Upper limits for such a process for x-ray energies between 7-100 keV were set. The limits between 7 and 30 keV are below {approx} 3 x 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}-keV for induced decay that bypasses the 4-s isomer and {approx} 5 x 10{sup -27} cm{sup 2}-keV for induced decay that is delayed through this isomer, orders of magnitude below values at which induced decay was reported previously. These limits are consistent with what is known about the properties of atomic nuclei.

  17. Impaired flow-induced arterial remodeling in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemkens, Pieter; Nelissen, Jelly; Meens, Merlijn J P M T

    2012-01-01

    )-salt hypertension in rats, a model for an upregulated endothelin-1 system. Mesenteric small arteries (MrA) were exposed to low blood flow (LF) or high blood flow (HF) for 4 or 7 weeks. The bioavailability of vasoactive peptides was modified by chronic treatment of the rats with the dual neutral endopeptidase (NEP...... arteries but reduced the infiltration of monocyte/macrophages. We show for the first time that flow-induced remodeling is impaired during the development of DOCA-salt hypertension and that this can be prevented by chronic NEP/ECE inhibition....

  18. CP violation induced by the double resonance for pure annihilation decay process in perturbative QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue, Gang; Li, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Yu-Ting [Henan University of Technology, College of Science, Zhengzhou (China); Lu, Ye [Guangxi Normal University, Department of Physics, Guilin (China)

    2017-08-15

    In a perturbative QCD approach we study the direct CP violation in the pure annihilation decay process of anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -} induced by the ρ and ω double resonance effect. Generally, the CP violation is small in the pure annihilation type decay process. However, we find that the CP violation can be enhanced by double ρ-ω interference when the invariant masses of the π{sup +}π{sup -} pairs are in the vicinity of the ω resonance. For the decay process of anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -}, the CP violation can reach A{sub CP}(anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -}) = 27.20{sup +0.05+0.28+7.13}{sub -0.15-0.31-6.11}%. (orig.)

  19. Electrokinetic removal of Ca(NO3)2 from bricks to avoid salt induced decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2007-01-01

    the experiments but the experimental setup did not successfully prevent acid from the brick surface in front of the anode. It was found that the brick itself had a buffering capacity against acidification, and involved in the buffering reaction may have been a release of calcium. This contact with acid...

  20. Korean Solar Salt Ameliorates Colon Carcinogenesis in an AOM/DSS-Induced C57BL/6 Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jaehyun; Kim, Yeung-Ju; Park, Eui Seong; Park, Kun-Young

    2017-06-01

    The effects of Korean solar salt on an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon cancer C57BL/6 mouse model were studied. Korean solar salt samples (SS-S, solar salt from S salt field; SS-Yb, solar salt from Yb salt field), nine-time-baked bamboo salt (BS-9x, made from SS-Yb), purified salt (PS), and SS-G (solar salt from Guérande, France) were orally administered at a concentration of 1% during AOM/DSS colon cancer induction, and compared for their protective effects during colon carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice. SS-S and SS-Yb suppressed colon length shortening and tumor counts in mouse colons. Histological evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining also revealed suppression of tumorigenesis by SS-S. Conversely, PS and SS-G did not show a similar suppressive efficacy as Korean solar salt. SS-S and SS-Yb promoted colon mRNA expression of an apoptosis-related factor and cell-cycle-related gene and suppressed pro-inflammatory factor. SS-Yb baked into BS-9x further promoted these anti-carcinogenic efficacies. Taken together, the results indicate that Korean solar salt, especially SS-S and SS-Yb, exhibited anti-cancer activity by modulating apoptosis- and inflammation-related gene expression during colon carcinogenesis in mice, and bamboo salt baked from SS-Yb showed enhanced anti-cancer functionality.

  1. Far field velocity potential induced by a rapidly decaying vorticity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rupert; Ting, LU

    1990-01-01

    The velocity field induced by a vorticity distribution decaying rapidly in the distance from the origin is investigated. It is shown that the sum of vector potentials for the velocity field can be expressed as a linear combination of Mn values, where Mn denotes the number of linearly independent vector functions of nth order. It is then shown that only the linear combinations 2n + 1 of these Mn vector functions contribute to the far field velocity which is irrotational, and that the corresponding scalar potential is then represented by a linear combination of 2n + 1 spherical harmonics of nth order whose coefficients are linear combinations of nth moments of vorticity.

  2. Caleosin from Chlorella vulgaris TISTR 8580 is salt-induced and heme-containing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charuchinda, Pairpilin; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Yamada, Daisuke; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and functional properties of lipid droplet-associated proteins in algae remain scarce. We report here the caleosin gene from Chlorella vulgaris encodes a protein of 279 amino acid residues. Amino acid sequence alignment showed high similarity to the putative caleosins from fungi, but less to plant caleosins. When the C. vulgaris TISTR 8580 cells were treated with salt stress (0.3 M NaCl), the level of triacylglycerol increased significantly. The mRNA contents for caleosin in Chlorella cells significantly increased under salt stress condition. Caleosin gene was expressed in E. coli. Crude extract of E. coli cells exhibited the cumene hydroperoxide-dependent oxidation of aniline. Absorption spectroscopy showed a peak around 415 nm which was decreased upon addition of cumene hydroperoxide. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggests caleosin existed as the oligomer. These data indicate that a fresh water C. vulgaris TISTR 8580 contains a salt-induced heme-protein caleosin.

  3. High dietary salt intake exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Jennifer A; Radin, Jana N; Loh, John T; Zhang, Feng; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2013-06-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA(+) H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and maintained the animals on a regular diet or a high-salt diet. At 4 months postinfection, gastric adenocarcinoma was detected in 100% of the WT-infected/high-salt-diet animals, 58% of WT-infected/regular-diet animals, and none of the animals infected with the cagA mutant strain (P diet had more severe gastric inflammation, higher gastric pH, increased parietal cell loss, increased gastric expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and decreased gastric expression of hepcidin and hydrogen potassium ATPase (H,K-ATPase) compared to those on a regular diet. Previous studies have detected upregulation of CagA synthesis in response to increased salt concentrations in the bacterial culture medium, and, concordant with the in vitro results, we detected increased cagA transcription in vivo in animals fed a high-salt diet compared to those on a regular diet. Animals infected with the cagA mutant strain had low levels of gastric inflammation and did not develop hypochlorhydria. These results indicate that a high-salt diet potentiates the carcinogenic effects of cagA(+) H. pylori strains.

  4. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Attenuates Salt-Induced Hypertension and Kidney Injury in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Wollner, Clayton; Kurth, Theresa; Bukowy, John D; Cowley, Allen W

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore the protective effects of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) inhibition by rapamycin on salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We have previously demonstrated that H 2 O 2 is elevated in the kidneys of SS rats. The present study showed a significant upregulation of renal mTORC1 activity in the SS rats fed a 4.0% NaCl for 3 days. In addition, renal interstitial infusion of H 2 O 2 into salt-resistant Sprague Dawley rats for 3 days was also found to stimulate mTORC1 activity independent of a rise of arterial blood pressure. Together, these data indicate that the salt-induced increases of renal H 2 O 2 in SS rats activated the mTORC1 pathway. Daily administration of rapamycin (IP, 1.5 mg/kg per day) for 21 days reduced salt-induced hypertension from 176.0±9.0 to 153.0±12.0 mm Hg in SS rats but had no effect on blood pressure salt sensitivity in Sprague Dawley treated rats. Compared with vehicle, rapamycin reduced albumin excretion rate in SS rats from 190.0±35.0 to 37.0±5.0 mg/d and reduced the renal infiltration of T lymphocytes (CD3 + ) and macrophages (ED1 + ) in the cortex and medulla. Renal hypertrophy and cell proliferation were also reduced in rapamycin-treated SS rats. We conclude that enhancement of intrarenal H 2 O 2 with a 4.0% NaCl diet stimulates the mTORC1 pathway that is necessary for the full development of the salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in the SS rat. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Jasmonate mediates salt-induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonate (JA, as an important signal, plays a key role in multiple processes of plant growth, development and stress response. Nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. are essential secondary metabolites. Whether environmental factors control nicotine biosynthesis and the underlying mechanism remains previously unreported. Here, we applied physiological and biochemical approaches to investigate how salt stress affects nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco. We found that salt stress induced the biosynthesis of JA, which subsequently triggered the activation of JA-responsive gene expression and, ultimately, nicotine synthesis. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the existence of many NtMYC2a-recognized G-box motifs in the promoter regions of NtLOX, NtAOS, NtAOC and NtOPR genes. Applying exogenous JA increased nicotine content, while suppressing JA biosynthesis reduced nicotine biosynthesis. Salt treatment could not efficiently induce nicotine biosynthesis in transgenic anti-COI1 tobacco plants. These results demonstrate that JA acts as the essential signal which triggers nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco after salt stress.

  6. Salt-stress induced physiological and proteomic changes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaa, Arafet; Ahmed, Hela Ben; Smiti, Samira; Faurobert, Mireille

    2011-11-01

    Soil salinity is one of the major abiotic stress limiting crop productivity and the geographical distribution of many important crops worldwide. To gain a better understanding of the salinity stress responses at physiological and molecular level in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. cv. Supermarmande), we carried out a comparative physiological and proteomic analysis. The tomato seedlings were cultivated using a hydroponic system in the controlled environment growth chamber. The salt stress (NaCl) was applied (0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 mM), and maintained for 14 days. Salt treatment induced a plant growth reduction estimated as fresh-dry weight. Photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, b) content of NaCl-treated tomato plants was significantly decreased as the salinity level increased. Proline accumulation levels in leaf and root tissues increased significantly with increasing NaCl concentration. Relative electrolyte leakage known as an indicator of membrane damage caused by salt stress was increased proportionally according to the NaCl concentrations. Roots of control and salt-stressed plants were also sampled for phenol protein extraction. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE). Several proteins showed up- and downregulation during salt stress. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis and database searching of some of the identified proteins indicated that the proteins are known to be in a wide range of physiological processes, that is, energy metabolism, ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging and detoxification, protein translation, processing and degradation, signal transduction, hormone and amino acid metabolism, and cell wall modifications. All proteins might work cooperatively to reestablish cellular homeostasis under salt stress, water deficiency, and ionic toxicity.

  7. Salt-induced root protein profile changes in seedlings of maize inbred lines with differing salt tolerances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress is one of the severest growth limited-factors to agriculture production. To gain in-depth knowledge of salt-stress response mechanisms, the proteomics analysis from two maize (Zea mays L. inbred lines was carried out using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. There were 57 salt-regulated proteins identified, 21 and 36 proteins were differentially regulated in inbred lines 'Nongda 1145' (salt-resistant and 'D340' (salt-sensitive, respectively. The identified proteins were distributed in 11 biological processes and seven molecular functions. Under salt stress, proteins related to antioxidation and lignin synthesis were increased in both inbred lines. The relative abundance of proteins involved in translation initiation, elongation, and protein proteolysis increased in 'Nongda 1145' and decreased in 'D340'. In addition, the abundance of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, protein refolding, ATP synthase and transcription differed between the two inbred lines. Our results suggest that the enhanced ability of salt-tolerant inbred line 'Nongda 1145' to combat salt stress occurs via regulation of transcription factors promoting increased antioxidation and lignin biosynthesis, enhanced energy production, and acceleration of protein translation and protein proteolysis.

  8. Salt stress-induced changes in antioxidative defense system and proteome profiles of salt-tolerant and sensitive Frankia strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amrita; Singh, Anumeha; Singh, Satya S; Mishra, Arun K

    2017-04-16

    An appreciation of comparative microbial survival is most easily done while evaluating their adaptive strategies during stress. In the present experiment, antioxidative and whole cell proteome variations based on spectrophotometric analysis and SDS-PAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis have been analysed among salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive Frankia strains. This is the first report of proteomic basis underlying salt tolerance in these newly isolated Frankia strains from Hippophae salicifolia D. Don. Salt-tolerant strain HsIi10 shows higher increment in the contents of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase as compared to salt-sensitive strain HsIi8. Differential 2-DGE profile has revealed differential profiles for salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive strains. Proteomic confirmation of salt tolerance in the strains with inbuilt efficiency of thriving in nitrogen-deficient locales is a definite advantage for these microbes. This would be equally beneficial for improvement of soil nitrogen status. Efficient protein regulation in HsIi10 suggests further exploration for its potential use as biofertilizer in saline soils.

  9. The clinically approved drugs dasatinib and bosutinib induce anti-inflammatory macrophages by inhibiting the salt-inducible kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanne, James; Prescott, Alan R; Clark, Kristopher

    2015-01-15

    Macrophages switch to an anti-inflammatory, 'regulatory'-like phenotype characterized by the production of high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to promote the resolution of inflammation. A potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases would be to administer drugs that could induce the formation of 'regulatory'-like macrophages at sites of inflammation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the clinically approved cancer drugs bosutinib and dasatinib induce several hallmark features of 'regulatory'-like macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with bosutinib or dasatinib elevates the production of IL-10 while suppressing the production of IL-6, IL-12p40 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Moreover, macrophages treated with bosutinib or dasatinib express higher levels of markers of 'regulatory'-like macrophages including LIGHT, SPHK1 and arginase 1. Bosutinib and dasatinib were originally developed as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinases Bcr-Abl and Src but we show that, surprisingly, the effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on macrophage polarization are the result of the inhibition of the salt-inducible kinases. Consistent with the present finding, bosutinib and dasatinib induce the dephosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 3 (CRTC3) and its nuclear translocation where it induces a cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene transcription programme including that of IL-10. Importantly, these effects of bosutinib and dasatinib on IL-10 gene expression are lost in macrophages expressing a drug-resistant mutant of salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2). In conclusion, our study identifies the salt-inducible kinases as major targets of bosutinib and dasatinib that mediate the effects of these drugs on the innate immune system and provides novel mechanistic insights into the anti-inflammatory properties

  10. Environmental Heat and Salt Stress Induce Transgenerational Phenotypic Changes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Léonie; Widmer, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Plants that can adapt their phenotype may be more likely to survive changing environmental conditions. Heritable epigenetic variation could provide a way to rapidly adapt to such changes. Here we tested whether environmental stress induces heritable, potentially adaptive phenotypic changes independent of genetic variation over few generations in Arabidopsis thaliana. We grew two accessions (Col-0, Sha-0) of A. thaliana for three generations under salt, heat and control conditions and tested for induced heritable phenotypic changes in the fourth generation (G4) and in reciprocal F1 hybrids generated in generation three. Using these crosses we further tested whether phenotypic changes were maternally or paternally transmitted. In generation five (G5), we assessed whether phenotypic effects persisted over two generations in the absence of stress. We found that exposure to heat stress in previous generations accelerated flowering under G4 control conditions in Sha-0, but heritable effects disappeared in G5 after two generations without stress exposure. Previous exposure to salt stress increased salt tolerance in one of two reciprocal F1 hybrids. Transgenerational effects were maternally and paternally inherited. Lacking genetic variability, maternal and paternal inheritance and reversibility of transgenerational effects together indicate that stress can induce heritable, potentially adaptive phenotypic changes, probably through epigenetic mechanisms. These effects were strongly dependent on plant genotype and may not be a general response to stress in A. thaliana. PMID:23585834

  11. Central Diabetes Insipidus and Cisplatin-Induced Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome: A Challenging Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Gerard; Hansford, Jordan R; Duke, Trevor

    2016-05-01

    We describe a 2-year-old female with a suprasellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central diabetes insipidus (DI) who developed polyuria with natriuresis and subsequent hyponatremia 36 hr after cisplatin administration. The marked urinary losses of sodium in combination with a negative sodium balance led to the diagnosis of cisplatin-induced renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS). The subsequent clinical management is very challenging. Four weeks later she was discharged from ICU without neurological sequela. The combination of cisplatin-induced RSWS with DI can be confusing and needs careful clinical assessment as inaccurate diagnosis and management can result in increased neurological injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Isolation and functional characterization of salt-stress induced RCI2-like genes from Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ruicai; Zhang, Fan; Li, Zhenyi; Li, Mingna; Cong, Lili; Kang, Junmei; Zhang, Tiejun; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qingchuan

    2015-07-01

    Salt stress is one of the most significant adverse abiotic factors, causing crop failure worldwide. So far, a number of salt stress-induced genes, and genes improving salt tolerance have been characterized in a range of plants. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a salt stress-induced Medicago sativa (alfalfa) gene (MsRCI2A), which showed a high similarity to the yeast plasma membrane protein 3 gene (PMP3) and Arabidopsis RCI2A. The sequence comparisons revealed that five genes of MtRCI2(A-E) showed a high similarity to MsRCI2A in the Medicago truncatula genome. MsRCI2A and MtRCI2(A-E) encode small, highly hydrophobic proteins containing two putative transmembrane domains, predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. The transcript analysis results suggest that MsRCI2A and MtRCI2(A-D) genes are highly induced by salt stress. The expression of MsRCI2A and MtRCI2(A-C) in yeast mutants lacking the PMP3 gene can functionally complement the salt sensitivity phenotype resulting from PMP3 deletion. Overexpression of MsRCI2A in Arabidopsis plants showed improved salt tolerance suggesting the important role of MsRCI2A in salt stress tolerance in alfalfa.

  13. Direct and mixing-induced CP violation in charmless two-body B decays.

    CERN Document Server

    Derkach, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The recent analyses performed by the LHCb collaboration in the sector of the charmless two-body B-decays. The following analyses are included: time-integrated CP asymmetry measurement of Bd ! Kp and Bs ! pK decays, time-dependent measurements of Bd ! pp and Bs ! KK decays, effective lifetime measurements of Bs ! KK decays, and triple asymmetries of Bs ! f f.

  14. Salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Wansheng; Hu, Jin; Liu, Jing; Dai, Zhifei; Wang, Kun; Wei, Yen; Bai, Jing; Gao, Weiping

    2016-02-01

    The challenge in photothermal therapy (PTT) is to develop biocompatible photothermal transducers that can absorb and convert near-infrared (NIR) light into heat with high efficiency. Herein, we report salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in biological media to form highly efficient and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers for PTT and photothermal/photoacoustic (PT/PA) imaging of cancer. The GNP depots in situ formed by salt-induced aggregation of GNPs show strong NIR absorption induced by plasmonic coupling between adjacent GNPs and very high photothermal conversion efficiency (52%), enabling photothermal destruction of tumor cells. More interestingly, GNPs in situ aggregate in tumors to form GNP depots, enabling simultaneous PT/PA imaging and PTT of the tumors. These findings may provide a simple and effective way to develop a new class of intelligent and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers with high efficiency for PT/PA imaging and PTT.The challenge in photothermal therapy (PTT) is to develop biocompatible photothermal transducers that can absorb and convert near-infrared (NIR) light into heat with high efficiency. Herein, we report salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in biological media to form highly efficient and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers for PTT and photothermal/photoacoustic (PT/PA) imaging of cancer. The GNP depots in situ formed by salt-induced aggregation of GNPs show strong NIR absorption induced by plasmonic coupling between adjacent GNPs and very high photothermal conversion efficiency (52%), enabling photothermal destruction of tumor cells. More interestingly, GNPs in situ aggregate in tumors to form GNP depots, enabling simultaneous PT/PA imaging and PTT of the tumors. These findings may provide a simple and effective way to develop a new class of intelligent and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers with high efficiency for PT/PA imaging and PTT. Electronic supplementary

  15. Experimental investigation of effect of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between a lift jet and an aircraft wing for a jet VTOL aircraft was performed for the simplified model of an unheated, subsonic, circular jet exiting at right angles to a flat plate into a uniform subsonic crosswind. The effects of jet dynamic pressure decay rate upon the jet location and jet induced pressure distribution on the plate were studied over a range of jet to crossflow velocity ratios of 2.2 or = R or = 10. Jet decay rate was varied through use of cylindrical centerbodies with flat or hemispherical tips submerged in the jet nozzle at various depths below the jet exit plane. Quicker jet dynamic pressure decay, caused by the presence of a centerbody, resulted in reductions in the jet induced lift loss by as much as 45 percent relative to values for jets with no centerbody. These reductions in lift loss were observed at the larger values of crossflow velocity.

  16. A multi-component model of the dynamics of salt-induced hypertension in Dahl-S rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Vliet Bruce N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, salt intake has been suggested to influence blood pressure (BP on a wide range of time scales ranging from several hours or days to many months or years. Detailed time course data collected in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat strain suggest that the development of salt-induced hypertension may consist of several distinct phases or components that differ in their timing and reversibility. To better understand these components, the present study sought to model the dynamics of salt-induced hypertension in the Dahl salt sensitive (Dahl-S rat using 3 sets of time course data. Results The first component of the model ("Acute-Reversible" consisted of a linear transfer function to account for the rapid and reversible effects of salt on BP (ie. acute salt sensitivity, corresponding with a depressed slope of the chronic pressure natriuresis relationship. For the second component ("Progressive-Irreversible", an integrator function was used to represent the relatively slow, progressive, and irreversible effect of high salt intake on BP (corresponding with a progressive salt-induced shift of the chronic pressure natriuresis relationship to higher BP levels. A third component ("Progressive-Reversible" consisted of an effect of high salt intake to progressively increase the acute salt-sensitivity of BP (ie. reduce the slope of the chronic pressure natriuresis relationship, amounting to a slow and progressive, yet reversible, component of salt-induced hypertension. While the 3 component model was limited in its ability to follow the BP response to rapid and/or brief transitions in salt intake, it was able to accurately follow the slower steady state components of salt-induced BP changes. This model exhibited low values of mean absolute error (1.92 ± 0.23, 2.13 ± 0.37, 2.03 ± 0.3 mmHg for data sets 1 - 3, and its overall performance was significantly improved over that of an initial model having only 2 components. The 3 component

  17. Local salt substitutes “Obu-otoyo” activate acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase and induce lipid peroxidation in rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has shown that ingestion of heavy metals can lead to neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to investigate the neurotoxic potential of salt substitutes (Obu-Otoyo); salt A (made by burning palm kernel shaft then soaked in water overnight and the extract from the resulting residue is used as the salt substitute) and salt B (an unrefined salt mined from a local site at Ilobu town, Osun-State, Nigeria) by assessing their effect on some key enzymes linked with neurodegenerative disease [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities] as well as on malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the rat brain. Salt substitutes were fed to normal rats as dietary inclusion at doses of 0.5 and 1.0% for 30 days. Thereafter, the effect of the salt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities as well as on MDA level in the rat brain was determined. The results revealed that the salt substitutes caused a significant (psalt substitutes on AChE and BChE activities could be attributed to the presence of some toxic heavy metals. Therefore, the ability of the salt substitutes to induce lipid peroxidation and activate AChE and BChE activities could provide some possible mechanism for their neurotoxic effect. PMID:27486373

  18. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine leads to alleviate salt-induced potassium efflux and enhances salt tolerance in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dandan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Cuicui; Meng, Qingwei; Li, Gang; Chen, Tony H H; Yang, Xinghong

    2017-04-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. 'Moneymaker') was transformed with the choline oxidase gene codA from Arthrobacter globiformis, which was modified to allow for targeting to both chloroplasts and the cytosol. Glycine betaine (GB) was accumulated in transformed plants, while no detectable GB was found in wild-type (WT) plants. Compared to WT plants, transgenic lines showed significantly higher photosynthetic rates (Pn) and antioxidant enzyme activities and lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in the leaves when exposed to salt stress. Furthermore, compared with WT plants, K+ efflux decreased and Na+ efflux increased in roots of transgenic plants under salt stress; resulted in lower Na+/K+ ratios in transgenic lines. The exogenous application of GB also significantly reduced NaCl-induced K+ efflux and increased Na+ efflux in WT plants. A qRT-PCR assay indicated that GB enhanced NaCl-induced expression of genes encoding the K+ transporter, Na+/H+ antiporter, and H+-ATPase. These results suggest that the enhanced salt tolerance conferred by codA in transgenic tomato plants might be due to the regulation of ion channel and transporters by GB, which would allow high potassium levels and low sodium levels to be maintained in transgenic plants under salt stress condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral microvascular inflammation in DOCA salt-induced hypertension: role of angiotensin II and mitochondrial superoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, Daniel Neil

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II-mediated hypertension (HTN) is accompanied by a pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic state in the cerebral microvasculature. Whether comparable phenotypic changes are elicited in other models of HTN remains unclear. Using wild-type mice with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) salt-induced HTN and intravital microscopy, we observed significant increases in the adhesion of both leukocytes and platelets in cerebral venules, compared with uninephrectomized control mice, without an accompanying increase in blood-brain barrier permeability. The cell-cell interactions in hypertensive mice were more pronounced after ischemic stroke, but no difference in infarct size was detected. The blood cell recruitment was largely prevented in the following groups of DOCA salt mice: losartan (angiotensin II AT1 receptor blocker) treated, AT1 receptor knockout mice, tempol (a membrane-permeable oxygen radical scavenger) treated, and mito-TEMPO (a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) treated. A similar pattern of protection was noted in mice subjected to ischemic stroke. The blunted cell recruitment responses were not accompanied by reductions in blood pressure (BP). These findings implicate mitochondria-derived oxygen radicals and angiotensin II in the cerebral inflammation associated with DOCA salt HTN and suggests that BP per se is not a critical determinant of the phenotypic changes that accompany HTN, even after ischemic stroke.

  20. Field induced spontaneous quasiparticle decay and renormalization of quasiparticle dispersion in a quantum antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao; Qiu, Y.; Matsumoto, M.; Tennant, D. A.; Coester, K.; Schmidt, K. P.; Awwadi, F. F.; Turnbull, M. M.; Agrawal, H.; Chernyshev, A. L.

    2017-01-01

    The notion of a quasiparticle, such as a phonon, a roton or a magnon, is used in modern condensed matter physics to describe an elementary collective excitation. The intrinsic zero-temperature magnon damping in quantum spin systems can be driven by the interaction of the one-magnon states and multi-magnon continuum. However, detailed experimental studies on this quantum many-body effect induced by an applied magnetic field are rare. Here we present a high-resolution neutron scattering study in high fields on an S=1/2 antiferromagnet C9H18N2CuBr4. Compared with the non-interacting linear spin–wave theory, our results demonstrate a variety of phenomena including field-induced renormalization of one-magnon dispersion, spontaneous magnon decay observed via intrinsic linewidth broadening, unusual non-Lorentzian two-peak structure in the excitation spectra and a dramatic shift of spectral weight from one-magnon state to the two-magnon continuum. PMID:28474679

  1. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  2. Grazing management can counteract the impacts of climate change-induced sea level rise on salt marsh-dependent waterbirds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Stjernholm, Michael; Clausen, Preben

    2013-01-01

    1) Climate change–induced rises in sea level threaten to drastically reduce the areal extent of important salt marsh habitats for large numbers of waterfowl and waders. Furthermore, recent changes in management practice have rendered existent salt marshes unfavourable to many birds, as lack...... of grazing has induced an increase in high-sward communities on former good-quality marshes. 2) Based on a high-resolution digital elevation model and two scenarios for projected rise in near-future sea levels, we employ an ArcMap allocation model to foresee the areal loss in salt marsh associated...... with these changes. In addition, we quantify the areal extent of inadequate salt marsh management in four EU Special Protection Areas for Birds, and demonstrate concurrent population dynamics in four species relying on managed habitats. We conclude by investigating potential compensation for climate change...

  3. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori cagA promoter elements required for salt-induced upregulation of CagA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, John T; Friedman, David B; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Bravo, Luis E; Wilson, Keith T; Peek, Richard M; Correa, Pelayo; Cover, Timothy L

    2012-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection and consumption of a high-salt diet are each associated with an increased risk for the development of gastric cancer. To investigate potential synergism between these factors, we used a global proteomic approach to analyze H. pylori strains cultured in media containing varying salt concentrations. Among the differentially expressed proteins identified, CagA exhibited the greatest increase in expression in response to high salt concentrations. Analysis of 36 H. pylori strains isolated from patients in two regions of Colombia with differing incidences of gastric cancer revealed marked differences among strains in salt-responsive CagA expression. Sequence analysis of the cagA promoter region in these strains revealed a DNA motif (TAATGA) that was present in either one or two copies. Salt-induced upregulation of CagA expression was detected more commonly in strains containing two copies of the TAATGA motif than in strains containing one copy. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed that two copies of the TAATGA motif are required for salt-induced upregulation of CagA expression. In summary, there is considerable heterogeneity among H. pylori strains in salt-regulated CagA expression, and these differences are attributable to variation in a specific DNA motif upstream of the cagA transcriptional start site.

  4. cDNA-AFLP analysis of salt-inducible genes expression in Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium under salt treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huang; Yajing, Niu; Huawen, Cao; Xingjiao, Tang; Xinli, Xia; Weilun, Yin; Silan, Dai

    2012-03-01

    Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium (Fisch. ex Trautv.) Makino is a halophyte species that belongs to the Asteraceae family, and the genus Chrysanthemum. It is one of the ancestors of C.×morifolium Ramatella. Understanding the tolerance mechanism associated with salt stress in C. lavandulifolium could provide important information for explaining the salt tolerance of higher plants and could also help enhancing breeding programs of cultivated Chrysanthemum. In this study, cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) was used to detect differential gene expression in leaves of C. lavandulifolium in response to NaCl treatment. The determination of membrane permeablility, peroxidase activity (POD), malon-dialdehyde (MDA), as well as proline and leaf chlorophyll contents under different NaCl concentrations showed that a 200 mM NaCl treatment was an optimal condition for the cDNA-AFLP experiment. Using this concentration during different times (0, 3 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h), we obtained 1930 cDNA fragments using 64 primers. After sequencing 234 randomly chosen cDNA clones and BLASTx analyzing, we got 129 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) which had no significant homology with other sequences, 85 ESTs were homologous to genes with known functions, whereas the rest of ESTs showed homology to unclassified or putative proteins. 25 ESTs that were similar to known functional genes involved in several abiotic and biotic stresses were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. The expression patterns of these salt-responsive genes not only responded to salt stress but also to plant hormones, such as abscisic acid (ABA), and to other abiotic stresses such as drought and cold. These results indicate an extensive cross-talk among several stresses. Our results provide interesting information for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in C. lavandulifolium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolonged Baroreflex Activation Abolishes Salt-Induced Hypertension After Reductions in Kidney Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Drew A; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Chronic electric activation of the carotid baroreflex produces sustained reductions in sympathetic activity and arterial pressure and is currently being evaluated for therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. However, patients with significant impairment of renal function have been largely excluded from clinical trials. Thus, there is little information on blood pressure and renal responses to baroreflex activation in subjects with advanced chronic kidney disease, which is common in resistant hypertension. Changes in arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate were determined in 5 dogs after combined unilateral nephrectomy and surgical excision of the poles of the remaining kidney to produce ≈70% reduction in renal mass. After control measurements, sodium intake was increased from ≈45 to 450 mol/d. While maintained on high salt, animals experienced increases in mean arterial pressure from 102±4 to 121±6 mm Hg and glomerular filtration rate from 40±2 to 45±2 mL/min. During 7 days of baroreflex activation, the hypertension induced by high salt was abolished (103±6 mm Hg) along with striking suppression of plasma norepinephrine concentration from 139±21 to 81±9 pg/mL, but despite pronounced blood pressure lowering, there were no significant changes in glomerular filtration rate (43±2 mL/min). All variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. These findings indicate that after appreciable nephron loss, chronic suppression of central sympathetic outflow by baroreflex activation abolishes hypertension induced by high salt intake. The sustained antihypertensive effects of baroreflex activation occur without significantly compromising glomerular filtration rate in remnant nephrons. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Reverse function of ROS-induced CBL10 during salt and drought stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Kyung; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2016-02-01

    Cellular levels of Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are maintained at low levels in the cytosol but fluctuate greatly when acting as second messengers to decode environmental and developmental signals. Phytohormones are primary signals leading to various changes in ROS or Ca(2+) signaling during synergistic and antagonistic cross-talk. In this study, we found that brassinosteroids (BRs), hormones involved in diverse plant developmental processes, promote ROS production. To identify downstream signaling components of ROS during BR-mediated plant development, we searched for genes whose expression remained unchanged by ROS only in BR- signaling mutants and found calcineurin B-like (CBL) 10, which encodes a CBL should be changed to CBL10. protein that senses calcium. ROS-induced CBL10 expression was nullified and endogenous CBL10 expression in the shoot was low in the BR-signaling mutant. Using a cbl10 mutant and a transgenic plant overexpressing CBL10, we showed that BR sensitivity during hypocotyl growth decreased in the cbl10 mutant under salt stress, providing an additional mechanism for positive regulation of salt stress by CBL10. We also demonstrated that CBL10 negatively affects tolerance to drought and is not mediated by abscisic acid-induced signaling. Our results suggest that Ca(2+) signaling through CBL10 differently affects the response to abiotic stresses, partly by regulating BR sensitivity of plant tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adsorbate-Induced Anchoring Transitions of Liquid Crystals on Surfaces Presenting Metal Salts with Mixed Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jacob T.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    We report that metal salts composed of mixtures of anions of differing coordination strength can be used to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of adsorbate-induced anchoring transitions of liquid crystals (LCs) supported on surfaces decorated with the metal salts. Specifically, the dynamics of anchoring transitions triggered by the adsorbate dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on surfaces of aluminum (III) salts were analyzed within the framework of a model for mass transport to reveal that the sensitivity of a nitrile-containing nematic LC to DMMP increased from 250 parts-per- billion (ppb) to 25 ppb when the composition of the (counter) anion was changed from 100% perchlorate to 90% nitrate and 10% perchlorate (by mole percent). To provide insight into these observations, Polarization-Modulation Infrared Reflectance-Absorbance Spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was used to show that the intensity of the absorption band in the IR spectrum corresponding to the coordinated state of the nitrile group (but not the position of the peak) decreased with increase in mole fraction of the strongly coordinating anion (nitrate) in the anion mixture, thus suggesting that the addition of the strongly coordinating anion decreased the number of coordination interactions (per unit area of the interface) but not the strength of the individual coordination interactions between the metal cation and the LC. We also measured the incorporation of the nitrate anion into the metal salt to decrease the effect of humidity on the dynamic response of the LC to DMMP, a result that is consistent with weaker interactions between the nitrate anion and water as compared to the perchlorate anion and water. Finally, the bidentate anion acetylacetonate was measured to cause a similar increase in sensitivity to DMMP when mixed with perchlorate in a 1:1 ratio (the resulting sensitivity of the system to DMMP was 100 ppb). Overall, these results suggest that tailoring the identity of the anion represents a

  8. Optimizing the salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents: Effects of lyophilization time and water content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, M.T.; Reimer, J.A.; Clark, D.S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Dordick, J.S. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-04-20

    The addition of simple inorganic salts to aqueous enzyme solutions prior to lyophilization results in a dramatic activation of the dried powder in organic media relative to enzyme with no added salt. Activation of both the serine protease subtilisin Carlsberg and lipase from Mucor javanicus resulting from lyophilization in the presence of KCl was highly sensitive to the lyophilization time and water content of the sample. Specifically, for a preparation containing 98% (w/w) KCl, 1% (w/w) phosphate buffer, and 1% (w/w) enzyme, varying the lyophilization time showed a direct correlation between water content and activity up to an optimum, beyond which the activity decreased with increasing lyophilization time. The catalytic efficiency in hexane varied as much as 13-fold for subtilisin Carlsberg and 11-fold for lipase depending on the lyophilization time. This dependence was apparently a consequence of including the salt, as a similar result was not observed for the enzyme freeze-dried without KCl. In the case of subtilisin Carlsberg, the salt-induced optimum value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for transesterification in hexane was over 20,000-fold higher than that for salt-free enzyme, a substantial improvement over the previously reported enhancement of 3750-fold. As was found previously for pure enzyme, the salt-activated enzyme exhibited greatest activity when lyophilized from a solution of pH equal to the pH for optimal activity in water. The active-site content of the lyophilized enzyme samples also depended upon lyophilization time and inclusion of salt, with opposite trends in this dependence observed for the solvents hexane and tetrahydrofuran. Finally, substrate selectivity experiments suggested that mechanism(s) other than selective partitioning of substrate into the enzyme-salt matrix are responsible for salt-induced activation of enzymes in organic solvents.

  9. Salt-Induced Tissue-Specific Cytosine Methylation Downregulates Expression of HKT Genes in Contrasting Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Beena, Ananda Sankara; Awana, Monika; Singh, Archana

    2017-04-01

    Plants have evolved several strategies, including regulation of genes through epigenetic modifications, to cope with environmental stresses. DNA methylation is dynamically regulated through the methylation and demethylation of cytosine in response to environmental perturbations. High-affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) have accounted for the homeostasis of sodium and potassium ions in plants under salt stress. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is sensitive to soil salinity, which impedes its growth and development, resulting in decreased productivity. The differential expression of HKTs has been reported to confer tolerance to salt stress in plants. In this study, we investigated variations in cytosine methylation and their effects on the expression of HKT genes in contrasting wheat genotypes under salt stress. We observed a genotype- and tissue-specific increase in cytosine methylation induced by NaCl stress that downregulated the expression of TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;3 in the shoot and root tissues of Kharchia-65, thereby contributing to its improved salt-tolerance ability. Although TaHKT1;4 was expressed only in roots and was downregulated under the stress in salt-tolerant genotypes, it was not regulated through variations in cytosine methylation. Thus, understanding epigenetic regulation and the function of HKTs would enable an improvement in salt tolerance and the development of salt-tolerant crops.

  10. Optical cryoimaging of rat kidney and the effective role of chromosome 13 in salt-induced hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, F.; Yang, C.; Kurth, T.; Cowley, A. W.; Ranji, M.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work is to assess oxidative stress levels in salt-sensitive hypertension animal model using 3D optical cryoimager to image mitochondrial redox ratio. We studied Dahl salt-induced (SS) rats, and compared the results with a consomic SS rat strain (SSBN13). The SSBN13 strain was developed by the introgression of chromosome from the Brown Norway (BN) rat into the salt-sensitive (SS) genetic background and exhibits significant protection from salt induced hypertension1 . These two groups were fed on a high salt diet of 8.0% NaCl for one week. Mitochondrial redox ratio (NADH/FAD=NADH RR), was used as a quantitative marker of the oxidative stress in kidney tissue. Maximum intensity projected images and their corresponding histograms in each group were acquired from each kidney group. The result showed a 49% decrease in mitochondrial redox ratio of SS compared to SSBN13 translated to an increase in the level of oxidative stress of the tissue. Therefore, the results quantify oxidative stress levels and its effect on mitochondrial redox in salt sensitive hypertension.

  11. Rock-Salt Growth-Induced (003) Cracking in a Layered Positive Electrode for Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanlei [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast; Omenya, Fredrick [NorthEast; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental; Luo, Langli [Environmental; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NorthEast; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhou, Guangwen [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast

    2017-10-20

    For the first time, the (003) cracking is observed and determined to be the major cracking mechanism for the primary particles of Ni-rich layered dioxides as the positive electrode for Li-ion batteries. Using transmission electron microscopy techniques, here we show that the propagation and fracturing of platelet-like rock-salt phase along the (003) plane of the layered oxide are the leading cause for the cracking of primary particles. The fracturing of the rock-salt platelet is induced by the stress discontinuity between the parent layered oxide and the rock-salt phase. The high nickel content is considered to be the key factor for the formation of the rock-salt platelet and thus the (003) cracking. The (003)-type cracking can be a major factor for the structural degradation and associated capacity fade of the layered positive electrode.

  12. Salt Induces Features of a Dormancy-Like State in Seeds of Eutrema (Thellungiella salsugineum, a Halophytic Relative of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Kazachkova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The salinization of land is a major factor limiting crop production worldwide. Halophytes adapted to high levels of salinity are likely to possess useful genes for improving crop tolerance to salt stress, as well as providing a food source on marginal lands. However, despite being salt-tolerant plants, the seeds of many halophytes will not germinate on saline soils, yet little is understood regarding biochemical and gene expression changes underlying salt-mediated inhibition of halophyte seed germination. We have used the halophytic Arabidopsis relative model system, Eutrema (Thellungiella salsugineum to explore salt-mediated inhibition of germination. We show that E. salsugineum seed germination is inhibited by salt to a far greater extent than in Arabidopsis, and that this inhibition is in response to the osmotic component of salt exposure. E. salsugineum seeds remain viable even when germination is completely inhibited, and germination resumes once seeds are transferred to non-saline conditions. Moreover, removal of the seed coat from salt-treated seeds allows embryos to germinate on salt-containing medium. Mobilization of seed storage reserves is restricted in salt-treated seeds, while many germination-associated metabolic changes are arrested or progress to a lower extent. Salt-exposed seeds are further characterized by a reduced GA/ABA ratio and increased expression of the germination repressor genes, RGL2, ABI5 and DOG1. Furthermore, a salt-mediated increase in expression of a LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT gene and accretion of metabolites involved in osmoprotection indicates induction of processes associated with stress tolerance, and accumulation of easily mobilized carbon reserves. Overall, our results suggest that salt inhibits E. salsugineum seed germination by inducing a seed state with molecular features of dormancy while a physical constraint to radicle emergence is provided by the seed coat layers. This seed state could facilitate

  13. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1 is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn-Karina M Selvik

    Full Text Available Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER. We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1 Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4 and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas.

  14. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas.

  15. Experimental investigation of effects of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate: Tabulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tabular data are presented for an experimental study of the effects of jet decay rate on the jet-induced pressure distribution on a flat plate for a single jet issuing at right angle to the flat plate into a uniform crossflow. The data are presented in four sections: (1) presents the static nozzle calibration data; (2) lists the plate surface static pressure data and integrated loads; (3) lists the jet centerline trajectory data; and (4) lists the centerline dynamic pressure data.

  16. Salt-Induced Hypertension in a Mouse Model of Liddle's Syndrome is Mediated by Epithelial Sodium Channels in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Huysse, James W.; Amin, Md. Shahrier; Yang, Baoli; Leenen, Frans H. H.

    2012-01-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed and developmentally downregulated 4-2 protein (Nedd4-2) facilitates the endocytosis of epithelial Na channels (ENaC). Both mice and humans with a loss of regulation of ENaC by Nedd4-2 have salt-induced hypertension. ENaC is also expressed in the brain, where it is critical for hypertension on high salt diet in salt-sensitive rats. In the present studies we assessed whether Nedd4-2 knockout (−/−) mice have: 1) increased brain ENaC; 2) elevated CSF sodium on high salt diet; and 3) enhanced pressor responses to CSF sodium and hypertension on high salt diet, both mediated by brain ENaC. Prominent choroid plexus and neuronal ENaC staining was present in −/− but not in wild-type (W/T) mice. In chronically instrumented mice, intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of Na-rich aCSF increased MAP 3-fold higher in −/− than W/T. Icv infusion of the ENaC blocker benzamil abolished this enhancement. In telemetered −/− mice on high salt diet (8% NaCl), CSF [Na+], MAP and HR increased significantly, MAP by 30-35 mmHg. These MAP and HR responses were largely prevented by icv benzamil, but only to a minor extent by sc benzamil at the icv rate. We conclude that increased ENaC expression in the brain of Nedd 4-2 −/− mice mediates their hypertensive response to high salt diet, by causing increased sodium levels in the CSF as well as hyper-responsiveness to CSF sodium. These findings highlight the possible causative contribution of CNS ENaC in the etiology of salt-induced hypertension. PMID:22802227

  17. Altered lymphatic function and architecture in salt-induced hypertension assessed by near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Agollah, Germaine D.; Chan, Wenyaw; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-08-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in maintaining the fluid homeostasis between the blood vascular and interstitial tissue compartment and there is recent evidence that its transport capabilities may regulate blood pressure in salt-induced hypertension. Yet, there is little known how the lymphatic contractile function and architecture responds to dietary salt-intake. Thus, we longitudinally characterized lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling noninvasively using dynamic near-infrared fluorescence imaging in animal models of salt-induced hypertension. The lymphatics of mice and rats were imaged following intradermal injection of indocyanine green to the ear tip or the base of the tail before and during two weeks of either a high salt diet (HSD) or normal chow. Our noninvasive imaging data demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the skin of mice and rats on a HSD as compared to their baseline levels. In addition, our dynamic imaging results showed increased lymphatic contraction frequency in HSD-fed mice and rats. Lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling occurs in response to salt-induced hypertension suggesting a possible role for the lymphatics in the regulation of vascular blood pressure.

  18. Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jaffe, John E.; Jiang, Weilin; Strachan, Denis M.

    2011-04-01

    This is a milestone document covering the activities to validate theoretical calculations with experimental data for the effect of the decay of 90Sr to 90Zr on materials properties. This was done for a surragate waste form strontium titanate.

  19. Observation of fast and slow interatomic Coulombic decay in argon dimers induced by electron-impact ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueguang; Miteva, Tsveta; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Dorn, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) in argon dimers induced by electron-impact ionization (E0=90 eV ) using a multiparticle coincidence experiment in which the momentum vectors and, consequently, the kinetic energies for electrons and fragment ions are determined. The signature of the ICD process is obtained from a correlation map between ejected electron energy and kinetic energy release (KER) for Ar++Ar+ fragment ions where low-energy ICD electrons can be identified. Furthermore, two types of ICD processes, termed fast and slow interatomic decay, are separated by the ICD initial-state energies and projectile energy losses. The dependence of the energies of emitted low-energy ICD electrons on the initial-state energy is studied. ICD electron energy spectra and KER spectra are obtained separately for fast and slow decay processes where the KER spectra for the slow decay channel are strongly influenced by nuclear motion. The KER and ICD electron energy spectra are well reproduced by ab initio calculations.

  20. Influence of the external conditions on salt retention and pressure-induced electrical potential measured across a composite membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence on these paramet......Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence...... with respect to the value determined with single electrolytes at the same concentration was obtained, which is attributed to a strong coupling among the fluxes of individual ions and their distribution in the membrane when transport of mixed salt is studied. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Long-term decay and possible reactivation of induced seismicity at the Basel EGS site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Toni; Herrmann, Marcus; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Tormann, Thessa; Deichmann, Nicolas; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In December 2006, an extensive fluid injection was carried out below the city of Basel, Switzerland, to stimulate a reservoir for an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). After six days of gradual increase of flow rate (and thus seismicity), a strongly felt ML3.4 earthquakes led to the immediate termination of the project. The well was opened subsequently and seismicity declined rapidly. The Basel EGS project might be an unsuccessful attempt in terms of energy supply, but a chance to advance the physical understanding of EGSs. The well-monitored and well-studied induced sequence allowed many new insights in terms of reservoir creation. A special observation in the nine years of monitoring is the revive of seismic activity six years after prolonged seismic decay. This renewed activity increase might relate to a gradual pressure increase due to the ultimate shut-in (closure) of the borehole about one year before. Until now, a detailed analysis of the long-term behaviour remained unexplored since a consistent catalogue did not exist. In the current study, we took advantage of the high waveform similarity within a seismic sequence and applied a multi-trace template-matching (i.e. cross-correlation) procedure to detect seismic events about one order of magnitude below the detection threshold. We detected about 100,000 events within the six-day long stimulation alone - previously, only 13,000 microearthquakes were detected. We only scanned the recordings of the deepest borehole station (2.7km). This station is very close to the 5km-deep reservoir and has the highest signal-to-noise ratio among all (borehole-)stations. Our newly obtained catalogue spans over more than nine years and features a uniform (and low) detection threshold and a uniform magnitude determination. The improved resolution of the long-term behaviour and the later seismicity increase will help to understand involved mechanisms better. More induced or natural sequences can be investigated with our procedure.

