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Sample records for saliva metabolomics identified

  1. Effect of masticatory stimulation on the quantity and quality of saliva and the salivary metabolomic profile.

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    Okuma, Nobuyuki; Saita, Makiko; Hoshi, Noriyuki; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    This study characterized the changes in quality and quantity of saliva, and changes in the salivary metabolomic profile, to understand the effects of masticatory stimulation. Stimulated and unstimulated saliva samples were collected from 55 subjects and salivary hydrophilic metabolites were comprehensively quantified using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In total, 137 metabolites were identified and quantified. The concentrations of 44 metabolites in stimulated saliva were significantly higher than those in unstimulated saliva. Pathway analysis identified the upregulation of the urea cycle and synthesis and degradation pathways of glycine, serine, cysteine and threonine in stimulated saliva. A principal component analysis revealed that the effect of masticatory stimulation on salivary metabolomic profiles was less dependent on sample population sex, age, and smoking. The concentrations of only 1 metabolite in unstimulated saliva, and of 3 metabolites stimulated saliva, showed significant correlation with salivary secretion volume, indicating that the salivary metabolomic profile and salivary secretion volume were independent factors. Masticatory stimulation affected not only salivary secretion volume, but also metabolite concentration patterns. A low correlation between the secretion volume and these patterns supports the conclusion that the salivary metabolomic profile may be a new indicator to characterize masticatory stimulation.

  2. Effect of masticatory stimulation on the quantity and quality of saliva and the salivary metabolomic profile.

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    Nobuyuki Okuma

    Full Text Available This study characterized the changes in quality and quantity of saliva, and changes in the salivary metabolomic profile, to understand the effects of masticatory stimulation.Stimulated and unstimulated saliva samples were collected from 55 subjects and salivary hydrophilic metabolites were comprehensively quantified using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.In total, 137 metabolites were identified and quantified. The concentrations of 44 metabolites in stimulated saliva were significantly higher than those in unstimulated saliva. Pathway analysis identified the upregulation of the urea cycle and synthesis and degradation pathways of glycine, serine, cysteine and threonine in stimulated saliva. A principal component analysis revealed that the effect of masticatory stimulation on salivary metabolomic profiles was less dependent on sample population sex, age, and smoking. The concentrations of only 1 metabolite in unstimulated saliva, and of 3 metabolites stimulated saliva, showed significant correlation with salivary secretion volume, indicating that the salivary metabolomic profile and salivary secretion volume were independent factors.Masticatory stimulation affected not only salivary secretion volume, but also metabolite concentration patterns. A low correlation between the secretion volume and these patterns supports the conclusion that the salivary metabolomic profile may be a new indicator to characterize masticatory stimulation.

  3. Measurement of 1,5-anhydroglucitol in blood and saliva: from non-targeted metabolomics to biochemical assay.

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    Halama, Anna; Kulinski, Michal; Kader, Sara Abdul; Satheesh, Noothan J; Abou-Samra, Abdul Badi; Suhre, Karsten; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-05-18

    Diabetes testing using saliva, rather than blood and urine, could facilitate diabetes screening in public spaces. We previously identified 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol (1,5-AG) in saliva as a diabetes biomarker. The Glycomark™ assay kit is FDA approved for 1,5-AG measurement in blood. Here we evaluated its applicability for 1,5-AG quantification in saliva. Using pooled saliva samples, we validated Glycomark™ assay use with a RX Daytona(+) clinical chemistry analyser. We then used this set-up to analyse 82 paired blood and saliva samples from a diabetes case-control study, for which broad mass spectrometry-based characterization of the blood and saliva metabolome was also available. Osmolality was measured to account for potential variability in saliva samples. The technical variability of the read-outs for the pooled saliva samples (CV = 2.05 %) was comparable to that obtained with manufacturer-provided blood surrogate quality controls (CV = 1.38-1.8 %). We found a high correlation between Glycomark assay and mass spectrometry measurements of serum 1,5-AG (r(2) = 0.902), showing reproducibility of the non-targeted metabolomics results. The significant correlation between the osmolality measurements performed at two independent platforms with the time interval of 2 years (r(2) = 0.887), also indicates the sample integrity. The assay read-out for saliva was not correlated with the mass spectrometry-based 1,5-AG saliva measurements. Comparison with the full saliva metabolome revealed a high correlation of the saliva assay read-outs with galactose. Glycomark™ assay read-outs for saliva were stable and replicable. However, the signal was dominated by galactose, which is biochemically similar to 1,5-AG and absent in blood. Adapting the 1,5-AG kit for saliva analysis will require enzymatic depletion of galactose. This should be feasible, since the assay already includes a similar step for glucose depletion from blood samples.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry-based metabolome analysis of serum and saliva from neurodegenerative dementia patients.

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    Tsuruoka, Mayuko; Hara, Junko; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Shankle, William R; Tomita, Masaru

    2013-10-01

    Despite increasing global prevalence, the precise pathogenesis and terms for objective diagnosis of neurodegenerative dementias remain controversial, and comprehensive understanding of the disease remains lacking. Here, we conducted metabolomic analysis of serum and saliva obtained from patients with neurodegenerative dementias (n = 10), including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia, and Lewy body disease, as well as from age-matched healthy controls (n = 9). Using CE-TOF-MS, six metabolites in serum (β-alanine, creatinine, hydroxyproline, glutamine, iso-citrate, and cytidine) and two in saliva (arginine and tyrosine) were significantly different between dementias and controls. Using multivariate analysis, serum was confirmed as a more efficient biological fluid for diagnosis compared to saliva; additionally, 45 metabolites in total were identified as candidate markers that could discriminate at least one pair of diagnostic groups from the healthy control group. These metabolites possibly provide an objective method for diagnosing dementia-type by multiphase screening. Moreover, diagnostic-type-dependent differences were observed in several tricarboxylic acid cycle compounds detected in serum, indicating that some pathways in glucose metabolism may be altered in dementia patients. This pilot study revealed novel alterations in metabolomic profiles between various neurodegenerative dementias, which would contribute to etiological investigations. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The same microbiota and a potentially discriminant metabolome in the saliva of omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and Vegan individuals.

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    De Filippis, Francesca; Vannini, Lucia; La Storia, Antonietta; Laghi, Luca; Piombino, Paola; Stellato, Giuseppina; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Gozzi, Giorgia; Turroni, Silvia; Ferrocino, Ilario; Lazzi, Camilla; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in >98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three "salivary types" that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using (1)H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1-propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis.

  6. The same microbiota and a potentially discriminant metabolome in the saliva of omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and Vegan individuals.

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    Francesca De Filippis

    Full Text Available The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in >98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three "salivary types" that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using (1H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1-propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis.

  7. Metabolomics tools for identifying biomarkers for neuropsychiatric diseases.

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    Quinones, Marlon P; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2009-08-01

    The repertoire of biochemicals (or small molecules) present in cells, tissue, and body fluids is known as the metabolome. Today, clinicians utilize only a very small part of the information contained in the metabolome, as revealed by the quantification of a limited set of analytes to gain information on human health. Examples include measuring glucose or cholesterol to monitor diabetes and cardiovascular health, respectively. With a focus on comprehensively studying the metabolome, the rapidly growing field of metabolomics captures the metabolic state of organisms at the global or "-omics" level. Given that the overall health status of an individual is captured by his or her metabolic state, which is a reflection of what has been encoded by the genome and modified by environmental factors, metabolomics has the potential to have a great impact upon medical practice by providing a wealth of relevant biochemical data. Metabolomics promises to improve current, single metabolites-based clinical assessments by identifying metabolic signatures (biomarkers) that embody global biochemical changes in disease, predict responses to treatment or medication side effects (pharmachometabolomics). State of the art metabolomic analytical platforms and informatics tools are being used to map potential biomarkers for a multitude of disorders including those of the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, CNS disorders are linked to disturbances in metabolic pathways related to neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate); fatty acids such as arachidonic acid-cascade; oxidative stress and mitochondrial function. Metabolomics tools are enabling us to map in greater detail perturbations in many biochemical pathways and links among these pathways this information is key for development of biomarkers that are disease-specific. In this review, we elaborate on some of the concepts and technologies used in metabolomics and its promise for biomarker discovery. We also

  8. Identification of a discriminative metabolomic fingerprint of potential clinical relevance in saliva of patients with periodontitis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

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    Rzeznik, Matthias; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Levy, Pierre; Jungo, Sébastien; Botosoa, Eliot; Duchemann, Boris; Le Moyec, Laurence; Bernaudin, Jean-François; Savarin, Philippe; Guez, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by the loss of the supporting tissues of the teeth in an inflammatory-infectious context. The diagnosis relies on clinical and X-ray examination. Unfortunately, clinical signs of tissue destruction occur late in the disease progression. Therefore, it is mandatory to identify reliable biomarkers to facilitate a better and earlier management of this disease. To this end, saliva represents a promising fluid for identification of biomarkers as metabolomic fingerprints. The present study used high-resolution 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis to identify the metabolic signature of active periodontitis. The metabolome of stimulated saliva of 26 patients with generalized periodontitis (18 chronic and 8 aggressive) was compared to that of 25 healthy controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA), performed with clinical variables, indicated that the patient population was homogeneous, demonstrating a strong correlation between the clinical and the radiological variables used to assess the loss of periodontal tissues and criteria of active disease. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS) analysis showed that patients with periodontitis can be discriminated from controls on the basis of metabolite concentrations in saliva with satisfactory explained variance (R2X = 0.81 and R2Y = 0.61) and predictability (Q2Y = 0.49, CV-AUROC = 0.94). Interestingly, this discrimination was irrespective of the type of generalized periodontitis, i.e. chronic or aggressive. Among the main discriminating metabolites were short chain fatty acids as butyrate, observed in higher concentrations, and lactate, γ-amino-butyrate, methanol, and threonine observed in lower concentrations in periodontitis. The association of lactate, GABA, and butyrate to generate an aggregated variable reached the best positive predictive value for diagnosis of periodontitis. In conclusion, this pilot study showed that 1H

  9. Identification of a discriminative metabolomic fingerprint of potential clinical relevance in saliva of patients with periodontitis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy.

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    Matthias Rzeznik

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is characterized by the loss of the supporting tissues of the teeth in an inflammatory-infectious context. The diagnosis relies on clinical and X-ray examination. Unfortunately, clinical signs of tissue destruction occur late in the disease progression. Therefore, it is mandatory to identify reliable biomarkers to facilitate a better and earlier management of this disease. To this end, saliva represents a promising fluid for identification of biomarkers as metabolomic fingerprints. The present study used high-resolution 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis to identify the metabolic signature of active periodontitis. The metabolome of stimulated saliva of 26 patients with generalized periodontitis (18 chronic and 8 aggressive was compared to that of 25 healthy controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA, performed with clinical variables, indicated that the patient population was homogeneous, demonstrating a strong correlation between the clinical and the radiological variables used to assess the loss of periodontal tissues and criteria of active disease. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS analysis showed that patients with periodontitis can be discriminated from controls on the basis of metabolite concentrations in saliva with satisfactory explained variance (R2X = 0.81 and R2Y = 0.61 and predictability (Q2Y = 0.49, CV-AUROC = 0.94. Interestingly, this discrimination was irrespective of the type of generalized periodontitis, i.e. chronic or aggressive. Among the main discriminating metabolites were short chain fatty acids as butyrate, observed in higher concentrations, and lactate, γ-amino-butyrate, methanol, and threonine observed in lower concentrations in periodontitis. The association of lactate, GABA, and butyrate to generate an aggregated variable reached the best positive predictive value for diagnosis of periodontitis. In conclusion, this pilot study

  10. Identifying biomarkers for asthma diagnosis using targeted metabolomics approaches

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    Checkley, William; Deza, Maria P.; Klawitter, Jost; Romero, Karina M.; Klawitter, Jelena; Pollard, Suzanne L.; Wise, Robert A.; Christians, Uwe; Hansel, Nadia N.

    2017-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of asthma in children is challenging and relies on a combination of clinical factors and biomarkers including methacholine challenge, lung function, bronchodilator responsiveness, and presence of airway inflammation. No single test is diagnostic. We sought to identify a pattern of inflammatory biomarkers that was unique to asthma using a targeted metabolomics approach combined with data science methods. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of 100 children living in a peri-urban community in Lima, Peru. We defined cases as children with current asthma, and controls as children with no prior history of asthma and normal lung function. We further categorized enrollment following a factorial design to enroll equal numbers of children as either overweight or not. We obtained a fasting venous blood sample to characterize a comprehensive panel of targeted markers using a metabolomics approach based on high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results A statistical comparison of targeted metabolites between children with asthma (n = 50) and healthy controls (n = 49) revealed distinct patterns in relative concentrations of several metabolites: children with asthma had approximately 40–50% lower relative concentrations of ascorbic acid, 2-isopropylmalic acid, shikimate-3-phosphate, and 6-phospho-d-gluconate when compared to children without asthma, and 70% lower relative concentrations of reduced glutathione (all p acid and betaine strongly discriminated between children with asthma (2-isopropylmalic acid ≤ 13 077 normalized counts/second) and controls (2-isopropylmalic acid > 13 077 normalized counts/second and betaine ≤ 16 47 121 normalized counts/second). Conclusions By using a metabolomics approach applied to serum, we were able to discriminate between children with and without asthma by revealing different metabolic patterns. These results suggest that serum metabolomics may represent a diagnostic tool for

  11. Metabolomic analysis identifies altered metabolic pathways in Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Poddighe, Simone; Murgia, Federica; Lorefice, Lorena; Liggi, Sonia; Cocco, Eleonora; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Atzori, Luigi

    2017-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system and is characterized by a complex pathogenesis and difficult management. The identification of new biomarkers would be clinically useful for more accurate diagnoses and disease monitoring. Metabolomics, the identification of small endogenous molecules, offers an instantaneous molecular snapshot of the MS phenotype. Here the metabolomic profiles (utilizing plasma from patients with MS) were characterized with a Gas cromatography-mass spectrometry-based platform followed by a multivariate statistical analysis and comparison with a healthy control (HC) population. The obtained partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model identified and validated significant metabolic differences between individuals with MS and HC (R2X=0.223, R2Y=0.82, Q2=0.562; p<0.001). Among discriminant metabolites phosphate, fructose, myo-inositol, pyroglutamate, threonate, l-leucine, l-asparagine, l-ornithine, l-glutamine, and l-glutamate were correctly identified, and some resulted as unknown. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with AUC 0.84 (p=0.01; CI: 0.75-1) generated with the concentrations of the discriminant metabolites, supported the strength of the model. Pathway analysis indicated asparagine and citrulline biosynthesis as the main canonical pathways involved in MS. Changes in the citrulline biosynthesis pathway suggests the involvement of oxidative stress during neuronal damage. The results confirmed metabolomics as a useful approach to better understand the pathogenesis of MS and to provide new biomarkers for the disease to be used together with clinical data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

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    Belstrøm, Daniel; Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R; Lyon, David

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with...

  13. Global metabolomic analysis of human saliva and plasma from healthy and diabetic subjects, with and without periodontal disease.

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    Virginia M Barnes

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are bi-directionally associated. Identification of a molecular signature for periodontitis using unbiased metabolic profiling could allow identification of biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of both diabetes and periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study identified plasma and salivary metabolic products associated with periodontitis and/or diabetes in order to discover biomarkers that may differentiate or demonstrate an interaction of these diseases. Saliva and plasma samples were analyzed from 161 diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects with a healthy periodontium, gingivitis and periodontitis. Metabolite profiling was performed using Metabolon's platform technology. A total of 772 metabolites were found in plasma and 475 in saliva. Diabetics had significantly higher levels of glucose and α-hydroxybutyrate, the established markers of diabetes, for all periodontal groups of subjects. Comparison of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis saliva samples within the non-diabetic group confirmed findings from previous studies that included increased levels of markers of cellular energetic stress, increased purine degradation and glutathione metabolism through increased levels of oxidized glutathione and cysteine-glutathione disulfide, markers of oxidative stress, including increased purine degradation metabolites (e.g. guanosine and inosine, increased amino acid levels suggesting protein degradation, and increased ω-3 (docosapentaenoate and ω-6 fatty acid (linoleate and arachidonate signatures. Differences in saliva between diabetic and non-diabetic cohorts showed altered signatures of carbohydrate, lipid and oxidative stress exist in the diabetic samples. Global untargeted metabolic profiling of human saliva in diabetics replicated the metabolite signature of periodontal disease progression in non-diabetic patients and revealed unique metabolic

  14. Global metabolomic analysis of human saliva and plasma from healthy and diabetic subjects, with and without periodontal disease.

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    Barnes, Virginia M; Kennedy, Adam D; Panagakos, Fotinos; Devizio, William; Trivedi, Harsh M; Jönsson, Thomas; Guo, Lining; Cervi, Shannon; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are bi-directionally associated. Identification of a molecular signature for periodontitis using unbiased metabolic profiling could allow identification of biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of both diabetes and periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study identified plasma and salivary metabolic products associated with periodontitis and/or diabetes in order to discover biomarkers that may differentiate or demonstrate an interaction of these diseases. Saliva and plasma samples were analyzed from 161 diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects with a healthy periodontium, gingivitis and periodontitis. Metabolite profiling was performed using Metabolon's platform technology. A total of 772 metabolites were found in plasma and 475 in saliva. Diabetics had significantly higher levels of glucose and α-hydroxybutyrate, the established markers of diabetes, for all periodontal groups of subjects. Comparison of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis saliva samples within the non-diabetic group confirmed findings from previous studies that included increased levels of markers of cellular energetic stress, increased purine degradation and glutathione metabolism through increased levels of oxidized glutathione and cysteine-glutathione disulfide, markers of oxidative stress, including increased purine degradation metabolites (e.g. guanosine and inosine), increased amino acid levels suggesting protein degradation, and increased ω-3 (docosapentaenoate) and ω-6 fatty acid (linoleate and arachidonate) signatures. Differences in saliva between diabetic and non-diabetic cohorts showed altered signatures of carbohydrate, lipid and oxidative stress exist in the diabetic samples. Global untargeted metabolic profiling of human saliva in diabetics replicated the metabolite signature of periodontal disease progression in non-diabetic patients and revealed unique metabolic signatures associated

  15. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann

    Metabolomics is the analysis of the whole metabolome and the focus in metabolomics studies is to measure as many metabolites as possible. The use of chemometrics in metabolomics studies is widespread, but there is a clear lack of validation in the developed models. The focus in this thesis has been...... how to properly handle complex metabolomics data, in order to achieve reliable and valid multivariate models. This has been illustrated by three case studies with examples of forecasting breast cancer and early detection of colorectal cancer based on data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR...... is a presentation of a core consistency diagnostic aiding in determining the number of components in a PARAFAC2 model. It is of great importance to validate especially PLS-DA models and if not done properly, the developed models might reveal spurious groupings. Furthermore, data from metabolomics studies contain...

  16. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Aguilar Pierle, Sebastian; Turse, Joshua E.; Scoles, Glen A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Ueti, Massaro W.; Brown, Wendy C.; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2014-08-07

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5 day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.

  17. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann

    Metabolomics is the analysis of the whole metabolome and the focus in metabolomics studies is to measure as many metabolites as possible. The use of chemometrics in metabolomics studies is widespread, but there is a clear lack of validation in the developed models. The focus in this thesis has been...... how to properly handle complex metabolomics data, in order to achieve reliable and valid multivariate models. This has been illustrated by three case studies with examples of forecasting breast cancer and early detection of colorectal cancer based on data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR......) spectroscopy (Paper II), fluorescence spectroscopy (Paper III) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The principles of the three data acquisition techniques have been briefly described and the methods have been compared. The techniques complement each other, which makes room for data...

  18. Untargeted metabolomic profiling in saliva of smokers and nonsmokers by a validated GC-TOF-MS method.

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    Mueller, Daniel C; Piller, Markus; Niessner, Reinhard; Scherer, Max; Scherer, Gerhard

    2014-03-07

    A GC-TOF-MS method was developed and validated for a metabolic fingerprinting in saliva of smokers and nonsmokers. We validated the method by spiking 37 different metabolites and 6 internal standards to saliva between 0.1 μM and 2 mM. Intraday coefficients of variation (CVs) (accuracies) were on average, 11.9% (85.8%), 8.2% (88.9%), and 10.0% (106.7%) for the spiked levels 25, 50, and 200 μM, respectively (N = 5). Interday CVs (accuracies) were 12.4% (97%), 18.8% (95.5%), and 17.2% (105.9%) for the respective levels of 25, 50, and 200 μM (N = 5). The method was applied to saliva of smokers and nonsmokers, obtained from a 24 h diet-controlled clinical study, in order to identify biomarkers of endogenous origin, which could be linked to smoking related diseases. Automated peak picking, integration, and statistical analysis were conducted by the software tools MZmine, Metaboanalyst, and PSPP. We could identify 13 significantly altered metabolites in smokers (p glucose-6-phosphate, could be linked to smoking-related perturbations and may be associated with established detrimental effects of smoking.

  19. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; VUNCK, SARAH A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; SOUZA,RENAN P. DE; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphe...

  20. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann

    is a presentation of a core consistency diagnostic aiding in determining the number of components in a PARAFAC2 model. It is of great importance to validate especially PLS-DA models and if not done properly, the developed models might reveal spurious groupings. Furthermore, data from metabolomics studies contain...

  1. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann

    and the results indicate that GC-MS-based metabolomics in combination with PARAFAC2 modelling is applicable for extracting relevant biological information from the plasma samples. Overall, the work in this thesis shows that suitable and properly validated chemometrics models used in metabolomics are very useful......) spectroscopy (Paper II), fluorescence spectroscopy (Paper III) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The principles of the three data acquisition techniques have been briefly described and the methods have been compared. The techniques complement each other, which makes room for data...... fusion where data from different platforms can be combined. Complex data are obtained when samples are analysed using NMR, fluorescence and GC-MS. Chemometrics methods which can be used to extract the relevant information from the obtained data are presented. Focus has been on principal component...

  2. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann

    and the results indicate that GC-MS-based metabolomics in combination with PARAFAC2 modelling is applicable for extracting relevant biological information from the plasma samples. Overall, the work in this thesis shows that suitable and properly validated chemometrics models used in metabolomics are very useful...... fusion where data from different platforms can be combined. Complex data are obtained when samples are analysed using NMR, fluorescence and GC-MS. Chemometrics methods which can be used to extract the relevant information from the obtained data are presented. Focus has been on principal component...... many redundant variables. These have been suggested to be eliminated using an approach termed reduction of redundant variables (RRV), which is time consuming but efficient, since the curse of dimensionality is reduced and the risk of over-fit is decreased. The use of appropriate multivariate models...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics to identify novel biomarkers of alcohol-dependence

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    Hamza Mostafa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol misuse is a ravaging public health and social problem. Its harm can affect the drinkers and the whole society. Alcohol-dependence is a phase of alcohol misuse in which the drinker consumes excessive amounts of alcohol and has a continuous urge to consume alcohol. Current methods of alcohol dependence diagnoses are questionnaires and some biomarkers. However, both methods lack specificity and sensitivity. Metabolomics is a scientific field which deals with the identification and the quantification of the metabolites present in the metabolome using spectroscopic techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Metabolomics helps to indicate the perturbation in the levels of metabolites in cells and tissues due to diseases or ingestion of any substances. NMR is one of the most widely used spectroscopic techniques in metabolomics because of its reproducibility and speed. Some recent metabolomics studies were conducted on alcohol consumption and alcohol misuse in animals and humans. However, few focused on identifying alcohol dependence novel biomarkers. A sensitive and specific technique such as NMR based metabolomics applied to find novel biomarkers in plasma and urine can be useful to diagnose alcohol-dependence.

  4. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, D E; McClay, J L; Vunck, S A; Batman, A M; Vann, R E; Clark, S L; Souza, R P; Crowley, J J; Sullivan, P F; van den Oord, E J C G; Beardsley, P M

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In this study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine (MA)-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate, FDR biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  5. Diagnostic approach to breast cancer patients based on target metabolomics in saliva by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Takahiro; Tsutsui, Haruhito; Shimizu, Ippei; Toyama, Tatsuya; Yoshimoto, Nobuyasu; Endo, Yumi; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Mizuno, Hajime; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most fearful diseases due to its increasing worldwide prevalence. A number of screening tests has been employed including clinical examinations and mammography. However, another screening method, which is a simple, not embarrassing, and low cost, is highly desired. Based on these findings, we are currently investigating the determination of polyamines including their acetylated structures for the diagnosis of breast cancer patients. We established a diagnostic approach to breast cancer patients based on the ratios of polyamines in saliva by a UPLC-MS/MS analysis. Twelve polyamines including their acetylated form were labeled with DBD-F, separated by a reversed-phase chromatography and detected by a Xevo TQ-S tandem mass spectrometer. Eight polyamines (e.g., SPM, CAD, Ac-SPM, N1-Ac-SPD, N8-Ac-SPD) strongly correlated with the cancer patients. A simple 1-order equation was developed for the discrimination of the breast cancer patients and healthy persons (Y=0.5XSPM-3XAc-SPM-0.15XSPD-3.5XN8-Ac-SPD+0.5XN1-Ac-SPD+0.04XCAD). The concordance rate of the breast cancer patients and the healthy persons by the equation was 88% and 76% on the training set, respectively, whereas those on the validation set was both 88%. The score Y in the equation tended to correlate with the cancer stage of the patients and increased with the more serious conditions. The determination of polyamines in the saliva after the cancer patient operations was also performed to identify the concentration change before and after the surgical treatment. The discriminant analysis using 6 polyamines (i.e., N8-Ac-SPD, N1-Ac-SPD, CAD, DAc-SPD, PUT, and Ac-PUT), which were the most influenced molecules derived from the ROC analysis, was performed using the relative percentage. Both the sensitivity and specificity indicated nearly 80% from the ROC analysis result using the ratio of N8-Ac-SPD/(N1-Ac-SPD+N8-Ac-SPD). The discrimination equation appears to be useful for the diagnosis of

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva Identifies Potential Biomarkers for Orthodontic Tooth Movement

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    Mohd Faiz Ellias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment has been shown to induce inflammation, followed by bone remodelling in the periodontium. These processes trigger the secretion of various proteins and enzymes into the saliva. This study aims to identify salivary proteins that change in expression during orthodontic tooth movement. These differentially expressed proteins can potentially serve as protein biomarkers for the monitoring of orthodontic treatment and tooth movement. Whole saliva from three healthy female subjects were collected before force application using fixed appliance and at 14 days after 0.014′′ Niti wire was applied. Salivary proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE over a pH range of 3–10, and the resulting proteome profiles were compared. Differentially expressed protein spots were then identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed; however, only eight were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Four of these proteins—Protein S100-A9, immunoglobulin J chain, Ig alpha-1 chain C region, and CRISP-3—have known roles in inflammation and bone resorption.

  7. Serum Metabolomics Profiling to Identify Biomarkers for Unstable Angina

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    Wei Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although statistical evidence is clear regarding the dangerousness of unstable angina (UA, a form of coronary heart disease (CHD characterised by high mortality and morbidity globally, it is important to recognise that diagnostic precision for the condition is unfavourable. In the present research, to gain insight into candidate biomarkers, the author draws on 1H NMR-based serum metabolic profiling to analyze the unstable angina pectoris (UAP metabolic signatures; this constitutes an effective way to produce medical diagnosis. 101 unstable angina pectoris patients and 132 healthy controls were enrolled and 22 serum samples from each group were analyzed. Effective separation was noted regarding the UAP and control groups, and, for the former group considered in relation to their counterpart, the serum concentrations of Lac, m-I, lipid, VLDL, 3-HB, and LDL were higher whereas the concentrations of Thr, Cr, Cho, PC/GPC, Glu, Gln, Lys, HDL, Ile, Leu, and Val were lower. The conclusion drawn in view of the results is that the plasma metabolomics examined by 1H NMR displayed promise for biomarker identification for UA. In addition to this, the analysis illuminated the metabolic processes of UA.

  8. Serum Metabolomics Profiling to Identify Biomarkers for Unstable Angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; Gao, Yuxia; Wan, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Although statistical evidence is clear regarding the dangerousness of unstable angina (UA), a form of coronary heart disease (CHD) characterised by high mortality and morbidity globally, it is important to recognise that diagnostic precision for the condition is unfavourable. In the present research, to gain insight into candidate biomarkers, the author draws on (1)H NMR-based serum metabolic profiling to analyze the unstable angina pectoris (UAP) metabolic signatures; this constitutes an effective way to produce medical diagnosis. 101 unstable angina pectoris patients and 132 healthy controls were enrolled and 22 serum samples from each group were analyzed. Effective separation was noted regarding the UAP and control groups, and, for the former group considered in relation to their counterpart, the serum concentrations of Lac, m-I, lipid, VLDL, 3-HB, and LDL were higher whereas the concentrations of Thr, Cr, Cho, PC/GPC, Glu, Gln, Lys, HDL, Ile, Leu, and Val were lower. The conclusion drawn in view of the results is that the plasma metabolomics examined by (1)H NMR displayed promise for biomarker identification for UA. In addition to this, the analysis illuminated the metabolic processes of UA.

  9. Potential of human saliva for nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and for health-related biomarker identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Eggers, Nina; Eller, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    in intensities of several metabolites including trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), choline, propionate, alanine, methanol, and N-acetyl groups. No effects of gender and body mass index (BMI) on the salivary metabolite profile were detected. The relationships between the salivary metabolome and glycated hemoglobin...

  10. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  11. Identifying hypoxia in a newborn piglet model using urinary NMR metabolomic profiling.

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    Christopher Skappak

    Full Text Available Establishing the severity of hypoxic insult during the delivery of a neonate is key step in the determining the type of therapy administered. While successful therapy is present, current methods for assessing hypoxic injuries in the neonate are limited. Urine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR metabolomics allows for the rapid non-invasive assessment of a multitude breakdown products of physiological processes. In a newborn piglet model of hypoxia, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the levels of metabolites in urine samples, which were correlated with physiological measurements. Using PLS-DA analysis, we identified 13 urinary metabolites that differentiated hypoxic versus nonhypoxic animals (1-methylnicotinamide, 2-oxoglutarate, alanine, asparagine, betaine, citrate, creatine, fumarate, hippurate, lactate, N-acetylglycine, N-carbamoyl-β-alanine, and valine. Using this metabolomic profile, we then were able to blindly identify hypoxic animals correctly 84% of the time compared to nonhypoxic controls. This was better than using physiologic measures alone. Metabolomic profiling of urine has potential for identifying neonates that have undergone episodes of hypoxia.

  12. Using NMR metabolomics to identify responses of an environmental estrogen in blood plasma of fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, Linda M. [Department of Physiology/Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Box 434, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Foerlin, Lars [Department of Zoology/Zoophysiology, Goeteborg University, Box 463, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Karlsson, Goeran [Swedish NMR Centre at Goeteborg University, Box 465, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden); Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha [Institute of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Larsson, D.G. Joakim [Department of Physiology/Endocrinology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Box 434, SE-405 30 Goeteborg (Sweden)]. E-mail: joakim.larsson@fysiologi.gu.se

    2006-07-20

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics in combination with multivariate data analysis may become valuable tools to study environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other chemicals in aquatic organisms. To explore the usefulness of this approach in fish, we have used {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics to compare blood plasma and plasma lipid extracts from rainbow trout exposed to the synthetic contraceptive estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE{sub 2}) with plasma from control fish. The plasma metabolite profile was affected in fish exposed to 10 ng/L but not 0.87 ng/L of EE{sub 2}, which was in agreement with an induced vitellogenin synthesis in the high dose group only, as measured by ELISA. The main affected metabolites were vitellogenin, alanine, phospholipids and cholesterol. The responses identified by this discovery-driven method could be put in context with previous knowledge of the effects of estrogens on fish. This adds confidence to the approach of using NMR metabolomics to identify environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants.

  13. Identifying biomarkers of dietary patterns by using metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playdon, Mary C; Moore, Steven C; Derkach, Andriy; Reedy, Jill; Subar, Amy F; Sampson, Joshua N; Albanes, Demetrius; Gu, Fangyi; Kontto, Jukka; Lassale, Camille; Liao, Linda M; Männistö, Satu; Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Irwin, Melinda L; Mayne, Susan T; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2017-02-01

    Healthy dietary patterns that conform to national dietary guidelines are related to lower chronic disease incidence and longer life span. However, the precise mechanisms involved are unclear. Identifying biomarkers of dietary patterns may provide tools to validate diet quality measurement and determine underlying metabolic pathways influenced by diet quality. The objective of this study was to examine the correlation of 4 diet quality indexes [the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) 2010, the Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED), the WHO Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), and the Baltic Sea Diet (BSD)] with serum metabolites. We evaluated dietary patterns and metabolites in male Finnish smokers (n = 1336) from 5 nested case-control studies within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort. Participants completed a validated food-frequency questionnaire and provided a fasting serum sample before study randomization (1985-1988). Metabolites were measured with the use of mass spectrometry. We analyzed cross-sectional partial correlations of 1316 metabolites with 4 diet quality indexes, adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking, energy intake, education, and physical activity. We pooled estimates across studies with the use of fixed-effects meta-analysis with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, and conducted metabolic pathway analyses. The HEI-2010, aMED, HDI, and BSD were associated with 23, 46, 23, and 33 metabolites, respectively (17, 21, 11, and 10 metabolites, respectively, were chemically identified; r-range: -0.30 to 0.20; P = 6 × 10-15 to 8 × 10-6). Food-based diet indexes (HEI-2010, aMED, and BSD) were associated with metabolites correlated with most components used to score adherence (e.g., fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and unsaturated fat). HDI correlated with metabolites related to polyunsaturated fat and fiber components, but not other macro- or micronutrients (e.g., percentages of protein and cholesterol). The

  14. Helicobacter Pylori - Specific Antigen Tests in Saliva to Identify an Oral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yajie; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shumin; Yee, John Kc

    2017-05-01

    Over the past twenty years, the existence of oral Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been controversial and is still disputed. It proposes that living H. pylori do not exist in the oral cavity. However, the progressive loss of efficacy of standard eradication therapies has made the treatment of H. pylori more challenging than ever due to oral H. pylori infection. We conducted a study to explore the existence of oral H. pylori infection among 4321 adults. A total 4321 adults (age range, 20-89 years old) comprising 2849 men and 1472 women were recruited by annual physical exam and evaluated using the saliva H. pylori antigen test (HPS) to diagnose oral H. pylori infection and the urea breath test (UBT) to diagnose stomach H. pylori infection. According to the classification on age grouping of World Health Organization, patients were divided into three age groups: A group, the young age subgroup (H. pylori was 59.59% in the 95% confidence interval (CI) ranges on A group. The lowest positive rate of H. pylori in D group was 25.48% in the 95% confidence interval CI ranges. There was a statistically significant difference (pH. pylori infection of individuals who have no risk for H. pylori gastric infection. The positive rate of oral H. pylori was 59.59% and this varies across different age groups. This information was not provided by UBT methods. It further identified that the prevalence of oral H. pylori infection is lower in the elder group that may be associated with fewer number of teeth. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  15. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colarado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both ...

  16. Targeted Metabolomics Identifies Pharmacodynamic Biomarkers for BIO 300 Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jace W; Jackson, Isabel L; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Kaytor, Michael D; Kane, Maureen A

    2017-10-02

    Biomarkers serve a number of purposes during drug development including defining the natural history of injury/disease, serving as a secondary endpoint or trigger for intervention, and/or aiding in the selection of an effective dose in humans. BIO 300 is a patent-protected pharmaceutical formulation of nanoparticles of synthetic genistein being developed by Humanetics Corporation. The primary goal of this metabolomic discovery experiment was to identify biomarkers that correlate with radiation-induced lung injury and BIO 300 efficacy for mitigating tissue damage based upon the primary endpoint of survival. High-throughput targeted metabolomics of lung tissue from male C57L/J mice exposed to 12.5 Gy whole thorax lung irradiation, treated daily with 400 mg/kg BIO 300 for either 2 weeks or 6 weeks starting 24 h post radiation exposure, were assayed at 180 d post-radiation to identify potential biomarkers. A panel of lung metabolites that are responsive to radiation and able to distinguish an efficacious treatment schedule of BIO 300 from a non-efficacious treatment schedule in terms of 180 d survival were identified. These metabolites represent potential biomarkers that could be further validated for use in drug development of BIO 300 and in the translation of dose from animal to human.

  17. The metabolomic approach identifies a biological signature of low-dose chronic exposure to cesium 137.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Stéphane; Martin, Jean-Charles; Grandcolas, Line; Banzet, Nathalie; Blanchardon, Eric; Tourlonias, Elie; Defoort, Catherine; Favé, Gaëlle; Bott, Romain; Dublineau, Isabelle; Gourmelon, Patrick; Souidi, Maâmar

    2012-01-01

    Reports have described apparent biological effects of (137)Cs (the most persistent dispersed radionuclide) irradiation in people living in Chernobyl-contaminated territory. The sensitive analytical technology described here should now help assess the relation of this contamination to the observed effects. A rat model chronically exposed to (137)Cs through drinking water was developed to identify biomarkers of radiation-induced metabolic disorders, and the biological impact was evaluated by a metabolomic approach that allowed us to detect several hundred metabolites in biofluids and assess their association with disease states. After collection of plasma and urine from contaminated and non-contaminated rats at the end of the 9-months contamination period, analysis with a LC-MS system detected 742 features in urine and 1309 in plasma. Biostatistical discriminant analysis extracted a subset of 26 metabolite signals (2 urinary, 4 plasma non-polar, and 19 plasma polar metabolites) that in combination were able to predict from 68 up to 94% of the contaminated rats, depending on the prediction method used, with a misclassification rate as low as 5.3%. The difference in this metabolic score between the contaminated and non-contaminated rats was highly significant (P = 0.019 after ANOVA cross-validation). In conclusion, our proof-of-principle study demonstrated for the first time the usefulness of a metabolomic approach for addressing biological effects of chronic low-dose contamination. We can conclude that a metabolomic signature discriminated (137)Cs-contaminated from control animals in our model. Further validation is nevertheless required together with full annotation of the metabolic indicators.

  18. Serum Metabolomic Profiling Identifies Characterization of Non-Obstructive Azoospermic Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Male infertility is considered a common health problem, and non-obstructive azoospermia with unclear pathogenesis is one of the most challenging tasks for clinicians. The objective of this study was to investigate the differential serum metabolic pattern in non-obstructive azoospermic men and to determine potential biomarkers related to spermatogenic dysfunction. Serum samples from patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (n = 22 and healthy controls (n = 31 were examined using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS. Serum metabolomic profiling could differentiate non-obstructive azoospermic patients from healthy control subjects. A total of 24 metabolites were screened and identified as potential markers, many of which are involved in energy production, oxidative stress and cell apoptosis in spermatogenesis. Moreover, the results showed that various metabolic pathways, including d-glutamine and d-glutamate metabolism, taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, the citrate cycle and alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, were disrupted in patients with non-obstructive azoospermia. Our results indicated that the serum metabolic disorders may contribute to the etiology of non-obstructive azoospermia. This study suggested that serum metabolomics could identify unique metabolic patterns of non-obstructive azoospermia and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis underlying male infertility.

  19. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity.

  20. Comprehensive metabolomics identified lipid peroxidation as a prominent feature in human plasma of patients with coronary heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a complex human disease associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers for the different types of CHD remain poorly defined. Metabolomics has been increasingly recognized as an enabling technique with the potential to identify key metabolomic features in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology and differentiate different stages of CHD. We performed comprehensive metabolomic analysis in human plasma from 28 human subjects with stable angina (SA, myocardial infarction (MI, and healthy control (HC. Subsequent analysis demonstrated a uniquely altered metabolic profile in these CHD: a total of 18, 37 and 36 differential metabolites were identified to distinguish SA from HC, MI from SA, and MI from HC groups respectively. Among these metabolites, glycerophospholipid (GPL metabolism emerged as the most significantly disturbed pathway. Next, we used a targeted metabolomic approach to systematically analyze GPL, oxidized phospholipid (oxPL, and downstream metabolites derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, such as arachidonic acid and linoleic acid. Surprisingly, lipids associated with lipid peroxidation (LPO pathways including oxidized PL and isoprostanes, isomers of prostaglandins, were significantly elevated in plasma of MI patients comparing to HC and SA, consistent with the notion that oxidative stress-induced LPO is a prominent feature in CHD. Our studies using the state-of-the-art metabolomics help to understand the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CHD; LPO metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers to differentiation MI from SA and HC.

  1. Disruption of TCA Cycle and Glutamate Metabolism Identified by Metabolomics in an In Vitro Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrat-Durebex, Charlotte; Corcia, Philippe; Piver, Eric; Devos, David; Dangoumau, Audrey; Gouel, Flore; Vourc'h, Patrick; Emond, Patrick; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Gordon, Paul H; Andres, Christian R; Blasco, Hélène

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to develop a cellular metabolomics model that reproduces the pathophysiological conditions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in order to improve knowledge of disease physiology. We used a co-culture model combining the motor neuron-like cell line NSC-34 and the astrocyte clone C8-D1A, with each over-expressing wild-type or G93C mutant human SOD1, to examine amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) physiology. We focused on the effects of mutant human SOD1 as well as oxidative stress induced by menadione on intracellular metabolism using a metabolomics approach through gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Preliminary non-supervised analysis by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) revealed that cell type, genetic environment, and time of culture influenced the metabolomics profiles. Supervised analysis using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) on data from intracellular metabolomics profiles of SOD1G93C co-cultures produced metabolites involved in glutamate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle. This study revealed the feasibility of using a metabolomics approach in a cellular model of ALS. We identified potential disruption of the TCA cycle and glutamate metabolism under oxidative stress, which is consistent with prior research in the disease. Analysis of metabolic alterations in an in vitro model is a novel approach to investigation of disease physiology.

  2. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anjali K.; Roberts, Lee D.; Liu, Yan; Mahon, Sari B.; Kim, Sonia; Ryu, Justine H.; Werdich, Andreas; Januzzi, James L.; Boss, Gerry R.; Rockwood, Gary A.; MacRae, Calum A.; Brenner, Matthew; Gerszten, Robert E.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to cyanide causes a spectrum of cardiac, neurological, and metabolic dysfunctions that can be fatal. Improved cyanide antidotes are needed, but the ideal biological pathways to target are not known. To understand better the metabolic effects of cyanide and to discover novel cyanide antidotes, we developed a zebrafish model of cyanide exposure and scaled it for high-throughput chemical screening. In a screen of 3120 small molecules, we discovered 4 novel antidotes that block cyanide toxicity. The most potent antidote was riboflavin. Metabolomic profiling of cyanide-treated zebrafish revealed changes in bile acid and purine metabolism, most notably by an increase in inosine levels. Riboflavin normalizes many of the cyanide-induced neurological and metabolic perturbations in zebrafish. The metabolic effects of cyanide observed in zebrafish were conserved in a rabbit model of cyanide toxicity. Further, humans treated with nitroprusside, a drug that releases nitric oxide and cyanide ions, display increased circulating bile acids and inosine. In summary, riboflavin may be a novel treatment for cyanide toxicity and prophylactic measure during nitroprusside treatment, inosine may serve as a biomarker of cyanide exposure, and metabolites in the bile acid and purine metabolism pathways may shed light on the pathways critical to reversing cyanide toxicity.—Nath, A. K., Roberts, L. D., Liu, Y., Mahon, S. B., Kim, S., Ryu, J. H., Werdich, A., Januzzi, J. L., Boss, G. R., Rockwood, G. A., MacRae, C. A., Brenner, M., Gerszten, R. E., Peterson, R. T. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure. PMID:23345455

  3. Consolidating metabolite identifiers to enable contextual and multi-platform metabolomics data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Analysis of data from high-throughput experiments depends on the availability of well-structured data that describe the assayed biomolecules. Procedures for obtaining and organizing such meta-data on genes, transcripts and proteins have been streamlined in many data analysis packages, but are still lacking for metabolites. Chemical identifiers are notoriously incoherent, encompassing a wide range of different referencing schemes with varying scope and coverage. Online chemical databases use multiple types of identifiers in parallel but lack a common primary key for reliable database consolidation. Connecting identifiers of analytes found in experimental data with the identifiers of their parent metabolites in public databases can therefore be very laborious. Results Here we present a strategy and a software tool for integrating metabolite identifiers from local reference libraries and public databases that do not depend on a single common primary identifier. The program constructs groups of interconnected identifiers of analytes and metabolites to obtain a local metabolite-centric SQLite database. The created database can be used to map in-house identifiers and synonyms to external resources such as the KEGG database. New identifiers can be imported and directly integrated with existing data. Queries can be performed in a flexible way, both from the command line and from the statistical programming environment R, to obtain data set tailored identifier mappings. Conclusions Efficient cross-referencing of metabolite identifiers is a key technology for metabolomics data analysis. We provide a practical and flexible solution to this task and an open-source program, the metabolite masking tool (MetMask), available at http://metmask.sourceforge.net, that implements our ideas. PMID:20426876

  4. Consolidating metabolite identifiers to enable contextual and multi-platform metabolomics data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Kazuki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of data from high-throughput experiments depends on the availability of well-structured data that describe the assayed biomolecules. Procedures for obtaining and organizing such meta-data on genes, transcripts and proteins have been streamlined in many data analysis packages, but are still lacking for metabolites. Chemical identifiers are notoriously incoherent, encompassing a wide range of different referencing schemes with varying scope and coverage. Online chemical databases use multiple types of identifiers in parallel but lack a common primary key for reliable database consolidation. Connecting identifiers of analytes found in experimental data with the identifiers of their parent metabolites in public databases can therefore be very laborious. Results Here we present a strategy and a software tool for integrating metabolite identifiers from local reference libraries and public databases that do not depend on a single common primary identifier. The program constructs groups of interconnected identifiers of analytes and metabolites to obtain a local metabolite-centric SQLite database. The created database can be used to map in-house identifiers and synonyms to external resources such as the KEGG database. New identifiers can be imported and directly integrated with existing data. Queries can be performed in a flexible way, both from the command line and from the statistical programming environment R, to obtain data set tailored identifier mappings. Conclusions Efficient cross-referencing of metabolite identifiers is a key technology for metabolomics data analysis. We provide a practical and flexible solution to this task and an open-source program, the metabolite masking tool (MetMask, available at http://metmask.sourceforge.net, that implements our ideas.

  5. Metabolomic approach for identifying and visualizing molecular tissue markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis by mass spectrometry imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Goto-Inoue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In developmental and cell biology it is crucial to evaluate the dynamic profiles of metabolites. An emerging frog model system using Xenopus tropicalis, whose genome sequence and inbred strains are available, is now ready for metabolomics investigation in amphibians. In this study we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MSI analysis to identify and visualize metabolomic molecular markers in tadpoles of Xenopus tropicalis. We detected tissue-specific peaks and visualized their distribution in tissues, and distinguished 19 tissues and their specific peaks. We identified, for the first time, some of their molecular localizations via tandem mass spectrometric analysis: hydrocortisone in artery, L-DOPA in rhombencephalon, taurine in eye, corticosterone in gill, heme in heart, inosine monophosphate and carnosine in muscle, dopamine in nerves, and phosphatidylethanolamine (16:0/20:4 in pharynx. This is the first MALDI-MSI study of X. tropicalis tadpoles, as in small tadpoles it is hard to distinguish and dissect the various organs. Furthermore, until now there has been no data about the metabolomic profile of each organ. Our results suggest that MALDI-MSI is potentially a powerful tool for examining the dynamics of metabolomics in metamorphosis as well as conformational changes due to metabolic changes.

  6. A metabolomics approach to identify factors influencing glucosinolate thermal degradation rates in Brassica vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, K; de Vos, R C H; Maliepaard, C; Dekker, M; Verkerk, R; Bonnema, G

    2014-07-15

    Thermal processing of Brassica vegetables can lead to substantial loss of potential health-promoting glucosinolates (GLs). The extent of thermal degradation of a specific GL varies in different vegetables, possibly due to differences in the composition of other metabolites within the plant matrices. An untargeted metabolomics approach followed by random forest regression was applied to identify metabolites associated to thermal GL degradation in a segregating Brassica oleracea population. Out of 413 metabolites, 15 were associated with the degradation of glucobrassicin, six with that of glucoraphanin and two with both GLs. Among these 23 metabolites three were identified as flavonols (one kaempferol- and two quercetin-derivatives) and two as other GLs (4-methoxyglucobrassicin, gluconasturtiin). Twenty quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these metabolites, which were associated with glucoraphanin and glucobrassicin degradation, were identified on linkage groups C01, C07 and C09. Two flavonols mapped on linkage groups C07 and C09 and co-localise with the QTL for GL degradation determined previously. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolomic biomarkers identify differences in milk produced by Holstein cows and other minor dairy animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yangdong; Han, Rongwei; Yang, Jinhui; Zhao, Shengguo; Li, Songli; Guo, Tongjun; Zang, Changjiang; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-03-16

    Several milk metabolites are associated with breeds or species of dairy animals. A better understanding of milk metabolites from different dairy animals would advance their use in evaluating milk traits and detecting milk adulteration. The objective of this study was to characterize the milk metabolite profiles of Chinese Holstein, Jersey, yak, buffalo, goat, camel, and horse and identify any differences using non-targeted metabolomic approaches. Milk samples were tested using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Data were analyzed using a multivariate analysis of variance and differences in milk metabolites between Holstein and the other dairy animals were assessed using orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis. Differential metabolites were identified and some metabolites, such as choline and succinic acid, were used to distinguish Holstein milk from that of the other studied animals. Metabolic pathway analysis of different metabolites revealed that glycerophospholipid metabolism as well as valine, leucine, and isoleucine biosynthesis were shared in the other ruminant animals (Jersey, buffalo, yak, and goat), and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids was shared in the non-ruminant animals (camel and horse). These results can be useful for gaining a better understanding of the differences in milk synthesis between Holstein and the other dairy animals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Isern, Nancy G.; O' Connell, Thomas M.; Wooten, Jan B.; Zedler, Barbara K.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Webb, B. T.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Murrelle, Edward L.; Leppert, Mark F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2010-06-04

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  9. Use of NMR metabolomic plasma profiling methodologies to identify illicit growth-promoting administrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stewart F; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; Lommen, Arjen; Cannizzo, Francesca T; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Elliott, Christopher T; Mooney, Mark H

    2012-04-01

    Detection of growth-promoter use in animal production systems still proves to be an analytical challenge despite years of activity in the field. This study reports on the capability of NMR metabolomic profiling techniques to discriminate between plasma samples obtained from cattle treated with different groups of growth-promoting hormones (dexamethasone, prednisolone, oestradiol) based on recorded metabolite profiles. Two methods of NMR analysis were investigated-a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG)-pulse sequence technique and a conventional (1)H NMR method using pre-extracted plasma. Using the CPMG method, 17 distinct metabolites could be identified from the spectra. (1)H NMR analysis of extracted plasma facilitated identification of 23 metabolites-six more than the alternative method and all within the aromatic region. Multivariate statistical analysis of acquired data from both forms of NMR analysis separated the plasma metabolite profiles into distinct sample cluster sets representative of the different animal study groups. Samples from both sets of corticosteroid-treated animals-dexamethasone and prednisolone-were found to be clustered relatively closely and had similar alterations to identified metabolite panels. Distinctive metabolite profiles, different from those observed within plasma from corticosteroid-treated animal plasma, were observed in oestradiol-treated animals and samples from these animals formed a cluster spatially isolated from control animal plasma samples. These findings suggest the potential use of NMR methodologies of plasma metabolite analysis as a high-throughput screening technique to aid detection of growth promoter use.

  10. Urinary metabolomics analysis identifies key biomarkers of different stages of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shu; Zhan, Zong-Ying; Cao, Hong-Yan; Wu, Chao; Bian, Yan-Qin; Li, Jian-Yuan; Cheng, Gen-Hong; Liu, Ping; Sun, Ming-Yu

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify a panel of biomarkers that can distinguish between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and explore molecular mechanism involved in the process of developing NASH from NAFLD. METHODS Biomarkers may differ during stages of NAFLD. Urine and blood were obtained from non-diabetic subjects with NAFLD and steatosis, with normal liver function (n = 33), from patients with NASH, with abnormal liver function (n = 45), and from healthy age and sex-matched controls (n = 30). Samples were subjected to metabolomic analysis to identify potential non-invasive biomarkers. Differences in urinary metabolic profiles were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminate analysis. RESULTS Compared with NAFLD patients, patients with NASH had abnormal liver function and high serum lipid concentrations. Urinary metabonomics found differences in 31 metabolites between these two groups, including differences in nucleic acids and amino acids. Pathway analysis based on overlapping metabolites showed that pathways of energy and amino acid metabolism, as well as the pentose phosphate pathway, were closely associated with pathological processes in NAFLD and NASH. CONCLUSION These findings suggested that a panel of biomarkers could distinguish between NAFLD and NASH, and could help to determine the molecular mechanism involved in the process of developing NASH from NAFLD. Urinary biomarkers may be diagnostic in these patients and could be used to assess responses to therapeutic interventions. PMID:28487615

  11. Metabolomics classifies phase of care and identifies risk for mortality in a porcine model of multiple injuries and hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexcen, Daniel R; Lusczek, Elizabeth R; Witowski, Nancy E; Mulier, Kristine E; Beilman, Greg J

    2012-08-01

    Early recognition and intervention in hemorrhagic shock is essential to improved outcomes. However, the lack of robust diagnostic tools readily available to identify patients in the field inhibits the ability to provide timely intervention. Therefore, the development of a reliable prognostic indicator, such as a serum biomarker or a metabolic profile, has significant potential to improve far-forward trauma care. In this study, we used metabolomics as a tool to identify a metabolic state associated with the hemorrhagic shock and outcome in our porcine model of multiple injuries, shock, and resuscitation. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate serum metabolites from 23 animals that underwent multiple injuries, controlled hemorrhage, and 20 hours of a standard resuscitation protocol. Serum samples were collected from the animals at baseline (before hemorrhage), at shock (after 45 minutes of shock), and at 8 hours of full resuscitation. We were able to demonstrate shifts in the metabolome throughout different time points and construct a metabolic profile associated with mortality using partial least squares discriminate analysis. The metabolites most responsible for the classification of hemorrhagic shock in our model serve as markers for ischemia, changes in energy production, and cellular damage. Hemorrhagic shock was characterized by marked increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, glycolytic-gluconeogenic by-products, purine-pyrimidine catabolism, and fatty acid oxidation. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for metabolomics as a tool to classify the metabolic flux, to identify relevant biochemical pathways, and to identify clinically useful biomarkers.

  12. Towards the chiral metabolomics: Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry based DL-amino acid analysis after labeling with a new chiral reagent, (S)-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl-1-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate, and the application to saliva of healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Toshiki; Takayama, Takahiro; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo’oka, Toshimasa, E-mail: toyooka@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

    2015-05-22

    Highlights: • A novel chiral labeling reagent was synthesized. • Analysis of DL-amino acids was performed by UPLC–ESI-MS/MS. • Efficient enantioseparation and detection of DL-amino acids were performed. • DL-Amino acid in saliva was successfully determined under mild conditions. - Abstract: A novel triazine-type chiral derivatization reagent, i.e., (S)-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl-1-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate (DMT-(S)-Pro-OSu), was developed for the highly sensitive and selective detection of chiral amines and amino acids by UPLC–MS/MS analysis. The enantiomers of amino acids were easily labeled with the reagents at room temperature within 40 min in an alkaline medium containing triethylamine. The diastereomers derived from proteolytic amino acids, except serine, were well separated under isocratic elution conditions by reversed-phase chromatography using an ODS column (R{sub s} = 1.2–9.0). DL-Serine was separated by use of an ADME column which has relatively higher polar surface than the conventional ODS column. The characteristic product ions, i.e., m/z 195.3 and m/z 209.3, were detected from all the diastereomers by the collision-induced dissociation of the protonated molecule. A highly sensitive detection on the amol–fmol level was obtained from the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) chromatogram. The chiral amines (e.g., adrenaline and noradrenaline) labeled with DMT-(S)-Pro-OSu were also well separated and sensitively detected by the present procedure. The method using DMT-(S)-Pro-OSu was used for the determination of DL-amino acids in the human saliva from healthy volunteers. Various L-amino acids were identified in the saliva. Furthermore, D-alanine (D-Ala) and D-proline (D-Pro) were also detected in relatively high concentrations (>5%). The ratio was higher in male saliva than in female saliva. However, the difference in the ratio of D-Ala for one day was not very high and the effect of foods and beverage

  13. Using fragmentation trees and mass spectral trees for identifying unknown compounds in metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniya, Arpana

    2015-01-01

    Identification of unknown metabolites is the bottleneck in advancing metabolomics, leaving interpretation of metabolomics results ambiguous. The chemical diversity of metabolism is vast, making structure identification arduous and time consuming. Currently, comprehensive analysis of mass spectra in metabolomics is limited to library matching, but tandem mass spectral libraries are small compared to the large number of compounds found in the biosphere, including xenobiotics. Resolving this bottleneck requires richer data acquisition and better computational tools. Multi-stage mass spectrometry (MSn) trees show promise to aid in this regard. Fragmentation trees explore the fragmentation process, generate fragmentation rules and aid in sub-structure identification, while mass spectral trees delineate the dependencies in multi-stage MS of collision-induced dissociations. This review covers advancements over the past 10 years as a tool for metabolite identification, including algorithms, software and databases used to build and to implement fragmentation trees and mass spectral annotations. PMID:26213431

  14. Use of NMR metabolomic plasma profiling methodologies to identify illicit growth-promoting administrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, S.F.; Ruiz Aracama, A.; Lommen, A.; Cannizzo, F.T.; Biolatti, B.; Elliott, C.T.; Mooney, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Detection of growth-promoter use in animal production systems still proves to be an analytical challenge despite years of activity in the field. This study reports on the capability of NMR metabolomic profiling techniques to discriminate between plasma samples obtained from cattle treated with

  15. Combining a nontargeted and targeted metabolomics approach to identify metabolic pathways significantly altered in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alice Y; Lalia, Antigoni Z; Jenkins, Gregory D; Dutta, Tumpa; Carter, Rickey E; Singh, Ravinder J; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition of androgen excess and chronic anovulation frequently associated with insulin resistance. We combined a nontargeted and targeted metabolomics approach to identify pathways and metabolites that distinguished PCOS from metabolic syndrome (MetS). Twenty obese women with PCOS were compared with 18 obese women without PCOS. Both groups met criteria for MetS but could not have diabetes mellitus or take medications that treat PCOS or affect lipids or insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was derived from the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. A nontargeted metabolomics approach was performed on fasting plasma samples to identify differentially expressed metabolites, which were further evaluated by principal component and pathway enrichment analysis. Quantitative targeted metabolomics was then applied on candidate metabolites. Measured metabolites were tested for associations with PCOS and clinical variables by logistic and linear regression analyses. This multiethnic, obese sample was matched by age (PCOS, 37±6; MetS, 40±6years) and body mass index (BMI) (PCOS, 34.6±5.1; MetS, 33.7±5.2kg/m 2 ). Principal component analysis of the nontargeted metabolomics data showed distinct group separation of PCOS from MetS controls. From the subset of 385 differentially expressed metabolites, 22% were identified by accurate mass, resulting in 19 canonical pathways significantly altered in PCOS, including amino acid, lipid, steroid, carbohydrate, and vitamin D metabolism. Targeted metabolomics identified many essential amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) that were elevated in PCOS compared with MetS. PCOS was most associated with BCAA (P=.02), essential amino acids (P=.03), the essential amino acid lysine (P=.02), and the lysine metabolite α-aminoadipic acid (P=.02) in models adjusted for surrogate variables representing technical variation in metabolites. No significant differences between

  16. Metabolomic compounds identified in Piriformospora indica-colonized Chinese cabbage roots delineate symbiotic functions of the interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Mo Da-Sang; Senthil Kumar, Rajendran; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Tian, Zhihong; Oelmüller, Ralf; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2017-08-24

    Root colonization by endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica facilitating growth/development and stress tolerance has been demonstrated in various host plants. However, global metabolomic studies are rare. By using high-throughput gas-chromatography-based mass spectrometry, 549 metabolites of 1,126 total compounds observed were identified in colonized and uncolonized Chinese cabbage roots, and hyphae of P. indica. The analyses demonstrate that the host metabolomic compounds and metabolite pathways are globally reprogrammed after symbiosis with P. indica. Especially, γ-amino butyrate (GABA), oxylipin-family compounds, poly-saturated fatty acids, and auxin and its intermediates were highly induced and de novo synthesized in colonized roots. Conversely, nicotinic acid (niacin) and dimethylallylpyrophosphate were strongly decreased. In vivo assays with exogenously applied compounds confirmed that GABA primes plant immunity toward pathogen attack and enhances high salinity and temperature tolerance. Moreover, generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species stimulated by nicotinic acid is repressed by P. indica, and causes the feasibility of symbiotic interaction. This global metabolomic analysis and the identification of symbiosis-specific metabolites may help to understand how P. indica confers benefits to the host plant.

  17. Large-scale metabolomic profiling identifies novel biomarkers for incident coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ganna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of circulating metabolites in large prospective epidemiological studies could lead to improved prediction and better biological understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD. We performed a mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics study for association with incident CHD events in 1,028 individuals (131 events; 10 y. median follow-up with validation in 1,670 individuals (282 events; 3.9 y. median follow-up. Four metabolites were replicated and independent of main cardiovascular risk factors [lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶1 (hazard ratio [HR] per standard deviation [SD] increment = 0.77, P-value<0.001, lysophosphatidylcholine 18∶2 (HR = 0.81, P-value<0.001, monoglyceride 18∶2 (MG 18∶2; HR = 1.18, P-value = 0.011 and sphingomyelin 28∶1 (HR = 0.85, P-value = 0.015]. Together they contributed to moderate improvements in discrimination and re-classification in addition to traditional risk factors (C-statistic: 0.76 vs. 0.75; NRI: 9.2%. MG 18∶2 was associated with CHD independently of triglycerides. Lysophosphatidylcholines were negatively associated with body mass index, C-reactive protein and with less evidence of subclinical cardiovascular disease in additional 970 participants; a reverse pattern was observed for MG 18∶2. MG 18∶2 showed an enrichment (P-value = 0.002 of significant associations with CHD-associated SNPs (P-value = 1.2×10-7 for association with rs964184 in the ZNF259/APOA5 region and a weak, but positive causal effect (odds ratio = 1.05 per SD increment in MG 18∶2, P-value = 0.05 on CHD, as suggested by Mendelian randomization analysis. In conclusion, we identified four lipid-related metabolites with evidence for clinical utility, as well as a causal role in CHD development.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics to identify novel biomarkers of alcohol-dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza Mostafa; Amin, Arwa M.; Nor Hayati Arif; Vikneswaran a/l Murugaiyah; Baharudin Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol misuse is a ravaging public health and social problem. Its harm can affect the drinkers and the whole society. Alcohol-dependence is a phase of alcohol misuse in which the drinker consumes excessive amounts of alcohol and has a continuous urge to consume alcohol. Current methods of alcohol dependence diagnoses are questionnaires and some biomarkers. However, both methods lack specificity and sensitivity. Metabolomics is a scientific field which deals with the identification ...

  19. Metabolomic NMR fingerprinting to identify and predict survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertini, Ivano; Cacciatore, Stefano; Jensen, Benny V

    2012-01-01

    Earlier detection of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) might improve their treatment and survival outcomes. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) to profile the serum metabolome in patients with mCRC and determine whether a disease signature may exist...... survival (HR, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-5.50; P = 1.33 × 10(-6)). A number of metabolites concurred with the (1)H-NMR fingerprint of mCRC, offering insights into mCRC metabolic pathways. Our findings establish that (1)H-NMR profiling of patient serum can provide a strong metabolomic signature of m...... that is strong enough to predict overall survival (OS). In 153 patients with mCRC and 139 healthy subjects from three Danish hospitals, we profiled two independent sets of serum samples in a prospective phase II study. In the training set, (1)H-NMR metabolomic profiling could discriminate patients with mCRC from...

  20. The Use of Metabolomics to Identify Biological Signatures of Manganese Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Marissa G; Simpson, Christopher D; Lin, Yvonne S; Shireman, Laura M; Seixas, Noah

    2017-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a known neurotoxicant, and given its health effects and ubiquitous nature in metal-working settings, identification of a valid and reproducible biomarker of Mn exposure is of interest. Here, global metabolomics is utilized to determine metabolites that differ between groups defined by Mn exposure status, with the goal being to help inform a potential metabolite biomarker of Mn exposure. Mn exposed subjects were recruited from a Mn steel foundry and Mn unexposed subjects were recruited from crane operators at a metal recycling facility. Over the course of a work day, each subject wore a personal inhalable dust sampler (IOM), and provided an end of shift urine sample that underwent global metabolomics profiling. Both exposed and unexposed subjects were divided into a training set and demographically similar validation set. Using a two-sided adjusted t-test, relative abundances of all metabolites found were compared between Mn exposed and unexposed training sets, and those with a false discovery rates (FDR) metabolomics has been used to distinguish between Mn exposure status in an occupational cohort, though additional work should be done to replicate these findings with a larger cohort. With metabolite identification by name, empirical formula, or pathway, a better understanding of the relationship between Mn exposure and neurotoxic effects could be elucidated, and a potential metabolite biomarker of Mn exposure could be determined.

  1. Sticky Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Louise; Solomon, Michael; Schultz, William

    2016-11-01

    Oral and even systemic health begins with healthy saliva by maintaining antibacterial activity, lubricating hard and soft oral tissues, healing, tasting, chewing, and swallowing. Saliva functionality is intimately linked to its rheology. Alterations in saliva rheology may indicate or cause unhealthy biological function. One imprecise pathological designation is "sticky saliva", usually self-reported or qualitatively described by health professionals. Saliva is 99% water and therefore behaves like water in shear. Saliva also contains mucins, electrolytes, enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. These additional constituents enable saliva to form a long-lasting filament with a "beads-on-a-string" morphology in extension. Therefore, the main kinematic feature that distinguishes the coupling between the oral cavity and saliva elongational mechanics. We investigate the effect of pH and salinity on saliva filament formation with preliminary experiments and compare to 1D unsteady viscoelastic models. We discuss the results in the context of saliva functionality and in generating more satisfactory saliva substitutes for those suffering from xerostomia. We will discuss when beads-on-a-string are likely to occur.

  2. Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Miyamoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05. Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

  3. Urinary metabolomic analysis to identify preterm neonates exposed to histological chorioamnionitis: A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Fattuoni

    Full Text Available Chorioamnionitis is a leading cause of preterm birth worldwide, with higher incidence at lower gestational ages. An early and reliable diagnosis of histological chorioamnionitis (HCA in preterm infants may be helpful in guiding postnatal management, especially the administration of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent early-onset sepsis. The main aim of this study was to investigate metabolomic analysis of urines collected in the first 24 hours of life as diagnostic tool of HCA.Gestational age-, birth weight-, delivery mode- and sex- matched (1:2 preterm neonates (< 35 weeks' gestation born to mothers with or without HCA were enrolled from an observational study. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS-based metabolomic analysis was performed on urine samples non-invasively collected in the first 24 hours of life. Univariate analysis, partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA and its associated variable importance in projection (VIP score were performed. The most affected metabolic pathways were examined by Metabolite Sets Enrichment Analysis (MSEA.Fifteen cases (mean GA 30.2 ± 3.8 weeks, mean BW 1415 ± 471.9 grams and 30 controls (mean GA 30.2 ± 2.9 weeks, mean BW 1426 ± 569.8 grams were enrolled. Following univariate analysis, 29 metabolites had a significantly different concentration between cases and controls. The supervised PLS-DA model confirmed a separation between the two groups. Only gluconic acid, an oxidation product of glucose, was higher in cases than in controls. All other VIP metabolites were more abundant in the control group. Glutamate metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport chain, citric acid cycle, galactose metabolism, and fructose and mannose degradation metabolism were the most significantly altered pathways (P < 0.01.For the first time, urinary metabolomics was able to discriminate neonates born to mothers with and without HCA. The identification of specifically altered metabolic pathways may be

  4. Knowns and unknowns in metabolomics identified by multidimensional NMR and hybrid MS/NMR methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Metabolomics continues to make rapid progress through the development of new and better methods and their applications to gain insight into the metabolism of a wide range of different biological systems from a systems biology perspective. Customization of NMR databases and search tools allows the faster and more accurate identification of known metabolites, whereas the identification of unknowns, without a need for extensive purification, requires new strategies to integrate NMR with mass spectrometry, cheminformatics, and computational methods. For some applications, the use of covalent and non-covalent attachments in the form of labeled tags or nanoparticles can significantly reduce the complexity of these tasks.

  5. Metabolomics screening identifies reduced L-carnitine to be associated with progressive emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Thomas M; Bartel, Jörg; Ballweg, Korbinian; Günter, Stefanie; Prehn, Cornelia; Krumsiek, Jan; Meiners, Silke; Theis, Fabian J; Adamski, Jerzy; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic bronchitis, small airway remodelling and emphysema. Emphysema is the destruction of alveolar structures, leading to enlarged airspaces and reduced surface area impairing the ability for gaseous exchange. To further understand the pathological mechanisms underlying progressive emphysema, we used MS-based approaches to quantify the lung, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum metabolome during emphysema progression in the established murine porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model on days 28, 56 and 161, compared with PBS controls. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis revealed greater changes in the metabolome of lung followed by BALF rather than serum during emphysema progression. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that emphysema progression is associated with a reduction in lung-specific L-carnitine, a metabolite critical for transporting long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for their subsequent β-oxidation. In vitro, stimulation of the alveolar epithelial type II (ATII)-like LA4 cell line with L-carnitine diminished apoptosis induced by both PPE and H2O2. Moreover, PPE-treated mice demonstrated impaired lung function compared with PBS-treated controls (lung compliance; 0.067±0.008 ml/cmH20 compared with 0.035±0.005 ml/cmH20, PL-carnitine (0.051±0.006, PL-carnitine and, importantly, suggest therapeutic avenues for COPD. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. 1,5-Anhydroglucitol in saliva is a noninvasive marker of short-term glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Selim, Mohammed M El-Din; Takiddin, Ahmed H; Al-Homsi, Hala; Al-Mahmoud, Khoulood A S; Al-Obaidli, Amina; Zirie, Mahmoud A; Rowe, Jillian; Yousri, Noha A; Karoly, Edward D; Kocher, Thomas; Sekkal Gherbi, Wafaa; Chidiac, Omar M; Mook-Kanamori, Marjonneke J; Abdul Kader, Sara; Al Muftah, Wadha A; McKeon, Cindy; Suhre, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    In most ethnicities at least a quarter of all cases with diabetes is assumed to be undiagnosed. Screening for diabetes using saliva has been suggested as an effective approach to identify affected individuals. The objective of the study was to identify a noninvasive metabolic marker of type 2 diabetes in saliva. In a case-control study of type 2 diabetes, we used a clinical metabolomics discovery study to screen for diabetes-relevant metabolic readouts in saliva, using blood and urine as a reference. With a combination of three metabolomics platforms based on nontargeted mass spectrometry, we examined 2178 metabolites in saliva, blood plasma, and urine samples from 188 subjects with type 2 diabetes and 181 controls of Arab and Asian ethnicities. We found a strong association of type 2 diabetes with 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) in saliva (P = 3.6 × 10(-13)). Levels of 1,5-AG in saliva highly correlated with 1,5-AG levels in blood and inversely correlated with blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. These findings were robust across three different non-Caucasian ethnicities (Arabs, South Asians, and Filipinos), irrespective of body mass index, age, and gender. Clinical studies have already established 1,5-AG in blood as a reliable marker of short-term glycemic control. Our study suggests that 1,5-AG in saliva can be used in national screening programs for undiagnosed diabetes, which are of particular interest for Middle Eastern countries with young populations and exceptionally high diabetes rates.

  7. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antharam, Vijay C; McEwen, Daniel C; Garrett, Timothy J; Dossey, Aaron T; Li, Eric C; Kozlov, Andrew N; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism.

  8. Comprehensive Metabolomic, Lipidomic and Microscopic Profiling of Yarrowia lipolytica during Lipid Accumulation Identifies Targets for Increased Lipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle R Pomraning

    Full Text Available Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous ascomycete yeast that accumulates large amounts of lipids and has potential as a biofuel producing organism. Despite a growing scientific literature focused on lipid production by Y. lipolytica, there remain significant knowledge gaps regarding the key biological processes involved. We applied a combination of metabolomic and lipidomic profiling approaches as well as microscopic techniques to identify and characterize the key pathways involved in de novo lipid accumulation from glucose in batch cultured, wild-type Y. lipolytica. We found that lipids accumulated rapidly and peaked at 48 hours during the five day experiment, concurrent with a shift in amino acid metabolism. We also report that exhaustion of extracellular sugars coincided with thickening of the cell wall, suggesting that genes involved in cell wall biogenesis may be a useful target for improving the efficiency of lipid producing yeast strains.

  9. Metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots identifies a key metabolic pathway for iron acquisition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Schmidt

    Full Text Available Fe deficiency compromises both human health and plant productivity. Thus, it is important to understand plant Fe acquisition strategies for the development of crop plants which are more Fe-efficient under Fe-limited conditions, such as alkaline soils, and have higher Fe density in their edible tissues. Root secretion of phenolic compounds has long been hypothesized to be a component of the reduction strategy of Fe acquisition in non-graminaceous plants. We therefore subjected roots of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under Fe-replete and Fe-deplete conditions to comprehensive metabolome analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Scopoletin and other coumarins were found among the metabolites showing the strongest response to two different Fe-limited conditions, the cultivation in Fe-free medium and in medium with an alkaline pH. A coumarin biosynthesis mutant defective in ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamic acids was unable to grow on alkaline soil in the absence of Fe fertilization. Co-cultivation with wild-type plants partially rescued the Fe deficiency phenotype indicating a contribution of extracellular coumarins to Fe solubilization. Indeed, coumarins were detected in root exudates of wild-type plants. Direct infusion mass spectrometry as well as UV/vis spectroscopy indicated that coumarins are acting both as reductants of Fe(III and as ligands of Fe(II.

  10. Metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots identifies a key metabolic pathway for iron acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Holger; Günther, Carmen; Weber, Michael; Spörlein, Cornelia; Loscher, Sebastian; Böttcher, Christoph; Schobert, Rainer; Clemens, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Fe deficiency compromises both human health and plant productivity. Thus, it is important to understand plant Fe acquisition strategies for the development of crop plants which are more Fe-efficient under Fe-limited conditions, such as alkaline soils, and have higher Fe density in their edible tissues. Root secretion of phenolic compounds has long been hypothesized to be a component of the reduction strategy of Fe acquisition in non-graminaceous plants. We therefore subjected roots of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under Fe-replete and Fe-deplete conditions to comprehensive metabolome analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Scopoletin and other coumarins were found among the metabolites showing the strongest response to two different Fe-limited conditions, the cultivation in Fe-free medium and in medium with an alkaline pH. A coumarin biosynthesis mutant defective in ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamic acids was unable to grow on alkaline soil in the absence of Fe fertilization. Co-cultivation with wild-type plants partially rescued the Fe deficiency phenotype indicating a contribution of extracellular coumarins to Fe solubilization. Indeed, coumarins were detected in root exudates of wild-type plants. Direct infusion mass spectrometry as well as UV/vis spectroscopy indicated that coumarins are acting both as reductants of Fe(III) and as ligands of Fe(II).

  11. Metabolomics as a tool to identify biomarkers to predict and improve outcomes in reproductive medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracewell-Milnes, Timothy; Saso, Srdjan; Abdalla, Hossam; Nikolau, Dimitrios; Norman-Taylor, Julian; Johnson, Mark; Holmes, Elaine; Thum, Meen-Yau

    2017-11-01

    Infertility is a complex disorder with significant medical, psychological and financial consequences for patients. With live-birth rates per cycle below 30% and a drive from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) to encourage single embryo transfer, there is significant research in different areas aiming to improve success rates of fertility treatments. One such area is investigating the causes of infertility at a molecular level, and metabolomics techniques provide a platform for studying relevant biofluids in the reproductive tract. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the recent findings for the potential application of metabolomics to female reproduction, specifically to the metabolomics of follicular fluid (FF), embryo culture medium (ECM) and endometrial fluid. To our knowledge no other systematic review has investigated this topic. English peer-reviewed journals on PubMed, Science Direct, SciFinder, were systematically searched for studies investigating metabolomics and the female reproductive tract with no time restriction set for publications. Studies were assessed for quality using the risk of bias assessment and ROBIN-I. There were 21 studies that met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Metabolomic studies have been employed for the compositional analysis of various biofluids in the female reproductive tract, including FF, ECM, blastocoele fluid and endometrial fluid. There is some weak evidence that metabolomics technologies studying ECM might be able to predict the viability of individual embryos and implantation rate better than standard embryo morphology, However these data were not supported by randomized the controlled trials (RCTs) which showed no evidence that using metabolomics is able to improve the most important reproductive outcomes, such as clinical pregnancy and live-birth rates. This systematic review provides guidance for future metabolomic studies on biofluids of the female

  12. New biomarkers of coffee consumption identified by the non-targeted metabolomic profiling of cohort study subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Rothwell

    Full Text Available Coffee contains various bioactives implicated with human health and disease risk. To accurately assess the effects of overall consumption upon health and disease, individual intake must be measured in large epidemiological studies. Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful approach to discover biomarkers of intake for a large range of foods. Here we report the profiling of the urinary metabolome of cohort study subjects to search for new biomarkers of coffee intake. Using repeated 24-hour dietary records and a food frequency questionnaire, 20 high coffee consumers (183-540 mL/d and 19 low consumers were selected from the French SU.VI.MAX2 cohort. Morning spot urine samples from each subject were profiled by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Partial least-square discriminant analysis of multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data clearly distinguished high consumers from low via 132 significant (p-value<0.05 discriminating features. Ion clusters whose intensities were most elevated in the high consumers were annotated using online and in-house databases and their identities checked using commercial standards and MS-MS fragmentation. The best discriminants, and thus potential markers of coffee consumption, were the glucuronide of the diterpenoid atractyligenin, the diketopiperazine cyclo(isoleucyl-prolyl, and the alkaloid trigonelline. Some caffeine metabolites, such as 1-methylxanthine, were also among the discriminants, however caffeine may be consumed from other sources and its metabolism is subject to inter-individual variation. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed that the biomarkers identified could be used effectively in combination for increased sensitivity and specificity. Once validated in other cohorts or intervention studies, these specific single or combined biomarkers will become a valuable alternative to assessment of coffee intake by dietary survey and finally lead to a better understanding of

  13. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses identify a role for chlorophyll catabolism and phytoalexin during Medicago nonhost resistance against Asian soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Gill, Upinder S; Huhman, David; Tang, Yuhong; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2015-08-12

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a devastating foliar disease affecting soybean production worldwide. Understanding nonhost resistance against ASR may provide an avenue to engineer soybean to confer durable resistance against ASR. We characterized a Medicago truncatula-ASR pathosystem to study molecular mechanisms of nonhost resistance. Although urediniospores formed appressoria and penetrated into epidermal cells of M. truncatula, P. pachyrhizi failed to sporulate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the induction of phenylpropanoid, flavonoid and isoflavonoid metabolic pathway genes involved in the production of phytoalexin medicarpin in M. truncatula upon infection with P. pachyrhizi. Furthermore, genes involved in chlorophyll catabolism were induced during nonhost resistance. We further characterized one of the chlorophyll catabolism genes, Stay-green (SGR), and demonstrated that the M. truncatula sgr mutant and alfalfa SGR-RNAi lines showed hypersensitive-response-like enhanced cell death upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. Consistent with transcriptomic analysis, metabolomic analysis also revealed the accumulation of medicarpin and its intermediate metabolites. In vitro assay showed that medicarpin inhibited urediniospore germination and differentiation. In addition, several triterpenoid saponin glycosides accumulated in M. truncatula upon inoculation with P. pachyrhizi. In summary, using multi-omic approaches, we identified a correlation between phytoalexin production and M. truncatula defense responses against ASR.

  14. Serum Metabolomics to Identify the Liver Disease-Specific Biomarkers for the Progression of Hepatitis to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rong; Cheng, Jianhua; Fan, Chunlei; Shi, Xiaofeng; Cao, Yuan; Sun, Bo; Ding, Huiguo; Hu, Chengjin; Dong, Fangting; Yan, Xianzhong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that has region specific etiologies. Unfortunately, 85% of cases of HCC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Reliable biomarkers for the early diagnosis of HCC are urgently required to reduced mortality and therapeutic expenditure. We established a non-targeted gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) metabolomics method in conjunction with Random Forests (RF) analysis based on 201 serum samples from healthy controls (NC), hepatitis B virus (HBV), liver cirrhosis (LC) and HCC patients to explore the metabolic characteristics in the progression of hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Ultimately, 15 metabolites were identified intimately associated with the process. Phenylalanine, malic acid and 5-methoxytryptamine for HBV vs. NC, palmitic acid for LC vs. HBV, and asparagine and β-glutamate for HCC vs. LC were screened as the liver disease-specific potential biomarkers with an excellent discriminant performance. All the metabolic perturbations in these liver diseases are associated with pathways for energy metabolism, macromolecular synthesis, and maintaining the redox balance to protect tumor cells from oxidative stress.

  15. Metabolomics identifies perturbations in amino acid metabolism in the prefrontal cortex of the learned helplessness rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyu; Liu, Lanxiang; Zhang, Yuqing; Pu, Juncai; Yang, Lining; Zhou, Chanjuan; Yuan, Shuai; Zhang, Hanping; Xie, Peng

    2017-02-20

    Major depressive disorder is a serious psychiatric condition associated with high rates of suicide and is a leading cause of health burden worldwide. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of major depression are still essentially unclear. In our study, a non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach was used to investigate metabolic changes in the prefrontal cortex of the learned helplessness (LH) rat model of depression. Body-weight measurements and behavioral tests including the active escape test, sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, elevated plus-maze and open field test were used to assess changes in the behavioral spectrum after inescapable footshock stress. Rats in the stress group exhibited significant learned helpless and depression-like behaviors, while without any significant change in anxiety-like behaviors. Using multivariate and univariate statistical analysis, a total of 18 differential metabolites were identified after the footshock stress protocol. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and MetaboAnalyst were applied for predicted pathways and biological functions analysis. "Amino Acid Metabolism, Molecule Transport, Small Molecule Biochemistry" was the most significantly altered network in the LH model. Amino acid metabolism, particularly glutamate metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, was significantly perturbed in the prefrontal cortex of LH rats. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Decoding functional metabolomics with docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA) identifies novel bioactive signals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Rong; Fredman, Gabrielle; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Agrawal, Nitin; Irimia, Daniel; Piomelli, Daniele; Serhan, Charles N

    2011-01-01

    .... Using LC-UV-MS-MS-based lipidomics in tandem with functional screening at the single-cell level in microfluidic chambers, we identified a series of novel bioactive oxygenated docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide- (DHEA...

  17. Metabolome-wide association study identified the association between a circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids variant rs174548 and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Zhu, Meng; Chen, Minjian; Xie, Kaipeng; Cheng, Yang; Dai, Juncheng; Liu, Jia; Xia, Yankai; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Amos, Christopher I; Hu, Zhibin; Lin, Dongxin; Shen, Hongbing

    2017-10-26

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are widely used as instruments to infer causal risk factors of diseases based on the idea of mendelian randomization. Plasma metabolites can serve as risk factors of cancer, and the heritability of many circulating metabolites was high. We conducted a metabolome-wide association study (MWAS) to systematically investigate the effects of genetic variants on metabolites and lung cancer based on published genome-wide association study (GWASs) and metabolic-QTL (mQTL) study. Then we confirmed the results by subsequent genetic and metabolic validations and inferred the causal relationship between identified metabolites and lung cancer through genetic variant(s). We firstly identified six polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) represented by rs174548-linked haplotype were significantly associated with lung cancer risk in a Chinese GWAS (2311 cases and 3077 controls). Rs174548 was further confirmed to be associated with lung cancer in 13 821 Europeans and 18 471 Asians (ORmeta = 0.87, Pmeta = 1.76 × 10-15) and the effect was much stronger in females (Pinteraction = 6.00 × 10-4). We next validated rs174548-plasma PUFA association in 253 Chinese subjects (β = -0.57, P = 1.68 × 10-3). Rs174548 was also found associated with FADS1 (the major fatty acid desaturase of identified PUFAs) expression in liver tissues. Taken together, we found that rs174548 was associated with both PUFAs and lung cancer. Because rs174548 was the only mQTL variant of PUFAs reported by previous GWASs and explained a large proportion of heritability, we proposed that plasma PUFAs could be causally associated with lung cancer based on the idea of mendelian randomization. These findings provide a diet-related risk factor and may have important implications for prevention on lung cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Metabolomics: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Locasale, Jason W

    2017-04-01

    Metabolomics generates a profile of small molecules that are derived from cellular metabolism and can directly reflect the outcome of complex networks of biochemical reactions, thus providing insights into multiple aspects of cellular physiology. Technological advances have enabled rapid and increasingly expansive data acquisition with samples as small as single cells; however, substantial challenges in the field remain. In this primer we provide an overview of metabolomics, especially mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics, which uses liquid chromatography (LC) for separation, and discuss its utilities and limitations. We identify and discuss several areas at the frontier of metabolomics. Our goal is to give the reader a sense of what might be accomplished when conducting a metabolomics experiment, now and in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A multi-platform metabolomics approach identifies highly specific biomarkers of bacterial diversity in the vagina of pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Amy; Rulisa, Stephen; Sumarah, Mark; Macklaim, Jean M; Renaud, Justin; Bisanz, Jordan E; Gloor, Gregory B; Reid, Gregor

    2015-09-21

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases transmission of HIV, enhances the risk of preterm labour, and is associated with malodour. Clinical diagnosis often relies on microscopy, which may not reflect the microbiota composition accurately. We use an untargeted metabolomics approach, whereby we normalize the weight of samples prior to analysis, to obtained precise measurements of metabolites in vaginal fluid. We identify biomarkers for BV with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC = 0.99) in a cohort of 131 pregnant and non-pregnant Rwandan women, and demonstrate that the vaginal metabolome is strongly associated with bacterial diversity. Metabolites associated with high diversity and clinical BV include 2-hydroxyisovalerate and γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), but not succinate, which is produced by both Lactobacillus crispatus and BV-associated anaerobes in vitro. Biomarkers associated with high diversity and clinical BV are independent of pregnancy status, and were validated in a blinded replication cohort from Tanzania (n = 45), where we predicted clinical BV with 91% accuracy. Correlations between the metabolome and microbiota identified Gardnerella vaginalis as a putative producer of GHB, and we demonstrate production by this species in vitro. This work illustrates how changes in community structure alter the chemical composition of the vagina, and identifies highly specific biomarkers for a common condition.