  2. Decay accelerating factor (CD55 protects neuronal cells from chemical hypoxia-induced injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsokos George C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated complement system is known to mediate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration following exposure to hypoxic-ischemic insults. Therefore, inhibition of the complement activation cascade may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for the management of ischemic brain injury. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, also known as CD55 inhibits complement activation by suppressing the function of C3/C5 convertases, thereby limiting local generation or deposition of C3a/C5a and membrane attack complex (MAC or C5b-9 production. The present study investigates the ability of DAF to protect primary cultured neuronal cells subjected to sodium cyanide (NaCN-induced hypoxia from degeneration and apoptosis. Methods Cultured primary cortical neurons from embryonic Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned one of four groups: control, DAF treatment alone, hypoxic, or hypoxic treated with DAF. Hypoxic cultures were exposed to NaCN for 1 hour, rinsed, followed by 24 hour exposure to 200 ng/ml of recombinant human DAF in normal medium. Human DAF was used in the present study and it has been shown to effectively regulate complement activation in rats. Neuronal cell function, morphology and viability were investigated by measuring plateau depolarization potential, counting the number dendritic spines, and observing TUNEL and MTT assays. Complement C3, C3a, C3a receptor (R production, C3a-C3aR interaction and MAC formation were assessed along with the generation of activated caspase-9, activated caspase-3, and activated Src. Results When compared to controls, hypoxic cells had fewer dendritic spines, reduced plateau depolarization accompanied by increased apoptotic activity and accumulation of MAC, as well as up-regulation of C3, C3a and C3aR, enhancement of C3a-C3aR engagement, and elevated caspase and Src activity. Treatment of hypoxic cells with 200 ng/ml of recombinant human DAF resulted in attenuation of neuronal apoptosis and exerted

  3. Acalypha wilkesiana Muell Arg Induced Diuresis in Salt-Loaded Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of the leaves on the weight, urine output, and plasma and urine chemistry of salt-loaded rats was investigated. The control group received a diet consisting 100% of the commercial feed; the test-control received a diet consisting 8% salt and 92% commercial feed, while the test received diet containing 8% salt, 5% leaf ...

  4. Rapid insight into heating-induced phase transformations in the solid state of the calcium salt of atorvastatin using multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Peter Aae; Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Kwok, Kaho

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the heating-induced dehydration and melting behavior of the trihydrate phase of the calcium salt of atorvastatin.......To investigate the heating-induced dehydration and melting behavior of the trihydrate phase of the calcium salt of atorvastatin....

  5. Analysing monthly sectorial water use and its influence on salt intrusion induced water shortage in urbanized deltas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Mingtian; Yan, Dan; Kabat, Pavel; Huang, Heqing; Hutjes, Ronald W.A.; Werners, Saskia E.

    2016-01-01

    Urbanizing delta regions face seasonal water shortages induced by rising salt intrusion. Decreasing river discharge is readily listed as the major cause of water shortage events. Yet, observations of river discharge often fail to support this attribution. Evidence of the association between

  6. A metal-free cyclic iminium induced one-pot double annulation cascade: access to dihydroisoquinolinium (DHIQ) salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, A; Nagarjuna Babu, Venkata; Shinde, Anand H; Sharada, Duddu S

    2016-11-08

    A reactive cyclic iminium induced one-pot Groebke-Blackburn-Bienayme (GBB) double annulation cascade (DAC) for the synthesis of skeletally diverse DHIQ salts has been described. The key features of this protocol are transition-metal and solvent-free, mild reaction conditions, robust method, one-step construction of two privileged heterocyclic rings, clean reaction profile and operational simplicity.

  7. Analysis of proton-induced fragment production cross sections by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics plus Statistical Decay Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Fukahori, Tokio; Niita, Koji; Maruyama, Toshiki; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production cross sections of various fragments from proton-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 27}Al have been analyzed by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) plus Statistical Decay Model (SDM). It was found that the mass and charge distributions calculated with and without the statistical decay have very different shapes. These results also depend strongly on the impact parameter, showing an importance of the dynamical treatment as realized by the QMD approach. The calculated results were compared with experimental data in the energy region from 50 MeV to 5 GeV. The QMD+SDM calculation could reproduce the production cross sections of the light clusters and intermediate-mass to heavy fragments in a good accuracy. The production cross section of {sup 7}Be was, however, underpredicted by approximately 2 orders of magnitude, showing the necessity of another reaction mechanism not taken into account in the present model. (author)

  8. Inactivation of Ca2+-induced ciliary reversal by high-salt extraction in the cilia of Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutomi, Osamu; Seki, Makoto; Nakamura, Shogo; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Munenori

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) induces ciliary reversal and backward swimming in Paramecium. However, it is not known how the Ca(2+) signal controls the motor machinery to induce ciliary reversal. We found that demembranated cilia on the ciliated cortical sheets from Paramecium caudatum lost the ability to undergo ciliary reversal after brief extraction with a solution containing 0.5 M KCl. KNO(3), which is similar to KCl with respect to chaotropic effect; it had the same effect as that of KCl on ciliary response. Cyclic AMP antagonizes Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal. Limited trypsin digestion prevents endogenous A-kinase and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of an outer arm dynein light chain and induces ciliary reversal. However, the trypsin digestion prior to the high-salt extraction did not affect the inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal caused by the high-salt extraction. Furthermore, during the course of the high-salt extraction, some axonemal proteins were extracted from ciliary axonemes, suggesting that they may be responsible for Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal.

  9. Brain endogenous angiotensin II receptor type 2 (AT2-R) protects against DOCA/salt-induced hypertension in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shu-Yan; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Li, Jian-Dong; Shen, Ying; Sun, Xiao-Fei

    2015-03-08

    Recent studies demonstrate that there are sex differences in the expression of angiotensin receptor type 2 (AT2-R) in the kidney and that AT2-R plays an enhanced role in regulating blood pressure (BP) in females. Also, brain AT2-R activation has been reported to negatively modulate BP and sympathetic outflow. The present study investigated whether the central blockade of endogenous AT2-R augments deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-induced hypertension in both male and female rats. All rats were subcutaneously infused with DOCA combined with 1% NaCl solution as the sole drinking fluid. BP and heart rate (HR) were recorded by telemetric transmitters. To determine the effect of central AT2-R on DOCA/salt-induced hypertension, male and female rats were intracerebroventricularly (icv) infused with AT2-R antagonist, PD123,319, during DOCA/salt treatment. Subsequently, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, a key cardiovascular regulatory region of the brain, was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. DOCA/salt treatment elicited a greater increase in BP in male rats than that in females. Icv infusions of the AT2-R antagonist significantly augmented DOCA/salt pressor effects in females. However, this same treatment had no enhanced effect on DOCA/salt-induced increase in the BP in males. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis of the female brain revealed that DOCA/salt treatment enhanced the mRNA and protein expression for both antihypertensive components including AT2-R, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2, and interleukin (IL)-10 and hypertensive components including angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1-R), ACE-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-1β, but decreased mRNA expression of renin in the PVN. The central blockade of AT2-R reversed the changes in mRNA and protein expressions of ACE-2, IL-10, and renin, further increased the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β, and kept higher the expressions of AT1-R, ACE-1, and AT2-R

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Renal Oxidative Stress and Kidney Injury in Dahl Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study was designed to investigate if H2S could inhibit high-salt diet-induced renal excessive oxidative stress and kidney injury in Dahl rats. Methods. Male salt-sensitive Dahl and SD rats were used. Blood pressure (BP, serum creatinine, urea, creatinine clearance rate, and 24-hour urine protein were measured. Renal ultra- and microstructures were observed. Collagen-I and -III contents the oxidants and antioxidants levels in renal tissue were detected. Keap1/Nrf2 association and Keap1 s-sulfhydration were detected. Results. After 8 weeks of high-salt diet, BP was significantly increased, renal function and structure were impaired, and collagen deposition was abundant in renal tissues with increased renal MPO activity, H2O2, MDA, GSSG, and •OH contents, reduced renal T-AOC and GSH contents, CAT, GSH-PX and SOD activity, and SOD expressions in Dahl rats. Furthermore, endogenous H2S in renal tissues was decreased in Dahl rats. H2S donor, however, decreased BP, improved renal function and structure, and inhibited collagen excessive deposition in kidney, in association with increased antioxidative activity and reduced oxidative stress in renal tissues. H2S activated Nrf2 by inducing Keap1 s-sulfhydration and subsequent Keap1/Nrf2 disassociation. Conclusions. H2S protected against high-salt diet-induced renal injury associated with enhanced antioxidant capacity and inhibited renal oxidative stress.

  11. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the (Pro)renin receptor antagonist PRO20 attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wencheng; Sullivan, Michelle N; Zhang, Sheng; Worker, Caleb J; Xiong, Zhenggang; Speth, Robert C; Feng, Yumei

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that binding of prorenin to the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) plays a major role in brain angiotensin II formation and the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension. Here, we designed and developed an antagonistic peptide, PRO20, to block prorenin binding to the PRR. Fluorescently labeled PRO20 bound to both mouse and human brain tissues with dissociation constants of 4.4 and 1.8 nmol/L, respectively. This binding was blocked by coincubation with prorenin and was diminished in brains of neuron-specific PRR-knockout mice, indicating specificity of PRO20 for PRR. In cultured human neuroblastoma cells, PRO20 blocked prorenin-induced calcium influx in a concentration- and AT(1) receptor-dependent manner. Intracerebroventricular infusion of PRO20 dose-dependently inhibited prorenin-induced hypertension in C57Bl6/J mice. Furthermore, acute intracerebroventricular infusion of PRO20 reduced blood pressure in both DOCA-salt and genetically hypertensive mice. Chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of PRO20 attenuated the development of hypertension and the increase in brain hypothalamic angiotensin II levels induced by DOCA-salt. In addition, chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of PRO20 improved autonomic function and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in mice treated with DOCA-salt. In summary, PRO20 binds to both mouse and human PRRs and decreases angiotensin II formation and hypertension induced by either prorenin or DOCA-salt. Our findings highlight the value of the novel PRR antagonist, PRO20, as a lead compound for a novel class of antihypertensive agents and as a research tool to establish the validity of brain PRR antagonism as a strategy for treating hypertension. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Protective Effects of Decay-Accelerating Factor on Blast-Induced Neurotrauma in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    suggest early adminis- tration of complement inhibitors as a novel and viable pharmaceutical strategy to mitigate BINT. Administration of decay...volume after controlled cortical impact brain injury in mice. Crit Care Med 2009, 37:659–665. doi:10.1097/ CCM .0b013e318195998a. 18. You Z, Yang J

  13. Microscopic theory of phonon-induced effects on semiconductor quantum dot decay dynamics in cavity QED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lodahl, P.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the electron-phonon interaction on the decay dynamics of a quantum dot coupled to an optical microcavity. We show that the electron-phonon interaction has important consequences on the dynamics, especially when the quantum dot and cavity are tuned out of resonance,...

  14. Evaluation of Salt Removal from Azulejo Tiles and Mortars using Electrodesalination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Célia Maria Dias; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren

    2011-01-01

    loss of historic value. In this work preliminary studies with single tiles presenting an underlying layer of mortar have been conducted to assess the amount of salts that can be removed from the building material using a new technique called “electrodesalination”, in which the salt’s ions...... and underlying mortar are no longer at risk of salt induced decay. The main conclusions are that the technique is successful in extracting salts from mortars (removals efficiencies between 88% and 92%) but not as good for the tile (removals between 10% and 80%). The risk of salt damage to the mortar and tile...

  15. NADPH oxidase-dependent H2O2 production is required for salt-induced antioxidant defense in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rejeb, Kilani; Benzarti, Maâli; Debez, Ahmed; Bailly, Christophe; Savouré, Arnould; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-02-01

    The involvement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase) in the antioxidant defense system was assessed in salt-challenged Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. In the wild-type, short-term salt exposure led to a transient and significant increase of H2O2 concentration, followed by a marked increase in catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.16), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) activities. Pre-treatment with either a chemical trap for H2O2 (dimethylthiourea) or two widely used NADPH oxidase inhibitors (imidazol and diphenylene iodonium) significantly decreased the above-mentioned enzyme activities under salinity. Double mutant atrbohd/f plants failed to induce the antioxidant response under the culture conditions. Under long-term salinity, the wild-type was more salt-tolerant than the mutant based on the plant biomass production. The better performance of the wild-type was related to a significantly higher photosynthetic activity, a more efficient K(+) selective uptake, and to the plants' ability to deal with the salt-induced oxidative stress as compared to atrbohd/f. Altogether, these data suggest that the early H2O2 generation by NADPH oxidase under salt stress could be the beginning of a reaction cascade that triggers the antioxidant response in A. thaliana in order to overcome the subsequent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, thereby mitigating the salt stress-derived injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of toxic and essential metals in rock and sea salts using pulsed nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, I; Khan, M Zubair; Rehan, K; Mateen, A; Aamar Farooque, M; Sultana, S; Farooq, Z

    2018-01-10

    A spectrometer based on pulsed nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for the quantitative determination of heavy and essential metals in salts from various sources available in Pakistan. Six salt samples were collected from sea salt and rock salt. Toxic metals (Cu, Cd, and Ni) and other microessentials (Fe, Ca, Co, Mg, Mn, S, and Zn) were investigated from the recorded spectra. The detection system was calibrated using a parametric dependence study. The quantitative analyses were accomplished under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium and optically thin plasma. The results by the LIBS technique were in agreement with the outcomes of the same samples studied using a more standard approach like inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). When the concentrations of heavy and essential metals were calculated using a calibration-free LIBS method that does not need a standard salt specimen and dilution, both LIBS and ICP-AES were also in good agreement. The limit of detection of the experimental set up was determined for the observed heavy metals in the studied samples.

  17. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-04-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting noncovalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas-phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase.

  18. The RNA Helicase DHX34 Activates NMD by Promoting a Transition from the Surveillance to the Decay-Inducing Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Hug

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD is a surveillance mechanism that degrades aberrant mRNAs. A complex comprising SMG1, UPF1, and the translation termination factors eRF1 and eRF3 (SURF is assembled in the vicinity of a premature termination codon. Subsequently, an interaction with UPF2, UPF3b, and the exon junction complex induces the formation of the decay-inducing complex (DECID and triggers NMD. We previously identified the RNA helicase DHX34 as an NMD factor in C. elegans and in vertebrates. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which DHX34 activates NMD in human cells. We show that DHX34 is recruited to the SURF complex via its preferential interaction with hypophosphorylated UPF1. A series of molecular transitions induced by DHX34 include enhanced recruitment of UPF2, increased UPF1 phosphorylation, and dissociation of eRF3 from UPF1. Thus, DHX34 promotes mRNP remodeling and triggers the conversion from the SURF complex to the DECID complex resulting in NMD activation.

  19. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide enhances salt tolerance by coupling the reestablishment of redox homeostasis and preventing salt-induced K⁺ loss in seedlings of Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Diwen; Mao, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Li, Feng; Wu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Jing; He, Ziyi; Cui, Weiti; Xie, Yanjie

    2014-08-01

    Despite the external application of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conferring plant tolerance against various environmental cues, the physiological significance of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES)-associated endogenous H2S production involved in salt-stress signaling was poorly understood. To address this gap, the participation of in planta changes of H2S homeostasis involved in alfalfa salt tolerance was investigated. The increasing concentration of NaCl (from 50 to 300 mM) progressively caused the induction of total l-DES activity and the increase of endogenous H2S production. NaCl-triggered toxicity symptoms (175 mM), including seedling growth inhibition and lipid peroxidation, were alleviated by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; 100 μM), a H2S donor, whereas aggravated by an inhibitor of l-DES or a H2S scavenger. A weaker or negative response was observed in lower or higher dose of NaHS. Further results showed that endogenous l-DES-related H2S modulated several genes/activities of antioxidant defence enzymes, and also regulated the contents of antioxidant compounds, thus counterbalancing the NaCl-induced lipid peroxidation. Moreover, H2S maintained K(+)/Na(+) homeostasis by preventing the NaCl-triggered K(+) efflux, which might be result form the impairment of SKOR expression. Together, our findings indicated that endogenous H2S homeostasis enhance salt tolerance by coupling the reestablishment of redox balance and restraining K(+) efflux in alfalfa seedlings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Downregulation of Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Pathway Is Involved in Mitochondrion-Related Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Induced by High Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Zong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study aimed to investigate whether endogenous H2S pathway was involved in high-salt-stimulated mitochondria-related vascular endothelial cell (VEC apoptosis. Methods. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were used in the study. H2S content in the supernatant was detected. Western blot was used to detect expression of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE, cleaved-caspase-3, and mitochondrial and cytosolic cytochrome c (cytc. Fluorescent probes were used to quantitatively detect superoxide anion generation and measure the in situ superoxide anion generation in HUVEC. Mitochondrial membrane pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase-9 activities were measured. The cell apoptosis was detected by cell death ELISA and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL methods. Results. High-salt treatment downregulated the endogenous VEC H2S/CSE pathway, in association with increased generation of oxygen free radicals, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore and leakage of mitochondrial cytc, activated cytoplasmic caspase-9 and caspase-3 and subsequently induced VEC apoptosis. However, supplementation of H2S donor markedly inhibited VEC oxidative stress and mitochondria-related VEC apoptosis induced by high salt. Conclusion. H2S/CSE pathway is an important endogenous defensive system in endothelial cells antagonizing high-salt insult. The protective mechanisms for VEC damage might involve inhibiting oxidative stress and protecting mitochondrial injury.

  1. Radiation-induced in vitro mutagenesis system for salt tolerance and other agronomic characters in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok A. Nikam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray-induced in vitro mutagenesis and selection for salt (NaCl tolerance were investigated in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.. Embryogenic callus cultures were irradiated (10 to 80 Gy and subjected to in vitro selection by exposure of irradiated callus to NaCl (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mmol L− 1. Increasing NaCl concentrations resulted in growth reduction and increased membrane damage. Salt-selected callus lines were characterized by the accumulation of proline, glycine betaine, and Na+ and K+ concentration. Higher accumulation of proline and glycine betaine was observed in NaCl stressed callus irradiated at 20 Gy. Na+ concentration increased and K+ concentration decreased with increasing salt level. Irradiated callus showed 50–60% regeneration under NaCl stress, and in vitro-regenerated plants were acclimatized in the greenhouse, with 80–85% survival. A total of 138 irradiated and salt-selected selections were grown to maturity and their agronomic performance was evaluated under normal and saline conditions. Of these, 18 mutant clones were characterized for different agro-morphological characters and some of the mutant clones exhibited improved sugar yield with increased Brix%, number of millable canes, and yield. The result suggest that radiation-induced mutagenesis offers an effective way to enhance genetic variation in sugarcane.

  2. Cisplatin-Induced Renal Salt Wasting Requiring over 12 Liters of 3% Saline Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuong-Chi; Reddy, Pavani; Qaqish, Shaker; Kamath, Ashvin; Rodriguez, Johana; Bolos, David; Zalom, Martina; Pham, Phuong-Thu

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is known to induce Fanconi syndrome and renal salt wasting (RSW). RSW typically only requires transient normal saline (NS) support. We report a severe RSW case that required 12 liters of 3% saline. A 57-year-old woman with limited stage small cell cancer was admitted for cisplatin (80 mg/m(2)) and etoposide (100 mg/m(2)) therapy. Patient's serum sodium (SNa) decreased from 138 to 133 and 125 mEq/L within 24 and 48 hours of cisplatin therapy, respectively. A diagnosis of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) was initially made. Despite free water restriction, patient's SNa continued to decrease in association with acute onset of headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Three percent saline (3%S) infusion with rates up to 1400 mL/day was required to correct and maintain SNa at 135 mEq/L. Studies to evaluate Fanconi syndrome revealed hypophosphatemia and glucosuria in the absence of serum hyperglycemia. The natriuresis slowed down by 2.5 weeks, but 3%S support was continued for a total volume of 12 liters over 3.5 weeks. Attempts of questionable benefits to slow down glomerular filtration included the administration of ibuprofen and benazepril. To our knowledge, this is the most severe case of RSW ever reported with cisplatin.

  3. RAGE-aptamer attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate/salt-induced renal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kensei; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Yokoro, Miyuki; Ito, Sakuya; Kodama, Goh; Kaida, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yosuke; Ando, Ryotaro; Yamada-Obara, Nana; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Matsui, Takanori; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Brooks, Craig R; Ueda, Seiji; Okuda, Seiya; Fukami, Kei

    2018-02-08

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and its downstream signaling play an important role in hypertensive renal injury. The interaction of advanced glycation end products (AGE) with their receptor (RAGE) is involved in the progression of renal disease. However, the pathological crosstalk between AGE-RAGE axis and MR system in kidney derangement remains unclear. We screened DNA-aptamer directed against RAGE (RAGE-apt) in vitro and examined its effects on renal injury in uninephrectomized deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-induced hypertensive mice. RAGE, GTP-bound Rac-1 (Rac1), and MR were co-localized in the podocytes of DOCA mice. The deletion of RAGE gene significantly inhibited mesangial matrix expansion and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DOCA mice, which was associated with the reduction of glomerular oxidative stress, MR, Rac1, and urinary albumin excretion (UAE) levels. RAGE-apt attenuated the increase in carboxymethyllysine (CML), RAGE, nitrotyrosine, Rac1, and MR levels in the kidneys and reduced UAE in DOCA mice. Aldosterone (Aldo) increased nitrotyrosine, CML, and RAGE gene expression in murine podocytes, whereas CML stimulated MR and Rac1 levels, which were blocked by RAGE-apt. The present study indicates the crosstalk between the AGE-RAGE axis and Aldo-MR system, suggesting that RAGE-apt may be a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of MR-associated renal diseases.

  4. Reentrant Variation of Single-Chain Elasticity of Polyelectrolyte Induced by Monovalent Salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Qian, Lu; Cui, Shuxun

    2017-04-27

    The interactions between monovalent counterions and polyelectrolyte are important in chemical and biological systems. The condensation and screening effect of counterions complicate the polyelectrolyte solutions. By means of single-molecule AFM, the single-chain mechanics of a strong polyelectrolyte, poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (PSSNa), in KCl aqueous solutions over almost whole concentration range have been studied. The M-FJC model has been used to describe the single-chain elasticity of PSSNa in KCl solutions with a parameter of single-chain modulus (K 0 ). Along with the increase of the concentration of KCl from zero to almost the saturation concentration, a reentrant variation of K 0 of single PSSNa chain can be observed. When [K + ] is between 0.01 to 3 M, the charges on the PSSNa backbone are almost completely screened, i.e., the PSSNa chain is virtually neutral in this case. Because K 0 has a positive correlation with the net charge of the polymer chain, the increased K 0 at very high KCl concentrations (≥3.5 M) indicates that the chain is charged again. Due to the negative charges on the backbone of PSSNa, only the positively charged counterions (K + ) can be adsorbed on the chain. Thus, the PSSNa chain should be positively charged when KCl concentrations ≥3.5 M. That is, the charge inversion occurs in this case, which is induced by a monovalent salt. This finding may lay the foundation for the future applications of drug delivery and gene therapy.

  5. Evaluation of genetic damage induced by glyphosate isopropylamine salt using Tradescantia bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Moya, Carlos; Silva, Mónica Reynoso; Arámbula, Alma Rosa Villalobos; Sandoval, Alfonso Islas; Vasquez, Hugo Castañeda; González Montes, Rosa María

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate is noted for being non-toxic in fishes, birds and mammals (including humans). Nevertheless, the degree of genotoxicity is seriously controversial. In this work, various concentrations of a glyphosate isopropylamine salt were tested using two methods of genotoxicity assaying, viz., the pink mutation assay with Tradescantia (4430) and the comet assay with nuclei from staminal cells of the same plant. Staminal nuclei were studied in two different forms, namely nuclei from exposed plants, and nuclei exposed directly. Using the pink mutation assay, isopropylamine induced a total or partial loss of color in staminal cells, a fundamental criterion utilized in this test. Consequently, its use is not recommended when studying genotoxicity with agents that produce pallid staminal cells. The comet assay system detected statistically significant (p < 0.01) genotoxic activity by isopropylamine, when compared to the negative control in both the nuclei of treated plants and directly treated nuclei, but only the treated nuclei showed a dose-dependent increase. Average migration in the nuclei of treated plants increased, when compared to that in treated nuclei. This was probably due, either to the permanence of isopropylamine in inflorescences, or to the presence of secondary metabolites. In conclusion, isopropylamine possesses strong genotoxic activity, but its detection can vary depending on the test systems used. PMID:21637555

  6. Evaluation of genetic damage induced by glyphosate isopropylamine salt using Tradescantia bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alvarez-Moya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is noted for being non-toxic in fishes, birds and mammals (including humans. Nevertheless, the degree of genotoxicity is seriously controversial. In this work, various concentrations of a glyphosate isopropylamine salt were tested using two methods of genotoxicity assaying, viz., the pink mutation assay with Tradescantia (4430 and the comet assay with nuclei from staminal cells of the same plant. Staminal nuclei were studied in two different forms, namely nuclei from exposed plants, and nuclei exposed directly. Using the pink mutation assay, isopropylamine induced a total or partial loss of color in staminal cells, a fundamental criterion utilized in this test. Consequently, its use is not recommended when studying genotoxicity with agents that produce pallid staminal cells. The comet assay system detected statistically significant (p < 0.01 genotoxic activity by isopropylamine, when compared to the negative control in both the nuclei of treated plants and directly treated nuclei, but only the treated nuclei showed a dose-dependent increase. Average migration in the nuclei of treated plants increased, when compared to that in treated nuclei. This was probably due, either to the permanence of isopropylamine in inflorescences, or to the presence of secondary metabolites. In conclusion, isopropylamine possesses strong genotoxic activity, but its detection can vary depending on the test systems used.

  7. Dissipation of excess excitation energy by drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching in two species of drought-tolerant moss: desiccation-induced acceleration of photosystem II fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-07-02

    Drought-tolerant mosses survive with their green color intact even after long periods of dehydration that would kill ordinary plants. The mechanism of dissipation of excitation energy under drought stress was studied in two species of drought-tolerant moss, Rhytidium rugosum and Ceratodon purpureus. They showed severe quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence (PSII) after being dehydrated in the dark. Quenching was induced by the acceleration of the fluorescence decay rate. This drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching (designated d-NPQ) was fully reversed by rehydration. Global analysis of fluorescence decay at 77 K indicated rapid 46 ps transfer of excitation energy from the 680-690 nm PSII bands to a 710 nm band, and to 740-760 nm bands. The latter bands decayed to the ground state with the same time constant showing the rapid dissipation of excitation energy into heat. The quenching by d-NPQ in dry moss was stronger than that by PSII charge separation or nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ), which operates under hydrating conditions. Drought-tolerant mosses, thus, dissipate excess excitation energy into heat. The d-NPQ mechanism in moss resembles that reported in lichens, suggesting their common origin.

  8. Acalypha wilkesiana Muell Arg Induced Diuresis in Salt-Loaded Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    ABSTRACT: Effect of the leaves on the weight, urine output, and plasma and urine chemistry of salt-loaded rats was investigated. The control group received a diet consisting 100% of the commercial feed; the test-control received a diet consisting 8% salt and 92% commercial feed, while the test received diet containing 8% ...

  9. Aggregation-induced emission of a novel conjugated phosphonium salt and its application in mitochondrial imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-dan; Zhang, Da-wei; Gong, Wei-tao; Lin, Yuan; Ning, Gui-ling

    2013-06-01

    A new conjugated phosphonium salt TPP was synthesized readily from phosphine-triggered ring-opening of 2,4,5-triphenylpyrylium salt. In aqueous solution, it exhibited interesting AIEE properties and self-assembled into fluorescent nanoparticles, which can be used as a fluorescence probe to image mitochondria in cells.

  10. Salt stress induces changes in the proteomic profile of micropropagated sugarcane shoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Ricardo S.; Heringer, Angelo S.; Rangel, Patricia L.; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Grativol, Clícia; Veiga, Carlos F. M.; Souza-Filho, Gonçalo A.

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the most common stresses in agricultural regions worldwide. In particular, sugarcane is affected by salt stress conditions, and no sugarcane cultivar presently show high productivity accompanied by a tolerance to salt stress. Proteomic analysis allows elucidation of the important pathways involved in responses to various abiotic stresses at the biochemical and molecular levels. Thus, this study aimed to analyse the proteomic effects of salt stress in micropropagated shoots of two sugarcane cultivars (CB38-22 and RB855536) using a label-free proteomic approach. The mass spectrometry proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006075. The RB855536 cultivar is more tolerant to salt stress than CB38-22. A quantitative label-free shotgun proteomic analysis identified 1172 non-redundant proteins, and 1160 of these were observed in both cultivars in the presence or absence of NaCl. Compared with CB38-22, the RB855536 cultivar showed a greater abundance of proteins involved in non-enzymatic antioxidant mechanisms, ion transport, and photosynthesis. Some proteins, such as calcium-dependent protein kinase, photosystem I, phospholipase D, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were more abundant in the RB855536 cultivar under salt stress. Our results provide new insights into the response of sugarcane to salt stress, and the changes in the abundance of these proteins might be important for the acquisition of ionic and osmotic homeostasis during exposure to salt stress. PMID:28419154

  11. Salt-induced changes in germination and vegetative stages of Anethum graveolens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehr, Zahra Setayesh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to determine the response of dill (Anethum graveolens L. to salt stress during germination and vegetative stages. In the first stage, response of dill seeds germination to levels of salinity (0, 50, 75 and 100 mM was investigated. In the second stage, influence of salt stress on physiological and biochemical parameters in dill seedlings were investigated. Results showed germination rate and percentage, radical, plumule length and dry weight decreased significantly with the increase of salinity levels. Effect of salt stress on amount of chlorophyll a, b and total was significant. Results indicated that, amount of proline, total soluble carbohydrates and proteins and catalase (CAT activity in shoots and roots significantly increased with the increase of salinity. These results showed that dill maintained higher carbohydrates, proteins, proline and activity of CAT under salt stress and these traits could have partially to its salt tolerance.

  12. Arabidopsis RabF1 (ARA6) Is Involved in Salt Stress and Dark-Induced Senescence (DIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Congfei; Karim, Sazzad; Zhang, Hongsheng; Aronsson, Henrik

    2017-02-01

    Arabidopsis small GTPase RabF1 (ARA6) functions in endosomal vesicle transport and may play a crucial role in recycling and degradation of molecules, thus involved in stress responses. Here we have reported that complementary overexpression lines RabF1OE (overexpression), GTPase mutants RabF1Q93L (constitutively active) and RabF1S47N (dominant negative) lines show longer root growth than wild-type, rabF1 knockout and N-myristoylation deletion (Δ1-29, N-terminus) complementary overexpression mutant plants under salt induced stress, which indicates that N-myristoylation of RabF1 is indispensable for salt tolerance. Moreover, RabF1 is highly expressed during senescence and RabF1OE lines were more tolerant of dark-induced senescence (DIS) than wild-type and rabF1.

  13. Arabidopsis RabF1 (ARA6 Is Involved in Salt Stress and Dark-Induced Senescence (DIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congfei Yin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis small GTPase RabF1 (ARA6 functions in endosomal vesicle transport and may play a crucial role in recycling and degradation of molecules, thus involved in stress responses. Here we have reported that complementary overexpression lines RabF1OE (overexpression, GTPase mutants RabF1Q93L (constitutively active and RabF1S47N (dominant negative lines show longer root growth than wild-type, rabF1 knockout and N-myristoylation deletion (Δ1−29, N-terminus complementary overexpression mutant plants under salt induced stress, which indicates that N-myristoylation of RabF1 is indispensable for salt tolerance. Moreover, RabF1 is highly expressed during senescence and RabF1OE lines were more tolerant of dark-induced senescence (DIS than wild-type and rabF1.

  14. A closer look at salt loaded microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, M.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Many walls of ancient buildings are covered with plaster layers. Amongst the most recurrent causes of damage of plasters and substrates are moisture and salt decay processes. To combat these salt problems, special salt resistant plasters have been developed for application on salt loaded substrates.

  15. Observation of neutrino induced diffractive $D_s^{*+}$ production and subsequent decay $D_s^{*+} \\to D_s^+ \\to \\tau^+ \\to \\mu^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P; Artamonov, S A; Barbuto, E; Di Bartolomeo, A; Bonekämper, D; Bozza, C; Brooijmans, G; Brunner, J; Bülte, A; Buontempo, S; Capone, A; Cassol, F; Catanesi, M G; Chikawa, M; Cocco, A G; Cussans, D G; D'Ambrosio, N; Van Dantzig, R; De Lellis, G; De Pedis, D; Di Capua, E; Dore, U; El-Aidi, R; Ereditato, A; Favart, D; Ferreira, R; Fiorillo, G; Frekers, D; Goldberg, J; Gorbunov, P; Grégoire, G; Grella, G; Hara, T; Hérin, J; Hoshino, K; Iovane, G; Ishi, Y; De Jong, M; Kawamura, T; Kayis, A; Kazuno, M; Khovanskii, V D; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Konijn, J; Kotaka, Y; Kozaki, T; Litmaath, M; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Meinhard, H; Melzer, O; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Miyanishi, M; Muciaccia, M T; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Niu, E; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Obayashi, Y; Ogawa, S; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R G C; Onengüt, G; Øverås, H; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Park, I G; Pesen, E; Piredda, G; Van der Poel, C A F J; Radicioni, E; Ricciardi, S; Righini, P; Romano, G; Rondeshagen, D; Rosa, G; Saltzberg, D; Saitta, B; Santacesaria, R; Sato, O; Sato, Y; Satta, A; Shamanov, V V; Shibuya, H; Simone, S; Song, J S; Sorrentino, S; Strolin, P; Tezuka, I; Tioukov, V; Tolun, P; Toshito, T; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Ushida, N; Van der Donckt, M; Van de Vyver, B L; Vilain, P; Visschers, J L; Vivolo, L; Weinheimer, C; Wilquet, G; Winter, Klaus; Wolff, T; Wong, H; Yoon, C S; Zeyrek, M T; Zucchelli, P

    1998-01-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a neutrino induced charged-current interaction with two subsequent decays of short-lived particles close to the interaction vertex. This rare double- kink signature in the CHORUS emulsion target is interpreted as a $D_s^{*+}$ production followed by the decay chain $D_s^{*+} \\rightarrow D_s^+ \\gamma, D_s^+ \\rightarrow \\tau^+ \

  16. Salt-tolerance mechanisms induced in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni: Effects on mineral nutrition, antioxidative metabolism and steviol glycoside content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantabella, Daniel; Piqueras, Abel; Acosta-Motos, José Ramón; Bernal-Vicente, Agustina; Hernández, José A; Díaz-Vivancos, Pedro

    2017-06-01

    In order to cope with challenges linked to climate change such as salinity, plants must develop a wide spectrum of physiological and molecular mechanisms to rapidly adapt. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni plants are a case in point. According to our findings, salt stress has no significant effect on plant growth in these plants, which accumulate sodium (Na + ) in their roots, thus avoiding excessive Na + accumulation in leaves. Furthermore, salt stress (NaCl stress) increases the potassium (K + ), calcium (Ca 2+ ), chloride ion (Cl - ) and proline concentrations in Stevia leaves, which could contribute to osmotic adjustment. We also found that long-term NaCl stress does not produce changes in chlorophyll concentrations in Stevia leaves, reflecting a mechanism to protect the photosynthesis process. Interestingly, an increase in chlorophyll b (Chlb) content occured in the oldest plants studied. In addition, we found that NaCl induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in Stevia leaves and that this accumulation was more evident in the presence of 5 g/L NaCl, the highest concentration used in the study. Nevertheless, Stevia plants are able to induce (16 d) or maintain (25 d) antioxidant enzymes to cope with NaCl-induced oxidative stress. Low salt levels did not affect steviolbioside and rebaudioside A contents. Our results suggest that Stevia plants induce tolerance mechanisms in order to minimize the deleterious effects of salt stress. We can thus conclude that saline waters can be used to grow Stevia plants and for Steviol glycosides (SGs) production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Salt stress increases the expression of p5cs gene and induces proline accumulation in cactus pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Ortega, Claudia O; Ochoa-Alfaro, Ana E; Reyes-Agüero, Juan A; Aguado-Santacruz, Gerardo A; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2008-01-01

    Proline (Pro) is one of the most accumulated osmolytes in salinity and water deficit conditions in plants. In the present study, we measured the Pro content, the activity and the expression level of delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS: gamma-glutamyl kinase, EC 2.7.2.11 and glutamate-5-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, EC 1.2.1.41), a key regulatory enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of Pro, in cactus pear (Opuntia streptacantha) subjected to 6, 9 and 11 days of salt stress. Treatment with NaCl of O. streptacantha young plants resulted in a decrease in the cladode thickness and root length, and in a significant and gradual accumulation of Pro in young cladodes, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. P5CS activity, studied as gamma-glutamyl kinase, was reduced at all times as a consequence of salt treatment, except at the sixth day at 75 and 150mM of NaCl, where a slight increase was observed. We isolated an open reading frame (ORF) fragment of p5cs gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of the P5CS protein exhibited 90.4% of identity with the P5CS protein from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Osp5cs gene of O. streptacantha was induced by salt stress at 9 and 11 days of treatment. Furthermore, ABA-induced Osp5cs gene expression was observed in cladodes of cactus pear young plants. We observed an evident correlation between the transcript up-regulation and the Pro accumulation under salt stress; however, these results do not parallel with the changes in P5CS enzymatic activity. This Pro accumulation might function as an osmolyte for the intracellular osmotic adjustment and might be playing a critical role in protecting photosynthetic activity in O. streptacantha plants under salt stress.

  18. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum TWK10-Fermented Soymilk on Deoxycorticosterone Acetate-Salt-Induced Hypertension and Associated Dementia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Hua Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress resulting from excessive production of reactive oxygen species is the major mediator of neuronal cell degeneration observed in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and vascular dementia (VaD. Additionally, hypertension has been shown to be a positive risk factor for VaD. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum strain TWK10 (TWK10-fermented soymilk on the protection of PC-12 cells in H2O2-, oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD- and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA-salt-induced rat models of VaD. Notably, the viabilities of H2O2-treated PC-12 cells and OGD model were significantly increased by treatment with TWK10-fermented soymilk ethanol extract (p < 0.05. In addition, oral administration of TWK10-fermented soymilk extract in DOCA-salt hypertension-induced VaD rats resulted in a significant decrease in blood pressure (p < 0.05, which was regulated by inhibiting ACE activity and promoting NO production, in addition to decreased escape latency and increased target crossing (p < 0.05. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that TWK10-fermented soymilk extract could improve learning and memory in DOCA-salt hypertension-induced VaD rats by acting as a blood pressure-lowering and neuroprotective agent.

  19. Increased salt consumption induces body water conservation and decreases fluid intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakova, Natalia; Kitada, Kento; Lerchl, Kathrin; Dahlmann, Anke; Birukov, Anna; Daub, Steffen; Kopp, Christoph; Pedchenko, Tetyana; Zhang, Yahua; Beck, Luis; Johannes, Bernd; Marton, Adriana; Müller, Dominik N; Rauh, Manfred; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2017-05-01

    The idea that increasing salt intake increases drinking and urine volume is widely accepted. We tested the hypothesis that an increase in salt intake of 6 g/d would change fluid balance in men living under ultra-long-term controlled conditions. Over the course of 2 separate space flight simulation studies of 105 and 205 days' duration, we exposed 10 healthy men to 3 salt intake levels (12, 9, or 6 g/d). All other nutrients were maintained constant. We studied the effect of salt-driven changes in mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid urinary excretion on day-to-day osmolyte and water balance. A 6-g/d increase in salt intake increased urine osmolyte excretion, but reduced free-water clearance, indicating endogenous free water accrual by urine concentration. The resulting endogenous water surplus reduced fluid intake at the 12-g/d salt intake level. Across all 3 levels of salt intake, half-weekly and weekly rhythmical mineralocorticoid release promoted free water reabsorption via the renal concentration mechanism. Mineralocorticoid-coupled increases in free water reabsorption were counterbalanced by rhythmical glucocorticoid release, with excretion of endogenous osmolyte and water surplus by relative urine dilution. A 6-g/d increase in salt intake decreased the level of rhythmical mineralocorticoid release and elevated rhythmical glucocorticoid release. The projected effect of salt-driven hormone rhythm modulation corresponded well with the measured decrease in water intake and an increase in urine volume with surplus osmolyte excretion. Humans regulate osmolyte and water balance by rhythmical mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid release, endogenous accrual of surplus body water, and precise surplus excretion. Federal Ministry for Economics and Technology/DLR; the Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research; the NIH; the American Heart Association (AHA); the Renal Research Institute; and the TOYOBO Biotechnology Foundation. Food products were donated by APETITO

  20. Mechanism of Process-Induced Salt-to-Free Base Transformation of Pharmaceutical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Hansen, Thomas; Qu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    pH-solubility profiles of a model drug in salt form was established and the mechanism of salt-to-free base form transformation was investigated by increasing pH of the system. Wet massing experiments along with suspension experiments were used to investigate the effects of excipients...... on the stability of the salt form. It was found that nucleation of the free base did not occur at pHmax but that instead, a new boundary, the pHmetastable had to be reached before transformation occurred. It was also shown that some excipients impact the stability of the drug, this can help find excipients...

  1. The Taser Induced Fluorescence Spectra And Decay Lifetime Of NI2+ Doped Chrysoberyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanting, Ji; Genwang, Wen; Jun, Oian; Zhende, Chen; Wenbin, Gao; Songhao, Lui

    1985-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental results on the fluorescence spectra and decay lifetime of 3T2---3A2 vibronic transition of NI2+ : BeAl204 with LIFM. The center wavelength of fluorescence spectra is 1.33u , the bandwidth (FWHM) is 0.14u (1.26 - 1.40u), and the center red-shift of fluorescence spectra in relative to absorption spectra is 0.225u at room temperature (300k). The radiation lifetime is 3T2 band is 198 us.

  2. Ethylene antagonizes salt-induced growth retardation and cell death process via transcriptional controlling of ethylene-, BAG- and senescence-associated genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YaJie ePan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The existing question whether ethylene is involved in the modulation of salt-induced cell death to mediate plant salt tolerance is important for understanding the salt tolerance mechanisms. Here, we employed Arabidopsis plants to study the possible role of ethylene in salt-induced growth inhibition and programmed cell death (PCD profiles. The root length, DNA ladder and cell death indicated by Evan’s blue detection were measured by compared to the control or salt-stressed seedlings. Secondly, the protoplasts isolated from plant leaves and dyed with Annexin V-FITC were subjected to flow cytometric (FCM assay. Our results showed that ethylene works effectively in seedling protoplasts, antagonizing salt-included root retardation and restraining cell death both in seedlings or protoplasts. Due to salinity, the entire or partial insensitivity of ethylene signaling resulted in an elevated levels of cell death in ein2-5 and ein3-1 plants and the event were amended in ctr1-1 plants after salt treatment. The subsequent experiment with exogenous ACC further corroborated that ethylene could modulate salt-induced PCD process actively. Plant Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG family genes are recently identified to play an extensive role in plant PCD processes ranging from growth, development to stress responses and even cell death. Our result showed that salinity alone significantly suppressed the transcripts of BAG6, BAG7 and addition of ACC in the saline solution could obviously re-activate BAG6 and BAG7 expressions, which might play a key role to inhibit the salt-induced cell death. In summary, our research implies that ethylene and salinity antagonistically control BAG family-, ethylene-, and senescence-related genes to alleviate the salt-induced cell death.

  3. Silencing of the CaCP Gene Delays Salt- and Osmotic-Induced Leaf Senescence in Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Juan Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteinases have been known to participate in developmental processes and in response to stress in plants. Our present research reported that a novel CP gene, CaCP, was involved in leaf senescence in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.. The full-length CaCP cDNA is comprised of 1316 bp, contains 1044 nucleotides in open reading frame (ORF, and encodes a 347 amino acid protein. The deduced protein belongs to the papain-like cysteine proteases (CPs superfamily, containing a highly conserved ERFNIN motif, a GCNGG motif and a conserved catalytic triad. This protein localized to the vacuole of plant cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of CaCP gene was dramatically higher in leaves and flowers than that in roots, stems and fruits. Moreover, CaCP transcripts were induced upon during leaf senescence. CaCP expression was upregulated by plant hormones, especially salicylic acid. CaCP was also significantly induced by abiotic and biotic stress treatments, including high salinity, mannitol and Phytophthora capsici. Loss of function of CaCP using the virus-induced gene-silencing technique in pepper plants led to enhanced tolerance to salt- and osmotic-induced stress. Taken together, these results suggest that CaCP is a senescence-associated gene, which is involved in developmental senescence and regulates salt- and osmotic-induced leaf senescence in pepper.

  4. Salt loading in canola oil fed SHRSP rats induces endothelial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annateresa Papazzo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine if 50 days of canola oil intake in the absence or presence of salt loading affects: (1 antioxidant and oxidative stress markers, (2 aortic mRNA of NADPH oxidase (NOX subunits and superoxide dismutase (SOD isoforms and (3 endothelial function in SHRSP rats. SHRSP rats were fed a diet containing 10 wt/wt% soybean oil or 10 wt/wt% canola oil, and given tap water or water containing 1% NaCl for 50 days. Without salt, canola oil significantly increased RBC SOD, plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, aortic p22 (phox , NOX2 and CuZn-SOD mRNA, and decreased RBC glutathione peroxidase activity. With salt, canola oil reduced RBC SOD and catalase activity, LDL-C, and p22 (phox mRNA compared with canola oil alone, whereas plasma malondialdehyde (MDA was reduced and RBC MDA and LDL-C were higher. With salt, the canola oil group had significantly reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilating responses to ACh and contractile responses to norepinephrine compared with the canola oil group without salt and to the WKY rats. These results indicate that ingestion of canola oil increases O2 (- generation, and that canola oil ingestion in combination with salt leads to endothelial dysfunction in the SHRSP model.

  5. Potential for α -induced nuclear scattering, reaction and decay, and a resonance-pole-decay model with exact explicit analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Basudeb; Bhoi, Swagatika

    2017-10-01

    The decay of α particle from a nucleus is viewed as a quantum resonance state of a two-body scattering process of the α +daughter nucleus pair governed by a novel nucleus-nucleus potential in squared Woods-Saxon form. By the application of the rigorous optical model (OM) potential scattering (S -matrix) theory the genuineness of the potential for the system is established by giving a good explanation of the elastic scattering and reaction cross sections data of the α +nucleus pair. From the pole position in the complex momentum (k ) plane of the S matrix of the real part of the OM potential defined above, the energy and width of the resonance state akin to the decaying state of emission of α particle are extracted and from this width, the result of the α -decay half-life is derived to account for the experimental result of the half-life in the cases of a large number of α emitters including heavy and superheavy nuclei. The S matrix of the real OM potential is replaced by an analytical function expressed in terms of exact Schrödinger solutions of a global potential that closely represents the real Coulomb-nuclear interaction in the interior and the pure Coulomb wave functions outside, and the resonant poles of this S matrix in the complex momentum plane are used to give satisfactory results of decay half-lives of α coming out from varieties of nuclei.

  6. A Distinct, Sequence-Induced Conformation Is Required for Recognition of the Constitutive Decay Element RNA by Roquin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codutti, Luca; Leppek, Kathrin; Zálešák, Jan; Windeisen, Volker; Masiewicz, Pawel; Stoecklin, Georg; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-08-04

    The constitutive decay element (CDE) of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) mRNA (Tnf) represents the prototype of a class of RNA motifs that mediate rapid degradation of mRNAs encoding regulators of the immune response and development. CDE-type RNAs are hairpin structures featuring a tri-nucleotide loop. The protein Roquin recognizes CDE-type stem loops and recruits the Ccr4-Caf1-Not deadenylase complex to the mRNA, thereby inducing its decay. Stem recognition does not involve nucleotide bases; however, there is a strong stem sequence requirement for functional CDEs. Here, we present the solution structures of the natural Tnf CDE and of a CDE mutant with impaired Roquin binding. We find that the two CDEs adopt unique and distinct structures in both the loop and the stem, which explains the ability of Roquin to recognize stem loops in a sequence-specific manner. Our findings result in a relaxed consensus motif for prediction of new CDE stem loops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction-induced decay of a heteronuclear two-atom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Jiaheng; Liu, Min; He, Xiaodong; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Kunpeng; Wang, Jin; Papoular, D. J.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two-atom systems in small traps are of fundamental interest for understanding the role of interactions in degenerate cold gases and for the creation of quantum gates in quantum information processing with single-atom traps. One of the key quantities is the inelastic relaxation (decay) time when one of the atoms or both are in a higher hyperfine state. Here we measure this quantity in a heteronuclear system of 87Rb and 85Rb in a micro optical trap and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the presence of both fast and slow relaxation processes, depending on the choice of the initial hyperfine states. This experimental method allows us to single out a particular relaxation process thus provides an extremely clean platform for collisional physics studies. Our results have also implications for engineering of quantum states via controlled collisions and creation of two-qubit quantum gates. PMID:26199051

  8. Induced radioactivity in the target station and decay tunnel from a 4MW proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Otto, T; Silari, Marco

    2003-01-01

    An important aspect of a future CERN Neutrino Factory is the material activation arising from a 2.2 GeV, 4 MW proton beam striking a mercury target. A first estimation of the hadronic inelastic interactions and the production of residual nuclei in the target, the magnetic horn, the decay tunnel, the surrounding rock and a downstream dump has been performed by the Monte Carlo hadronic cascade code FLUKA. The aim is both to assess the dose equivalent rate to be expected during maintenance work and to evaluate the amount of residual radioactivity, which will have to be disposed of after the facility has ceased operation. This paper discusses the first results of such calculations.