  20. Integrated metabolome and transcriptome analysis of Magnolia champaca identifies biosynthetic pathways for floral volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Savitha; Jin, Jingjing; Sridhar, Vishweshwaran; Sarojam, Rajani; Chua, Nam-Hai; Jang, In-Cheol

    2017-06-14

    Magnolia champaca, commonly known as champak is a well-known tree due to its highly fragrant flowers. Champak floral scent is attributed to a complex mix of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These aromatic flowers are widely used in flavors and fragrances industry. Despite its commercial importance, the VOC biosynthesis pathways in these flowers are largely unknown. Here, we combine metabolite and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of fully opened champak flowers to discover the active VOC biosynthesis pathways as well as floral scent-related genes. Volatile collection by headspace method and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) identified a total of 43 VOCs from fully opened champak flowers, of which 46.9% were terpenoids, 38.9% were volatile esters and 5.2% belonged to phenylpropanoids/benzenoids. Sequencing and de novo assembly of champak flower transcriptome yielded 47,688 non-redundant unigenes. Transcriptome assembly was validated using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based approach for randomly selected unigenes. The detailed profiles of VOCs led to the discovery of pathways and genes involved in floral scent biosynthesis from RNA-seq data. Analysis of expression levels of many floral-scent biosynthesis-related unigenes in flowers and leaves showed that most of them were expressed higher in flowers than in leaf tissues. Moreover, our metabolite-guided transcriptomics, in vitro and in vivo enzyme assays and transgenic studies identified (R)-linalool synthase that is essential for the production of major VOCs of champak flowers, (R)-linalool and linalool oxides. As our study is the first report on transcriptome analysis of Magnolia champaca, this transcriptome dataset that serves as an important public information for functional genomics will not only facilitate better understanding of ecological functions of champak floral VOCs, but also provide biotechnological targets for sustainable production of champak floral scent.

  1. Urinary metabolomic profiling to identify biomarkers of a flavonoid-rich and flavonoid-poor fruits and vegetables diet in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulaszewska, Maria M.; Trost, Kajetan; Stanstrup, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the dose dependent effects of consuming diets enriched in flavonoid-rich and flavonoid-poor fruits and vegetables on the urine metabolome of adults who had a ≥1.5 fold increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. A single-blind, dose-dependent, parallel...... randomized controlled dietary intervention was conducted where volunteers (n = 126) were randomly assigned to one of three diets: high flavonoid diet, low flavonoid diet or habitual diet as a control for 18 weeks. High resolution LC–MS untargeted metabolomics with minimal sample cleanup was performed using...... an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Putative biomarkers which characterize diets with high and low flavonoid content were selected by state-of-the-art data analysis strategies and identified by HR-MS and HR-MS/MS assays. Discrimination between diets was observed by application of two linear mixed models: one...

  2. Metabolomics analysis identifies intestinal microbiota-derived biomarkers of colonization resistance in clindamycin-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump, Robin L P; Polinkovsky, Alex; Hurless, Kelly; Sitzlar, Brett; Eckart, Kevin; Tomas, Myreen; Deshpande, Abhishek; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota protect the host against enteric pathogens through a defense mechanism termed colonization resistance. Antibiotics excreted into the intestinal tract may disrupt colonization resistance and alter normal metabolic functions of the microbiota. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that alterations in levels of bacterial metabolites in fecal specimens could provide useful biomarkers indicating disrupted or intact colonization resistance after antibiotic treatment. To assess in vivo colonization resistance, mice were challenged with oral vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus or Clostridium difficile spores at varying time points after treatment with the lincosamide antibiotic clindamycin. For concurrent groups of antibiotic-treated mice, stool samples were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to assess changes in the microbiota and using non-targeted metabolic profiling. To assess whether the findings were applicable to another antibiotic class that suppresses intestinal anaerobes, similar experiments were conducted with piperacillin/tazobactam. Colonization resistance began to recover within 5 days and was intact by 12 days after clindamycin treatment, coinciding with the recovery bacteria from the families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, both part of the phylum Firmicutes. Clindamycin treatment caused marked changes in metabolites present in fecal specimens. Of 484 compounds analyzed, 146 (30%) exhibited a significant increase or decrease in concentration during clindamycin treatment followed by recovery to baseline that coincided with restoration of in vivo colonization resistance. Identified as potential biomarkers of colonization resistance, these compounds included intermediates in carbohydrate or protein metabolism that increased (pentitols, gamma-glutamyl amino acids and inositol metabolites) or decreased (pentoses, dipeptides) with clindamycin treatment. Piperacillin/tazobactam treatment caused

  3. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast™ chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultur...

  4. Urinary Metabolomics in Pediatric Obesity and NAFLD Identifies Metabolic Pathways/Metabolites Related to Dietary Habits and Gut-Liver Axis Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Troisi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To get insight into still elusive pathomechanisms of pediatric obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD we explored the interplay among GC-MS studied urinary metabolomic signature, gut liver axis (GLA abnormalities, and food preferences (Kid-Med. Intestinal permeability (IP, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance were investigated in forty children (mean age 9.8 years categorized as normal weight (NW or obese (body mass index <85th or >95th percentile, respectively ± ultrasonographic bright liver and hypertransaminasemia (NAFLD. SIBO was increased in all obese children (p = 0.0022, IP preferentially in those with NAFLD (p = 0.0002. The partial least-square discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome correctly allocated children based on their obesity, NAFLD, visceral fat, pathological IP and SIBO. Compared to NW, obese children had (1 higher levels of glucose/1-methylhistidine, the latter more markedly in NAFLD patients; and (2 lower levels of xylitol, phenyl acetic acid and hydroquinone, the latter especially in children without NAFLD. The metabolic pathways of BCAA and/or their metabolites correlated with excess of visceral fat centimeters (leucine/oxo-valerate, and more deranged IP and SIBO (valine metabolites. Urinary metabolome analysis contributes to define a metabolic fingerprint of pediatric obesity and related NAFLD, by identifying metabolic pathways/metabolites reflecting typical obesity dietary habits and GLA perturbations.

  5. 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomic Study for Identifying Serum Profiles Associated with the Response to Etanercept in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Mariacristina; Scrivo, Rossana; Valesini, Guido; Manetti, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not have a satisfactory response to biological therapies. We investigated the use of metabolomics approach to identify biomarkers able to anticipate the response to biologics in RA patients. Methods Due to gender differences in metabolomic profiling, the analysis was restricted to female patients starting etanercept as the first biological treatment and having a minimum of six months’ follow-up. Each patient was evaluated by the same rheumatologist before and after six months of treatment. At this time, the clinical response (good, moderate, none) was determined according to the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, based on both erythrocyte sedimentation rate (EULAR-ESR) and C-reactive protein (EULAR-CRP). Sera collected prior and after six months of etanercept were analyzed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis. Results Twenty-seven patients were enrolled: 18 had a good/moderate response and 9 were non responders according to both EULAR-ESR and EULAR-CRP after six months of etanercept. Metabolomic analysis at baseline was able to discriminate good, moderate, and non-responders with a very good predictivity (Q2 = 0.68) and an excellent sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (100%). In good responders, we found an increase in isoleucine, leucine, valine, alanine, glutamine, tyrosine, and glucose levels and a decrease in 3-hydroxybutyrate levels after six months of treatment with etanercept with respect to baseline. Conclusion Our study confirms the potential of metabolomic analysis to predict the response to biological agents. Changes in metabolic profiles during treatment may help elucidate their mechanism of action. PMID:26558759

  6. The human serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Psychogios

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca.

  7. Metabolomics in dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Miao, Hua; Feng, Ya-Long; Zhao, Ying-Yong; Lin, Rui-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is an important public health problem with increased incidence and prevalence worldwide. Current clinical biomarkers, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol lack the necessary specificity and sensitivity and only increase significantly after serious dyslipidemia. Therefore, sensitive biomarkers are needed for hyperlipidemia. Hyperlipidemia-specific biomarkers would improve clinical diagnosis and therapeutic treatment at early disease stages. The aim of metabolomics is to identify untargeted and global small-molecule metabolite profiles from cells, biofluids, and tissues. This method offers the potential for a holistic approach to improve disease diagnoses and our understanding of underlying pathologic mechanisms. This review summarizes analytical techniques, data collection and analysis for metabolomics, and metabolomics in hyperlipidemia animal models and clinical studies. Mechanisms of hypolipemia and antilipemic drug therapy are also discussed. Metabolomics provides a new opportunity to gain insight into metabolic profiling and pathophysiologic mechanisms of hyperlipidemia.

  8. The food metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according...... to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food...... by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still...

  9. Linking gene regulation and the exo-metabolome: A comparative transcriptomics approach to identify genes that impact on the production of volatile aroma compounds in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Florian F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Omics' tools provide novel opportunities for system-wide analysis of complex cellular functions. Secondary metabolism is an example of a complex network of biochemical pathways, which, although well mapped from a biochemical point of view, is not well understood with regards to its physiological roles and genetic and biochemical regulation. Many of the metabolites produced by this network such as higher alcohols and esters are significant aroma impact compounds in fermentation products, and different yeast strains are known to produce highly divergent aroma profiles. Here, we investigated whether we can predict the impact of specific genes of known or unknown function on this metabolic network by combining whole transcriptome and partial exo-metabolome analysis. Results For this purpose, the gene expression levels of five different industrial wine yeast strains that produce divergent aroma profiles were established at three different time points of alcoholic fermentation in synthetic wine must. A matrix of gene expression data was generated and integrated with the concentrations of volatile aroma compounds measured at the same time points. This relatively unbiased approach to the study of volatile aroma compounds enabled us to identify candidate genes for aroma profile modification. Five of these genes, namely YMR210W, BAT1, AAD10, AAD14 and ACS1 were selected for overexpression in commercial wine yeast, VIN13. Analysis of the data show a statistically significant correlation between the changes in the exo-metabome of the overexpressing strains and the changes that were predicted based on the unbiased alignment of transcriptomic and exo-metabolomic data. Conclusion The data suggest that a comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics approach can be used to identify the metabolic impacts of the expression of individual genes in complex systems, and the amenability of transcriptomic data to direct applications of

  10. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal

  11. SALIVA AS A DIAGNOSTIC FLUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezelj-Ribarić Sonja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is a readily available oral fluid with many functions, from digestion, maintenance of oral tissues' integrity, to caries prevention. Changes regarding its secretion may be divided into qualitative and quantitative: both of them are a consequence of certain conditions/diseases (e.g. internal factors or nutrients/drugs ingested (e.g. external factors. During the last 15 years, technological advances gave a significant momentum to utilization of saliva as a diagnostic tool. Analysis of saliva, just like the blood analysis, has two main objectives: to identify the subjects suffering from a certain disorder, and to follow the development and progress of therapy. This paper provides an overview of possibilities for the use of saliva for diagnostic purposes and gives specific examples of some clinical investigations, with the final aim to stimulate the use of this noninvasive means for the health care promotion.

  12. Functional metabolomics: from biomarker discovery to metabolome reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-09-01

    Metabolomics is emerging as a powerful tool for studying metabolic processes, identifying crucial biomarkers responsible for metabolic characteristics and revealing metabolic mechanisms, which construct the content of discovery metabolomics. The crucial biomarkers can be used to reprogram a metabolome, leading to an aimed metabolic strategy to cope with alteration of internal and external environments, naming reprogramming metabolomics here. The striking feature on the similarity of the basic metabolic pathways and components among vastly different species makes the reprogramming metabolomics possible when the engineered metabolites play biological roles in cellular activity as a substrate of enzymes and a regulator to other molecules including proteins. The reprogramming metabolomics approach can be used to clarify metabolic mechanisms of responding to changed internal and external environmental factors and to establish a framework to develop targeted tools for dealing with the changes such as controlling and/or preventing infection with pathogens and enhancing host immunity against pathogens. This review introduces the current state and trends of discovery metabolomics and reprogramming metabolomics and highlights the importance of reprogramming metabolomics.

  13. A metabolomic approach to identify anti-hepatocarcinogenic compounds from plants used traditionally in the treatment of liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassagne, François; Haddad, Mohamed; Amiel, Aurélien; Pharkeovilay, Chiobouaphong; Manithip, Chanthanom; Bourdy, Geneviève; Deharo, Eric; Marti, Guillaume

    2018-02-22

    Liver cancer is a major health burden in Southeast Asia, and most patients turn towards the use of medicinal plants to alleviate their symptoms. The aim of this work was to apply to Southeast Asian plants traditionally used to treat liver disorders, a successive ranking strategy based on a comprehensive review of the literature and metabolomic data in order to relate ethnopharmacological relevance to chemical entities of interest. We analyzed 45 publications resulting in a list of 378 plant species, and our point system based on the frequency of citation in the literature allowed the selection of 10 top ranked species for further collection and extraction. Extracts of these plants were tested for their in vitro anti-proliferative activities on HepG2 cells. Ethanolic extracts of Andrographis paniculata, Oroxylum indicum, Orthosiphon aristatus and Willughbeia edulis showed the highest anti-proliferative effects (IC 50  = 195.9, 64.1, 71.3 and 66.7 μg/ml, respectively). A metabolomic ranking model was performed to annotate compounds responsible for the anti-proliferative properties of A. paniculata (andrographolactone and dehydroandrographolide), O. indicum (baicalein, chrysin, oroxylin A and scutellarein), O. aristatus (5-desmethylsinensetin) and W. edulis (parabaroside C and procyanidin). Overall, our dereplicative approach combined with a bibliographic scoring system allowed us to rapidly decipher the molecular basis of traditionally used medicinal plants. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality assurance of metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Beger, Richard; Flynn, Thomas; Guo, Lining; Harris, Georgina; Hogberg, Helena; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Kamp, Hennicke; Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Odwin-DaCosta, Shelly; Pamies, David; Robertson, Donald; Smirnova, Lena; Sun, Jinchun; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics promises a holistic phenotypic characterization of biological responses to toxicants. This technology is based on advanced chemical analytical tools with reasonable throughput, including mass-spectroscopy and NMR. Quality assurance, however - from experimental design, sample preparation, metabolite identification, to bioinformatics data-mining - is urgently needed to assure both quality of metabolomics data and reproducibility of biological models. In contrast to microarray-based transcriptomics, where consensus on quality assurance and reporting standards has been fostered over the last two decades, quality assurance of metabolomics is only now emerging. Regulatory use in safety sciences, and even proper scientific use of these technologies, demand quality assurance. In an effort to promote this discussion, an expert workshop discussed the quality assurance needs of metabolomics. The goals for this workshop were 1) to consider the challenges associated with metabolomics as an emerging science, with an emphasis on its application in toxicology and 2) to identify the key issues to be addressed in order to establish and implement quality assurance procedures in metabolomics-based toxicology. Consensus has still to be achieved regarding best practices to make sure sound, useful, and relevant information is derived from these new tools.

  16. Metabolomic analysis of 92 pulmonary embolism patients from a nested case-control study identifies metabolites associated with adverse clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, O A; Poole, E M; Lindstrom, S; Kraft, P; Van Hylckama Vlieg, A; Lasky-Su, J A; Harrington, L B; Hagan, K; Kim, J; Parry, B A; Giordano, N; Kabrhel, C

    2017-12-29

    Essentials Risk-stratification often fails to predict clinical deterioration in pulmonary embolism (PE). First-ever high-throughput metabolomics analysis of risk-stratified PE patients. Changes in circulating metabolites reflect a compromised energy metabolism in PE. Metabolites play a key role in the pathophysiology and risk stratification of PE. Background Patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) exhibit wide variation in clinical presentation and outcomes. Our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms differentiating low-risk and high-risk PE is limited, so current risk-stratification efforts often fail to predict clinical deterioration and are insufficient to guide management. Objectives To improve our understanding of the physiology differentiating low-risk from high-risk PE, we conducted the first-ever high-throughput metabolomics analysis (843 named metabolites) comparing PE patients across risk strata within a nested case-control study. Patients/methods We enrolled 92 patients diagnosed with acute PE and collected plasma within 24 h of PE diagnosis. We used linear regression and pathway analysis to identify metabolites and pathways associated with PE risk-strata. Results When we compared 46 low-risk with 46 intermediate/high-risk PEs, 50 metabolites were significantly different after multiple testing correction. These metabolites were enriched in the following pathways: tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid metabolism (acyl carnitine) and purine metabolism, (hypo)xanthine/inosine containing. Additionally, energy, nucleotide and amino acid pathways were downregulated in intermediate/high-risk PE patients. When we compared 28 intermediate-risk with 18 high-risk PE patients, 41 metabolites differed at a nominal P-value level. These metabolites were enriched in fatty acid metabolism (acyl cholines), and hemoglobin and porphyrin metabolism. Conclusion Our results suggest that high-throughput metabolomics can provide insight into the

  17. Saliva diagnostics - Current views and directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor-Urbanowicz, Karolina Elżbieta; Martin Carreras-Presas, Carmen; Aro, Katri; Tu, Michael; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Wong, David Tw

    2017-03-01

    In this review, we provide an update on the current and future applications of saliva for diagnostic purposes. There are many advantages of using saliva as a biofluid. Its collection is fast, easy, inexpensive, and non-invasive. In addition, saliva, as a "mirror of the body," can reflect the physiological and pathological state of the body. Therefore, it serves as a diagnostic and monitoring tool in many fields of science such as medicine, dentistry, and pharmacotherapy. Introduced in 2008, the term "Salivaomics" aimed to highlight the rapid development of knowledge about various "omics" constituents of saliva, including: proteome, transcriptome, micro-RNA, metabolome, and microbiome. In the last few years, researchers have developed new technologies and validated a wide range of salivary biomarkers that will soon make the use of saliva a clinical reality. However, a great need still exists for convenient and accurate point-of-care devices that can serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. In addition, there is an urgent need to decipher the scientific rationale and mechanisms that convey systemic diseases to saliva. Another promising technology called liquid biopsy enables detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and fragments of tumor DNA in saliva, thus enabling non-invasive early detection of various cancers. The newly developed technology-electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM) provides near perfect detection of actionable mutations in lung cancer patients. These recent advances widened the salivary diagnostic approach from the oral cavity to the whole physiological system, and thus point towards a promising future of salivary diagnostics for personalized individual medicine applications including clinical decisions and post-treatment outcome predictions. Impact statement The purpose of this mini-review is to make an update about the present and future applications of saliva as a diagnostic biofluid in many fields of science such as dentistry

  18. Saliva diagnostics – Current views and directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor-Urbanowicz, Karolina Elżbieta; Martin Carreras-Presas, Carmen; Aro, Katri; Tu, Michael; Wong, David TW

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we provide an update on the current and future applications of saliva for diagnostic purposes. There are many advantages of using saliva as a biofluid. Its collection is fast, easy, inexpensive, and non-invasive. In addition, saliva, as a “mirror of the body,” can reflect the physiological and pathological state of the body. Therefore, it serves as a diagnostic and monitoring tool in many fields of science such as medicine, dentistry, and pharmacotherapy. Introduced in 2008, the term “Salivaomics” aimed to highlight the rapid development of knowledge about various “omics” constituents of saliva, including: proteome, transcriptome, micro-RNA, metabolome, and microbiome. In the last few years, researchers have developed new technologies and validated a wide range of salivary biomarkers that will soon make the use of saliva a clinical reality. However, a great need still exists for convenient and accurate point-of-care devices that can serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. In addition, there is an urgent need to decipher the scientific rationale and mechanisms that convey systemic diseases to saliva. Another promising technology called liquid biopsy enables detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and fragments of tumor DNA in saliva, thus enabling non-invasive early detection of various cancers. The newly developed technology—electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM) provides near perfect detection of actionable mutations in lung cancer patients. These recent advances widened the salivary diagnostic approach from the oral cavity to the whole physiological system, and thus point towards a promising future of salivary diagnostics for personalized individual medicine applications including clinical decisions and post-treatment outcome predictions. Impact statement The purpose of this mini-review is to make an update about the present and future applications of saliva as a diagnostic biofluid in many fields of science such

  19. Livestock metabolomics and the livestock metabolome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldansaz, Seyed Ali; Guo, An Chi; Sajed, Tanvir; Steele, Michael A; Plastow, Graham S; Wishart, David S

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics uses advanced analytical chemistry techniques to comprehensively measure large numbers of small molecule metabolites in cells, tissues and biofluids. The ability to rapidly detect and quantify hundreds or even thousands of metabolites within a single sample is helping scientists paint a far more complete picture of system-wide metabolism and biology. Metabolomics is also allowing researchers to focus on measuring the end-products of complex, hard-to-decipher genetic, epigenetic and environmental interactions. As a result, metabolomics has become an increasingly popular "omics" approach to assist with the robust phenotypic characterization of humans, crop plants and model organisms. Indeed, metabolomics is now routinely used in biomedical, nutritional and crop research. It is also being increasingly used in livestock research and livestock monitoring. The purpose of this systematic review is to quantitatively and objectively summarize the current status of livestock metabolomics and to identify emerging trends, preferred technologies and important gaps in the field. In conducting this review we also critically assessed the applications of livestock metabolomics in key areas such as animal health assessment, disease diagnosis, bioproduct characterization and biomarker discovery for highly desirable economic traits (i.e., feed efficiency, growth potential and milk production). A secondary goal of this critical review was to compile data on the known composition of the livestock metabolome (for 5 of the most common livestock species namely cattle, sheep, goats, horses and pigs). These data have been made available through an open access, comprehensive livestock metabolome database (LMDB, available at http://www.lmdb.ca). The LMDB should enable livestock researchers and producers to conduct more targeted metabolomic studies and to identify where further metabolome coverage is needed.

  20. Livestock metabolomics and the livestock metabolome: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Goldansaz

    Full Text Available Metabolomics uses advanced analytical chemistry techniques to comprehensively measure large numbers of small molecule metabolites in cells, tissues and biofluids. The ability to rapidly detect and quantify hundreds or even thousands of metabolites within a single sample is helping scientists paint a far more complete picture of system-wide metabolism and biology. Metabolomics is also allowing researchers to focus on measuring the end-products of complex, hard-to-decipher genetic, epigenetic and environmental interactions. As a result, metabolomics has become an increasingly popular "omics" approach to assist with the robust phenotypic characterization of humans, crop plants and model organisms. Indeed, metabolomics is now routinely used in biomedical, nutritional and crop research. It is also being increasingly used in livestock research and livestock monitoring. The purpose of this systematic review is to quantitatively and objectively summarize the current status of livestock metabolomics and to identify emerging trends, preferred technologies and important gaps in the field. In conducting this review we also critically assessed the applications of livestock metabolomics in key areas such as animal health assessment, disease diagnosis, bioproduct characterization and biomarker discovery for highly desirable economic traits (i.e., feed efficiency, growth potential and milk production. A secondary goal of this critical review was to compile data on the known composition of the livestock metabolome (for 5 of the most common livestock species namely cattle, sheep, goats, horses and pigs. These data have been made available through an open access, comprehensive livestock metabolome database (LMDB, available at http://www.lmdb.ca. The LMDB should enable livestock researchers and producers to conduct more targeted metabolomic studies and to identify where further metabolome coverage is needed.

  1. Nutritional Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde

    . Application of multiple analytical strategies may provide comprehensive information to reach a valid answer to these research questions. In this thesis, I investigated several analytical technologies and data handling strategies in order to evaluate their effects on the biological answer. In metabolomics, one......Metabolomics provides a holistic approach to investigate the perturbations in human metabolism with respect to a specific exposure. In nutritional metabolomics, the research question is generally related to the effect of a specific food intake on metabolic profiles commonly of plasma or urine...... purposes and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) for classification and variable selection purposes; both have been used in PAPER I and II. In PAPER III, the application potential of sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) on LC-MS based metabolomics data as a pattern recognition...

  2. Metabolomics in Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Antonio; Fanos, Vassilios; Dessì, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the quantitative analysis of a large number of low molecular weight metabolites that are intermediate or final products of all the metabolic pathways in a living organism. Any metabolic profiles detectable in a human biological fluid are caused by the interaction between gene expression and the environment. The metabolomics approach offers the possibility to identify variations in metabolite profile that can be used to discriminate disease. This is particularly important for neonatal and pediatric studies especially for severe ill patient diagnosis and early identification. This property is of a great clinical importance in view of the newer definitions of health and disease. This review emphasizes the workflow of a typical metabolomics study and summarizes the latest results obtained in neonatal studies with particular interest in prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, inborn errors of metabolism, perinatal asphyxia, sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, kidney disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and cardiac malformation and dysfunction. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Saliva: a fluid of study for OMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Santiago-García, Juan

    2014-02-01

    Saliva is a fluid that can be collected easily and noninvasively. Its functions in the oral cavity are well known. Advances in molecular biology and technology, as well as research conducted by the various disciplines of omics (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and metagenomics) have contributed to the identification and characterization of salivary components, including DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and microorganisms. These biomolecules enter the saliva through extracellular and intracellular routes, providing information from several organs and systems and raising the possibility of their use as disease biomarkers. In recent years, these factors have expanded the potential use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid for oral and systemic diseases. This review integrates information regarding salivary biomolecules studied through omics and explores their utility as biomarkers for the diagnosis of several infectious and noninfectious diseases, and the opportunity they represent for the development of point of care devices for clinical application. We also discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges to be overcome in order to establish saliva as a useful fluid for the accurate diagnosis and monitoring of a wide range of diseases.

  4. Urinary Metabolomic Profiling to Identify Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Behcet’s Disease by Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight−Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Kyong Ahn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing Behcet’s disease (BD is challenging because of the lack of a diagnostic biomarker. The purposes of this study were to investigate distinctive metabolic changes in urine samples of BD patients and to identify urinary metabolic biomarkers for diagnosis of BD using gas chromatography/time-of-flight–mass spectrometry (GC/TOF−MS. Metabolomic profiling of urine samples from 44 BD patients and 41 healthy controls (HC were assessed using GC/TOF−MS, in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis. A total of 110 urinary metabolites were identified. The urine metabolite profiles obtained from GC/TOF−MS analysis could distinguish BD patients from the HC group in the discovery set. The parameter values of the orthogonal partial least squared-discrimination analysis (OPLS-DA model were R2X of 0.231, R2Y of 0.804, and Q2 of 0.598. A biomarker panel composed of guanine, pyrrole-2-carboxylate, 3-hydroxypyridine, mannose, l-citrulline, galactonate, isothreonate, sedoheptuloses, hypoxanthine, and gluconic acid lactone were selected and adequately validated as putative biomarkers of BD (sensitivity 96.7%, specificity 93.3%, area under the curve 0.974. OPLS-DA showed clear discrimination of BD and HC groups by a biomarker panel of ten metabolites in the independent set (accuracy 88%. We demonstrated characteristic urinary metabolic profiles and potential urinary metabolite biomarkers that have clinical value in the diagnosis of BD using GC/TOF−MS.

  5. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival

  6. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In

  7. NMR-based metabolomics in human disease diagnosis: Applications, limitations, and recommendations

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-04-03

    Metabolomics is a dynamic and emerging research field, similar to proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics in affording global understanding of biological systems. It is particularly useful in functional genomic studies in which metabolism is thought to be perturbed. Metabolomics provides a snapshot of the metabolic dynamics that reflect the response of living systems to both pathophysiological stimuli and/or genetic modification. Because this approach makes possible the examination of interactions between an organism and its diet or environment, it is particularly useful for identifying biomarkers of disease processes that involve the environment. For example, the interaction of a high fat diet with cardiovascular disease can be studied via such a metabolomics approach by modeling the interaction between genes and diet. The high reproducibility of NMR-based techniques gives this method a number of advantages over other analytical techniques in large-scale and long-term metabolomic studies, such as epidemiological studies. This approach has been used to study a wide range of diseases, through the examination of biofluids, including blood plasma/serum, urine, blister fluid, saliva and semen, as well as tissue extracts and intact tissue biopsies. However, complicating the use of NMR spectroscopy in biomarker discovery is the fact that numerous variables can effect metabolic composition including, fasting, stress, drug administration, diet, gender, age, physical activity, life style and the subject\\'s health condition. To minimize the influence of these variations in the datasets, all experimental conditions including sample collection, storage, preparation as well as NMR spectroscopic parameters and data analysis should be optimized carefully and conducted in an identical manner as described by the local standard operating protocol. This review highlights the potential applications of NMR-based metabolomics studies and gives some recommendations to improve sample

  8. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  9. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  10. The Saliva Exposome for Monitoring of Individuals' Health Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonneau, Vincent; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2017-07-20

    There is increasing evidence that environmental, rather than genetic, factors are the major causes of most chronic diseases. By measuring entire classes of chemicals in archived biospecimens, exposome-wide association studies (EWAS) are being conducted to investigate associations between a myriad of exposures received during life and chronic diseases. Because the intraindividual variability in biomarker levels, arising from changes in environmental exposures from conception onwards, leads to attenuation of exposure-disease associations, we posit that saliva can be collected repeatedly in longitudinal studies to reduce exposure-measurement errors in EWAS. From the literature and an open-source saliva-metabolome database, we obtained concentrations of 1,233 chemicals that had been detected in saliva. We connected salivary metabolites with human metabolic pathways and PubMed Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms, and performed pathway enrichment and pathway topology analyses. One hundred ninety-six salivary metabolites were mapped into 49 metabolic pathways and connected with human metabolic diseases, central nervous system diseases, and neoplasms. We found that the saliva exposome represents at least 14 metabolic pathways, including amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle, gluconeogenesis, glutathione metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, and butanoate metabolism. Saliva contains molecular information worthy of interrogation via EWAS. The simplicity of specimen collection suggests that saliva offers a practical alternative to blood for measurements that can be used to characterize individual exposomes. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1011.

  11. Circadian Metabolomics in Time and Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, Kenneth A; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are widely known to govern human health and disease, but specific pathogenic mechanisms linking circadian disruption to metabolic diseases are just beginning to come to light. This is thanks in part to the development and application of various "omics"-based tools in biology and medicine. Current high-throughput technologies allow for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple dynamic cellular events over time, ranging from gene expression to metabolite abundance and sub-cellular localization. These fundamental temporal and spatial perspectives have allowed for a more comprehensive understanding of how various dynamic cellular events and biochemical processes are related in health and disease. With advances in technology, metabolomics has become a more routine "omics" approach for studying metabolism, and "circadian metabolomics" (i.e., studying the 24-h metabolome) has recently been undertaken by several groups. To date, circadian metabolomes have been reported for human serum, saliva, breath, and urine, as well as tissues from several species under specific disease or mutagenesis conditions. Importantly, these studies have consistently revealed that 24-h rhythms are prevalent in almost every tissue and metabolic pathway. Furthermore, these circadian rhythms in tissue metabolism are ultimately linked to and directed by internal 24-h biological clocks. In this review, we will attempt to put these data-rich circadian metabolomics experiments into perspective to find out what they can tell us about metabolic health and disease, and what additional biomarker potential they may reveal.

  12. Integration of Traditional and Metabolomics Biomarkers Identifies Prognostic Metabolites for Predicting Responsiveness to Nutritional Intervention against Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Jin Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Various statistical approaches can be applied to integrate traditional and omics biomarkers, allowing the discovery of prognostic markers to classify subjects into poor and good prognosis groups in terms of responses to nutritional interventions. Here, we performed a prototype study to identify metabolites that predict responses to an intervention against oxidative stress and inflammation, using a data set from a randomized controlled trial evaluating Korean black raspberry (KBR in sedentary overweight/obese subjects. First, a linear mixed-effects model analysis with multiple testing correction showed that four-week consumption of KBR significantly changed oxidized glutathione (GSSG, q = 0.027 level, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH to GSSG (q = 0.039 in erythrocytes, malondialdehyde (MDA, q = 0.006 and interleukin-6 (q = 0.006 levels in plasma, and seventeen NMR metabolites in urine compared with those in the placebo group. A subsequent generalized linear mixed model analysis showed linear correlations between baseline urinary glycine and N-phenylacetylglycine (PAG and changes in the GSH:GSSG ratio (p = 0.008 and 0.004 as well as between baseline urinary adenine and changes in MDA (p = 0.018. Then, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that a two-metabolite set (glycine and PAG had the strongest prognostic relevance for future interventions against oxidative stress (the area under the curve (AUC = 0.778. Leave-one-out cross-validation confirmed the accuracy of prediction (AUC = 0.683. The current findings suggest that a higher level of this two-metabolite set at baseline is useful for predicting responders to dietary interventions in subjects with oxidative stress and inflammation, contributing to the emergence of personalized nutrition.

  13. Integration of Traditional and Metabolomics Biomarkers Identifies Prognostic Metabolites for Predicting Responsiveness to Nutritional Intervention against Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You Jin; Huh, Iksoo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Saejong; Ryu, Sung Ha; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Suhkmann; Park, Taesung; Kwon, Oran

    2017-03-04

    Various statistical approaches can be applied to integrate traditional and omics biomarkers, allowing the discovery of prognostic markers to classify subjects into poor and good prognosis groups in terms of responses to nutritional interventions. Here, we performed a prototype study to identify metabolites that predict responses to an intervention against oxidative stress and inflammation, using a data set from a randomized controlled trial evaluating Korean black raspberry (KBR) in sedentary overweight/obese subjects. First, a linear mixed-effects model analysis with multiple testing correction showed that four-week consumption of KBR significantly changed oxidized glutathione (GSSG, q = 0.027) level, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to GSSG (q = 0.039) in erythrocytes, malondialdehyde (MDA, q = 0.006) and interleukin-6 (q = 0.006) levels in plasma, and seventeen NMR metabolites in urine compared with those in the placebo group. A subsequent generalized linear mixed model analysis showed linear correlations between baseline urinary glycine and N-phenylacetylglycine (PAG) and changes in the GSH:GSSG ratio (p = 0.008 and 0.004) as well as between baseline urinary adenine and changes in MDA (p = 0.018). Then, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that a two-metabolite set (glycine and PAG) had the strongest prognostic relevance for future interventions against oxidative stress (the area under the curve (AUC) = 0.778). Leave-one-out cross-validation confirmed the accuracy of prediction (AUC = 0.683). The current findings suggest that a higher level of this two-metabolite set at baseline is useful for predicting responders to dietary interventions in subjects with oxidative stress and inflammation, contributing to the emergence of personalized nutrition.

  14. Construction and characterization of the Korean whole saliva proteome to determine ethnic differences in human saliva proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ha Ra; Kim, Han Sol; Park, Jun Seo; Park, Seung Cheol; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Wood, Troy D; Choi, Yong Seok

    2017-01-01

    As the first step to discover protein disease biomarkers from saliva, global analyses of the saliva proteome have been carried out since the early 2000s, and more than 3,000 proteins have been identified in human saliva. Recently, ethnic differences in the human plasma proteome have been reported, but such corresponding studies on human saliva in this aspect have not been previously reported. Thus, here, in order to determine ethnic differences in the human saliva proteome, a Korean whole saliva (WS) proteome catalogue indexing 480 proteins was built and characterized through nLC-Q-IMS-TOF analyses of WS samples collected from eleven healthy South Korean male adult volunteers for the first time. Identification of 226 distinct Korean WS proteins, not observed in the integrated human saliva protein dataset, and significant gene ontology distribution differences in the Korean WS proteome compared to the integrated human saliva proteome strongly support ethnic differences in the human saliva proteome. Additionally, the potential value of ethnicity-specific human saliva proteins as biomarkers for diseases highly prevalent in that ethnic group was confirmed by finding 35 distinct Korean WS proteins likely to be associated with the top 10 deadliest diseases in South Korea. Finally, the present Korean WS protein list can serve as the first level reference for future proteomic studies including disease biomarker studies on Korean saliva.

  15. Commercial saliva collections tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Slowey, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Saliva has been used as a specimen for diagnostics purposes for many years, but it has only been in the last 10 years that a number of new tools have been developed that promise to greatly increase...

  16. Commercial saliva collections tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowey, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    Saliva has been used as a specimen for diagnostics purposes for many years, but it has only been in the last 10 years that a number of new tools have been developed that promise to greatly increase the use of oral specimens for broad-based diagnosis and potentially screening applications. This article focuses on tools that are commercially viable or can play a role in whole saliva collection and future testing for critical diseases.

  17. The human urine metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhaila Bouatra

    Full Text Available Urine has long been a "favored" biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS, direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify a total of: 209 (209 by NMR, 179 (85 by GC-MS, 127 (127 by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40 by ICP-MS and 10 (10 by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database

  18. Metabolic network segmentation: A probabilistic graphical modeling approach to identify the sites and sequential order of metabolic regulation from non-targeted metabolomics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kuehne

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number of large-scale metabolomics studies on various cellular processes in different organisms has increased drastically. However, it remains a major challenge to perform a systematic identification of mechanistic regulatory events that mediate the observed changes in metabolite levels, due to complex interdependencies within metabolic networks. We present the metabolic network segmentation (MNS algorithm, a probabilistic graphical modeling approach that enables genome-scale, automated prediction of regulated metabolic reactions from differential or serial metabolomics data. The algorithm sections the metabolic network into modules of metabolites with consistent changes. Metabolic reactions that connect different modules are the most likely sites of metabolic regulation. In contrast to most state-of-the-art methods, the MNS algorithm is independent of arbitrary pathway definitions, and its probabilistic nature facilitates assessments of noisy and incomplete measurements. With serial (i.e., time-resolved data, the MNS algorithm also indicates the sequential order of metabolic regulation. We demonstrated the power and flexibility of the MNS algorithm with three, realistic case studies with bacterial and human cells. Thus, this approach enables the identification of mechanistic regulatory events from large-scale metabolomics data, and contributes to the understanding of metabolic processes and their interplay with cellular signaling and regulation processes.

  19. Metabolic network segmentation: A probabilistic graphical modeling approach to identify the sites and sequential order of metabolic regulation from non-targeted metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Andreas; Mayr, Urs; Sévin, Daniel C; Claassen, Manfred; Zamboni, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the number of large-scale metabolomics studies on various cellular processes in different organisms has increased drastically. However, it remains a major challenge to perform a systematic identification of mechanistic regulatory events that mediate the observed changes in metabolite levels, due to complex interdependencies within metabolic networks. We present the metabolic network segmentation (MNS) algorithm, a probabilistic graphical modeling approach that enables genome-scale, automated prediction of regulated metabolic reactions from differential or serial metabolomics data. The algorithm sections the metabolic network into modules of metabolites with consistent changes. Metabolic reactions that connect different modules are the most likely sites of metabolic regulation. In contrast to most state-of-the-art methods, the MNS algorithm is independent of arbitrary pathway definitions, and its probabilistic nature facilitates assessments of noisy and incomplete measurements. With serial (i.e., time-resolved) data, the MNS algorithm also indicates the sequential order of metabolic regulation. We demonstrated the power and flexibility of the MNS algorithm with three, realistic case studies with bacterial and human cells. Thus, this approach enables the identification of mechanistic regulatory events from large-scale metabolomics data, and contributes to the understanding of metabolic processes and their interplay with cellular signaling and regulation processes.

  20. NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shulei; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by progressive death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are linked to PD pathogenesis, its etiology and pathology remain to be elucidated. Metabolomics investigates metabolite changes in biofluids, cell lysates, tissues and tumors in order to correlate these metabolomic changes to a disease state. Thus, the application of metabolomics to investigate PD provides a systematic approach to understand the pathology of PD, to identify disease biomarkers, and to complement genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics studies. This review will examine current research into PD mechanisms with a focus on mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Neurotoxin-based PD animal models and the rationale for metabolomics studies in PD will also be discussed. The review will also explore the potential of NMR metabolomics to address important issues related to PD treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26078917

  1. Immunoreactive pattern of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm against human whole saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhais, Virginia; Amado, Francisco; Cerveira, Frederico; Ferreira, Rita; Vilanova, Manuel; Cerca, Nuno; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-05-01

    Saliva is essential to interact with microorganisms in the oral cavity. Therefore, the interest in saliva antimicrobial properties is on the rise. Here, we used an immunoproteomic approach, based on protein separation of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms by 2DE, followed by Western-blotting, to compare human serum and saliva reactivity profile. A total of 17 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Serum and saliva presented a distinct pattern of immunoreactive proteins. Our results suggest that saliva seems to have higher propensity to react against S. epidermidis proteins with oxidoreductase activity and proteins involved with L-serine metabolic processes. We show that saliva was a powerful tool for the identification of potential S. epidermidis biofilms proteins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Circadian Metabolomics in Time and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Dyar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are widely known to govern human health and disease, but specific pathogenic mechanisms linking circadian disruption to metabolic diseases are just beginning to come to light. This is thanks in part to the development and application of various “omics”-based tools in biology and medicine. Current high-throughput technologies allow for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple dynamic cellular events over time, ranging from gene expression to metabolite abundance and sub-cellular localization. These fundamental temporal and spatial perspectives have allowed for a more comprehensive understanding of how various dynamic cellular events and biochemical processes are related in health and disease. With advances in technology, metabolomics has become a more routine “omics” approach for studying metabolism, and “circadian metabolomics” (i.e., studying the 24-h metabolome has recently been undertaken by several groups. To date, circadian metabolomes have been reported for human serum, saliva, breath, and urine, as well as tissues from several species under specific disease or mutagenesis conditions. Importantly, these studies have consistently revealed that 24-h rhythms are prevalent in almost every tissue and metabolic pathway. Furthermore, these circadian rhythms in tissue metabolism are ultimately linked to and directed by internal 24-h biological clocks. In this review, we will attempt to put these data-rich circadian metabolomics experiments into perspective to find out what they can tell us about metabolic health and disease, and what additional biomarker potential they may reveal.

  3. Discovery of Mosquito Saliva MicroRNAs during CHIKV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Payal D.; Widen, Steven G.; Huang, Jing; Wood, Thomas G.; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito borne pathogens are transmitted to humans via saliva during blood feeding. Mosquito saliva is a complex concoction of many secretory factors that modulate the feeding foci to enhance pathogen infection and establishment. Multiple salivary proteins/factors have been identified/characterized that enhance pathogen infection. Here, we describe, for the first time, the identification of exogenous microRNAs from mosquito saliva. MicroRNAs are short, 18–24 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression, and are generally intracellular. However, circulating miRNAs have been described from serum and saliva of humans. Exogenous miRNAs have not been reported from hematophagous arthropod saliva. We sought to identify miRNAs in the mosquito saliva and their role in Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. Next generation sequencing was utilized to identify 103 exogenous miRNAs in mosquito saliva of which 31 miRNAs were previously unidentified and were designated novel. Several miRNAs that we have identified are expressed only in the CHIKV infected mosquitoes. Five of the saliva miRNAs were tested for their potential to regulated CHIKV infection, and our results demonstrate their functional role in the transmission and establishment of infection during blood feeding on the host. PMID:25612225

  4. [Use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović, Tatjana; Dozić, Ivan; Pavlica, Dusan; Marković, Dejan; Brajović, Gavrilo; Ivanović, Mirjana; Stevanović, Gordana; Mirković, Silvija; Andjelski, Biljana

    2005-01-01

    Saliva is a secretion of the salivary and mucous glands and is of major importance in the maintainance of oral health. Over the last few decades, saliva has been evaluated as a diagnostic fluid in medicine for determining systemic disease markers as well as for monitoring numerous drugs, narcotics, and hormones. The biochemical analysis of saliva is particularly important in dentistry. The estimation of the risk of appearance and diagnosis of disease, monitoring of disease progression, evaluation of therapy efficacy for caries, periodontitis, premalignant and malignant oral lesions, as well as infectious diseases of the oral cavity, can be assessed by analysing different constituents of saliva. Individuals at risk of caries can be identified using tests that determine saliva flow rate, saliva buffer capacity, and colonisation of the oral cavity by cariogenic bacteria. Today, these rapid and simple diagnostic tests are used routinely in caries risk determination. The study and use of saliva-based diagnostics have increased over the last few decades. Clinical testing of saliva shows much promise. However, there is a need for much additional research in this area, before the true clinical value of saliva as a diagnostic fluid in dentistry can be determined.

  5. Use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović Tatjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is a secretion of the salivary and mucous glands and is of major importance in the maintainance of oral health. Over the last few decades, saliva has been evaluated as a diagnostic fluid in medicine for determining systemic disease markers as well as for monitoring numerous drugs, narcotics, and hormones. The biochemical analysis of saliva is particularly important in dentistry. The estimation of the risk of appearance and diagnosis of disease, monitoring of disease progression, evaluation of therapy efficacy for caries, periodontitis, premalignant and malignant oral lesions, as well as infectious diseases of the oral cavity, can be assessed by analyzing different constituent: of saliva, individuals at risk of caries can be identified using test: that determine saliva flow rate, saliva buffer capacity, and colonization of the oral cavity by cariogenic bacteria. Today, these rapid and simple diagnostic tests are used routinely in caries risk determination. The study and use of saliva-based diagnostics have increased over the last few decades. Clinical testing of saliva shows much promise. However, there is a need for much additional research in this area, before the true clinical value of saliva as a diagnostic fluid in dentistry can be determined.

  6. Identification of canine saliva using mRNA-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Yoneyama, Katsumi; Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    A dog saliva analysis in addition to a bite-mark analysis may be important for evidence when a crime involves a dog bite. In this study, the utility of detecting canine saliva-specific mRNAs to identify canine saliva was evaluated. Canine saliva swabs (n = 20), urine swabs (n = 20), body surface swabs (n = 20), whole blood samples (n = 10), human saliva (n = 20), human skin surface swabs (n = 20), and human whole blood (n = 20) were tested. The saliva-specific genes encoding statherin (STATH), carbonic anhydrase VI (CA-VI), and dog allergens (Canf1 and Canf2) were analyzed as candidate genes. Moreover, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was used as confirmation of canine mRNA extraction. STATH, CA-VI, Canf1, Canf2, and GAPDH mRNAs were detected in 19/20, 1/20, 11/20, 4/20, and 20/20 saliva samples, respectively. The STATH, CA-VI, Canf1, Canf2, and GAPDH mRNAs did not exhibit cross-reactivity with samples of human origin. This mRNA-based assay was also able to detect canine saliva in mock forensic samples. The results of this study indicated that the detection of STATH mRNA is useful for the identification of canine saliva, and GAPDH is a suitable marker for canine mRNA extraction.

  7. Metabolomics for laboratory diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał J; Kaliszan, Roman

    2015-09-10

    Metabolomics is an emerging approach in a systems biology field. Due to continuous development in advanced analytical techniques and in bioinformatics, metabolomics has been extensively applied as a novel, holistic diagnostic tool in clinical and biomedical studies. Metabolome's measurement, as a chemical reflection of a current phenotype of a particular biological system, is nowadays frequently implemented to understand pathophysiological processes involved in disease progression as well as to search for new diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of various organism's disorders. In this review, we discussed the research strategies and analytical platforms commonly applied in the metabolomics studies. The applications of the metabolomics in laboratory diagnostics in the last 5 years were also reviewed according to the type of biological sample used in the metabolome's analysis. We also discussed some limitations and further improvements which should be considered taking in mind potential applications of metabolomic research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Erosion protection conferred by whole human saliva, dialysed saliva, and artificial saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Kozik, J.; Lussi, A.; Carvalho, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    During dental erosion, tooth minerals are dissolved, leading to a softening of the surface and consequently to irreversible surface loss. Components from human saliva form a pellicle on the tooth surface, providing some protection against erosion. To assess the effect of different components and compositions of saliva on the protective potential of the pellicle against enamel erosion, we prepared four different kinds of saliva: human whole stimulated saliva (HS), artificial saliva containing only ions (AS), human saliva dialysed against artificial saliva, containing salivary proteins and ions (HS/AS), and human saliva dialysed against deionised water, containing only salivary proteins but no ions (HS/DW). Enamel specimens underwent four cycles of immersion in either HS, AS, HS/AS, HS/DW, or a humid chamber (Ctrl), followed by erosion with citric acid. During the cycling process, the surface hardness and the calcium released from the surface of the specimens were measured. The different kinds of saliva provided different levels of protection, HS/DW exhibiting significantly better protection than all the other groups (p saliva, therefore, have different effects on the protective properties of the pellicle and the right proportions of these components in saliva are critical for the ability to form a protective pellicle.

  9. Burning mouth and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Kustner, Eduardo; Marques-Soares, Maria Sueli

    2002-01-01

    Stomatodynia is the complaint of burning, tickling or itching of the oral cavity, and can be associated with other oral and non-oral signs and symptoms. However, the oral mucosa often appears normal, with no apparent underlying organic cause to account for the symptomatology. The etiology is unknown, though evidence points to the participation of numerous local, systemic and psychological factors. Among the local factors, saliva may play an important role in the symptoms of burning mouth. Saliva possesses specific rheological properties as a result of its chemical, physical and biological characteristics - these properties being essential for maintaining balanced conditions within the oral cavity. Patients with burning mouth present evidence of changes in salivary composition and flow, as well as a probable alteration in the oral mucosal sensory perception related particularly to dry mouth and taste alterations. On the other hand, alterations in salivary composition appear to reflect on its viscosity and symptomatology of burning mouth. Saliva is a field open to much research related to burning mouth, and knowledge of its properties (e.g., viscosity) merits special attention in view of its apparent relationship to the symptoms of burning mouth. The present study describes our clinical experience with burning mouth, and discusses some of the aspects pointing to salivary alterations as one of the most important factors underlying stomatodynia.

  10. Microbial community profiling of human saliva using shotgun metagenomic sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur A Hasan

    Full Text Available Human saliva is clinically informative of both oral and general health. Since next generation shotgun sequencing (NGS is now widely used to identify and quantify bacteria, we investigated the bacterial flora of saliva microbiomes of two healthy volunteers and five datasets from the Human Microbiome Project, along with a control dataset containing short NGS reads from bacterial species representative of the bacterial flora of human saliva. GENIUS, a system designed to identify and quantify bacterial species using unassembled short NGS reads was used to identify the bacterial species comprising the microbiomes of the saliva samples and datasets. Results, achieved within minutes and at greater than 90% accuracy, showed more than 175 bacterial species comprised the bacterial flora of human saliva, including bacteria known to be commensal human flora but also Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Gamma proteobacteria. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTn analysis in parallel, reported ca. five times more species than those actually comprising the in silico sample. Both GENIUS and BLAST analyses of saliva samples identified major genera comprising the bacterial flora of saliva, but GENIUS provided a more precise description of species composition, identifying to strain in most cases and delivered results at least 10,000 times faster. Therefore, GENIUS offers a facile and accurate system for identification and quantification of bacterial species and/or strains in metagenomic samples.

  11. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojiao Zheng; Tianlu Chen; Aihua Zhao; Xiaoyan Wang; Guoxiang Xie; Fengjie Huang; Jiajian Liu; Qing Zhao; Shouli Wang; Chongchong Wang; Mingmei Zhou; Jun Panee; Zhigang He; Wei Jia

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and ami...

  12. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  13. Metabolomics, Nutrition, and Potential Biomarkers of Food Quality, Intake, and Health Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sébédio, Jean-Louis

    Diet, dietary patterns, and other environmental factors such as exposure to toxins are playing an important role in the prevention/development of many diseases, like obesity, type 2 diabetes, and consequently on the health status of individuals. A major challenge nowadays is to identify novel biomarkers to detect as early as possible metabolic dysfunction and to predict evolution of health status in order to refine nutritional advices to specific population groups. Omics technologies such as genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics coupled with statistical and bioinformatics tools have already shown great potential in this research field even if so far only few biomarkers have been validated. For the past two decades, important analytical techniques have been developed to detect as many metabolites as possible in human biofluids such as urine, blood, and saliva. In the field of food science and nutrition, many studies have been carried out for food authenticity, quality, and safety, as well as for food processing. Furthermore, metabolomic investigations have been carried out to discover new early biomarkers of metabolic dysfunction and predictive biomarkers of developing pathologies (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type-2 diabetes, etc.). Great emphasis is also placed in the development of methodologies to identify and validate biomarkers of nutrients exposure. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid for diagnostic purposes. Glycoproteins, glucose, steroids, DNA, and other molecules of diagnostic value are found in saliva. It is easier to collect as compared to blood or urine. Unfortunately, saliva also contains large numbers of bacteria that can release enzymes, which can degrade proteins and nucleic acids. These degradative enzymes destroy or reduce saliva s diagnostic value. This innovation describes the formulation of a chemical preservative that prevents microbial growth and inactivates the degradative enzymes. This extends the time that saliva can be stored or transported without losing its diagnostic value. Multiple samples of saliva can be collected if needed without causing discomfort to the subject and it does not require any special facilities to handle after it is collected.

  15. Bioinformatics advances in saliva diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Ji-Ye; Smith, Barry; Wong, David T W

    2012-06-01

    There is a need recognized by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research and the National Cancer Institute to advance basic, translational and clinical saliva research. The goal of the Salivaomics Knowledge Base (SKB) is to create a data management system and web resource constructed to support human salivaomics research. To maximize the utility of the SKB for retrieval,integration and analysis of data, we have developed the Saliva Ontology and SDxMart. This article reviews the informatics advances in saliva diagnostics made possible by the Saliva Ontology and SDxMart.

  16. Boca ardiente y saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo; Marques Soares, Maria Sueli

    2002-01-01

    La sensación de ardor, escozor o picor generalizados en la cavidad bucal se denomina estomatodinia. Es un síntoma que puede guardar relación con otros síntomas o signos orales y no orales. Sin embargo, es frecuente que la mucosa bucal esté normal, no observándose una causa orgánica que justifique la sintomatología. Su etiología es desconocida, a pesar de que hay indicios de la participación de numerosos factores locales, sistémicos y psicológicos. Entre los factores locales, la saliva puede d...

  17. Metabolomic Studies in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James E; Thummel, Carl S; Tennessen, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis provides a powerful new tool for studies of Drosophila physiology. This approach allows investigators to detect thousands of chemical compounds in a single sample, representing the combined contributions of gene expression, enzyme activity, and environmental context. Metabolomics has been used for a wide range of studies in Drosophila, often providing new insights into gene function and metabolic state that could not be obtained using any other approach. In this review, we survey the uses of metabolomic analysis since its entry into the field. We also cover the major methods used for metabolomic studies in Drosophila and highlight new directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. A comparison of four sputum pre-extraction preparation methods for identifying and characterising Mycobacterium tuberculosis using GCxGC-TOFMS metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Johannes C; du Preez, Ilse; Loots, Du Toit

    2012-11-01

    In many pulmonary diseases, sputum is a valuable sample material for use in disease characterisation and diagnostics. However, due to its high viscosity and uneven consistency (lumpiness), it is difficult to obtain reproducible/repeatable results during compound extraction and analysis. We subsequently investigated and compared four sputum pre-extraction preparation methods using: 1) Sputolysin; 2) a combination of N-acetyl-l-cysteine and sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH); 3) NaOH alone, and 4) a simple ethanol homogenisation method, prior to sputum extraction and metabolomics analyses. The simple ethanol homogenisation approach proved to be the comparatively superior sputum pre-extraction preparation method, considering its repeatability, the number of characteristic compounds extracted, its ability to extract those compounds best differentiating the sample groups (Mycobacterium tuberculosis-spiked and clinically confirmed TB-positive patient samples from each of the controls respectively), and its detection limit. This developed methodology subsequently allows for accurate GC based analyses of sputum, and hence, could contribute significantly to the better characterisation or diagnostics of not only tuberculosis, but also potentially other pulmonary diseases, including, interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, pneumonia and any other bacterial induced pulmonary diseases producing sputum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A proteomic approach to porcine saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ana M; Cerón, José J; Fuentes-Rubio, María; Tecles, Fernando; Beeley, Josie A

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in salivary animal proteomics, with special reference to the porcine proteome. Until fairly recently, most studies on saliva as a diagnostic fluid have focused on humans, primates and rodents, and the development of salivary analysis in monitoring health in farm animals including pigs has received only limited consideration. The porcine salivary proteome has been characterised by 2D-electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Major and minor proteins have been identified. The use of saliva as a non-invasive biological fluid in monitoring health and disease in pigs will be reviewed, together with the potential use of proteomics for the development of biomarkers. In this review, methods of collection and the composition of porcine saliva will be considered, together with saliva handling and analysis. The overall findings indicate that there is considerable potential for the development of salivary analysis as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid in the pig, and that it offers advantages over other body fluids in this animal.

  20. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-07

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Radioimmunoassay of thyroxine in saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Z.; Vanuga, A.; Veleminsky, J. (Institute of Clinical Endocrinology, Lubochna (Czechoslovakia))

    1985-04-01

    A simple radioimmunoassay (RIA) for thyroxine (T/sub 4/) in saliva has been described. Fifty euthyroid control subjects, 14 euthyroid pregnant women, 23 thyreotoxic and 10 hypothyroid patients were examined. Serum T/sub 3/, T/sub 4/, thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) and TSH were measured simultaneously. The mean level of T/sub 4/ in saliva in controls was 1.10 +- 0.07 nmol/l. There was a good correlation between the saliva and serum T/sub 4/ concentrations (r = 0.74) and between saliva T/sub 4/ values and the T/sub 4//TBG ratio (r = 0.83). The saliva T/sub 4/ levels, like serum free T/sub 4/, were not dependent on fluctuations of serum TBG concentrations. In euthyroid pregnant women, saliva T/sub 4/ levels were within the normal range while the serum T/sub 4/ and TBG were increased. There was a good agreement of saliva T/sub 4/ values with the functional state of the thyroid. Thus, the RIA of saliva T/sub 4/ could replace the laborious determination of serum free T/sub 4/. It can especially be useful in instances with abnormal values of TBG, as it is in pregnancy, in congenital deficiency of serum TBG or in subjects with hereditary elevated TBG levels.

  2. Cortisol in urine and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurwitz Eller, N; Netterstrøm, B; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis.......The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis....

  3. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Lakshman

    2007-10-01

    The use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid for various human ailments is gaining popularity as it offers distinct advantages over serum. These include the non-invasive nature of saliva collection compared with phlebotomy, simplicity of collection even for individuals with a modest training and the cost-effective applicability for screening large populations. Whole saliva is most frequently used for diagnosis of systemic diseases since it is readily collected and contains serum constituents while gland-specific saliva is useful for investigating pathology of major salivary glands. Broadly, saliva analysis is currently used for the diagnosis of infectious and malignant diseases, hereditary disorders, autoimmune diseases, and endocrine disorders, as well as for the assessment of therapeutic drug levels, particularly in monitoring drug abuse. This review addresses the current status of salivary diagnostics and their future potential.

  4. Statistical methods in metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Alexander; Oh, Amy; Raskind, Alexander; Banks, David

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics is the relatively new field in bioinformatics that uses measurements on metabolite abundance as a tool for disease diagnosis and other medical purposes. Although closely related to proteomics, the statistical analysis is potentially simpler since biochemists have significantly more domain knowledge about metabolites. This chapter reviews the challenges that metabolomics poses in the areas of quality control, statistical metrology, and data mining.

  5. Metabolomics across the globe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Summer, L.W.; Hall, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights some of the larger and more recent metabolomics activities which are funded and organised at local (mostly national) level. While being just a snap-shot, and far from exhaustive, the details clearly illustrate the extent to which metabolomics has already become established

  6. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid. Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Álamo, Silvia; Mancheño-Franch, Aisha; Marzal-Gamarra, Cristina; Carlos-Fabuel, Laura

    2012-10-01

    There is a growing interest in diagnosis based on the analysis of saliva. This is a simple, non-invasive method of obtaining oral samples which is safe for both the health worker and the patient, not to mention allowing for simple and cost-efficient storage. The majority of studies use general saliva samples in their entirety, complex fluids containing both local and systemic sources and whose composition corresponds to that of the blood. General saliva contains a considerable amount of desquamated epithelial cells, microorganisms and remnants of food and drink; it is essential to cleanse and refine the saliva samples to remove any external elements. Immediate processing of the sample is recommended in order to avoid decomposition, where this is not possible, the sample may be stored at -80ºC. Salivary analysis - much the same as blood analysis - aims to identify diverse medication or indications of certain diseases while providing a relatively simple tool for both early diagnosis and monitoring various irregularities. The practicalities of salivary analysis have been studied in fields such as: viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases (like Sjögren's syndrome and cɶliac disease), endocrinopathies (such as Cushing's syndrome), oncology (early diagnosis of breast, lung and stomach carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma), stress assessment, medication detection and forensic science among others. It is hoped that salivary analysis, with the help of current technological advances, will be valued much more highly in the near future. There still remain contradictory results with respect to analytic markers, which is why further studies into wider-ranging samples are fundamental to prove its viability. Key words:Saliva, biomarkers, early diagnosis.

  7. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid. Literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheño-Franch, Aisha; Marzal-Gamarra, Cristina; Carlos-Fabuel, Laura

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in diagnosis based on the analysis of saliva. This is a simple, non-invasive method of obtaining oral samples which is safe for both the health worker and the patient, not to mention allowing for simple and cost-efficient storage. The majority of studies use general saliva samples in their entirety, complex fluids containing both local and systemic sources and whose composition corresponds to that of the blood. General saliva contains a considerable amount of desquamated epithelial cells, microorganisms and remnants of food and drink; it is essential to cleanse and refine the saliva samples to remove any external elements. Immediate processing of the sample is recommended in order to avoid decomposition, where this is not possible, the sample may be stored at -80ºC. Salivary analysis – much the same as blood analysis – aims to identify diverse medication or indications of certain diseases while providing a relatively simple tool for both early diagnosis and monitoring various irregularities. The practicalities of salivary analysis have been studied in fields such as: viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases (like Sjögren’s syndrome and cɶliac disease), endocrinopathies (such as Cushing’s syndrome), oncology (early diagnosis of breast, lung and stomach carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma), stress assessment, medication detection and forensic science among others. It is hoped that salivary analysis, with the help of current technological advances, will be valued much more highly in the near future. There still remain contradictory results with respect to analytic markers, which is why further studies into wider-ranging samples are fundamental to prove its viability. Key words:Saliva, biomarkers, early diagnosis. PMID:24558562

  8. Metabolomics: Developing a chemical specific fingerprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Joel G.

    2016-01-01

    We combine cell assays and metabolomics to create a powerful tool, which emerges to elevate the identification of new control chemicals. We combined the use of bigheaded carp fry cell line with metabolite profiling to describe the dose response to thiram. Thiram is a registered pesticide commonly used as a fungicide in the field or as a seed protectant and is known to be toxic to fish. Seven concentrations of thiram were used to dose bighead carp fry cells and silver carp fry cells. We identified 700 metabolomic markers and 41 of those markers exhibited a dose response to thiram in the bighead carp fry cells. We identified 1590 metabolomic markers with 205 of those markers exhibited a dose response to thiram in the silver carp fry cells. When the metabolites of both cell lines are compared using volcano plots, 16 metabolomic markers were identified as significant. A smaller subset of metabolites indicate that a thiram specific metabolomic fingerprint exists that is not species specific, but instead toxin specific. Application of toxin fingerprints (toxin specific but species independent metabolites) can be used to address the cause of ecological significant events, such as mass fish kills.

  9. Functional metabolomics reveals novel active products in the DHA metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu eShinohara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous mechanisms for successful resolution of an acute inflammatory response and the local return to homeostasis are of interest because excessive inflammation underlies many human diseases. In this review, we provide an update and overview of functional metabolomics that identified a new bioactive metabolome of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Systematic studies revealed that DHA was converted to DHEA-derived novel bioactive products as well as aspirin-triggered (AT forms of protectins. The new oxygenated DHEA derived products blocked PMN chemotaxis, reduced P-selectin expression and platelet-leukocyte adhesion, and showed organ protection in ischemia/reperfusion injury. These products activated cannabinoid receptor (CB2 receptor and not CB1 receptors. The AT-PD1 reduced neutrophil (PMN recruitment in murine peritonitis. With human cells, AT-PD1 decreased transendothelial PMN migration as well as enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic human PMN by macrophages. The recent findings reviewed here indicate that DHEA oxidative metabolism and aspirin-triggered conversion of DHA produce potent novel molecules with anti-inflammatory and organ-protective properties, opening the DHA metabolome functional roles.

  10. The functions of human saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dawes, C; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Villa, A

    2015-01-01

    as a buffer to protect oral, pharyngeal and oesophageal mucosae from orally ingested acid or acid regurgitated from the stomach. Saliva protects the teeth against acid by contributing to the acquired enamel pellicle, which forms a renewable lubricant between opposing tooth surfaces, by being supersaturated...... with respect to tooth mineral, by containing bicarbonate as a buffer and urea and by facilitating clearance of acidic materials from the mouth. Saliva contains many antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal agents which modulate the oral microbial flora in different ways. Saliva also facilitates the healing...

  11. [The diagnostic possibilities of saliva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochurova, E V; Kozlov, S V

    2014-01-01

    Saliva is a clinically informative biological fluid which contains multitude of bio-markers. This characteristic makes it possible to carry out numerous analyzes for developing mode to test patient in situ, express-tests included. The diagnostic by saliva is a new area of more simple application both markers and analyzers that can be useful in diagnostic of diseases of oral cavity, oncological diseases included. The using of saliva expands perspectives for making clinical diagnosis and establishment of dynamics and monitoring of disease.

  12. Comparative analysis of bacterial profiles in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The microbial profiles of stimulated saliva samples have been shown to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, patients with dental caries, and orally healthy individuals. Saliva was stimulated to allow for easy and rapid collection; however, microbial composition may not reflect the more natural, unstimulated state. The purpose of this study was to validate whether stimulated saliva is an adequate surrogate for unstimulated saliva in determining salivary microbiomes. Design: Unstimulated (n=20 and stimulated (n=20 saliva samples were collected from 20 orally and systemically healthy, non-smoking participants. Salivary bacterial profiles were analyzed by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS, and statistical analysis was performed using Mann–Whitney test with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparison, cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and correspondence analysis. Results: From a total of 40 saliva samples, 496 probe targets were identified with a mean number of targets per sample of 203 (range: 146–303, and a mean number of probe targets of 206 and 200 in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples, respectively (p=0.62. Based on all statistical methods used for this study, the microbial profiles of unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples collected from the same person were not statistically significantly different. Conclusions: Analysis of bacterial salivary profiles in unstimulated and stimulated saliva samples collected from the same individual showed comparable results. Thus, the results verify that stimulated saliva is an adequate surrogate of unstimulated saliva for microbiome-related studies.

  13. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  14. Application of Metabolomics in Thyroid Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wojakowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with four major types distinguished on the basis of histopathological features: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Classification of thyroid cancer is the primary step in the assessment of prognosis and selection of the treatment. However, in some cases, cytological and histological patterns are inconclusive; hence, classification based on histopathology could be supported by molecular biomarkers, including markers identified with the use of high-throughput “omics” techniques. Beside genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomic approach emerges as the most downstream attitude reflecting phenotypic changes and alterations in pathophysiological states of biological systems. Metabolomics using mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques allows qualitative and quantitative profiling of small molecules present in biological systems. This approach can be applied to reveal metabolic differences between different types of thyroid cancer and to identify new potential candidates for molecular biomarkers. In this review, we consider current results concerning application of metabolomics in the field of thyroid cancer research. Recent studies show that metabolomics can provide significant information about the discrimination between different types of thyroid lesions. In the near future, one could expect a further progress in thyroid cancer metabolomics leading to development of molecular markers and improvement of the tumor types classification and diagnosis.

  15. Nutritional Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde

    strategy influences the patterns identified as important for the nutritional question under study. Therefore, in depth understanding of the study design and the specific effects of the analytical technology on the produced data is extremely important to achieve high quality data handling. Besides data......-carnitines and ketone bodies were only detected in the rat study (PAPER I). The study group in PAPER III were from a largely un-controlled observational setting with varying quality and quantity of food intake as well as varying time from last meal. This may be the cause why fewer compounds were extracted in this study...

  16. Novel Approach to Identify Potential Bioactive Plant Metabolites: Pharmacological and Metabolomics Analyses of Ethanol and Hot Water Extracts of Several Canadian Medicinal Plants of the Cree of Eeyou Istchee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Nan; Saleem, Ammar; Musallam, Lina; Walshe-Roussel, Brendan; Badawi, Alaa; Cuerrier, Alain; Arnason, John T; Haddad, Pierre S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated and compared the antidiabetic potential and molecular mechanisms of 17 Cree plants' ethanol extracts (EE) and hot water extracts (HWE) on glucose homeostasis in vitro and used metabolomics to seek links with the content of specific phytochemicals. Several EE of medical plants stimulated muscle glucose uptake and inhibited hepatic G6Pase activity. Some HWE partially or completely lost these antidiabetic activities in comparison to EE. Only R. groenlandicum retained similar potential between EE and HWE in both assays. In C2C12 muscle cells, EE of R. groenlandicum, A. incana and S. purpurea stimulated glucose uptake by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and increasing glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) expression. In comparison to EE, HWE of R. groenlandicum exhibited similar activities; HWE of A. incana completely lost its effect on all parameters; interestingly, HWE of S. purpurea activated insulin pathway instead of AMPK pathway to increase glucose uptake. In the liver, for a subset of 5 plants, HWE and EE activated AMPK pathway whereas the EE and HWE of S. purpurea and K. angustifolia also activated insulin pathways. Quercetin-3-O-galactoside and quercetin 3-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside, were successfully identified by discriminant analysis as biomarkers of HWE plant extracts that stimulate glucose uptake in vitro. More importantly, the latter compound was not identified by previous bioassay-guided fractionation.

  17. Saliva as a diagnostic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Richard; Simek, Jiri; Vondrakova, Jana; Faber, Edgar; Michl, Petr; Pazdera, Jindrich; Indrak, Karel

    2009-06-01

    This is a review of current knowledge on the use of saliva, gingival cervical fluid and mucosal transudate in the detection of some oral and systemic diseases as well as drugs. Oral fluid is a diagnostic medium that can be easily collected and with minimal invasion but it has been neglected in the past. Today, saliva is being used more often to diagnose: HIV virus, oro-facial and systemic tumors, cardiovascular disease and in detecting addictive substances. Neutropil levels in saliva may also indicate successful bone marrow transplant. Oral fluid is now systematically being researched and oral fluid analysis is being compared with the analysis of other diagnostic media such as blood and urine. A number of recent studies have focused on oncogenic marker detection and its monitoring in saliva. The latest clinical and laboratory findings on diagnostic markers of oropharyngeal carcinoma in oral fluid could be the beginning of their wider use as a diagnostic medium. Oral fluid can also be also used to diagnose other malignancies such as breast cancer which was one of the first malignant tumors to be detected using genetic protein biomarkers. Raised levels of CA15-3 and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor have been found in patients with breast cancer and elevated levels of CA 125 and the glycoprotein complex in the saliva of ovarian cancer patients. Doubtless, the diagnostic value of saliva, aided by current technological development will increase rapidly in the near future.

  18. Fatty acids and small organic compounds bind to mineralo-organic nanoparticles derived from human body fluids as revealed by metabolomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Jan; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Hung, Cheng-Yu; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Young, John D

    2016-03-14

    Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a "protein corona" that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an "organic corona" containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body.

  19. Saliva as a potential diagnostic tool

    OpenAIRE

    T Deepa; N Thirrunavukkarasu

    2010-01-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid consisting of secretions from the major and minor salivary glands. Gland-specific saliva can be used to diagnose any pathology from the specific major salivary gland. Whole saliva has serum constituents that are derived from the local vasculature of the salivary glands and gingival crevicular fluid. Saliva, as a diagnostic fluid, has distinctive advantages over serum as whole saliva can be collected non-invasively by individuals with limited training using simple equ...

  20. Environmental metabolomics: a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marion G

    2007-02-01

    Metabolomic approaches have the potential to make an exceptional contribution to understanding how chemicals and other environmental stressors can affect both human and environmental health. However, the application of metabolomics to environmental exposures, although getting underway, has not yet been extensively explored. This review will use a SWOT analysis model to discuss some of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that are apparent to an investigator venturing into this relatively new field. SWOT has been used extensively in business settings to uncover new outlooks and identify problems that would impede progress. The field of environmental metabolomics provides great opportunities for discovery, and this is recognized by a high level of interest in potential applications. However, understanding the biological consequence of environmental exposures can be confounded by inter- and intra-individual differences. Metabolomic profiles can yield a plethora of data, the interpretation of which is complex and still being evaluated and researched. The development of the field will depend on the availability of technologies for data handling and that permit ready access metabolomic databases. Understanding the relevance of metabolomic endpoints to organism health vs adaptation vs variation is an important step in understanding what constitutes a substantive environmental threat. Metabolomic applications in reproductive research are discussed. Overall, the development of a comprehensive mechanistic-based interpretation of metabolomic changes offers the possibility of providing information that will significantly contribute to the protection of human health and the environment.

  1. Untargeted Metabolomics Strategies—Challenges and Emerging Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Sherrod, Stacy D.; McLean, John A.

    2016-12-01

    Metabolites are building blocks of cellular function. These species are involved in enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions and are essential for cellular function. Upstream biological disruptions result in a series of metabolomic changes and, as such, the metabolome holds a wealth of information that is thought to be most predictive of phenotype. Uncovering this knowledge is a work in progress. The field of metabolomics is still maturing; the community has leveraged proteomics experience when applicable and developed a range of sample preparation and instrument methodology along with myriad data processing and analysis approaches. Research focuses have now shifted toward a fundamental understanding of the biology responsible for metabolomic changes. There are several types of metabolomics experiments including both targeted and untargeted analyses. While untargeted, hypothesis generating workflows exhibit many valuable attributes, challenges inherent to the approach remain. This Critical Insight comments on these challenges, focusing on the identification process of LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics studies—specifically in mammalian systems. Biological interpretation of metabolomics data hinges on the ability to accurately identify metabolites. The range of confidence associated with identifications that is often overlooked is reviewed, and opportunities for advancing the metabolomics field are described.

  2. The human urine metabolome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bouatra, Souhaila; Aziat, Farid; Mandal, Rupasri; Guo, An Chi; Wilson, Michael R; Knox, Craig; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Saleem, Fozia; Liu, Philip; Dame, Zerihun T; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Yallou, Faizath S; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bogumil, Ralf; Roehring, Cornelia; Wishart, David S

    2013-01-01

    .... Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine...

  3. Metabolomic studies in pulmonology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Furina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review shows the results of metabolomic studies in pulmonology. The key idea of metabolomics is to detect specific biomarkers in a biological sample for the diagnosis of diseases of the bronchi and lung. Main methods for the separation and identification of volatile organic substances as biomarkers (gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry used in metabolomics are given. A solid-phase microextraction method used to pre-prepare a sample is also covered. The results of laboratory tests for biomarkers for lung cancer, acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, chronic infections, and pulmonary tuberculosis are presented. In addition, emphasis is placed on the possibilities of metabolomics used in experimental medicine, including to the study of asthma. The information is of interest to both theorists and practitioners.

  4. Systematic comparison of the human saliva and plasma proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Weihong; Apweiler, Rolf; Balgley, Brian M.; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Bundy, Jonathan L.; Cargile, Benjamin J.; Cole, Steve; Fang, Xueping; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Griffin, Timothy J.; Hagen, Fred; Hu, Shen; Wolinsky, Lawrence E.; Lee, Cheng S.; Malamud, Daniel; Melvin, James E.; Menon, Rajasree; Mueller, Michael; Qiao, Renli; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Sevinsky, Joel R.; States, David; Stephenson, James L.; Than, Shawn; Yates, John R.; Yu, Weixia; Xie, Hongwei; Xie, Yongming; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Loo, Joseph A.; Wong, David T.

    2009-01-01

    The proteome of human salivary fluid has the potential to open new doors for disease biomarker discovery. A recent study to comprehensively identify and catalog the human ductal salivary proteome led to the compilation of 1166 proteins. The protein complexity of both saliva and plasma is large, suggesting that a comparison of these two proteomes will provide valuable insight into their physiological significance and an understanding of the unique and overlapping disease diagnostic potential that each fluid provides. To create a more comprehensive catalog of human salivary proteins, we have first compiled an extensive list of proteins from whole saliva (WS) identified through MS experiments. The WS list is thereafter combined with the proteins identified from the ductal parotid, and submandibular and sublingual (parotid/SMSL) salivas. In parallel, a core dataset of the human plasma proteome with 3020 protein identifications was recently released. A total of 1939 nonredundant salivary proteins were compiled from a total of 19 474 unique peptide sequences identified from whole and ductal salivas; 740 out of the total 1939 salivary proteins were identified in both whole and ductal saliva. A total of 597 of the salivary proteins have been observed in plasma. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed similarities in the distributions of the saliva and plasma proteomes with regard to cellular localization, biological processes, and molecular function, but revealed differences which may be related to the different physiological functions of saliva and plasma. The comprehensive catalog of the salivary proteome and its comparison to the plasma proteome provides insights useful for future study, such as exploration of potential biomarkers for disease diagnostics. PMID:19898684

  5. Metabolomics er fremtiden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersern, Birger

    2010-01-01

    Forskningen i fødevarer har fået et potent redskab i hånden. Metabolomics er vejen frem, mener professor Søren Balling Engelsen fra Københavns Universitet......Forskningen i fødevarer har fået et potent redskab i hånden. Metabolomics er vejen frem, mener professor Søren Balling Engelsen fra Københavns Universitet...

  6. Fatty acids and small organic compounds bind to mineralo-organic nanoparticles derived from human body fluids as revealed by metabolomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Jan; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Hung, Cheng-Yu; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Young, John D.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a ``protein corona'' that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an ``organic corona'' containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body.Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a ``protein corona'' that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an ``organic corona'' containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See

  7. Capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry based metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Buko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE-MS is a powerful orthogonal technique capable of filling in gaps in the identification, quantitation and isomeric resolution of many small hydrophilic and charged metabolites. The metabolome is a large complex mixture of molecules for which not one technique nor a combination of techniques can optimally identify and measure it in it’s entirety. LC-MS, GC-MS and NMR have been the widely used for metabolomics for the past 20 years for a wide range of applications, each technique having shown uniqueness and advantages, for specific applications or target metabolic chemical space. CE-MS captures a unique metabolic chemical space beyond these standard methods providing another window into metabolomics profiling. This review will focus on the recent publications published within 2016 focusing on biotechnology and pharmaceutical applications of CE-MS.

  8. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R.; Dalsgaard, Trine K.; Bertram, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health. PMID:26091233

  9. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Clausen, Morten R; Dalsgaard, Trine K; Bertram, Hanne C

    2015-06-17

    Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  10. Metabolomic heterogeneity of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidan Zhao

    Full Text Available Although multiple gene and protein expression have been extensively profiled in human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, the mechanism for the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension remains elusive. Analysis of the global metabolomic heterogeneity within the pulmonary vascular system leads to a better understanding of disease progression. Using a combination of high-throughput liquid-and-gas-chromatography-based mass spectrometry, we showed unbiased metabolomic profiles of disrupted glycolysis, increased TCA cycle, and fatty acid metabolites with altered oxidation pathways in the human PAH lung. The results suggest that PAH has specific metabolic pathways contributing to increased ATP synthesis for the vascular remodeling process in severe pulmonary hypertension. These identified metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of PAH. By profiling metabolomic alterations of the PAH lung, we reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of PAH, opening an avenue of exploration for therapeutics that target metabolic pathway alterations in the progression of PAH.

  11. Metabolomics: Definitions and Significance in Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Aline; Faccio, Andréa Tedesco; Canuto, Gisele André Baptista; da Cruz, Pedro Luis Rocha; Ribeiro, Henrique Caracho; Tavares, Marina Franco Maggi; Sussulini, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest in deeply understanding biological mechanisms not only at the molecular level (biological components) but also the effects of an ongoing biological process in the organism as a whole (biological functionality), as established by the concept of systems biology. Within this context, metabolomics is one of the most powerful bioanalytical strategies that allow obtaining a picture of the metabolites of an organism in the course of a biological process, being considered as a phenotyping tool. Briefly, metabolomics approach consists in identifying and determining the set of metabolites (or specific metabolites) in biological samples (tissues, cells, fluids, or organisms) under normal conditions in comparison with altered states promoted by disease, drug treatment, dietary intervention, or environmental modulation. The aim of this chapter is to review the fundamentals and definitions used in the metabolomics field, as well as to emphasize its importance in systems biology and clinical studies.

  12. NMR metabolomics of renal cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana M; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Monteiro, Márcia S; Duarte, Iola F

    2015-09-23

    This paper reviews the use of NMR metabolomics for the metabolic characterization of renal cancer. The existing challenges in the clinical management of this disease are first presented, followed by a brief introduction to the metabolomics approach, in the context of cancer research. A subsequent review of the literature on NMR metabolic studies of renal cancer reveals that the subject has been clearly underdeveloped, compared with other types of cancer, particularly regarding cultured cells and tissue analysis. NMR analysis of biofluids has focused on blood (plasma or serum) metabolomics, comprising no account of studies on human urine, in spite of its noninvasiveness and physiological proximity to the affected organs. Finally, some areas of potential future development are identified.

  13. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  14. Metabolomic Heterogeneity of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yidan; Peng, Jenny; Lu, Catherine; Hsin, Michael; Mura, Marco; Wu, Licun; Chu, Lei; Zamel, Ricardo; Machuca, Tiago; Waddell, Thomas; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Granton, John; de Perrot, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple gene and protein expression have been extensively profiled in human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the mechanism for the development and progression of pulmonary hypertension remains elusive. Analysis of the global metabolomic heterogeneity within the pulmonary vascular system leads to a better understanding of disease progression. Using a combination of high-throughput liquid-and-gas-chromatography-based mass spectrometry, we showed unbiased metabolomic profiles of disrupted glycolysis, increased TCA cycle, and fatty acid metabolites with altered oxidation pathways in the human PAH lung. The results suggest that PAH has specific metabolic pathways contributing to increased ATP synthesis for the vascular remodeling process in severe pulmonary hypertension. These identified metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of PAH. By profiling metabolomic alterations of the PAH lung, we reveal new pathogenic mechanisms of PAH, opening an avenue of exploration for therapeutics that target metabolic pathway alterations in the progression of PAH. PMID:24533144

  15. The Proteomes of Human Parotid and Submandibular/Sublingual Gland Salivas Collected as the Ductal Secretions

    OpenAIRE

    Denny, Paul; Hagen, Fred K.; Hardt, Markus; Liao, Lujian; Yan, Weihong; Arellanno, Martha; Bassilian, Sara; Bedi, Gurrinder S.; Boontheung, Pinmannee; Cociorva, Daniel; Delahunty, Claire M.; Denny, Trish; Dunsmore, Jason; Faull, Kym F.; Gilligan, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Saliva is a body fluid with important functions in oral and general health. A consortium of three research groups catalogued the proteins in human saliva collected as the ductal secretions: 1166 identifications—914 in parotid and 917 in submandibular/sublingual saliva—were made. The results showed that a high proportion of proteins that are found in plasma and/or tears are also present in saliva along with unique components. The proteins identified are involved in numerous molecular processes...

  16. [Application and research advances of metabolomics in the field of orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhijian; Qiu, Guixing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Metabolomics is a subject of systematic, qualitative and quantitative analysis of all metabolites in all organisms, which is applied to finding biomarkers and studying pathogenesis of diseases. Study procedures of metabolomics include data acquisition by spectroscopic/spectrometric techniques, multivariate statistical analysis and projection of the acquired metabolomic information. In recent years, metabolomics have gained popularity in orthopedic field. Metabolomic study of osteoarthritis was firstly conducted and widely developed. Metabolite profiles of different samples, including serum/plasma, urine, synovial fluid and synovial tissue, were studied and dozens of differential metabolites and several disturbed metabolic pathways were found. In addition, metabolomic studies of osteoporosis, ankylosing spondylitis and bone tumors were also conducted, which identified many potential biomarkers and made further understanding of pathogenesis of corresponding disease. However, metabolomic studies in orthopedic field just begin. More orthopedic diseases will be researched thank to the satisfactory results of previous reports.