  9. An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law Wave Height Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    current distribution based on the power law of ’wave - hegiht, decay in the surf zone developed in Chapter :1. The model is. in e ,,d- e tD e an...slopes and large values of Y the n-valoe will te large, "ne ,!rrent: :4str4ution will be more peaked, an-: thLe " 3cat -:n of toe nax-- z" ’e closer to the...2? R E AD *SLCPE,5INDEX N=0. 32-0.0096/SL0PE-0 . 657*BSINDEX+0. 043*BINDEX/SLOPE 00D TD 74 -*P 72 7 F CR M A T(𔃻X,𔃻nput power law exponent, n

  10. Seed priming with hormones does not alleviate induced oxidative stress in maize seedlings subjected to salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Falleiros Carvalho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seed priming with hormones has been an efficient method for increasing seed vigor as well as seedling growth under stressful conditions. These responses have in the past been attributed to the activation of antioxidant systems in a range of crops. The results described in this work show that hormonal priming with methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid or CEPA (chloroethylphosphonic acid, an ethylene (ET releaser, does not induce the antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase or glutathione reductase in maize seedlings subjected to salt stress. The enhanced biomass of maize seedlings under salt stress that was observed only from ET priming indicates that the stress tolerance in maize from ethylene priming is a fundamental process for stress tolerance acquisition, which is explained, however, by other biochemical mechanisms but not by changes in the antioxidant system.

  11. Effects of Clofibrate on Salt Loading-Induced Hypertension in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of clofibrate on the hemodynamic and renal manifestations of increased saline intake were analyzed. Four groups of male Wistar rats were treated for five weeks: control, clofibrate (240 mg/kg/day, salt (2% via drinking water, and salt+clofibrate. Body weight, systolic blood pressure (SBP, and heart rate (HR were recorded weekly. Finally, SBP, HR, and morphologic, metabolic, plasma, and renal variables were measured. Salt increased SBP, HR, urinary isoprostanes, NOx, ET, vasopressin and proteinuria and reduced plasma free T4 (FT4 and tissue FT4 and FT3 versus control rats. Clofibrate prevented the increase in SBP produced by salt administration, reduced the sodium balance, and further reduced plasma and tissue thyroid hormone levels. However, clofibrate did not modify the relative cardiac mass, NOx, urinary ET, and vasopressin of saline-loaded rats. In conclusion, chronic clofibrate administration prevented the blood pressure elevation of salt-loaded rats by decreasing sodium balance and reducing thyroid hormone levels.

  12. Effects of chlorpromazine hydrochloride on bile salt synthesis, bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in the rhesus monkey: a model for chlorpromazine-induced cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, E; Small, D M; Carey, M C

    1979-02-01

    We studied the acute effects of intravenous infusions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride on bile salt synthesis, bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in the alert female Rhesus monkey prepared with a total biliary fistula and in a steady bile salt secretory state. In twelve studies (three animals), five doses of radiolabelled chlorpromazine hydrochloride (1-10 mg identical to 2.8-28 mumol/kg) were infused intravenously for 1 h in random order. Cholestasis was induced within minutes in all experiments. The radiolabel appeared rapidly in bile, with similar recoveries in bile and urine and a 90% total cumulative output in 4 days. Both bile flow, bile salt and other biliary lipid outputs were inhibited in a dose related and reversible manner. The apparent bile salt independent bile flow was consistently abolished, and a prompt return to basal values occurred when biliary concentration of the drug and metabolities fell below 1-2 mM. When chlorpromazine hydrochloride was infused at three doses (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg identical to 7-28 mumol/kg) during constant intravenous infusion of 14C sodium taurocholate (300 mumol/h), bile flow, total bile salt output and 14C taurocholate output decreased within minutes. This was accompanied by a progressive rise in the serum 14C taurocholate concentration. After 90 min the taurocholate specific activity in bile increased significantly indicating that bile salt synthesis was inhibited. Secretion of retained bile salts and reversal of inhibition of bile salt synthesis occurred with time: the course of both events was correlated with the dose of the drug. Thus, in monkeys, chlorpromazine hydrochloride induces reversible, dose related cholestasis suppression of the bile salt dependent and independent flow, inhibition of bile salt synthesis and impairment of biliary lipid secretion. We suggest that these effects are due to both bile salt-chlorpromazine interactions and the effect of the latter on canalicular and other membranes.

  13. Characterization of pore system and their influence on decay rates caused by salt weathering on limestones and dolostones quarried in Abanto (Zaragoza, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisbert, J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Abanto natural stone is a rock used in modern constructions and currently quarried as an ornamental rock in Abanto, Zaragoza. The varieties described here are a limestone with depositional texture and a crystalline limestone. In this work we have carried out a detailed study of the mineralogy, texture, hydric behaviour, pore system characteristics, dynamic behaviour and behaviour against the effects of salt crystallisation. After 30 cycles of salts crystallization, the weight loss in these rocks is lower than 0.5%. This low weathering is a consequence of the configuration of their pore system, characterised by a low open porosity and high percentages of microporosity with pore-throat sizes on average of less than a 0.2 µm. The petrographical and physical characteristics, as well as its high resistance against salt crystallisation confer these rocks a high technical quality for their use as building stones in modern construction.

    La piedra natural de Abanto es un material utilizado en obra civil moderna y explotado como roca Ornamental en Abanto (Zaragoza. Las variedades caracterizadas son una caliza con textura deposicional y una caliza cristalina. En este trabajo se ha realizado un detallado estudio de su mineralogía, textura, características del sistema poroso, comportamiento hídrico, comportamiento dinámico y de su comportamiento frente a la cristalización de sales. La pérdida en peso en estas rocas es inferior al 0,5% tras realizar 30 ciclos de cristalización de sales. Esta baja alterabilidad es consecuencia de la configuración del sistema poroso, caracterizado por presentar una baja porosidad abierta y porcentajes elevados de microporosidad con tamaños de radios de acceso de poro preferentemente inferiores a 0,2 µm. Sus características petrográficas y físicas, así como su elevada resistencia frente a la cristalización de sales, les confieren unas buenas cualidades técnicas para su utilización como

  14. Top quark rare decays via loop-induced FCNC interactions in extended mirror fermion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Q. Hung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavor changing neutral current (FCNC interactions for a top quark t decays into Xq with X represents a neutral gauge or Higgs boson, and q a up- or charm-quark are highly suppressed in the Standard Model (SM due to the Glashow–Iliopoulos–Miami mechanism. Whilst current limits on the branching ratios of these processes have been established at the order of 10−4 from the Large Hadron Collider experiments, SM predictions are at least nine orders of magnitude below. In this work, we study some of these FCNC processes in the context of an extended mirror fermion model, originally proposed to implement the electroweak scale seesaw mechanism for non-sterile right-handed neutrinos. We show that one can probe the process t→Zc for a wide range of parameter space with branching ratios varying from 10−6 to 10−8, comparable with various new physics models including the general two Higgs doublet model with or without flavor violations at tree level, minimal supersymmetric standard model with or without R-parity, and extra dimension model.

  15. Failure Analysis of a Nickel-Plated Electronic Connector Due to Salt-Induced Corrosion (ENGE 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Ri; Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2015-10-01

    When electronic connectors in mobile devices are miniaturized, the thickness of plating decreases. However, this thin plating is expected to decrease the life of the connector due to problems with corrosion. In this study, salt spray aging tests were performed on miniaturized nickel-plated stainless steel electronic connectors to observe failure mechanisms in realistic environments. The tests were performed three times using a 5% NaCl solution in an atmosphere of 45 °C; each test included several cycles where one cycle was one 24-h period consisting of 8 h of salt spray and 16 h without salt spray. The nickel-plating layers were periodically observed by electron probe X-ray micro-analyzer, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy to analyze and identify the corrosion mechanism. We found that the primary failure mode of the nickel plating is blistering and delamination. The corrosion mechanism is typically a chain reaction of several corrosion mechanisms: pitting corrosion --> stress corrosion cracking --> hydrogen-induced cracking --> blistering and delamination. Finally, we discuss countermeasures to prevent corrosion of the nickel layer based on the corrosion mechanisms identified in this study.

  16. Stereoselective differentiation in the Salt-induced Peptide Formation reaction and its relevance for the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plankensteiner, Kristof; Reiner, Hannes; Rode, Bernd M

    2005-04-01

    All living organisms on earth are almost totally made up of biomolecules of only one chiral form. For example, proteins are built almost exclusively of L-amino acids, and sugars are composed of D-saccharides, a fact that is usually referred to as biohomochirality. Its origin is the center of numerous investigations and theories but is not really elucidated yet. The results of experimental investigations of peptide formation in a prebiotically relevant scenario, as described in this paper, give indications on a possible pathway for the synthesis of homochiral L-peptides in the course of the Salt-induced Peptide Formation (SIPF) reaction.

  17. Numerical modeling of salt marsh morphological change induced by Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kelin; Chen, Qin; Wang, Hongqing; Hartig, Ellen K.; Orton, Philip M.

    2018-01-01

    The salt marshes of Jamaica Bay serve as a recreational outlet for New York City residents, mitigate wave impacts during coastal storms, and provide habitat for critical wildlife species. Hurricanes have been recognized as one of the critical drivers of coastal wetland morphology due to their effects on hydrodynamics and sediment transport, deposition, and erosion processes. In this study, the Delft3D modeling suite was utilized to examine the effects of Hurricane Sandy (2012) on salt marsh morphology in Jamaica Bay. Observed marsh elevation change and accretion from rod Surface Elevation Tables and feldspar Marker Horizons (SET-MH) and hydrodynamic measurements during Hurricane Sandy were used to calibrate and validate the wind-waves-surge-sediment transport-morphology coupled model. The model results agreed well with in situ field measurements. The validated model was then used to detect salt marsh morphological change due to Sandy across Jamaica Bay. Model results indicate that the island-wide morphological changes in the bay's salt marshes due to Sandy were in the range of −30 mm (erosion) to +15 mm (deposition), and spatially complex and heterogeneous. The storm generated paired deposition and erosion patches at local scales. Salt marshes inside the west section of the bay showed erosion overall while marshes inside the east section showed deposition from Sandy. The net sediment amount that Sandy brought into the bay is only about 1% of the total amount of reworked sediment within the bay during the storm. Numerical experiments show that waves and vegetation played a critical role in sediment transport and associated wetland morphological change in Jamaica Bay. Furthermore, without the protection of vegetation, the marsh islands of Jamaica Bay would experience both more erosion and less accretion in coastal storms.

  18. Quantification of vegetation-induced allochthonous sediment deposition on coastal salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerch, Mark; Reef, Ruth; Elizabeth, Christie; Iris, Möller; Tom, Spencer; Roberto, Mayerle

    2017-04-01

    Coastal salt marshes are highly valuable ecosystems at the boundary between land and sea and are governed by the quasi-continuous deposition of autochthonous and allochthonous sediment, depending upon prevailing hydrological and hydrodynamic conditions. Continuous sediment deposition is responsible for the ability of coastal salt marshes to adapt their elevation to increasing sea levels and thus their potential to attenuate hydrodynamic energy, which contributes to coastal protection during extreme storm events. Using two high-resolution suspended sediment profilers (Argus Surface Meters IV) in a field flume, we investigate the interactions between vegetation biomass/structure, hydrodynamics and deposition of allochthonous sediment on a UK east coast salt marsh. The measurements allow the estimation of sediment deposition within the field flume and give insights into the dependency of sediment deposition processes within a marsh on the prevailing hydrodynamics, seasonal influences and vegetation characteristics. Preliminary results indicate that sediment trapping efficiency of salt marshes under summer conditions is largely independent of biomass and vegetation structure, since suspended sediment is primarily found within the lower 10cm of the water column. Suspended sediment concentrations are largely controlled by the resuspension of sediment on the adjacent intertidal mudflat and the trapping efficiency appears to depend on the prevailing hydrodynamic conditions and the vertical distribution of the suspended sediments within the water column. The results of this study have important implications for the prediction of the future development of coastal salt marshes and the spatial distribution of sediment deposition, which until now has primarily been described as a function of the distance from a tidal channel or the marsh edge. Many previous field studies, however, found spatial patterns that could not be related to this distance, a knowledge gap to which our

  19. Quantum coherence in the dynamical excitation, ionization, and decaying of neon gas induced by X-ray laser

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yongqiang; Dong, Wenpu; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    We develop a large scale quantum master equation approach to describe dynamical processes of practical open quantum systems driven by both coherent and stochastic interactions by including more than one thousand true states of the systems, motivated by the development of highly bright and fully coherent lasers in the X-ray wavelength regime. The method combines the processes of coherent dynamics induced by the X-ray laser and incoherent relaxations due to spontaneous emissions, Auger decays, and electronic collisions. As examples, theoretical investigation of {\\it real} coherent dynamics of inner-shell electrons of a neon gas, irradiated by a high-intensity X-ray laser with a full temporal coherence, is carried out with the approach. In contrast to the rate equation treatment, we find that coherence can suppress the multiphoton absorptions of a neon gas in the ultra-intense X-ray pulse, due to coherence-induced Rabi oscillations and power broadening effects. We study the influence of coherence on ionization p...

  20. Isolation, identification and expression analysis of salt-induced genes in Suaeda maritima, a natural halophyte, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Binod B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite wealth of information generated on salt tolerance mechanism, its basics still remain elusive. Thus, there is a need of continued effort to understand the salt tolerance mechanism using suitable biotechnological techniques and test plants (species to enable development of salt tolerant cultivars of interest. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to generate information on salt stress responsive genes in a natural halophyte, Suaeda maritima, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (PCR-SSH technique. Results Forward and reverse SSH cDNA libraries were constructed after exposing the young plants to 425 mM NaCl for 24 h. From the forward SSH cDNA library, 429 high quality ESTs were obtained. BLASTX search and TIGR assembler programme revealed overexpression of 167 unigenes comprising 89 singletons and 78 contigs with ESTs redundancy of 81.8%. Among the unigenes, 32.5% were found to be of special interest, indicating novel function of these genes with regard to salt tolerance. Literature search for the known unigenes revealed that only 17 of them were salt-inducible. A comparative analysis of the existing SSH cDNA libraries for NaCl stress in plants showed that only a few overexpressing unigenes were common in them. Moreover, the present study also showed increased expression of phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene, indicating the possible accumulation of a much studied osmoticum, glycinebetaine, in halophyte under salt stress. Functional categorization of the proteins as per the Munich database in general revealed that salt tolerance could be largely determined by the proteins involved in transcription, signal transduction, protein activity regulation and cell differentiation and organogenesis. Conclusion The study provided a clear indication of possible vital role of glycinebetaine in the salt tolerance process in S. maritima. However, the salt-induced expression of a large number of genes

  1. Isolation, identification and expression analysis of salt-induced genes in Suaeda maritima, a natural halophyte, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Binod B; Shaw, Birendra P

    2009-06-05

    Despite wealth of information generated on salt tolerance mechanism, its basics still remain elusive. Thus, there is a need of continued effort to understand the salt tolerance mechanism using suitable biotechnological techniques and test plants (species) to enable development of salt tolerant cultivars of interest. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to generate information on salt stress responsive genes in a natural halophyte, Suaeda maritima, using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (PCR-SSH) technique. Forward and reverse SSH cDNA libraries were constructed after exposing the young plants to 425 mM NaCl for 24 h. From the forward SSH cDNA library, 429 high quality ESTs were obtained. BLASTX search and TIGR assembler programme revealed overexpression of 167 unigenes comprising 89 singletons and 78 contigs with ESTs redundancy of 81.8%. Among the unigenes, 32.5% were found to be of special interest, indicating novel function of these genes with regard to salt tolerance. Literature search for the known unigenes revealed that only 17 of them were salt-inducible. A comparative analysis of the existing SSH cDNA libraries for NaCl stress in plants showed that only a few overexpressing unigenes were common in them. Moreover, the present study also showed increased expression of phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene, indicating the possible accumulation of a much studied osmoticum, glycinebetaine, in halophyte under salt stress. Functional categorization of the proteins as per the Munich database in general revealed that salt tolerance could be largely determined by the proteins involved in transcription, signal transduction, protein activity regulation and cell differentiation and organogenesis. The study provided a clear indication of possible vital role of glycinebetaine in the salt tolerance process in S. maritima. However, the salt-induced expression of a large number of genes involved in a wide range of cellular functions was

  2. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  3. Rare Higgs three body decay induced by top-Higgs FCNC coupling in the littlest Higgs model with T-parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing-Fang; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the search for flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) top quark decays at the LHC, we calculate the rare Higgs three body decay H → Wbc induced by top-Higgs FCNC coupling in the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT). We find that the branching ratio of H → Wbc in the LHT model can reach O(10-7) in the allowed parameter space. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305049, 11405047), Startup Foundation for Doctors of Henan Normal University (11112, qd15207) and Education Department Foundation of Henan Province(14A140010)

  4. Antioxidant responses of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. seedlings to prolonged salt-induced stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavas Musa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of long-term NaCl treatment were investigated in two cultivars of peanut designated as drought-resistant and drought-sensitive. Growth parameters, changes in the concentrations of MDA, H2O2 and proline, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were determined under salinity stress. Growth parameters indicated the superiority of cv. Florispan to cv. Gazipaşa under milder salinity stress treatment. However, comparative analysis of the two cultivars showed that MDA, H2O2, ion leakage levels and photosystem II activities were not significantly different, except for the proline activity, which increased only in Florispan leaf tissues under 100 mM salt treatment. Among the processes that govern the tolerance in peanut tissues, proline level and the activity of glutathione reductase (GR appeared to be only components that play an important part in salt stress protection.

  5. Gold-based optical biosensor for single-mismatched DNA detection using salt-induced hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Ma, Xingyi; Cao, Cuong

    2011-01-01

    DNA while Au-NPs modified with oligonucleotide detection sequences played a role in recognition and signal production. Due to the much lower stability of mismatched DNA strands caused by unstable duplex structures in solutions of relatively low salt concentration, hybridization efficiency...... in the presence of different buffers was well investigated, and thus, the optimized salt concentration allowed for discrimination of single-mismatched DNA (MMT) from perfectly matched DNA (PMT). Therefore, quantitative information concerning the target analyte was translated into a colorimetric signal, which...... could easily and quantitatively measured by low-cost UV–vis spectrophotometric analysis. The results indicated this to be a very simple and economic strategy for detection of single-mismatched DNA strands....

  6. In vitro salt stress induced production of gymnemic acid in callus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Addition of salt (NaCl) up to 150 mM, to MS + 0.5 - 3.0 mg/l 2,4-D led to antho- cyanin formation in the fragile brown callus (Table 1 and. Kumar et al. 4905. Plate 1). This is in contrast with the report on Vitis vinifera callus, where anthocyanin accumulation reduced callus growth under osmotic stress (Do and ...

  7. Synergistic upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils by a high-salt diet and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, T; Tsukamoto, T; Hirano, N; Mizoshita, T; Kato, S; Takasu, S; Ban, H; Tatematsu, M

    2008-05-01

    The intake of salt and salty food is known as a risk factor for gastric cancer. We have previously demonstrated that a high-salt diet dose-dependently enhances Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastritis and stomach carcinogenesis in Mongolian gerbils. In this study, we focused on the influence of excessive salt intake on the expression of inflammatory mediators involved in progression of H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis. A total of 45 stomach samples from Mongolian gerbils were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The animals were infected with H. pylori and fed basal (0.32%) or a high-salt (10%) diet, and sacrificed after 40 weeks. Proliferative activity and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in gastric mucosa were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected gerbils. The additional high-salt diet significantly up-regulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and COX-2 in H. pylori-infected groups (Pdiet on the expression of iNOS (Pdiet works synergistically with H. pylori infection to enhance iNOS and COX-2 expression in the gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils, and support the hypothesis that excessive salt intake may be associated with progression of H. pylori-induced gastritis.

  8. Salt-induced conformation and interaction changes of nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2002-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to follow changes in the conformation and interactions of nucleosome core particles (NCP) as a function of the monovalent salt concentration C(s). The maximal extension (D(max)) of the NCP (145 +/- 3-bp DNA) increases from 137 +/- 5 A to 165 +/- 5 A when C(s) rises from 10 to 50 mM and remains constant with further increases of C(s) up to 200 mM. In view of the very weak increase of the R(g) value in the same C(s) range, we attribute this D(max) variation to tail extension, a proposal confirmed by simulations of the entire I(q) curves, considering an ideal solution of particles with tails either condensed or extended. This tail extension is observed at higher salt values when particles contain longer DNA fragments (165 +/- 10 bp). The maximal extension of the tails always coincides with the screening of repulsive interactions between particles. The second virial coefficient becomes smaller than the hard sphere virial coefficient and eventually becomes negative (net attractive interactions) for NCP(145). Addition of salt simultaneously screens Coulombic repulsive interactions between NCP and Coulombic attractive interactions between tails and DNA inside the NCP. We discuss how the coupling of these two phenomena may be of biological relevance.

  9. Identification and characterization of a salt stress-inducible zinc finger protein from Festuca arundinacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased biotic and abiotic plant stresses due to climate change together with an expected global human population of over 9 billion by 2050 intensifies the demand for agricultural production on marginal lands. Soil salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses responsible for reduced crop productivity worldwide and the salinization of arable land has dramatically increased over the last few decades. Consequently, as land becomes less amenable for conventional agriculture, plants grown on marginal soils will be exposed to higher levels of soil salinity. Forage grasses are a critical component of feed used in livestock production worldwide, with many of these same species of grasses being utilized for lawns, erosion prevention, and recreation. Consequently, it is important to develop a better understanding of salt tolerance in forage and related grass species. Findings A gene encoding a ZnF protein was identified during the analysis of a salt-stress suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH expression library from the forage grass species Festuca arundinacea. The expression pattern of FaZnF was compared to that of the well characterized gene for delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS, a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis, which was also identified in the salt-stress SSH library. The FaZnF and P5CS genes were both up-regulated in response to salt and drought stresses suggesting a role in dehydration stress. FaZnF was also up-regulated in response to heat and wounding, suggesting that it might have a more general function in multiple abiotic stress responses. Additionally, potential downstream targets of FaZnF (a MAPK [Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase], GST [Glutathione-S-Transferase] and lipoxygenase L2 were found to be up-regulated in calli overexpressing FaZnF when compared to control cell lines. Conclusions This work provides evidence that FaZnF is an AN1/A20 zinc finger protein that is involved in the regulation

  10. Measurement of Cerium and Gadolinium in Solid Lithium Chloride-Potassium Chloride Salt Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ammon; Bryce, Keith; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2017-10-01

    Pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel (UNF) has many advantages-including that it is proliferation resistant. However, as part of the process, special nuclear materials accumulate in the electrolyte salt and present material accountability and safeguards concerns. The main motivation of this work was to explore a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) approach as an online monitoring technique to enhance the material accountability of special nuclear materials in pyroprocessing. In this work, a vacuum extraction method was used to draw the molten salt (CeCl3-GdCl3-LiCl-KCl) up into 4 mm diameter Pyrex tubes where it froze. The salt was then removed and the solid salt was measured using LIBS and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). A total of 36 samples were made that varied the CeCl3 and GdCl3 (surrogates for uranium and plutonium, respectively) concentrations from 0.5 wt% to 5 wt%. From these samples, univariate calibration curves for Ce and Gd were generated using peak area and peak intensity methods. For Ce, the Ce 551.1 nm line using the peak area provided the best calibration curve with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.099 wt% and a root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 0.197 wt%. For Gd, the best curve was generated using the peak intensities of the Gd 564.2 nm line resulting in a LOD of 0.027 wt% and a RMSECV of 0.295 wt%. The RMSECV for the univariate cases were determined using leave-one-out cross-validation. In addition to the univariate calibration curves, partial least squares (PLS) regression was done to develop a calibration model. The PLS models yielded similar results with RMSECV (determined using Venetian blind cross-validation with 17% left out per split) values of 0.30 wt% and 0.29 wt% for Ce and Gd, respectively. This work has shown that solid pyroprocessing salt can be qualitatively and quantitatively monitored using LIBS. This work has the potential of significantly enhancing the

  11. High salt loading induces urinary storage dysfunction via upregulation of epithelial sodium channel alpha in the bladder epithelium in Dahl salt-sensitive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Yamamoto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether high salt intake affects bladder function via epithelial sodium channel (ENaC by using Dahl salt-resistant (DR and salt-sensitive (DS rats. Bladder weight of DR + high-salt diet (HS, 8% NaCl and DS + HS groups were significantly higher than those of DR + normal-salt diet (NS, 0.3% NaCl and DS + NS groups after one week treatment. We thereafter used only DR + HS and DS + HS group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly higher in DS + HS group than in DR + HS group after the treatment period. Cystometrogram showed the intercontraction intervals (ICI were significantly shorter in DS + HS group than in DR + HS group during infusion of saline. Subsequent infusion of amiloride significantly prolonged ICI in DS + HS group, while no intra-group difference in ICI was observed in DR + HS group. No intra- or inter-group differences in maximum intravesical pressure were observed. Protein expression levels of ENaCα in the bladder were significantly higher in DS + HS group than in DR + HS group. ENaCα protein was localized at bladder epithelium in both groups. In conclusion, high salt intake is considered to cause urinary storage dysfunction via upregulation of ENaC in the bladder epithelium with salt-sensitive hypertension, suggesting that ENaC might be a candidate for therapeutic target for urinary storage dysfunction.

  12. A Tandem Repeat in Decay Accelerating Factor 1 Is Associated with Severity of Murine Mercury-Induced Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Cauvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay accelerating factor (DAF, a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA. Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  13. Induced-Decay of Glycine Decarboxylase Transcripts as an Anticancer Therapeutic Strategy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewing tumor-initiating cells (TICs are thought to be responsible for tumor recurrence and chemo-resistance. Glycine decarboxylase, encoded by the GLDC gene, is reported to be overexpressed in TIC-enriched primary non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. GLDC is a component of the mitochondrial glycine cleavage system, and its high expression is required for growth and tumorigenic capacity. Currently, there are no therapeutic agents against GLDC. As a therapeutic strategy, we have designed and tested splicing-modulating steric hindrance antisense oligonucleotides (shAONs that efficiently induce exon skipping (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] at 3.5–7 nM, disrupt the open reading frame (ORF of GLDC transcript (predisposing it for nonsense-mediated decay, halt cell proliferation, and prevent colony formation in both A549 cells and TIC-enriched NSCLC tumor sphere cells (TS32. One candidate shAON causes 60% inhibition of tumor growth in mice transplanted with TS32. Thus, our shAONs candidates can effectively inhibit the expression of NSCLC-associated metabolic enzyme GLDC and may have promising therapeutic implications.

  14. Surface induced phonon decay rates in thin film nano-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Photiadis, D M [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5320, (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Nano-scale structure significantly impacts phonon transport and related phonon relaxation rates, with order of magnitude effects on the thermal conductivity of dielectric thin films and quantum wires, and even larger effects on the lifetimes of ultrasonic phonons of micro- (nano-) oscillators. In both cases, efforts to explain the data have been hampered by our lack of knowledge of the effects of confined dimensionality on phonon-phonon scattering rates. Using a phonon Boltzmann equation with appropriate boundary conditions on the free surfaces to take surface roughness into account, we have obtained an expression yielding phonon lifetimes in 2-D dielectric nanostructures(thin films) resulting from phonon-phonon scattering in conjunction with phonon-surface scattering. We present these theoretical results and, in the limit in which surface induced losses dominate, obtain explicit predictions for the phonon lifetimes. The predicted temperature dependence of the ultrason{exclamation_point} ic loss does not explain the observed saturation of the loss at low temperatures({tau}(T) {yields} const), but does give results of the order of magnitude of measured ultrasonic lifetimes.

  15. Surface induced phonon decay rates in thin film nano-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photiadis, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    Nano-scale structure significantly impacts phonon transport and related phonon relaxation rates, with order of magnitude effects on the thermal conductivity of dielectric thin films and quantum wires, and even larger effects on the lifetimes of ultrasonic phonons of micro- (nano-) oscillators. In both cases, efforts to explain the data have been hampered by our lack of knowledge of the effects of confined dimensionality on phonon-phonon scattering rates. Using a phonon Boltzmann equation with appropriate boundary conditions on the free surfaces to take surface roughness into account, we have obtained an expression yielding phonon lifetimes in 2-D dielectric nanostructures(thin films) resulting from phonon-phonon scattering in conjunction with phonon-surface scattering. We present these theoretical results and, in the limit in which surface induced losses dominate, obtain explicit predictions for the phonon lifetimes. The predicted temperature dependence of the ultrason! ic loss does not explain the observed saturation of the loss at low temperatures(τ(T) → const), but does give results of the order of magnitude of measured ultrasonic lifetimes.

  16. First determination of the one-proton induced Non-Mesonic Weak Decay width of p-shell Λ-Hypernuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agnello

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of proton and neutron spectra from Non-Mesonic Weak Decay of eight Λ-Hypernuclei (A=5–16 have been revisited. New values of the ratio of the two-nucleon and the one-proton induced decay widths, Γ2N/Γp, are obtained from single proton spectra, Γ2N/Γp=0.50±0.24, and from neutron and proton coincidence spectra, Γ2N/Γp=0.36±0.14stat−0.04sys+0.05sys, in full agreement with previously published ones. With these values, a method is developed to extract the one-proton induced decay width in units of the free Λ decay width, Γp/ΓΛ, without resorting to Intra Nuclear Cascade models but by exploiting only experimental data, under the assumption of a linear dependence on A of the Final State Interaction contribution. This is the first systematic determination ever done and it agrees within the errors with recent theoretical calculations.

  17. Developmental Control of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Inducibility by Salt Stress in the Common Ice Plant 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John C.; Michalowski, Christine B.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1990-01-01

    Ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) is a facultative halophyte that responds to water stress in the form of drought or high salinity by switching from C3 photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a physiological adaptation that increases water conservation. Although CAM is clearly environmentally controlled, and reversible upon removal of water stress, the competence to switch is developmentally determined. We have demonstrated this by measuring three parameters in the expression of a gene encoding a stress-specific isoform of a key enzyme of CAM, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase, Ppc1): (a) protein accumulation; (b) steady-state amounts of mRNA; and (3) transcriptional activity in isolated nuclei. Young plants (3 weeks of age) show little induction of PEPCase protein, mRNA, or transcription when stressed. In contrast, salt stress elicits a strong induction at all three levels of expression at 6 weeks of age. By 9 weeks of age, plants have already accumulated PEPCase protein and mRNA without being stressed. More importantly, transcriptional activation of Ppc1 by salt stress in 9-week-old plants is no longer observed despite an increase of both Ppc1 mRNA and protein. From these results we suggest that a developmental program exists that regulates PEPCase transcription and mRNA stability. This program appears to be synchronized with the climatic conditions in the plant's native environment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16667808

  18. Induction and decay of glucagon-induced amino acid transport in primary cultures of adult rat liver cells: paradoxical effects of cycloheximide and puromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariza, M W; Butcher, F R; Kletzien, R F; Becker, J E; Potter, V R

    1976-12-01

    Liver parenchymal cells were isolated from adult rats and cultured in collagen-coated plastic petri dishes in serum-free medium. Glucagon induced 4- to 5-fold increases in alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) transport within 6 hr. Dexaemthasone had no direct effect on AIB transport but greatly potentiated the induction by glucagon ("permissive effect"). Levels of 3':5'-cyclic AMP increased 30- to 100-fold within 30 min after glucagon addition to cultures that had been treated with dexamethasone, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP mimicked the glucagon induction of AIB transport. Additionally, dexamethasone exerted a "permissive" effect on induction of AIB transport by dibutyryl cyclic AMP, whereas the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine induced AIB transport only in cultures that had been treated with dexamethasone. Induction of AIB transport was not dependent upon the continued presence of glucagon, but induced AIB transport activity decayed to uninduced levels within 3-4 hr after glucagon removal. The protein syntesis inhibitors puromycin and cycloheximide inhibited both induction and decay of glucagon induced AIB transport, but had a stabilizing effect if added once induction or decay had commenced. Unlike cycloheximide, the inhibitory effect of puromycin on the glucagon induction of AIB transport was reversible.

  19. Variation in dietary salt intake induces coordinated dynamics of monocyte subsets and monocyte-platelet aggregates in humans: implications in end organ inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocyte activation and tissue infiltration are quantitatively associated with high-salt intake induced target organ inflammation. We hypothesized that high-salt challenge would induce the expansion of CD14++CD16+ monocytes, one of the three monocyte subsets with a pro-inflammatory phenotype, that is associated with target organ inflammation in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dietary intervention study was performed in 20 healthy volunteers, starting with a 3-day usual diet and followed with a 7-day high-salt diet (≥15 g NaCl/day, and a 7-day low-salt diet (≤5 g NaCl/day. The amounts of three monocyte subsets ("classical" CD14++CD16-, "intermediate" CD14++CD16+ and "non-classical" CD14+CD16++ and their associations with monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs were measured by flow cytometry. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI was used to evaluate renal hypoxia. Switching to a high-salt diet resulted in CD14++ monocyte activation and a rapid expansion of CD14++CD16+ subset and MPAs, with a reciprocal decrease in the percentages of CD14++CD16- and CD14+CD16++ subsets. In vitro study using purified CD14++ monocytes revealed that elevation in extracellular [Na(+] could lead to CD14++CD16+ expansion via a ROS dependent manner. In addition, high-salt intake was associated with progressive hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2* signal and enhanced urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 excretion, indicating a temporal and spatial correlation between CD14++CD16+ subset and renal inflammation. The above changes could be completely reversed by a low-salt diet, whereas blood pressure levels remained unchanged during dietary intervention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work demonstrates that short-term increases in dietary salt intake could induce the expansion of CD14++CD16+ monocytes, as well as an elevation of MPAs, which might be the underlying cellular basis of high-salt induced

  20. Whole-catchment application of dolomite to mitigate episodic acidification of streams induced by sea-salt deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindar, Atle

    2005-05-01

    To counteract mobilisation of potentially toxic aluminium (Al) ions to tributaries of salmon rivers, two paired-catchment experiments with terrestrial liming at two sites on the Norwegian west coast were performed. Streams at both sites experienced episodically elevated and potentially toxic Al levels induced by high deposition of sea salts. After application of 2 metric tons ha-1 of 0.2-2 mm dolomite powder at the Brommeland area, stream pH increased above critical levels at about pH=6.0 and remained stable throughout the monitoring period of 3.5 years. Inorganic aluminium decreased to below 20 microg Al L-1, a water quality supposed to be nontoxic for salmon. This was evident also during extreme weather conditions with large relative increases in chloride (Cl) concentrations and negative calculated nonmarine sodium (Na*) concentrations in the streams, indicating potentially toxic sea-salt effects. Cl changed from being closely related to increases in inorganic Al, especially at the Brommeland stream (R2=0.75), to being not important (R2=0.12), but still significant for its variation. At the Hovland area, receiving 1 ton ha-1 of 0-2 mm dolomite powder, stream pH and Al effects were less clear-cut, probably due to the lower dolomite dose. Stream concentrations of both NO3- and SO4(2-) increased significantly due to liming.

  1. Water deficit and salt stress diagnosis through LED induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis in Jatropha curcas L. oil plants for biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; Oliveira, Ronaldo A.; Cunha, Patrícia C.; Costa, Ernande B.; Câmara, Terezinha J. R.; Willadino, Lilia G.

    2011-02-01

    Light-emitting-diode induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis is employed to investigate the effect of water and salt stress upon the growth process of physicnut(jatropha curcas) grain oil plants for biofuel. Red(Fr) and far-red (FFr) chlorophyll fluorescence emission signals around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, were observed and examined as a function of the stress intensity(salt concentration and water deficit) for a period of time of 30 days. The chlorophyll fluorescence(ChlF) ratio Fr/FFr which is a valuable nondestructive and nonintrusive indicator of the chlorophyll content of leaves was exploited to monitor the level of stress experienced by the jatropha plants. The ChlF technique data indicated that salinity plays a minor role in the chlorophyll concentration of leaves tissues for NaCl concentrations in the 25 to 200 mM range, and results agreed quite well with those obtained using conventional destructive spectrophotometric methods. Nevertheless, for higher NaCl concentrations a noticeable decrease in the Chl content was observed. The Chl fluorescence ratio analysis also permitted detection of damage caused by water deficit in the early stages of the plants growing process. A significant variation of the Fr/FFr ratio was observed sample in the first 10 days of the experiment when one compared control and nonwatered samples. The results suggest that the technique may potentially be applied as an early-warning indicator of stress caused by water deficit.

  2. Osmotic and Salt Stresses Modulate Spontaneous and Glutamate-Induced Action Potentials and Distinguish between Growth and Circumnutation in Helianthus annuus Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stolarz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Action potentials (APs, i.e., long-distance electrical signals, and circumnutations (CN, i.e., endogenous plant organ movements, are shaped by ion fluxes and content in excitable and motor tissues. The appearance of APs and CN as well as growth parameters in seedlings and 3-week old plants of Helianthus annuus treated with osmotic and salt stress (0–500 mOsm were studied. Time-lapse photography and extracellular measurements of electrical potential changes were performed. The hypocotyl length was strongly reduced by the osmotic and salt stress. CN intensity declined due to the osmotic but not salt stress. The period of CN in mild salt stress was similar to the control (~164 min and increased to more than 200 min in osmotic stress. In sunflower seedlings growing in a hydroponic medium, spontaneous APs (SAPs propagating basipetally and acropetally with a velocity of 12–20 cm min−1 were observed. The number of SAPs increased 2–3 times (7–10 SAPs 24 h−1plant−1 in the mild salt stress (160 mOsm NaCl and KCl, compared to the control and strong salt stress (3–4 SAPs 24 h−1 plant−1 in the control and 300 mOsm KCl and NaCl. Glutamate-induced series of APs were inhibited in the strong salt stress-treated seedlings but not at the mild salt stress and osmotic stress. Additionally, in 3-week old plants, the injection of the hypo- or hyperosmotic solution at the base of the sunflower stem evoked series of APs (3–24 APs transmitted along the stem. It has been shown that osmotic and salt stresses modulate differently hypocotyl growth and CN and have an effect on spontaneous and evoked APs in sunflower seedlings. We suggested that potassium, sodium, and chloride ions at stress concentrations in the nutrient medium modulate sunflower excitability and CN.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide in paraventricular nucleus attenuates blood pressure by regulating oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in high salt-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Hong-Li; Liu, Kai-Li; Qi, Jie; Li, Hong-Bao; Yi, Qiu-Yue; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Cui, Wei; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2017-03-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gaseous signaling molecule in neuro-modulation, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-hypertensive effects. The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is a major integrative nucleus in regulating BP and SNA. The aim of this study is to explore whether endogenous or exogenous H2S changed by hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA) or GYY4137 infused in the PVN affects RSNA and MAP by regulating oxidative stress or the balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and anti-inflammatory cytokines in high salt-induced hypertensive rats. Male Dahl rats were fed by high-salt or normal-salt diet. At the end of the 4th week, GYY4137, HA or vehicle was microinjected into bilateral PVN for 6 weeks. The levels of MAP, HR, plasma norepinephrine (NE), reactive oxygen species (ROS), NOX2, NOX4 and IL-1β were increased significantly in high salt-induced hypertensive rats. Higher levels of these parameters were detected in the group treated by HA, but lower levels in the GYY4137 group. The trends of H2S, CBS, IL-10 and Cu/Zn SOD were opposite to the parameters described above. These findings suggest that endogenous or exogenous H2S in the PVN attenuates sympathetic activity and hypertensive response, which are partly due to decrease of ROS and PICs within the PVN in high salt-induced hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Unusual salt-induced behaviour of guanine-rich natural DNA evidenced by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbone, Massimo; Bonaventura, Gabriele; Baeri, Pietro; Barcellona, Maria Luisa

    2012-05-01

    The appearance of the slow mode, revealed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements in Micrococcus luteus DNA with high GC content, and the effect of guanine sequences on changes of DNA physical state and conformational transitions were investigated. We used two different spectroscopic approaches: DLS, to evidence the relatively slowly diffusing particles arising at high salt concentration, ascribable to the formation of large unspecific molecular aggregates, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, to identify these entities. Our results bring us to conclude that a peculiar, unconventional, structural transition, due to the presence of long guanine stretches, in a well-defined experimental condition, can occur. We comment on the biological implications to detect, by spectroscopic measurements, such an unusual structure involved in the stability, protection and replication maintenance along the human telomeric G-rich strand.

  5. System analysis of salt and osmotic stress induced proteins in Nostoc muscorum and Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Kaithwas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study the proteome response of the two diazotrophic organism’s viz. Nostoc muscorum and Bradyrhizobium japonicum exposed to salt (NaCl and osmotic (sucrose stresses was compared. Out of the total over expressed proteins; we have selected only three over expressed proteins viz. GroEL chaperonin, nitrogenase Mo-Fe protein and argininosuccinate synthase for further analysis, and then we analyzed the amino acid frequencies of all the three over expressed proteins. That led to the conclusion that amino acids e.g. alanine, glycine and valine that were energetically cheaper to produce were showing higher frequencies. This study would help in tracing the phylogenetic relationship between protein families.

  6. Mixed-amphetamine salts expectancies among college students: Is stimulant induced cognitive enhancement a placebo effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropsey, Karen L; Schiavon, Samantha; Hendricks, Peter S; Froelich, Morgan; Lentowicz, Iga; Fargason, Rachel

    2017-09-01

    Non-medical use of prescription stimulants for cognitive enhancement in college students is increasing, despite evidence showing little benefit in non-clinical populations. The balanced placebo design (BPD) was used to independently evaluate the pharmacologic versus expectancy effects of mixed amphetamine salts on cognitive performance among a non-clinical sample of college-aged students. Participants were screened and excluded for ADHD and other psychopathologies. A non-clinical sample (N=32) completed four two-hour laboratory sessions and were administered a neurocognitive battery in each session. Medication Assignment (10mg mixed-amphetamine salt (Adderall™) versus placebo) was crossed with Instructional Set (deception versus truth). A within-subjects design was used, such that all participants experienced each of the four conditions of the BPD during one of the four laboratory sessions. Participants performed no better than chance in identifying whether they received stimulant or placebo (Belief about Medication Assignment; 47% agreement; κ=-0.047, p=0.590). Participants showed improvement on only two of 31 subtests during active medication. Expecting and receiving stimulants was associated with improved cognitive performance. However, expecting placebo was associated with worse cognitive performance, regardless of the type of medication given. This study demonstrated that although non-medical use of stimulants does not enhance cognition, expectancies prominently influence cognitive performance. Participants who believed they received active medication both subjectively rated themselves as performing better and objectively performed better on a minority of subtests, independent of medication state. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A closer look at salt loaded microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Rooij, M.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Many walls of ancient buildings are covered with plaster layers. Amongst the most recurrent causes of damage of plasters and substrates are moisture and salt decay processes. To combat these salt problems, special salt resistant plasters have been developed for application on salt loaded substrates. However, experience in the field has shown that failures regularly occur on these special mortars, making the situation little transparent for end-users. A European project called COMPASS has addr...

  8. A novel detection of radon based on its decay product inducing conformational changes of an aptamer probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Minzhi; Deng, Han; Tian, Gang; Song, Chunli; Liu, Hongwen; Shen, Yi; Lv, Changyin, E-mail: Lchy1955@163.com

    2016-09-14

    This study proposes a novel method for the detection of inert gas radon using a label-free, specific, fluorescence-sensing aptamer in the context of PW17-OG system. This method utilizes the cyanine dye OliGreen (OG) as a signal reactor and the aptamer PW17 as a fluorescent identification probe. When OG integrates into the free curling PW17, a strong fluorescence signal is generated. After radon decays, the long lived naturally occurring radon progeny Pb being disposed and introduced to the system. Lead ions induce PW17 to form a stable G-quadruplex, thereby inhibiting the interaction between OG and PW17 and resulting in a reduction of the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence intensity show a good linear relationship with lead ion and the radon concentration (D), thereinto, We fitted linear regression of radon concentration in the range of 0.92–4.22 (×10{sup 4} Bqhm{sup −3}) to receive a good relationship between ΔF and the concentration of radon with the detection limit of 1963 Bqhm{sup −3}. This method has been successfully applied for detecting standard cumulative concentration of radon and the detection limit reached the national standard of China. This sensitive method can exclude radiation damage in field testing, furthermore, it explores a new field in biological analysis using an aptamer to detected inorganic, gaseous, and radioactive materials. - Highlights: • The label-free fluorescence sensor for detection of radon. • This microscale experiment without radiation damage to experimenters and with less harm to environment. • It provides a sensitive, low cost and simple strategy for radon accumulated concentration and lead ion detection.

  9. Salting effects on protein components in aqueous NaCl and urea solutions: toward understanding of urea-induced protein denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-02-02

    The mechanism of urea-induced protein denaturation is explored through studying the salting effect of urea on 14 amino acid side chain analogues, and N-methylacetamide (NMA) which mimics the protein backbone. The solvation free energies of the 15 molecules were calculated in pure water, aqueous urea, and NaCl solutions. Our results show that NaCl displays strong capability to salt out all 15 molecules, while urea facilitates the solvation (salting-in) of all the 15 molecules on the other hand. The salting effect is found to be largely enthalpy-driven for both NaCl and urea. Our observations can explain the higher stability of protein's secondary and tertiary structures in typical salt solutions than that in pure water. Meanwhile, urea's capability to better solvate protein backbone and side-chain components can be extrapolated to explain protein's denaturation in aqueous urea solution. Urea salts in molecules through direct binding to solute surface, and the strength is linearly dependent on the number of heavy atoms of solute molecules. The van der Waals interactions are found to be the dominant force, which challenges a hydrogen-bonding-driven mechanism proposed previously.

  10. Convivial Decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    maintenance may reach the limits of repair and shift from repair-as-sustaining into a mode of repair- into-decay, actively working towards the end-of-life. What this reveals is that, rather than infrastructural decay being a natural by-product of time’s passing, there is active work that goes into producing...

  11. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  12. Salicornia Extract Ameliorates Salt-Induced Aggravation of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Obese Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hwan; Suk, Sujin; Jang, Woo Jung; Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Jong-Eun; Park, Jin-Kyu; Kweon, Mee-Hyang; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Ki Won

    2017-07-01

    High-fat and high-salt intakes are among the major risks of chronic diseases including obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Salicornia is a halophytic plant known to exert antioxidant, antidiabetic, and hypolipidemic effects, and Salicornia-extracted salt (SS) has been used as a salt substitute. In this study, the effects of SS and purified salt (PS) on the aggravation of NAFLD/NASH were compared. C57BL/6J male mice (8-wk-old) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 mo and divided into 3 dietary groups, which were additionally fed HFD, HFD + SS, and HFD + PS for 13 wk. PS induced aggravation of NAFLD/NASH in HFD-fed mice. Although the actual salt intake was same between the PS and SS groups as 1% of the diet (extrapolated from the World Health Organization [WHO] guideline), SS induced less liver injury and hepatic steatosis compared to PS. The hepatic mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines and fibrosis marker were significantly lower in the SS group than the PS group. Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of inflammation in NAFLD/NASH. Results of the component analysis showed that the major polyphenols that exhibited antioxidant activity in the Salicornia water extract were ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and isorhamnetin. These results suggest that even the level of salt intake recommended by WHO can accelerate the progression of liver disease in obese individuals consuming HFD. It is proposed that SS can be a salt substitute for obese individuals who consume HFD. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. Effects of salt and low light intensity during the vegetative stage on susceptibility of rice to male sterility induced by chilling stress during the reproductive stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemasa Koumoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We tested whether exposing rice plants to abiotic stress (salt or shade during vegetative growth affects the chilling tolerance of reproductive organs, which is one of the most important traits for rice growing in a cool climate; we used two rice cultivars with different tolerance in two growing seasons. We divided the vegetative growth into three phases to clarify the most sensitive period: 7–22 days after transplanting (DAT, 23–38 DAT and 39–54 DAT. Chilling tolerance of the pre-stressed plants was based on the male sterility induced by low temperatures. Shade and salt stress during all three vegetative growth phases significantly reduced stomatal conductance. Shade decreased the specific leaf weight and the leaf sugar and starch contents, but salt had no significant effect, despite causing leaf damage. Low temperatures during the reproductive stage induced spikelet sterility in all plants, but the magnitude was greater in the salt- and shade-stressed plants of both cultivars, especially those stressed late during vegetative growth. The increased spikelet sterility caused by chilling was closely related to the reduction of the total spikelet number per panicle. This is the first study to show that salt and low light stress during vegetative growth increased the susceptibility of rice plants to chilling damage during panicle development.