  17. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  18. Fluoroacetylation/fluoroethylesterification as a derivatization approach for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in metabolomics: preliminary study of lymphohyperplastic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamani, Anna A; Fiamegos, Yiannis Ch; Vartholomatos, George; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2013-08-09

    Metabolic fingerprinting in combination with gas chromatography and multivariate analysis is being extensively employed for the improved understanding of biological changes induced by endogenous or exogenous factors. Chemical derivatization increases the sensitivity and specificity of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for polar or thermally labile biological compounds, which bear derivatizable groups. Thus, there is a constant demand for simple methods of derivatization and separation that satisfy the need for metabolite analysis, identifying as many chemical classes of compounds as possible. In this study, an optimized protocol of extraction and derivatization is established as a generally applicable method for the analysis of a wide range of classes of metabolites in urine, whole blood and saliva. Compounds of biological relevance bearing hydroxyl- carboxyl- and amino-groups are derivatized using single-step fluoroacetylation/fluoroethylesterification after proper optimization of the protocol. Subsequently, the developed derivatization procedure is engaged in finding blood metabolic biomarkers, induced by lymphohyperplastic disease, through the metabolomic fingerprinting approach, the multivariate modeling (hierarchical cluster analysis) and GC-MS. Our preliminary, GC-MS-based metabolomic fingerprinting study underlines the contribution of certain metabolites to the discrimination of patients with lymphohyperplastic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Recommendations and Standardization of Biomarker Quantification Using NMR-based Metabolomics with Particular Focus on Urinary Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2016-01-08

    NMR-based metabolomics has shown considerable promise in disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery because it allows one to non-destructively identify and quantify large numbers of novel metabolite biomarkers in both biofluids and tissues. Indeed, precise metabolite quantification is a necessary prerequisite to move any chemical biomarker or biomarker panel from the lab into the clinic. Among the many biofluids (urine, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva) commonly used for disease diagnosis and prognosis, urine has several advantages. It is abundant, sterile, easily obtained, needs little sample preparation and does not require any invasive medical procedures for collection. Furthermore, urine captures and concentrates many “unwanted” or “undesirable” compounds throughout the body, thereby providing a rich source of potentially useful disease biomarkers. However, the incredible variation in urine chemical concentrations due to effects such as gender, age, diet, life style, health conditions, and physical activity make the analysis of urine and the identification of useful urinary biomarkers by NMR quite challenging. In this review, we discuss a number of the most significant issues regarding NMR-based urinary metabolomics with a specific emphasis on metabolite quantification for disease biomarker applications. We also propose a number of data collection and instrumental recommendations regarding NMR pulse sequences, acceptable acquisition parameter ranges, relaxation effects on quantitation, proper handling of instrumental differences, as well as recommendations regarding sample preparation and biomarker assessment.

  20. Can Untargeted Metabolomics Be Utilized in Drug Discovery/Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Gary W; Leo, Gregory C

    2017-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics is a promising approach for reducing the significant attrition rate for discovering and developing drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. This review aims to highlight the practical decision-making value of untargeted metabolomics for the advancement of drug candidates in drug discovery/development including potentially identifying and validating novel therapeutic targets, creating alternative screening paradigms, facilitating the selection of specific and translational metabolite biomarkers, identifying metabolite signatures for the drug efficacy mechanism of action, and understanding potential drug-induced toxicity. The review provides an overview of the pharmaceutical process workflow to discover and develop new small molecule drugs followed by the metabolomics process workflow that is involved in conducting metabolomics studies. The pros and cons of the major components of the pharmaceutical and metabolomics workflows are reviewed and discussed. Finally, selected untargeted metabolomics literature examples, from primarily 2010 to 2016, are used to illustrate why, how, and where untargeted metabolomics can be integrated into the drug discovery/preclinical drug development process. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  2. Metabolomic Identification of Subtypes of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina; Fernández-Ramos, David; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Arranz, Ibon; Navasa, Nicolás; Van Liempd, Sebastiaan M; Lavín Trueba, José L; Mayo, Rebeca; Ilisso, Concetta P; de Juan, Virginia G; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; delaCruz-Villar, Laura; Mincholé, Itziar; Robinson, Aaron; Crespo, Javier; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Sann, Holger; Platon, Julian; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Aspichueta, Patricia; Noureddin, Mazen; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Anguita, Juan; Aransay, Ana M; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M

    2017-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of defects in diverse metabolic pathways that involve hepatic accumulation of triglycerides. Features of these aberrations might determine whether NAFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We investigated whether the diverse defects observed in patients with NAFLD are caused by different NAFLD subtypes with specific serum metabolomic profiles, and whether these can distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis. We collected liver and serum from methionine adenosyltransferase 1a knockout (MAT1A-KO) mice, which have chronically low levels of hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and spontaneously develop steatohepatitis, as well as C57Bl/6 mice (controls); the metabolomes of all samples were determined. We also analyzed serum metabolomes of 535 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD (353 with simple steatosis and 182 with NASH) and compared them with serum metabolomes of mice. MAT1A-KO mice were also given SAMe (30 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks); liver samples were collected and analyzed histologically for steatohepatitis. Livers of MAT1A-KO mice were characterized by high levels of triglycerides, diglycerides, fatty acids, ceramides, and oxidized fatty acids, as well as low levels of SAMe and downstream metabolites. There was a correlation between liver and serum metabolomes. We identified a serum metabolomic signature associated with MAT1A-KO mice that also was present in 49% of the patients; based on this signature, we identified 2 NAFLD subtypes. We identified specific panels of markers that could distinguish patients with NASH from patients with simple steatosis for each subtype of NAFLD. Administration of SAMe reduced features of steatohepatitis in MAT1A-KO mice. In an analysis of serum metabolomes of patients with NAFLD and MAT1A-KO mice with steatohepatitis, we identified 2 major subtypes of NAFLD and markers that differentiate steatosis from NASH in each subtype. These might be

  3. Urinary Metabolomics Identifies a Molecular Correlate of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome in a Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveri S. Parker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS is a poorly understood syndrome affecting up to 6.5% of adult women in the U.S. The lack of broadly accepted objective laboratory markers for this condition hampers efforts to diagnose and treat this condition. To identify biochemical markers for IC/BPS, we applied mass spectrometry-based global metabolite profiling to urine specimens from a cohort of female IC/BPS subjects from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network. These analyses identified multiple metabolites capable of discriminating IC/BPS and control subjects. Of these candidate markers, etiocholan-3α-ol-17-one sulfate (Etio-S, a sulfoconjugated 5-β reduced isomer of testosterone, distinguished female IC/BPS and control subjects with a sensitivity and specificity >90%. Among IC/BPS subjects, urinary Etio-S levels are correlated with elevated symptom scores (symptoms, pelvic pain, and number of painful body sites and could resolve high- from low-symptom IC/BPS subgroups. Etio-S-associated biochemical changes persisted through 3–6 months of longitudinal follow up. These results raise the possibility that an underlying biochemical abnormality contributes to symptoms in patients with severe IC/BPS.

  4. Think Tank on Metabolomics and Prospective Cohorts: How to Leverage Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Think Tank identified resources that can be used collaboratively across prospective cohorts; developed strategies to leverage resources for advancing the use of metabolomics in prospective cohort studies; identified the best strategies for performing analyses using metabolomics data across multiple studies; and, established a collaborative group that will identify and tackle research projects that cannot be effectively investigated by one independent group.

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the fall armyworm saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Flor E; Stanley, Bruce A; Stanley, Anne; Peiffer, Michelle; Luthe, Dawn S; Felton, Gary W

    2017-07-01

    Lepidopteran larvae secrete saliva on plant tissues during feeding. Components in the saliva may aid in food digestion, whereas other components are recognized by plants as cues to elicit defense responses. Despite the ecological and economical importance of these plant-feeding insects, knowledge of their saliva composition is limited to a few species. In this study, we identified the salivary proteins of larvae of the fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda; determined qualitative and quantitative differences in the salivary proteome of the two host races-corn and rice strains-of this insect; and identified changes in total protein concentration and relative protein abundance in the saliva of FAW larvae associated with different host plants. Quantitative proteomic analyses were performed using labeling with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 98 proteins were identified (>99% confidence) in the FAW saliva. These proteins were further categorized into five functional groups: proteins potentially involved in (1) plant defense regulation, (2) herbivore offense, (3) insect immunity, (4) detoxification, (5) digestion, and (6) other functions. Moreover, there were differences in the salivary proteome between the FAW strains that were identified by label-free proteomic analyses. Thirteen differentially identified proteins were present in each strain. There were also differences in the relative abundance of eleven salivary proteins between the two FAW host strains as well as differences within each strain associated with different diets. The total salivary protein concentration was also different for the two strains reared on different host plants. Based on these results, we conclude that the FAW saliva contains a complex mixture of proteins involved in different functions that are specific for each strain and its composition can change plastically in response to diet type

  6. [The acoustic indicator of saliva under stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalenkova, M A; Mikhaĭlova, Z D; Klemin, V A; Korkotashvili, L V; Abanin, A M; Klemina, A V; Dolgov, V V

    2014-03-01

    The situation of stress affects various organs and systems that results in development of functional disorders and/or somatic diseases. As a result, different noninvasive, including salivary, techniques of diagnostic of stress conditions are in the process of development. The dynamics of acoustic indicator of saliva is studied during the period of passing the exams. The relationship of indicator with levels of potassium, sodium, glucose and protein of saliva was analyzed. The sampling consisted of 102 students of 5 and 6 academic years of medical university. To detect the acoustic indicator of saliva acoustic analyzer AKBa-01- "BIOM" was applied. The level of potassium and sodium in saliva was detected using method of flame photometry. The level of glucose in saliva was detected by glucose oxydase technique using analyzer "EXAN-G". The protein in saliva was detected by biuretic technique. The correlation between acoustic indicator of saliva and analyzed indicators of saliva was established.

  7. Single-Cell Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Samy; Amer, Sara; Ali, Ahmed; Abouleila, Yasmine; Oga, April; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of a cell is always changing. Cells move, divide, communicate, adapt, and are always reacting to their surroundings non-synchronously. Currently, single-cell metabolomics has become the leading field in understanding the phenotypical variations between them, but sample volumes, low analyte concentrations, and validating gentle sample techniques have proven great barriers toward achieving accurate and complete metabolomics profiling. Certainly, advanced technologies such as nanodevices and microfluidic arrays are making great progress, and analytical techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), are gaining popularity with high-throughput methodology. Nevertheless, live single-cell mass spectrometry (LCSMS) values the sample quality and precision, turning once theoretical speculation into present-day applications in a variety of fields, including those of medicine, pharmaceutical, and agricultural industries. While there is still room for much improvement, it is clear that the metabolomics field is progressing toward analysis and discoveries at the single-cell level.

  8. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Michael H.; Ward, Jane L.; Baker, John M.

    Modern ‘metabolomic’ methods allow us to compare levels of many structurally diverse compounds in an automated fashion across a large number of samples. This technology is ideally suited to screening of populations of plants, including trials where the aim is the determination of unintended effects introduced by GM. A number of metabolomic methods have been devised for the determination of substantial equivalence. We have developed a methodology, using [1H]-NMR fingerprinting, for metabolomic screening of plants and have applied it to the study of substantial equivalence of field-grown GM wheat. We describe here the principles and detail of that protocol as applied to the analysis of flour generated from field plots of wheat. Particular emphasis is given to the downstream data processing and comparison of spectra by multivariate analysis, from which conclusions regarding metabolome changes due to the GM can be assessed against the background of natural variation due to environment.

  9. Metabolomics Toward Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peiyuan; Xu, Guowang

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics has been used as practical tool in the discovery of novel biomarkers in a broad area in the clinic. The analytical platforms including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) can cover thousands of metabolites. With the help of multivariate data analysis, many potential biomarkers can be defined in the studies. Since metabolites stand at the end point of metabolism, it remains difficult to find novel biomarkers with good diagnostic or prognostic performance. In this chapter, we will introduce a general protocol for biomarker discovery within the scope of metabolomics using MS.

  10. Effect of glycine nitrogen on lettuce growth under soilless culture: a metabolomics approach to identify the main changes occurred in plant primary and secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Feng, Lei; Zhao, Li; Liu, Xiaosong; Hassani, Danial; Huang, Danfeng

    2018-01-01

    Lettuce is a significant source of antioxidants and bioactive compounds. Nitrate is a cardinal fertilizer in horticulture and influences vegetable yield and quality; however, the negative effects of nitrate on the biosynthesis of flavonoids require further study. It is expected that using fertilizers containing organic nitrogen (N) could promote the synthesis of health-promoting compounds. Lettuces were hydroponically cultured in media containing 9 mmol L -1 nitrate or 9 mmol L -1 glycine for 4 weeks. Primary and secondary metabolites were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/IMS/QTOF-MS). Data analysis revealed that 29 metabolites were significantly altered between nitrate and glycine treatments. Metabolites were tentatively identified by comparison with online databases, literature and standards and using collision cross-section values. Significant differences in flavonoid biosynthesis, phenolic biosynthesis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle response were observed between N sources. Compared with nitrate, glycine promoted accumulation of glycosylated flavonoids (quercetin 3-glucoside, quercetin 3-(6″-malonyl-glucoside), luteolin 7-glucuronide, luteolin 7-glucoside), ascorbic acid and amino acids (l-valine, l-leucine, l-glutamine, asparagine, l-serine, l-ornithine, 4-aminobutanoic acid, l-phenylalanine) but reduced phenolic acids (dihydroxybenzoic acid hexose isomers 1 and 2, chicoric acid, chicoric acid isomer 1) and TCA intermediates (fumaric, malic, citric and succinic acids). The novel methodology applied in this study can be used to characterize metabolites in lettuce. Accumulation of glycosylated flavonoids, amino acids and ascorbic acid in response to glycine supply provides strong evidence supporting the idea that using amino acids as an N source alters the nutritional value of vegetable crops. © 2017

  11. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  12. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6050 Saliva absorber. (a) Identification. A saliva...

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study with Targeted and Non-targeted NMR Metabolomics Identifies 15 Novel Loci of Urinary Human Metabolic Individuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Raffler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies with metabolic traits (mGWAS uncovered many genetic variants that influence human metabolism. These genetically influenced metabotypes (GIMs contribute to our metabolic individuality, our capacity to respond to environmental challenges, and our susceptibility to specific diseases. While metabolic homeostasis in blood is a well investigated topic in large mGWAS with over 150 known loci, metabolic detoxification through urinary excretion has only been addressed by few small mGWAS with only 11 associated loci so far. Here we report the largest mGWAS to date, combining targeted and non-targeted 1H NMR analysis of urine samples from 3,861 participants of the SHIP-0 cohort and 1,691 subjects of the KORA F4 cohort. We identified and replicated 22 loci with significant associations with urinary traits, 15 of which are new (HIBCH, CPS1, AGXT, XYLB, TKT, ETNPPL, SLC6A19, DMGDH, SLC36A2, GLDC, SLC6A13, ACSM3, SLC5A11, PNMT, SLC13A3. Two-thirds of the urinary loci also have a metabolite association in blood. For all but one of the 6 loci where significant associations target the same metabolite in blood and urine, the genetic effects have the same direction in both fluids. In contrast, for the SLC5A11 locus, we found increased levels of myo-inositol in urine whereas mGWAS in blood reported decreased levels for the same genetic variant. This might indicate less effective re-absorption of myo-inositol in the kidneys of carriers. In summary, our study more than doubles the number of known loci that influence urinary phenotypes. It thus allows novel insights into the relationship between blood homeostasis and its regulation through excretion. The newly discovered loci also include variants previously linked to chronic kidney disease (CPS1, SLC6A13, pulmonary hypertension (CPS1, and ischemic stroke (XYLB. By establishing connections from gene to disease via metabolic traits our results provide novel hypotheses about molecular

  15. Sample Stability and Protein Composition of Saliva: Implications for Its Use as a Diagnostic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Roelofsen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is an easy accessible plasma ultra-filtrate. Therefore, saliva can be an attractive alternative to blood for measurement of diagnostic protein markers. Our aim was to determine stability and protein composition of saliva. Protein stability at room temperature was examined by incubating fresh whole saliva with and without inhibitors of proteases and bacterial metabolism followed by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI analyses. Protein composition was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE fractionation of saliva proteins followed by digestion of excised bands and identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Results show that rapid protein degradation occurs within 30 minutes after sample collection. Degradation starts already during collection. Protease inhibitors partly prevented degradation while inhibition of bacterial metabolism did not affect degradation. Three stable degradation products of 2937 Da, 3370 Da and 4132 Da were discovered which can be used as markers to monitor sample quality. Saliva proteome analyses revealed 218 proteins of which 84 can also be found in blood plasma. Based on a comparison with seven other proteomics studies on whole saliva we identified 83 new saliva proteins. We conclude that saliva is a promising diagnostic fl uid when precautions are taken towards protein breakdown.

  16. The use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to detect proteins in saliva from horses with and without systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Top Adler, Ditte Marie; Bundgaard, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess global expression of proteins in equine saliva using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Saliva was obtained from seven horses with and six horses without evidence of systemic inflammatory disease. Tryptic peptides from saliva were...... analysed by LC-MS/MS. Of 195 unique proteins identified, 57 were detected only in saliva samples from horses with systemic inflammation (in two to six of the seven horses). Among the differentially expressed proteins were several acute phase proteins (APPs) such as serum amyloid A, fibrinogen, haptoglobin......, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein. The study is the first to describe detection of inflammatory proteins in horse saliva. The proteins detected were similar to those described in saliva from cattle, small ruminants and pigs. Detection of APPs in horses with systemic inflammation suggests that saliva may be used...

  17. Metabolomics in the fight against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jorge L; Kissinger, Jessica C; Jones, Dean P; Galinski, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Metabolomics uses high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide a chemical fingerprint of thousands of metabolites present in cells, tissues or body fluids. Such metabolic phenotyping has been successfully used to study various biologic processes and disease states. High-resolution metabolomics can shed new light on the intricacies of host-parasite interactions in each stage of the Plasmodium life cycle and the downstream ramifications on the host's metabolism, pathogenesis and disease. Such data can become integrated with other large datasets generated using top-down systems biology approaches and be utilised by computational biologists to develop and enhance models of malaria pathogenesis relevant for identifying new drug targets or intervention strategies. Here, we focus on the promise of metabolomics to complement systems biology approaches in the quest for novel interventions in the fight against malaria. We introduce the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC), a new systems biology research coalition. A primary goal of the MaHPIC is to generate systems biology datasets relating to human and non-human primate (NHP) malaria parasites and their hosts making these openly available from an online relational database. Metabolomic data from NHP infections and clinical malaria infections from around the world will comprise a unique global resource.

  18. Metabolomics in the fight against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Salinas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics uses high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide a chemical fingerprint of thousands of metabolites present in cells, tissues or body fluids. Such metabolic phenotyping has been successfully used to study various biologic processes and disease states. High-resolution metabolomics can shed new light on the intricacies of host-parasite interactions in each stage of the Plasmodium life cycle and the downstream ramifications on the host’s metabolism, pathogenesis and disease. Such data can become integrated with other large datasets generated using top-down systems biology approaches and be utilised by computational biologists to develop and enhance models of malaria pathogenesis relevant for identifying new drug targets or intervention strategies. Here, we focus on the promise of metabolomics to complement systems biology approaches in the quest for novel interventions in the fight against malaria. We introduce the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC, a new systems biology research coalition. A primary goal of the MaHPIC is to generate systems biology datasets relating to human and non-human primate (NHP malaria parasites and their hosts making these openly available from an online relational database. Metabolomic data from NHP infections and clinical malaria infections from around the world will comprise a unique global resource.

  19. Single cell metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Zenobi, Renato

    Recent discoveries suggest that cells of a clonal population often display multiple metabolic phenotypes at the same time. Motivated by the success of mass spectrometry (MS) in the investigation of population-level metabolomics, the analytical community has initiated efforts towards MS-based single

  20. Saliva as a potential diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, T; Thirrunavukkarasu, N

    2010-07-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid consisting of secretions from the major and minor salivary glands. Gland-specific saliva can be used to diagnose any pathology from the specific major salivary gland. Whole saliva has serum constituents that are derived from the local vasculature of the salivary glands and gingival crevicular fluid. Saliva, as a diagnostic fluid, has distinctive advantages over serum as whole saliva can be collected non-invasively by individuals with limited training using simple equipments. This review aimed to explore the diagnostic applications of saliva in systemic and oral diseases. Analysis of saliva can offer a cost-effective approach to screen for a larger population. Salivary analysis may be useful for diagnosing systemic oral disorders, as well as for monitoring hormone and therapeutic levels of drug.

  1. [Application of saliva in disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xingqun, Cheng; Xuedong, Zhou; Xin, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Saliva is secreted by salivary glands and performs a variety of functions, including mouth cleaning and protection, antibacterial activity, and digestion. With the rapid progress in salivaomics, saliva became recognized as a potential pool of biological markers. Being a non-invasive and safe source, saliva is a potential substitute for blood in diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. This review summarizes the latest advancement in saliva-related studies and presents the potential value of saliva in early diagnosis of oral diseases, such as dental caries, periodontal disease, cancer, diabetes, and other systemic disorders. Saliva biomarkers can reveal changes ranging from changes in biochemical index, DNA, RNA, and proteins to the diversification of microbiota structure. By integrating recent data, this paper discusses the clinical significance and application prospect of saliva in early diagnosis of diseases and in translational and precision medicine.

  2. Yeast metabolomics: sample preparation for a GC/MS-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sónia; Pereira, Rui; Rocha, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolome sample preparation is one of the key factors in metabolomics analyses. The quality of the metabolome data will depend on the suitability of the experimental procedures to the cellular system (e.g., yeast cells) and the analytical performance. Here, we summarize a protocol for metabolome analysis of yeast cells using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). First, the main phases of a metabolomics analysis are identified: sample preparation, metabolite extraction, and analysis. We also provide an overview on different methods used to quench samples and extract intracellular metabolites from yeast cells. This protocol provides a detailed description of a GC-MS-based analysis of yeast metabolome, in particular for metabolites containing amino and/or carboxyl groups, which represent most of the compounds participating in the central carbon metabolism.

  3. SALIVA SEBAGAI UJI SARING OSTEOPOROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniarty Z. Djamal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease, and is characterized by low bone mass and microstructure deterioration of the bone, which leads to increased risk of fracture. Biomarker of bone metabolism can be seen as beginning of bone loss and first detection before imbalanced bone turnover comes. Biomarker of bone formation as serum bone alkaline fosfatase, osteocalcin (OC, procollagen type I, and biomarker of bone resorption as urine pyridinoline (Pyd and deoxypyridinoline (Dpd crosslinks, hydroxyprolin. The simultaneous examination of serum OC and urine Pyd or Dpd as a very good screening test for determination of bone imbalanced at the moment of the menopausal or the beginning of the pasca menopausal. Saliva as a potential diagnostic fluid for the assessment of osteoporosis biomarker concentrations. The study found elevated three classic warning signs for osteopororsis os OC, Dpd and 116 in the saliva of sheep without ovaries, which were similar to the levels of signs found in their blood and urine. Expectations, that the test may become available within five years and one day the test may be able to be performed at home like pregnancy test. Osteoporosis biomarker in saliva suggested detected of bone mass density easier. Beside that can be used as a method of early diagnostic and as a monitor therapy that as salinity of the examinations of bone mass on radiology.

  4. Systems Biology Analysis Merging Phenotype, Metabolomic and Genomic Data Identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and Cellular Maintenance Processes as Major Contributors to Genetic Variability in Bovine Feed Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Philipp Widmann; Antonio Reverter; Rosemarie Weikard; Karsten Suhre; Hammon, Harald M.; Elke Albrecht; Christa Kuehn

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems ...

  5. Rapid Antemortem Detection of CWD Prions in Deer Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Nicholas J.; Denkers, Nathaniel D.; Nalls, Amy V.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Caughey, Byron; Hoover, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other) prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA) and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3%) diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%). In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1%) of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination. PMID:24040235

  6. Rapid antemortem detection of CWD prions in deer saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davin M Henderson

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is an efficiently transmitted prion disease of cervids, now identified in 22 United States, 2 Canadian provinces and Korea. One hallmark of CWD is the shedding of infectious prions in saliva, as demonstrated by bioassay in deer. It is also clear that the concentration of prions in saliva, blood, urine and feces is much lower than in the nervous system or lymphoid tissues. Rapid in vitro detection of CWD (and other prions in body fluids and excreta has been problematic due to the sensitivity limits of direct assays (western blotting, ELISA and the presence of inhibitors in these complex biological materials that hamper detection. Here we use real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC to demonstrate CWD prions in both diluted and prion-enriched saliva samples from asymptomatic and symptomatic white-tailed deer. CWD prions were detected in 14 of 24 (58.3% diluted saliva samples from CWD-exposed white-tailed deer, including 9 of 14 asymptomatic animals (64.2%. In addition, a phosphotungstic acid enrichment enhanced the RT-QuIC assay sensitivity, enabling detection in 19 of 24 (79.1% of the above saliva samples. Bioassay in Tg[CerPrP] mice confirmed the presence of infectious prions in 2 of 2 RT-QuIC-positive saliva samples so examined. The modified RT-QuIC analysis described represents a non-invasive, rapid ante-mortem detection of prions in complex biologic fluids, excreta, or environmental samples as well as a tool for exploring prion trafficking, peripheralization, and dissemination.

  7. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections.

  8. Ultra-deep and quantitative saliva proteome reveals dynamics of the oral microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassl, Niklas; Kulak, Nils Alexander; Pichler, Garwin

    2016-01-01

    , disruptions in saliva secretion and changes in the oral microbiome contribute to conditions such as tooth decay and respiratory tract infections. Here we set out to quantitatively map the saliva proteome in great depth with a rapid and in-depth mass spectrometry-based proteomics workflow. METHODS: We used...... recent improvements in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to develop a rapid workflow for mapping the saliva proteome quantitatively and at great depth. Standard clinical cotton swabs were used to collect saliva form eight healthy individuals at two different time points, allowing us to study inter......-individual differences and interday changes of the saliva proteome. To accurately identify microbial proteins, we developed a method called "split by taxonomy id" that prevents peptides shared by humans and bacteria or between different bacterial phyla to contribute to protein identification. RESULTS: Microgram protein...

  9. Metabolomics and its application to acute lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A. Stringer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics, and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a snapshot in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS. We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and mass spectrometry (MS approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical

  10. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  11. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. © 2015 AABB.

  12. Microbial metabolomics : Toward a platform with full metabolome coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M.J.v.d.; Overkamp, K.M.; Muilwijk, B.; Coulier, L.; Hankemeier, T.

    2007-01-01

    Achieving metabolome data with satisfactory coverage is a formidable challenge in metabolomics because metabolites are a chemically highly diverse group of compounds. Here we present a strategy for the development of an advanced analytical platform that allows the comprehensive analysis of microbial

  13. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  14. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-04-11

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward.

  15. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid. Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Martí-Álamo, Silvia; Mancheño-Franch, Aisha; Marzal-Gamarra, Cristina; Carlos-Fabuel, Laura

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in diagnosis based on the analysis of saliva. This is a simple, non-invasive method of obtaining oral samples which is safe for both the health worker and the patient, not to mention allowing for simple and cost-efficient storage. The majority of studies use general saliva samples in their entirety, complex fluids containing both local and systemic sources and whose composition corresponds to that of the blood. General saliva contains a considerable amount of desqu...

  16. Saliva as a diagnostic fluid: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Álamo, Silvia; Mancheño Franch, Aisha; Marzal Gamarra, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in diagnosis based on the analysis of saliva. This is a simple, non-invasive method of obtaining oral samples which is safe for both the health worker and the patient, not to mention allowing for simple and cost-efficient storage. The majority of studies use general saliva samples in their entirety, complex fluids containing both local and systemic sources and whose composition corresponds to that of the blood. General saliva contains a considerable ...

  17. The diagnostic role of saliva: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Sanjeev; Bansal, Vikram; Garg, Shushant K.; Atreja, Gaurav; Bansal, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    As a diagnostic fluid, saliva offers distinctive advantages over serum because it can be collected non-invasively by individuals, even by patient. Does not require special equipment for collection and storage as unlike blood saliva does not clot. Advantageous for person in whom blood drawing is difficult as in obese and haemophilic patient. Whole saliva used for diagnosis of systemic diseases, because it contains serum constituents. These constituents are derived from the ...

  18. Introducing Undergraduate Students to Metabolomics Using a NMR-Based Analysis of Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandusky, Peter Olaf

    Metabolomics applies multivariate statistical analysis to sets of high-resolution spectra taken over a population of biologically derived samples. The objective is to distinguish subpopulations within the overall sample population, and possibly also to identify biomarkers. While metabolomics has become part of the standard analytical toolbox in…

  19. Introducing Undergraduate Students to Metabolomics Using a NMR-Based Analysis of Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandusky, Peter Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics applies multivariate statistical analysis to sets of high-resolution spectra taken over a population of biologically derived samples. The objective is to distinguish subpopulations within the overall sample population, and possibly also to identify biomarkers. While metabolomics has become part of the standard analytical toolbox in…

  20. Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spur, Eva-Margarete [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Decelle, Emily A.; Cheng, Leo L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized noninvasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth in patients with asymptomatic PCa newly diagnosed by biopsy. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, PCa metabolomics is mainly studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates has demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies has uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness noninvasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be applied not only to PCa, but also to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies and metabolic diseases. (orig.)

  1. Detection of Zika virus in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Roche, Claudine; Nhan, Tu-Xuan; Robin, Emilie; Teissier, Anita; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai

    2015-07-01

    During the largest Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak ever reported that occurred from October 2013 to March 2014 in French Polynesia, we observed that several patients presenting the symptoms of acute phase Zika fever were tested negative in blood by ZIKV real-time PCR (RT-PCR). As we have previously detected ZIKV RNA in the saliva of a young child, we investigated the use of saliva as an alternative sample for routine ZIKV RNA detection. Over a 6 month period, 1,067 samples collected from 855 patients presenting symptoms of Zika fever (saliva only, blood only or both samples) were tested using a specific ZIKV RT-PCR. A medical questionnaire was available for most of the patients. ZIKV was more frequently detected in saliva compared to blood. For the 182 patients with both samples collected, tests were positive for 35 (19.2%) in saliva while negative in blood and tests were positive for 16 (8.8%) in blood while negative in saliva; the difference in mean days after symptoms onset and the percentage of the main symptoms of Zika fever for patients only positive in saliva or in blood was not significant. The use of saliva sample increased the rate of molecular detection of ZIKV at the acute phase of the disease but did not enlarge the window of detection of ZIKV RNA. Saliva was of particular interest when blood was difficult to collect (children and neonates especially). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [The use of metabolomics in medicine - some examples of oncological and metabolic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, Dominika; Szatkowska, Marta; Połubok, Joanna; Maciaszek, Julian; Machaj, Mikołaj; Barg, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is a new field of medicine focused on examining and analyzing metabolites produced in biological cells. Biological fluids primarily used in this method include: plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva and urine. The most common methods of evaluating the composition involve nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance (MR) with addition of gas chromatography (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography (LC-MS). Metabolomics is used in a wide variety of medicine disciplines. The variability of biochemical processes in tumor cells in comparison to normal cells is the starting point of such studies. The metabolomic changes are observed not only in solid tumors, like the mammary tumor, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer but also in tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. Nowadays, the aim of studies is to find biomarkers which would help to diagnose a disease quickly, assess its progression, and implement effective treatment. Metabolomics is also widely applied in metabolic diseases, mainly the diabetes. The list of examined metabolites gives promising chances for a successful prognosis, diagnosis and comprehensive monitoring of the progression of this civilization disease. The development of metabolomics will also contribute to the individualization of treatment, proper drugs adjustment, which will make a therapy more successful, cause less side effects and improve the quality of patient's life. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  3. Metabolomics technologies and metabolite identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moco, S.I.A.; Bino, R.J.; Vos, de C.H.; Vervoort, J.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolomics studies rely on the analysis of the multitude of small molecules (metabolites) present in a biological system. Most commonly, metabolomics is heavily supported by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as parallel technologies that provide an overview of the

  4. Genome-enabled plant metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohge, Takayuki; de Souza, Leonardo Perez; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2014-09-01

    The grand challenge currently facing metabolomics is that of comprehensitivity whilst next generation sequencing and advanced proteomics methods now allow almost complete and at least 50% coverage of their respective target molecules, metabolomics platforms at best offer coverage of just 10% of the small molecule complement of the cell. Here we discuss the use of genome sequence information as an enabling tool for peak identity and for translational metabolomics. Whilst we argue that genome information is not sufficient to compute the size of a species metabolome it is highly useful in predicting the occurrence of a wide range of common metabolites. Furthermore, we describe how via gene functional analysis in model species the identity of unknown metabolite peaks can be resolved. Taken together these examples suggest that genome sequence information is current (and likely will remain), a highly effective tool in peak elucidation in mass spectral metabolomics strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative detection of PfHRP2 in saliva of malaria patients in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Andrew O; Damoiseaux, Robert; Grundeen, Sarah; Panes, Jonnas L; Horton, Daniel H; Judy, Jack W; Moore, Theodore B

    2012-05-25

    Malaria is a global health priority with a heavy burden of fatality and morbidity. Improvements in field diagnostics are needed to support the agenda for malaria elimination. Saliva has shown significant potential for use in non-invasive diagnostics, but the development of off-the-shelf saliva diagnostic kits requires best practices for sample preparation and quantitative insight on the availability of biomarkers and the dynamics of immunoassay in saliva. This pilot study measured the levels of the PfHRP2 in patient saliva to inform the development of salivary diagnostic tests for malaria. Matched samples of blood and saliva were collected between January and May, 2011 from eight patients at Palawan Baptist Hospital in Roxas, Palawan, Philippines. Parasite density was determined from thick-film blood smears. Concentrations of PfHRP2 in saliva of malaria-positive patients were measured using a custom chemiluminescent ELISA in microtitre plates. Sixteen negative-control patients were enrolled at UCLA. A substantive difference between this protocol and previous related studies was that saliva samples were stabilized with protease inhibitors. Of the eight patients with microscopically confirmed P. falciparum malaria, seven tested positive for PfHRP2 in the blood using rapid diagnostic test kits, and all tested positive for PfHRP2 in saliva. All negative-control samples tested negative for salivary PfHRP2. On a binary-decision basis, the ELISA agreed with microscopy with 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity. Salivary levels of PfHRP2 ranged from 17 to 1,167 pg/mL in the malaria-positive group. Saliva is a promising diagnostic fluid for malaria when protein degradation and matrix effects are mitigated. Systematic quantitation of other malaria biomarkers in saliva would identify those with the best clinical relevance and suitability for off-the-shelf diagnostic kits.

  6. Quantitative detection of PfHRP2 in saliva of malaria patients in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Andrew O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a global health priority with a heavy burden of fatality and morbidity. Improvements in field diagnostics are needed to support the agenda for malaria elimination. Saliva has shown significant potential for use in non-invasive diagnostics, but the development of off-the-shelf saliva diagnostic kits requires best practices for sample preparation and quantitative insight on the availability of biomarkers and the dynamics of immunoassay in saliva. This pilot study measured the levels of the PfHRP2 in patient saliva to inform the development of salivary diagnostic tests for malaria. Methods Matched samples of blood and saliva were collected between January and May, 2011 from eight patients at Palawan Baptist Hospital in Roxas, Palawan, Philippines. Parasite density was determined from thick-film blood smears. Concentrations of PfHRP2 in saliva of malaria-positive patients were measured using a custom chemiluminescent ELISA in microtitre plates. Sixteen negative-control patients were enrolled at UCLA. A substantive difference between this protocol and previous related studies was that saliva samples were stabilized with protease inhibitors. Results Of the eight patients with microscopically confirmed P. falciparum malaria, seven tested positive for PfHRP2 in the blood using rapid diagnostic test kits, and all tested positive for PfHRP2 in saliva. All negative-control samples tested negative for salivary PfHRP2. On a binary-decision basis, the ELISA agreed with microscopy with 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity. Salivary levels of PfHRP2 ranged from 17 to 1,167 pg/mL in the malaria-positive group. Conclusion Saliva is a promising diagnostic fluid for malaria when protein degradation and matrix effects are mitigated. Systematic quantitation of other malaria biomarkers in saliva would identify those with the best clinical relevance and suitability for off-the-shelf diagnostic kits.

  7. Whole-Genome Saliva and Blood DNA Methylation Profiling in Individuals with a Respiratory Allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine A S Langie

    Full Text Available The etiology of respiratory allergies (RA can be partly explained by DNA methylation changes caused by adverse environmental and lifestyle factors experienced early in life. Longitudinal, prospective studies can aid in the unravelment of the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the disease development. High compliance rates can be expected in these studies when data is collected using non-invasive and convenient procedures. Saliva is an attractive biofluid to analyze changes in DNA methylation patterns. We investigated in a pilot study the differential methylation in saliva of RA (n = 5 compared to healthy controls (n = 5 using the Illumina Methylation 450K BeadChip platform. We evaluated the results against the results obtained in mononuclear blood cells from the same individuals. Differences in methylation patterns from saliva and mononuclear blood cells were clearly distinguishable (PAdj0.2, though the methylation status of about 96% of the cg-sites was comparable between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and saliva. When comparing RA cases with healthy controls, the number of differentially methylated sites (DMS in saliva and blood were 485 and 437 (P0.1, respectively, of which 216 were in common. The methylation levels of these sites were significantly correlated between blood and saliva. The absolute levels of methylation in blood and saliva were confirmed for 3 selected DMS in the PM20D1, STK32C, and FGFR2 genes using pyrosequencing analysis. The differential methylation could only be confirmed for DMS in PM20D1 and STK32C genes in saliva. We show that saliva can be used for genome-wide methylation analysis and that it is possible to identify DMS when comparing RA cases and healthy controls. The results were replicated in blood cells of the same individuals and confirmed by pyrosequencing analysis. This study provides proof-of-concept for the applicability of saliva-based whole-genome methylation analysis in the field of respiratory allergy.

  8. Saliva and Serum Protein Exchange at the Tooth Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, D; Helmerhorst, E J; Oppenheim, F G

    2017-04-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle is an oral, fluid-derived protein layer that forms on the tooth surface. It is a biologically and clinically important integument that protects teeth against enamel demineralization, and abrasion. Tooth surfaces are exposed to different proteinaceous microenvironments depending on the enamel location. For instance, tooth surfaces close to the gingival sulcus contact serum proteins that emanate via this sulcus, which may impact pellicle composition locally. The aims of this study were to define the major salivary and serum components that adsorb to hydroxyapatite, to study competition among them, and to obtain preliminary evidence in an in vivo saliva/serum pellicle model. Hydroxyapatite powder was incubated with saliva and serum, and the proteins that adsorbed were identified by mass spectrometry. To study competition, saliva and serum proteins were labeled with CyDyes, mixed in various proportions, and incubated with hydroxyapatite. In vivo competition was assessed using a split-mouth design, with half the buccal tooth surfaces coated with serum and the other half with saliva. After exposure to the oral environment for 0 min, 30 min and 2 h, the pellicles were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In pure saliva- or serum-derived pellicles, 82 and 84 proteins were identified, respectively. When present concomitantly, salivary protein adsorbers effectively competed with serum protein adsorbers for the hydroxyapatite surface. Specifically, acidic proline-rich protein, cystatin, statherin and protein S100-A9 proteins competed off apolipoproteins, complement C4-A, haptoglobin, transthyretin and serotransferrin. In vivo evidence further supported the replacement of serum proteins by salivary proteins. In conclusion, although significant numbers of serum proteins emanate from the gingival sulcus, their ability to participate in dental pellicle formation is likely reduced in the presence of strong salivary protein adsorbers. The functional properties of the

  9. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. Design: Stimulated saliva samples from 292 participants with low levels of dental caries and periodontitis, enrolled in the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES, were analyzed for the presence of approximately 300 bacterial species by means of the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM. Using presence and levels (mean HOMIM-value of bacterial probes as endpoints, the influence of diet intake, lifestyle, and socioeconomic status on the bacterial saliva profile was analyzed by Mann–Whitney tests with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction for multiple comparisons and principal component analysis. Results: Targets for 131 different probes were identified in 292 samples, with Streptococcus and Veillonella being the most predominant genera identified. Two bacterial taxa (Streptococcus sobrinus and Eubacterium [11][G-3] brachy were more associated with smokers than non-smokers (adjusted p-value<0.01. Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI, and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles of saliva. Conclusions: The bacterial profile of saliva seems independent of diet intake, but influenced by smoking and maybe socioeconomic status.

  10. Saliva Parameters and Erosive Wear in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, N.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J.; Bronkhorst, E. M.; Truin, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between several parameters of saliva and erosive wear in adolescents. (Un-)stimulated saliva was collected from 88 adolescents with erosion and 49 controls (age 16 +/- 1 years). Flow rate, pH and buffer capacity were determined immediately.

  11. Enhancement of Cellulose Degradation by Cattle Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yasutaka; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Ryo; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Aburai, Kenichi; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ruike, Tatsushi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Saccharification of cellulose is a promising technique for producing alternative source of energy. However, the efficiency of conversion of cellulose into soluble sugar using any currently available methodology is too low for industrial application. Many additives, such as surfactants, have been shown to enhance the efficiency of cellulose-to-sugar conversion. In this study, we have examined first whether cattle saliva, as an additive, would enhance the cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose, and subsequently elucidated the mechanism by which cattle saliva enhanced this conversion. Although cattle saliva, by itself, did not degrade cellulose, it enhanced the cellulase-catalyzed degradation of cellulose. Thus, the amount of reducing sugar produced increased approximately 2.9-fold by the addition of cattle saliva. We also found that non-enzymatic proteins, which were present in cattle saliva, were responsible for causing the enhancement effect. Third, the mechanism of cattle saliva mediated enhancement of cellulase activity was probably similar to that of the canonical surfactants. Cattle saliva is available in large amounts easily and cheaply, and it can be used without further purification. Thus, cattle saliva could be a promising additive for efficient saccharification of cellulose on an industrial scale. PMID:26402242

  12. Saliva in forensic odontology: A comprehensive update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Susmita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, saliva has attracted much interest among researchers especially in the field of forensic sciences. This complex body fluid is gaining popularity due to its ease of collection, safety in handling and its close relationship with plasma. Analysis of saliva for serological testing and cellular content has proved to be of wide use in crime detection, drug and alcohol abuse, hormone identification, cases of poisoning and animal bites. There is a need for forensic laboratories to automate the settings specific for saliva as routinely done for blood or urine in order to consider saliva as the primary investigating tool in the absence of other body fluids. This update is aimed at highlighting the many uses of saliva in the practice of forensic odontology.

  13. Menthol Smokers: Metabolomic Profiling and Smoking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ping-Ching; Lan, Renny S; Brasky, Theodore M; Marian, Catalin; Cheema, Amrita K; Ressom, Habtom W; Loffredo, Christopher A; Pickworth, Wallace B; Shields, Peter G

    2017-01-01

    The use of menthol in cigarettes and marketing is under consideration for regulation by the FDA. However, the effects of menthol on smoking behavior and carcinogen exposure have been inconclusive. We previously reported metabolomic profiling for cigarette smokers, and novelly identified a menthol-glucuronide (MG) as the most significant metabolite directly related to smoking. Here, MG is studied in relation to smoking behavior and metabolomic profiles. This is a cross-sectional study of 105 smokers who smoked two cigarettes in the laboratory one hour apart. Blood nicotine, MG, and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) boosts were determined (the difference before and after smoking). Spearman correlation, χ 2 , and ANCOVA adjusted for gender, race, and cotinine levels for menthol smokers assessed the relationship of MG boost, smoking behavior, and metabolic profiles. Multivariate metabolite characterization using supervised partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was carried out for the classification of metabolomics profiles. MG boost was positively correlated with CO boost, nicotine boost, average puff volume, puff duration, and total smoke exposure. Classification using PLS-DA, MG was the top metabolite discriminating metabolome of menthol versus nonmenthol smokers. Among menthol smokers, 42 metabolites were significantly correlated with MG boost, which linked to cellular functions, such as of cell death, survival, and movement. Plasma MG boost is a new smoking behavior biomarker that may provide novel information over self-reported use of menthol cigarettes by integrating different smoking measures for understanding smoking behavior and harm of menthol cigarettes. These results provide insight into the biological effect of menthol smoking. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 51-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. A plasma metabolomic signature discloses human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Mariona; Collado, Ricardo; Quiles, José Luís; Ramírez-Tortosa, Mari-Carmen; Sol, Joaquim; Ruiz-Sanjuan, Maria; Fernandez, Mónica; de la Torre Cabrera, Capilla; Ramírez-Tortosa, Cesar; Granados-Principal, Sergio; Sánchez-Rovira, Pedro; Pamplona, Reinald

    2017-03-21

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive global study of metabolites in biological samples. In this retrospective pilot study we explored whether serum metabolomic profile can discriminate the presence of human breast cancer irrespective of the cancer subtype. Plasma samples were analyzed from healthy women (n = 20) and patients with breast cancer after diagnosis (n = 91) using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform. Multivariate statistics and a Random Forest (RF) classifier were used to create a metabolomics panel for the diagnosis of human breast cancer. Metabolomics correctly distinguished between breast cancer patients and healthy control subjects. In the RF supervised class prediction analysis comparing breast cancer and healthy control groups, RF accurately classified 100% both samples of the breast cancer patients and healthy controls. So, the class error for both group in and the out-of-bag error were 0. We also found 1269 metabolites with different concentration in plasma from healthy controls and cancer patients; and basing on exact mass, retention time and isotopic distribution we identified 35 metabolites. These metabolites mostly support cell growth by providing energy and building stones for the synthesis of essential biomolecules, and function as signal transduction molecules. The collective results of RF, significance testing, and false discovery rate analysis identified several metabolites that were strongly associated with breast cancer. In breast cancer a metabolomics signature of cancer exists and can be detected in patient plasma irrespectively of the breast cancer type.

  15. Metabolomics for clinical use and research in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocher, Berthold; Adamski, Jerzy

    2017-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a high prevalence in the general population and is associated with high mortality; a need therefore exists for better biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and therapy stratification. Moreover, very sensitive biomarkers are needed in drug development and clinical research to increase understanding of the efficacy and safety of potential and existing therapies. Metabolomics analyses can identify and quantify all metabolites present in a given sample, covering hundreds to thousands of metabolites. Sample preparation for metabolomics requires a very fast arrest of biochemical processes. Present key technologies for metabolomics are mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which require sophisticated biostatistic and bioinformatic data analyses. The use of metabolomics has been instrumental in identifying new biomarkers of CKD such as acylcarnitines, glycerolipids, dimethylarginines and metabolites of tryptophan, the citric acid cycle and the urea cycle. Biomarkers such as c-mannosyl tryptophan and pseudouridine have better performance in CKD stratification than does creatinine. Future challenges in metabolomics analyses are prospective studies and deconvolution of CKD biomarkers from those of other diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, inflammatory conditions, stress and cancer.

  16. The saliva microbiome of Pan and Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Nasidze, Ivan; Quinque, Dominique; Li, Mingkun; Horz, Hans-Peter; André, Claudine; Garriga, Rosa M; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Stoneking, Mark

    2013-09-11

    It is increasingly recognized that the bacteria that live in and on the human body (the microbiome) can play an important role in health and disease. The composition of the microbiome is potentially influenced by both internal factors (such as phylogeny and host physiology) and external factors (such as diet and local environment), and interspecific comparisons can aid in understanding the importance of these factors. To gain insights into the relative importance of these factors on saliva microbiome diversity, we here analyze the saliva microbiomes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) from two sanctuaries in Africa, and from human workers at each sanctuary. The saliva microbiomes of the two Pan species are more similar to one another, and the saliva microbiomes of the two human groups are more similar to one another, than are the saliva microbiomes of human workers and apes from the same sanctuary. We also looked for the existence of a core microbiome and find no evidence for a taxon-based core saliva microbiome for Homo or Pan. In addition, we studied the saliva microbiome from apes from the Leipzig Zoo, and found an extraordinary diversity in the zoo ape saliva microbiomes that is not found in the saliva microbiomes of the sanctuary animals. The greater similarity of the saliva microbiomes of the two Pan species to one another, and of the two human groups to one another, are in accordance with both the phylogenetic relationships of the hosts as well as with host physiology. Moreover, the results from the zoo animals suggest that novel environments can have a large impact on the microbiome, and that microbiome analyses based on captive animals should be viewed with caution as they may not reflect the microbiome of animals in the wild.

  17. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  18. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-10-20

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  19. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  20. Metabolomics of Small Numbers of Cells: Metabolomic Profiling of 100, 1000, and 10000 Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xian; Li, Liang

    2017-10-26

    In cellular metabolomics, it is desirable to carry out metabolomic profiling using a small number of cells in order to save time and cost. In some applications (e.g., working with circulating tumor cells in blood), only a limited number of cells are available for analysis. In this report, we describe a method based on high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) nanoflow liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) for high-coverage metabolomic analysis of small numbers of cells (i.e., ≤10000 cells). As an example, (12)C-/(13)C-dansyl labeling of the metabolites in lysates of 100, 1000, and 10000 MCF-7 breast cancer cells was carried out using a new labeling protocol tailored to handle small amounts of metabolites. Chemical-vapor-assisted ionization in a captivespray interface was optimized for improving metabolite ionization and increasing robustness of nanoLC-MS. Compared to microflow LC-MS, the nanoflow system provided much improved metabolite detectability with a significantly reduced sample amount required for analysis. Experimental duplicate analyses of biological triplicates resulted in the detection of 1620 ± 148, 2091 ± 89 and 2402 ± 80 (n = 6) peak pairs or metabolites in the amine/phenol submetabolome from the (12)C-/(13)C-dansyl labeled lysates of 100, 1000, and 10000 cells, respectively. About 63-69% of these peak pairs could be either identified using dansyl labeled standard library or mass-matched to chemical structures in human metabolome databases. We envisage the routine applications of this method for high-coverage quantitative cellular metabolomics using a starting material of 10000 cells. Even for analyzing 100 or 1000 cells, although the metabolomic coverage is reduced from the maximal coverage, this method can still detect thousands of metabolites, allowing the analysis of a large fraction of the metabolome and focused analysis of the detectable metabolites.

  1. Systematic comparison of the human saliva and plasma proteomes

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Weihong; Apweiler, Rolf; Balgley, Brian M.; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Bundy, Jonathan L.; Cargile, Benjamin J.; Cole, Steve; Fang, Xueping; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Griffin, Timothy J.; Hagen, Fred; Hu, Shen; Wolinsky, Lawrence E.; Lee, Cheng S.; Malamud, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The proteome of human salivary fluid has the potential to open new doors for disease biomarker discovery. A recent study to comprehensively identify and catalog the human ductal salivary proteome led to the compilation of 1166 proteins. The protein complexity of both saliva and plasma is large, suggesting that a comparison of these two proteomes will provide valuable insight into their physiological significance and an understanding of the unique and overlapping disease diagnostic potential t...

  2. What computational non-targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomics can gain from shotgun proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeiy, Hamid; Cox, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Computational workflows for mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics and untargeted metabolomics share many steps. Despite the similarities, untargeted metabolomics is lagging behind in terms of reliable fully automated quantitative data analysis. We argue that metabolomics will strongly benefit from the adaptation of successful automated proteomics workflows to metabolomics. MaxQuant is a popular platform for proteomics data analysis and is widely considered to be superior in achieving high precursor mass accuracies through advanced nonlinear recalibration, usually leading to five to ten-fold better accuracy in complex LC-MS/MS runs. This translates to a sharp decrease in the number of peptide candidates per measured feature, thereby strongly improving the coverage of identified peptides. We argue that similar strategies can be applied to untargeted metabolomics, leading to equivalent improvements in metabolite identification. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of Fe and Ca in non-stimulated human saliva using NAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, J. A. G.; Zamboni, C. B.; Kovacs, L.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigated non-stimulated human whole saliva of healthy subjects and patients with periodontal disease using Neutron Activation Analysis technique (NAA). The measurements were performed in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP. We found considerable metabolic changes mainly in Fe and Ca concentration in whole saliva of periodontal patients. These data are useful for identifying or preventing this oral disease in the Brazilian population.

  4. Metabolomics Workbench (MetWB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Metabolomics Program's Data Repository and Coordinating Center (DRCC), housed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), University of California, San Diego,...

  5. The biology of plant metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Following a general introduction, this book includes details of metabolomics of model species including Arabidopsis and tomato. Further chapters provide in-depth coverage of abiotic stress, data integration, systems biology, genetics, genomics, chemometrics and biostatisitcs. Applications of plant

  6. Detection of sulphate-reducing bacteria in human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggendorn, Fabiano Luiz; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Silva Junior, Arley; Galvão, Mariana Machado; Lutterbach, Márcia T S

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in human saliva and correlate with oral and systemic conditions. Saliva samples were collected from 118 patients and inoculated in 2 ml of modified Postgate's E medium culture. After 28 days of incubation at 30°C the presence of SRB was identified by the production of sulphide. Of 118 saliva samples collected, 35 were positive for the presence of SRB. Three positive samples were randomly chosen to identify the species of SRB by PCR and sequenced. The three selected samples were identified as Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Raoultella ornithinolytica. Gastritis (14.4%) was the most prevalent systemic disease, followed by diabetes (3.4%), while periodontitis (11%) and traumatic fibroma (4.2%) were the oral manifestations most frequently found. A bivariate analysis was performed to examine for the presence of SRB and the most prevalent systemic and oral manifestations. Only periodontitis showed a statistically significant association (p = 0.0003). The results showed SRB can be found in oral microbiota of healthy patients. Regarding the several conditions studied, there was a higher prevalence of SRB in patients with gastritis and patients with periodontal disease, with a possible correlation between the presence of SRB in the oral microbiota and periodontal disease.

  7. Saliva Proteins of Vector Culicoides Modify Structure and Infectivity of Bluetongue Virus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darpel, Karin E.; Langner, Kathrin F. A.; Nimtz, Manfred; Anthony, Simon J.; Brownlie, Joe; Takamatsu, Haru-Hisa; Mellor, Philip S.; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2011-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are related orbiviruses, transmitted between their ruminant hosts primarily by certain haematophagous midge vectors (Culicoides spp.). The larger of the BTV outer-capsid proteins, ‘VP2’, can be cleaved by proteases (including trypsin or chymotrypsin), forming infectious subviral particles (ISVP) which have enhanced infectivity for adult Culicoides, or KC cells (a cell-line derived from C. sonorensis). We demonstrate that VP2 present on purified virus particles from 3 different BTV strains can also be cleaved by treatment with saliva from adult Culicoides. The saliva proteins from C. sonorensis (a competent BTV vector), cleaved BTV-VP2 more efficiently than those from C. nubeculosus (a less competent / non-vector species). Electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified a trypsin-like protease in C. sonorensis saliva, which was significantly reduced or absent from C. nubeculosus saliva. Incubating purified BTV-1 with C. sonorensis saliva proteins also increased their infectivity for KC cells ∼10 fold, while infectivity for BHK cells was reduced by 2–6 fold. Treatment of an ‘eastern’ strain of EHDV-2 with saliva proteins of either C. sonorensis or C. nubeculosus cleaved VP2, but a ‘western’ strain of EHDV-2 remained unmodified. These results indicate that temperature, strain of virus and protein composition of Culicoides saliva (particularly its protease content which is dependent upon vector species), can all play a significant role in the efficiency of VP2 cleavage, influencing virus infectivity. Saliva of several other arthropod species has previously been shown to increase transmission, infectivity and virulence of certain arboviruses, by modulating and/or suppressing the mammalian immune response. The findings presented here, however, demonstrate a novel mechanism by which proteases in Culicoides saliva can also directly modify the orbivirus particle structure, leading to

  8. Saliva proteins of vector Culicoides modify structure and infectivity of bluetongue virus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E Darpel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV are related orbiviruses, transmitted between their ruminant hosts primarily by certain haematophagous midge vectors (Culicoides spp.. The larger of the BTV outer-capsid proteins, 'VP2', can be cleaved by proteases (including trypsin or chymotrypsin, forming infectious subviral particles (ISVP which have enhanced infectivity for adult Culicoides, or KC cells (a cell-line derived from C. sonorensis. We demonstrate that VP2 present on purified virus particles from 3 different BTV strains can also be cleaved by treatment with saliva from adult Culicoides. The saliva proteins from C. sonorensis (a competent BTV vector, cleaved BTV-VP2 more efficiently than those from C. nubeculosus (a less competent/non-vector species. Electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified a trypsin-like protease in C. sonorensis saliva, which was significantly reduced or absent from C. nubeculosus saliva. Incubating purified BTV-1 with C. sonorensis saliva proteins also increased their infectivity for KC cells ∼10 fold, while infectivity for BHK cells was reduced by 2-6 fold. Treatment of an 'eastern' strain of EHDV-2 with saliva proteins of either C. sonorensis or C. nubeculosus cleaved VP2, but a 'western' strain of EHDV-2 remained unmodified. These results indicate that temperature, strain of virus and protein composition of Culicoides saliva (particularly its protease content which is dependent upon vector species, can all play a significant role in the efficiency of VP2 cleavage, influencing virus infectivity. Saliva of several other arthropod species has previously been shown to increase transmission, infectivity and virulence of certain arboviruses, by modulating and/or suppressing the mammalian immune response. The findings presented here, however, demonstrate a novel mechanism by which proteases in Culicoides saliva can also directly modify the orbivirus particle structure, leading to

  9. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  10. LC-MS-BASED METABOLOMICS OF XENOBIOTIC-INDUCED TOXICITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenobiotic exposure, especially high-dose or repeated exposure of xenobiotics, can elicit detrimental effects on biological systems through diverse mechanisms. Changes in metabolic systems, including formation of reactive metabolites and disruption of endogenous metabolism, are not only the common consequences of toxic xenobiotic exposure, but in many cases are the major causes behind development of xenobiotic-induced toxicities (XIT. Therefore, examining the metabolic events associated with XIT generates mechanistic insights into the initiation and progression of XIT, and provides guidance for prevention and treatment. Traditional bioanalytical platforms that target only a few suspected metabolites are capable of validating the expected outcomes of xenobiotic exposure. However, these approaches lack the capacity to define global changes and to identify unexpected events in the metabolic system. Recent developments in high-throughput metabolomics have dramatically expanded the scope and potential of metabolite analysis. Among all analytical techniques adopted for metabolomics, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS has been most widely used for metabolomic investigations of XIT due to its versatility and sensitivity in metabolite analysis. In this review, technical platform of LC-MS-based metabolomics, including experimental model, sample preparation, instrumentation, and data analysis, are discussed. Applications of LC-MS-based metabolomics in exploratory and hypothesis-driven investigations of XIT are illustrated by case studies of xenobiotic metabolism and endogenous metabolism associated with xenobiotic exposure.

  11. The antiadhesive activity of cranberry phytocomplex studied by metabolomics: Intestinal PAC-A metabolites but not intact PAC-A are identified as markers in active urines against uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Gregorio; Sut, Stefania; Pellizzaro, Anna; Brun, Paola; Voinovich, Dario; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Cranberry procyanidins and quercetin derivatives are considered possible active compounds against urinary tract infections (UTIs). In this paper a small group (n=6) of healthy subjects consumed a product containing 360mg of cranberry extract (42.6% w/w of PAC-A and 14.6% w/w of PAC-B) and 200mg of quercetin. Urine samples were collected after 2,4,6,8, and 24h. The changes in antiadhesive properties against urophatogenic E. coli of the urinary output were determined in vitro and modification to urinary metabolome were studied by LC-MS. Significant antiadhesive properties of urine samples were observed, with the greatest effect 6-8h after oral administration, confirming the possible usefulness of cranberry containing products in urinary tract infections (UTI). Metabolomic analysis revealed that valeric acid and valerolactone derivatives that were detected in 6 and 8h sample, while 4-hydroxy-5-(phenyl)-valeric acid-O-glucuronide and 5-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone at 6h and 4-hydroxy-5-(phenyl)-valeric acid-O-sulphate, 3-hydroxyphenyl-valeric acid, 5-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone-4'-O-glucuronide and 4-hydroxy-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid-3'-O-sulphate were the most abundant at 8h. The present study shows that the antiadhesive properties of urine sample after cranberry consumption are not ascribable to the direct effect of PAC-A, because their levels in urinary output are in the range of ng/mL. On the other hand, significant metabolites that were detected are mainly metabolites of intestinal action on polyphenols and PACs, as well as glucuronidated and sulphated quercetin, suggesting an important role of intestinal modification of phytoconstituents in the cranberry extract mechanism of action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Untargeted Metabolomics To Ascertain Antibiotic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabel M.; Ehmann, David E.; Mills, Scott D.; Perros, Manos

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mode of action (MOA) of new antibiotics discovered through phenotypic screening is of increasing importance. Metabolomics offers a potentially rapid and cost-effective means of identifying modes of action of drugs whose effects are mediated through changes in metabolism. Metabolomics techniques also collect data on off-target effects and drug modifications. Here, we present data from an untargeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach to identify the modes of action of eight compounds: 1-[3-fluoro-4-(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-pyrimidin-1-yl)phenyl]-3-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]urea (AZ1), 2-(cyclobutylmethoxy)-5′-deoxyadenosine, triclosan, fosmidomycin, CHIR-090, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 5-chloro-2-(methylsulfonyl)-N-(1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-4-pyrimidinecarboxamide (AZ7), and ceftazidime. Data analysts were blind to the compound identities but managed to identify the target as thymidylate kinase for AZ1, isoprenoid biosynthesis for fosmidomycin, acyl-transferase for CHIR-090, and DNA metabolism for 2-(cyclobutylmethoxy)-5′-deoxyadenosine. Changes to cell wall metabolites were seen in ceftazidime treatments, although other changes, presumably relating to off-target effects, dominated spectral outputs in the untargeted approach. Drugs which do not work through metabolic pathways, such as the proton carrier CCCP, have no discernible impact on the metabolome. The untargeted metabolomics approach also revealed modifications to two compounds, namely, fosmidomycin and AZ7. An untreated control was also analyzed, and changes to the metabolome were seen over 4 h, highlighting the necessity for careful controls in these types of studies. Metabolomics is a useful tool in the analysis of drug modes of action and can complement other technologies already in use. PMID:26833150

  13. Metabolomic fingerprint of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beshay N Zordoky

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis.Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24, HFrEF (n = 20, and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38 were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively.The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804.

  14. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality.

  15. Clinical metabolomics paves the way towards future healthcare strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François‐Pierre J.; Rezzi, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is recognized as a powerful top‐down system biological approach to understand genetic‐environment‐health paradigms paving new avenues to identify clinically relevant biomarkers. It is nowadays commonly used in clinical applications shedding new light on physiological regulatory processes of complex mammalian systems with regard to disease aetiology, diagnostic stratification and, potentially, mechanism of action of therapeutic solutions. A key feature of metabolomics lies in its ability to underpin the complex metabolic interactions of the host with its commensal microbial partners providing a new way to define individual and population phenotypes. This review aims at describing recent applications of metabolomics in clinical fields with insight into diseases, diagnostics/monitoring and improvement of homeostatic metabolic regulation. PMID:22348240

  16. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality.

  17. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant...... are identified as the main species driving the association between biosynthesis of BCAAs and insulin resistance, and in mice we demonstrate that P. copri can induce insulin resistance, aggravate glucose intolerance and augment circulating levels of BCAAs. Our findings suggest that microbial targets may have...... the potential to diminish insulin resistance and reduce the incidence of common metabolic and cardiovascular disorders....

  18. Metabolomics: Challenges and Opportunities in Systems Biology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, Luca; Valerio, Mariacristina; Manetti, Cesare

    2018-01-01

    Metabolomics has the capability of providing predisposition, diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic biomarker profiles of individual patients, since a large number of metabolites can be measured in an unbiased manner from biological samples. In this setting, (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of biofluids such as plasma, urine, and fecal water offers the opportunity to identify patterns of biomarker changes that reflects the physiological or pathological status of an individual patient.In this chapter, we show as a metabolomics study can be used to diagnose a disease, classifying patients as healthy or as pathological taking into account individual variability.

  19. What Have Metabolomics Approaches Taught Us About Type 2 Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Burkart, Alison M; Isganaitis, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    and mathematical modeling approaches, have provided the scientific community with new tools to describe the T2D metabolome. The metabolomics signatures associated with T2D and obesity include increased levels of lactate, glycolytic intermediates, branched-chain and aromatic amino acids, and long-chain fatty acids....... Conversely, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, betaine, and other metabolites decrease. Future studies will be required to fully integrate these and other findings into our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to identify biomarkers of disease risk, stage, and responsiveness to specific...

  20. Saliva: A fluid in search of a diagnostic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since saliva has been studied for more than 50 years and is relatively easy to collect, it is reasonable to ask why saliva is not in wider use as a diagnostic fluid. Here we discuss the criteria for diagnostic tests for diseases, barriers to use saliva for diagnostic testing, and the possibility of overcoming barriers to acceptance of saliva for diagnosis.

  1. Saliva: A fluid in search of a diagnostic use

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Liu

    2015-01-01

    Since saliva has been studied for more than 50 years and is relatively easy to collect, it is reasonable to ask why saliva is not in wider use as a diagnostic fluid. Here we discuss the criteria for diagnostic tests for diseases, barriers to use saliva for diagnostic testing, and the possibility of overcoming barriers to acceptance of saliva for diagnosis.

  2. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242- 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lewgoy, H. R. [Universidade Anhanguera Bandeirante, UNIBAN R. Maria Candida, 1813, Bloco G / 6o andar - 02071-013 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  3. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 ± 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 ± 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at São Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  4. Saliva: a reliable sample matrix in bioanalytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschl, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Saliva is gaining increasing attention as a bioanalytical sample matrix. Mostly because of the easy and noninvasive collection, it is not only beneficial in endocrinological and behavioral science, but also in pediatrics. Saliva also has the advantage of being the only body fluid which can be collected even during physical exercise, for example, during sportive activities, and there are physiological characteristics that make it superior to serum/plasma or urine for specific scientific questions. This review provides an insight into the physiology of saliva formation, explaining how certain compounds enter this bodily fluid, and gives advice for collection, storage and analytical methods. Finally, it presents a number of reliable and proven applications for saliva analysis from scientific fields including endocrinology, sports medicine, forensics and immunology.

  5. Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167531.html Zika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: Study Research with ... HealthDay News) -- Scientists have some interesting news about Zika: You're unlikely to get the virus from ...

  6. Metabolomics Society’s International Affiliations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessner, U.; Rolin, D.; Rijswijk, van M.E.C.; Hall, R.D.; Hankemeier, T.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 the Metabolomics Society established a more formal system for national and regional metabolomics initiatives, interest groups, societies and networks to become an International Affiliate of the Society. A number of groups (http://metabolomicssociety.org/international-affilia

  7. Liver metabolomics analysis associated with feed efficiency on steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The liver represents a metabolic crossroad regulating and modulating nutrients available from digestive tract absorption to the peripheral tissues. To identify potential differences in liver function that lead to differences in feed efficiency, liver metabolomic analysis was conducted using ultra-pe...

  8. Metabolomic elucidation of pork from different crossbreds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine S.; Straadt, Ida Krestine; Clausen, Morten Rahr

    )-based metabolomics. Several metabolites including amino acids, organic acids and nucleotides were identified in the obtained proton NMR spectra. Breed-specific differences in the level of several metabolites including inosine, carnosine and lactate were found. Sensory analysis of the cooked pork was performed......, and correlations between individual metabolites and sensory attributes were elucidated. A high content of carnosine in the meat was associated with a low value of many sensory attributes related to meat flavor/taste. Surprsingly, IMP and inosine were in general not correlated with sensory attributes related...

  9. An inhibitor of phospholipase D in saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Rex M. C.; Hemington, Norma

    1974-01-01

    1. Bovine, dog and human saliva contain substances which inhibit the soluble phospholipase D present in grass leaf or celery stalk. 2. The inhibitor in bovine saliva is of high molecular weight and exhibits considerable stability to heat, acids and alkalis. 3. The inhibitor has been purified free from salivary mucoprotein. 4. It is suggested that the inhibitor could protect the upper alimentary tract of a herbage-eating animal from the necrotic action of phospholipase D. PMID:4376946

  10. Metabolomics: the chemistry between ecology and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macel, M.; Van Dam, N.M.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomics is a fast developing field of comprehensive untargeted chemical analyses. It has many applications and can in principle be used on any organism without prior knowledge of the metabolome or genome. The amount of functional information that is acquired with metabolomics largely depends on

  11. A Metabolomic Perspective on Coeliac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabrò, A.; Gralka, E.; Luchinat, C.; Saccenti, E.; Tenori, L.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is an “omic” science that is now emerging with the purpose of elaborating a comprehensive analysis of the metabolome, which is the complete set of metabolites (i.e., small molecules intermediates) in an organism, tissue, cell, or biofluid. In the past decade, metabolomics has already

  12. MPINet: Metabolite Pathway Identification via Coupling of Global Metabolite Network Structure and Metabolomic Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput metabolomics technology, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of hundreds of metabolites. Understanding that these metabolites dominate the study condition from biological pathway perspective is still a significant challenge. Pathway identification is an invaluable aid to address this issue and, thus, is urgently needed. In this study, we developed a network-based metabolite pathway identification method, MPINet, which considers the global importance of metabolites and the unique character of metabolomic profile. Through integrating the global metabolite functional network structure and the character of metabolomic profile, MPINet provides a more accurate metabolomic pathway analysis. This integrative strategy simultaneously captures the global nonequivalence of metabolites in a pathway and the bias from metabolomic experimental technology. We then applied MPINet to four different types of metabolite datasets. In the analysis of metastatic prostate cancer dataset, we demonstrated the effectiveness of MPINet. With the analysis of the two type 2 diabetes datasets, we show that MPINet has the potentiality for identifying novel pathways related with disease and is reliable for analyzing metabolomic data. Finally, we extensively applied MPINet to identify drug sensitivity related pathways. These results suggest MPINet’s effectiveness and reliability for analyzing metabolomic data across multiple different application fields.

  13. Metabolomic Modularity Analysis (MMA) to Quantify Human Liver Perfusion Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Bruinsma, Bote; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Swaminathan, Anandh; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Korkut

    2017-11-13

    Large-scale -omics data are now ubiquitously utilized to capture and interpret global responses to perturbations in biological systems, such as the impact of disease states on cells, tissues, and whole organs. Metabolomics data, in particular, are difficult to interpret for providing physiological insight because predefined biochemical pathways used for analysis are inherently biased and fail to capture more complex network interactions that span multiple canonical pathways. In this study, we introduce a nov-el approach coined Metabolomic Modularity Analysis (MMA) as a graph-based algorithm to systematically identify metabolic modules of reactions enriched with metabolites flagged to be statistically significant. A defining feature of the algorithm is its ability to determine modularity that highlights interactions between reactions mediated by the production and consumption of cofactors and other hub metabolites. As a case study, we evaluated the metabolic dynamics of discarded human livers using time-course metabolomics data and MMA to identify modules that explain the observed physiological changes leading to liver recovery during subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP). MMA was performed on a large scale liver-specific human metabolic network that was weighted based on metabolomics data and identified cofactor-mediated modules that would not have been discovered by traditional metabolic pathway analyses.

  14. Untargeted GC-MS Metabolomics Reveals Changes in the Metabolite Dynamics of Industrial Scale Batch Fermentations of Streptoccoccus thermophilus Broth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Christiansen, Lene D.; Heins, Anna-Lena

    2017-01-01

    effects of batch fermentation, fermentation time, production line, and yeast extract brands on the biomass metabolome using untargeted GC-MS metabolomics. Processing of the raw GC-MS data using PARAFAC2 revealed a total of 90 metabolites out of which 64 are identified. Partitioning of the data variance...

  15. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-14

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women's bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the "interactive metabolome", which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI.

  16. Profiling the metabolome changes caused by cranberry procyanidins in plasma of female rats using (1) H NMR and UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS global metabolomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Garrett, Timothy J; Tayyari, Fariba; Gu, Liwei

    2015-11-01

    The objective was to investigate the metabolome changes in female rats gavaged with partially purified cranberry procyanidins (PPCP) using (1) H NMR and UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS metabolomics approaches, and to identify the contributing metabolites. Twenty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into two groups and administered PPCP or partially purified apple procyanidins (PPAP) for three times using a 250 mg extracts/kg body weight dose. Plasma was collected 6 h after the last gavage and analyzed using (1) H NMR and UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS. No metabolome difference was observed using (1) H NMR metabolomics approach. However, LC-HRMS metabolomics data show that metabolome in the plasma of female rats administered PPCP differed from those gavaged with PPAP. Eleven metabolites were tentatively identified from a total of 36 discriminant metabolic features based on accurate masses and/or product ion spectra. PPCP caused a greater increase of exogenous metabolites including p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phenol, phenol-sulphate, catechol sulphate, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylvaleric acid, and 4'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-3'-O-beta-glucuronide in rat plasma. Furthermore, the plasma level of O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-O-glucuronide, 4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid-O-sulphate, 5-(hydroxyphenyl)-ϒ-valerolactone-O-sulphate, 4-hydroxydiphenylamine, and peonidin-3-O-hexose were higher in female rats administered with PPAP. The metabolome changes caused by cranberry procyanidins were revealed using an UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS global metabolomics approach. Exogenous and microbial metabolites were the major identified discriminate biomarkers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Medicinal Plants: A Public Resource for Metabolomics and Hypothesis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Syrkin Wurtele

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Specialized compounds from photosynthetic organisms serve as rich resources for drug development. From aspirin to atropine, plant-derived natural products have had a profound impact on human health. Technological advances provide new opportunities to access these natural products in a metabolic context. Here, we describe a database and platform for storing, visualizing and statistically analyzing metabolomics data from fourteen medicinal plant species. The metabolomes and associated transcriptomes (RNAseq for each plant species, gathered from up to twenty tissue/organ samples that have experienced varied growth conditions and developmental histories, were analyzed in parallel. Three case studies illustrate different ways that the data can be integrally used to generate testable hypotheses concerning the biochemistry, phylogeny and natural product diversity of medicinal plants. Deep metabolomics analysis of Camptotheca acuminata exemplifies how such data can be used to inform metabolic understanding of natural product chemical diversity and begin to formulate hypotheses about their biogenesis. Metabolomics data from Prunella vulgaris, a species that contains a wide range of antioxidant, antiviral, tumoricidal and anti-inflammatory constituents, provide a case study of obtaining biosystematic and developmental fingerprint information from metabolite accumulation data in a little studied species. Digitalis purpurea, well known as a source of cardiac glycosides, is used to illustrate how integrating metabolomics and transcriptomics data can lead to identification of candidate genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes in the cardiac glycoside pathway. Medicinal Plant Metabolomics Resource (MPM [1] provides a framework for generating experimentally testable hypotheses about the metabolic networks that lead to the generation of specialized compounds, identifying genes that control their biosynthesis and establishing a basis for modeling metabolism in less

  18. Connecting extracellular metabolomic measurements to intracellular flux states in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrgård Markus J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful tool in the quantitative identification of physiological and disease-induced biological states. Extracellular metabolome or metabolic profiling data, in particular, can provide an insightful view of intracellular physiological states in a noninvasive manner. Results We used an updated genome-scale metabolic network model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, iMM904, to investigate how changes in the extracellular metabolome can be used to study systemic changes in intracellular metabolic states. The iMM904 metabolic network was reconstructed based on an existing genome-scale network, iND750, and includes 904 genes and 1,412 reactions. The network model was first validated by comparing 2,888 in silico single-gene deletion strain growth phenotype predictions to published experimental data. Extracellular metabolome data measured in response to environmental and genetic perturbations of ammonium assimilation pathways was then integrated with the iMM904 network in the form of relative overflow secretion constraints and a flux sampling approach was used to characterize candidate flux distributions allowed by these constraints. Predicted intracellular flux changes were consistent with published measurements on intracellular metabolite levels and fluxes. Patterns of predicted intracellular flux changes could also be used to correctly identify the regions of the metabolic network that were perturbed. Conclusion Our results indicate that integrating quantitative extracellular metabolomic profiles in a constraint-based framework enables inferring changes in intracellular metabolic flux states. Similar methods could potentially be applied towards analyzing biofluid metabolome variations related to human physiological and disease states.

  19. Protein Biomarkers of Periodontitis in Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the tissues that surround and support the teeth and is initiated by inappropriate and excessive immune responses to bacteria in subgingival dental plaque leading to loss of the integrity of the periodontium, compromised tooth function, and eventually tooth loss. Periodontitis is an economically important disease as it is time-consuming and expensive to treat. Periodontitis has a worldwide prevalence of 5–15% and the prevalence of severe disease in western populations has increased in recent decades. Furthermore, periodontitis is more common in smokers, in obesity, in people with diabetes, and in heart disease patients although the pathogenic processes underpinning these links are, as yet, poorly understood. Diagnosis and monitoring of periodontitis rely on traditional clinical examinations which are inadequate to predict patient susceptibility, disease activity, and response to treatment. Studies of the immunopathogenesis of periodontitis and analysis of mediators in saliva have allowed the identification of many potentially useful biomarkers. Convenient measurement of these biomarkers using chairside analytical devices could form the basis for diagnostic tests which will aid the clinician and the patient in periodontitis management; this review will summarise this field and will identify the experimental, technical, and clinical issues that remain to be addressed before such tests can be implemented. PMID:24944840

  20. Saliva of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) inhibits classical and alternative complement pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Naylene C S; Vale, Vladimir F; Franco, Paula F; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Rodrigues, Daniel S; Lima, Walter S; Fux, Blima; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-08-11

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the main ectoparasite affecting livestock worldwide. For a successful parasitism, ticks need to evade several immune responses of their hosts, including the activation of the complement system. In spite of the importance of R. microplus, previous work only identified one salivary molecule that blocks the complement system. The current study describes complement inhibitory activities induced by R. microplus salivary components and mechanisms elicited by putative salivary proteins on both classical and alternative complement pathways. We found that R. microplus saliva from fully- and partially engorged females was able to inhibit both pathways. Saliva acts strongly at the initial steps of both complement activation pathways. In the classical pathway, the saliva blocked C4 cleavage, and hence, deposition of C4b on the activation surface, suggesting that the inhibition occurs at some point between C1q and C4. In the alternative pathway, saliva acts by binding to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and reducing C3b production and deposition as well as cleavage of factor B. Saliva has no effect on formation or decay of the C6 to C8 components of the membrane attack complex. The saliva of R. microplus is able to inhibit the early steps of classical and alternative pathways of the complement system. Saliva acts by blocking C4 cleavage and deposition of C4b on the classical pathway activation surface and, in the alternative pathway, saliva bind to initial components of the cascade (C3b and properdin) thereby preventing the C3 convertase formation and the production and deposition of additional C3b.

  1. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Essential for the Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Lilly M.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Burghout, Peter; Schraa, Kiki; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Mennens, Svenja; Eleveld, Marc J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Zomer, Aldert; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Bootsma, Hester J.

    2014-01-01

    Since Streptococcus pneumoniae transmits through droplet spread, this respiratory tract pathogen may be able to survive in saliva. Here, we show that saliva supports survival of clinically relevant S. pneumoniae strains for more than 24 h in a capsule-independent manner. Moreover, saliva induced growth of S. pneumoniae in growth-permissive conditions, suggesting that S. pneumoniae is well adapted for uptake of nutrients from this bodily fluid. By using Tn-seq, a method for genome-wide negative selection screening, we identified 147 genes potentially required for growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva, among which genes predicted to be involved in cell envelope biosynthesis, cell transport, amino acid metabolism, and stress response predominated. The Tn-seq findings were validated by testing a panel of directed gene deletion mutants for their ability to survive in saliva under two testing conditions: at room temperature without CO2, representing transmission, and at 37°C with CO2, representing in-host carriage. These validation experiments confirmed that the plsX gene and the amiACDEF and aroDEBC operons, involved in respectively fatty acid metabolism, oligopeptide transport, and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids play an important role in the growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva at 37°C. In conclusion, this study shows that S. pneumoniae is well-adapted for growth and survival in human saliva and provides a genome-wide list of genes potentially involved in adaptation. This notion supports earlier evidence that S. pneumoniae can use human saliva as a vector for transmission. PMID:24586856

  2. Genome-wide identification of genes essential for the survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae in human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilly M Verhagen

    Full Text Available Since Streptococcus pneumoniae transmits through droplet spread, this respiratory tract pathogen may be able to survive in saliva. Here, we show that saliva supports survival of clinically relevant S. pneumoniae strains for more than 24 h in a capsule-independent manner. Moreover, saliva induced growth of S. pneumoniae in growth-permissive conditions, suggesting that S. pneumoniae is well adapted for uptake of nutrients from this bodily fluid. By using Tn-seq, a method for genome-wide negative selection screening, we identified 147 genes potentially required for growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva, among which genes predicted to be involved in cell envelope biosynthesis, cell transport, amino acid metabolism, and stress response predominated. The Tn-seq findings were validated by testing a panel of directed gene deletion mutants for their ability to survive in saliva under two testing conditions: at room temperature without CO2, representing transmission, and at 37 °C with CO2, representing in-host carriage. These validation experiments confirmed that the plsX gene and the amiACDEF and aroDEBC operons, involved in respectively fatty acid metabolism, oligopeptide transport, and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids play an important role in the growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva at 37 °C. In conclusion, this study shows that S. pneumoniae is well-adapted for growth and survival in human saliva and provides a genome-wide list of genes potentially involved in adaptation. This notion supports earlier evidence that S. pneumoniae can use human saliva as a vector for transmission.

  3. Growth of Candida albicans in human saliva is supported by low-molecular-mass compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-12-01

    Saliva plays a key role in the maintenance of a stable oral microflora. It contains antimicrobial compounds but also functions as a substrate for growth of bacteria under conditions of low external nutrient supply. Besides bacteria, yeasts, in particular Candida albicans, commonly inhabit the oral cavity. Under immunocompromised conditions, instantaneous outgrowth of this yeast occurs in oral carriers of C. albicans, suggesting that this yeast is able to survive in the oral cavity with saliva as sole source of growth substrate. The aim of the present study was to identify the salivary constituents that are used by C. albicans for growth and survival in saliva. In addition, we have explored the effect of growth in saliva on the susceptibility of C. albicans to histatin 5, a salivary antifungal peptide. It was found that C. albicans was able to grow in human saliva without addition of glucose, and in the stationary phase could survive for more than 400 h. Candida albicans grown in saliva was more than 10 times less susceptible for salivary histatin 5 than C. albicans cultured in Sabouraud medium. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Correlation between factors associated with the removable partial dentures use and Candida spp. in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, João Milton Rocha; Ferreira dos Santos, Silvana Soleo; Neisser, Maximiliano Piero; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Faria, Ms Ivan

    2011-12-01

    To correlate the presence and number of Candida spp. in the saliva of wearers of removable partial dentures retained with precision attachments with the proportion of metal/acrylic resin present in the dentures. Saliva samples from 40 removable partial denture wearers (test) and one paired sample of individuals, non-wearers of any type of removable denture (control) were collected, seeded, and the colony forming units of Candida counted and identified. The metal/acrylic resin proportion of each denture was quantified, using silicone plates pressed over each denture. Candida spp. was found in the saliva of 80% of the individuals in the test group and 65% of the control, with C. albicans being the most prevalent species. The test group presented with the highest number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva, and there was weak correlation between this number and the metal and resin area of the denture (Pearson's coefficient of correlation). Greater prevalence and a higher number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva occurred in removable partial denture wearers (p = 0.04) with a weak positive correlation between the metal and resin area and the number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva. However, this correlation was more significant for the area of resin. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Comparing Properties (Concentration, PH and mutans streptococcus Saliva in Both Status Resting Saliva and Stimulated Saliva in Preschoolers of Kerman city

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Farokh-Gisour,; Hadis Fatholah Nejhad; Hamid Reza Poureslami

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed to compare the characteristics (concentration, PH and mutans streptococcus) saliva in both status resting saliva and stimulated saliva in preschoolers of Kerman city. In this study, 100 children aged 5 years among patients admitted to the pediatric ward of Kerman dental school and dental offices, some experts in Kerman dental school participated. Resting and stimulated saliva (after chewing oral paraffin) children collected and in concentrations, PH and the amount...

  6. Food metabolomics: from farm to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics, one of the latest components in the suite of systems biology, has been used to understand the metabolism and physiology of living systems, including microorganisms, plants, animals and humans. Food metabolomics can be defined as the application of metabolomics in food systems, including food resources, food processing and diet for humans. The study of food metabolomics has increased gradually in the recent years, because food systems are directly related to nutrition and human health. This review describes the recent trends and applications of metabolomics to food systems, from farm to human, including food resource production, industrial food processing and food intake by humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NMR-based metabolomics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaccarino, Nunzia

    ’s phenotype. This approach finds an increasing number of applications in many areas including medical, pharmaceutical, food and environmental sciences. The combined use of NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics techniques, is able to provide the metabolic “fingerprint” of the various samples. This PhD project...... focused on the analysis of various samples covering a wide range of fields, namely, food and nutraceutical sciences, cell metabolomics and medicine using a metabolomics approach. Indeed, the first part of the thesis describes two exploratory studies performed on Algerian extra virgin olive oil and apple...... juice from ancient Danish apple cultivars. Both studies revealed variety-related peculiarities that would have been difficult to detect by means of traditional analysis. The second part of the project includes four metabolomics studies performed on samples of biological origin. In particular, the first...