  14. Treatment of diabetes with vanadium salts: general overview and amelioration of nutritionally induced diabetes in the Psammomys obesus gerbil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafrir, E; Spielman, S; Nachliel, I; Khamaisi, M; Bar-On, H; Ziv, E

    2001-01-01

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated the beneficial effect of vanadium salts on diabetes in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats, in rodents with genetically determined diabetes and in human subjects. The amelioration of diabetes included the abolition of hyperglycemia, preservation of insulin secretion, reduction in hepatic glucose production, enhanced glycolysis and lipogenesis and improved muscle glucose uptake through GLUT4 elevation and translocation. The molecular basis of vanadium salt action is not yet fully elucidated. Although evidence has been provided that the insulin receptor is activated, the possibility exists that cytosolic non-receptor tyrosine kinase, direct phosphorylation of IRS-1 and activation of PI3-K, leading to GLUT4 translocation, are involved. The raised phosphorylation of proteins in the insulin signaling pathway appears to be related to the inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity by vanadium salts. The model utilized in our study was Psammomys obesus (sand rat), a desert gerbil which becomes hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic on an ad libitum high energy (HE) diet. In contrast to the previously investigated insulin deficient models, vanadyl sulphate was used to correct insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, which led to beta-cell loss. Administration of 5 mg/kg vanadyl sulfate for 5 days resulted in prolonged restoration of normoglycemia and normoinsulinemia in most animals, return of glucose tolerance to normal, and a reduction of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. There was no change in food consumption and in regular growth during or after the vanadyl treatment. Pretreatment with vanadyl sulfate, followed by transfer to a HE diet, significantly delayed the onset of hyperglycemia. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp of vanadyl sulfate treated Psammomys demonstrated an improvement in glucose utilization. However, vanadyl sulfate was ineffective when administered to animals which lost their

  15. Acute salt marsh dieback in the Mississippi River deltaic plain: A drought-induced phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; Materne, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Aims Extensive dieback of salt marsh dominated by the perennial grass Spartina alterniflora occurred throughout the Mississippi River deltaic plain during 2000. More than 100,000 ha were affected, with 43,000 ha severely damaged. The aim of this work was to determine if sudden dieback could have been caused by a coincident drought and to assess the significance of this event with respect to long-term changes in coastal vegetation. Location Multiple dieback sites and reference sites were established along 150 km of shoreline in coastal Louisiana, USA. Methods Aerial and ground surveys were conducted from June 2000 to September 2001 to assess soil conditions and plant mortality and recovery. Results Dieback areas ranged in size from???300 m2-5 km2 in area with 50-100% mortality of plant shoots and rhizomes in affected zones. Co-occurring species such as Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) and Juncus roemerianus (needlegrass rush) were unaffected. Historical records indicate that precipitation, river discharge, and mean sea level were unusually low during the previous year. Although the cause of dieback is currently unknown, plant and soil characteristics were consistent with temporary soil desiccation that may have reduced water availability, increased soil salinity, and/or caused soil acidification (via pyrite oxidation) and increased uptake of toxic metals such as Fe or Al. Plant recovery 15 months after dieback was variable (0-58% live cover), but recovering plants were vigorous and indicated no longlasting effects of the dieback agent. Main conclusions These findings have relevance for global change models of coastal ecosystems that predict vegetation responses based primarily on long-term increases in sea level and submergence of marshes. Our results suggest that large-scale changes in coastal vegetation may occur over a relatively short time span through climatic extremes acting in concert with sea-level fluctuations and pre-existing soil conditions. ?? 2004

  16. First flavor-tagged determination of bounds on mixing-induced CP violation in Bs0 --> J/psiphi decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Labarga, L; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-04-25

    This Letter describes the first determination of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2beta(s) using B(s)(0) decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2000 B(s)(0)-->J/psiphi decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb(-1) data sample collected with the CDF II detector using pp collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2beta(s) and the decay-width difference DeltaGamma. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2beta(s) and DeltaGamma, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations.

  17. First Flavor-Tagged Determination of Bounds on Mixing-Induced CP Violation in Bs -> J/psi phi Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez-Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabreras, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillom, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerritoq, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenars, C; Cuevasp, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdeckere, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoloua, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokarisa, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gonzlez, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraesda Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hilld, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Labargab, L; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Le Compte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Leer, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakisa, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martink, V; Martínez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNultyj, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemerl, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielseng, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohosi, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademackerd, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salt, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojimao, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffardf, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thomh, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquezm, F; Velev, G; Vellidisa, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouevr, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whitesonf, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittichh, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yangn, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhengc, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2007-01-01

    This Letter describes the first determination of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2*beta_s using Bs decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2,000 Bs -> J/psi phi decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb-1 data sample collected with the CDF II detector using p-bar p collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2*beta_s and the decay-width difference Delta-Gamma. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2*beta_s and Delta-Gamma, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations. Dedicated to the memory of our dear friend and colleague, Michael P. Schmidt.

  18. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidur Rahaman

    Full Text Available While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s, the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD, ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N, denatured (D and intermediate state (X of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4 at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400 and CD ([θ]409, is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1 that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2 that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3 that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1, classical (X2 and disordered (X3, i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  19. Salt-induced osmotic stress for lipid overproduction in batch culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of NaCl-induced osmotic stress on lipid production was investigated in batch culture of Chlorella vulgaris. Based on the facts that NaCl stress improved lipid production but inhibited cells growth at the same times, the novel strategies of multiple osmotic stresses with different NaCl additions (2 g/L at 80 h, 4 g/L at 100 h, ...

  20. Rare Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1998-04-01

    Fifty years after the discovery of the strange quark and the first search for lepton flavor violation in muon decay, extraordinary experimental progress continues to be made on measurements and searches for rare kaon and muon decays. Several important new rare kaon decay channels, including the second order weak flavor-changing-neutral-current process K^+arrowπ^+ν\\overlineν, have been reported recently, and further significant advances are anticipated. Although only null results have been found so far in the quest for lepton flavor violation, there are promising prospects for additional gains in sensitivity of orders of magnitude on such processes as μ→ e γ, nuclear μ → e conversion, K^0_Larrowμ e and Karrowπμ^+e^-. In this presentation, the status of experiments on selected rare decays of kaons and muons will be reviewed.

  1. Bosutinib Attenuates Inflammation via Inhibiting Salt-Inducible Kinases in Experimental Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage on Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Manaenko, Anatol; Ou, Yi-Bo; Shao, An-Wen; Yang, Shu-Xu; Zhang, John H

    2017-11-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a subtype of stroke with highest mortality and morbidity. Pronounced inflammation plays a significant role in the development of the secondary brain injury after ICH. Recently, SIK-2 (salt-inducible kinase-2) was identified as an important component controlling inflammatory response. Here we sought to investigate the role of SIK-2 in post-ICH inflammation and potential protective effects of SIK-2 inhibition after ICH. Two hundred and ninety-three male CD-1 mice were used. ICH was induced via injection of 30 μL of autologous blood. Recombinant SIK-2 was administrated 1 hour after ICH intracerebroventricularly. SIK-2 small interfering RNA was injected intracerebroventricularly 24 hours before ICH. Bosutinib, a clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor with affinity to SIK-2, was given intranasally 1 hour or 6 hours after ICH. Effects of treatments were evaluated by neurological tests and brain water content calculation. Molecular pathways were investigated by Western blots and immunofluorescence studies. Endogenous SIK-2 was expressed in microglia and neurons. SIK-2 expression was reduced after ICH. Exogenous SIK-2 aggravated post-ICH inflammation, leading to brain edema and the neurobehavioral deficits. SIK-2 inhibition attenuated post-ICH inflammation, reducing brain edema and ameliorating neurological dysfunctions. Bosutinib inhibited SIK-2-attenuating ICH-induced brain damage. Protective effects of Bosutinib were mediated, at least partly, by CRTC3 (cyclic amp-response element binding protein-regulated transcription coactivator 3)/cyclic amp-response element binding protein/NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) pathway. SIK-2 participates in inflammation induction after ICH. SIK-2 inhibition via Bosutinib or small interfering RNA decreased inflammation, attenuating brain injury. SIK-2 effects are, at least partly, mediated by CRTC3-cyclic amp-response element binding protein-NF-κB signaling pathway. © 2017 American Heart Association

  2. Role of salt inducible kinase 1 in high glucose-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells and metformin intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Takemori, Hiroshi; Wang, Chang; Fu, JiaHui; Xu, MingWang; Xiong, Liang; Li, NingXu; Wen, XiuYing

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the roles of salt inducible kinase (SIK1) in high glucose-induced triglyceride accumulation in human hepatoma HepG2 cells as well as in the molecular mechanism by which metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, suppresses high glucose-induced lipogenesis. A cell model for high glucose-induced hepatic steatosis was prepared by exposing HepG2 cells to high glucose (25mmol) in the absence or presence of metformin (0.5mmol). Intracellular triglycerides were visualized by Oil Red O and measured using a triglyceride assay kit. Cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. SIK1 overexpression in HepG2 cells was achieved by transient transfection, and the mRNA and protein levels of SIK1 and lipogenic factors were measured using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells was obvious after treatment with high glucose for 24h. In response to high glucose, SIK1 expression was negatively correlated with that of lipogenic factors and lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. We observed that overexpression of SIK1, or treatment with metformin, suppressed lipogenesis, even in high glucose conditions. Furthermore, treatment with metformin upregulated SIK1 mRNA and protein levels, as well as the active form of SIK1. SIK1 plays a vital role in high glucose-induced lipid accumulation, and metformin suppresses lipogenesis via the induction and activation of SIK1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental validation of calculations of decay heat induced by 14 MeV neutron activation of ITER materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, N.P.; Bartels, H.-W.; Saji, G. [ITER Joint Central Team, San Diego, La Jolla (United States); Ikeda, Y.; Maekawa, F. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura (Japan); Cambi, G. [Physics Department, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Cepraga, D.G. [ENEA, INN-FIS-MACO, Bologna (Italy); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research Inc., Solana Beach, CA (United States); Forrest, R.A.; Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Iida, H.; Santoro, R.T. [ITER Joint Central Team, Garching (Germany); Khater, H.Y.; Sawan, M.E. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Youssef, M.Z. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1999-03-01

    In a D-T fusion tokamak, neutron activation of structural material will result in a source of heat from radioactive decay after shutdown of the plasma. Although relatively small, in certain postulated loss-of-cooling accidents this decay heat could drive a temperature transient of modest proportions. In safety studies of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), such accident scenarios are analysed for their possible consequences, requiring an accurate knowledge of the level and time-dependence of the decay heat in components in which it is significant. This is calculated by activation modelling using computer codes with libraries of nuclear data. This paper describes an international benchmark activity to validate several of these codes and data, using the results of direct measurements of decay heat in ITER-relevant materials after exposure to a flux of 14 MeV neutrons. The results show consistency between the codes and, when using data from the recently-compiled FENDL/A-2 activation data library, good agreement with the experiments over the time-scales of interest in ITER safety studies. (orig.) 24 refs.

  4. Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Coriandrum sativum Seeds in Salt Induced Arrhythmic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Rehman1, Nazish Jahan1*, Khalil-ul-Rahman2, Khalid Mahmood Khan2 and Fatiqa Zafar1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the anti-arrhythmic potential of Coriandrum sativum (seeds was evaluated in BaCl2 induced tachycardia and KCl induced bradycardia in rats. Heart rate and electrocardiogram (ECG was recorded during the experimental period. The BaCl2 increased the heart rate from 111/min to 157/min while KCL decreased the heart rate from 112/min to 60/min in the rats of positive control groups. ECG patterns also confirmed the tachy- and brady-arrhythmia in the rats of both positive control groups. The changes in biochemical cardiac biomarkers (CK-MB, LDH, AST, and ALT were also the studied parameters. The level of cardiac biomarkers was significantly elevated in the serum of positive control rats as compared to their respective absolute controls. In case of both curative and preventive mode of treatment the elevated levels of enzymes, cardiac biomarkers were significantly reduced. Electrocardiogram (ECG pattern revealed that the studied plant possesses a very good anti-arrhythmic potential in case of curative mode of treatment. The antiarrhythmic potential through preventive mode of treatment was also encouraging, but comparatively less than the curative mode of treatment. Anti-tachycardial potential of C. sativum was comparable with standard drug while, recovery in bradycardia was relatively slow than standard drug. Gross pathology and ECG pattern of base line group confirmed the innoxious nature of C. sativum seeds. Treatment of rats with Coriandrum sativum (100 mgkg-1 BW normalized the heart rate and attenuated the cardiac arrhythmia.

  5. Konjac flour improved textural and water retention properties of transglutaminase-mediated, heat-induced porcine myofibrillar protein gel: Effect of salt level and transglutaminase incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Koo B; Go, Mi Y; Xiong, Youling L

    2009-03-01

    Functional properties of heat-induced gels prepared from microbial transglutaminase (TG)-treated porcine myofibrillar protein (MP) containing sodium caseinate with or without konjac flour (KF) under various salt concentrations (0.1, 0.3 and 0.6MNaCl) were evaluated. The mixed MP gels with KF exhibited improved cooking yields at all salt concentrations. TG treatment greatly enhanced gel strength and elasticity (storage modulus, G') at 0.6M NaCl, but not at lower salt concentrations. The combination of KF and TG improved the gel strength at 0.1 and 0.3M NaCl and G' at all salt concentrations, when compared with non-TG controls. Incubation of MP suspensions (sols) with TG promoted the disappearance of myosin heavy chain and the production of polymers. The TG-treated MP mixed gels had a compact structure, compared to those without TG, and the KF incorporation modified the gel matrix and increased its water-holding capacity. Results from differential scanning calorimetry suggested possible interactions of MP with KF, which may explain the changes in the microstructure of the heat-induced gels.

  6. Detection and quantification of a toxic salt substitute (LiCl) by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Banu; Velioglu, Hasan Murat; Bilge, Gonca; Berkkan, Aysel; Ozdinc, Nese; Tamer, Ugur; Boyaci, Ismail Hakkı

    2018-01-01

    The use of Li salts in foods has been prohibited due to their negative effects on central nervous system; however, they might still be used especially in meat products as Na substitutes. Lithium can be toxic and even lethal at higher concentrations and it is not approved in foods. The present study focuses on Li analysis in meatballs by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Meatball samples were analyzed using LIBS and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Calibration curves were obtained by utilizing Li emission lines at 610nm and 670nm for univariate calibration. The results showed that Li calibration curve at 670nm provided successful determination of Li with 0.965 of R(2) and 4.64ppm of limit of detection (LOD) value. While Li Calibration curve obtained using emission line at 610nm generated R(2) of 0.991 and LOD of 22.6ppm, calibration curve obtained at 670nm below 1300ppm generated R(2) of 0.965 and LOD of 4.64ppm. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The mRNA decay factor tristetraprolin (TTP) induces senescence in human papillomavirus-transformed cervical cancer cells by targeting E6-AP ubiquitin ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Sanduja, Sandhya; Kaza, Vimala; Dixon, Dan A.

    2009-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates expression of many cancer-associated and proinflammatory factors through binding AU-rich elements (ARE) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and facilitating rapid mRNA decay. Here we report on the ability of TTP to act in an anti-proliferative capacity in HPV18-positive HeLa cells by inducing senescence. HeLa cells maintain a dormant p53 pathway and elevated telomerase activity resulting from HPV-mediated transformation, whereas TTP ex...

  8. Identification of salt-inducible kinase 3 as a novel tumor antigen associated with tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenfuprasert, S; Yang, Y-Y; Lee, Y-C; Chao, K-C; Chu, P-Y; Lai, C-R; Hsu, K-F; Chang, K-C; Chen, Y-C; Chen, L-T; Chang, J-Y; Leu, S-J; Shih, N-Y

    2011-08-18

    Existence of humoral immunity has been previously demonstrated in malignant ascitic fluids. However, only a limited number of immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) were identified, and few of which are associated with ovarian cancer. Here, we identified salt-inducible kinase 3 (SIK3) as a TAA through screening of a random peptide library in the phage display system. Overexpression of SIK3 markedly promoted cell proliferation, attenuated p21(Waf/Cip1) and p27(Kip) expressions in low-grade OVCAR3 cells, and permitted the cells to grow in mice. Decrease in SIK3 expression in high-grade SK-OV3 cells consistently demonstrated its tumorigenic potency by modulating the protein levels of cell cycle regulators. When the expressions of SIK3 and CA125 were compared in cancer tissues, immunohistochemical (IHC) studies indicated that cytoplasm-localized SIK3 was highly expressed in 55% of the ovarian cancer samples. In contrast, it was rarely detected in adenomyosis, leiomyoma and normal ovary tissues, showing its higher specificity (97%) to CA125 (65%) in ovarian cancer. Moreover, experiments using pharmacological inhibitors to block SIK3-induced p21(Waf/Cip1) expression revealed that activation of c-Src and phosphoinositide-3-kinase were critically required for its biological activity, suggesting that they are the downstream signaling mediators of SIK3. These data were further supported by IHC studies, showing coexpression of c-Src with SIK3 in 85% of the ovarian tumor samples stained positive for SIK3. Collectively, our findings indicate that SIK3 is a novel ovarian TAA. Overexpression of SIK3 promotes G1/S cell cycle progression, bestows survival advantages to cancer cells for growth and correlates the clinicopathological conditions of patients with ovarian cancer.

  9. Geomechanical analysis applied to geological carbon dioxide sequestration, induced seismicity in deep mines, and detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sub-salt environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucier, Amie Marie

    and injection induced micro-seismicity are implemented. The second issue to which we apply geomechanical analysis in this thesis is mining-induced stress perturbations and induced seismicity in the TauTona gold mine, which is located in the Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa and is one of the deepest underground mines in the world. In the first investigation, we developed and tested a new technique for determining the virgin stress state near the TauTona gold mine. This technique follows an iterative forward modeling approach that combines observations of drilling induced borehole failures in borehole images, boundary element modeling of the mining-induced stress perturbations, and forward modeling of borehole failures based on the results of the boundary element modeling. The final result was a well constrained range of principal stress orientations and magnitudes that are consistent with all the observed failures and other stress indicators. In the second investigation, we used this constrained stress state to examine the likelihood of faulting to occur both on pre-existing fault planes that are optimally oriented to the virgin stress state and on faults affected by the mining-perturbed stress field, the latter of which is calculated with boundary element modeling. We made several recommendations that could potentially increase safety in deep South African mines as development continues. Finally, the third issue addressed in this thesis is the detection of stress-induced shear wave velocity anisotropy in a sub-salt environment. In this study, we tested a technique proposed by Boness and Zoback (2006) to identify structure-induced velocity anisotropy and isolate possible stress-induced velocity anisotropy. The investigation used cross-dipole sonic data from three deep water sub-salt wells in the Gulf of Mexico. First, we determined the parameters necessary to ensure the quality of the fast azimuth data used in our analysis. We then characterized the quality

  10. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyan; Ge, Zhishen; Jiang, Xiaoze; Hassan, P A; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-12-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt, p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC), were investigated by stopped-flow with light scattering detection. Spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles transform into short ellipsoidal shapes at low salt concentrations ([PTHC]/[SDS], chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.4). Upon stopped-flow mixing aqueous solutions of spherical SDS micelles with PTHC, the scattered light intensity gradually increases with time. Single exponential fitting of the dynamic traces leads to characteristic relaxation time, tau(g), for the growth process from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles, and it increases with increasing SDS concentrations. This suggests that ellipsoidal micelles might be produced by successive insertion of unimers into spherical micelles, similar to the case of formation of spherical micelles as suggested by Aniansson-Wall (A-W) theory. At chi(PTHC) > or = 0.5, rod-like micelles with much higher axial ratio form. The scattered light intensity exhibits an initially abrupt increase and then levels off. The dynamic curves can be well fitted with single exponential functions, and the obtained tau(g) decreases with increasing SDS concentration. Thus, the growth from spherical to rod-like micelles might proceed via fusion of spherical micelles, in agreement with mechanism proposed by Ikeda et al. At chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.6, the apparent activation energies obtained from temperature dependent kinetic studies for the micellar growth are 40.4 and 3.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The large differences between activation energies for the growth from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles at low chi(PTHC) and the sphere-to-rod transition at high chi(PTHC) further indicate that they should follow different mechanisms. Moreover, the sphere-to-rod transition kinetics of sodium alkyl sulfate with varying hydrophobic chain lengths (n=10, 12, 14, and 16) are also studied. The longer the carbon chain

  11. Corrosion-induced surface states on n-GaAs as studied by photoluminescence versus voltage scans and luminescence decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balko, B.A.; Richmond, G.L. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States))

    1993-09-02

    Picosecond photoluminescence studies of n-GaAs electrodes have been performed to characterize surface states present at the GaAs/electrolyte interface. Potential-dependent photoluminescence and luminescence decay measurements under high photon flux indicate that as the applied voltage is biased more positive than E[sub CB] - 1 V, new surface states are formed. These appear to be corrosion states since increasing the sulfide (S[sup 2[minus

  12. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  13. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  14. Toxicant induced changes on delayed fluorescence decay kinetics of cyanobacteria and green algae: a rapid and sensitive biotest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Leunert

    Full Text Available Algal tests have developed into routine tools for testing toxicity of pollutants in aquatic environments. Meanwhile, in addition to algal growth rates, an increasing number of fluorescence based methods are used for rapid and sensitive toxicity measures. The present study stresses the suitability of delayed fluorescence (DF as a promising parameter for biotests. DF is based on the recombination fluorescence at the reaction centre of photosystem II, which is emitted only by photosynthetically active cells. We analyzed the effects of three chemicals (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, 3,5 Dichlorophenol (3,5 DCP and copper on the shape of the DF decay kinetics for potential use in phytoplankton toxicity tests. The short incubation tests were done with four phytoplankton species, with special emphasis on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. All species exhibited a high sensitivity to DCMU, but cyanobacteria were more affected by copper and less by 3,5 DCP than the tested green algae. Analyses of changes in the DF decay curve in response to the added chemicals indicated the feasibility of the DF decay approach as a rapid and sensitive testing tool.

  15. INNER SALTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a...Products that have been characterized include: (1) mesomeric phosphonium salts possessing phototropic properties; (2) pentavalent phosphorus compounds; and (3) a mesomeric inner salt . (Author)...Novel phosphonium and phosphorane compounds ere prepared by a variety of m hods from triphenylphosphine and methylene bromide. Products that have

  16. Lipid Peroxide-Derived Short-Chain Carbonyls Mediate Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced and Salt-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Md. Sanaullah; Mano, Jun’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxide-derived toxic carbonyl compounds (oxylipin carbonyls), produced downstream of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were recently revealed to mediate abiotic stress-induced damage of plants. Here, we investigated how oxylipin carbonyls cause cell death. When tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, several species of short-chain oxylipin carbonyls [i.e. 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal and acrolein] accumulated and the cells underwent programmed cell death (PCD), as judged based on DNA fragmentation, an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive nuclei, and cytoplasm retraction. These oxylipin carbonyls caused PCD in BY-2 cells and roots of tobacco and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To test the possibility that oxylipin carbonyls mediate an oxidative signal to cause PCD, we performed pharmacological and genetic experiments. Carnosine and hydralazine, having distinct chemistry for scavenging carbonyls, significantly suppressed the increase in oxylipin carbonyls and blocked PCD in BY-2 cells and Arabidopsis roots, but they did not affect the levels of ROS and lipid peroxides. A transgenic tobacco line that overproduces 2-alkenal reductase, an Arabidopsis enzyme to detoxify α,β-unsaturated carbonyls, suffered less PCD in root epidermis after hydrogen peroxide or salt treatment than did the wild type, whereas the ROS level increases due to the stress treatments were not different between the lines. From these results, we conclude that oxylipin carbonyls are involved in the PCD process in oxidatively stressed cells. Our comparison of the ability of distinct carbonyls to induce PCD in BY-2 cells revealed that acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal are the most potent carbonyls. The physiological relevance and possible mechanisms of the carbonyl-induced PCD are discussed. PMID:26025050

  17. A novel pulse-chase SILAC strategy measures changes in protein decay and synthesis rates induced by perturbation of proteostasis with an Hsp90 inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Fierro-Monti

    Full Text Available Standard proteomics methods allow the relative quantitation of levels of thousands of proteins in two or more samples. While such methods are invaluable for defining the variations in protein concentrations which follow the perturbation of a biological system, they do not offer information on the mechanisms underlying such changes. Expanding on previous work [1], we developed a pulse-chase (pc variant of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture. pcSILAC can quantitate in one experiment and for two conditions the relative levels of proteins newly synthesized in a given time as well as the relative levels of remaining preexisting proteins. We validated the method studying the drug-mediated inhibition of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone, which is known to lead to increased synthesis of stress response proteins as well as the increased decay of Hsp90 "clients". We showed that pcSILAC can give information on changes in global cellular proteostasis induced by treatment with the inhibitor, which are normally not captured by standard relative quantitation techniques. Furthermore, we have developed a mathematical model and computational framework that uses pcSILAC data to determine degradation constants kd and synthesis rates Vs for proteins in both control and drug-treated cells. The results show that Hsp90 inhibition induced a generalized slowdown of protein synthesis and an increase in protein decay. Treatment with the inhibitor also resulted in widespread protein-specific changes in relative synthesis rates, together with variations in protein decay rates. The latter were more restricted to individual proteins or protein families than the variations in synthesis. Our results establish pcSILAC as a viable workflow for the mechanistic dissection of changes in the proteome which follow perturbations. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000538.

  18. Constitutive and stress-inducible overexpression of a native aquaporin gene (MusaPIP2;6) in transgenic banana plants signals its pivotal role in salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Shareena; Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2015-05-01

    High soil salinity constitutes a major abiotic stress and an important limiting factor in cultivation of crop plants worldwide. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a aquaporin gene, MusaPIP2;6 which is involved in salt stress signaling in banana. MusaPIP2;6 was firstly identified based on comparative analysis of stressed and non-stressed banana tissue derived EST data sets and later overexpression in transgenic banana plants was performed to study its tangible functions in banana plants. The overexpression of MusaPIP2;6 in transgenic banana plants using constitutive or inducible promoter led to higher salt tolerance as compared to equivalent untransformed control plants. Cellular localization assay performed using transiently transformed onion peel cells indicated that MusaPIP2;6 protein tagged with green fluorescent protein was translocated to the plasma membrane. MusaPIP2;6-overexpressing banana plants displayed better photosynthetic efficiency and lower membrane damage under salt stress conditions. Our results suggest that MusaPIP2;6 is involved in salt stress signaling and tolerance in banana.

  19. Cold-induced aqueous acetonitrile phase separation: A salt-free way to begin quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Gang; Agar, Jeffrey; Giese, Roger W

    2017-07-14

    Cooling a 1:1 (v/v) solution of acetonitrile and water at -16° C is known to result in two clear phases. We will refer to this event as "cold-induced aqueous acetonitrile phase separation (CIPS)". On a molar basis, acetonitrile is 71.7% and 13.6% in the upper and lower phases, respectively, in our study. The phase separation proceeds as a descending cloud of microdroplets. At the convenient temperature (typical freezer) employed here the lower phase is rather resistant to solidification, although it emerges from the freezer as a solid if various insoluble matter is present at the outset. In a preliminary way, we replaced the initial (salting-out) step of a representative QuEChERS procedure with CIPS, applying this modified procedure ("CIPS-QuEChERS") to a homogenate of salmon (and partly to beef). Three phases resulted, where only the upper, acetonitrile-rich phase is a liquid (that is completely clear). The middle phase comprises ice and precipitated lipids, while the lower phase is the residual matrix of undissolved salmon or meat. Treating the upper phase from salmon, after isolation, with anhydrous MgSO4 and C18-Si (typical QuEChERS dispersive solid phase extraction sorbents), and injecting into a GC-MS in a nontargeted mode, gives two-fold more preliminary hits for chemicals, and also number of spiked pesticides recovered, relative to that from a comparable QuEChERS method. In part, this is because of much higher background signals in the latter case. Further study of CIPS-QuEChERS is encouraged, including taking advantage of other QuERChERS conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical study of evaporation-induced salt accumulation and precipitation in bare saline soils: Mechanism and feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation from bare saline soils in coastal wetlands causes salt precipitation in the form of efflorescence and subflorescence. However, it is not clear how much the precipitated salt in turn affects the water transport in the soil and hence the evaporation rate. We hypothesized that efflorescence exerts a mulching resistance to evaporation, while subflorescence reduces the pore space for water vapor to move through the soil. A numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of water, solute, and heat in the soil, and resulting evaporation and salt precipitation with the hypothesized feedback mechanism incorporated. The model was applied to simulate four evaporation experiments in soil columns with and without a fixed shallow water table, and was found to replicate well the experimental observations. The simulated results indicated that as long as the hydraulic connection between the near surface soil layer and the water source in the interior soil layer exists, vaporization occurs near the surface, and salt precipitates exclusively as efflorescence. When such hydraulic connection is absent, the vaporization plane develops downward and salt precipitates as subflorescence. Being more substantial in quantity, efflorescent affects more significantly evaporation than subflorescence during the soil-drying process. Different evaporation stages based on the location of the vaporization plane and the state of salt accumulation can be identified for characterizing the process of evaporation from bare saline soils with or without a fixed shallow water table.

  1. Search for X-Ray Induced Acceleration of the Decay of the 31-yr Isomer 178Hf Using Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, I; Becker, J A; Gemmell, D S; Krämer, A; Mashayekhi, A; McNabb, D P; Miller, G G; Moore, E F; Pangault, L N; Rundberg, R S; Schiffer, J P; Shastri, S D; Wang, T F; Wilhelmy, J B

    2002-01-01

    Releasing the energy stored in an isomeric nuclear state in a controlled way with an atomic or electromagnetic trigger is an attractive speculation: the energy gain may be on the order of the ratio of nuclear/atomic energies - MeV/keV. (Nuclear isomers are loosely defined as excited nuclear states with lifetimes longer than 10 sup - sup 9 s.) Nuclear isomers, therefore, represent an opportunity for a stand-alone energy source if suitable schemes for trigger and control of the energy release can be found. Potential applications include space drive, as well as very bright gamma-ray sources. The nucleus sup 1 sup 7 sup 8 Hf has a nuclear isomer with excitation energy E sub x = 2.447 MeV. The 2.447-MeV isomeric state decays slowly (t sub 1 sub / sub 2 = 31 y) to the nearby state at 2.433 MeV. The J suppi = 13 sup - state loses energy in a rapid (t approx 10 sup - sup 1 sup 2 s) gamma-ray cascade ending at the 8 sup - rotational band head which in turn decays via the ground-state rotational band cascade. The gamma...

  2. Bile salts and fatty acids induce the expression of Escherichia coli AcrAB multidrug efflux pump through their interaction with Rob regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Emiko Y; Bertenthal, Dan; Nilles, Matthew L; Bertrand, Kevin P; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    AcrAB of Escherichia coli, an archetype among bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, exports an extremely wide range of substrates including solvents, dyes, detergents and antimicrobial agents. Its expression is regulated by three XylS/AraC family regulators, MarA, SoxS and Rob. Although MarA and SoxS regulation works by the alteration of their own expression levels, it was not known how Rob, which is constitutively expressed, exerts its regulatory action. We show here that the induction of the AcrAB efflux pump by decanoate and the more lipophilic unconjugated bile salts is mediated by Rob, and that the low-molecular-weight inducers specifically bind to the C-terminal, non-DNA-binding domain of Rob. Induction of Rob is not needed for induction of AcrAB, and we suggest that the inducers act by producing conformational alterations in pre-existing Rob, as was suggested recently (Rosner, Dangi, Gronenborn and Martin, J Bacteriol 184: 1407-1416, 2002). Decanoate and unconjugated bile salts, which are present in the normal habitat of E. coli, were further shown to make the bacteria more resistant to lipophilic antibiotics, at least in part because of the induction of the AcrAB efflux pump. Thus, it is likely that E. coli is protecting itself by the Rob-mediated upregulation of AcrAB against the harmful effects of bile salts and fatty acids in the intestinal tract.

  3. MusaDHN-1, a novel multiple stress-inducible SK(3)-type dehydrin gene, contributes affirmatively to drought- and salt-stress tolerance in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Srinivas, Lingam; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2011-11-01

    Dehydrins are highly hydrophilic proteins involved in playing key adaptive roles in response to abiotic stress conditions having dehydration as a common component. In the present study, a novel banana SK(3)-type dehydrin, MusaDHN-1, was identified and later characterized using transgenic banana plants to investigate its functions in abiotic stress tolerance. Expression profiling in native banana plants demonstrated that MusaDHN-1 was induced in leaves by drought, salinity, cold, oxidative and heavy metal stress as well as by treatment with signalling molecules like abscisic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate. Promoter analysis carried out by making a MusaDHN-1 promoter: β-glucuronidase fusion construct reconfirmed the abiotic stress inducibility of MusaDHN-1. Transgenic banana plants constitutively overexpressing MusaDHN-1 were phenotypically normal and displayed improved tolerance to drought and salt-stress treatments in both in vitro and ex vitro assays. Enhanced accumulation of proline and reduced malondialdehyde levels in drought and salt-stressed MusaDHN-1 overexpressing plants further established their superior performance in stressed conditions. This study is the first to report generation of transgenic banana plants engineered for improved drought and salt-stress tolerance.

  4. Modulation of salt (NaCl)-induced effects on oil composition and fatty acid profile of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by exogenous application of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Sibgha; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2010-12-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a potential endogenous plant hormone that plays an important role in plant growth and development. Since sunflower yield and its seed oil yield are adversely affected by salinity, in this study the role of SA in modulating salt (NaCl)-induced effects on various yield and oil characteristics of sunflower was investigated. For this purpose a greenhouse experiment comprising two sunflower hybrid lines (Hysun-33 and SF-187), two NaCl levels (0 and 120 mmol L(-1)) and four SA levels (0, 100, 200 and 300 mg L(-1)) was conducted. Salt stress markedly reduced yield, oil content, linoleic acid and δ-tocopherol in both sunflower lines, while it increased linolenic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and α- and γ-tocopherols. However, increasing levels of foliar-applied SA resulted in improved achene yield and hundred-achene weight in both lines. Foliar-applied SA caused a significant decrease in oil stearic acid and α- and γ-tocopherols in both lines under non-saline and saline conditions. Salt-induced harmful effects on achene yield and oil characteristics of sunflower could be alleviated by exogenous application of SA. High doses of SA caused a marked increase in sunflower achene oil content as well as some key fatty acids. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Osmopriming-induced salt tolerance during seed germination of alfalfa most likely mediates through H2O2 signaling and upregulation of heme oxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amooaghaie, Rayhaneh; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2017-07-01

    The present study showed that osmopriming or pretreatment with low H2O2 doses (2 mM) for 6 h alleviated salt-reduced seed germination. The NADPH oxidase activity was the main source, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity might be a secondary source of H2O2 generation during osmopriming or H2O2 pretreatment. Hematin pretreatment similar to osmopriming improved salt-reduced seed germination that was coincident with the enhancement of heme oxygenase (HO) activity. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed that osmopriming or H2O2 pretreatment was able to upregulate heme oxygenase HO-1 transcription, while the application of N,N-dimethyl thiourea (DMTU as trap of endogenous H2O2) and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI as inhibitor of NADPHox) not only blocked the upregulation of HO but also reversed the osmopriming-induced salt attenuation. The addition of CO-saturated aqueous rescued the inhibitory effect of DMTU and DPI on seed germination and α-amylase activity during osmopriming or H2O2 pretreatment, but H2O2 could not reverse the inhibitory effect of ZnPPIX (as HO inhibitor) or Hb (as CO scavenger) that indicates that the CO acts downstream of H2O2 in priming-driven salt acclimation. The antioxidant enzymes and proline synthesis were upregulated in roots of seedlings grown from primed seeds, and these responses were reversed by adding DMTU, ZnPPIX, and Hb during osmopriming. These findings for the first time suggest that H2O2 signaling and upregulation of heme oxygenase play a crucial role in priming-driven salt tolerance.

  6. Terrestrial ecosystem recovery - Modelling the effects of reduced acidic inputs and increased inputs of sea-salts induced by global change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, C.; Moldan, F.; Wright, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    The reduced emissions of acidifying sulfur and nitrogen in Europe since the late 1970s will be further reduced when the Gothenburg protocol is fully implemented by 2010. Here we address the consequences for the recovery of acidified terrestrial ecosystems using the acidification model MAGIC applied...... and base saturation increases less than 5% over the next 30 years. A climate-induced increase in storm severity will increase the sea-salt input to the ecosystems. This will provide additional base cations to the soils and more than double the rate of the recovery, but also lead to strong acid pulses...... following high sea-salt inputs as the deposited base cations exchange with the acidity stored in the soil. Future recovery of soils and runoff at acidified catchments will thus depend on the amount and rate of reduction of acid deposition, and in the case of systems near the coast, the frequency...

  7. Data in support of intermolecular interactions at early stage of protein/detergent particle association induced by salt/polyethylene glycol mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Odahara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data provide information in support of the research article, “Intermolecular interactions at early stage of protein/detergent particle association induced by salt/polyethylene glycol mixtures” [1]. The data regarding variation of absorption spectra is used as an indicator of the duration of Rp. viridis PRU and RC, Rb. sphaeroides RC and LH2, and Rb. capsulatus LH2 in the native state in the presence of NaCl/polyethylene glycol (PEG mixture. The data about minimum concentrations of salt and PEG whose aqueous phases are mutually separated presents information on additional influence of Tris buffer and N-octyl-β-d-glucoside on the salt–PEG phase separation.

  8. Deletion of interleukin-6 prevents cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and dysfunction without affecting blood pressure in angiotensin II-high salt-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Germán E; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; D'Ambrosio, Martin A; Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Leung, Pablo; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed as a key component in the development of hypertension and cardiac remodeling associated with different cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the chronic stage of hypertension is not well defined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that deletion of interleukin-6 protects against the development of hypertension, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, remodeling and dysfunction induced by high salt diet and angiotensin II (Ang II). Male C57BL/6J and interleukin-6-knock out (KO) mice were implanted with telemetry devices for blood pressure (BP) measurements, fed a 4% NaCl diet, and infused with either vehicle or Ang II (90 ng/min per mouse subcutaneously) for 8 weeks. We studied BP and cardiac function by echocardiography at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), macrophage infiltration, and myocardial fibrosis were also assessed. BP increased similarly in both strains when treated with Ang II and high salt (Ang II-high salt); however, C57BL/6J mice developed a more severe decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction, fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration compared with interleukin-6-KO mice. No differences between strains were observed in MCSA, capillary density and MCSA to capillary density ratio. In conclusion, absence of interleukin -6 did not alter the development of Ang II-high salt-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but it prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, myocardial inflammation, and fibrosis. This indicates that interleukin-6 plays an important role in hypertensive heart damage but not in the development of hypertension.

  9. Deletion of interleukin-6 prevents cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and dysfunction without affecting blood pressure in angiotensin II-high salt-induced hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Germán E.; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; D’ambrosio, Martin A.; Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Leung, Pablo; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inflammation has been proposed as a key component in the development of hypertension and cardiac remodeling associated with different cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the chronic stage of hypertension is not well defined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that deletion of interleukin-6 protects against the development of hypertension, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, remodeling and dysfunction induced by high salt diet and angiotensin II (Ang II). Methods Male C57BL/6J and interleukin-6-knock out (KO) mice were implanted with telemetry devices for blood pressure (BP) measurements, fed a 4% NaCl diet, and infused with either vehicle or Ang II (90 ng/min per mouse subcutaneously) for 8 weeks. We studied BP and cardiac function by echocardiography at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Results Myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), macrophage infiltration, and myocardial fibrosis were also assessed. BP increased similarly in both strains when treated with Ang II and high salt (Ang II-high salt); however, C57BL/6J mice developed a more severe decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction, fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration compared with interleukin-6-KO mice. No differences between strains were observed in MCSA, capillary density and MCSA to capillary density ratio. Conclusion In conclusion, absence of interleukin -6 did not alter the development of Ang II-high salt-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but it prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, myocardial inflammation, and fibrosis. This indicates that interleukin-6 plays an important role in hypertensive heart damage but not in the development of hypertension. PMID:25304471

  10. Salt stress-induced transcription of σB- and CtsR-regulated genes in persistent and non-persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains from food processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringus, Daina L; Ivy, Reid A; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2012-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can persist in food processing environments. Six persistent and six non-persistent strains from fish processing plants and one persistent strain from a meat plant were selected to determine if expression of genes in the regulons of two stress response regulators, σ(B) and CtsR, under salt stress conditions is associated with the ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in food processing environments. Subtype data were also used to categorize the strains into genetic lineages I or II. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to measure transcript levels for two σ(B)-regulated genes, inlA and gadD3, and two CtsR-regulated genes, lmo1138 and clpB, before and after (t=10 min) salt shock (i.e., exposure of exponential phase cells to BHI+6% NaCl for 10 min at 37°C). Exposure to salt stress induced higher transcript levels relative to levels under non-stress conditions for all four stress and virulence genes across all wildtype strains tested. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of induction data revealed that transcript levels for one gene (clpB) were induced at significantly higher levels in non-persistent strains compared to persistent strains (p=0.020; two-way ANOVA). Significantly higher transcript levels of gadD3 (p=0.024; two-way ANOVA) and clpB (p=0.053; two-way ANOVA) were observed after salt shock in lineage I strains compared to lineage II strains. No clear association between stress gene transcript levels and persistence was detected. Our data are consistent with an emerging model that proposes that establishment of L. monocytogenes persistence in a specific environment occurs as a random, stochastic event, rather than as a consequence of specific bacterial strain characteristics.

  11. Cost effective purification of intein based syntetic cationic antimicrobial peptide expressed in cold shock expression system using salt inducible E. coli GJ1158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetha Ram Kotra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide (SC-AMP is an important and upcoming therapeutic molecule against onventional antibiotics. In this study, an attempt was made to purify the SC-AMP without the enzymatic cleavage of the affinity tag, by using an intein-based system. Methods:The intein sequence was amplified from pTYB11 vector using PCR methodologies and the N-terminal of intein was ligated with SC-AMP. The designed construct, intein-SC-AMP was cloned into MCS region of cold shock expression vector, pCOLDI and the recombinant peptide was purified on a chitin affinity column by cleaving intein with 50 mM DTT without applying enzymatic cleavage. Later the peptide was quantified and its antibacterial activity of the purified peptide was studied using well diffusion method. Results: Initially, intein-SC-AMP was expressed as a fusion protein in both IPTG inducible E. coli BL21(DE3 and salt inducible E. coli GJ1158. Single step purification using CBD (chitin binding domain - intein tag in salt inducible E. coli GJ1158, yields the SC-AMP in the soluble form at a oncentration of 208 mg/L. The antibacterial activity and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the purified SC-AMP was studied against both Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms. Conclusion: For the first time, single step purification of soluble SC-AMP was carried out using chitin-binding domain affinity tag in salt inducible E. coli GJ1158 without an application of enzymatic cleavage. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;4(1:13-19

  12. Pore-network model of evaporation-induced salt precipitation in porous media: The effect of correlations and heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtian, Hassan; Shokri, Nima; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Salt transport and precipitation in porous media constitute a set of complex and fascinating phenomena that are of considerable interest to several important problems, ranging from storage of CO2 in geological formations, to soil fertility, and protection of pavements and roads, as well as historical monuments. The phenomena occur at the pore scale and are greatly influenced by the heterogeneity of the pore space morphology. We present a pore-network (PN) model to study the phenomena. Vapor diffusion, capillary effect at the brine-vapor interface, flow of brine, and transport of salt and its precipitation in the pores that plug the pores partially or completely are all accounted for. The drying process is modeled by the invasion percolation, while transport of salt in brine is accounted for by the convective-diffusion equation. We demonstrate that the drying patterns, the clustering and connectivity of the pore throats in which salt precipitation occurs, the saturation distribution, and the drying rate are all strongly dependent upon the pore-size distribution, the correlations among the pore sizes, and the anisotropy of the pore space caused by stratification that most natural porous media contain. In particular, if the strata are more or less parallel to the direction of injection of the gas that dries out the pore space (air, for example) and/or causes salt precipitation (CO2, for example), the drying rate increases significantly. Moreover, salt tends to precipitate in clusters of neighboring pores that are parallel to the open surface of the porous medium.

  13. Monitoring of Deformations Induced by Crystal Growth of Salts in Porous Systems Using Microscopic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülker, G.; Jarad, A. El; Hinsch, K. D.; Juling, H.; Linnow, K.; Steiger, M.; Brüggerhoff, St.; Kirchner, D.

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) has been used to monitor microdeformations and surface microstructure changes produced by crystallization or hydration pressure of magnesium sulfate in a porous material. Samples of fritted glass were chosen as a standard porous substrate because of its mean grain size, its porosity distribution, and its negligible humidity expansion. The glass samples, soaked with salt solution, were exposed to changes in relative humidity of the surrounding air. The full-field ESPI measurements were combined with cryogenic SEM visualizations. Results from these investigations were partly not expected theoretically and give new insight in the underlying salt phase transition processes.

  14. Salt-induced expression of NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Olga V; Ismailov, Stanislav F; Popova, Tatyana N; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Golldack, Dortje

    2002-10-01

    NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase is a key cytosolic enzyme that links C and N metabolism by supplying C skeletons for primary N assimilation in plants. We report the characterization of the transcript Mc-ICDH1 encoding an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH, EC 1.1.1.42) from the facultative halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L., focussing on salt-dependent regulation of the enzyme. The activity of NADP-ICDH in plants adapted to high salinity increased in leaves and decreased in roots. By transcript analyses and Western-type hybridizations, expression of Mc-ICDH1 was found to be stimulated in leaves in salt-adapted M. crystallinum. By immunocytological analyses, NADP-ICDH proteins were localized to most cell types with strongest expression in epidermal cells and in the vascular tissue. In leaves of salt-adapted plants, signal intensities increased in mesophyll cells. In contrast to Mc-ICDH1, the activity and transcript abundance of ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1), which is the key enzyme of N assimilation and biosynthesis of amino acids, decreased in leaves in response to salt stress. The physiological roles of NADP-ICDH and Fd-GOGAT in the adaptation of plants to high salinity are discussed.

  15. Molecular dissection of Oryza sativa salt-induced RING Finger Protein 1 (OsSIRP1): possible involvement in the sensitivity response to salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun-Goo; Kim, Jung Ju; Lim, Sung Don; Park, Yong Chan; Moon, Jun-Cheol; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2016-10-01

    Ubiquitination-mediated protein degradation via Really Interesting New Gene (RING) E3 ligase plays an important role in plant responses to abiotic stress conditions. Many plant studies have found that RING proteins regulate the perception of various abiotic stresses and signal transduction. In this study, Oryza sativa salt-induced RING Finger Protein 1 (OsSIRP1) gene was selected randomly from 44 Oryza sativa RING Finger Proteins (OsRFPs) genes highly expressed in rice roots exposed to salinity stress. Transcript levels of OsSIRP1 in rice leaves after various stress treatments, including salt, heat, drought and hormone abscisic acid (ABA), were observed. Poly-ubiquitinated products of OsSIRP1 were investigated via an in vitro ubiquitination assay.35S:OsSIRP1-EYFP was distributed in the cytosol of untreated and salt-treated rice protoplasts. Heterogeneous overexpression of OsSIRP1 in Arabidopsis reduced tolerance for salinity stress during seed germination and root growth. Our findings indicate that OsSIRP1 acts as a negative regulator of salinity stress tolerance mediated by the ubiquitin 26S proteasome system. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Biological artificial fluid-induced non-lamellar phases in glyceryl monooleate: the kinetics pathway and its digestive process by bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yuan, Bo; Li, Sanming; Liu, Hongzhuo

    2014-02-01

    The cubic (Q(II)) phase is a promising sustained-release system. However, its rigid gel-like propensity is highly viscous, which makes it difficult to handle in pharmaceutical applications. To circumvent this problem, a less viscous lamellar (L(α)) phase that could spontaneously transform to Q(II) phase by the introduction of water or biological artificial fluid can be used. However, the kinetics pathway of phase transition, susceptibility to digestive processes and impact of the transition on drug release are not yet well understood. We investigated various biological artificial fluid-induced L(α) to inverse Q(II) phase transition over time in glyceryl monooleate (GMO) by water penetration scan and light polarizing microscopy. To reveal the structure stability, fluorescence spectroscopy studies were conducted using pyrene as a probe. Furthermore, the release mechanism of pyrene as a lipophilic drug model in the spontaneously formed Q(II) was investigated. Although hexagonal (H(II)) mesophases occurred when phosphate buffered saline (PBS) 7.4, 0.1 M HCl or sodium taurocholate (NaTC) solutions were introduced to GMO at room temperature, they disappear with the exception of 0.1 M HCl at 37 °C. Compared with 25 °C, L(α) to Q(II) phase transition was in a faster rate as almost completely transforms were observed after 2 h post-immersion. The spontaneously formed mesophases were stable over 24 h immersions in PBS or pancreatic lipase solutions as proven by the extremely low fluorescence signal, however they were digestible by bile salts. This result indicated that digestion by bile salts was the major pathway instead of digestion by lipases. Moreover, pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that the digestion by bile salts induced the formation of GMO-bile salt mixed micelles whose performance depended on the bile salt concentrations. This dependence influenced the drug release from the spontaneously formed Q(II) phase. All the results concluded that

  17. Medium salt strength induced changes in growth, physiology and secondary metabolite content in adventitious roots of Morinda citrifolia: the role of antioxidant enzymes and phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahil Baque, Md; Lee, Eun-Jung; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2010-07-01

    In an attempt to improve growth and secondary metabolite production, and to understand the possible mechanism involved in relation to the changes in physiology and activities of antioxidant enzymes, we cultured Morinda citrifolia adventitious roots in different strength (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0) of Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 5 mg l(-1) indole butyric acid and 30 g l(-1) sucrose. Quarter-strength MS medium was proven suitable for the production of both root biomass and secondary metabolites [anthraquinone (AQ), phenolics and flavonoids]. With the increasing salt strength, root growth and AQ accumulation decreased significantly. Higher (1.5 and 2 MS) salt strength provoked osmotic stress resulted in more than twofold free proline accumulation than lower salt strength treated roots and induced free radical scavenging activity. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity showed a positive correlation in relation to salt strength that leads to an increase in phenol biosynthesis in expense of AQ formation. The elevated catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (G-POD) and superoxide dismutase activities and decreased ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were observed in roots treated with 2.0 MS. On the other hand, APX activity was strongly activated along with considerable increase in CAT activity at 0.25 MS treated culture. However, the joint functions of CAT, G-POD and APX at 0.25 MS treated cultures were efficient to eliminate the potential danger of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as evidenced from low H(2)O(2) accumulation and low level of lipid peroxidation.

  18. Exogenous proline and glycine betaine mediated upregulation of antioxidant defense and glyoxalase systems provides better protection against salt-induced oxidative stress in two rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Alam, Md Mahabub; Rahman, Anisur; Hasanuzzaman, Md; Nahar, Kamrun; Fujita, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the roles of exogenous proline (Pro, 5 mM) and glycine betaine (GB, 5 mM) in improving salt stress tolerance in salt sensitive (BRRI dhan49) and salt tolerant (BRRI dhan54) rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties. Salt stresses (150 and 300 mM NaCl for 48 h) significantly reduced leaf relative water (RWC) and chlorophyll (chl) content and increased endogenous Pro and increased lipid peroxidation and H2O2 levels. Ascorbate (AsA), glutathione (GSH) and GSH/GSSG, ascorbate peroxidae (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), and glyoxalase I (Gly I) activities were reduced in sensitive variety and these were increased in tolerant variety due to salt stress. The glyoxalase II (Gly II), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in both cultivars by salt stress. Exogenous Pro and GB application with salt stress improved physiological parameters and reduced oxidative damage in both cultivars where BRRI dhan54 showed better tolerance. The result suggests that exogenous application of Pro and GB increased rice seedlings' tolerance to salt-induced oxidative damage by upregulating their antioxidant defense system where these protectants rendered better performance to BRRI dhan54 and Pro can be considered as better protectant than GB.

  19. Exogenous Proline and Glycine Betaine Mediated Upregulation of Antioxidant Defense and Glyoxalase Systems Provides Better Protection against Salt-Induced Oxidative Stress in Two Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Alam, Md. Mahabub; Rahman, Anisur; Hasanuzzaman, Md.; Nahar, Kamrun; Fujita, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the roles of exogenous proline (Pro, 5 mM) and glycine betaine (GB, 5 mM) in improving salt stress tolerance in salt sensitive (BRRI dhan49) and salt tolerant (BRRI dhan54) rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties. Salt stresses (150 and 300 mM NaCl for 48 h) significantly reduced leaf relative water (RWC) and chlorophyll (chl) content and increased endogenous Pro and increased lipid peroxidation and H2O2 levels. Ascorbate (AsA), glutathione (GSH) and GSH/GSSG, ascorbate peroxidae (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), and glyoxalase I (Gly I) activities were reduced in sensitive variety and these were increased in tolerant variety due to salt stress. The glyoxalase II (Gly II), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in both cultivars by salt stress. Exogenous Pro and GB application with salt stress improved physiological parameters and reduced oxidative damage in both cultivars where BRRI dhan54 showed better tolerance. The result suggests that exogenous application of Pro and GB increased rice seedlings' tolerance to salt-induced oxidative damage by upregulating their antioxidant defense system where these protectants rendered better performance to BRRI dhan54 and Pro can be considered as better protectant than GB. PMID:24991566

  20. Exogenous Proline and Glycine Betaine Mediated Upregulation of Antioxidant Defense and Glyoxalase Systems Provides Better Protection against Salt-Induced Oxidative Stress in Two Rice (Oryza sativa L. Varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Hasanuzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the roles of exogenous proline (Pro, 5 mM and glycine betaine (GB, 5 mM in improving salt stress tolerance in salt sensitive (BRRI dhan49 and salt tolerant (BRRI dhan54 rice (Oryza sativa L. varieties. Salt stresses (150 and 300 mM NaCl for 48 h significantly reduced leaf relative water (RWC and chlorophyll (chl content and increased endogenous Pro and increased lipid peroxidation and H2O2 levels. Ascorbate (AsA, glutathione (GSH and GSH/GSSG, ascorbate peroxidae (APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, catalase (CAT, and glyoxalase I (Gly I activities were reduced in sensitive variety and these were increased in tolerant variety due to salt stress. The glyoxalase II (Gly II, glutathione S-transferase (GST, and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were increased in both cultivars by salt stress. Exogenous Pro and GB application with salt stress improved physiological parameters and reduced oxidative damage in both cultivars where BRRI dhan54 showed better tolerance. The result suggests that exogenous application of Pro and GB increased rice seedlings’ tolerance to salt-induced oxidative damage by upregulating their antioxidant defense system where these protectants rendered better performance to BRRI dhan54 and Pro can be considered as better protectant than GB.

  1. Neuroprotective and antioxidant activities of bamboo salt soy sauce against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong Hee; Noh, Min-Young; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Haiwon; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Bamboo salt (BS) and soy sauce (SS) are traditional foods in Asia, which contain antioxidants that have cytoprotective effects on the body. The majority of SS products contain high levels of common salt, consumption of which has been associated with numerous detrimental effects on the body. However, BS may be considered a healthier substitute to common salt. The present study hypothesized that SS made from BS, known as bamboo salt soy sauce (BSSS), may possess enhanced cytoprotective properties; this was evaluated using a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal cell death rat model. Rat neuronal cells were pretreated with various concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10%) of BSSS, traditional soy sauce (TRSS) and brewed soy sauce (BRSS), and were subsequently exposed to H2O2 (100 µM). The viability of neuronal cells, and the occurrence of DNA fragmentation, was subsequently examined. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with TRSS and BRSS reduced cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas neuronal cells pretreated with BSSS exhibited increased cell viability, as compared with non-treated neuronal cells. Furthermore, neuronal cells pretreated with 0.01% BSSS exhibited the greatest increase in viability. Exposure of neuronal cells to H2O2 significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein, poly (ADP-ribose), cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3, in all cases. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with BSSS significantly reduced the levels of ROS generated by H2O2, and increased the levels of phosphorylated AKT and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Furthermore, the observed effects of BSSS could be blocked by administration of 10 µM LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. The results of the present study suggested that BSSS may exert positive neuroprotective effects against H2O2-induced cell death

  2. Corrosion-induced microstructural developments in 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li2BeF4(FLiBe) salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guiqiu; He, Lingfeng; Carpenter, David; Sridharan, Kumar

    2016-12-01

    The microstructural developments in the near-surface regions of AISI 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li2BeF4 (FLiBe) salt have been investigated with the goal of using this material for the construction of the fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), a leading nuclear reactor concept for the next generation nuclear plants (NGNP). Tests were conducted in molten FLiBe salt (melting point: 459 °C) at 700 °C in graphite crucibles and 316 stainless steel crucibles for exposure duration of up to 3000 h. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in the near-surface regions of the samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with EDS capabilities. Intergranular corrosion attack in the near-surface regions was observed with associated Cr depletion along the grain boundaries. High-angle grain boundaries (15-180°) were particularly prone to intergranular attack and Cr depletion. The depth of attack extended to the depths of 22 μm after 3000-h exposure for the samples tested in graphite crucible, while similar exposure in 316 stainless steel crucible led to the attack depths of only about 11 μm. Testing in graphite crucibles led to the formation of nanometer-scale Mo2C, Cr7C3 and Al4C3 particle phases in the near-surface regions of the material. The copious depletion of Cr in the near-surface regions induced a γ-martensite to α-ferrite phase (FeNix) transformation. Based on the microstructural analysis, a thermal diffusion controlled corrosion model was developed and experimentally validated for predicting long-term corrosion attack depth.

  3. The mRNA decay factor tristetraprolin (TTP) induces senescence in human papillomavirus-transformed cervical cancer cells by targeting E6-AP ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanduja, Sandhya; Kaza, Vimala; Dixon, Dan A

    2009-09-10

    The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates expression of many cancer-associated and proinflammatory factors through binding AU-rich elements (ARE) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and facilitating rapid mRNA decay. Here we report on the ability of TTP to act in an anti-proliferative capacity in HPV18-positive HeLa cells by inducing senescence. HeLa cells maintain a dormant p53 pathway and elevated telomerase activity resulting from HPV-mediated transformation, whereas TTP expression counteracted this effect by stabilizing p53 protein and inhibiting hTERT expression. Presence of TTP did not alter E6 and E7 viral mRNA levels indicating that these are not TTP targets. It was found that TTP promoted rapid mRNA decay of the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6-associated protein (E6-AP). RNA-binding studies demonstrated TTP and E6-AP mRNA interaction and deletion of the E6-AP mRNA ARE-containing 3'UTR imparts resistance to TTP-mediated downregulation. Similar results were obtained with high-risk HPV16-positive cells that employ the E6-AP pathway to control p53 and hTERT levels. Furthermore, loss of TTP expression was consistently observed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. These findings demonstrate the ability of TTP to act as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting the E6-AP pathway and indicate TTP loss to be a critical event during HPV-mediated carcinogenesis.

  4. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Granular encapsulation of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) in LHL-salt water systems: Particle induced densification with quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin; Sukop, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Addition of granular materials to floating crude oil slicks can be effective in capturing and densifying the floating hydrophobic phase, which settles by gravity. Interaction of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) with quartz sand was investigated in LHL-salt water systems. The LHLs studied were decane, tetradecane, hexadecane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 2-cholorotoluene. Experiments were conducted with fine quartz sand (passing sieve No. 40 with openings 0.425 mm). Each LHL was dyed with few crystals of Sudan IV dye for ease of visual observation. A volume of 0.5 mL of each LHL was added to 100 mL salt water (34 g/L). Addition of one gram of quartz sand to the floating hydrophobic liquid layer resulted in formation of sand-encapsulated globules, which settled due to increased density. All LHLs (except for a few globules of decane) formed globules covered with fine sand particles that were heavy enough to settle by gravity. The encapsulated globules were stable and retained their shape upon settling. Polarity of hydrophobic liquids as the main factor of aggregation with minerals was found to be insufficient to explain LHL aggregation with sand. Contact angle measurements were made by submerging a large quartz crystal with the LHL drop on its surface into salt water. A positive correlation was observed between the wetting angle of LHL and the LHL volume captured (r = 0.75). The dependence of the globule density on globule radius was analyzed in relation to the coverage (%) of globule surface (LHL-salt water interface) by fine quartz particles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Plant nonsense-mediated mRNA decay is controlled by different autoregulatory circuits and can be induced by an EJC-like complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyikó, Tünde; Kerényi, Farkas; Szabadkai, Levente; Benkovics, Anna H.; Major, Péter; Sonkoly, Boglárka; Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Barta, Endre; Niemiec, Emilia; Kufel, Joanna; Silhavy, Dániel

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a eukaryotic quality control system that recognizes and degrades transcripts containing NMD cis elements in their 3′untranslated region (UTR). In yeasts, unusually long 3′UTRs act as NMD cis elements, whereas in vertebrates, NMD is induced by introns located >50 nt downstream from the stop codon. In vertebrates, splicing leads to deposition of exon junction complex (EJC) onto the mRNA, and then 3′UTR-bound EJCs trigger NMD. It is proposed that this intron-based NMD is vertebrate specific, and it evolved to eliminate the misproducts of alternative splicing. Here, we provide evidence that similar EJC-mediated intron-based NMD functions in plants, suggesting that this type of NMD is evolutionary conserved. We demonstrate that in plants, like in vertebrates, introns located >50 nt from the stop induces NMD. We show that orthologs of all core EJC components are essential for intron-based plant NMD and that plant Partner of Y14 and mago (PYM) also acts as EJC disassembly factor. Moreover, we found that complex autoregulatory circuits control the activity of plant NMD. We demonstrate that expression of suppressor with morphogenic effect on genitalia (SMG)7, which is essential for long 3′UTR- and intron-based NMD, is regulated by both types of NMD, whereas expression of Barentsz EJC component is downregulated by intron-based NMD. PMID:23666629

  7. Mild Salt Stress Conditions Induce Different Responses in Root Hydraulic Conductivity of Phaseolus vulgaris Over-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Polanco, Monica; Sánchez-Romera, Beatriz; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to salinity by altering their physiological parameters in order to maintain their water balance. The reduction in root hydraulic conductivity is one of the first responses of plants to the presence of salt in order to minimize water stress. Although its regulation has been commonly attributed to aquaporins activity, osmotic adjustment and the toxic effect of Na+ and Cl− have also a main role in the whole process. We studied the effects of 30 mM NaCl on Phaseolus vulgaris plants after 9 days and found different responses in root hydraulic conductivity over-time. An initial and final reduction of root hydraulic conductivity, stomatal conductance, and leaf water potential in response to NaCl was attributed to an initial osmotic shock after 1 day of treatment, and to the initial symptoms of salt accumulation within the plant tissues after 9 days of treatment. After 6 days of NaCl treatment, the increase in root hydraulic conductivity to the levels of control plants was accompanied by an increase in root fructose content, and with the intracellular localization of root plasma membrane aquaporins (PIP) to cortex cells close to the epidermis and to cells surrounding xylem vessels. Thus, the different responses of bean plants to mild salt stress over time may be connected with root fructose accumulation, and intracellular localization of PIP aquaporins. PMID:24595059

  8. Mild salt stress conditions induce different responses in root hydraulic conductivity of phaseolus vulgaris over-time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Calvo-Polanco

    Full Text Available Plants respond to salinity by altering their physiological parameters in order to maintain their water balance. The reduction in root hydraulic conductivity is one of the first responses of plants to the presence of salt in order to minimize water stress. Although its regulation has been commonly attributed to aquaporins activity, osmotic adjustment and the toxic effect of Na+ and Cl- have also a main role in the whole process. We studied the effects of 30 mM NaCl on Phaseolus vulgaris plants after 9 days and found different responses in root hydraulic conductivity over-time. An initial and final reduction of root hydraulic conductivity, stomatal conductance, and leaf water potential in response to NaCl was attributed to an initial osmotic shock after 1 day of treatment, and to the initial symptoms of salt accumulation within the plant tissues after 9 days of treatment. After 6 days of NaCl treatment, the increase in root hydraulic conductivity to the levels of control plants was accompanied by an increase in root fructose content, and with the intracellular localization of root plasma membrane aquaporins (PIP to cortex cells close to the epidermis and to cells surrounding xylem vessels. Thus, the different responses of bean plants to mild salt stress over time may be connected with root fructose accumulation, and intracellular localization of PIP aquaporins.

  9. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  10. Non-monotonic swelling of surface grafted hydrogels induced by pH and/or salt concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Gabriel S. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas Teóricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Olvera de la Cruz, Monica [Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Szleifer, I., E-mail: igal@northwestern.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We use a molecular theory to study the thermodynamics of a weak-polyacid hydrogel film that is chemically grafted to a solid surface. We investigate the response of the material to changes in the pH and salt concentration of the buffer solution. Our results show that the pH-triggered swelling of the hydrogel film has a non-monotonic dependence on the acidity of the bath solution. At most salt concentrations, the thickness of the hydrogel film presents a maximum when the pH of the solution is increased from acidic values. The quantitative details of such swelling behavior, which is not observed when the film is physically deposited on the surface, depend on the molecular architecture of the polymer network. This swelling-deswelling transition is the consequence of the complex interplay between the chemical free energy (acid-base equilibrium), the electrostatic repulsions between charged monomers, which are both modulated by the absorption of ions, and the ability of the polymer network to regulate charge and control its volume (molecular organization). In the absence of such competition, for example, for high salt concentrations, the film swells monotonically with increasing pH. A deswelling-swelling transition is similarly predicted as a function of the salt concentration at intermediate pH values. This reentrant behavior, which is due to the coupling between charge regulation and the two opposing effects triggered by salt concentration (screening electrostatic interactions and charging/discharging the acid groups), is similar to that found in end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers. Understanding how to control the response of the material to different stimuli, in terms of its molecular structure and local chemical composition, can help the targeted design of applications with extended functionality. We describe the response of the material to an applied pressure and an electric potential. We present profiles that outline the local chemical composition of the

  11. Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  12. Synthesis of the Z =122 superheavy nucleus via 58Fe- and 64Ni-induced reactions using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sahila; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-04-01

    Within the framework of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), we have studied the nuclear system with Z =122 and mass number A = 306 formed via two "hot" fusion reactions 58Fe+248Cm and 64Ni+242Pu . The up-to-date measured data are available only for the first reaction, and for fusion-fission cross section σff and quasifission cross section σqf, only at one compound nucleus (CN) excitation energy E*=33 MeV . In this study, we have included the deformation effects up to quadrupole deformations β2 i and with "optimum" orientations θiopt . for coplanar (Φ =00 ) configurations. The only parameter of the model is the neck-length parameter Δ R whose value, for the nuclear proximity potential used here, remains within its range of validity (˜2 fm ). Using the best fitted Δ R 's to the observed data for σff, calculated for mass region A /2 ±20 , and σqf for the incoming channel of Fe-induced reaction at E*=33 MeV , we have extended the DCM calculations to the other Ni-induced reaction, and to E*'s in the energy range 25-68 MeV. The interesting result is that the predicted evaporation residue cross section σER for 1-4 neutrons is largest for 4n decay at E*=45 MeV , having the value σER≡σ4 n˜10-5 pb for both reactions, and that the Δ R 's for the three processes (ER, ff, and qf) are different, i.e., they belong to different time scales where ff occurs first, then qf and the ER at the end. Other results of interest are the predictions of the magic N =82 136Xe fragment in the ff region of mass A /2 ±20 , and the doubly magic 208Pb in the qf region, in near close agreement with observed data (the observed fission fragment is of mass 132, instead of the predicted mass 136). The role of the weakly bound neutron-rich intermediate mass fragments and of the nucleus in the neighborhood of deformed magic Z = 108 are also indicated in the DCM calculations, which need experimental verification. For the predicted σER, the largest value of CN fusion probability PCN

  13. A halotolerant bacterium Bacillus licheniformis HSW-16 augments induced systemic tolerance to salt stress in wheat plant (Triticum aestivum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Prakash Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Certain plant growth promoting bacteria can protect associated plants from harmful effects of salinity. We report the isolation and characterization of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC deaminase bacterium Bacillus licheniformis HSW-16 capable of ameliorating salt (NaCl stress in wheat plants. The bacterium was isolated from water of Sambhar salt lake, Rajasthan, India. The presence of ACC deaminase activity was confirmed by enzyme assay and analysis of AcdS gene, a structural gene for ACC deaminase. Inoculation of B. licheniformis HSW-16 protected wheat plants from growth inhibition caused by NaCl and increased plant growth (6-38% in terms of root length, shoot length, fresh weight, and dry weight. Ionic analysis of plant samples showed that the bacterial inoculation decreased accumulation of Na+ content (51%, and increased K+ (68%, and Ca2+ content (32% in plants at different concentration of NaCl. It suggested that bacterial inoculation protected plants from the effect of NaCl by decreasing level of Na+ in plants. Production of exopolysaccharide by the B. licheniformis HSW-16 can also protect from Na+ by binding this ion. Moreover, application of test isolate resulted in an increase in certain osmolytes such as total soluble sugar, total protein content and a decrease in malondialdehyde content, illustrating their role in the protection of plants. The ability of B. licheniformis HSW-16 to colonize plant root surface was examined by staining the bacterium with acridine orange followed by fluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based DNA fingerprinting analysis. These results suggested that B. licheniformis HSW-16 could be used as a bioinoculant to improve the productivity of plants growing under salt stress.

  14. Effects of gamma irradiation on physicochemical properties of heat-induced gel prepared with chicken salt-soluble proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Seo, Kwang-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The technological effects of gamma irradiation (0, 3, 7, and 10 kGy) on chicken salt-soluble meat proteins in a model system were investigated. There were no significant differences in protein, fat, and ash content, and sarcoplasmic protein solubility among all samples. The samples with increasing gamma irradiation levels had higher pH, lightness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity, whereas moisture content, water holding capacity, redness, myofibrillar protein solubility, total protein solubility, hardness, springiness, cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness were the highest in the unirradiated control. The result from meat products using gamma irradiation was intended to provide a basic resource processing technology.

  15. Evaluation of anti-hypertensive activity of Ulmus wallichiana extract and fraction in SHR, DOCA-salt- and L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Anees A; Lahiri, Shibani; Mohan, Divya; Valicherla, Guru R; Gupta, Anand P; Riyazuddin, Mohammed; Kumar, Sudhir; Maurya, Rakesh; Hanif, Kashif; Gayen, Jiaur R

    2016-12-04

    Ulmus wallichiana Planchon (Himalayan Elm), a traditional medicinal plant, used in fracture healing in folk tradition of Uttarakhand, Himalaya, India. It is also used as diuretic. U. rhynchophylla, native to China, known as Gou Teng in Chinese medicine, is used for hypertension (WHO). U. macrocarpa has antihypertensive and vasorelaxant activity. However, no detailed studies related to hypertension have been reported previously, so we have explored the antihypertensive activity of U. wallichiana. To investigate the pharmacological effect of ethanolic extract (EE) and butanolic fraction (BF) of U. wallichiana in hypertensive rats. SHR, DOCA-salt- and L-NAME-induced hypertension models were used. Treatment was performed by oral administration of EE and BF of U. wallichiana (500mg/kg/day and 50mg/kg/day) for 14 days. Then blood pressure was measured by non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurement technique. Invasive blood pressure (IBP) was also reported to support the NIBP data. Concentrations of plasma renin, angiotensin II (Ang II), nitrate/nitrite (NO), cGMP were estimated. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and ROS activity were also estimated. Blood pressure was significantly higher in SHR as compared to normotensive wistar group (170.59±0.83mmHg vs 121.54±1.24mmHg, respectively). SBP was increased in DOCA-salt induced group compared to their control (132.77±3.90mmHg vs 107.85±5.95mmHg, respectively) and L-NAME-induced group compared to their control (168.55±5.07mmHg vs 113.03±4.13mmHg, respectively). The treatment of extract and fraction of U. wallichiana significantly decreased the blood pressure in SHR+EE (151.26±1.85mmHg, phypertension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Renal Dysfunction Induced by Kidney-Specific Gene Deletion ofHsd11b2as a Primary Cause of Salt-Dependent Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kohei; Nishimoto, Mitsuhiro; Hirohama, Daigoro; Ayuzawa, Nobuhiro; Kawarazaki, Wakako; Watanabe, Atsushi; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Loffing, Johannes; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Marumo, Takeshi; Fujita, Toshiro

    2017-07-01

    Genome-wide analysis of renal sodium-transporting system has identified specific variations of Mendelian hypertensive disorders, including HSD11B2 gene variants in apparent mineralocorticoid excess. However, these genetic variations in extrarenal tissue can be involved in developing hypertension, as demonstrated in former studies using global and brain-specific Hsd11b2 knockout rodents. To re-examine the importance of renal dysfunction on developing hypertension, we generated kidney-specific Hsd11b2 knockout mice. The knockout mice exhibited systemic hypertension, which was abolished by reducing salt intake, suggesting its salt-dependency. In addition, we detected an increase in renal membrane expressions of cleaved epithelial sodium channel-α and T53-phosphorylated Na + -Cl - cotransporter in the knockout mice. Acute intraperitoneal administration of amiloride-induced natriuresis and increased urinary sodium/potassium ratio more in the knockout mice compared with those in the wild-type control mice. Chronic administration of amiloride and high-KCl diet significantly decreased mean blood pressure in the knockout mice, which was accompanied with the correction of hypokalemia and the resultant decrease in Na + -Cl - cotransporter phosphorylation. Accordingly, a Na + -Cl - cotransporter blocker hydrochlorothiazide significantly decreased mean blood pressure in the knockout mice. Chronic administration of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone significantly decreased mean blood pressure of the knockout mice along with downregulation of cleaved epithelial sodium channel-α and phosphorylated Na + -Cl - cotransporter expression in the knockout kidney. Our data suggest that kidney-specific deficiency of 11β-HSD2 leads to salt-dependent hypertension, which is attributed to mineralocorticoid receptor-epithelial sodium channel-Na + -Cl - cotransporter activation in the kidney, and provides evidence that renal dysfunction is essential for developing the

  17. NaCl-induced expression of AtVHA-c5 gene in the roots plays a role in response of Arabidopsis to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aimin; Liu, Enhui; Ma, Hongping; Feng, Shuang; Gong, Shufang; Wang, Jingang

    2018-01-06

    Suppression of AtVHA-c5 expression results in changes in H+ and Na+ fluxes of roots, and increase sensitivity to salt in Arabidopsis. Vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit endomembrane proton pump, is essential in plant growth and response to environmental stresses. In the present study, the function of Arabidopsis V-ATPase subunit c5 (AtVHA-c5) gene in response to salt stress was investigated. Subcellular localization showed that AtVHA-c5 was mainly localized to endosomes and the vacuolar membrane in Arabidopsis. The analysis of quantitative real-time PCR showed that expression of AtVHA-c5 gene was induced by NaCl stress. Histochemical analysis revealed that AtVHA-c5 was expressed in the root epidermis of untreated Arabidopsis and in the whole root elongation zone after NaCl treatment. Phenotypic analysis showed that the atvha-c5 mutant is sensitive to high NaCl as compared to the wild type. The non-invasive micro-test technology measurement demonstrated that the net H+ and Na+ efflux in the root elongation zone of the atvha-c5 mutant was weaker than that of the wild type under NaCl treatment, suggesting that H+ and Na+ fluxes in atvha-c5 roots are impaired under NaCl stress. Moreover, compared to the wild type, the expression of AtSOS1 (salt overly sensitive 1) and AtAHA1 (plasma membrane H+-ATPase 1) were down-regulated in atvha-c5 roots under NaCl stress. Overall, our results indicate that AtVHA-c5 plays a role in Arabidopsis root response to NaCl stress by influencing H+ and Na+ fluxes.

  18. Possible roles of nitrogen fixation and mineral uptake induced by rhizobacterial inoculation on salt tolerance of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Komy, Hesham M A; Abdel-Samad, Hamdia M; Hetta, Ahmed M A; Barakat, Nasser A

    2004-01-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the possible roles of nitrogen fixation and/or enhanced mineral uptake by Azospirillum lipoferum and Bacillus polymexa inoculation in improving salt tolerance of maize plants. Plants were inoculated and grown under salt stress (osmotic potential: -0.3, -0.6, -0.9 and -1.2 Mpa). Both microorganisms were able to fix nitrogen up to -0.9 Mpa salinity level accompanied with increased total N-yield compared with the control plants. In order to investigate the role of bacterial inoculation on enhanced mineral uptake, the growth and some physiological parameters of inoculated plants were compared with plants fertilized by K and P foliar application. Plant inoculation with the N2-fixers or plant spraying with KH2PO4 resulted in an increase in fresh and dry matter as well as water content of plants. Treated plants exhibited changed plant mineral content which was associated with increased Mg/K and decreased P/K, Ca/K and Na/K ratios. This was accompanied by accumulation of soluble sugars, amino acids in shoots and roots of plants resulting in a concomitant increase in the osmotic potential of the cell sap as a possible mechanism of adaptation to salinity.

  19. The role of cyclo-oxygenase-1 in high-salt diet-induced microvascular dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavka, Ana; Cosic, Anita; Jukic, Ivana; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lombard, Julian H; Phillips, Shane A; Seric, Vatroslav; Mihaljevic, Ivan; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2015-12-15

    Recent studies have shown that some of the deleterious effects of a high-salt (HS) diet are independent of elevated blood pressure and are associated with impaired endothelial function. Increased generation of cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2)-derived vasoconstrictor factors and endothelial activation may contribute to impaired vascular relaxation during HS loading. The present study aimed to assess the regulation of microvascular reactivity and to clarify the role of COX-1 and COX-2 in normotensive subjects on a short-term HS diet. The present study demonstrates the important role of COX-1 derived vasoconstrictor metabolites in regulation of microvascular blood flow during a HS diet. These results help to explain how even short-term HS diets may impact upon microvascular reactivity without changes in blood pressure and suggest that a vasoconstrictor metabolite of COX-1 could play a role in this impaired tissue blood flow. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a 1-week high-salt (HS) diet on the role of cyclo-oxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and the vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, thromboxane A2 (TXA2 ) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ), on skin microcirculatory blood flow, as well as to detect its effect on markers of endothelial activation such as soluble cell adhesion molecules. Young women (n = 54) were assigned to either the HS diet group (N = 30) (∼14 g day(-1) NaCl ) or low-salt (LS) diet group (N = 24) (diet protocols. One HS diet group subset received 100 mg of indomethacin (non-selective COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor), and another HS group subset received 200 mg of celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) before repeating laser Doppler flowmetry measurements. Blood pressure was unchanged after the HS diet, although it significantly reduced after the LS diet. Twenty-four hour urinary sodium was increased, and plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone levels were decreased after the HS diet. The HS diet significantly impaired PORH and

  20. Quaternary ammonium salt N-(dodecyloxycarboxymethyl)-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium chloride induced alterations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblak, Ewa; Piecuch, Agata; Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Wawrzycka, Donata

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the influence of the quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) called IM (N-(dodecyloxycarboxymethyl)- N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium chloride) on yeast cells of the parental strain and the IM-resistant mutant (EO25 IMR) growth. The phenotype of this mutant was pleiotropic. The IMR mutant exhibited resistance to ethanol, osmotic shock and oxidative stress, as well as increased sensitivity to UV. Moreover, it was noted that mutant EO25 appears to have an increased resistance to clotrimazole, ketoconazole, fluconazole, nystatin and cycloheximide. It also tolerated growth in the presence of crystal violet, DTT and metals (selenium, tin, arsenic). It was shown that the presence of IM decreased ergosterol level in mutant plasma membrane and increased its unsaturation. These results indicate changes in the cell lipid composition. Western blot analysis showed the induction of Pma1 level by IM. RT-PCR revealed an increased PMA1 expression after IM treatment.

  1. Tannins Enriched Fraction of Emblica officinalis Fruits Alleviates High-Salt and Cholesterol Diet-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Rats via Nrf2–ARE Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem Husain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern diets containing high quantities of salt and cholesterol have exhibited to cause a considerable effect on our health. Such diets, when consumed in the long term, have also shown to be a precursor to several disorders such as the metabolic disorder and consequently, various other diseases, including cognitive deficits. In the present study, we used a high salt and cholesterol diet (HSCD to induce cognitive impairment in rats and also investigated the pharmacological action of tannins enriched fractions of Emblica officinalis (EOT – a fruit that has been traditionally used for the treatment of numerous disorders for centuries. Significant alterations in MDA, GSH, TBARS, GPx, mitochondrial ATP, and mitochondrial membrane potential levels were observed in rats fed HSCD, which indicated presence of oxidative stress. Moreover, classic signs of cognitive impairment and deficits in spatial learning and memory were observed in the neurobehavioral tests. E. officinalis tannins exhibited good affinity to Nrf2 receptors in in silico studies, significantly reversed the changes in the aforementioned biomarkers of oxidative stress which were altered in the model group, as well as improved the performance of rats in Morris water maze task. Our results also reflected that EOT supplementation significantly increased the expression of Nrf2 in the CA1 region of hippocampus and cortex. Additionally, TUNEL assay indicated that EOT supplementation led to reversal of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis caused by HSCD. Immunohistochemical analysis and western blot further revealed a surge in the nuclear location of Nrf2. Through our study, we have demonstrated that cognitive impairment can be caused in rats via HSCD as a result of the oxidative stress induced by the same. Additionally, we have investigated a novel mechanism of action for EOT (which strongly suggests to be via the Nrf2–ARE pathway and demonstrated that it has the potential to be used in the

  2. Histone acetylation associated up-regulation of the cell wall related genes is involved in salt stress induced maize root swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yan, Shihan; Zhao, Lin; Tan, Junjun; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Fei; Wang, Pu; Hou, Haoli; Li, Lijia

    2014-04-23

    Salt stress usually causes crop growth inhibition and yield decrease. Epigenetic regulation is involved in plant responses to environmental stimuli. The epigenetic regulation of the cell wall related genes associated with the salt-induced cellular response is still little known. This study aimed to analyze cell morphological alterations in maize roots as a consequence of excess salinity in relation to the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the cell wall related protein genes. In this study, maize seedling roots got shorter and displayed swelling after exposure to 200 mM NaCl for 48 h and 96 h. Cytological observation showed that the growth inhibition of maize roots was due to the reduction in meristematic zone cell division activity and elongation zone cell production. The enlargement of the stele tissue and cortex cells contributed to root swelling in the elongation zone. The cell wall is thought to be the major control point for cell enlargement. Cell wall related proteins include xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET), expansins (EXP), and the plasma membrane proton pump (MHA). RT-PCR results displayed an up-regulation of cell wall related ZmEXPA1, ZmEXPA3, ZmEXPA5, ZmEXPB1, ZmEXPB2 and ZmXET1 genes and the down-regulation of cell wall related ZmEXPB4 and ZmMHA genes as the duration of exposure was increased. Histone acetylation is regulated by HATs, which are often correlated with gene activation. The expression of histone acetyltransferase genes ZmHATB and ZmGCN5 was increased after 200 mM NaCl treatment, accompanied by an increase in the global acetylation levels of histones H3K9 and H4K5. ChIP experiment showed that the up-regulation of the ZmEXPB2 and ZmXET1 genes was associated with the elevated H3K9 acetylation levels on the promoter regions and coding regions of these two genes. These data suggested that the up-regulation of some cell wall related genes mediated cell enlargement to possibly mitigate the salinity-induced ionic toxicity, and

  3. Comparative physiological and growth responses of tomato and pepper plants to fertilizer induced salinity and salt stress under greenhouse conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Eraslan, Figen; Güneş, Aydın; İnal, Ali; Çiçek, Nuray; Alpaslan, Mehmet

    2008-01-01

    Fertilizer induced salinity adversely affects plant growth through its ionic and osmotic effects as in ordinary salinity caused by toxic ions (Na, Cl, etc.). In this study, to determine the ionic and osmotic effects of fertilizer induced salinity and NaCl salinity on growth, ascorbic acid, proline and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and stomatal resistance (SR), relative water content (RWC), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of tomato and pepper plants subjected to different tr...

  4. The impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mitigating salt-induced adverse effects in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Elhindi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is one of the serious abiotic stresses adversely affecting the majority of arable lands worldwide, limiting the crop productivity of most of the economically important crops. Sweet basil (Osmium basilicum plants were grown in a non-saline soil (EC = 0.64 dS m−1, in low saline soil (EC = 5 dS m−1, and in a high saline soil (EC = 10 dS m−1. There were differences between arbuscular mycorrhizal (Glomus deserticola colonized plants (+AMF and non-colonized plants (−AMF. Mycorrhiza mitigated the reduction of K, P and Ca uptake due to salinity. The balance between K/Na and between Ca/Na was improved in +AMF plants. Growth enhancement by mycorrhiza was independent from plant phosphorus content under high salinity levels. Different growth parameters, salt stress tolerance and accumulation of proline content were investigated, these results showed that the use of mycorrhizal inoculum (AMF was able to enhance the productivity of sweet basil plants under salinity conditions. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased chlorophyll content and water use efficiency under salinity stress. The sweet basil plants appeared to have high dependency on AMF which improved plant growth, photosynthetic efficiency, gas exchange and water use efficiency under salinity stress. In this study, there was evidence that colonization with AMF can alleviate the detrimental salinity stress influence on the growth and productivity of sweet basil plants.

  5. Salt-induced adaptation of a dynamic combinatorial library of pseudopeptidic macrocycles: unraveling the electrostatic effects in mixed aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atcher, Joan; Moure, Alejandra; Bujons, Jordi; Alfonso, Ignacio

    2015-04-27

    Dynamic combinatorial libraries are powerful systems for studying adaptive behaviors and relationships, as models of more complex molecular networks. With this aim, we set up a chemically diverse dynamic library of pseudopeptidic macrocycles containing amino-acid side chains with differently charged residues (negative, positive, and neutral). The responsive ability of this complex library upon the increase of the ionic strength has been thoroughly studied. The families of the macrocyclic members concentrating charges of the same sign showed a large increase in its proportion as the ionic strength increases, whereas those with residues of opposite charges showed the reverse behavior. This observation suggested an electrostatic shielding effect of the salt within the library of macrocycles. The top-down deconvolution of the library allowed us to obtain the fundamental thermodynamic information connecting the library members (exchange equilibrium constants), as well as to parameterize the adaptation to the external stimulus. We also visualized the physicochemical driving forces for the process by structural analysis using NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. This knowledge permitted the full understanding of the whole dynamic library and also the de novo design of dynamic chemical systems with tailored co-adaptive relationships, containing competing or cooperating species. This study highlights the utility of dynamic combinatorial libraries in the emerging field of systems chemistry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Assessment of rock mass decay in artificial slopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.

    2006-01-01

    This research investigates the decay of rock masses underlying slopes, and seeks to quantify the relations of such decay with time and geotechnical parameters of the slope and rock mass. Decay can greatly affect the geotechnical properties of rocks within engineering timescales, and may induce a

  7. Effect of Anionic Salt and Highly Fermentable Carbohydrate Supplementations on Urine pH and on Experimentally Induced Hypocalcaemia in Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enemark JMD

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of dietary grain on calcium homeostasis. Six rumen-fistulated dairy cows with 3 or more previous lactations and no history of parturient paresis were randomly assigned to a sequence of diets in a crossover study with 4 periods of 10 days each. Dietary treatments were: A control ration consisting of wrap grass silage alone (1, the control ration supplemented with ammonium chloride and ammonium sulphate salt solution (2, control ration following a period with supplementation (3 and control ration supplemented with increasing amounts of barley from 4 to 10 kg/cow per day, expected to produce subclinical rumen acidosis (4. Daily intake of the diets was adjusted to 14 kg DM/cow per day. On day 11, the calcium-regulating mechanisms in cows were challenged until recumbency by a standardized intravenous EDTA infusion and cows were left to recover spontaneously. Anion supplementation and the feeding of highly fermentable carbohydrate lowered urine pH below 7.0 due to subclinical acidosis. During spontaneous recovery from EDTA induced hypocalcaemia, the cows more quickly regained a whole blood free calcium concentration of 1.00 mmol/L if they had most recently been supplemented with either anionic salts or with increasing amounts of barley, as compared to the basic ration. It is concluded that so-called slug-feeding or 'steaming up' with highly fermentable carbohydrates before parturition in milk fever susceptible cows enhanced calcium homeostasis similar to the effect seen in cows on anionic diets.

  8. Salt-induced delay in cotyledonary globulin mobilization is abolished by induction of proteases and leaf growth sink strength at late seedling establishment in cashew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Luiz Ferreira Aguiar; Silva, André Luis Coelho da; Carvalho, Fabrício Eulálio Leite; Maia, Josemir Moura; Voigt, Eduardo Luiz; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio Gomes

    2014-09-15

    Seedling establishment in saline conditions is crucial for plant survival and productivity. This study was performed to elucidate the biochemical and physiological mechanisms involved with the recovery and establishment of cashew seedlings subjected to salinity. The changes in the Na+ levels and K/Na ratios, associated with relative water content, indicated that osmotic effects were more important than salt toxicity in the inhibition of seedling growth and cotyledonary protein mobilization. Salinity (50mM NaCl) induced a strong delay in protein breakdown and amino acid accumulation in cotyledons, and this effect was closely related to azocaseinolytic and protease activities. In parallel, proline and free amino acids accumulated in the leaves whereas the protein content decreased. Assays with specific inhibitors indicated that the most important proteases in cotyledons were of serine, cysteine and aspartic types. Proteomic analysis revealed that most of the cashew reserve proteins are 11S globulin-type and that these proteins were similarly degraded under salinity. In the late establishment phase, the salt-treated seedlings displayed an unexpected recovery in terms of leaf growth and N mobilization from cotyledon to leaves. This recovery coordinately involved a great leaf expansion, decreased amino acid content and increased protein synthesis in leaves. This response occurred in parallel with a prominent induction in the cotyledon proteolytic activity. Altogether, these data suggest that a source-sink mechanism involving leaf growth and protein synthesis may have acted as an important sink for reserve mobilization contributing to the seedling establishment under salinity. The amino acids that accumulated in the leaves may have exerted negative feedback to act as a signal for the induction of protease activity in the cotyledon. Overall, these mechanisms employed by cashew seedlings may be part of an adaptive process for the efficient rescue of cotyledonary proteins

  9. Cloning and characterization of cold, salt and drought inducible C-repeat binding factor gene from a highly cold adapted ecotype of Lepidium latifolium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M; Jaiswal, A; Jaiswal, J P; Qureshi, M I; Tufchi, M; Singh, N K

    2013-04-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein/C-Repeat Binding Factors (CBFs) belongs to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that binds to DRE/CRT cis-element in cold-responsive (COR) genes and induce COR genes. CBFs have been isolated and characterized from evolutionarily diverse plant species. CBF pathway is conserved by CBF regulon and the size or the number and kind of target genes vary among freezing sensitive and tolerant plants. Hence, cloning of CBFs from highly freezing tolerant plants such as Lepidium latifolium L. will be useful in understanding the freezing tolerance of this species. In this study, LlCBF, a CBF1 family gene from L. Latifolium L., was cloned using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR. The full length mRNA of LlCBF is 948 bp with an open reading frame of 642 bp, encoding a protein of 213 amino acids with a molecular weight of 23.92 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 4.80. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that LlCBF has an AP2 DNA binding domain, a potential CBF type nuclear localization signal (NLS) and C-terminal acidic domain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of LlCBF revealed that this gene is up-regulated by high salt, dehydration and low temperature stresses. The investigation is therefore successful in cloning of a gene having strong homology with CBF transcription factors and responsive to low temperature, high salt and dehydration conditions.

  10. Condensation and salt-induced decondensation of DNA upon incorporation of a V-shaped luminescent [Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)](4+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Gui-Lian; Chao, Hui; Cai, Xue-Ping; Jiang, Zhen-Shen; Li, Hong

    2013-12-01

    This paper first reports on the condensation of DNA to a tightly packed state induced by a V-shaped di-ruthenium(II) complex [Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)]Cl4 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine and mbpibH2=1,3-bis([1,10]phenanthroline[5,6-d]imidazol-2-yl)benzene), which binds to the groove of herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) with the binding constant of 2.0×10(7)M(-1) (0.05M NaCl, pH7.2). The di-Ru(II) complex is found to induce the condensation of both hsDNA to long chain-like particle clusters and originally circular plasmid pBR322 DNA to particulate structure under neutral conditions. More interestingly, the presence of NaCl has a significant impact on the condensation and decondensation of DNA upon incorporation of [Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)](4+), representing tunable luminescence characteristics by NaCl. High salt concentration facilitates the decondensation of DNA-[Ru2(bpy)4(mbpibH2)](4+) adducts. The results from this study offer an effective method to control the condensation and decondensation of DNA upon incorporation of luminescent concentrators. © 2013.

  11. The role of the tractus diagonalis in drinking behaviour induced by central chemical stimulation, water deprivation and salt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, G.K.; Slangen, J.L.

    The role of the tractus diagonalis in drinking behaviour induced by central chemical stimulation, 23-hr water deprivation and injection of a hypertonic sodium chloride solution was investigated by means of central and peripheral administration of atropine and methylatropine. The effect of the same

  12. The role of the tractus diagonalis in drinking behaviour induced by central chemical stimulation, water deprivation and salt injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, G.K.; Slangen, J.L.

    1972-01-01

    The role of the tractus diagonalis in drinking behaviour induced by central chemical stimulation, 23-hr water deprivation and injection of a hypertonic sodium chloride solution was investigated by means of central and peripheral administration of atropine and methylatropine. The effect of the same

  13. Tooth decay - early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... inside of your baby's mouth healthy and prevents tooth decay. If you are bottle-feeding your baby: Give babies, ages newborn to ...