  8. Preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euceda, Leslie R; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2015-05-01

    Metabolomics involves the large scale analysis of metabolites and thus, provides information regarding cellular processes in a biological sample. Independently of the analytical technique used, a vast amount of data is always acquired when carrying out metabolomics studies; this results in complex datasets with large amounts of variables. This type of data requires multivariate statistical analysis for its proper biological interpretation. Prior to multivariate analysis, preprocessing of the data must be carried out to remove unwanted variation such as instrumental or experimental artifacts. This review aims to outline the steps in the preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data and describe some of the methods to perform these. Since using different preprocessing methods may produce different results, it is important that an appropriate pipeline exists for the selection of the optimal combination of methods in the preprocessing workflow.

  9. Proteome Analysis of Watery Saliva Secreted by Green Rice Leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hattori

    Full Text Available The green rice leafhopper, Nephotettix cincticeps, is a vascular bundle feeder that discharges watery and gelling saliva during the feeding process. To understand the potential functions of saliva for successful and safe feeding on host plants, we analyzed the complexity of proteinaceous components in the watery saliva of N. cincticeps. Salivary proteins were collected from a sucrose diet that adult leafhoppers had fed on through a membrane of stretched parafilm. Protein concentrates were separated using SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions. Six proteins were identified by a gas-phase protein sequencer and two proteins were identified using LC-MS/MS analysis with reference to expressed sequence tag (EST databases of this species. Full -length cDNAs encoding these major proteins were obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR and degenerate PCR. Furthermore, gel-free proteome analysis that was performed to cover the broad range of salivary proteins with reference to the latest RNA-sequencing data from the salivary gland of N. cincticeps, yielded 63 additional protein species. Out of 71 novel proteins identified from the watery saliva, about 60 % of those were enzymes or other functional proteins, including GH5 cellulase, transferrin, carbonic anhydrases, aminopeptidase, regucalcin, and apolipoprotein. The remaining proteins appeared to be unique and species- specific. This is the first study to identify and characterize the proteins in watery saliva of Auchenorrhyncha species, especially sheath-producing, vascular bundle-feeders.

  10. Metabolomic application in toxicity evaluation and toxicological biomarker identification of natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan-Qian; Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Tang, Dan-Dan; Miao, Hua; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2016-05-25

    Natural product plays a vital role in disease prevention and treatment since the appearance of civilization, but the toxicity severely hinders its wide use. In order to avoid toxic effect as far as possible and use natural product safely, more comprehensive understandings of toxicity are urgently required. Since the metabolome represents the physiological or pathological status of organisms, metabolomics-based toxicology is of significance to observe potential injury before toxins have caused physiological or pathological damages. Metabolomics-based toxicology can evaluate toxicity and identify toxicological biomarker of natural product, which is helpful to guide clinical medication and reduce adverse drug reactions. In the past decades, dozens of metabolomic researches have been implemented on toxicity evaluation, toxicological biomarker identification and potential mechanism exploration of nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and central nervous system toxicity induced by pure compounds, extracts and compound prescriptions. In this paper, metabolomic technology, sample preparation, data process and analysis, and metabolomics-based toxicological research of natural product are reviewed, and finally, the potential problems and further perspectives in toxicological metabolomic investigations of natural product are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Secretory proteins in the saliva of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Thiruvanamalai; Hand, Arthur R; Mednieks, Maija

    2009-12-01

    The protein composition of oral fluid is modulated by environmental factors and physiological states, i.e. chemical, mechanical and pharmacologic stimuli, pathologic conditions, and psychological stress. Secretory protein concentrations in samples of whole saliva (WS) from children were measured and the results were subjected to statistical analysis. Protein expression was determined using electrophoresis and Western blotting. Protein profiles of children were significantly different from those of adults (n = 50, P saliva from children contained a group of high-molecular-weight (>90 kDa) proteins, whereas fewer than 5% of samples from adults had comparable bands. The ratio of the regulatory subunits (RII) of type II protein kinase A (an enzyme that regulates secretion) to total protein was stable in children's saliva, but variable in saliva from adults. Alpha amylase (alpha-amylase), an enzyme that digests carbohydrates, was less degraded in WS of children than in that of adults. Gingival crevicular fluid of both children and adults did not contain alpha-amylase or RII. No significant gender-based differences were found, but Caucasian children had higher salivary protein levels than children with an African background. Saliva collection is rapid, painless, non-invasive, economical, and yields findings that are reproducible. Objective, biochemical monitoring of secretory proteins in oral fluid of children may reveal responses to stressful stimuli.

  12. Urine Metabolomics in Hypertension Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiropoulou, Sofia; McBride, Martin; Padmanabhan, Sandosh

    2017-01-01

    Functional genomics requires an understanding of the complete network of changes within an organism by extensive measurements of moieties from mRNA, proteins, and metabolites. Metabolomics utilizes analytic chemistry tools to profile the complete spectrum of metabolites found in a tissue, cells, or biofluids using a wide range of tools from infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. In this protocol, we outline a procedure for performing metabolomic analysis of urine samples using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). We outline the advantages of using this approach and summarize some of the early promising studies in cardiovascular diseases using this approach.

  13. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Widmann

    Full Text Available Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53 and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1 genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG I442M (rs109570900 and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8 Q204X (rs110344317 loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily

  14. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  15. Postnatal Identification of Zika Virus Peptides from Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuanazzi, D; Arts, E J; Jorge, P K; Mulyar, Y; Gibson, R; Xiao, Y; Bringel Dos Santos, M; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Siqueira, W L

    2017-09-01

    We explored the potential to diagnose Zika virus (ZIKV) infection by analyzing peptides in saliva during a convalescent phase of infection, long after resolution of acute disease. A 25-y-old woman clinically diagnosed with Zika fever in the first trimester was enrolled with her dizygotic twins for a 3-mo postnatal sample of saliva (9-mo after maternal infection). The female baby (A) had microcephaly while the male baby (B) was born healthy. Peptidomic analysis was completed by mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and ZIKV peptides were identified using the National Institutes of Health Zika Virus Resource database, then aligned and mapped to the ZIKV polyprotein to determine proteome coverage and phylogenetic studies. A total of 423 (mother), 607 (baby A), and 183 (baby B) unique ZIKV peptides were identified in saliva by MS/MS, providing a coverage of 67%, 84%, and 45%, respectively, of the entire ZIKV polyprotein (>3,400 amino acids). All peptides were aligned to other flaviviruses that are circulating in Brazil (dengue and yellow fever) to discard false-positive matches. Nine peptides identified were highly conserved to dengue virus. Alignment of a contiguous peptide sequence for mother/babies with the 74 ZIKV sequences suggested that the virus may have entered the oral cavity through the salivary glands, leading to an infection that persists into the postnatal period (vertical transmission). Furthermore, we identified 9 sequence variations that were unique to the baby with microcephaly (not found in the mother or the twin). This sequence information could provide a template for future neuropathogenic studies. A much larger sample size is required to determine whether sequence variation in the envelope protein significantly associates with microcephaly. Finally, from a public health perspective, it will be important to determine whether viral replication is still taking place after birth and whether the virus can be transmitted through salivary contact.

  16. The Proteomes of Human Parotid and Submandibular/Sublingual Gland Salivas Collected as the Ductal Secretions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Paul; Hagen, Fred K.; Hardt, Markus; Liao, Lujian; Yan, Weihong; Arellanno, Martha; Bassilian, Sara; Bedi, Gurrinder S.; Boontheung, Pinmannee; Cociorva, Daniel; Delahunty, Claire M.; Denny, Trish; Dunsmore, Jason; Faull, Kym F.; Gilligan, Joyce; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Halgand, Frédéric; Hall, Steven C.; Han, Xuemei; Henson, Bradley; Hewel, Johannes; Hu, Shen; Jeffrey, Sherry; Jiang, Jiang; Loo, Joseph A.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Malamud, Daniel; Melvin, James E.; Miroshnychenko, Olga; Navazesh, Mahvash; Niles, Richard; Park, Sung Kyu; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Richert, Megan; Robinson, Sarah; Sondej, Melissa; Souda, Puneet; Sullivan, Mark A.; Takashima, Jona; Than, Shawn; Wang, Jianghua; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Wolinsky, Lawrence; Xie, Yongming; Xu, Tao; Yu, Weixia; Ytterberg, Jimmy; Wong, David T.; Yates, John R.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Saliva is a body fluid with important functions in oral and general health. A consortium of three research groups catalogued the proteins in human saliva collected as the ductal secretions: 1166 identifications—914 in parotid and 917 in submandibular/sublingual saliva—were made. The results showed that a high proportion of proteins that are found in plasma and/or tears are also present in saliva along with unique components. The proteins identified are involved in numerous molecular processes ranging from structural functions to enzymatic/catalytic activities. As expected, the majority mapped to the extracellular and secretory compartments. An immunoblot approach was used to validate the presence in saliva of a subset of the proteins identified by mass spectrometric approaches. These experiments focused on novel constituents and proteins for which the peptide evidence was relatively weak. Ultimately, information derived from the work reported here and related published studies can be used to translate blood-based clinical laboratory tests into a format that utilizes saliva. Additionally, a catalogue of the salivary proteome of healthy individuals allows future analyses of salivary samples from individuals with oral and systemic diseases, with the goal of identifying biomarkers with diagnostic and/or prognostic value for these conditions; another possibility is the discovery of therapeutic targets. PMID:18361515

  17. Proteomic profiling of cereal aphid saliva reveals both ubiquitous and adaptive secreted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail A K Rao

    Full Text Available The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113.

  18. Proteomic profiling of cereal aphid saliva reveals both ubiquitous and adaptive secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sohail A K; Carolan, James C; Wilkinson, Tom L

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113.

  19. Fluoride in dental biofilm and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Staun

    Dette ph.d.-projekt bidrager med ny viden om fordelingen af fluorid i dental biofilm og saliva. For at udforske koncentrationen af fluorid i naturlig (in vivo) biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og i saliva, blev der udført to meget forskellige kliniske studier. Resultaterne fra tværsnitsstudiet (Studie...... mellem fluoridkoncentrationerne i biofilmsediment og fordeling af caries mellem regioner. Forskere anbefales at være opmærksomme på de intra-orale forskelle i fluoridkoncentrationer mellem regioner samt sikre balancering af effekten af region, når der indsamles dental biofilm til fluoridanalyse. I det...... I), hos en stor gruppe mennesker (n=42) der konsulterede en tandklinik for behandling, bekræfter tidligere viden, at der findes en naturlig biologisk variation i fluoridkoncentrationerne i biofilm fra forskellige intra-orale regioner samt mellem biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og saliva...

  20. Plasma metabolomics combined with personalized diagnosis guided by Chinese medicine reveals subtypes of chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Juan WANG; Guo, Shuzhen; Gao, Kuo; Shi, Qi; Fu, Bangze; Chen, Chan; Luo, Liangtao; Deng, Dong; Zhao, Huihui; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic heart failure (CHF) is characterized by insufficient blood supply from heart to meet the body's metabolic demands. Integrating Western and traditional Chinese medicine to treat CHF has proved a validated therapeutic approach. In recent years, metabolomics has been regarded as a potential platform to provide biomarkers for disease-subtypes. Objective: To examine 38 patients, combined NMR plasma metabolomics and traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis in order to identify ...

  1. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard Luy; Bernhard Watzl; Stefan Heissler; Achim Bub; Rist, Manuela J.; Benjamin Görling; Claudia Muhle-Goll

    2013-01-01

    It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine sample...

  2. A device for the collection of submandibular saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Sara; Motoi, Lidia; Medlicott, Natalie; Swindells, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the construction of a non-invasive device for the collection of submandibular saliva. Preliminary tests were carried out on saliva collected from a single donor in order to determine whether the rheological properties of submandibular saliva collected using the device were comparable to whole saliva collected using the expectoration (or 'spit') method. The device collected a lower quantity of saliva than that collected using the expectoration method. Stimulated saliva collected using the device had a pH close to that of unstimulated saliva because the sealed collection unit in the device minimised contamination. Saliva exhibited shear-thinning behaviour regardless of the method of collection, although that collected using the device was more viscous. The viscoelasticity of saliva collected using the two methods was different, probably as a result of differences in composition. This difference was greater with stimulated saliva. Despite the discrepancies between whole saliva and submandibular saliva, the device provides a non-invasive method for the collection of high-quality saliva over extended periods.

  3. Aqueous and lipid nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic profiles of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa show potential as an indicator species for environmental metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey N; Samuelsson, Linda; Bernardi, Giuliana; Gooneratne, Ravi; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2014-10-01

    The common pasture earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa has often been neglected in environmental metabolomics in favor of species easily bred in the laboratory. The present study assigns aqueous metabolites in A. caliginosa using high-resolution 1- and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In total, 51 aqueous metabolites were identified, including typical amino acids (alanine, leucine, asparagine, phenylalanine), sugars (maltose, glucose), the dominant earthworm-specific 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-furansulfonate, and several previously unreported metabolites (oxoglutarate, putrescine). Examining the lesser-known earthworm lipid metabolome showed various lipid fatty acyl chains, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine. To briefly test if the NMR metabolomic techniques could differentiate A. caliginosa from different sites, earthworms were collected from 2 adjacent farms. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis detected metabolomic differences, suggesting the worms from the 2 sites differed in their energy metabolism, as indicated by altered levels of alanine, glutamine, glutamate, malate, fumarate, and lipids. Evidence of greater utilization of lipid energy reserves and onset of protein catabolism was also present. While the precise cause of the metabolomic differences could not be determined, the results show the potential of this species for further environmental metabolomic studies. © 2014 SETAC.

  4. Computational Tools for the Secondary Analysis of Metabolomics Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Cameron Booth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics experiments have become commonplace in a wide variety of disciplines. By identifying and quantifying metabolites researchers can achieve a systems level understanding of metabolism. These studies produce vast swaths of data which are often only lightly interpreted due to the overwhelmingly large amount of variables that are measured. Recently, a number of computational tools have been developed which enable much deeper analysis of metabolomics data. These data have been difficult to interpret as understanding the connections between dozens of altered metabolites has often relied on the biochemical knowledge of researchers and their speculations. Modern biochemical databases provide information about the interconnectivity of metabolism which can be automatically polled using metabolomics secondary analysis tools. Starting with lists of altered metabolites, there are two main types of analysis: enrichment analysis computes which metabolic pathways have been significantly altered whereas metabolite mapping contextualizes the abundances and significances of measured metabolites into network visualizations. Many different tools have been developed for one or both of these applications. In this review the functionality and use of these software is discussed. Together these novel secondary analysis tools will enable metabolomics researchers to plumb the depths of their data and produce farther reaching biological conclusions than ever before.

  5. COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR THE SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF METABOLOMICS EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C. Booth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics experiments have become commonplace in a wide variety of disciplines. By identifying and quantifying metabolites researchers can achieve a systems level understanding of metabolism. These studies produce vast swaths of data which are often only lightly interpreted due to the overwhelmingly large amount of variables that are measured. Recently, a number of computational tools have been developed which enable much deeper analysis of metabolomics data. These data have been difficult to interpret as understanding the connections between dozens of altered metabolites has often relied on the biochemical knowledge of researchers and their speculations. Modern biochemical databases provide information about the interconnectivity of metabolism which can be automatically polled using metabolomics secondary analysis tools. Starting with lists of altered metabolites, there are two main types of analysis: enrichment analysis computes which metabolic pathways have been significantly altered whereas metabolite mapping contextualizes the abundances and significances of measured metabolites into network visualizations. Many different tools have been developed for one or both of these applications. In this review the functionality and use of these software is discussed. Together these novel secondary analysis tools will enable metabolomics researchers to plumb the depths of their data and produce farther reaching biological conclusions than ever before.

  6. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Bartel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the 'human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface' (BMTI. Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease.

  7. Food Metabolomics: Fact or Fiction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, L.; Tas, A.; Thissen, U.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of both volatile and non-volatile metabolites in food combined with information on sensory properties and multivariate statistics can be a valuable tool in understanding and improving the taste of food. Performing food metabolomics studies is, however, challenging and requires

  8. Candida in saliva of Brazilian hemophilic patients Candida na saliva de pacientes hemofílicos brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Maranhão Pereira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is a common hereditary hemorrhagic disorder, however little is known about the oral microflora of hemophilic patients. The aim of this study was to quantify the Candida and identify its species in non-stimulated saliva of hemophilic patients, and consider its relationship with clinical factors influencing Candida carriage. This study comprised evaluation of 86 hemophilic patients of the Hematology Center/UNICAMP and 43 healthy subjects as controls. All patients were submitted to anamnesis, intraoral examination and unstimulated saliva collection. Candida counts and species identification were performed in salivary samples. Candida was present in 64% of the hemophilic patients and in 44% of the healthy controls. C. albicans represented 65% and 68% of the isolated species, in hemophiliacs and control group respectively, and C. tropicalis was the second most common species in both groups. These results indicate that hemophilic patients carry Candida more frequently and in higher counts than healthy controls, independently of oral clinical parameter considered, as viral infections, complete dentures, transfusions of hemoderivatives, and salivary flow.Hemofilia é uma alteração hemorrágica hereditária comum, entretanto pouco se sabe a respeito da microbiota oral destes indivíduos. O objetivo deste estudo foi quantificar a presença de Candida e identificar as suas espécies na saliva de hemofílicos, correlacionando os resultados com fatores clínicos que possam influenciar a presença deste fungo. Foram avaliados 86 hemofílicos do Hemocentro/UNICAMP e 43 indivíduos saudáveis. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a anamnese, exame clínico intra-oral e coleta de saliva de forma não estimulada. A quantificação e identificação das espécies de Candida foram realizadas nas amostras de saliva. Candida estava presente em 64% dos hemofílicos e em 44% dos indivíduos saudáveis. C. albicans representou 65% e 68% das esp

  9. Saliva: A tool in assessing glucose levels in Diabetes Mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Satish, B N V S; Srikala, P; Maharudrappa, B; Awanti, Sharanabasappa M; Kumar, Prashant; Hugar, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was undertaken to correlate the glucose levels in saliva and blood of diabetic and healthy non diabetic individuals and to determine the efficacy of saliva as a diagnostic...

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae in saliva of Dutch primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyllie, Anne L.; Chu, Mei Ling J. N.; Schellens, Mariëlle H. B.; van Engelsdorp Gastelaars, Jody; Jansen, Marc D.; van der Ende, Arie; Bogaert, Debby; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Trzciński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    While nasopharyngeal sampling is the gold standard for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage, historically seen, saliva sampling also seems highly sensitive for pneumococcal detection. We investigated S. pneumoniae carriage in saliva from fifty schoolchildren by conventional and

  11. Pattern recognition of estradiol, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in children's saliva samples using stochastic microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staden, Raluca-Ioana Stefan-Van; Gugoaşă, Livia Alexandra; Calenic, Bogdan; Legler, Juliette

    2014-07-01

    Stochastic microsensors based on diamond paste and three types of electroactive materials (maltodextrin (MD), α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H porphyrin (P)) were developed for the assay of estradiol (E2), testosterone (T2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in children's saliva. The main advantage of utilization of such tools is the possibility to identify and quantify all three hormones within minutes in small volumes of childen's saliva. The limits of quantification obtained for DHT, T2, and E2 (1 fmol/L for DHT, 1 pmol/L for T2, and 66 fmol/L for E2) determined using the proposed tools allows the utilization of these new methods with high reliability for the screening of saliva samples from children. This new method proposed for the assay of the three hormones overcomes the limitations (regarding limits of determination) of ELISA method which is the standard method used in clinical laboratories for the assay of DHT, T2, and E2 in saliva samples. The main feature of its utilization for children's saliva is to identify earlier problems related to early puberty and obesity.

  12. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to measurement of hemodynamic signals accompanying stimulated saliva secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Obata, Akiko N; Moda, Ichiro; Ozaki, Kazutaka; Yasuhara, Takaomi; Yamamoto, Yukari; Kiguchi, Masashi; Maki, Atsushi; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-04-01

    We aim to test the feasibility of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for indirect measurement of human saliva secretion in response to taste stimuli for potential application to organoleptic testing. We use an NIRS system to measure extracranial hemodynamics (Hb-signals around the temples) of healthy participants when taste stimuli are taken in their mouths. First, the Hb-signals and volume of expelled saliva (stimulated by distilled-water or sucrose-solution intake) are simultaneously measured and large Hb-signal changes in response to the taste stimuli (Hb-responses) are found. Statistical analysis show that both the Hb response and saliva volume are larger for the sucrose solution than for the distilled water with a significant correlation between them (r = 0.81). The effects of swallowing on the Hb-signals are investigated. Similar Hb responses, differing from the sucrose solution and distilled water, are obtained even though the participants swallow the mouth contents. Finally, functional magnetic resonance imaging is used to identify possible sources of the Hb signals corresponding to salivation. Statistical analysis indicates similar responses in the extracranial regions, mainly around the middle meningeal artery. In conclusion, the identified correlation between extracranial hemodynamics and the saliva volume suggests that NIRS is applicable to the measurement of hemodynamic signals accompanying stimulated saliva secretion.

  13. A population-based study of how children are exposed to saliva in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa: implications for the spread of saliva-borne pathogens to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, L M; Neilands, T B; Mosam, A; Mzolo, S; Martin, J N

    2010-04-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, many viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and hepatitis B are acquired in childhood. While saliva is an important transmission conduit for these viruses, little is known about how saliva is passed to African children. We endeavoured to identify the range and determinants of acts by which African children are exposed to saliva. To identify the range of acts by which African children are exposed to saliva, we conducted focus groups, semi-structured interviews and participant observations in an urban and a rural community in South Africa. To measure the prevalence and determinants of the identified acts, we administered a questionnaire to a population-based sample of caregivers. We identified 12 caregiving practices that expose a child's oral-respiratory mucosa, cutaneous surfaces or anal-rectal mucosa to saliva. Several acts were heretofore not described in the contemporary literature (e.g., caregiver inserting finger lubricated with saliva into child's rectum to relieve constipation). Among 896 participants in the population-based survey, many of the acts were commonly practised by all respondent types (mothers, fathers, grandmothers and siblings). The most common were premastication of food, sharing sweets and premastication of medicinal plants that are spit onto a child's body. African children are exposed to saliva through a variety of acts, practised by a variety of caregivers, with no single predominant practice. This diversity poses challenges for epidemiologic work seeking to identify specific saliva-passing practices that transmit viruses. Most acts could be replaced by other actions and are theoretically preventable.

  14. Bacterial profiles of saliva in relation to diet, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The bacterial profile of saliva is composed of bacteria from different oral surfaces. The objective of this study was to determine whether different diet intake, lifestyle, or socioeconomic status is associated with characteristic bacterial saliva profiles. DESIGN....... RESULTS: Targets for 131 different probes were identified in 292 samples, with Streptococcus and Veillonella being the most predominant genera identified. Two bacterial taxa (Streptococcus sobrinus and Eubacterium [11][G-3] brachy) were more associated with smokers than non-smokers (adjusted p-value....01). Stratification of the group based on extreme ends of the parameters age, gender, alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI), and diet intake had no statistical influence on the composition of the bacterial profile of saliva. Conversely, differences in socioeconomic status were reflected by the bacterial profiles...

  15. [Study on mobile phone enabled wireless detection of saliva glucose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Yu, Yang; Lu, Yongqiang; Liu, Jing

    2011-09-01

    In this study, based on the correlation between the blood and saliva glucose, we proposed and developed a new conceptual method of using mobile phone to measure wirelessly the glucose concentration in saliva. According to the experiments on simulated saliva, the new system could draw, display, store and carry out calculation on the correlation curves between saliva glucose and electrical parameters. This demonstrates the feasibility and bright future of the new technique.

  16. Re-evaluation of saliva for monitoring theophylline concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Rylance, G W; Beswick, D T; Cullen, R. E.; Roberts, D G

    1985-01-01

    Variability of the mixed saliva/plasma theophylline relation was examined in seven children aged 2 to 13 years. Good correlation between plasma and saliva concentrations was found, but on the three occasions there was considerable inter- and intrapatient variability. There was no significant or consistent relation between unstimulated and stimulated saliva concentrations or between saliva concentrations and sample volumes. Plasma theophylline concentrations cannot be predicted accurately from...

  17. Influence of Individual Saliva Secretion on Fluoride Bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Naumova; Gaengler, P.; Zimmer, S.; Arnold, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to compare the individual saliva secretion rate with the fluoride bioavailability in saliva after using sodium fluoride and amine fluoride. Methods: To assess oral fluoride kinetics 10 highly trained volunteers brushed their teeth with one of the formulations and saliva was collected. The amount of saliva was measured, and the fluoride content was determined. Data underwent statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney-U test and Pearson correlation...

  18. Increasing rigor in NMR-based metabolomics through validated and open source tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Romero, Pedro R; Westler, William M; Baskaran, Kumaran; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L

    2017-02-01

    The metabolome, the collection of small molecules associated with an organism, is a growing subject of inquiry, with the data utilized for data-intensive systems biology, disease diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and the broader characterization of small molecules in mixtures. Owing to their close proximity to the functional endpoints that govern an organism's phenotype, metabolites are highly informative about functional states. The field of metabolomics identifies and quantifies endogenous and exogenous metabolites in biological samples. Information acquired from nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS), and the published literature, as processed by statistical approaches, are driving increasingly wider applications of metabolomics. This review focuses on the role of databases and software tools in advancing the rigor, robustness, reproducibility, and validation of metabolomics studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Kinematic viscosity of unstimulated whole saliva in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglio-Bonda, A; Pattarino, F; Foglio-Bonda, P L

    2014-10-01

    To analyze kinematic viscosity and pH of unstimulated whole saliva, evaluate possible variations after sampling, identify any gender differences and detect possible correlations between them. The sample consisted of sixty-four healthy young adults (37 females and 27 males, mean age 25.2 years). Saliva was collected using the spitting method at 11:00 am. Kinematic viscosity was determined with a capillary viscometer (ViscoClock, Schott-Geräte Mainz, Germany) equipped with a micro-Ubbelohde capillary. Viscosity and pH were measured at a temperature of 36 °C in a thermostatic bath. Viscosity and pH data were evaluated almost simultaneously at six different times after sampling in order to identify any variations due to aging. The data were statistically analyzed using Student's t test and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. In total sample kinematic viscosity was 1.40 cSt (SD = 0.39; RSD % = 27.81), in the male and female groups was 1.33 cSt (SD = 0.35, RSD% = 26.31) and 1.45 cSt (SD = 0.41, RSD % = 28.45) respectively; the difference was not statistically significant. Viscosity decreased exponentially as a function of time after sampling then reaching a plateau around 1.12 cSt, while the pH values increased linearly. There was a trend of pH to decrease while viscosity decreases. Kinematic viscometry could be a valid tool to evaluate salivary viscosity. Degradation of saliva after sampling affects viscosity and slightly pH. The use of capillary viscometer to evaluate salivary aging needs more improvements. Further studies are required to investigate and explain the effects of different techniques to reduce the film forming on the air/liquid interface during measurement.

  20. Potential Impact and Study Considerations of Metabolomics in Cardiovascular Health and Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Susan; Shah, Svati H; Corwin, Elizabeth J; Fiehn, Oliver; Fitzgerald, Robert L; Gerszten, Robert E; Illig, Thomas; Rhee, Eugene P; Srinivas, Pothur R; Wang, Thomas J; Jain, Mohit

    2017-04-01

    Through the measure of thousands of small-molecule metabolites in diverse biological systems, metabolomics now offers the potential for new insights into the factors that contribute to complex human diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Targeted metabolomics methods have already identified new molecular markers and metabolomic signatures of cardiovascular disease risk (including branched-chain amino acids, select unsaturated lipid species, and trimethylamine- N -oxide), thus in effect linking diverse exposures such as those from dietary intake and the microbiota with cardiometabolic traits. As technologies for metabolomics continue to evolve, the depth and breadth of small-molecule metabolite profiling in complex systems continue to advance rapidly, along with prospects for ongoing discovery. Current challenges facing the field of metabolomics include scaling throughput and technical capacity for metabolomics approaches, bioinformatic and chemoinformatic tools for handling large-scale metabolomics data, methods for elucidating the biochemical structure and function of novel metabolites, and strategies for determining the true clinical relevance of metabolites observed in association with cardiovascular disease outcomes. Progress made in addressing these challenges will allow metabolomics the potential to substantially affect diagnostics and therapeutics in cardiovascular medicine. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Validation of a novel saliva-based ELISA test for diagnosing tapeworm burden in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Kirsty L; Davis, Paul J; Austin, Corrine J

    2016-06-01

    Tapeworm infections pose a significant threat to equine health as they are associated with clinical cases of colic. Diagnosis of tapeworm burden using fecal egg counts (FECs) is unreliable, and, although a commercial serologic ELISA for anti-tapeworm antibodies is available, it requires a veterinarian to collect the blood sample. A reliable diagnostic test using an owner-accessible sample such as saliva could provide a cost-effective alternative for tapeworm testing in horses, and allow targeted deworming strategies. The purpose of the study was to statistically validate a saliva tapeworm ELISA test and compare to a tapeworm-specific IgG(T) serologic ELISA. Serum samples (139) and matched saliva samples (104) were collected from horses at a UK abattoir. The ileocecal junction and cecum were visually examined for tapeworms and any present were counted. Samples were analyzed using a serologic ELISA and the saliva tapeworm test. The test results were compared to tapeworm numbers and the various data sets were statistically analyzed. Saliva scores had strong positive correlations with both infection intensity (0.74) and serologic results (Spearman's rank coefficients; 0.74 and 0.86, respectively). The saliva tapeworm test was capable of identifying the presence of one or more tapeworms with 83% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Importantly, no high-burden (more than 20 tapeworms) horses were misdiagnosed. The saliva tapeworm test has statistical accuracy for detecting tapeworm burdens in horses with 83% sensitivity and 85% specificity, similar to those of the serologic ELISA (85% and 78%, respectively). © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Analysis of saliva by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for diagnosis of physiological stress in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Caetano Júnior

    Full Text Available Introduction Saliva is the most promising biofluid to monitor the physiological state of athletes, because this method is not invasive and has low contamination risks. The characterization of saliva by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR has been studied as an alternative technique to the standard clinical analysis. However, methodological procedures for saliva analysis are not completely clear, especially in terms of influence of storage conditions and sample preparations for infrared analysis. Thawed saliva includes a precipitate, which may influence the infrared spectral analysis. Thus, the purpose of this study was to show the spectral differences of the precipitate, supernatant, and a combo, as well as the best way to classify the physiological state of the athletes by FT-IR. Methods The saliva collection was performed before, immediately after, and two hours after a handball match. After the storage of samples at –20 ○C, it was possible to identify two phases (precipitate and supernatant and to determine the biochemical differences between the spectra of each phase, which were distinctly analyzed by the second derivative and deconvolution bands. Results The precipitate and supernatant results showed characteristic bands, especially in the protein regions. All FT-IR spectra were also statistically classified by linear discriminant analysis (LDA, using principal component analysis (PCA. The LDA precipitate and supernatant had lower value when compared to combo spectra (Combination of precipitate and supernatant with 82%, showing that this combination is the best way to discriminate spectra of saliva samples collected before, immediately after, and 2 h after physical effort. Discussion The results showed that it is possible to differentiate biochemically the two salivary phases, as well as the importance of the homogenization process of saliva samples to classify the physiological status of athletes using FT-IR.

  3. Comparing Properties (Concentration, PH and mutans streptococcus Saliva in Both Status Resting Saliva and Stimulated Saliva in Preschoolers of Kerman city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Farokh-Gisour,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to compare the characteristics (concentration, PH and mutans streptococcus saliva in both status resting saliva and stimulated saliva in preschoolers of Kerman city. In this study, 100 children aged 5 years among patients admitted to the pediatric ward of Kerman dental school and dental offices, some experts in Kerman dental school participated. Resting and stimulated saliva (after chewing oral paraffin children collected and in concentrations, PH and the amount of mutans streptococcus was measured. Mc Nemar test to compare the frequency of positive and negative cultures before and after stimulation as well as paired t-test to compare the saliva pH and concentration of not stimulated saliva and stimulated saliva in two modes was used. The significance level was set less than 0.05.The mean resting salivary osmolality of the population: 30.42 ± 87.41 and the average salivary osmolality of the total population were 79.81. Osmolality differences in saliva before and after stimulation with each other was significant (p = 0.009, paired t-test. The mean of resting saliva in the total population PH 0.45 ± 7.78 and the average PH stimulated saliva in the total population was 8.22 and the difference before and after each significant (p = 0.02, paired t-test. In mutans streptococcus in test samples in all 71 patients (71% positive test and 29 patients (29% had a negative test that number of positive cultures are equal before and after stimulation of saliva and thus the difference between the two groups (p> 0.05 was observed. In terms of comparing the properties of resting and stimulated saliva can conclude that salivary stimulated PH was significantly higher than resting saliva. While stimulated saliva osmolality was significantly less than resting saliva and the frequency of positive test mutans streptococcus in saliva before and after stimulation had no significant difference (p> 0.05. This means that test results on samples of mutans

  4. Saliva as research material: Biochemical, physicochemical and practical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, R.G.; Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Whole saliva is a complex mixture of proteins and other molecules which originate from several sources. The biochemical and physicochemical properties of saliva contribute to the numerous functions of saliva in, e.g., speech, maintaining oral and general health, and food processing. Interest in

  5. RHEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF MUCIN-CONTAINING SOLUTIONS AND SALIVA SUBSTITUTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOLTERMAN, HJ; WATERMAN, HA; BLOM, C; SGRAVENMADE, FJ; Mellema, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this study rheological properties of aqueous solutions of mucin, albumin and mucin-albumin have been investigated in search for saliva substitutes. They were compared with commercially available saliva substitutes on the one hand and natural human saliva on the other hand. For the latter a few

  6. Applications of Metabolomics in Cancer Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily Grace; Ciborowski, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of metabolomics as a field of research, the number of studies related to cancer has grown to such an extent that cancer metabolomics now represents its own discipline. In this chapter, the applications of metabolomics in cancer studies are explored. Different approaches and analytical platforms can be employed for the analysis of samples depending on the goal of the study and the aspects of the cancer metabolome being investigated. Analyses have concerned a range of cancers including lung, colorectal, bladder, breast, gastric, oesophageal and thyroid, amongst others. Developments in these strategies and methodologies that have been applied are discussed, in addition to exemplifying the use of cancer metabolomics in the discovery of biomarkers and in the assessment of therapy (both pharmaceutical and nutraceutical). Finally, the application of cancer metabolomics in personalised medicine is presented.

  7. NMR and pattern recognition methods in metabolomics: from data acquisition to biomarker discovery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska, Agnieszka; Blanchet, Lionel; Buydens, Lutgarde M C; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2012-10-31

    Metabolomics is the discipline where endogenous and exogenous metabolites are assessed, identified and quantified in different biological samples. Metabolites are crucial components of biological system and highly informative about its functional state, due to their closeness to functional endpoints and to the organism's phenotypes. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, next to Mass Spectrometry (MS), is one of the main metabolomics analytical platforms. The technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy have enabled the identification and quantitative measurement of the many metabolites in a single sample of biofluids in a non-targeted and non-destructive manner. Combination of NMR spectra of biofluids and pattern recognition methods has driven forward the application of metabolomics in the field of biomarker discovery. The importance of metabolomics in diagnostics, e.g. in identifying biomarkers or defining pathological status, has been growing exponentially as evidenced by the number of published papers. In this review, we describe the developments in data acquisition and multivariate analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data, with particular emphasis on the metabolomics of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and biomarker discovery in Multiple Sclerosis (MScl). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma metabolomic profiles enhance precision medicine for volunteers of normal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lining; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Lonergan, Shaun C.; Mitchell, Matthew W.; Wulff, Jacob E.; Alexander, Danny C.; Evans, Anne M.; Bridgewater, Brandi; Miller, Luke; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Caskey, C. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine, taking account of human individuality in genes, environment, and lifestyle for early disease diagnosis and individualized therapy, has shown great promise to transform medical care. Nontargeted metabolomics, with the ability to detect broad classes of biochemicals, can provide a comprehensive functional phenotype integrating clinical phenotypes with genetic and nongenetic factors. To test the application of metabolomics in individual diagnosis, we conducted a metabolomics analysis on plasma samples collected from 80 volunteers of normal health with complete medical records and three-generation pedigrees. Using a broad-spectrum metabolomics platform consisting of liquid chromatography and GC coupled with MS, we profiled nearly 600 metabolites covering 72 biochemical pathways in all major branches of biosynthesis, catabolism, gut microbiome activities, and xenobiotics. Statistical analysis revealed a considerable range of variation and potential metabolic abnormalities across the individuals in this cohort. Examination of the convergence of metabolomics profiles with whole-exon sequences (WESs) provided an effective approach to assess and interpret clinical significance of genetic mutations, as shown in a number of cases, including fructose intolerance, xanthinuria, and carnitine deficiency. Metabolic abnormalities consistent with early indications of diabetes, liver dysfunction, and disruption of gut microbiome homeostasis were identified in several volunteers. Additionally, diverse metabolic responses to medications among the volunteers may assist to identify therapeutic effects and sensitivity to toxicity. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolomics could be an effective approach to complement next generation sequencing (NGS) for disease risk analysis, disease monitoring, and drug management in our goal toward precision care. PMID:26283345

  9. Metabolomics-Driven Nutraceutical Evaluation of Diverse Green Tea Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Megumi; Kosaka, Reia; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Nesumi, Atsushi; Saito, Takeshi; Kanda, Tomomasa; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Background Green tea has various health promotion effects. Although there are numerous tea cultivars, little is known about the differences in their nutraceutical properties. Metabolic profiling techniques can provide information on the relationship between the metabolome and factors such as phenotype or quality. Here, we performed metabolomic analyses to explore the relationship between the metabolome and health-promoting attributes (bioactivity) of diverse Japanese green tea cultivars. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the ability of leaf extracts from 43 Japanese green tea cultivars to inhibit thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This thrombin-induced phosphorylation is a potential hallmark of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Among the tested cultivars, Cha Chuukanbohon Nou-6 (Nou-6) and Sunrouge (SR) strongly inhibited MRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate the bioactivity of green tea cultivars using a metabolomics approach, the metabolite profiles of all tea extracts were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Multivariate statistical analyses, principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), revealed differences among green tea cultivars with respect to their ability to inhibit MRLC phosphorylation. In the SR cultivar, polyphenols were associated with its unique metabolic profile and its bioactivity. In addition, using partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis, we succeeded in constructing a reliable bioactivity-prediction model to predict the inhibitory effect of tea cultivars based on their metabolome. This model was based on certain identified metabolites that were associated with bioactivity. When added to an extract from the non-bioactive cultivar Yabukita, several metabolites enriched in SR were able to transform the extract into a bioactive extract

  10. Metabolomics-driven nutraceutical evaluation of diverse green tea cultivars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Fujimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Green tea has various health promotion effects. Although there are numerous tea cultivars, little is known about the differences in their nutraceutical properties. Metabolic profiling techniques can provide information on the relationship between the metabolome and factors such as phenotype or quality. Here, we performed metabolomic analyses to explore the relationship between the metabolome and health-promoting attributes (bioactivity of diverse Japanese green tea cultivars. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of leaf extracts from 43 Japanese green tea cultivars to inhibit thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. This thrombin-induced phosphorylation is a potential hallmark of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Among the tested cultivars, Cha Chuukanbohon Nou-6 (Nou-6 and Sunrouge (SR strongly inhibited MRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate the bioactivity of green tea cultivars using a metabolomics approach, the metabolite profiles of all tea extracts were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Multivariate statistical analyses, principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA, revealed differences among green tea cultivars with respect to their ability to inhibit MRLC phosphorylation. In the SR cultivar, polyphenols were associated with its unique metabolic profile and its bioactivity. In addition, using partial least-squares (PLS regression analysis, we succeeded in constructing a reliable bioactivity-prediction model to predict the inhibitory effect of tea cultivars based on their metabolome. This model was based on certain identified metabolites that were associated with bioactivity. When added to an extract from the non-bioactive cultivar Yabukita, several metabolites enriched in SR were able to transform the extract into a bioactive

  11. Metabolomics-driven nutraceutical evaluation of diverse green tea cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Kurihara, Kana; Ida, Megumi; Kosaka, Reia; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Nesumi, Atsushi; Saito, Takeshi; Kanda, Tomomasa; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Green tea has various health promotion effects. Although there are numerous tea cultivars, little is known about the differences in their nutraceutical properties. Metabolic profiling techniques can provide information on the relationship between the metabolome and factors such as phenotype or quality. Here, we performed metabolomic analyses to explore the relationship between the metabolome and health-promoting attributes (bioactivity) of diverse Japanese green tea cultivars. We investigated the ability of leaf extracts from 43 Japanese green tea cultivars to inhibit thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This thrombin-induced phosphorylation is a potential hallmark of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Among the tested cultivars, Cha Chuukanbohon Nou-6 (Nou-6) and Sunrouge (SR) strongly inhibited MRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate the bioactivity of green tea cultivars using a metabolomics approach, the metabolite profiles of all tea extracts were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Multivariate statistical analyses, principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), revealed differences among green tea cultivars with respect to their ability to inhibit MRLC phosphorylation. In the SR cultivar, polyphenols were associated with its unique metabolic profile and its bioactivity. In addition, using partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis, we succeeded in constructing a reliable bioactivity-prediction model to predict the inhibitory effect of tea cultivars based on their metabolome. This model was based on certain identified metabolites that were associated with bioactivity. When added to an extract from the non-bioactive cultivar Yabukita, several metabolites enriched in SR were able to transform the extract into a bioactive extract. Our findings suggest that metabolic profiling

  12. Parámetros inflamatorios en saliva y sangre en niños y adolescentes sanos Inflammatory parameters in saliva and blood from healthy children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska Tahis Viera Sirit

    2011-09-01

    como fluido corporal que permita sustituir la determinación sérica de IL-1, IL-6 y sustancias reactivas al ácido tiobarbitúrico. En cuanto al TNF-a se evidenció una correlación significativa, lo cual podría plantear la posible sustitución de muestras séricas por salivales.At present times, there is interest in the use of saliva as a diagnosis, prediction and progression alternative of different pathologies in relation to the body fluids. To correlate the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-a, substances reactive to thiobarbituric acid (RSTBA and O2- in the saliva and blood of systematically healthy children and adolescents. A cross-sectional study was performed in 23 healthy children and adolescents aged from 4 to 17 underwent to clinical tests to demonstrate the oral conditions and immunological to identify the cytokine levels and the RSTBAs by colorimetry trial. There was a significant difference in saliva samples compared to that of peripheral blood in study cytokines and RSTBAs: IL-1 (blood: 1.646 ± 0.13 pg/mL, saliva: 552.36 ± 75.7 pg/mL; IL-6 (blood: 3.506 ± 1.85 pg/mL, saliva: 26.89 ± 9.97 pg/mL: TNF-a (blood: 12.91 ± 3.05 pg/mL, saliva: 43.56 ± 6.44 pg/mL, RSTBA (blood: 9.46 ± 3.26 nmol/mL, saliva: 1.26 ± 0.03 nmol/mL. There was not a statistically significant difference among blood and saliva samples for IL-1, IL-6 and RSTBA values. As regards TNF-a it was demonstrated a significant correlation, r s= 0.78. There was not evidence of cells positive to O2 in study samples. Results of correlation analysis obtained among the saliva and serum samples not offer evidences that saliva may be used as body fluid allows substituting the serum determination of IL-1, IL-6 and RSTBA. In the case of the TNF-a, there was a significant correlation, which could to propose the possible substitution of serum samples for the salivary ones.