  14. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  15. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gadbury, Casey [USDOE Carlsbad Field Office, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  16. Effects of Na2SO4 or NaCl on sonochemical degradation of phenolic compounds in an aqueous solution under Ar: Positive and negative effects induced by the presence of salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Helal; Nanzai, Ben; Okitsu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Sonochemical degradation of 4-chlorophenol, phenol, catechol and resorcinol was studied under Ar at 200 kHz in the absence and presence of Na2SO4 or NaCl. The rates of sonochemical degradation in the absence of salts decreased in the order 4-chlorophenol>phenol>catechol>resorcinol and this order was in good agreement with the order of log P (partition coefficient) value of each phenolic compound. The effects of salts on the rates of sonochemical degradation consisted of no effect or slight negative or positive effects. We discussed these unclear results based on two viewpoints: one was based on the changes in pseudo hydrophobicity and/or diffusion behavior of phenolic compounds and the other was based on the changes in solubility of Ar gas. The measured log P value of each phenolic compound slightly increased with increasing salt concentration. In addition, the dynamic surface tension for 4-chlorophenol aqueous solution in the absence and presence of Na2SO4 or NaCl suggested that phenolic compounds more easily accumulated at the interface region of bubbles at higher salt concentration. These results indicated that the rates of sonochemical degradation should be enhanced by the addition of salts. On the other hand, the calculated Ar gas solubility was confirmed to decrease with increasing salt concentration. The yield of H2O2 formed in the presence of Na2SO4 or NaCl decreased with increasing salt concentration. These results suggested that sonochemical efficiency decreased with decreasing gas amount in aqueous solution: a negative effect of salts was observed. Because negative and positive effects were induced simultaneously, we concluded that the effects of salts on the rates of sonochemical degradation of phenolic compounds became unclear. The products formed from sonochemical degradation of 4-chlorophenol were also characterized by HPLC analysis. The formation of phenol and 4-chloro-1,3-dihydroxy benzene was confirmed and these concentrations were affected by the

  17. Decreased resistance of sublethally injured Escherichia coli O157:H7 to salt, mild heat, nisin and acids induced by high pressure carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiufang; Wang, Yongtao; Hu, Xiaosong; Liao, Xiaojun

    2018-02-01

    Resistance of sublethally injured cells (SICs) of Escherichia coli O157:H7 induced by high pressure carbon dioxide (HPCD) to salt, low temperature, mild heat, nisin, acids and low pHs was investigated in this study. The SICs of E. coli were obtained following HPCD at 5 MPa and 25 °C for 40-60 min or 5 MPa and 45 °C for 20 min. The untreated cells could survive normally while the HPCD-treated cells showed 2.87 log 10  cycles' reduction on tryptic soy agar (TSA) with 3% NaCl. The counts of the untreated cells were not significantly changed during 5 h incubation at 4 °C or 40 min incubation at 45 °C, and the HPCD-treated cells were also not affected by 5 h incubation at 4 °C but showed 1.75 log 10  cycles' reduction at 45 °C for 40 min. The antimicrobial nisin caused an extra 0.25-1.0 log 10  cycles' reduction of the HPCD-treated cells while the untreated cells was not inactivated by nisin. Except for oxalic acid (OA), citric acid (CA), malic acid (MA), tartaric acid (TA), lactic acid (LA), acetic acid (AA) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) did not inactivate the untreated cells, but all these seven acids caused a 0.74-1.53 log 10  cycles' reduction of HPCD-treated cells. These results indicated that HPCD-induced SICs had a decreased resistance to salt, mild heat, nisin and acids. Moreover, the recovery test was used to investigate the sensitivity of the SICs to different pHs. Results showed that the SICs could not recover below or equal to pH 4.0. These promising results would open up the possibility of exploring the combination of other technologies (eg. mild heat, nisin and acids) with HPCD as hurdle approaches to inactivate target pathogens in foods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  19. First Flavor-Tagged Determination of Bounds on Mixing-Induced CP Violation in B^0_s --> j/psi phi Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration, CDF; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    This Letter describes the first determination 1 of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2{beta}{sub s} using B{sub s}{sup 0} decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2, 000 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the CDFII detector using p{bar p} collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2{beta}{sub s} and the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2{beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations.

  20. First Flavor-Tagged Determination of Bounds on Mixing-Induced CP Violation in B0(s) ---> J/psi phi Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria U., Santander; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    This Letter describes the first determination of bounds on the CP-violation parameter 2{beta}{sub s} using B{sub s}{sup 0} decays in which the flavor of the bottom meson at production is identified. The result is based on approximately 2,000 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays reconstructed in a 1.35 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the CDFII detector using p{bar p} collisions produced at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report confidence regions in the two-dimensional space of 2{beta}{sub s} and the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}. Assuming the standard model predictions of 2{beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 15%, corresponding to 1.5 Gaussian standard deviations.

  1. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  2. Resonant Auger decay driving intermolecular Coulombic decay in molecular dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinter, F; Schöffler, M S; Kim, H-K; Sturm, F P; Cole, K; Neumann, N; Vredenborg, A; Williams, J; Bocharova, I; Guillemin, R; Simon, M; Belkacem, A; Landers, A L; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Dörner, R; Jahnke, T

    2014-01-30

    In 1997, it was predicted that an electronically excited atom or molecule placed in a loosely bound chemical system (such as a hydrogen-bonded or van-der-Waals-bonded cluster) could efficiently decay by transferring its excess energy to a neighbouring species that would then emit a low-energy electron. This intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) process has since been shown to be a common phenomenon, raising questions about its role in DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, in which low-energy electrons are known to play an important part. It was recently suggested that ICD can be triggered efficiently and site-selectively by resonantly core-exciting a target atom, which then transforms through Auger decay into an ionic species with sufficiently high excitation energy to permit ICD to occur. Here we show experimentally that resonant Auger decay can indeed trigger ICD in dimers of both molecular nitrogen and carbon monoxide. By using ion and electron momentum spectroscopy to measure simultaneously the charged species created in the resonant-Auger-driven ICD cascade, we find that ICD occurs in less time than the 20 femtoseconds it would take for individual molecules to undergo dissociation. Our experimental confirmation of this process and its efficiency may trigger renewed efforts to develop resonant X-ray excitation schemes for more localized and targeted cancer radiation therapy.

  3. Integration of phase separation with ultrasound-assisted salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction for analyzing the fluoroquinones in human body fluids by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huili; Gao, Ming; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Rongbo; Wang, Wenwei; Dahlgren, Randy A; Wang, Xuedong

    2015-03-15

    Herein, we developed a novel integrated device to perform phase separation based on ultrasound-assisted salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of five fluoroquinones (FQs) in human body fluids. The integrated device consisted of three simple HDPE components used to separate the extraction solvent from the aqueous phase prior to retrieving the extractant. A series of extraction parameters were optimized using the response surface method based on central composite design. Optimal conditions consisted of 945μL acetone extraction solvent, pH 2.1, 4.1min stir time, 5.9g Na2SO4, and 4.0min centrifugation. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection (at S/N=3) were 0.12-0.66μgL(-1), the linear range was 0.5-500μgL(-1) and recoveries were 92.6-110.9% for the five FQs extracted from plasma and urine. The proposed method has several advantages, such as easy construction from inexpensive materials, high extraction efficiency, short extraction time, and compatibility with HPLC analysis. Thus, this method shows excellent prospects for sample pretreatment and analysis of FQs in human body fluids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation of a bile salt export pump deficiency model using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagawa, Kazuo; Takayama, Kazuo; Isoyama, Shigemi; Tanikawa, Ken; Shinkai, Masato; Harada, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Sakurai, Fuminori; Noguchi, Emiko; Hirata, Kazumasa; Kage, Masayoshi; Kawabata, Kenji; Sumazaki, Ryo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-02

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP) plays an important role in hepatic secretion of bile acids and its deficiency results in severe cholestasis and liver failure. Mutation of the ABCB11 gene encoding BSEP induces BSEP deficiency and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2). Because liver transplantation remains standard treatment for PFIC2, the development of a novel therapeutic option is desired. However, a well reproducible model, which is essential for the new drug development for PFIC2, has not been established. Therefore, we attempted to establish a PFIC2 model by using iPSC technology. Human iPSCs were generated from patients with BSEP-deficiency (BD-iPSC), and were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). In the BD-iPSC derived HLCs (BD-HLCs), BSEP was not expressed on the cell surface and the biliary excretion capacity was significantly impaired. We also identified a novel mutation in the 5'-untranslated region of the ABCB11 gene that led to aberrant RNA splicing in BD-HLCs. Furthermore, to evaluate the drug efficacy, BD-HLCs were treated with 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA). The membrane BSEP expression level and the biliary excretion capacity in BD-HLCs were rescued by 4PBA treatment. In summary, we succeeded in establishing a PFIC2 model, which may be useful for its pathophysiological analysis and drug development.

  5. OsLEA3-2, an abiotic stress induced gene of rice plays a key role in salt and drought tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Duan

    Full Text Available Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins are involved in tolerance to drought, cold and high salinity in many different organisms. In this report, a LEA protein producing full-length gene OsLEA3-2 was identified in rice (Oryza sativa using the Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE method. OsLEA3-2 was found to be only expressed in the embryo and can be induced by abiotic stresses. The coding protein localizes to the nucleus and overexpression of OsLEA3-2 in yeast improved growth performance compared with control under salt- and osmotic-stress conditions. OsLEA3-2 was also inserted into pHB vector and overexpressed in Arabidopsis and rice. The transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings showed better growth on MS media supplemented with 150 mM mannitol or 100 mM NaCl as compared with wild type plants. The transgenic rice also showed significantly stronger growth performance than control under salinity or osmotic stress conditions and were able to recover after 20 days of drought stress. In vitro analysis showed that OsLEA3-2 was able to protect LDH from aggregation on freezing and inactivation on desiccation. These results indicated that OsLEA3-2 plays an important role in tolerance to abiotic stresses.

  6. Effects of salting-in interactions on macromolecule diffusiophoresis and salt osmotic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Michele S; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-02-03

    Macromolecule diffusiophoresis (i.e., macromolecule migration induced by a salt concentration gradient) in water and salt osmotic diffusion (i.e., salt migration induced by a macromolecule concentration gradient) are two cross-diffusion mechanisms caused by macromolecule-salt interactions. We investigated the effect of salting-in interactions on the behavior of these two cross-diffusion mechanisms. Our results are distinct from those previously obtained in the case of salting-out interactions. Cross-diffusion was experimentally characterized by Rayleigh interferometry at 25 °C. Specifically, multicomponent diffusion coefficients were measured for a neutral polymer, polyethylene glycol (molar mass, 20 kg/mol), in aqueous solutions of three thiocyanate salts (NaSCN, KSCN, and NH₄SCN) as a function of salt concentration at low polymer concentration (0.5% w/w). Our results on salt osmotic diffusion, which were qualitatively different from those previously obtained for salting-out salts, were used to quantitatively characterize the strength of salting-in interactions. The behavior of polymer diffusiophoresis as a function of salt concentration and cation type reveals that polymer chains have an extrinsic negative charge, consistent with anion binding being the cause of salting-in interactions. To quantitatively examine the effect of anion binding on salt osmotic diffusion and polymer diffusiophoresis, we developed a theoretical model based on the linear laws of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for diffusion, the Scatchard binding model, and particle electrophoresis. This work contributes to the understanding of the multifaceted effects of molecular interactions on cross-diffusion mechanisms, salting-in interactions, and the Hofmeister series.

  7. Bile Salt Sequestration Induces Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis Through Farnesoid X Receptor- and Liver X Receptor alpha-Controlled Metabolic Pathways in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrema, Hillechien; Meissner, Maxi; van Dijk, Theo H.; Brufau Dones, Gemma; Boverhof, Renze; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Muller, Michael; Stellaard, Frans; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert

    Diabetes is characterized by high blood glucose levels and dyslipidemia. Bile salt sequestration has been found to improve both plasma glycemic control and cholesterol profiles in diabetic patients. Yet bile salt sequestration is also known to affect triglyceride (TG) metabolism, possibly through

  8. Bile salt sequestration induces hepatic de novo lipogenesis through farnesoid X receptor– and liver X receptora–controlled metabolic pathways in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrema, H.J.; Meissner, M.; Dijk, van Th.; Brufau, G.; Boverhof, R.; Oosterveer, M.H.; Reijngoud, D.J.; Müller, M.R.; Stellaard, F.; Groen, A.K.; Kuipers, F.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by high blood glucose levels and dyslipidemia. Bile salt sequestration has been found to improve both plasma glycemic control and cholesterol profiles in diabetic patients. Yet bile salt sequestration is also known to affect triglyceride (TG) metabolism, possibly through

  9. Salting-in and salting-out of water-soluble polymers in aqueous salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Jahani, Farahnaz

    2012-05-03

    To obtain further experimental evidence for the mechanisms of the salting effect produced by the addition of salting-out or sating-in inducing electrolytes to aqueous solutions of water-soluble polymers, systematic studies on the vapor-liquid equilibria and liquid-liquid equilibria of aqueous solutions of several polymers are performed in the presence of a large series of electrolytes. Polymers are polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME250), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2000 (PEGDME2000), and polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), and the investigated electrolytes are KCl, NH(4)Cl, MgCl(2), (CH(3))(4)NCl, NaCl, NaNO(3), Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit (tri-sodium citrate). Aqueous solutions of PPG400 form aqueous two-phase systems with all the investigated salts; however, other investigated polymers form aqueous two-phase systems only with Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit. A relation was found between the salting-out or sating-in effects of electrolyte on the polymer aqueous solutions and the slopes of the constant water activity lines of ternary polymer-salt aqueous solutions, so that, in the case of the salting-out effect, the constant water activity lines had a concave slope, but in the case of the salting-in effects, the constant water activity lines had a convex slope. The effect of temperature, anion of electrolyte, cation of electrolyte, and type and molar mass of polymers were studied and the results interpreted in terms of the solute-water and solute-solute interactions. The salting-out effect results from the formation of ion (specially anion)-water hydration complexes, which, in turn, decreases hydration, and hence, the solubility of the polymer and the salting-in effect results from a direct binding of the cations to the ether oxygens of the polymers.

  10. Salt induction and the partial purification/characterization of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein-serine kinase from an inducible crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Chollet, R

    1994-10-01

    Treatment of the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) with high salinity caused the well-documented increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein and a concomitant rise in the activity of a Ca(2+)-independent PEPC-kinase (PEPC-PK). When the plants were irrigated with 0.5 M NaCl, PEPC protein level and PEPC-PK activity started to increase after 2 days of treatment and continued to rise for the next 8 days, attaining about a 14- and 8-fold total increase, respectively. This salt-induced PEPC-kinase activity was detected only in leaves harvested from the stressed plants at night. This highly regulated protein kinase was partially purified about 3500-fold from these darkened, salt-stressed plants by sequential fast-protein liquid chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, blue dextran-agarose, and Superdex 75. The gel-filtration data indicated that the native PEPC-kinase has a molecular weight around 33,000. Complementary analysis by denaturing electrophoresis and subsequent in situ renaturation and assay of PEPC-kinase activity revealed two major PEPC-PK polypeptides with approximate molecular masses of 39 and 32 kDa. The partially purified M. crystallinum PEPC-kinase readily phosphorylated PEPCs purified from maize, M. crystallinum, and tobacco leaves and a recombinant sorghum enzyme. In contrast, this Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase phosphorylated neither a recombinant sorghum mutant PEPC in which the target residue (Ser-8) was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Asp nor histone III-S, casein, and bovine serum albumin. The optimal pH for PEPC-PK activity was pH 8.0 and this activity was affected by both the substrate (phosphoenolpyruvate) and the negative allosteric effector (L-malate) of PEPC in a pH-dependent manner. Overall, the molecular properties of this highly regulated PEPC-kinase from M. crystallinum are strikingly similar to those reported recently by this laboratory for the reversibly light-activated C4 enzyme from maize (Arch

  11. $\\beta$-decay study of $^{77}$Cu

    CERN Document Server

    Patronis, N; Górska, M; Huyse, M; Kruglov, K; Pauwels, D; Van de Vel, K; Van Duppen, P; Van Roosbroeck, J; Thomas, J-C; Franchoo, S; Cederkäll, J; Fedosseev, V; Fynbo, H; Georg, U; Jonsson, O; Köster, U; Materna, T; Mathieu, L; Serot, O; Weissman, L; Müller, W F; Mishin, V I; Fedorov, D

    2009-01-01

    A beta-decay study of Cu-77 has been performed at the ISOLDE mass separator with the aim to deduce its beta-decay properties and to obtain spectroscopic information on Zn-77. Neutron-rich copper isotopes were produced by means of proton- or neutron-induced fission reactions on U-238. After the production, Cu-77 was selectively laser ionized, mass separated and sent to different detection systems where beta-gamma and beta-n coincidence data were collected. We report on the deduced half-live, decay scheme, and possible spin assignment of 77Cu.

  12. Effect of felodipine on myocardial and renal injury induced by aldosterone-high salt hypertension in uninephrectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Matsubara

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been recently shown that calcium channel blockers might have a protective effect on cardiac fibrogenesis induced by aldosterone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of felodipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, against heart and kidney damage caused by aldosterone-high sodium intake in uninephrectomized rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: CNEP (uninephrectomized + 1% NaCl in the drinking water, N = 9; ALDO (same as CNEP group plus continuous infusion of 0.75 µg/h aldosterone, N = 12; ALDOF (same as ALDO group plus 30 mg·kg-1·day-1 felodipine in the drinking water, N = 10. All results were compared with those of age-matched, untreated rats (CTL group, N = 10. After 6 weeks, tail cuff blood pressure was recorded and the rats were killed for histological analysis. Blood pressure (mmHg was significantly elevated (P < 0.05 in ALDO (180 ± 20 and ALDOF (168 ± 13 compared to CTL (123 ± 12 and CNEP (134 ± 13. Heart damage (lesion scores - median and interquartile range was 7.0 (5.5-8.0 in ALDO and was fully prevented in ALDOF (1.5; 1.0-2.0. Also, left ventricular collagen volume fraction (% in ALDOF (2.9 ± 0.5 was similar to CTL (2.9 ± 0.5 and CNEP (3.4 ± 0.4 and decreased compared to ALDO (5.1 ± 1.6. Felodipine partially prevented kidney injury since the damage score for ALDOF (2.0; 2.0-3.0 was significantly decreased compared to ALDO (7.5; 4.0-10.5, although higher than CTL (null score. Felodipine has a protective effect on the myocardium and kidney as evidenced by decreased perivascular inflammation, myocardial necrosis and fibrosis.

  13. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  14. Proteomic analysis of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum leaf microsomal fractions finds an imbalance in V-ATPase stoichiometry during the salt-induced transition from C3 to CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Cristian; Di Silvestre, Dario; Fischer-Schliebs, Elke; Homann, Ulrike; De Palma, Antonella; Comunian, Claudio; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Thiel, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    The halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum adapts to salt stress by salt uptake and switching from C3 photosynthesis to CAM (crassulacean acid metabolism). An important role in this process is played by transport proteins in the tonoplast of the central vacuole. In the present study we examine dynamic changes in the protein composition during salt-stress adaptation in microsomes from M. crystallinum leaves. Plants challenged with 400 mM NaCl accumulate salt by day 4 of treatment and malic acid only at day 12; a switching to CAM hence follows any initial steps of salt adaptation with a delay. Using a label-free and semiquantitative approach, we identified the most dramatic changes between the proteome of control plants and plants harvested after 12 days of the treatment; the abundance of 14 proteins was significantly affected. The proteomic data revealed that the majority of the subunits of V-ATPase (vacuolar H(+)-ATPase) holoenzyme. The salt treatment somewhat decreased the abundance of all subunits in the short term (4 days). Long-term adaptation, including the switching to CAM, goes together with a strong increase in the representation of all detectable subunits. Because this increase is subunit-specific, with the highest rise occurring for subunits E and c, the data suggest that long-term adaptation to salt stress correlates with a change in V-ATPase subunit stoichiometry and highlight the structural plasticity of this holoenzyme.

  15. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  16. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Sam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s0 → μ+μ− which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ− decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ−, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160 resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ− decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ− with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  17. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  18. A coupled road dust and surface moisture model to predict non-exhaust road traffic induced particle emissions (NORTRIP). Part 2: Surface moisture and salt impact modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, B. R.; Sundvor, I.; Johansson, C.; Pirjola, L.; Ketzel, M.; Norman, M.; Kupiainen, K.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Kauhaniemi, M.; Omstedt, G.

    2013-12-01

    Non-exhaust traffic induced emissions are a major source of airborne particulate matter in most European countries. This is particularly important in Nordic and Alpine countries where winter time road traction maintenance occurs, e.g. salting and sanding, and where studded tyres are used. Though the total mass generated by wear sources is a key factor in non-exhaust emissions, these emissions are also strongly controlled by surface moisture conditions. In this paper, Part 2, the road surface moisture sub-model of a coupled road dust and surface moisture model (NORTRIP) is described. We present a description of the road surface moisture part of the model and apply the coupled model to seven sites in Stockholm, Oslo, Helsinki and Copenhagen over 18 separate periods, ranging from 3.5 to 24 months. At two sites surface moisture measurements are available and the moisture sub-model is compared directly to these observations. The model predicts the frequency of wet roads well at both sites, with an average fractional bias of -2.6%. The model is found to correctly predict the hourly surface state, wet or dry, 85% of the time. From the 18 periods modelled using the coupled model an average absolute fractional bias of 15% for PM10 concentrations was found. Similarly the model predicts the 90'th daily mean percentiles of PM10 with an average absolute bias of 19% and an average correlation (R2) of 0.49. When surface moisture is not included in the modelling then this average correlation is reduced to 0.16, demonstrating the importance of the surface moisture conditions. Tests have been carried out to assess the sensitivity of the model to model parameters and input data. The model provides a useful tool for air quality management and for improving our understanding of non-exhaust traffic emissions.

  19. Salt-inducible kinase 2 links transcriptional coactivator p300 phosphorylation to the prevention of ChREBP-dependent hepatic steatosis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricambert, Julien; Miranda, Jonatan; Benhamed, Fadila; Girard, Jean; Postic, Catherine; Dentin, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased lipogenesis in the liver. This results in fat accumulation in hepatocytes, a condition known as hepatic steatosis, which is a form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common cause of liver dysfunction in the United States. Carbohydrate-responsive element–binding protein (ChREBP), a transcriptional activator of glycolytic and lipogenic genes, has emerged as a major player in the development of hepatic steatosis in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms enhancing its transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this study, we have identified the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) coactivator p300 and serine/threonine kinase salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2) as key upstream regulators of ChREBP activity. In cultured mouse hepatocytes, we showed that glucose-activated p300 acetylated ChREBP on Lys672 and increased its transcriptional activity by enhancing its recruitment to its target gene promoters. SIK2 inhibited p300 HAT activity by direct phosphorylation on Ser89, which in turn decreased ChREBP-mediated lipogenesis in hepatocytes and mice overexpressing SIK2. Moreover, both liver-specific SIK2 knockdown and p300 overexpression resulted in hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, and inflammation, phenotypes reversed by SIK2/p300 co-overexpression. Finally, in mouse models of type 2 diabetes and obesity, low SIK2 activity was associated with increased p300 HAT activity, ChREBP hyperacetylation, and hepatic steatosis. Our findings suggest that inhibition of hepatic p300 activity may be beneficial for treating hepatic steatosis in obesity and type 2 diabetes and identify SIK2 activators and specific p300 inhibitors as potential targets for pharmaceutical intervention. PMID:21084751

  20. Comparative physiology of salt and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, R.

    2002-02-01

    Plant responses to salt and water stress have much in common. Salinity reduces the ability of plants to take up water, and this quickly causes reductions in growth rate, along with a suite of metabolic changes identical to those caused by water stress. The initial reduction in shoot growth is probably due to hormonal signals generated by the roots. There may be salt-specific effects that later have an impact on growth; if excessive amounts of salt enter the plant, salt will eventually rise to toxic levels in the older transpiring leaves, causing premature senescence, and reduce the photosynthetic leaf area of the plant to a level that cannot sustain growth. These effects take time to develop. Salt-tolerant plants differ from salt-sensitive ones in having a low rate of Na+ and Cl-- transport to leaves, and the ability to compartmentalize these ions in vacuoles to prevent their build-up in cytoplasm or cell walls and thus avoid salt toxicity. In order to understand the processes that give rise to tolerance of salt, as distinct from tolerance of osmotic stress, and to identify genes that control the transport of salt across membranes, it is important to avoid treatments that induce cell plasmolysis, and to design experiments that distinguish between tolerance of salt and tolerance of water stress.

  1. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  2. Dysregulation of microRNAs and renin-angiotensin system in high salt diet-induced cardiac dysfunction in uninephrectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Surapaneni, Sunil Kumar; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2017-01-01

    Uninephrectomy is not associated with major adverse events in cardiovascular and renal functions of live kidney donors. The effect of high salt diet on the quality of life of live kidney donors is largely unknown. Hence in this study, we aimed to determine the effect of high salt diet on the alterations of renin-angiotensin system and microRNAs leading to CV and renal dysfunction in uninephrectomized rats. In order to mimic clinical scenario, uninephrectomized male Sprague Dawley rats were fed initially with normal pellet diet for 12 weeks and then for 20 weeks with high salt (10% w/w NaCl) diet. At the end of the study, biochemical, functional, histological and molecular parameters were measured. High salt diet feeding resulted in renal dysfunction & fibrosis, decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased in vivo cardiovascular reactivity to angiotensin II owing to upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors and L-type calcium channels leading to cardiovascular dysfunction in uninephrectomized rats (UNX+HSD) worse than that of normal (binephric) rats fed with high salt diet (HSD). Protein expression of functional and hypertrophic protein markers revealed decreased SERCA, p-AMPK and increased p-AKT. Interestingly, levels of miR-25, miR-451 and miR-155 increased and miR-99 decreased in heart of uninephrectomized rats fed with high salt. However, circulating miR-25 and miR-451 levels decreased and miR-99b increased in these animals. Our study points out that since tissue and circulating levels of miRNAs are not similar, caution must be exercised during the usage of miRs as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. To our knowledge, we are the first to show that epigenetic alterations result in cardiac dysfunction in uninephrectomized rats fed with high salt diet.

  3. Effect of long-term changes in soil chemistry induced by road salt applications on N-transformations in roadside soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sophie M; Machin, Robert; Cresser, Malcolm S

    2008-03-01

    Of several impacts of road salting on roadside soils, the potential disruption of the nitrogen cycle has been largely ignored. Therefore the fates of low-level ammonium-N and nitrate-N inputs to roadside soils impacted by salting over an extended period (decades) in the field have been studied. The use of road salts disrupts the proportional contributions of nitrate-N and ammonium-N to the mineral inorganic fraction of roadside soils. It is highly probable that the degree of salt exposure of the soil, in the longer term, controls the rates of key microbial N transformation processes, primarily by increasing soil pH. Additional influxes of ammonium-N to salt-impacted soils are rapidly nitrified therefore and, thereafter, increased leaching of nitrate-N to the local waterways occurs, which has particular relevance to the Water Framework Directive. The results reported are important when assessing the fate of inputs of ammonia to soils from atmospheric pollution.

  4. Cadmium hampers salt tolerance of Sesuvium portulacastrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Mariem; Martos, Soledad; Pérez-Martín, Laura; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Gunsé, Benet

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that salinity reduces cadmium toxicity in halophytes. However, the possible interference of Cd with the mechanisms of salt tolerance is poorly explored. The aim of this study was to see whether Cd affects salt tolerance mechanisms in the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum. S. portulacastrum plants obtained from cuttings were grown in hydroponics for 3 weeks and then exposed to low (0.09 mM) or moderate (200 mM) NaCl concentrations, alone or in combination with 25 μM CdCl 2 . Microscopy observation revealed two strategies of salt tolerance: euhalophytism and secretion of salt by bladder cells. Cadmium exposure hardly influenced the total leaf Na + concentrations. However, Cd supply delayed the salt-induced upregulation of AHA1 (plasma membrane H + -ATPase 1) and SOS1 (plasma membrane Na + transporter "Salt Overly Sensitive 1"), genes that are essential for salt tolerance. Moreover, Cd induced the activation of BADH, coding for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, indicating enhanced osmotic stress due to Cd. Sodium-green fluorescence in protoplasts from plants grown with low or high NaCl, alone or in combination with Cd, revealed higher Na + concentrations in the cytoplasm of Cd-exposed plants. Taken together the results indicate interference of Cd with salt tolerance mechanisms in S. portulacastrum. This may have consequences for the efficient use of halophytes in phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated saline soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Search for charmless decays of B hadrons in hadronic and radiative (b --> s gamma) decay modes using the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liko, Dietrich

    1995-01-01

    Charmless decays of B hadrons have been of considerable interest during the last years. Decays in hadronic modes proceed either trough tree level b � u transitions or loop diagrams involving so-called "hadronic" penguins. Tree level dominated decays confirm the non zero value of JVubl in the CKM mixing matrix while those induced by penguin processes provide tests of the loop structure of the Standard Model. Decays in the radiative modes b -+ s-y are forbidden at tree level and proceed only trough loop diagrams. Possible contributions to the decay rate due to new physics provide a test of the Standard Model. During the last years various measurements of decay rates have been performed at colliders at the bb-threshold. Experiments at the LEP collider have already collected sufficient data to study these decays in a different experimental environment. Results of searches at the DELPHI experiment are presented.

  6. Light stop decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeber, Ramona [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Muehlleitner, Margarete; Wlotzka, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Wolfgang-Gaede Str. 1, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Popenda, Eva [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5323 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate scenarios in the MSSM with a stop being the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and a neutralino as lightest supersymmetric particle, where the difference between the stop mass and the neutralino mass is less than the top quark mass. Depending on this mass difference the stop can undergo either a three-body decay into a neutralino, a W boson and a bottom quark, or a four-body decay into a neutralino, a bottom quark and two light fermions, or the stop can decay via flavor-changing neutral currents into an up/charm quark and a neutralino. We improve the calculations of the branching ratios (BRs) of these decay modes by including next-to-leading order corrections for the flavor changing decays and by taking into account the mass of the bottom quark and the tau lepton in the four-body decay. Moreover, flavor effects are incorporated in both the three- and the four-body decay and threshold effects at the W boson threshold are correctly taken into account. We find that the BRs can deviate significantly from one, leading to weaker stop exclusion limits.

  7. Charm Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M.

    2004-10-04

    The results of several studies of charmed mesons and baryons at BABAR are presented. First, searches for the rare decays D{sup 0} {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented and new upper limits on these processes are established. Second, a measurement of the branching fraction of the isospin-violating hadronic decay D*{sub s}(2112){sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} relative to the radiative decay D*{sub s}(2112){sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} is made. Third, the decays of D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} and D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +} mesons are studied and ratios of branching fractions are measured. Fourth, Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are examined and their branching fractions measured relative to Cabibbo-allowed modes. Fifth, the {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} is studied through its decays to {Chi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -}K{sup +}; in addition to measuring the ratio of branching fractions for {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} produced from the c{bar c} continuum, the uncorrected momentum spectrum is measured, providing clear confirmation of {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} production in B decays.

  8. Salt reduction in sheeted dough: A successful technological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diler, Guénaëlle; Le-Bail, Alain; Chevallier, Sylvie

    2016-10-01

    The challenge of reducing the salt content while maintaining shelf life, stability and acceptability of the products is major for the food industry. In the present study, we implemented processing adjustments to reduce salt content while maintaining the machinability and the saltiness perception of sheeted dough: the homogeneous distribution of a layer of encapsulated salt grains on the dough during the laminating process. During sheeting, for an imposed deformation of 0.67, the final strain remained unchanged around 0.50 for salt reduction below 50%, and then, increased significantly up to 0.53 for a dough without salt. This increase is, in fine, positive regarding the rolling process since the decrease of salt content induces less shrinkage of dough downstream, which is the main feature to be controlled in the process. Moreover, the final strain was negatively correlated to the resistance to extension measured with a texture analyzer, therefore providing a method to evaluate the machinability of the dough. From these results, a salt reduction of 25% was achieved by holding 50% of the salt in the dough recipe to maintain the dough properties and saving 25% as salt grains to create high-salted areas that would enhance the saltiness perception of the dough. The distributor mounted above the rollers of the mill proved to be able to distribute evenly salt grains at a calculated step of the rolling out process. An innovative method based on RX micro-tomography allowed to follow the salt dissolving and to demonstrate the capability of the coatings to delay the salt dissolving and consequently the diffusion of salt within the dough piece. Finally, a ranking test on the salted perception of different samples having either an even distribution of encapsulated salt grains, a single layer of salt grains or a homogeneous distribution of salt, demonstrated that increasing the saltiness perception in salt-reduced food product could be achieved by a technological approach

  9. Excitation functions of proton-induced reactions on natural Nd in the 10-30 MeV energy range, and production of radionuclides relevant for double-β decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeda, O.; Lozza, V.; Schrock, P.; Štursa, J.; Zuber, K.

    2012-01-01

    A preferred candidate for neutrinoless double-β decay, 150Nd, is present in natural neodymium at an abundance level of 5.64%. However, neodymium could be activated by cosmic rays during the period it spends on the Earth's surface. Its activation by protons is therefore of interest when it comes to estimating the possible disturbance effects and increased background during neutrinoless double-β-decay experiments like Sudbury Neutrino Observatory plus liquid scintillator (SNO+). In most cases, we lack experimental data on proton-induced reactions on neodymium. Therefore, a measurement of cross sections has been performed for the formation of 141Pm, 143Pm, 144Pm, 146Pm, 148Pm, 148Pmm, 149Pm, 150Pm, 140Nd, 141Nd, 147Nd, 149Nd, 138Prm, 139Pr, 142Pr, and 139Ce by 10-30 MeV protons. Oxidation-protected metal foil targets of natural isotopic abundance were irradiated by the usual stacked-foil technique on the external proton beam of the isochronous cyclotron U-120M at the Nuclear Physics Institute at Řež near Prague. Special attention was paid to the excitation functions of long-lived radionuclides. The measured data were compared with TENDL-2010 library data (talys code).

  10. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write ... before they decay will also save time and money in the long run by avoiding fillings, crowns, ...

  11. Radiative decays at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubega, L. E., E-mail: lavinia-elena.giubega@cern.ch [Horia Hulubei Institute for R& D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) (Romania); Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  12. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  13. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  14. Hyperon decays and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gaillard, J M; Gastmans, Raymond; Jacob, Maurice René Michel; Speiser, D; Weyers, J

    1980-01-01

    In an experiment in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) charged hyperon beam, 2400 Omega /sup -/ decays have been collected. The analysis of the Omega /sup -/ sample has given an accurate measurement of the Omega /sup -/ lifetime ( tau ( Omega /sup -/)=(0.822+or-0.028) *10/sup -10/ s) and the first determination of the Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios. In particular the measured ratio Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/ pi /sup -/)/ Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/) is 2.94+or-0.35, while a pure Delta I=1/2 amplitude would have given 2.03. A ratio of about 3 between those two decay modes had in fact been predicted by Finjord using the QCD framework. The author discusses briefly what QCD has to say about hyperon decays, then describes the Omega /sup -/ experiment and the analysis results. (8 refs).

  15. The behaviour of salt and salt caverns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Salts are mined for both storage and extraction purposes, either via dry or solution mining techniques. For operational, environmental and geological purposes, it is important to understand and predict the in situ behaviour of salt, in particular the creep and strength characteristics. A

  16. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  17. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  18. Leptonic Charm Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Bo

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent experimental results on D and Ds meson leptonic decays from CLEO-c, Belle, and BABAR, which results in the decay constants f_D= (206.7 +- 8.9) MeV and f_Ds= (257.3 +- 5.3) MeV. The latter is an average obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG). Comparisons with Lattice QCD (LQCD) calculations are discussed.

  19. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivit...

  20. Management of human-induced salinisation in the Berg River catchment and development of criteria for regulating agricultural land use in terms of salt generating capacity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jovanovic, W

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From previous WRC work by the same group, various needs were identified. One was to examine the effects a range of land uses may have on the production of salinity from the Sandspruit catchment. Another was to develop criteria to manage the salt...

  1. Induced Mesocrystal-Formation, Hydrothermal Growth and Magnetic Properties of α-Fe2O3 Nanoparticles in Salt-Rich Aqueous Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Larsen, Jacob; Varón, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    this influences their properties, mobility, fate, and environmental impact. We studied the growth of α-Fe2O3 (hematite), starting from 8 nm hematite particles in weakly acidic (HNO3) aqueous suspension with different states of particle aggregation, using salt (NaCl and NaH2PO4) to control their initial...

  2. Double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.; Picciotto, C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of double beta decay is reviewed with emphasis on its relevance to lepton number conservation. Recently, the ratio of the double beta-decay half-lives of /sup 128/Te and /sup 130/Te has been measured in a geological experiment and a limit for the ratio of the neutrinoless rate to the total rate for /sup 82/Se decay has been obtained from a direct-detection experiment. For the first time, these results show conclusively that double beta decay is not primarily a lepton-number-violating neutrinoless process. However, they also do not agree with calculations which assume that only lepton-number-conserving two-neutrino double beta decay occurs. The conclusion that lepton number conservation is violated is suggested by limited experimental information. By considering contributions to the total rate from both the two-neutrino and the neutrinoless channels, we obtain data which are consistent with a lepton nonconservation parameter of order eta=3.5 x 10/sup -5/. Roughly the same value of eta is obtained by assuming that the decay occurs either via lepton emission from two nucleons or via emission from a resonance in the nucleus.

  3. Effects of angiotensin (1-7 on nephrosis of the mice with metabolic syndrome induced by high-salt and high-fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan ZHU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To establish a metabolic syndrome model of C57BL/6 mice by high-salt and high-fat diet, and investigate the effects of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE 2 and angiotensin (1-7 on renal damage in mice. Methods Fifty-six male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 7 groups (8 each, and fed with normal diet (0.3% NaCl, 10% fat, high-salt diet (8% NaCl, 10% fat, high-fat diet (0.3% NaCl, 60% fat, high-salt and high-fat diet (8% NaCl, 60% fat, high-salt and high-fat diet with enalapril 20mg/(kg•d, with valsartan 50mg/(kg•d, and with valsartan 50mg/(kg•d plus Mas receptor antagonist (A-779 150ng/(kg•d, respectively for 16 weeks. Basal metabolic index including blood pressure, body weight, blood glucose and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER were tested. After intraperitoneal anesthesia with chloral hydrate, the blood was collected from the carotid artery. Serum angiotensin Ⅱ and angiotensin (1-7 levels were detected by ELISA; Western blotting was performed to evaluate the expression of ACE 2 protein and collagen Ⅲ in renal tissue; renal pathological changes were observed by HE and Masson staining. Results The blood pressure, ratio of visceral fat weight/body weight, blood lipid, blood glucose and UAER increased significantly in the C57BL/6 mice fed with high-salt and high-fat diet for 16 weeks, and the renal fibrosis change was obvious, serum angiotensin Ⅱ level increased, expressions of ACE 2 and angiotensin (1-7 decreased significantly in the renal tissue. In different intervention groups, valsartan obviously alleviated the abnormal metabolism, ameliorated renal injury, promoted the expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7 in the kidney and serum. However, no significant change was observed in the groups with intervention of enalapril or valsartan+A-779 compared with non-intervention group. Conclusions High-salt and high-fat diet can be used to successfully establish the model of metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6

  4. Low-salt diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-sodium diet; Salt restriction ... control many functions. Too much sodium in your diet can be bad for you. For most people, ... you limit salt. Try to eat a balanced diet. Buy fresh vegetables and fruits whenever possible. They ...

  5. Interatomic Coulombic decay in helium nanodroplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shcherbinin, Mykola; Laforge, Aaron; Sharma, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is induced in helium nanodroplets by photoexciting the n=2 excited state of He+ using XUV synchrotron radiation. By recording multiple-coincidence electron and ion images we find that ICD occurs in various locations at the droplet surface, inside the surface region...

  6. CP violation in B decay

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    We review the physics of CP violation in B decays. After introducing the CKM matrix and how it causes CP violation, we cover three types of CP violation that can occur in B decays: CP violation in mixing, CP violation by mixing-decay interference, and CP violation in decay.

  7. Association mapping of salt tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen Viet Long, L.; Dolstra, O.; Malosetti, M.; Kilian, B.; Graner, A.; Visser, R.G.F.; Linden, van der C.G.

    2013-01-01

    A spring barley collection of 192 genotypes from a wide geographical range was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for salt tolerance traits by means of an association mapping approach using a thousand SNP marker set. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay was found with marker distances

  8. A Role for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Plants: Pathogen Responses Are Induced in Arabidopsis thaliana NMD Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayson, Samantha; Arciga-Reyes, Luis; Wootton, Lucie; De Torres Zabala, Marta; Truman, William; Graham, Neil; Grant, Murray; Davies, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved mechanism that targets aberrant mRNAs for destruction. NMD has also been found to regulate the expression of large numbers of genes in diverse organisms, although the biological role for this is unclear and few evolutionarily conserved targets have been identified. Expression analyses of three Arabidopsis thaliana lines deficient in NMD reveal that the vast majority of NMD-targeted transcripts are associated with response to pathogens. Congruently, NMD mutants, in which these transcripts are elevated, confer partial resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. These findings suggest a biological rationale for the regulation of gene expression by NMD in plants and suggest that manipulation of NMD could offer a new approach for crop protection. Amongst the few non-pathogen responsive NMD-targeted genes, one potential NMD targeted signal, the evolutionarily conserved upstream open reading frame (CuORF), was found to be hugely over-represented, raising the possibility that this feature could be used to target specific physiological mRNAs for control by NMD. PMID:22384098

  9. A SnoRNA-derived piRNA interacts with human interleukin-4 pre-mRNA and induces its decay in nuclear exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fudi; Zhou, Nan; Wu, Kang; Guo, Yubiao; Tan, Weiping; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xue; Geng, Guannan; Pan, Ting; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Yijun; Xu, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bingfeng; Gao, Wenchao; Liu, Chao; Ren, Liangliang; Li, Jun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are highly expressed in germline cells and are involved in maintaining genome integrity by silencing transposons. These are also involved in DNA/histone methylation and gene expression regulation in somatic cells of invertebrates. The functions of piRNAs in somatic cells of vertebrates, however, remain elusive. We found that snoRNA-derived and C (C′)/D′ (D)-box conserved piRNAs are abundant in human CD4 primary T-lymphocytes. piRNA (piR30840) significantly downregulated interleukin-4 (IL-4) via sequence complementarity binding to pre-mRNA intron, which subsequently inhibited the development of Th2 T-lymphocytes. Piwil4 and Ago4 are associated with this piRNA, and this complex further interacts with Trf4-Air2-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex, which leads to the decay of targeted pre-mRNA through nuclear exosomes. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel piRNA mechanism in regulating gene expression in highly differentiated somatic cells and a possible novel target for allergy therapeutics. PMID:26405199

  10. Flavor Violating Higgs Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni [Fermilab; Kopp, Joachim [Fermilab; Zupan, Jure [Cincinnati U.

    2013-03-05

    We study a class of nonstandard interactions of the newly discovered 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance that are especially interesting probes of new physics: flavor violating Higgs couplings to leptons and quarks. These interaction can arise in many frameworks of new physics at the electroweak scale such as two Higgs doublet models, extra dimensions, or models of compositeness. We rederive constraints on flavor violating Higgs couplings using data on rare decays, electric and magnetic dipole moments, and meson oscillations. We confirm that flavor violating Higgs boson decays to leptons can be sizeable with, e.g., h → τμ and h → τe branching ratios of (10%) perfectly allowed by low energy constraints. We estimate the current LHC limits on h → τμ and h → τe decays by recasting existing searches for the SM Higgs in the ττ channel and find that these bounds are already stronger than those from rare tau decays. We also show that these limits can be improved significantly with dedicated searches and we outline a possible search strategy. Flavor violating Higgs decays therefore present an opportunity for discovery of new physics which in some cases may be easier to access experimentally than flavor conserving deviations from the Standard Model Higgs framework.

  11. Microwave-induced One-pot Synthesis of 2,4,5-trisubstituted Imidazoles Using Rochelle Salt as a Green Novel Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasaheb V. Shitole

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rochelle Salt is used as an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 2,4,5-triaryl-1H-imidazoles via condensation of benzil, ammonium acetate, and aromatic aldehydes. The key advantages of this process are the usage of an inexpensive and readily available catalyst, simple procedure, shorter reaction time, and high yield of products. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.720 

  12. The plant-growth-promoting bacterium Klebsiella sp. SBP-8 confers induced systemic tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum) under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Jha, Prameela; Jha, Prabhat Nath

    2015-07-20

    Plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylatedeaminase (ACCD) activity can protect plants from the deleterious effects of abioticstressors. An ACCD bacterial strain, SBP-8, identified as Klebsiella sp., also having other plant-growth-promoting activities, was isolated from Sorghum bicolor growing in the desertregion of Rajasthan, India. ACCD activity of SBP-8 was characterized at biochemical, physiological, and molecular levels. The presence of AcdS, a structural gene for ACCD, was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction. Strain SBP-8 showed optimum growth and ACCD activity at increased salt (NaCl) concentrations of up to 6%, indicating its potential to survive and associate with plants growing in saline soil. Inoculation of wheat plants with SBP-8 when grow in the presence of salt (150-200 mM) and temperature (30-40 °C) stressors resulted inamelioration of stress conditions by increasing plant biomass and chlorophyll content, and are duction in plant growth inhibition (10-100%) occurred due to salt and temperature stressors. Moreover, strain SBP-8 also caused Na(+) exclusion (65%) and increased uptake of K(+) (84.21%) in the host plant. This property can protect plants from adverse effects of Na(+) on plant growth and physiology. Thus, SBP-8 improves growth of the host plant and protects from salt stressors through more than one mechanism including an effect of ACCD activity and on K(+)/Na(+) ratio in plants. The colonization efficiency of strain SBP-8 was confirmedby CFU (colony-forming unit) count, microscopy, and ERIC-PCR based DNA-finger-printing approach. Therefore, and the use of efficient colonizing plant-growth-promoting bacteria may provideinsights into possible biotechnological approaches to decrease the impact of salinity and other stressors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of a salt-induced DhAHP, a gene coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, from the extremely halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Maurice SB

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debaryomyces hansenii is one of the most salt tolerant species of yeast and has become a model organism for the study of tolerance mechanisms against salinity. The goal of this study was to identify key upregulated genes that are involved in its adaptation to high salinity. Results By using forward subtractive hybridization we have cloned and sequenced DhAHP from D. hansenii that is significantly upregulated during salinity stress. DhAHP is orthologous to the alkly hydroperoxide reductase of the peroxiredoxin gene family, which catalyzes the reduction of peroxides at the expense of thiol compounds. The full-lengthed cDNA of DhAHP has 674 bp of nucleotide and contains a 516 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a deduced protein of 172 amino acid residues (18.3 kDa. D. hansenii Ahp is a cytosolic protein that belongs to the Ahp of the 1-Cys type peroxiredoxins. Phylogentically, the DhAhp and Candida albicans Ahp11 (Swiss-Prot: Q5AF44 share a common ancestry but show divergent evolution. Silence of its expression in D. hansenii by RNAi resulted in decreased tolerance to salt whereas overexpression of DhAHP in D. hansenii and the salt-sensitive yeasts Saccharomyces cereviasiae and Pichia methanolica conferred a higher tolerance with a reduced level of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion In conclusion, for the first time our study has identified alkly hydroperoxide reductase as a key protein involved in the salt tolerance of the extremely halophilic D. hansenii. Apparently, this enzyme plays a multi-functional role in the yeast's adaptation to salinity; it serves as a peroxidase in scavenging reactive oxygen species, as a molecular chaperone in protecting essential proteins from denaturation, and as a redox sensor in regulating H2O2-mediated cell defense signaling.

  14. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  15. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  16. Salt Tolerant and Sensitive Rice Varieties Display Differential Methylome Flexibility under Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Liliana J.; Azevedo, Vanessa; Maroco, João; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Santos, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation has been referred as an important player in plant genomic responses to environmental stresses but correlations between the methylome plasticity and specific traits of interest are still far from being understood. In this study, we inspected global DNA methylation levels in salt tolerant and sensitive rice varieties upon salt stress imposition. Global DNA methylation was quantified using the 5-methylcytosine (5mC) antibody and an ELISA-based technique, which is an affordable and quite pioneer assay in plants, and in situ imaging of methylation sites in interphase nuclei of tissue sections. Variations of global DNA methylation levels in response to salt stress were tissue- and genotype-dependent. We show a connection between a higher ability of DNA methylation adjustment levels and salt stress tolerance. The salt-tolerant rice variety Pokkali was remarkable in its ability to quickly relax DNA methylation in response to salt stress. In spite of the same tendency for reduction of global methylation under salinity, in the salt-sensitive rice variety IR29 such reduction was not statistically supported. In ‘Pokkali’, the salt stress-induced demethylation may be linked to active demethylation due to increased expression of DNA demethylases under salt stress. In ‘IR29’, the induction of both DNA demethylases and methyltransferases may explain the lower plasticity of DNA methylation. We further show that mutations for epigenetic regulators affected specific phenotypic parameters related to salinity tolerance, such as the root length and biomass. This work emphasizes the role of differential methylome flexibility between salt tolerant and salt sensitive rice varieties as an important player in salt stress tolerance, reinforcing the need to better understand the connection between epigenetic networks and plant responses to environmental stresses. PMID:25932633

  17. Salt Tolerant and Sensitive Rice Varieties Display Differential Methylome Flexibility under Salt Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana J Ferreira

    Full Text Available DNA methylation has been referred as an important player in plant genomic responses to environmental stresses but correlations between the methylome plasticity and specific traits of interest are still far from being understood. In this study, we inspected global DNA methylation levels in salt tolerant and sensitive rice varieties upon salt stress imposition. Global DNA methylation was quantified using the 5-methylcytosine (5mC antibody and an ELISA-based technique, which is an affordable and quite pioneer assay in plants, and in situ imaging of methylation sites in interphase nuclei of tissue sections. Variations of global DNA methylation levels in response to salt stress were tissue- and genotype-dependent. We show a connection between a higher ability of DNA methylation adjustment levels and salt stress tolerance. The salt-tolerant rice variety Pokkali was remarkable in its ability to quickly relax DNA methylation in response to salt stress. In spite of the same tendency for reduction of global methylation under salinity, in the salt-sensitive rice variety IR29 such reduction was not statistically supported. In 'Pokkali', the salt stress-induced demethylation may be linked to active demethylation due to increased expression of DNA demethylases under salt stress. In 'IR29', the induction of both DNA demethylases and methyltransferases may explain the lower plasticity of DNA methylation. We further show that mutations for epigenetic regulators affected specific phenotypic parameters related to salinity tolerance, such as the root length and biomass. This work emphasizes the role of differential methylome flexibility between salt tolerant and salt sensitive rice varieties as an important player in salt stress tolerance, reinforcing the need to better understand the connection between epigenetic networks and plant responses to environmental stresses.

  18. Numerical study of cold filling and tube deformation in the molten salt receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Zhang, Gongchen; Peniguel, Christophe; Liao, Zhirong; Li, Xin; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-06-01

    Molten salt tube cold filling is one way to accelerate the startup of molten salt Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plant. This practical operation may induce salt solidification and large thermal stress due to tube's large temperature difference. This paper presents the cold filling study and the induced thermal stress quantitatively through simulation approaches. Physical mechanisms and safe working criteria are identified under certain conditions.

  19. Salt-responsive gut commensal modulates TH17 axis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilck, Nicola; Matus, Mariana G; Kearney, Sean M; Olesen, Scott W; Forslund, Kristoffer; Bartolomaeus, Hendrik; Haase, Stefanie; Mähler, Anja; Balogh, András; Markó, Lajos; Vvedenskaya, Olga; Kleiner, Friedrich H; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Klug, Lars; Costea, Paul I; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Maier, Lisa; Rakova, Natalia; Schatz, Valentin; Neubert, Patrick; Frätzer, Christian; Krannich, Alexander; Gollasch, Maik; Grohme, Diana A; Côrte-Real, Beatriz F; Gerlach, Roman G; Basic, Marijana; Typas, Athanasios; Wu, Chuan; Titze, Jens M; Jantsch, Jonathan; Boschmann, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Kempa, Stefan; Bork, Peer; Linker, Ralf A; Alm, Eric J; Müller, Dominik N

    2017-11-30

    A Western lifestyle with high salt consumption can lead to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. High salt may additionally drive autoimmunity by inducing T helper 17 (TH17) cells, which can also contribute to hypertension. Induction of TH17 cells depends on gut microbiota; however, the effect of salt on the gut microbiome is unknown. Here we show that high salt intake affects the gut microbiome in mice, particularly by depleting Lactobacillus murinus. Consequently, treatment of mice with L. murinus prevented salt-induced aggravation of actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and salt-sensitive hypertension by modulating TH17 cells. In line with these findings, a moderate high-salt challenge in a pilot study in humans reduced intestinal survival of Lactobacillus spp., increased TH17 cells and increased blood pressure. Our results connect high salt intake to the gut-immune axis and highlight the gut microbiome as a potential therapeutic target to counteract salt-sensitive conditions.

  20. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given. Keywords. Double beta ...

  1. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Abstract. The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  2. $\\tau$ decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Sobie, Randall J

    1997-01-01

    The measurements of the properties of the tau lepton are becoming increasingly more precise. We show that these results can be used to test the Standard Model. In addition, we illustrate how the hadronic decays of the tau can be used to study the strong interaction. (12 refs).

  3. Attention decay in science

    CERN Document Server

    Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta; Ghosh, Rumi; Huberman, Bernardo A; Kaski, Kimmo; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    The exponential growth in the number of scientific papers makes it increasingly difficult for researchers to keep track of all the publications relevant to their work. Consequently, the attention that can be devoted to individual papers, measured by their citation counts, is bound to decay rapidly. In this work we make a thorough study of the life-cycle of papers in different disciplines. Typically, the citation rate of a paper increases up to a few years after its publication, reaches a peak and then decreases rapidly. This decay can be described by an exponential or a power law behavior, as in ultradiffusive processes, with exponential fitting better than power law for the majority of cases. The decay is also becoming faster over the years, signaling that nowadays papers are forgotten more quickly. However, when time is counted in terms of the number of published papers, the rate of decay of citations is fairly independent of the period considered. This indicates that the attention of scholars depends on th...

  4. Teleportation via decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present a rare example of a decay mechanism playing a constructive role in quantum information processing. We show how the state of an atom trapped in a cavity can be teleported to a second atom trapped in a distant cavity by the joint detection of photon leakage from the cavities. The scheme, which is ...

  5. Rare Decays With LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Mancinelli, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Rare decays involving leptons or photons in the final states are studied using 1.0 fb^{-1} of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=7TeV collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. We present results of measurements of branching ratios, angular distributions, and isospin asymmetries obtained using this data sample.

  6. Discoloration & decay in oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo

    1971-01-01

    Diseases that result in discoloration and decay of wood are major problems affecting all species of oak. Wounds often start the processes that can lead to these diseases. The type and severity of the wound, the vigor of the tree, the environment, and the aggressiveness of microorganisms that infect are some of the most important factors that determine the nature of the...

  7. Rare Kaon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    The prospects for measuring the ultra-rare decays K^ + -> π ^ + ν /line ν and KL0 -> π 0 ν /line ν are discussed. Several new experiments are being constructed or have been proposed at existing facilities and ideas for reaching very high precision experiments at a future high intensity proton source like Project X ICD2 are under discussion.

  8. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  9. Salinity-Induced Variation in Biochemical Markers Provides Insight into the Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Common (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Runner (P. coccineus) Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Morosan, Mihaela; López-Gresa, María del Pilar; Prohens, Jaime; Vicente, Oscar; Boscaiu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of biochemical markers is important for the understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to salinity of Phaseolus beans. We have evaluated several growth parameters in young plants of three Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars subjected to four salinity levels (0, 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl); one cultivar of P. coccineus, a closely related species reported as more salt tolerant than common bean, was included as external reference. Biochemical parameters evaluated in leaves of young plants included the concentrations of ions (Na+, K+, and Cl−), osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, and total soluble sugars), and individual soluble carbohydrates. Considerable differences were found among cultivars, salinity levels, and in their interaction for most traits. In general, the linear component of the salinity factor for the growth parameters and biochemical markers was the most important. Large differences in the salinity response were found, with P. vulgaris cultivars “The Prince” and “Maxidor” being, respectively, the most susceptible and tolerant ones. Our results support that salt stress tolerance in beans is mostly based on restriction of Na+ (and, to a lesser extent, also of Cl−) transport to shoots, and on the accumulation of myo-inositol for osmotic adjustment. These responses to stress during vegetative growth appear to be more efficient in the tolerant P. vulgaris cultivar “Maxidor”. Proline accumulation is a reliable marker of the level of salt stress affecting Phaseolus plants, but does not seem to be directly related to stress tolerance mechanisms. These results provide useful information on the responses to salinity of Phaseolus. PMID:27657045

  10. Salinity-Induced Variation in Biochemical Markers Provides Insight into the Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Common (Phaseolus vulgaris and Runner (P. coccineus Beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Al Hassan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of biochemical markers is important for the understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to salinity of Phaseolus beans. We have evaluated several growth parameters in young plants of three Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars subjected to four salinity levels (0, 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl; one cultivar of P. coccineus, a closely related species reported as more salt tolerant than common bean, was included as external reference. Biochemical parameters evaluated in leaves of young plants included the concentrations of ions (Na+, K+, and Cl−, osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, and total soluble sugars, and individual soluble carbohydrates. Considerable differences were found among cultivars, salinity levels, and in their interaction for most traits. In general, the linear component of the salinity factor for the growth parameters and biochemical markers was the most important. Large differences in the salinity response were found, with P. vulgaris cultivars “The Prince” and “Maxidor” being, respectively, the most susceptible and tolerant ones. Our results support that salt stress tolerance in beans is mostly based on restriction of Na+ (and, to a lesser extent, also of Cl− transport to shoots, and on the accumulation of myo-inositol for osmotic adjustment. These responses to stress during vegetative growth appear to be more efficient in the tolerant P. vulgaris cultivar “Maxidor”. Proline accumulation is a reliable marker of the level of salt stress affecting Phaseolus plants, but does not seem to be directly related to stress tolerance mechanisms. These results provide useful information on the responses to salinity of Phaseolus.

  11. Induced Mesocrystal-Formation, Hydrothermal Growth and Magnetic Properties of α-Fe2O3 Nanoparticles in Salt-Rich Aqueous Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Erik; Larsen, Jacob; Varón, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are widely prevalent in our aqueous environment (e. g., streams, seawater, hydrothermal vents). Their aggregation and crystal growth depend on their chemical surroundings, for instance just a change in pH or salt concentration can greatly affect this. In turn...... alignment, the particles did not merge and coalesce. Rather they remained stable as mesocrystals until heat-treated. In turn, the addition of NaCl significantly increases the rate of growth during hydrothermal treatment, probably because the nanoparticles, due to the chain formation, are already aligned...

  12. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Ayanna U. [Purdue University; Talaty, Nari [Purdue University; Cooks, R G [Purdue University; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  13. Comparison of antacids on the binding of bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousar, G D; Gadacz, T R

    1984-09-01

    Following a gastric operation (and occasionally in other patients), biliary reflux may damage the stomach mucosa. If severe damage occurs, a diverting Roux-en-Y procedure may be required. In most cases, nonoperative treatment is successful. Since bile salts have been implicated as a cause of mucosal injury, we evaluated the efficacy of antacids in binding these salts. Several bile salts were mixed with certain antacids and with cholestyramine resin, and the adsorption was determined. Cholestyramine resin absorbed 90% to 97% of the bile salts. At a pH of 7, magaldrate (Riopan) absorbed the dihydroxy-bile salts as well as cholestyramine resin, but the other antacids we tested showed poor adsorption. The ability of antacids to bind bile salts must be considered when treating bile salt-induced injury with these substances.

  14. Polymer-in-salt like conduction behavior of small-molecule electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxia; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Xue, Bofei; Meng, Qingbo; Huang, Xuejie; Chen, Liquan

    2004-10-07

    Abnormal salt content dependence of conductivity is observed in solid electrolytes exclusively composed of small molecules of 3-hydroxypropionitrile (HPN) and lithium iodide (LiI) induced by reinforced hydrogen bonding and formation of ionic clusters at high salt content.

  15. Sphingomyelin exhibits greatly enhanced protection compared with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine against detergent bile salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Portincasa, P.; Palasciano, G.; Groen, A. K.; van Erpecum, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    Inclusion of phosphatidylcholine within bile salt micelles protects against bile salt-induced cytotoxicity. In addition to phosphatidylcholine, bile may contain significant amounts of sphingomyelin, particularly under cholestatic conditions. We compared protective effects of egg yolk

  16. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  17. Ectopic overexpression of a novel Glycine soja stress-induced plasma membrane intrinsic protein increases sensitivity to salt and dehydration in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Cai, Hua; Li, Yong; Zhu, Yanming; Ji, Wei; Bai, Xi; Zhu, Dan; Sun, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) belong to the aquaporin family and facilitate water movement across plasma membranes. Existing data indicate that PIP genes are associated with the abilities of plants to tolerate certain stress conditions. A review of our Glycine soja expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset revealed that abiotic stress stimulated expression of a PIP, herein designated as GsPIP2;1 (GenBank_Accn: FJ825766). To understand the roles of this PIP in stress tolerance, we generated a coding sequence for GsPIP2;1 by in silico elongation and cloned the cDNA by 5'-RACE. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed that GsPIP2;1 expression was stimulated in G. soja leaves by cold, salt, or dehydration stress, whereas the same stresses suppressed GsPIP2;1 expression in the roots. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing GsPIP2;1 grew normally under unstressed and cold conditions, but exhibited depressed tolerance to salt and dehydration stresses. Moreover, greater changes in water potential were detected in the transgenic A. thaliana shoots, implying that GsPIP2;1 may negatively impact stress tolerance by regulating water potential. These results, deviating from those obtained in previous reports, provide new insights into the relationship between PIPs and abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

  18. Determination of the deliquesce point in double salts and in in-situ multicomponent salts with DVS equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated salt induced deterioration occurs by frequently changes across the deliquescence point. Therefore does the actual deliquescence point of the present salts have a major impact on preventive conservation being able to ensure a relative humidity not causing salt phase transition and to in......-situ desalination as dissolution of the salts is the essential criterion to enable transport of salt (ions) in the construction. In the present work deliquescence points were measured with dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) equipment in salt mixtures and the results are shown to be in agreement with values from...... the literature. Also in-situ-multi salt samples were measured including the difference between the second critical relative humidity and the efflorescence relative humidity being a measure for the critical supersaturation required for crystallization at the specific experimental conditions. The DVS equipment...

  19. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  20. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  1. Fast proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2010-10-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5)×U(1)X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p→eπ from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  2. Effects of dietary salt restriction on puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Ho Jo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dietary salt restriction may reduce proteinuria although the mechanism is not clear. We investigated the effects of dietary salt restriction on rat kidneys in an animal model of glomerular proteinuria. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: vehicle-treated normal-salt controls, puromycin aminonucleoside (PA-treated normal-salt rats, and PA-treated low-salt rats. PA was given at a dose of 150 mg/kg BW at time 0, followed by 50 mg/kg BW on days 28, 35, and 42. Sodium-deficient rodent diet with and without additional NaCl (0.5% were provided for normal-salt rats and low-salt rats, respectively. On day 63, kidneys were harvested for histopathologic examination. PA treatment produced overt proteinuria and renal damage. Dietary salt restriction insignificantly reduced proteinuria in PA-treated rats, and PA-treated low-salt rats had lower urine output and smaller creatinine clearance than vehicle-treated normal-salt controls. The tubulointerstitial injury score positively correlated with proteinuria. It was significantly increased by PA treatment and relieved by low-salt diet. ED1-positive infiltrating cells and immunostaining for interstitial collagen III were significantly increased by PA treatment. These changes appeared less in PA-treated low-salt rats although the differences in PA-treated normal-salt versus low-salt rats did not reach the statistical significance. Our results suggest that renal histopathology in PA nephrosis may potentially be improved by dietary salt restriction. The decreasing tendency in glomerular filtration rate induced by low-sodium diet might be beneficial in retarding renal progression.

  3. Charmless B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During 2011, LHCb has collected an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb−1, giving rise to a large variety of measurements. Amongst these, measurements of CP violation in B decays play a central role. In particular CP violation measurements in charmless transitions of B mesons are of interest since they provide new or improved constraints on new physics contributions. These proceedings concentrate on LHCb results made publicin the first half of the year 2012.

  4. Decays of s neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barradas, J E

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), we discussed possible two body decay modes for the s neutrino v, one charged and other neutral: v -> l sub x sub 1 sup + sup - and v -> vx sub 1 sup 0 , respectively. Exploring a range of possible values for its mass, and for the chargino x sub i sup + sup - and neutralino x sub j sup 0 masses as well. We present the specific calculation for branching ratios, which are analyzed numerically. (Author)

  5. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  6. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  7. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  8. Rare kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances spanning several orders of magnitude in sensitivity are anticipated in the current round of experiments with rare kaon decays. Observations of allowed processes, like /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /nu//nu/-bar and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/, shed light on detailed aspects of the standard model. New sources of T or CP violation could be manifested by measurements of muon polarization in /Kappa/ /yields/ /delta//mu//nu//sub /mu// and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/ decays and by studies of reactions like /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup -/. Evidence for new particlews and new interactions could appear in advanced efforts to observe /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chichi' and /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chi decays, where chi and chi' represent hypothethetical neutral particles, and in searches for lepton flavor violating processes /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu/e and /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /mu/e. The experiments are reviewed and their theoretical context is discussed.

  9. Endophytic Bacteria Improve Plant Growth, Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and Induce Suppression of Root Rot Caused by Fusarium solani under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdieva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Salinity causes disturbance in symbiotic performance of plants, and increases susceptibility of plants to soil-borne pathogens. Endophytic bacteria are an essential determinant of cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. The aim of this study was to isolate non–rhizobial endophytic bacteria from the root nodules of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., and to assess their ability to improve plant growth and symbiotic performance, and to control root rot in chickpea under saline soil conditions. A total of 40 bacterial isolates from internal root tissues of chickpea grown in salinated soil were isolated. Four bacterial isolates, namely Bacillus cereus NUU1, Achromobacter xylosoxidans NUU2, Bacillus thuringiensis NUU3, and Bacillus subtilis NUU4 colonizing root tissue demonstrated plant beneficial traits and/or antagonistic activity against F. solani and thus were characterized in more detail. The strain B. subtilis NUU4 proved significant plant growth promotion capabilities, improved symbiotic performance of host plant with rhizobia, and promoted yield under saline soil as compared to untreated control plants under field conditions. A combined inoculation of chickpea with M. ciceri IC53 and B. subtilis NUU4 decreased H2O2 concentrations and increased proline contents compared to the un-inoculated plants indicating an alleviation of adverse effects of salt stress. Furthermore, the bacterial isolate was capable to reduce the infection rate of root rot in chickpea caused by F. solani. This is the first report of F. solani causing root rot of chickpea in a salinated soil of Uzbekistan. Our findings demonstrated that the endophytic B. subtilis strain NUU4 provides high potentials as a stimulator for plant growth and as biological control agent of chickpea root rot under saline soil conditions. These multiple relationships could provide promising practical approaches to increase the productivity of legumes under salt stress.

  10. Resedimented salt deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaczka, A.; Kolasa, K. (Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland))

    1988-08-01

    Carparthian foredeep's Wieliczka salt mine, unique gravity deposits were lately distinguished. They are mainly built of salt particles and blocks with a small admixture of fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks, deposited on precipitated salt. The pattern of sediment distribution is similar to a submarine fan. Gravels are dominant in the upper part and sands in lower levels, creating a series of lobes. Coarse-grained deposits are represented by disorganized, self-supported conglomerates passing into matrix-supported ones, locally with gradation, and pebbly sandstones consisting of salt grains and scattered boulder-size clasts. The latter may show in the upper part of a single bed as indistinct cross-bedding and parallel lamination. These sediments are interpreted as debris-flow and high-density turbidity current deposits. Salt sandstones (saltstones) which build a lower part of the fan often show Bouma sequences and are interpreted as turbidity-current deposits. The fan deposits are covered by a thick series of debrites (olistostromes) which consist of clay matrix with salt grains and boulders. The latter as represented by huge (up to 100,000 m{sup 3}) salt blocks, fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks. These salt debrites represent slumps and debris-flow deposits. The material for resedimented deposits was derived from the southern part of the salt basin and from the adjacent, advancing Carpathian orogen. The authors believe the distinct coarsening-upward sequence of the series is the result of progressive intensification of tectonic movements with paroxysm during the sedimentation of salt debrites (about 15 Ma).

  11. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  12. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  13. Deep sequencing reveals direct targets of gammaherpesvirus-induced mRNA decay and suggests that multiple mechanisms govern cellular transcript escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Clyde

    Full Text Available One characteristic of lytic infection with gammaherpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV68, is the dramatic suppression of cellular gene expression in a process known as host shutoff. The alkaline exonuclease proteins (KSHV SOX, MHV-68 muSOX and EBV BGLF5 have been shown to induce shutoff by destabilizing cellular mRNAs. Here we extend previous analyses of cellular mRNA abundance during lytic infection to characterize the effects of SOX and muSOX, in the absence of other viral genes, utilizing deep sequencing technology (RNA-seq. Consistent with previous observations during lytic infection, the majority of transcripts are downregulated in cells expressing either SOX or muSOX, with muSOX acting as a more potent shutoff factor than SOX. Moreover, most cellular messages fall into the same expression class in both SOX- and muSOX-expressing cells, indicating that both factors target similar pools of mRNAs. More abundant mRNAs are more efficiently downregulated, suggesting a concentration effect in transcript targeting. However, even among highly expressed genes there are mRNAs that escape host shutoff. Further characterization of select escapees reveals multiple mechanisms by which cellular genes can evade downregulation. While some mRNAs are directly refractory to SOX, the steady state levels of others remain unchanged, presumably as a consequence of downstream effects on mRNA biogenesis. Collectively, these studies lay the framework for dissecting the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of mRNA to destruction during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection.

  14. Deep sequencing reveals direct targets of gammaherpesvirus-induced mRNA decay and suggests that multiple mechanisms govern cellular transcript escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyde, Karen; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2011-05-09

    One characteristic of lytic infection with gammaherpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), is the dramatic suppression of cellular gene expression in a process known as host shutoff. The alkaline exonuclease proteins (KSHV SOX, MHV-68 muSOX and EBV BGLF5) have been shown to induce shutoff by destabilizing cellular mRNAs. Here we extend previous analyses of cellular mRNA abundance during lytic infection to characterize the effects of SOX and muSOX, in the absence of other viral genes, utilizing deep sequencing technology (RNA-seq). Consistent with previous observations during lytic infection, the majority of transcripts are downregulated in cells expressing either SOX or muSOX, with muSOX acting as a more potent shutoff factor than SOX. Moreover, most cellular messages fall into the same expression class in both SOX- and muSOX-expressing cells, indicating that both factors target similar pools of mRNAs. More abundant mRNAs are more efficiently downregulated, suggesting a concentration effect in transcript targeting. However, even among highly expressed genes there are mRNAs that escape host shutoff. Further characterization of select escapees reveals multiple mechanisms by which cellular genes can evade downregulation. While some mRNAs are directly refractory to SOX, the steady state levels of others remain unchanged, presumably as a consequence of downstream effects on mRNA biogenesis. Collectively, these studies lay the framework for dissecting the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of mRNA to destruction during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection.

  15. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  16. Renal sodium handling and haemodynamics are equally affected by hyperinsulinaemia in salt-sensitive and salt-resistant hypertensives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Bakker, SJL; Serne, EH; Donker, AJM; Gans, ROB

    Objective It is well-known that insulin induces renal sodium retention. It is not yet known whether insulin's renal effects are involved in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. We assessed the effects of insulin on renal sodium handling and haemodynamics in 10 salt-sensitive (SS) and 10

  17. Rare meson decays into very light neutralinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreiner, H.K.; Grab, S. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics und Physikalisches Inst.; Koschade, D. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; London Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Reserach in String Theory; Kraemer, M.; O' Leary, B. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Langenfeld, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the bounds on the mass of the lightest neutralino from rare meson decays within the MSSM with and without minimal flavor violation. We present explicit formulae for the two-body decays of mesons into light neutralinos and perform the first complete calculation of the loop-induced decays of kaons to pions and light neutralinos and B mesons to kaons and light neutralinos. We find that the supersymmetric branching ratios are strongly suppressed within the MSSM with minimal flavor violation, and that no bounds on the neutralino mass can be inferred from experimental data, i.e. a massless neutralino is allowed. The branching ratios for kaon and B meson decays into light neutralinos may, however, be enhanced when one allows for non-minimal flavor violation. We find new constraints on the MSSM parameter space for such scenarios and discuss prospects for future kaon and B meson experiments. Finally, we comment on the search for light neutralinos in monojet signatures at the Tevatron and at the LHC. (orig.)

  18. Silicon alleviates salt stress, decreases malondialdehyde content ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... Hernandez JA, Corpass FJ, Gomez M, del Río LA, Sevilla F (1993). Salt-induced oxidative stress mediated by active oxygen species in pen leaf mitochondria, Physiol. Plant. 89: 103-110. Hwang SJ, Hamayun M, Kim HY, Na CI, Kim KU, Shin DH, Kim SY, Lee. IJ (2008). Effect of nitrogen and silicon nutrition ...

  19. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  20. Flavor violating top decays and flavor violating quark decays of the Higgs boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Itani, Ahmad; Nath, Pran; Zorik, Anas

    2017-08-01

    In the Standard Model, flavor violating decays of the top quark and of the Higgs boson are highly suppressed. Further, the flavor violating decays of the top and of the Higgs are also small in MSSM and not observable in current or in near future experiment. In this work, we show that much larger branching ratios for these decays can be achieved in an extended MSSM model with an additional vector-like quark generation. Specifically, we show that in the extended model, one can achieve branching ratios for t → h0c and t → h0u as large as the current experimental upper limits given by the ATLAS and the CMS Collaborations. We also analyze the flavor violating quark decay of the Higgs boson, i.e. h0 → sb¯ + b¯s and h0 → bd¯ + b¯d. Here again, one finds that the branching ratio for these decays can be as large as O(1)%. The analysis is done with inclusion of the CP phases in the Higgs sector, and the effect of CP phases on the branching ratios is investigated. Specifically, the Higgs sector spectrum and mixings are computed involving quarks and mirror quarks, squarks and mirror squarks in the loops consistent with the Higgs boson mass constraint. The resulting effective Lagrangian with inclusion of the vector-like quark generation induce flavor violating decays at the tree level. In the analysis, we also include the experimental constraints from the flavor changing quark decays of the Z boson. The test of the branching ratios predicted could come with further data from LHC13 and such branching ratios could also be accessible at future colliders such as the Higgs factories where the Higgs couplings to fermions will be determined with greater precision.

  1. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  2. Semileptonic kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Gasser, J

    1992-01-01

    We present the matrix elements for the semileptonic kaon decays $K_{l2\\gamma}$, $K_{l2l^+l^-}$, $K_{l2l'^+l'^-}$, $K_{l3}$, $K_{l3\\gamma}$ and $K_{l4}$ at next-to-leading order in chiral perturbation theory and compare the predictions with experimental data. Monte Carlo event generators are used to calculate the corresponding rates at DAFNE. We discuss the possibilities to improve our knowledge of the low-energy structure of the Standard Model at this and similar machines.

  3. Decay patterns of brick wall in atmospheric environment: a possible analogue to rock weathering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Richard; Weishauptová, Zuzana; Přikrylová, Jiřina; Jablonský, Jakub

    2015-04-01

    This study is focused on the decay of bricks exposed in enclosing wall of the Regional maternal hospital in Prague city centre (Czech Republic). The hospital, listed as a Czech architectural monument, has been constructed from locally produced bricks in neo-Gothic style in the period of 1867-1875. The bricks of the enclosing wall show sequence of decay patterns that resemble weathering forms observable on monuments built of natural stone. This study aims to study the observed decay patterns by means of in situ mapping and by analyses of decayed material (optical microscopy, SEM/EDS, X-ray diffraction, Hg-porosimetry, water soluble salts analysis) and to interpret them based on the phase composition and other properties of bricks. Finally, the decay patterns of studied brick wall are compared to known weathering sequences on porous rocks (both on natural outcrops and on artistic monuments).

  4. Amine salts of nitroazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1993-10-26

    Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

  5. What Are Bath Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reports of people becoming psychotic (losing touch with reality) and violent. Although it is rare, there have ... in bath salts can produce: feelings of joy increased social interaction increased sex drive paranoia nervousness hallucinations ( ...

  6. SUSY decays of Higgs particles

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Kalinowski, Jan; Zerwas, Peter M

    1996-01-01

    Among the possible decay modes of Higgs particles into supersymmetric states, neutralino and chargino decays play a prominent rôle. The experimental opportunities of observing such decay modes at LEP2 and at future $\\ee$ linear colliders are analyzed within the frame of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. For heavy Higgs particles, the chargino/neutralino decay modes can be very important, while only a small window is open for the lightest CP--even Higgs particle. If charginos/neutralinos are found at LEP2, such decay modes can be searched for in a small area of the parameter space, and invisible decays may reduce the exclusion limits of the lightest CP-even Higgs particle slightly; if charginos/neutralinos are not found at LEP2 in direct searches, the Higgs search will not be affected by the SUSY particle sector.

  7. Rare beauty and charm decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  8. Salt shock-inducible photosystem I cyclic electron transfer in Synechocystis PCC6803 relies on binding of ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase to the thylakoid membranes via its CpcD phycobilisome-linker homologous N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Thor, J J; Jeanjean, R; Havaux, M; Sjollema, K A; Joset, F; Hellingwerf, K J; Matthijs, H C

    2000-04-21

    Relative to ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) from chloroplasts, the comparable enzyme in cyanobacteria contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its amino-terminus. The domain is homologous to the phycocyanin associated linker polypeptide CpcD of the light harvesting phycobilisome antennae. The phenotypic consequences of the genetic removal of this domain from the petH gene, which encodes FNR, have been studied in Synechocystis PCC 6803. The in frame deletion of 75 residues at the amino-terminus, rendered chloroplast length FNR enzyme with normal functionality in linear photosynthetic electron transfer. Salt shock correlated with increased abundance of petH mRNA in the wild-type and mutant alike. The truncation stopped salt stress-inducible increase of Photosystem I-dependent cyclic electron flow. Both photoacoustic determination of the storage of energy from Photosystem I specific far-red light, and the re-reduction kinetics of P700(+), suggest lack of function of the truncated FNR in the plastoquinone-cytochrome b(6)f complex reductase step of the PS I-dependent cyclic electron transfer chain. Independent gold-immunodecoration studies and analysis of FNR distribution through activity staining after native polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis showed that association of FNR with the thylakoid membranes of Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires the presence of the extended amino-terminal domain of the enzyme. The truncated DeltapetH gene was also transformed into a NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH1) deficient mutant of Synechocystis PCC 6803 (strain M55) (T. Ogawa, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 4275-4279). Phenotypic characterisation of the double mutant supported our conclusion that both the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex and FNR contribute independently to the quinone cytochrome b(6)f reductase step in PS I-dependent cyclic electron transfer. The distribution, binding properties and function of FNR in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 will be discussed.

  9. Iodized Salt Use and Salt Iodine Content among Household Salts from Six Districts of Eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatiwada, S; Gelal, B; Tamang, M K; Kc, R; Singh, S; Lamsal, M; Baral, N

    2014-01-01

    Universal salt iodization is considered the best strategy for controlling iodine deficiency disorders in Nepal. This study was done to find iodized salt use among Nepalese population and the iodine content of household salts. Six districts (Siraha, Saptari, Jhapa, Udayapur, Ilam and Panchthar) were chosen randomly from 16 districts of eastern Nepal for the study. In each district, three schools (private and government) were chosen randomly for sample collection. A total of 1803 salt samples were collected from schools of those districts. For sample collection a clean air tight plastic pouch was provided to each school child and was asked to bring approximately 15 gm of their kitchen salt. The information about type of salt used; 'two child logo' iodized salt or crystal salt was obtained from each child and salt iodine content was estimated using iodometric titration. At the time of study, 85% (n=1533) of Nepalese households were found to use iodized salt whereas 15% (n=270) used crystal salt. The mean iodine content in iodized and crystal salt was 40.8±12.35 ppm and 18.43±11.49 ppm respectively. There was significant difference between iodized and crystal salts use and salt iodine content of iodized and crystal salt among different districts (p value <0.001 at confidence level of 95%). Of the total samples, only 169 samples (9.4% of samples) have iodine content<15 ppm. Most Nepalese households have access to iodized salt most salt samples have sufficient iodine content.

  10. Not salt taste perception but self-reported salt eating habit predicts actual salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hajeong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Excessive dietary salt intake is related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although dietary salt restriction is essential, it is difficult to achieve because of salt palatability. However, the association between salt perception or salt eating habit and actual salt intake remains uncertain. In this study, we recruited 74 healthy young individuals. We investigated their salt-eating habits by questionnaire and salt taste threshold through a rating scale that used serial dilution of a sodium chloride solution. Predicted 24-hr urinary salt excretions using Kawasaki's and Tanaka's equations estimated dietary salt intake. Participants' mean age was 35 yr, and 59.5% were male. Salt sense threshold did not show any relationship with actual salt intake and a salt-eating habit. However, those eating "salty" foods showed higher blood pressure (P for trend=0.048) and higher body mass index (BMI; P for trend=0.043). Moreover, a salty eating habit was a significant predictor for actual salt intake (regression coefficient [β] for Kawasaki's equation 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-2.69, P=0.048; β for Tanaka's equation 0.66, 95% CI 0.01-1.31, P=0.047). In conclusion, a self-reported salt-eating habit, not salt taste threshold predicts actual salt intake.

  11. Bile salt-induced pro-oxidant liver damage promotes transplanted cell proliferation for correcting Wilson disease in the Long-Evans Cinnamon rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Brigid; Kapoor, Sorabh; Schilsky, Michael L; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-05-01

    Insights into disease-specific mechanisms for liver repopulation are needed for cell therapy. To understand the efficacy of pro-oxidant hepatic perturbations in Wilson disease, we studied Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats with copper toxicosis under several conditions. Hepatocytes from healthy Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats were transplanted intrasplenically into the liver. A cure was defined as lowering of copper to below 250 microg/g liver, presence of ATPase, Cu++ transporting, beta polypeptide (atp7b) messenger RNA (mRNA) in the liver and improvement in liver histology. Treatment of animals with the hydrophobic bile salt, cholic acid, or liver radiation before cell transplantation produced cure rates of 14% and 33%, respectively; whereas liver radiation plus partial hepatectomy followed by cell transplantation proved more effective, with cure in 55%, P < 0.01; and liver radiation plus cholic acid followed by cell transplantation was most effective, with cure in 75%, P < 0.001. As a group, cell therapy cures in rats preconditioned with liver radiation plus cholic acid resulted in less hepatic copper, indicating greater extent of liver repopulation. We observed increased hepatic catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in LEC rats, suggesting chronic oxidative stress. After liver radiation or cholic acid, hepatic lipid peroxidation levels increased, indicating further oxidative injury, although we did not observe overt additional cytotoxicity. This contrasted with healthy animals in which liver radiation and cholic acid produced hepatic steatosis and loss of injured hepatocytes. We concluded that pro-oxidant perturbations were uniquely effective for cell therapy in Wilson disease because of the nature of preexisting hepatic damage.

  12. Salts and nutrients present in regenerated waters induce changes in water relations, antioxidative metabolism, ion accumulation and restricted ion uptake in Myrtus communis L. plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Motos, José R; Alvarez, Sara; Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Hernández, José A; Sánchez-Blanco, María J

    2014-12-01

    The use of reclaimed water (RW) constitutes a valuable strategy for the efficient management of water and nutrients in landscaping. However, RW may contain levels of toxic ions, affecting plant production or quality, a very important aspect for ornamental plants. The present paper evaluates the effect of different quality RWs on physiological and biochemical parameters and the recovery capacity in Myrtus communis L. plants. M. communis plants were submitted to 3 irrigation treatments with RW from different sources (22 weeks): RW1 (1.7 dS m(-1)), RW2 (4.0 dS m(-1)) and RW3 (8.0 dS m(-1)) and one control (C, 0.8 dS m(-1)). During a recovery period of 11 weeks, all plants were irrigated with the control water. The RW treatments did not negatively affect plant growth, while RW2 even led to an increase in biomass. After recovery,only plants irrigated with RW3 showed some negative effects on growth, which was related to a decrease in the net photosynthesis rate, higher Na accumulation and a reduction in K levels. An increase in salinity was accompanied by decreases in leaf water potential, relative water content and gas exchange parameters, and increases in Na and Cl uptake. Plants accumulated Na in roots and restricted its translocation to the aerial part. The highest salinity levels produced oxidative stress, as seen from the rise in electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation. The use of regenerated water together with carefully managed drainage practices, which avoid the accumulation of salt by the substrate, will provide economic and environmental benefits.

  13. Stochastic modeling of salt accumulation in the root zone due to capillary flux from brackish groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.H.H.; Vervoort, R.W.; Suweis, S.; Guswa, A.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater can be a source of both water and salts in semiarid areas, and therefore, capillary pressure–induced upward water flow may cause root zone salinization. To identify which conditions result in hazardous salt concentrations in the root zone, we combined the mass balance equations for salt

  14. Saltiness enhancement by taste contrast in bread prepared with encapsulated salt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M.W.J.; Bult, J.H.F.; Stieger, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate a technological approach to reduce the sodium content of bread whilst retaining its sensory profile by creating taste contrast using encapsulated salt. We demonstrate that sensory contrast in bread induced by encapsulated salt can enhance saltiness and allows for a salt

  15. Supersymmetric cascade decays at NLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popenda, Eva; Muehlleitner, Margarete; Hangst, Christian [KIT, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Kraemer, Michael [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie (Germany); Spira, Michael [Paul Scherrer Institut, Theory Group LTP (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The search for supersymmetric particles and determination of their properties is a major task at the LHC and is based on the analysis of the cascade decay chains in which SUSY particles are produced. This project aims at improving predictions for SUSY cascade decays through the inclusion of higher-order corrections in the production and decay processes and by embedding them in a fully flexible Monte Carlo program. In this talk we report on the progress of the implementation of squark pair production followed by the decay into a quark and the lightest neutralino including supersymmetric QCD corrections at next-to-leading order in a completely differential form.

  16. JENDL decay data file 2015

    OpenAIRE

    片倉 純一; 湊 太志

    2016-01-01

    JENDL Decay Data File 2015 (JENDL/DDF-2015) has been produced. The decay data of nuclides with mass numbers from 1 to 260 are included. The nuclides with unknown gamma- and/or beta-emission are also included in order to keep decay chains. The data of 1,284 fission product nuclides with mass from 66 to 172 remain unchanged from JENDL/FPD-2011 except several corrections which had been claimed by users, and those of the newly added 1,953 nuclides are taken from ENSDF. Finally, the decay data of ...

  17. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% Females, 16% Blacks, BMI 28.5±4.2 Kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared to high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dl, 10.8±7.3 mIU/L and 2.6±1.9) as compared to high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dl, 9.4±5.8 mIU/L and 2.1±1.4) (p salt sensitive (N=193) versus salt resistant (N=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in HOMA on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt resistant subjects (p=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in HOMA after including age, BMI, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:25185125

  18. Conditioned taste avoidance, conditioned place preference and hyperthermia induced by the second generation 'bath salt' α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Katharine H; Hempel, Briana J; Clasen, Matthew M; Rice, Kenner C; Riley, Anthony L

    2017-05-01

    α-Pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP) has been reported to be rewarding in a variety of pre-clinical models. Given that a number of drugs of abuse have both rewarding and aversive effects, the balance of which influences addiction potential, the present study examined the aversive properties of α-PVP by assessing its ability to induce taste avoidance. This assessment was made in a combined taste avoidance/place conditioning design that also allowed an evaluation of the relationship between α-PVP's aversive and rewarding effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a novel saccharin solution, injected with one of four doses of α-PVP (0, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0mg/kg) (IP) and placed on one side of a place conditioning apparatus. The next day, they were injected with vehicle, given access to water and placed on the other side. Following four conditioning cycles, saccharin avoidance and place preferences were then assessed. The effects of α-PVP on body temperature were also examined. α-PVP induced dose-dependent taste avoidance as well as significant increases in time spent on the drug-paired side (although this effect was not dependent on dose). α-PVP also induced dose- and time-dependent hyperthermia. α-PVP induced significant taste avoidance whose strength relative to the psychostimulants methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and cocaine paralleled their relative binding to the dopamine transporter. Similar to other drugs of abuse, α-PVP has both aversive and rewarding effects. It will be important to assess how various experiential and subject variables impact these effects and their balance to predict abuse liability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decay of oscillating universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  20. Role of Acetyl Salicylic Acid in Controlling the DOCA-Salt Induced Hypertension in Rats by Stimulating the Synthesis of r-Cortexin in the Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Uttam Kumar; Jana, Pradipta; Chatterjee, Mitali; Karmakar, Sanmay; Saha, Arup; Ghosh, Tamal Kanti

    2018-01-06

    Hypertension is a metabolic disease which is caused by vasoconstriction and that results into elevated blood pressure. A chronic hypertensive condition affects and even damages to various systems in the body. Presence of renal cortexin (r-cortexin), an antihypertensive protein, which is released from the kidney cortex controls the blood pressure. The effect of r-cortexin was mediated through nitric oxide (NO), a universal vasodilating agent. In our study, acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin), a well-known activator of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) induced r-cortexin synthesis. The hypertensive rat model was prepared by injecting deoxy corticosterone acetate (DOCA). Synthesis of r-cortexin was measured by the anti-r-cortexin antibody which was raised in adult white Wister albino rat model. NO level was determined by using methemoglobin method and later confirmed by chemiluminescence method. Change in blood pressure was determined indirectly by using NIBP monitoring system. Aspirin increased the r-cortexin expression from 64.36 ± 12.6 nM to 216.7 ± 21.31 nM in DOCA induced hypertensive rats. The mechanism was proved with the findings of increased level of NO from 0.4 to 1.9 µM. The DOCA induced blood pressure was also decreased from 139.39 ± 7.36 mm of Hg to 116.57 ± 6.89 mm of Hg in case of systolic blood pressure and in case of diastolic pressure from 110.41 ± 7 mm of Hg to 86.4 ± 2.76 mm of Hg that are quite approximate. So, from this study it has been found that aspirin induces the r-cortexin synthesis in kidney cortex through the activation of eNOS in DOCA induced hypertensive rats.

  1. Coupling Landscape Evolution with Active Salt Deformation in the Needles District, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, K.; Upton, P.; Tucker, G. E.; Mueller, K. J.; Roy, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    Active salt systems are commonly driven by variations in thickness of overlying units that drive salt from areas of high to low pressure. This often takes the form of differential loading from sedimentation, such as along passive margins, but some systems are driven primarily by differential unloading from erosion, a driving force that changes spatially and temporally on a scale of tens of meters. The Grabens within the Needles District, Canyonlands National Park is an active salt system driven by incision of the Colorado River and its tributaries into an evaporite sequence. We used numerical models to 1) investigate the scale and patterns of salt flow in relation to current topography in the region, and 2) explore feedbacks between salt deformation and erosion. Models exploring feedbacks between salt flow and current topography indicate that the rate of salt flow into the River canyon depends strongly on canyon width. Experiments with a three-dimensional geomechanical model demonstrate the rate of salt flow into the Colorado River canyon is dependent on canyon width, and predict areas of diapirism associated with tributary junctions. Salt also responds to variations in topography on a scale of tens of meters when the overburden is weak, influencing salt flow toward tributaries beneath individual grabens. Fully coupled models, in which erosion patterns both drive and are influenced by flow in a simple 2D viscous salt horizon, suggest that landscape evolution can be strongly influenced by shallow salt tectonics. Models testing salt deformation and erosion use the pressure gradient induced by an eroding landscape to calculate salt flux. Initially, headward erosion in side tributaries is faster above salt, but over time, salt flow into the canyon and side tributaries slows headward erosion, and the rate of canyon widening increases. As seen from the topographic models, canyon widening induces higher rates of salt flow into the canyon, creating a strong feedback

  2. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  3. Beauty hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings, I will report the recent results on properties, production and decays of beauty baryons, as well as measurements of B + c meson decays, based on data collected by the LHCb collaboration at the LHC collider in 2011–2012.

  4. Status of rare decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Some results are given for rare muon decay experiments currently running. Also, plans are discussed for rare kaon decay experiments. Some of the events sought come from processes which violate lepton flavor conservation. Several apparatuses used in the search are described. 35 references. (LEW)

  5. Relativistic 2-body Bottomonium decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barducci Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate some radiative decays of Bottomonium in a covariant scheme for two interacting fermions. We present their branching ratios and their absolute widths. A comparison with experimental data shows a good agreement with our results. Some decays for which data are not available are compared with other theoretical previsions.

  6. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  7. Majorana neutrino masses from neutrinoless double-beta decays and lepton-number-violating meson decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hao Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Schechter–Valle theorem states that a positive observation of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ decays implies a finite Majorana mass term for neutrinos when any unlikely fine-tuning or cancellation is absent. In this note, we reexamine the quantitative impact of the Schechter–Valle theorem, and find that current experimental lower limits on the half-lives of 0νββ-decaying nuclei have placed a restrictive upper bound on the Majorana neutrino mass |δmνee|<7.43×10−29 eV radiatively generated at the four-loop level. Furthermore, we generalize this quantitative analysis of 0νββ decays to that of the lepton-number-violating (LNV meson decays M−→M′++ℓα−+ℓβ− (for α,β=e or μ. Given the present upper limits on these rare LNV decays, we have derived the loop-induced Majorana neutrino masses |δmνee|<9.7×10−18 eV, |δmνeμ|<1.6×10−15 eV and |δmνμμ|<1.0×10−12 eV from K−→π++e−+e−, K−→π++e−+μ− and K−→π++μ−+μ−, respectively. A partial list of radiative neutrino masses from the LNV decays of D, Ds and B mesons is also given.

  8. Impact of rock salt creep law choice on subsidence calculations for hydrocarbon reservoirs overlain by evaporite caprocks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marketos, G; Spiers, C.J; Govers, R

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we focus entirely on rock salt, which overlies a large number of reservoirs worldwide, and specifically on the role of creep of rock salt caprocks in response to production-induced differential stresses...

  9. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  10. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  11. The noncommensal bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) ameliorates dextran sulfate (Sodium Salt)-Induced Ulcerative Colitis by influencing mechanisms essential for maintenance of the colonic barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiveland, Charlotte R; Hult, Lene T Olsen; Spetalen, Signe; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Christofferesen, Trine Eker; Bengtsson, Oskar; Romarheim, Odd Helge; Jacobsen, Morten; Lea, Tor

    2013-01-01

    Dietary inclusion of a bacterial meal has recently been shown to efficiently abolish soybean meal-induced enteritis in Atlantic salmon. The objective of this study was to investigate whether inclusion of this bacterial meal in the diet could abrogate disease development in a murine model of epithelial injury and colitis and thus possibly have therapeutic potential in human inflammatory bowel disease. C57BL/6N mice were fed ad libitum a control diet or an experimental diet containing 254 g/kg of body weight BioProtein, a bacterial meal consisting of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), together with the heterogenic bacteria Ralstonia sp., Brevibacillus agri, and Aneurinibacillus sp. At day 8, colitis was induced by 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) ad libitum in the drinking water for 6 days. Symptoms of DSS treatment were less profound after prophylactic treatment with the diet containing the BioProtein. Colitis-associated parameters such as reduced body weight, colon shortening, and epithelial damage also showed significant improvement. Levels of acute-phase reactants, proteins whose plasma concentrations increase in response to inflammation, and neutrophil infiltration were reduced. On the other, increased epithelial cell proliferation and enhanced mucin 2 (Muc2) transcription indicated improved integrity of the colonic epithelial layer. BioProtein mainly consists of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) (88%). The results that we obtained when using a bacterial meal consisting of M. capsulatus (Bath) were similar to those obtained when using BioProtein in the DSS model. Our results show that a bacterial meal of the noncommensal bacterium M. capsulatus (Bath) has the potential to attenuate DSS-induced colitis in mice by enhancing colonic barrier function, as judged by increased epithelial proliferation and increased Muc2 transcription.

  12. Plant Responses to Salt Stress: Adaptive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ramón Acosta-Motos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the adaptive mechanisms that plants can implement to cope with the challenge of salt stress. Plants tolerant to NaCl implement a series of adaptations to acclimate to salinity, including morphological, physiological and biochemical changes. These changes include increases in the root/canopy ratio and in the chlorophyll content in addition to changes in the leaf anatomy that ultimately lead to preventing leaf ion toxicity, thus maintaining the water status in order to limit water loss and protect the photosynthesis process. Furthermore, we deal with the effect of salt stress on photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence and some of the mechanisms thought to protect the photosynthetic machinery, including the xanthophyll cycle, photorespiration pathway, and water-water cycle. Finally, we also provide an updated discussion on salt-induced oxidative stress at the subcellular level and its effect on the antioxidant machinery in both salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive plants. The aim is to extend our understanding of how salinity may affect the physiological characteristics of plants.

  13. Cloning and characterization of cold, salt and drought inducible C-repeat binding factor gene from a highly cold adapted ecotype of Lepidium latifolium L.

    OpenAIRE

    Akhtar, M.; Jaiswal, A.; Jaiswal, J. P.; Qureshi, M. I.; Tufchi, M.; Singh, N. K.

    2013-01-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein/C-Repeat Binding Factors (CBFs) belongs to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that binds to DRE/CRT cis-element in cold-responsive (COR) genes and induce COR genes. CBFs have been isolated and characterized from evolutionarily diverse plant species. CBF pathway is conserved by CBF regulon and the size or the number and kind of target genes vary among freezing sensitive and tolerant plants. Hence, cloning of CBFs from highly fr...

  14. Baryon helicity in B decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko [Department of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The unexpectedly large transverse polarization measured in the decay B {yields} {phi}K* poses the question whether it is accounted for as a strong interaction effect or possibly points to a hidden nonstandard weak interaction. We extend here the perturbative argument to the helicity structure of the two-body baryonic decay and discuss qualitatively on how the baryonic B decay modes might help us in understanding the issue raised by B {yields} {phi}K*. We find among others that the helicity +1/2 amplitude dominates the leading order in the B(b-barq) decay and that unlike the B {yields} VV decay the dominant amplitude is sensitive to the right-handed b {yields} s current, if any, in the penguin interaction.

  15. Radioactive Decays in Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Steffen; Kuster, Markus; Batič, Matej; Bell, Zane W.; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Lang, Philipp M.; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The simulation of radioactive decays is a common task in Monte-Carlo systems such as Geant4. Usually, a system either uses an approach focusing on the simulations of every individual decay or an approach which simulates a large number of decays with a focus on correct overall statistics. The radioactive decay package presented in this work permits, for the first time, the use of both methods within the same simulation framework - Geant4. The accuracy of the statistical approach in our new package, RDM-extended, and that of the existing Geant4 per-decay implementation (original RDM), which has also been refactored, are verified against the ENSDF database. The new verified package is beneficial for a wide range of experimental scenarios, as it enables researchers to choose the most appropriate approach for their Geant4-based application.

  16. Radioactive Decays in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Hauf, Steffen; Batič, Matej; Bell, Zane W; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Lang, Philipp M; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The simulation of radioactive decays is a common task in Monte-Carlo systems such as Geant4. Usually, a system either uses an approach focusing on the simulations of every individual decay or an approach which simulates a large number of decays with a focus on correct overall statistics. The radioactive decay package presented in this work permits, for the first time, the use of both methods within the same simulation framework - Geant4. The accuracy of the statistical approach in our new package, RDM-extended, and that of the existing Geant4 per-decay implementation (original RDM), which has also been refactored, are verified against the ENSDF database. The new verified package is beneficial for a wide range of experimental scenarios, as it enables researchers to choose the most appropriate approach for their Geant4-based application.

  17. Semileptonic B Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenegger, U

    2004-02-17

    We present results on semileptonic B decays obtained with the BABAR detector. The large data set accumulated at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-Factory allows a new measurement technique, where the hadronic decay of one B meson is fully reconstructed and the semileptonic decay of the recoiling B meson is studied. Traditional analysis techniques of inclusive and exclusive B decays complement this approach with very high statistics data samples. These measurements play an important role in the tests of the description of CP violation in the Standard Model: The determinations of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| provide constraints on the unitarity of the CKM triangle. Furthermore, the experimental measurement of parameters of Heavy Quark Effective Theory test the consistency of the theoretical description of semileptonic B decays.

  18. Superluminal light propagation via quantum interference in decay channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, R.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the propagation of a weak probe light through a coherently driven Y -type system. Under the condition that the excited atomic levels decay via the same vacuum modes, the effects of quantum interference in decay channels are considered. It is found that the interference in decay channels results in a lossless anomalous dispersion between two gain peaks. We demonstrate that the probe pulse propagation can, in principle, be switched from subluminal to superluminal due to the decay-induced interference. We also show that the system exhibits a high index of refraction with negligible absorption for the driving fields. A dressed-state picture of the atom-light interaction is described to explain the numerical results.

  19. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  20. Gas releases from salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  1. Mechanism for salt scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  2. Dominant role of prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor in furosemide-induced salt-losing tubulopathy: a model for hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüsing, Rolf M; Treude, Antje; Weissenberger, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Increased formation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a key part of hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome (HPS/aBS), a renal disease characterized by NaCl wasting, water loss, and hyperreninism. Inhibition of PGE2 formation by cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors significantly lowers patient...... animals studied, furosemide stimulated a rise in diuresis and electrolyte excretion. However, this effect was blunted in EP1-/-, EP3-/-, and EP4-/- mice. Compared with WT mice, no difference was observed in EP2-/- and IP-/- mice. The furosemide-induced increase in plasma renin concentration...... was significantly decreased in EP4-/- mice and to a lesser degree also in IP-/- mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of EP4 receptors in furosemide-treated WT mice with the specific antagonist ONO-AE3-208 mimicked the changes in renin mRNA expression, plasma renin concentration, diuresis, and sodium excretion seen in EP4...

  3. Comparative study of wild and transformed salt tolerant bacterial strains on Triticum aestivum growth under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Afrasayab

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleven salt tolerant bacteria isolated from different sources (soil, plants and their transformed strains were used to study their influence on Triticum aestivum var. Inqlab-91 growth under salt (100 mM NaCl stress. Salt stress caused reduction in germination (19.4%, seedling growth (46% and fresh weight (39% in non-inoculated plants. In general, both wild and transformed strains stimulated germination, seedling growth and fresh weight in salt free and salt stressed conditions. At 100 mM NaCl, Staphylococcus xylosus ST-1 caused 25% increments in seedling length over respective control. Soluble protein content significantly enhanced (49% under salt stress as compared to salt free control. At 100 mM NaCl parental strain PT-5 resulted about 32% enhancement in protein content over respective control treatment. Salt stress induced the promotion of auxin content in seedlings. Overall, Bacillus subtilis HAa2 and transformed E. coli-SP-7-T, caused 33% and 30% increases in auxin content, respectively, were recorded under salt stress in comparison to control.

  4. Oxygen sparging of residue salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E.; Griego, W.J.; Owens, S.D.; Thorn, C.W.; Vigil, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    Oxygen sparge is a process for treating salt residues at Los Alamos National Laboratory by sparging oxygen through molten salts. Oxygen reacts with the plutonium trichloride in these salts to form plutonium dioxide. There is further reaction of the plutonium dioxide with plutonium metal and the molten salt to form plutonium oxychloride. Both of the oxide plutonium species are insoluble in the salt and collect atthe bottom of the crucible. This results in a decrease of a factor of 2--3 in the amount of salt that must be treated, and the amount of waste generated by aqueous treatment methods.

  5. Vortex-assisted low density solvent liquid-liquid microextraction and salt-induced demulsification coupled to high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of five organophosphorus pesticide residues in fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebunrueng, Ketsarin; Santaladchaiyakit, Yanawath; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2015-01-01

    A simple and rapid microextraction method, vortex-assisted low density solvent liquid-liquid microextraction and salt-induced demulsification (VLLME-SID) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the determination of organophosphorus pesticide (OPP) residues in fruits. The studied OPPs were azinphos-methyl, parathion-methyl, fenitrothion, diazinon and chlorpyrifos. For VLLME-SID, a mixture of low density solvents (1-dodecanol and hexane) was used as the extraction solvent under vortex agitation for enhancing dispersion. After complete dispersion, the emulsion was formed and the OPPs were extracted into extraction solvent droplets. Then, the emulsion was quickly broken up into two clear phases after the addition of AlCl3 as a demulsifier. Centrifugation was not required in this procedure. Under the optimal conditions, high enrichment factors (180-282), low limit of detections (LODs) (0.05-1 ng mL(-1)) and good precision (RSD≤7% for retention time and peak area) were obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of OPP residues in fruit samples (watermelon, grape, and cantaloupe). The LODs for samples were in the range 0.0006-0.0015 mg kg(-1) which are below the established EU-MRLs (0.01-0.3 mg kg(-1)). Good recoveries were also obtained (80-104%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  7. Higgs decay to fermions (CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for high mass Higgs boson of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model decaying into two fermions using the first 2015 data at 13 TeV is presented. The four final decay channels of μτh, eτh, τhτh and eμ is used. The limits on production cross section times branching ratio has been set. Other results from Run1 and different searches and measurements involving Higgs decays fermions will also be reviewed.

  8. Charm counting in b decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  9. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  10. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  11. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized...

  12. VirR-Mediated Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes against Food Antimicrobials and Cross-Protection Induced by Exposure to Organic Acid Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jihun; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J; Bergholz, Teresa M

    2015-07-01

    Formulations of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with antimicrobial compounds constitute an important safety measure against foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. While the efficacy of many commercially available antimicrobial compounds has been demonstrated in a variety of foods, the current understanding of the resistance mechanisms employed by L. monocytogenes to counteract these stresses is limited. In this study, we screened in-frame deletion mutants of two-component system response regulators associated with the cell envelope stress response for increased sensitivity to commercially available antimicrobial compounds (nisin, lauric arginate, ε-polylysine, and chitosan). A virR deletion mutant showed increased sensitivity to all antimicrobials and significantly greater loss of membrane integrity when exposed to nisin, lauric arginate, or ε-polylysine (P food antimicrobials. Further, the potential for cross-protection induced by other food-related stresses (e.g., organic acids) needs to be considered when applying these novel food antimicrobials as a hurdle strategy for RTE foods. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adassa Gama Tavares

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl, potassium chloride (KCl, lactic acid (LA and acetic acid (AA after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO. The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.

  14. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho do; Albuquerque, Allan Dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto de; Souza, Evandro Leite de

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.

  15. Learning SaltStack

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Colton

    2015-01-01

    If you are a system administrator who manages multiple servers, then you know how difficult it is to keep your infrastructure in line. If you've been searching for an easier way, this book is for you. No prior experience with SaltStack is required.

  16. Self-Healing Characteristics of Damaged Rock Salt under Different Healing Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Li; Chunhe Yang; Deyi Jiang; Song Ren; Jie Chen

    2013-01-01

    Salt deposits are commonly regarded as ideal hosts for geologic energy reservoirs. Underground cavern construction-induced damage in salt is reduced by self-healing. Thus, studying the influencing factors on such healing processes is important. This research uses ultrasonic technology to monitor the longitudinal wave velocity variations of stress-damaged rock salts during self-recovery experiments under different recovery conditions. The influences of stress-induced initial damage, temperatur...

  17. SALT-RESPONSIVE ERF1 Regulates Reactive Oxygen Species–Dependent Signaling during the Initial Response to Salt Stress in Rice[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Romy; Mieulet, Delphine; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Obata, Toshihiro; Hoefgen, Rainer; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Fisahn, Joachim; San Segundo, Blanca; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Schippers, Jos H.M.; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Early detection of salt stress is vital for plant survival and growth. Still, the molecular processes controlling early salt stress perception and signaling are not fully understood. Here, we identified SALT-RESPONSIVE ERF1 (SERF1), a rice (Oryza sativa) transcription factor (TF) gene that shows a root-specific induction upon salt and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Loss of SERF1 impairs the salt-inducible expression of genes encoding members of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade and salt tolerance–mediating TFs. Furthermore, we show that SERF1-dependent genes are H2O2 responsive and demonstrate that SERF1 binds to the promoters of MAPK KINASE KINASE6 (MAP3K6), MAPK5, DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING2A (DREB2A), and ZINC FINGER PROTEIN179 (ZFP179) in vitro and in vivo. SERF1 also directly induces its own gene expression. In addition, SERF1 is a phosphorylation target of MAPK5, resulting in enhanced transcriptional activity of SERF1 toward its direct target genes. In agreement, plants deficient for SERF1 are more sensitive to salt stress compared with the wild type, while constitutive overexpression of SERF1 improves salinity tolerance. We propose that SERF1 amplifies the reactive oxygen species–activated MAPK cascade signal during the initial phase of salt stress and translates the salt-induced signal into an appropriate expressional response resulting in salt tolerance. PMID:23800963

  18. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Lowering Salt in Your Diet Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... and can be used by individuals to replace salt in their diet. There are no known undesirable effects in healthy ...

  19. Carpinteria Salt Marsh Habitat Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We identified five common habitat types in Carpinteria Salt Marsh: channels, pans (flats), marsh, salt flat and upland. We then drew polygons around each habitat...

  20. Salt ingestion caves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundquist Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vertebrate herbivores, when they find a salt-bearing layer of rock, say in a cliff face, can produce sizable voids where, overgenerations, they have removed and consumed salty rock. The cavities formed by this natural animal process constitute a uniqueclass of caves that can be called salt ingestion caves. Several examples of such caves are described in various publications. Anexample in Mississippi U.S.A., Rock House Cave, was visited by the authors in 2000. It seems to have been formed by deer orbison. Perhaps the most spectacular example is Kitum Cave in Kenya. This cave has been excavated to a length over 100 metersby elephants. An ancient example is La Cueva del Milodon in Chile, which is reported to have been excavated by the now extinctmilodon, a giant ground sloth. Still other possible examples can be cited. This class of caves deserves a careful definition. First, thecavity in rock should meet the size and other conventions of the locally accepted definition of a cave. Of course this requirement differsin detail from country to country, particularly in the matter of size. The intent is to respect the local conventions. The characteristicthat human entry is possible is judged to be a crucial property of any recognized cave definition. Second, the cavity should besignificantly the result of vertebrate animal consumption of salt-bearing rock. The defining process is that rock removed to form thecave is carried away in the digestive track of an animal. While sodium salts are expected to be the norm, other salts for which thereis animal hunger are acceptable. Also some other speleogenesis process, such as solution, should not be excluded as long as it issecondary in formation of a cave in question.

  1. Overexpression of pigeonpea stress-induced cold and drought regulatory gene (CcCDR) confers drought, salt, and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-09-01

    A potent cold and drought regulatory protein-encoding gene (CcCDR) was isolated from the subtractive cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. CcCDR was induced by different abiotic stress conditions in pigeonpea. Overexpression of CcCDR in Arabidopsis thaliana imparted enhanced tolerance against major abiotic stresses, namely drought, salinity, and low temperature, as evidenced by increased biomass, root length, and chlorophyll content. Transgenic plants also showed increased levels of antioxidant enzymes, proline, and reducing sugars under stress conditions. Furthermore, CcCDR-transgenic plants showed enhanced relative water content, osmotic potential, and cell membrane stability, as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) as compared with control plants. Localization studies confirmed that CcCDR could enter the nucleus, as revealed by intense fluorescence, indicating its possible interaction with various nuclear proteins. Microarray analysis revealed that 1780 genes were up-regulated in CcCDR-transgenics compared with wild-type plants. Real-time PCR analysis on selected stress-responsive genes, involved in ABA-dependent and -independent signalling networks, revealed higher expression levels in transgenic plants, suggesting that CcCDR acts upstream of these genes. The overall results demonstrate the explicit role of CcCDR in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multifunctional CcCDR seems promising as a prime candidate gene for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in diverse plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  3. Microbial Diversity of Culinary Salts

    OpenAIRE

    Muske, Galen; Baxter, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Extremophiles are exceptional microorganisms that live on this planet in extraordinarily harsh environments. One such extremophiles are Halophiles, salt-loving microorganisms that can survive in extreme salinity levels, and have been found to survive inside salt crystals. We were curious is about the potential diversity of halophiles surviving in salts harvested from around the world. For this experiment various culinary salts were suspended in a 23 % NaCL growth media broth and allowed to gr...

  4. Thermodynamics of salt-doped polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2013-03-01

    There is much current interest in salt-doped polymers as materials for energy applications. For example, a promising system for rechargeable battery applications consists of diblock copolymers of an ion-dissolving block, such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) and a nonconducting block such as polystyrene. Experimentally, it has been shown that the addition of lithium salts significantly alters the order-order and order-disorder transition (ODT) temperatures. In particular, the ODT temperature can increase substantially upon adding even a small amount of lithium salt, and the domain spacing in the ordered phases also increases significantly. Both changes are found to depend on the anion type. In this talk, I describe a simple theory for explaining these phenomena. A key effect is the solvation energy of the anions by the polymers, which we approximate using the Born solvation model. The difference in the Born energy between different polymers provides a driving force towards phase separation. By studying the shift in the mean-field spinodal of the disordered phase, we can identify an effective χ parameter, with a systematic dependence on the anion radius, in agreement with available experimental data. Furthermore, by studying the behavior of the domain spacing with salt concentration, we clarify the relationship between different definitions of the effective χ parameter. We propose that the effective χ parameter determined from the structure factor of the disordered phase is a more robust measure of the change in miscibility between the two blocks. Finally, we demonstrate that salt doping induces a strongly first-order transition from the disordered phase to the lamellar phase, with different salt concentrations in the two phases.

  5. Formation and decay of hot nuclei in 475 MeV, 2 GeV proton- and 2 GeV He-3-induced reactions on Ag, Bi, An, and U

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledoux, [No Value; Bohlen, HG; Cugnon, J; Fuchs, H; Galin, J; Gatty, B; Gebauer, B; Guerreau, D; Hilscher, D; Jacquet, D; Jahnke, U; Josset, M; Leray, S; Lott, B; Morjean, M; Quednau, BM; Roschert, G; Rossner, H; Peghaire, A; Pienkowski, L; Siemssen, RH; Stephan, C

    The formation and decay of hot nuclei generated in the interaction of light projectiles (475 MeV and 2 GeV protons and 2 GeV He-3) on a series of targets (Ag-107, Au-197, Bi-209, and U-238) are studied with an apparatus combining the efficient detection of neutrons in 4 pi sr and an accurate

  6. The decay of hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  7. Weak Decays of Charmed Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Marc Gilles [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1986-05-01

    The lifetimes of charmed particles produced in interactions of high energy neutrinos with nucleons have been measured using a combination of a very high resolution emulsion-based vertex detector and a spectrometer allowing full kinematical reconstruction of the decays.

  8. The effect of the salt viscosity on future evolution of the Gorleben salt diapir, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Schmeling, H.; Koyi, H.

    2009-01-01

    The Gorleben diapir, which has been targeted for radioactive waste disposal, contains large blocks of anhydrite. Numerical models that depict the geometrical configuration of the Gorleben diapir are used to understand internal structure of diapir caused by movement of the anhydrite blocks....... Decreasing salt viscosity allows the previously “stationary” anhydrite blocks to sink. If the effective viscosity of salt in post-depositional stage of the Gorleben diapir falls below this threshold value, induced internal flow due to the present anhydrite layer might disturb any repository within the diapir....

  9. Hadronic {tau} decays and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  10. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  11. Augmenting laboratory rearing of stable fly (diptera: muscidae) larvae with ammoniacal salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable flies are blood feeding parasites and serious pests of livestock. The immature stages develop in decaying materials which frequently have high ammonium content. We added various ammonium salts to our laboratory stable fly rearing medium and measured their effect on size and survival as well a...

  12. Salt damage and RH changes: The case of the Waag Building in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the air MM can cause damage to building materials contaminated with hygroscopic saus, even in the absence of any other moishwe source. This phenomenon has been observed in the case of the iflag build ing in Amsterdam, affècted by severe salt decay. The investigation, canied out by means

  13. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    OpenAIRE

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids - flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF) - from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate i...

  14. Complex molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice revealed by comparative transcriptome and metabolomic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Sheng; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Min; Huang, Li-Yu; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Yan-Ru; Fu, Bin-Ying; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.), the phenotypic, metabolic, and transcriptome responses of two related rice genotypes, IR64 and PL177, with contrasting salt tolerance were characterized under salt stress and salt+abscisic acid (ABA) conditions. PL177 showed significantly less salt damage, lower Na+/K+ ratios in shoots, and Na+ translocation from roots to shoots, attributed largely to better salt exclusion from its roots and salt compartmentation of its shoots. Exogenous ABA was able to enhance the salt tolerance of IR64 by selectively decreasing accumulation of Na+ in its roots and increasing K+ in its shoots. Salt stress induced general and organ-specific increases of many primary metabolites in both rice genotypes, with strong accumulation of several sugars plus proline in shoots and allantoin in roots. This was due primarily to ABA-mediated repression of genes for degradation of these metabolites under salt. In PL177, salt specifically up-regulated genes involved in several pathways underlying salt tolerance, including ABA-mediated cellular lipid and fatty acid metabolic processes and cytoplasmic transport, sequestration by vacuoles, detoxification and cell-wall remodeling in shoots, and oxidation–reduction reactions in roots. Combined genetic and transcriptomic evidence shortlisted relatively few candidate genes for improved salt tolerance in PL177. PMID:26512058

  15. Controlling moisture content of wood samples using a modified soil-pan decay method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Simon F. Curling; Patricia K. Lebow

    2005-01-01

    In wood, the threshold level below which decay cannot occur varies with species or type of wood product and other factors such as temperature, humidity, and propensity of exposure or service-use to allow rain-induced wetting and subsequent drying. The ability to control wood moisture content (MC) during laboratory decay testing could allow research on the moisture...

  16. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Kawasaki, Nobuo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kume, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana VDAC2 involvement in salt stress response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil salinity seriously affects plants distribution and yield, while salt stress induces SOS genes, and voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) and a mitochondrial porin, are induced too. In this paper, phenotypes of AtVDAC2 transgenic lines and wild type (RLD) were analyzed. It was found that AtVDAC2 over-expressing ...

  18. Mixed salt crystallisation fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Helalizadeh, A

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation was to study the mechanisms of mixed salt crystallisation fouling on heat transfer surfaces during convective heat transfer and sub-cooled flow boiling conditions. To-date no investigations on the effects of operating parameters on the deposition of mixtures of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate, which are the most common constituents of scales formed on heat transfer surfaces, have been reported. As part of this research project, a substantial number of experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms controlling deposition. Fluid velocity, heat flux, surface and bulk temperatures, concentration of the solution, ionic strength, pressure and heat transfer surface material were varied systematically. After clarification of the effect of these parameters on the deposition process, the results of these experiments were used to develop a mechanistic model for prediction of fouling resistances, caused by crystallisation of mixed salts, under convective heat transfer...

  19. Thermochemical Properties of Nicotine Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs DM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results presented in this report clearly show that the thermal stability and the endothermic peak nicotine release temperatures are different for different nicotine salts and these temperatures appear to be linked to the general microstructural details of the salt itself. In addition, the peak nicotine release temperatures are highly dependent upon the sample size used. The heat of vaporization for neat (non-protonated nicotine is also sample-size dependent. The TGA data showed that the least stable of the salts tested at elevated temperatures was the liquid salt nicotine triacetate followed by the crystalline materials (e.g., nicotine gallate and finally, the amorphous salts (e.g., nicotine alginate. The DSC results revealed that the liquid and crystalline salts exhibit nicotine release endotherms that are strongly related to the sample weight being tested. The amorphous salts show nicotine endotherm peak temperatures that are nearly independent of the sample weight. The range of peak nicotine release temperatures varied depending upon the specific salts and the sample size from 83 oC to well over 200 oC. Based on these results, the evolution of nicotine from the nicotine salt should be expected to vary based on the composition of the salt, the details of its microstructure, and the amount of nicotine salt tested.

  20. Microemulsion of Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    then to an oil-rich, upper phase as salinity increases in a system of brine/octane/ TRS surfactant/tertiary amyl alcohol . Borkovec et al. (1988) have...11 4. Partial Pseudotemary Phase Diagram .................................. 12 5. Micrograph of Molten Salts/SDS/Pentanol/Decane System...negligible interfacial tension between microdomains. Theoretical work in ternary and pseudotemary systems has shown that the middle phase is a

  1. High efficiency transformation of banana [Musa acuminata L. cv. Matti (AA)] for enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stress through overexpression of a peanut salinity-induced pathogenesis-related class 10 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Anjana; Jain, Shalu; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Jain, Mukesh; Bhat, Vishnu; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2015-01-01

    Bananas and plantains (Musa spp. L.) are important subsistence crops and premium export commodity in several countries, and susceptible to a wide range of environmental and biotic stress conditions. Here, we report efficient, rapid, and reproducible Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and regeneration of an Indian niche cultivar of banana [M. acuminata cv. Matti (AA)]. Apical meristem-derived highly proliferative multiple shoot clump (MSC) explants were transformed with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring a binary vector pCAMBIA-1301 carrying hptII and uidA. Sequential agro-infiltration (10 min, 400 mmHg), infection (additional 35 min, Agrobacterium density A 600 = 0.8) and co-cultivation (18 h) regimen in 100 µM acetosyringone containing liquid medium were critical factors yielding high transformation efficiency (~81 %) corroborated by transient GUS expression assay. Stable transgenic events were recovered following two cycles of meristem initiation and selection on hygromycin containing medium. Histochemical GUS assay in several tissues of transgenic plants and molecular analyses confirmed stable integration and expression of transgene. The protocol described here allowed recovery of well-established putative transgenic plantlets in as little as 5 months. The transgenic banana plants could be readily acclimatized under greenhouse conditions, and were phenotypically similar to the wild-type untransformed control plants (WT). Transgenic plants overexpressing Salinity-Induced Pathogenesis-Related class 10 protein gene from Arachis hypogaea (AhSIPR10) in banana cv. Matti (AA) showed better photosynthetic efficiency and less membrane damage (P < 0.05) in the presence of NaCl and mannitol in comparison to WT plants suggesting the role of AhSIPR10 in better tolerance of salt stress and drought conditions.

  2. Biomarkers for Chronic Kidney Disease Associated with High Salt Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Hosohata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High salt intake has been related to the development to chronic kidney disease (CKD as well as hypertension. In its early stages, symptoms of CKD are usually not apparent, especially those that are induced in a “silent” manner in normotensive individuals, thereby providing a need for some kind of urinary biomarker to detect injury at an early stage. Because traditional renal biomarkers such as serum creatinine are insensitive, it is difficult to detect kidney injury induced by a high-salt diet, especially in normotensive individuals. Recently, several new biomarkers for damage of renal tubular epithelia such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL and kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1 have been identified. Previously, we found a novel renal biomarker, urinary vanin-1, in several animal models with renal tubular injury. However, there are few studies about early biomarkers of the progression to CKD associated with a high-salt diet. This review presents some new insights about these novel biomarkers for CKD in normotensives and hypertensives under a high salt intake. Interestingly, our recent reports using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY fed a high-salt diet revealed that urinary vanin-1 and NGAL are earlier biomarkers of renal tubular damage in SHR and WKY, whereas urinary Kim-1 is only useful as a biomarker of salt-induced renal injury in SHR. Clinical studies will be needed to clarify these findings.

  3. Sobre os efeitos vasomotôres exercidos pela agua distilada e pelas soluções anisotonicas de clorêto de sodio Vaso-motricity induced by distilled water and anisotonic salt solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Xavier

    1939-01-01

    Full Text Available The writer reports experiments done with distilled water and hypotonic and hypertonic salt solutions of definite osmotic concentrations. The experiments were performed according to the Laewen-Trendelenburg technic using the vascular system of the frog's hind legs, and according to the Pissemski-Krawkow method using the capillaries of the rabbit's ear. Both preparations react to distilled water by marked vaso-constriction, the same phenomenon taking place in the case of the hypotonic salt solutions. The lower the concentration pf the hypotonic salt solution the stronger the vaso-constriction obtained. With hypertonic salt solutions was observed a strong but rather transient vaso-dilatation followed by secondary vaso-constriction. The later results were found only in the experiments with the frog's hind legs.

  4. Cold Responsive Gene Expression Profiling of Sugarcane and Saccharum spontaneum with Functional Analysis of a Cold Inducible Saccharum Homolog of NOD26-Like Intrinsic Protein to Salt and Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Won; Benatti, Thiago R; Marconi, Thiago; Yu, Qingyi; Solis-Gracia, Nora; Mora, Victoria; da Silva, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of sugarcane hybrid CP72-1210 (cold susceptible) and Saccharum spontaneum TUS05-05 (cold tolerant) using Sugarcane Assembled Sequences (SAS) from SUCEST-FUN Database showed that a total of 35,340 and 34,698 SAS genes, respectively, were expressed before and after chilling stress. The analysis revealed that more than 600 genes are differentially expressed in each genotype after chilling stress. Blast2Go annotation revealed that the major difference in gene expression profiles between CP72-1210 and TUS05-05 after chilling stress are present in the genes related to the transmembrane transporter activity. To further investigate the relevance of transmembrane transporter activity against abiotic stress tolerance, a S. spontaneum homolog of a NOD26-like major intrinsic protein gene (SspNIP2) was selected for functional analysis, of which expression was induced after chilling stress in the cold tolerant TUS05-05. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that SspNIP2 expression was increased ~2.5 fold at 30 minutes after cold treatment and stayed induced throughout the 24 hours of cold treatment. The amino acid sequence analysis of the cloned SspNIP2 confirmed the presence of six transmembrane domains and two NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala) motifs, signature features of major intrinsic protein families. Amino acid analysis confirmed that four amino acids, comprising the ar/R (aromatic residue/arginine) region responsible for the substrate specificity among MIPs, are conserved among monocot silicon transporters and SspNIP2. Salinity stress test on SspNIP2 transgenic tobacco plants resulted in more vigorous transgenic lines than the non-transgenic tobacco plants, suggesting some degree of tolerance to salt stress conferred by SspNIP2. SspNIP2-transgenic plants, exposed to 2 weeks of water stress without irrigation, developed various degrees of water stress symptom. The water stress test confirmed that the SspNIP2 transgenic lines had lower evapotranspiration rates than non

  5. Characterization of Finnish Building materials under salt frost artificial ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luodes, Nike M.; Torppa, Akseli; Pirinen, Heikki; Bellopede, Rossana; Marini, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Under a national project co financed by the Confederation of Finnish Construction Industries RT (CFCI), the Finnish Natural Stone Association and the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), and thanks to the cooperation with the Polytechnic of Turin a comprehensive number of Finnish natural stones has been tested according to SFS EN standards for national CE marking and according to non standardized methods for research purposes. The aim was to evaluate the effects of combined salt and frost weathering caused by de-icing salts and to research a possible correlation between laboratory's accelerated decay and site weathering. The materials tested (60 stones in total) are mainly silicate rocks showing good resistance to the weathering. Results have been affected in some cases by uncertainties connected to the variation of material quality. Some materials have been from new quarries and variation of their properties has been higher than the effects of artificial weathering. Material sampled from crop presented higher weathering level and the additional artificial weathering has induced small variations. Results have shown that material weathering has been better represented by variation of flexural strength compared to uniaxial compressive strength. The most probable reason has been that small changes of planarity and perpendicularity had greater effects on the compressive strength than variations by weathering. Fifteen representative typologies of natural stones have been tested with non standardized methodologies to study the changes of the material and finding a possible correlation with methods used on site. Schmidt rebound test and Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV) have been used on site to assess the durability of stone on construction. Materials tested in laboratory have shown less variation between rebounds compared to site tests, this can be because of a more controlled environment and saw cut surface instead of rocky or chiselled ones. Laboratory tests showed an average

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faessler, Amand; Simkovic, Fedor

    1998-12-01

    We review the recent developments in the field of nuclear double beta decay, which is presently an important topic in both nuclear and particle physics. The mechanism of lepton number violation within the neutrinoless double beta decay (0954-3899/24/12/001/img5-decay) is discussed in the context of the problem of neutrino mixing and the R-parity violating supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. The problem of reliable determination of the nuclear matrix elements governing both two-neutrino and neutrinoless modes of the double beta decay is addressed. The validity of different approximation schemes in the considered nuclear structure studies is analysed and the role of the Pauli exclusion principle for a correct treatment of nuclear matrix elements is emphasized. The constraints on different lepton-number violating parameters such as effective electron neutrino mass, effective right-handed weak interaction parameters, effective Majoron coupling constant and R-parity violating SUSY parameters are derived from the best presently available experimental limits on the half-life of 0954-3899/24/12/001/img5-decay.

  7. Microcanonical simulation for the decay of very hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Yuming; Xu Shuyan; Zhang Xiaoze (Institute of Atomic Energy, P. O. Box 275, Beijing (CN)); Gross, D.H.E. (Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany (DE))

    1990-01-01

    The microcanonical Metropolis sampling method is used to simulate the nuclear fragmentation at excitation energies between {approx}10 MeV and 2 GeV. Contrary to the usual canonical description of compound nucleus decay the total energy, momentum, mass, and charge of the system are strictly conserved quantities. No artificial heat bath is needed. The calculated mass distribution, charge dispersion, and energy spectra are in good agreement with the data of nuclear fragmentations induced by highly energetic protons. The possible characteristics of the statistical decay of the exotic nucleus are discussed.

  8. Microcanonical simulation for the decay of very hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xheng Yuming; Xu Shuyan; Zhang Xiaoze; Gross, D.H.E.

    1988-11-01

    The microcanonical Metropolis sampling method is used to simulate the nuclear fragmentation at excitation energies between approx.10 MeV and 2 GeV. Contrary to the usual canonical description of compound nucleus decay the total energy, momentum, mass and charge of the system are strictly conserved quantities. No artificial heat bath is needed. The calculated mass distribution, charge dispersion and energy-spectra are in good agreement with the data of nuclear fragmentations induced by highly energetic protons. The possible characteristics of the statistical decay of the exotic nucleus are discussed.

  9. Lepton number violation by heavy Majorana neutrino in B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Asaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy Majorana neutrinos are predicted in addition to ordinary active neutrinos in the models with the seesaw mechanism. We investigate the lepton number violation (LNV in B decays induced by such a heavy neutrino N with GeV-scale mass. Especially, we consider the decay channel B+→μ+N→μ+μ+π− and derive the sensitivity limits on the mixing angle Θμ by the future search experiments at Belle II and in e+e− collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee.

  10. Salt supply to and significance of asymmetric salt diapirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Burliga, S.; Chemia, Zurab

    2012-01-01

    Salt diapirs can be asymmetric both internally and externally reflecting their evolution history. As such, this asymmetry bear a significant amount of information about the differential loading (± lateral forces) and in turn the salt supply that have shaped the diapir. In two dimensions...... southeastern overhang due to salt extrusion during Middle Cretaceous followed by its burial in Tertiary. This external asymmetry is also reflected in the internal configuration of the diapir which shows different rates of salt flow on the two halves of the structure. The asymmetric external and internal...... sediments, the diapir extruded an overhang. Using the asymmetric Klodawa Salt Structure (KSS) in central Poland as a prototype, a series of analogue models were carried out to investigate the evolution history and salt supply driven by asymmetric differential loading. During extension of the model, a daipir...

  11. Luminescence properties of common salt (NaCl available in Nigeria for use as accident dosimeter in radiological emergency situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Ayobami Ademola

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to assess and quantify radiation dose to the population. This could be done using materials in the vicinity that are sensitive to ionizing radiation. Common salt (NaCl is known to be a sensitive thermoluminescence (TL phosphor. Luminescence properties of common salt (NaCl used in Nigeria were investigated using an automated luminescence reader Risø TL/OSL-DA-15, with attention focused more on the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL. Strong radiation-induced TL and OSL signals were observed. The TL peaks occurred at about 100 °C, 240 °C and 280 °C. The dose response of both the TL and OSL signals showed a linear relationship. From the OSL pulse anneal curve with TL curve, a preheat temperature of 190 °C for 10 s was found adequate for the OSL measurements. There was no significant difference in the OSL decay for stimulation temperatures of 100 and 120 °C. Fading experiment over a storage period of 14 days showed about 13 and 3% decrease in the OSL signal of sample 1 and sample 2, respectively. The ratios of measured to given dose for dose recovery test were within ±19% of unity. Within the limit of error the samples could be used as a complementary emergency dosimeter in radiological accident situation.

  12. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception

    OpenAIRE

    Tournier, Carole; Knoop, Janine E.; Kooyman, Gonnie; Smit, Gerrit

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise m...

  13. The Decay Data Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E.

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear scientists from France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States have joined their efforts to evaluate decay data for radionuclides specifically used in applied research and detector calibrations. The purpose of this collaboration, the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP), is to produce recommended values, and to suggest new measurements for data that are unsatisfactory. Uniformity and reproducibility are features of importance for this work. These features, as well as the general scope of this project and its relation to the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) will be presented and illustrated with examples. This work is presented on behalf of the Decay Data Evaluation Project. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under contract number DEAC03-76SF00098.

  14. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  15. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  16. High salt-diet reduces SLC14A1 gene expression in the choroid plexus of Dahl salt sensitive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lirong; Meng, Jie; Xuan, Chengluan; Ge, Jingyan; Sun, Wenzhu; O'Rourke, Stephen T; Sun, Chengwen

    2015-05-29

    Elevated Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contributes to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. CSF is formed by the choroid plexus (CP) in cerebral ventricles, and [Na(+)] in CSF is controlled by transporters in CP. Here, we examined the effect of high salt diet on the expression of urea transporters (UTs) in the CP of Dahl S vs Dahl R rats using real time PCR. High salt intake (8%, for 2 weeks) did not alter the mRNA levels of UT-A (encoded by SLC14A2 gene) in the CP of either Dahl S or Dahl R rats. In contrast, the mRNA levels of UT-B (encoded by SLC14A1 gene) were significantly reduced in the CP of Dahl S rats on high salt diet as compared with Dahl R rats or Dahl S rats on normal salt diet. Reduced UT-B expression was associated with increased [Na(+)] in the CSF and elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) in Dahl S rats treated with high salt diet, as measured by radiotelemetry. High salt diet-induced reduction in UT-B protein expression in the CP of Dahl S rats was confirmed by Western blot. Immunohistochemistry using UT-B specific antibodies demonstrated that UT-B protein was expressed on the epithelial cells in the CP. These data indicate that high salt diet induces elevations in CSF [Na(+)] and in MAP, both of which are associated with reduced UT-B expression in the CP of Dahl S rats, as compared with Dahl R rats. The results suggest that altered UT-B expression in the CP may contribute to an imbalance of water and electrolytes in the CSF of Dahl S rats on high salt diet, thereby leading to alterations in MAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  18. Rheology of rock salt for salt tectonics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerical modeling of salt tectonics is a rapidly evolving field; however, the constitutive equations to model long-term rock salt rheology in nature still remain controversial. Firstly, we built a database about the strain rate versus the differential stress through collecting the data from salt creep experiments at a range of temperatures (20–200 °C in laboratories. The aim is to collect data about salt deformation in nature, and the flow properties can be extracted from the data in laboratory experiments. Moreover, as an important preparation for salt tectonics modeling, a numerical model based on creep experiments of rock salt was developed in order to verify the specific model using the Abaqus package. Finally, under the condition of low differential stresses, the deformation mechanism would be extrapolated and discussed according to microstructure research. Since the studies of salt deformation in nature are the reliable extrapolation of laboratory data, we simplified the rock salt rheology to dislocation creep corresponding to power law creep (n = 5 with the appropriate material parameters in the salt tectonic modeling.

  19. Reactive halogen species above salt lakes and salt pans

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Salt lakes can be found on all continents and saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth (FAO, 2012). This thesis investigates the presence of reactive halogen species (RHS) above salt lakes and saline soils to evaluate their relevance for tropospheric chemistry of the planetary boundary layer. Ground-based MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS measurements were conducted at salt lakes and two other sites with high halogen content. Prior to this work, RHS were found at three salt ...

  20. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  1. Salt Damage and Rising Damp Treatment in Building Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. P. Q. Delgado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salt damage can affect the service life of numerous building structures, both historical and contemporary, in a significant way. In this review, various damage mechanisms to porous building materials induced by salt action are analyzed. The importance of pretreatment investigations is discussed as well; in combination with the knowledge of salt and moisture transport mechanisms they can give useful indications regarding treatment options. The methods of salt damage treatment are assessed then, including both passive techniques based on environmental control, reduction of water transport, or conversion to less soluble salts and active procedures resulting in the removal of salts from deterioration zones. It is concluded that cellulose can still be considered as the favorite material presently used in desalination poultices but hydrophilic mineral wool can serve as its prospective alternative in future applications. Another important cause of building pathologies is the rising damp and, in this phenomenon, it is particularly severe considering the presence of salts in water. The treatment of rising damp in historic building walls is a very complex procedure and at Laboratory of Building Physics (LFC-FEUP a wall base hygroregulated ventilation system was developed and patented.

  2. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  3. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  4. CP Violation in Correlated Production and Decay of Unstable Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kittel, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    We study resonant CP-violating Einstein--Podolsky--Rosen correlations that may take place in the production and decay of unstable scalar particles at high-energy colliders. We show that as a consequence of unitarity and CPT invariance of the S-matrix, in 2 --> 2 scatterings mediated by mixed scalar particles, at least three linearly independent decay matrices associated with the unstable scalar states are needed to obtain non-zero CP-odd observables that are also odd under C-conjugation. Instead, for the correlated production and decay of two unstable particle systems in 2 --> 4 processes, we find that only two independent decay matrices are sufficient to induce a net non-vanishing CP-violating phenomenon. As an application of this theorem, we present numerical estimates of CP asymmetries for the correlated production and decay of supersymmetric scalar top--anti-top pairs at the LHC, and demonstrate that these could reach values of order one. As a byproduct of our analysis, we develop a novel spinorial trace ...

  5. Dark Matter Decays from Nonminimal Coupling to Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catà, Oscar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ingenhütt, Sebastian

    2016-07-08

    We consider the standard model extended with a dark matter particle in curved spacetime, motivated by the fact that the only current evidence for dark matter is through its gravitational interactions, and we investigate the impact on the dark matter stability of terms in the Lagrangian linear in the dark matter field and proportional to the Ricci scalar. We show that this "gravity portal" induces decay even if the dark matter particle only has gravitational interactions, and that the decay branching ratios into standard model particles only depend on one free parameter: the dark matter mass. We study in detail the case of a singlet scalar as a dark matter candidate, which is assumed to be absolutely stable in flat spacetime due to a discrete Z_{2} symmetry, but which may decay in curved spacetimes due to a Z_{2}-breaking nonminimal coupling to gravity. We calculate the dark matter decay widths and we set conservative limits on the nonminimal coupling parameter from experiments. The limits are very stringent and suggest that there must exist an additional mechanism protecting the singlet scalar from decaying via this gravity portal.

  6. Salt Intake Is Associated with Inflammation in Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Azak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Heart Failure (CHF is highly prevalent and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. It has been well established that excessive intake of sodium chloride (salt induced hypertension in some populations. Although salt seems to induce cardiovascular diseases through elevation of blood pressure, it has also been indicated that salt can induce cardiovascular diseases independently from blood pressure elevation. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the association between salt consumption and inflammation in CHF patients. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on 86 patients between 18 and 65 years old who were diagnosed with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class I and II heart failure. Salt intake was calculated by using 24 hour urine sodium excretion. Besides, the association between inflammation and daily salt intake was evaluated regarding C - reactive protein (CPR, High sensitive CRP (HsCPR, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR, and ferritin and fibrinogen levels using Pearson correlation analysis. Results: Our results showed a statistically significant difference between the low (n = 41 and high (n = 45 salt intake groups in terms of serum HsCRP levels (5.21 ± 2.62 vs. 6.36 ± 2.64 (P < 0.048. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between the amount of salt consumption and HsCRP levels. In this study, daily salt consumption of the enrolled patients was 8.53 gram/day. The medications and even the blood pressures were similar in the two groups, but daily pill count, prevalence of hypertension, and coronary heart disease were higher in the high salt intake group; however, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.065. Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups concerning the inflammation markers, such as CRP, ESR, ferritin, and fibrinogen. Conclusions: Neurohumoral and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to high mortality

  7. The Status of Hawaii Askaryan Salt Radi Array (HASRA) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milincic, R [3141 Chestnut St. 12-816, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 USA (United States); Gorham, P W [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Miocinovic, P [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Rosen, M [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Saltzberg, D [3166 Knudsen Hall, Los Angeles CA 90095 (United States); Varner, G [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    The exploration of GZK neutrinos through their interactions with matter via produced radio signals requires highly homogeneous material with small attenuation for radio frequencies. Rock salt in some salt dome formations provide dielectric material with great potential to host a large scale (100 km{sup 3}) water-equivalent ultra-high energy neutrino detector The Hawaii Askaryan in Salt Radio Array (HASRA) detector was built as a testbed for exploration of coherent radio Cherenkov emission in salt from interaction of cosmic ray induced cascades. We report results of 1 year of measurements of Askaryan effect with HASRA detector. Peformance of the detector its sensitivity and analysis of a newest data set will be presented.

  8. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Superheavy elements and decay properties. K P Santhosh. Volume 85 Issue 3 ... Author Affiliations. K P Santhosh1. School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, Payyanur 670 327, India ...

  9. Observations of offshore bar decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    the upper shoreface, and finally a stage of decaying bar form through loss of sediment volume at the outer boundary of the upper shoreface. The phenomenon has been previously documented in the Netherlands, the USA, the Canadian Great Lakes, and in New Zealand, but our present understanding...

  10. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S) are the one-dimensional slab-on-slab function. 3. Results and discussions. The Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) was used to evaluate the α decay properties of the isotopes of the SHN with Z = 115, ...

  11. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  12. Rare pion and kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.

    1984-05-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The ..pi.. ..-->.. e ..nu../..pi.. ..-->.. ..mu nu.. branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K/sup +/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..nu..nu-bar are reviewed.

  13. Rare pion and kaon decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1984-05-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The π → e ν/π → μν branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K+ → π+νν¯ are reviewed.

  14. Rare B decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  15. Hadronic decays of $W$ bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, III, Richard Paul [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for hadronic W decays in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton + neutrino + ≥ 4 jet events using a 109 pb -1 data sample of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  16. Relationship Between Salt Intake, Salt-Taste Threshold and Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many studies have found an association between sodium intake and blood pressure. Salt taste threshold is thought to be another marker of sodium intake. Objective: This study sought to assess two markers of sodium intake, 24-hour-urinary sodium and salt-taste threshold. We also determined the relationship ...

  17. Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, J.L.H.C.; Tournier, C.; Knoop, J.E.; Kooyman, G.; Smit, G.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various

  18. Null mutation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase subunit p67phox protects the Dahl-S rat from salt-induced reductions in medullary blood flow and glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Louise C; Ryan, Robert P; Broadway, Elizabeth; Skelton, Meredith M; Kurth, Theresa; Cowley, Allen W

    2015-03-01

    Null mutations in the p67(phox) subunit of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase confer protection from salt sensitivity on Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Here, we track the sequential changes in medullary blood flow (MBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary protein, and mean arterial pressure in SSp67(phox) null rats and wild-type littermates during 21 days of 4.0% NaCl high-salt (HS) diet. Optical fibers were implanted in the renal medulla and MBF was measured in conscious rats by laser Doppler flowmetry. Separate groups of rats were prepared with femoral venous catheters and GFR was measured by the transcutaneous assessment of fluorescein isothiocyanate-sinistrin disappearance curves. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured by telemetry. In wild-type rats, HS caused a rapid reduction in MBF, which was significantly lower than control values by HS day-6. Reduced MBF was associated with a progressive increase in mean arterial pressure, averaging 170±5 mm Hg by HS salt day-21. A significant reduction in GFR was evident on day-14 HS, after the onset of hypertension and reduced MBF. In contrast, HS had no significant effect on MBF in SSp67(phox) null rats and the pressor response to sodium was blunted, averaging 150±3 mm Hg on day-21 HS. GFR was maintained throughout the study and proteinuria was reduced. In summary, when p67(phox) is not functional in the salt-sensitive rats, HS does not cause reduced MBF and salt-sensitive hypertension is attenuated, and consequently renal injury is reduced and GFR is maintained. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Experiments in connection with Salt Domes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escher, B.G.; Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1928-01-01

    The different theories concerning the origin of Salt Domes in Roumania, Germany, Texas, Louisiana, Colorado and Utah are discussed. In Roumania the salt occurs in cores of “Diapir” anticlines. The existance of hills of salt indicates, that the salt is still pushing upwards. In Germany the salt

  20. Sodium: How to Tame Your Salt Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same amount of sodium as table salt. Use salt substitutes wisely. Some salt substitutes or light salts contain a mixture of table ... substitute — and get too much sodium. Also, many salt substitutes contain potassium chloride. Although potassium can lessen some ...