  13. Assessment of extracellular dehydration using saliva osmolality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Brett R; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Spitz, Marissa G; Heavens, Kristen R; Walsh, Neil P; Sawka, Michael N

    2014-01-01

    When substantial solute losses accompany body water an isotonic hypovolemia (extracellular dehydration) results. The potential for using blood or urine to assess extracellular dehydration is generally poor, but saliva is not a simple ultra-filtrate of plasma and the autonomic regulation of salivary gland function suggests the possibility that saliva osmolality (Sosm) may afford detection of extracellular dehydration via the influence of volume-mediated factors. This study aimed to evaluate the assessment of extracellular dehydration using Sosm. In addition, two common saliva collection methods and their effects on Sosm were compared. Blood, urine, and saliva samples were collected in 24 healthy volunteers during paired euhydration and dehydration trials. Furosemide administration and 12 h fluid restriction were used to produce extracellular dehydration. Expectoration and salivette collection methods were compared in a separate group of eight euhydrated volunteers. All comparisons were made using paired t-tests. The diagnostic potential of body fluids was additionally evaluated. Dehydration (3.1 ± 0.5% loss of body mass) decreased PV (-0.49 ± 0.12 L; -15.12 ± 3.94% change), but Sosm changes were marginal (diagnostic accuracy was poor (AUC = 0.77-0.78) for all body fluids evaluated. Strong agreement was observed between Sosm methods (Expectoration: 61 ± 10 mmol/kg, Salivette: 61 ± 8 mmol/kg, p > 0.05). Extracelluar dehydration was not detectable using plasma, urine, or saliva measures. Salivette and expectoration sampling methods produced similar, consistent results for Sosm, suggesting no methodological influence on Sosm.

  14. Dynamic metabolomic data analysis: a tutorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilde, A K; Westerhuis, J A; Hoefsloot, H C J; Bijlsma, S; Rubingh, C M; Vis, D J; Jellema, R H; Pijl, H; Roelfsema, F; van der Greef, J

    2010-03-01

    In metabolomics, time-resolved, dynamic or temporal data is more and more collected. The number of methods to analyze such data, however, is very limited and in most cases the dynamic nature of the data is not even taken into account. This paper reviews current methods in use for analyzing dynamic metabolomic data. Moreover, some methods from other fields of science that may be of use to analyze such dynamic metabolomics data are described in some detail. The methods are put in a general framework after providing a formal definition on what constitutes a 'dynamic' method. Some of the methods are illustrated with real-life metabolomics examples.

  15. NMR-Based Metabolomics of Oral Biofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Horst Joachim; Ford, Pauline J

    2017-01-01

    NMR-based metabolomics is an established technique for characterizing the metabolite profile of biological fluids and investigating how metabolite profiles change in response to biological and/or clinical stimuli. Thus, NMR-based metabolomics has the potential to discover biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and/or therapy of clinical conditions, as well as to unravel the physiology underlying clinical conditions. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for NMR-based metabolomics of oral biofluids, including sample collection, sample handling, NMR data acquisition, and processing. In addition, we give a general overview of the statistical analysis of the resulting metabolomic data.

  16. Metabolomics in Toxicology and Preclinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Bois, Frederic Y.; Clench, Malcolm R.; Coen, Muireann; Donley, Beth; Fischer, Steven M.; Ekman, Drew R.; Fabian, Eric; Guillou, Claude; Heuer, Joachim; Hogberg, Helena T.; Jungnickel, Harald; Keun, Hector C.; Krennrich, Gerhard; Krupp, Eckart; Luch, Andreas; Noor, Fozia; Peter, Erik; Riefke, Bjoern; Seymour, Mark; Skinner, Nigel; Smirnova, Lena; Verheij, Elwin; Wagner, Silvia; Hartung, Thomas; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological status of a biological system, and about the changes caused by chemicals. Metabolomics analysis is used in many fields, ranging from the analysis of the physiological status of genetically modified organisms in safety science to the evaluation of human health conditions. In toxicology, metabolomics is the -omics discipline that is most closely related to classical knowledge of disturbed biochemical pathways. It allows rapid identification of the potential targets of a hazardous compound. It can give information on target organs and often can help to improve our understanding regarding the mode-of-action of a given compound. Such insights aid the discovery of biomarkers that either indicate pathophysiological conditions or help the monitoring of the efficacy of drug therapies. The first toxicological applications of metabolomics were for mechanistic research, but different ways to use the technology in a regulatory context are being explored. Ideally, further progress in that direction will position the metabolomics approach to address the challenges of toxicology of the 21st century. To address these issues, scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory bodies came together in a workshop to discuss the current status of applied metabolomics and its potential in the safety assessment of compounds. We report here on the conclusions of three working groups addressing questions regarding 1) metabolomics for in vitro studies 2) the appropriate use of metabolomics in systems toxicology, and 3) use of metabolomics in a regulatory context. PMID:23665807

  17. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis in saliva and filled root canals of teeth associated with apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Chu, Chun-Hung; Zhu, Xiao-Fei

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis in saliva and filled root canals of patients requiring endodontic retreatment for apical periodontitis. Patients with apical periodontitis who were referred for endodontic retreatment were examined. The type and quality of the restoration, symptoms, quality of obturation were recorded. During retreatment, an oral rinse sample and root canal sample were cultured using brain-heart infusion agar and bile esculinazide agar to select for E. faecalis. The 16S rRNA technique was used to identify E. faecalis. A total of 32 women and 22 men (mean age: 38 years; s.d.: 11 years) and 58 teeth were studied. The prevalence of E. faecalis was 19% in the saliva and 38% in the root canals. The odds that root canals harbored E. faecalis were increased if the saliva habored this bacterium (odds ratio=9.7; 95% confidence interval=1.8-51.6; PTeeth with unsatisfactory root obturation had more cultivable bacterial species in root canals than teeth with satisfactory root obturation (Pfaecalis is more common in root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis than in saliva. The prevalence of E. faecalis in root canals is associated with the presence of E. faecalis in saliva.

  18. Identification of Saliva Using MicroRNA Biomarkers for Forensic Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Ji; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Di; Luo, Haibo; Chen, Xiaogang; Hou, Yiping

    2015-05-01

    In the forensic science community, microRNA (miRNA) profiling has started to be explored as an alternative tool for body fluid identification. Several origins of body fluid can be distinguished by measuring differential expression patterns of particular miRNAs. However, most of reported saliva miRNAs are nonoverlapping and debatable. The aim of this study was to develop a strategy of identifying saliva using miRNA biomarkers for forensic purpose. Eight miRNA candidates were selected to examine expression abundance in forensically relevant body fluids using hydrolysis probes quantitative real-time PCR (TaqMan qPCR). Results revealed that none of them was truly saliva specific, and only miR-200c-3p, miR-203a, and miR-205-5p were higher or more moderate expression in saliva. A stepwise strategy that combines each of three miRNAs with different body fluid-specific miRNAs was developed, and three miRNA combinations could effectively differentiate saliva from other body fluids. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Soluble toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2) is increased in saliva of children with dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Alyssa; Blackburn, Corinne; Chin, Judith; Srinivasan, Mythily

    2014-08-31

    Dental caries is the most common microbial disease affecting mankind. Caries risk assessment methods, identification of biomarkers and vaccine development strategies are being emphasized to control the incidence of the largely preventable disease. Pattern recognition receptors such as the toll like receptors (TLR) have been implicated as modulators of host-microbial interactions. Soluble TLR-2 and its co-receptor, CD14 identified in saliva can bind the cell wall components of cariogenic bacteria and modulate the disease process. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of salivary sTLR-2 and sCD14 as biomarkers of caries activity and indirect measures of the cariogenic bacterial burden. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from twenty caries free and twenty caries active children between the ages of 5 and 13 years. The concentration of sCD14 and sTLR-2 together with that of the cytokine IL-8 reported to be increased in dental caries was assessed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. While the level of sCD14 and that of IL-8 was equivocal between the two groups, the sTLR-2 concentration in caries active saliva was significantly higher than that in caries free saliva. The sTLR-2 in saliva could serve as a potential biomarker for caries activity.

  20. Soluble toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2) is increased in saliva of children with dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries is the most common microbial disease affecting mankind. Caries risk assessment methods, identification of biomarkers and vaccine development strategies are being emphasized to control the incidence of the largely preventable disease. Pattern recognition receptors such as the toll like receptors (TLR) have been implicated as modulators of host-microbial interactions. Soluble TLR-2 and its co-receptor, CD14 identified in saliva can bind the cell wall components of cariogenic bacteria and modulate the disease process. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of salivary sTLR-2 and sCD14 as biomarkers of caries activity and indirect measures of the cariogenic bacterial burden. Methods Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from twenty caries free and twenty caries active children between the ages of 5 and 13 years. The concentration of sCD14 and sTLR-2 together with that of the cytokine IL-8 reported to be increased in dental caries was assessed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results While the level of sCD14 and that of IL-8 was equivocal between the two groups, the sTLR-2 concentration in caries active saliva was significantly higher than that in caries free saliva. Conclusions The sTLR-2 in saliva could serve as a potential biomarker for caries activity. PMID:25174416

  1. Polyphenol metabolomics of twenty Italian red grape varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavaresco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available “Suspect screening analysis”method to study grape metabolomics, was performed. This method is a middle-way “targeted” and “untargeted”approach aiming at identifying the largest number of metabolites in grape samples. A new database of putative grape and wine metabolites (GrapeMetabolomics, which currently contains around 1,100 compounds, was constructed by CREA at Conegliano. By performing high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis of the grape extract in both positive and negative ionization mode, averaging 320-450 putative compounds are identified. Most of them are grape polyphenols, such as anthocyanins, flavonols and stilbene derivatives. By performing PCA and Cluster Analysis the composition in anthocyanins and flavonols of 20 Italian red grape varieties, was studied.

  2. Repeated measures study of weekly and daily cytomegalovirus shedding patterns in saliva and urine of healthy cytomegalovirus-seropositive children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Michael J; Stowell, Jennifer D; Clark, Rebekah; Dollard, Philip R; Johnson, Delaney; Mask, Karen; Stover, Cynthia; Wu, Karen; Amin, Minal; Hendley, Will; Guo, Jing; Schmid, D Scott; Dollard, Sheila C

    2014-11-13

    To better understand potential transmission risks from contact with the body fluids of children, we monitored the presence and amount of CMV shedding over time in healthy CMV-seropositive children. Through screening we identified 36 children from the Atlanta, Georgia area who were CMV-seropositive, including 23 who were shedding CMV at the time of screening. Each child received 12 weekly in-home visits at which field workers collected saliva and urine. During the final two weeks, parents also collected saliva and urine daily. Prevalence of shedding was highly correlated with initial shedding status: children shedding at the screening visit had CMV DNA in 84% of follow-up saliva specimens (455/543) and 28% of follow-up urine specimens (151/539); those not shedding at the screening visit had CMV DNA in 16% of follow-up saliva specimens (47/303) and 5% of follow-up urine specimens (16/305). Among positive specimens we found median viral loads of 82,900 copies/mL in saliva and 34,730 copies/mL in urine (P=0.01), while the viral load for the 75th percentile was nearly 1.5 million copies/mL for saliva compared to 86,800 copies/mL for urine. Younger age was significantly associated with higher viral loads, especially for saliva (Pchildren who were shedding at the screening visit were still shedding at least some days during weeks 11 and 12, and median and mean viral loads did not change substantially over time. Healthy CMV-seropositive children can shed CMV for months at high, relatively stable levels. These data suggest that behavioral prevention messages need to address transmission via both saliva and urine, but also need to be informed by the potentially higher risks posed by saliva and by exposures to younger children.

  3. Haematophagous arthropod saliva and host defense system: a tale of tear and blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Bruno B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The saliva from blood-feeding arthropod vectors is enriched with molecules that display diverse functions that mediate a successful blood meal. They function not only as weapons against host's haemostatic, inflammatory and immune responses but also as important tools to pathogen establishment. Parasites, virus and bacteria taking advantage of vectors' armament have adapted to facilitate their entry in the host. Today, many salivary molecules have been identified and characterized as new targets to the development of future vaccines. Here we focus on current information on vector's saliva and the molecules responsible to modify host's hemostasis and immune response, also regarding their role in disease transmission.

  4. Metabolomics as a promising tool for early osteoarthritis diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa,E.B.; dos Santos Junior,G.C.; Duarte,M.E.L.; V. Moura Neto; D.P. Aguiar

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of disability worldwide, due to progressive articular cartilage loss and degeneration. According to recent research, OA is more than just a degenerative disease due to some metabolic components associated to its pathogenesis. However, no biomarker has been identified to detect this disease at early stages or to track its development. Metabolomics is an emerging field and has the potential to detect many metabolites in a single spectrum using high resoluti...

  5. NMR-based milk metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine S.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality...... and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking...... the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive...

  6. Metabolomics investigation of whey intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan

    interest since it has been shown that it is possible to achieve greater weight loss on a high protein diet as oppose to a high carbohydrate diet. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that specifically milk-derived whey proteins have certain biological properties that might be beneficial in the treatment...... syndrome are complex disorders and are not caused by a high-calorie diet and low exercise level alone. The specific nature of the nutrients, independent of their caloric value, also play a role. The question is which. In the quest to answer this question the qualitative intake of protein is of special...... and prevention of the metabolic syndrome related to obesity and diabetes. In this thesis the effects of whey intake on the human metabolome was investigated using a metabolomics approach. We demonstrated that intake of whey causes a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to other protein sources...

  7. Differences in bacterial saliva profile between periodontitis patients and a control cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Nielsen, Claus H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease in which subgingival bacteria play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. The objective of this study was to determine if periodontitis is associated with a characteristic salivary bacterial profile. This was accomplished by comparing...... the bacterial profile of saliva from subjects with chronic periodontitis with that of saliva from a control cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stimulated saliva samples from 139 chronic periodontitis patients and 447 samples from a control cohort were analysed using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray...... component analysis was used to visualize bacterial community profiles obtained by the HOMIM. RESULTS: Eight bacterial taxa, including putative periodontal pathogens as Parvimonas micra and Filifactor alocis, and four bacterial clusters were identified statistically more frequently and at higher levels...

  8. Protein Quality Assessment on Saliva Samples for Biobanking Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Nuno; Marques, Jéssica; Esteves, Eduardo; Fernandes, Mónica; Mendes, Vera M; Afonso, Ângela; Dias, Sérgio; Pereira, Joaquim Polido; Manadas, Bruno; Correia, Maria José; Barros, Marlene

    2016-08-01

    Biobank saliva sample quality depends on specific criteria applied to collection, processing, and storage. In spite of the growing interest in saliva as a diagnostic fluid, few biobanks currently store large collections of such samples. The development of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for saliva collection and quality control is fundamental for the establishment of a new saliva biobank, which stores samples to be made available to the saliva research community. Different collection methods were tested regarding total volume of protein obtained, protein content, and protein profiles, and the results were used to choose the best method for protein studies. Furthermore, the impact of the circadian variability and inter- and intraindividual differences, as well as the saliva sample stability at room temperature, were also evaluated. Considering our results, a sublingual cotton roll method for saliva collection proved to produce saliva with the best characteristics and should be applied in the morning, whenever possible. In addition, there is more variability in salivary proteins between individuals than in the same individual for a 5-month period. According to the electrophoretic protein profile, protein stability is guaranteed for 24 hours at room temperature and the protein degradation profile and protein identification were characterized. All this information was used to establish an SOP for saliva collection, processing, and storage in a biobank. We conclude that it is possible to collect saliva using an easy and inexpensive protocol, resulting in saliva samples for protein analysis with sufficient quality for biobanking purposes.

  9. Efek Pengunyahan Permen Karet Gula dan Xylitol terhadap Status Saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisna Kurnia Rezky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang. Rongga mulut sebagai pintu masuk makanan ke dalam tubuh selalu dibasahi oleh saliva setiap harinya. Saat ini banyak produk permen karet yang beredar di masyarakat yang mengandung gula dan xylitol. Banyak orang yang gemar mengunyah permen karet dengan kurang memperhatikan komposisinya baik yang mengandung gula ataupun xylitol sehingga kurang mengetahui efek masing-masing jenis permen karet tersebut terhadap kesehatan rongga mulut. Tujuan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui efek pengunyahan permen karet gula dengan permen karet xylitol terhadap status saliva yang terdiri dari volume, pH, dan viskositas saliva. Metode penelitian. Subjek penelitian berjumlah 30 orang dibagi menjadi 3 kelompok masing-masing 10 orang, terdiri dari kelompok mengunyah permen karet gula, xylitol, dan kontrol dengan mengunyah apel. Pengambilan saliva dilakukan pagi hari dan siang hari. Subjek mengunyah 2 butir permen karet dan tidak diperbolehkan untuk makan dan minum 1 jam sebelum mengunyah. Subjek diinstruksikan meludah ke dalam pot saliva selama 10 menit dalam interval setiap 1 menit. Pengukuran volume saliva menggunakan pipet volume, pH saliva dengan menggunakan pH meter, dan viskositas saliva dengan menggunakan viskometer Ostwald hari ke-1 dan ke-4. Analisis data dengan uji statistik Mann-Whitney. Hasil. penelitian menunjukkan adanya peningkatan bermakna volume dan viskositas saliva pada pengunyahan permen karet xylitol dan gula. Derajat keasaman (pH saliva menurun setelah mengunyah permen karet gula sedangkan pada perm en karet xylitol relatif stabil. Disimpulkan bahwa permen karet xylitollebih baik untuk kestabilan status saliva dibandingkan permen karet gula.

  10. Factors That Influence the Extensional Rheological Property of Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Amrita; Inui, Taichi; Dodds, Michael; Proctor, Gordon; Carpenter, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The spinnbarkeit of saliva reflects the ability of saliva to adhere to surfaces within the mouth, thereby serving as a protective role and aiding in lubrication. Therefore, alterations in the extensional rheology of saliva may result in the loss in adhesiveness or the ability to bind onto surfaces. Mucin glycoproteins and their structures are known to be important factors for the extensional rheological properties of saliva. The conformation of mucin depends on factors such as pH and ionic strength. Chewing is one of the main stimuli for salivary secretion but creates significant sheer stress on the salivary film which could influence mouthfeel perceptions. The current study investigates the possible factors which affect the extensional rheological properties of saliva by comparing submandibular/sublingual saliva with different oral stimuli within the same group of subjects. Unstimulated and stimulated saliva (chew, smell and taste) salivas were collected primarily from submandibular/sublingual glands. The saliva samples were measured for Spinnbarkeit followed by the measuring mucin, total protein, total calcium and bicarbonate concentrations. The results indicated correlations between rheological properties and mucin/ion concentrations. However, chewing stimulated submandibular/sublingual saliva is shown to have significantly lower Spinnbarkeit, but factors such as mucin, protein and calcium concentrations did not account for this variation. Analysis of the concentration of bicarbonate and pH appears to suggest that it has a prominent effect on extensional rheology of saliva. PMID:26305698

  11. Lutzomyia longipalpis Saliva or Salivary Protein LJM19 Protects against Leishmania braziliensis and the Saliva of Its Vector, Lutzomyia intermedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Natalia M.; Silva, Robson A.; Costa, Dirceu J.; Pitombo, Maiana A.; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F.; Miranda, José C.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila I.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Background Leishmania transmission occurs in the presence of insect saliva. Immunity to Phlebotomus papatasi or Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva or salivary components confers protection against an infection by Leishmania in the presence of the homologous saliva. However, immunization with Lutzomyia intermedia saliva did not protect mice against Leishmania braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia saliva. In the present study, we have studied whether the immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or a DNA plasmid coding for LJM19 salivary protein would be protective against L. braziliensis infection in the presence of Lu. intermedia saliva, the natural vector for L. braziliensis. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or with LJM19 DNA plasmid induced a Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) response against Lu. longipalpis as well as against a Lu. intermedia saliva challenge. Immunized and unimmunized control hamsters were then intradermally infected in the ears with L. braziliensis in the presence of Lu. longipalpis or Lu. intermedia saliva. Animals immunized with Lu. longipalpis saliva exhibited smaller lesion sizes as well as reduced disease burdens both at lesion site and in the draining lymph nodes. These alterations were associated with a significant decrease in the expression levels of IL-10 and TGF-β. Animals immunized with LJM19 DNA plasmid presented similar findings in protection and immune response and additionally increased IFN-γ expression. Conclusions/Significance Immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or with a DNA plasmid coding LJM19 salivary protein induced protection in hamsters challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia saliva. These findings point out an important role of immune response against saliva components, suggesting the possibility to develop a vaccine using a single component of Lu. longipalpis saliva to generate protection against different species of Leishmania, even those transmitted by a different

  12. Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva or salivary protein LJM19 protects against Leishmania braziliensis and the saliva of its vector, Lutzomyia intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M Tavares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania transmission occurs in the presence of insect saliva. Immunity to Phlebotomus papatasi or Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva or salivary components confers protection against an infection by Leishmania in the presence of the homologous saliva. However, immunization with Lutzomyia intermedia saliva did not protect mice against Leishmania braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia saliva. In the present study, we have studied whether the immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or a DNA plasmid coding for LJM19 salivary protein would be protective against L. braziliensis infection in the presence of Lu. intermedia saliva, the natural vector for L. braziliensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or with LJM19 DNA plasmid induced a Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH response against Lu. longipalpis as well as against a Lu. intermedia saliva challenge. Immunized and unimmunized control hamsters were then intradermally infected in the ears with L. braziliensis in the presence of Lu. longipalpis or Lu. intermedia saliva. Animals immunized with Lu. longipalpis saliva exhibited smaller lesion sizes as well as reduced disease burdens both at lesion site and in the draining lymph nodes. These alterations were associated with a significant decrease in the expression levels of IL-10 and TGF-β. Animals immunized with LJM19 DNA plasmid presented similar findings in protection and immune response and additionally increased IFN-γ expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or with a DNA plasmid coding LJM19 salivary protein induced protection in hamsters challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia saliva. These findings point out an important role of immune response against saliva components, suggesting the possibility to develop a vaccine using a single component of Lu. longipalpis saliva to generate protection against different species of Leishmania, even those

  13. Metabolomics of Clostridial Biofuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Aristilde, Ludmilla [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Amador-Noguez, Daniel [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Members of the genus Clostridium collectively have the ideal set of the metabolic capabilities for fermentative biofuel production: cellulose degradation, hydrogen production, and solvent excretion. No single organism, however, can effectively convert cellulose into biofuels. Here we developed, using metabolomics and isotope tracers, basic science knowledge of Clostridial metabolism of utility for future efforts to engineer such an organism. In glucose fermentation carried out by the biofuel producer Clostridium acetobutylicum, we observed a remarkably ordered series of metabolite concentration changes as the fermentation progressed from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In general, high-energy compounds decreased while low-energy species increased during solventogenesis. These changes in metabolite concentrations were accompanied by large changes in intracellular metabolic fluxes, with pyruvate directed towards acetyl-CoA and solvents instead of oxaloacetate and amino acids. Thus, the solventogenic transition involves global remodeling of metabolism to redirect resources from biomass production into solvent production. In contrast to C. acetobutylicum, which is an avid fermenter, C. cellulolyticum metabolizes glucose only slowly. We find that glycolytic intermediate concentrations are radically different from fast fermenting organisms. Associated thermodynamic and isotope tracer analysis revealed that the full glycolytic pathway in C. cellulolyticum is reversible. This arises from changes in cofactor utilization for phosphofructokinase and an alternative pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. The net effect is to increase the high-energy phosphate bond yield of glycolysis by 150% (from 2 to 5) at the expense of lower net flux. Thus, C. cellulolyticum prioritizes glycolytic energy efficiency over speed. Degradation of cellulose results in other sugars in addition to glucose. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled pentose sugars

  14. MetaboLights: An Open-Access Database Repository for Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Namrata S; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Jayseelan, Kalaivani; Moreno, Pablo; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Nainala, Venkata Chandrasekhar; Spicer, Rachel A; Williams, Mark; Li, Xuefei; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2016-03-24

    MetaboLights is the first general purpose, open-access database repository for cross-platform and cross-species metabolomics research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Based upon the open-source ISA framework, MetaboLights provides Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) compliant metadata and raw experimental data associated with metabolomics experiments. Users can upload their study datasets into the MetaboLights Repository. These studies are then automatically assigned a stable and unique identifier (e.g., MTBLS1) that can be used for publication reference. The MetaboLights Reference Layer associates metabolites with metabolomics studies in the archive and is extensively annotated with data fields such as structural and chemical information, NMR and MS spectra, target species, metabolic pathways, and reactions. The database is manually curated with no specific release schedules. MetaboLights is also recommended by journals for metabolomics data deposition. This unit provides a guide to using MetaboLights, downloading experimental data, and depositing metabolomics datasets using user-friendly submission tools. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Key elements of metabolomics in the study of biomarkers of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, Jerzy

    2016-12-01

    Metabolomics is instrumental in the analysis of disease mechanisms and biomarkers of disease. The human metabolome is influenced by genetics and environmental interactions and reveals characteristic signatures of disease. Population studies with metabolomics require special study designs and care needs to be taken with pre-analytics. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry or NMR are popular techniques used for metabolomic analyses in human cohorts. Metabolomics has been successfully used in the biomarker search for disease prediction and progression, for analyses of drug action and for the development of companion diagnostics. Several metabolites or metabolite classes identified by metabolomics have gained much attention in the field of diabetes research in the search for early disease detection, differentiation of progressor types and compliance with medication. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'New approaches beyond genetics' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another review from this symposium by Bernd Mayer (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-4032-2 ) and an overview by the Session Chair, Leif Groop (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-4014-4 ).

  16. Metabolomic correlation-network modules in Arabidopsis based on a graph-clustering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redestig Henning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deciphering the metabolome is essential for a better understanding of the cellular metabolism as a system. Typical metabolomics data show a few but significant correlations among metabolite levels when data sampling is repeated across individuals grown under strictly controlled conditions. Although several studies have assessed topologies in metabolomic correlation networks, it remains unclear whether highly connected metabolites in these networks have specific functions in known tissue- and/or genotype-dependent biochemical pathways. Results In our study of metabolite profiles we subjected root tissues to gas chromatography-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS and used published information on the aerial parts of 3 Arabidopsis genotypes, Col-0 wild-type, methionine over-accumulation 1 (mto1, and transparent testa4 (tt4 to compare systematically the metabolomic correlations in samples of roots and aerial parts. We then applied graph clustering to the constructed correlation networks to extract densely connected metabolites and evaluated the clusters by biochemical-pathway enrichment analysis. We found that the number of significant correlations varied by tissue and genotype and that the obtained clusters were significantly enriched for metabolites included in biochemical pathways. Conclusions We demonstrate that the graph-clustering approach identifies tissue- and/or genotype-dependent metabolomic clusters related to the biochemical pathway. Metabolomic correlations complement information about changes in mean metabolite levels and may help to elucidate the organization of metabolically functional modules.

  17. Metabolomic signature of brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Renu; Caflisch, Laura; Lodi, Alessia; Brenner, Andrew J; Tiziani, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    Despite advances in surgery and adjuvant therapy, brain tumors represent one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality and morbidity in both adults and children. Gliomas constitute about 60% of all cerebral tumors, showing varying degrees of malignancy. They are difficult to treat due to dismal prognosis and limited therapeutics. Metabolomics is the untargeted and targeted analyses of endogenous and exogenous small molecules, which charact erizes the phenotype of an individual. This emerging "omics" science provides functional readouts of cellular activity that contribute greatly to the understanding of cancer biology including brain tumor biology. Metabolites are highly informative as a direct signature of biochemical activity; therefore, metabolite profiling has become a promising approach for clinical diagnostics and prognostics. The metabolic alterations are well-recognized as one of the key hallmarks in monitoring disease progression, therapy, and revealing new molecular targets for effective therapeutic intervention. Taking advantage of the latest high-throughput analytical technologies, that is, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS), metabolomics is now a promising field for precision medicine and drug discovery. In the present report, we review the application of metabolomics and in vivo metabolic profiling in the context of adult gliomas and paediatric brain tumors. Analytical platforms such as high-resolution (HR) NMR, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and high- and low-resolution MS are discussed. Moreover, the relevance of metabolic studies in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of gliomas are reviewed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Body fluid identification of blood, saliva and semen using second generation sequencing of micro-RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christel H.; Hjort, Benjamin Benn; Tvedebrink, Torben

    2013-01-01

    We report a new second generation sequencing method for identification micro-RNA (miRNA) that can be used to identify body fluids and tissues. Principal component analysis of 10 miRNAs with high expression in 16 samples of blood, saliva and semen showed clear differences in the expression of mi...

  19. Proteomic and N-glycoproteomic quantification reveal aberrant changes in the human saliva of oral ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xi; Cui, Dan; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Human whole saliva is a vital body fluid for studying the physiology and pathology of the oral cavity. As a powerful technique for biomarker discovery, MS-based proteomic strategies have been introduced for saliva analysis and identified hundreds of proteins and N-glycosylation sites. However, there is still a lack of quantitative analysis, which is necessary for biomarker screening and biological research. In this study, we establish an integrated workflow by the combination of stable isotope dimethyl labeling, HILIC enrichment, and high resolution MS for both quantification of the global proteome and N-glycoproteome of human saliva from oral ulcer patients. With the help of advanced bioinformatics, we comprehensively studied oral ulcers at both protein and glycoprotein scales. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that starch digestion and protein degradation activities are inhibited while the immune response is promoted in oral ulcer saliva. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Human IgG antibody response to Glossina saliva: an epidemiologic marker of exposure to Glossina bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsignon, Anne; Remoue, Franck; Rossignol, Marie; Cornelie, Sylvie; Courtin, David; Grébaut, Pascal; Garcia, Andre; Simondon, Francois

    2008-05-01

    The evaluation of human antibody response specific to arthropod saliva may be a useful marker of exposure to vector-borne disease. Such an immunologic tool, applied to the evaluation of the exposure to Glossina bites, could be integrated in the control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). The antibody (IgG) response specific to uninfected Glossina fuscipes fuscipes saliva was evaluated according to the vector exposure and trypanic status in individuals residing in an HAT-endemic area. A high level of anti-saliva IgG antibodies was only detected in exposed individuals, whether infected or not by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. In addition, the evaluation of specific IgG response represented spatial heterogeneity according to studied sites. These results suggest that the evaluation of anti-saliva IgG could be an indicator of Glossina exposure and thus could be integrated in other available tools to identify populations presenting risks of HAT transmission.

  1. Symbiosis of chemometrics and metabolomics: Past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J. van der; Smilde, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    Metabolomics is a growing area in the field of systems biology. Metabolomics has already a long history and also the connection of metabolomics with chemometrics goes back some time. This review discusses the symbiosis of metabolomics and chemometrics with emphasis on the medical domain, puts the

  2. The future of metabolomics in ELIXIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Merlijn; Beirnaert, Charlie; Caron, Christophe; Cascante, Marta; Dominguez, Victoria; Dunn, Warwick B; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Giacomoni, Franck; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hankemeier, Thomas; Haug, Kenneth; Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose L; Jimenez, Rafael C; Jourdan, Fabien; Kale, Namrata; Klapa, Maria I; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Koort, Kairi; Kultima, Kim; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Moreno, Pablo; Moschonas, Nicholas K; Neumann, Steffen; O'Donovan, Claire; Reczko, Martin; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Rosato, Antonio; Salek, Reza M; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Satagopam, Venkata; Schober, Daniel; Shimmo, Ruth; Spicer, Rachel A; Spjuth, Ola; Thévenot, Etienne A; Viant, Mark R; Weber, Ralf J M; Willighagen, Egon L; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics, the youngest of the major omics technologies, is supported by an active community of researchers and infrastructure developers across Europe. To coordinate and focus efforts around infrastructure building for metabolomics within Europe, a workshop on the "Future of metabolomics in ELIXIR" was organised at Frankfurt Airport in Germany. This one-day strategic workshop involved representatives of ELIXIR Nodes, members of the PhenoMeNal consortium developing an e-infrastructure that supports workflow-based metabolomics analysis pipelines, and experts from the international metabolomics community. The workshop established metabolite identification as the critical area, where a maximal impact of computational metabolomics and data management on other fields could be achieved. In particular, the existing four ELIXIR Use Cases, where the metabolomics community - both industry and academia - would benefit most, and which could be exhaustively mapped onto the current five ELIXIR Platforms were discussed. This opinion article is a call for support for a new ELIXIR metabolomics Use Case, which aligns with and complements the existing and planned ELIXIR Platforms and Use Cases.

  3. The future of metabolomics in ELIXIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Merlijn; Beirnaert, Charlie; Caron, Christophe; Cascante, Marta; Dominguez, Victoria; Dunn, Warwick B.; Ebbels, Timothy M. D.; Giacomoni, Franck; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hankemeier, Thomas; Haug, Kenneth; Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose L.; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Jourdan, Fabien; Kale, Namrata; Klapa, Maria I.; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Koort, Kairi; Kultima, Kim; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Moschonas, Nicholas K.; Neumann, Steffen; O’Donovan, Claire; Reczko, Martin; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Rosato, Antonio; Salek, Reza M.; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Satagopam, Venkata; Schober, Daniel; Shimmo, Ruth; Spicer, Rachel A.; Spjuth, Ola; Thévenot, Etienne A.; Viant, Mark R.; Weber, Ralf J. M.; Willighagen, Egon L.; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics, the youngest of the major omics technologies, is supported by an active community of researchers and infrastructure developers across Europe. To coordinate and focus efforts around infrastructure building for metabolomics within Europe, a workshop on the “Future of metabolomics in ELIXIR” was organised at Frankfurt Airport in Germany. This one-day strategic workshop involved representatives of ELIXIR Nodes, members of the PhenoMeNal consortium developing an e-infrastructure that supports workflow-based metabolomics analysis pipelines, and experts from the international metabolomics community. The workshop established metabolite identification as the critical area, where a maximal impact of computational metabolomics and data management on other fields could be achieved. In particular, the existing four ELIXIR Use Cases, where the metabolomics community - both industry and academia - would benefit most, and which could be exhaustively mapped onto the current five ELIXIR Platforms were discussed. This opinion article is a call for support for a new ELIXIR metabolomics Use Case, which aligns with and complements the existing and planned ELIXIR Platforms and Use Cases. PMID:29043062

  4. Metabolomics of a model fruit: tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de R.C.H.; Hall, R.D.; Moing, A.

    2011-01-01

    Tomato has quickly become a favoured species for metabolomics research. Tomato fills a niche that cannot be occupied by Arabidopsis, particularly regarding studies on fleshy fruit. Variations in genotype and phenotype have been broadly exploited using metabolomics approaches in order to gain a

  5. Identification of drug targets by chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Manhong

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To advance our understanding of disease biology, the characterization of the molecular target for clinically proven or new drugs is very important. Because of its simplicity and the availability of strains with individual deletions in all of its genes, chemogenomic profiling in yeast has been used to identify drug targets. As measurement of drug-induced changes in cellular metabolites can yield considerable information about the effects of a drug, we investigated whether combining chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast could improve the characterization of drug targets. BASIC METHODS: We used chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast to characterize the target for five drugs acting on two biologically important pathways. A novel computational method that uses a curated metabolic network was also developed, and it was used to identify the genes that are likely to be responsible for the metabolomic differences found. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The combination of metabolomic and chemogenomic profiling, along with data analyses carried out using a novel computational method, could robustly identify the enzymes targeted by five drugs. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to identify genes that are causative of metabolomic differences or drug targets. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  6. Saliva: A diagnostic biomarker of periodontal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Priti Basgauda; Patil, Basgauda Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of disease plays a crucial role in successful therapy. Early diagnosis and management reduces the severity and possible complications of the disease process. To overcome this challenge, medical researchers are devoted to finding molecular disease biomarkers that reveal a hidden lethal threat before the disease becomes complicated. Saliva, an important physiologic fluid, containing a highly complex mixture of substances, is rapidly gaining popularity as a diagnostic tool. Periodontal disease is a chronic disease of the oral cavity comprising a group of inflammatory conditions affecting the supporting structures of the dentition. In the field of periodontology, traditional clinical criteria are often insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Saliva, as a mirror of oral and systemic health, is a valuable source for clinically relevant information because it contains biomarkers specific for the unique physiologic aspects of periodontal diseases. This review highlights the various potentials of saliva as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal diseases. PMID:22368352

  7. Lactation-related metabolic mechanism investigated based on mammary gland metabolomics and 4 biofluids' metabolomics relationships in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui-Zeng; Shi, Kai; Wu, Xue-Hui; Xue, Ming-Yuan; Wei, Zi-Hai; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Hong-Yun

    2017-12-02

    Lactation is extremely important for dairy cows; however, the understanding of the underlying metabolic mechanisms is very limited. This study was conducted to investigate the inherent metabolic patterns during lactation using the overall biofluid metabolomics and the metabolic differences from non-lactation periods, as determined using partial tissue-metabolomics. We analyzed the metabolomic profiles of four biofluids (rumen fluid, serum, milk and urine) and their relationships in six mid-lactation Holstein cows and compared their mammary gland (MG) metabolomic profiles with those of six non-lactating cows by using gas chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry. In total, 33 metabolites were shared among the four biofluids, and 274 metabolites were identified in the MG tissues. The sub-clusters of the hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that the rumen fluid and serum metabolomics profiles were grouped together and highly correlated but were separate from those for milk. Urine had the most different profile compared to the other three biofluids. Creatine was identified as the most different metabolite among the four biofluids (VIP = 1.537). Five metabolic pathways, including gluconeogenesis, pyruvate metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), glycerolipid metabolism, and aspartate metabolism, showed the most functional enrichment among the four biofluids (false discovery rate 2). Clear discriminations were observed in the MG metabolomics profiles between the lactating and non-lactating cows, with 54 metabolites having a significantly higher abundance (P  1) in the lactation group. Lactobionic acid, citric acid, orotic acid and oxamide were extracted by the S-plot as potential biomarkers of the metabolic difference between lactation and non-lactation. The TCA cycle, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, glutamate metabolism and glycine metabolism were determined to be pathways that were significantly impacted (P 0.1) in the

  8. Can saliva replace plasma for the monitoring of methadone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiran, Mohammad Reza; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad; Iqbal, Mohammad Zafar; Lagundoye, Olawale; Seivewright, Nicholas; Lennard, Martin S; Tucker, Geoffrey T; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2005-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the relationship between saliva and plasma methadone concentrations and the influence of variability in saliva pH. Saliva and plasma samples were taken before the daily dose of methadone in 60 patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Saliva pH was measured immediately after sampling, and concentrations of (RS)-, (R)-, and (S)-methadone in saliva and plasma were assayed by LC/MS. In addition, unbound (R)- and (S)-methadone concentrations were measured in plasma samples by ultrafiltration. Plasma binding and pH differences between plasma and saliva were then used to estimate methadone saliva/plasma ratios and to compare them with observed values. Saliva pH ranged from 5.1 to 7.6 (mean +/- SD, 6.7 +/- 0.5). Plasma and saliva concentrations correlated weakly [(RS)-, r = 0.14, P = 0.007, n = 44; (R)-, r = 0.10, P = 0.04, n = 43; (S)-, r = 0.22, P = 0.002, n = 43], and the mean saliva-to-plasma methadone concentration ratios were 1.1 (+/-1.3 SD), 1.5 (+/-1.5), and 0.8 (+/-0.8), for (RS)-, (R)-, and (S)-methadone, respectively. Corresponding values based on unbound concentrations of methadone in plasma were 21 (+/-20.6, n = 31), 21 (+/-19, n = 34), and 17 (+/-15, n = 36). The salivary concentration-to-dose ratios showed statistically significant but weak inverse correlations with saliva pH [(RS)-, r = 0.27, P < 0.001; (R)-, r = 0.25, P < 0.001; (S)-, r = 0.29, P < 0.001, respectively]. There were significant correlations between predicted and observed saliva/plasma ratios [(RS)-, r = 0.44, P < 0.001, n = 31; (R)-, r = 0.58, P < 0.001, n = 32; (S)-, r = 0.10, P = 0.04, n = 34], but the mean predicted saliva concentrations were about 5 times lower than the mean observed values. The poor correlations between salivary and plasma methadone concentrations observed in this study are partly related to the effect of variable saliva pH. However, saliva pH explained only 10%-36% of the total variation. As a conclusion

  9. Plant metabolomics: from experimental design to knowledge extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amit; Umashankar, Shivshankar; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is one of the most recent additions to the functional genomics approaches. It involves the use of analytical chemistry techniques to provide high-density data of metabolic profiles. Data is then analyzed using advanced statistics and databases to extract biological information, thus providing the metabolic phenotype of an organism. Large variety of metabolites produced by plants through the complex metabolic networks and their dynamic changes in response to various perturbations can be studied using metabolomics. Here, we describe the basic features of plant metabolic diversity and analytical methods to describe this diversity, which includes experimental workflows starting from experimental design, sample preparation, hardware and software choices, combined with knowledge extraction methods. Finally, we describe a scenario for using these workflows to identify differential metabolites and their pathways from complex biological samples.

  10. Metabolome Consistency: Additional Parazoanthines from the Mediterranean Zoanthid Parazoanthus Axinellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Audoin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of the organic extract obtained from the Mediterranean zoanthid Parazoanthus axinellae yielded to the identification of five new parazoanthines F-J. The structures were fully determined by comparison of fragmentation patterns with those of previously isolated parazoathines and MS/MS spectra simulation of in silico predicted compounds according to the metabolome consistency. The absolute configuration of the new compounds has been assigned using on-line electronic circular dichroism (UHPLC-ECD. We thus demonstrated the potential of highly sensitive hyphenated techniques to characterize the structures of a whole family of natural products within the metabolome of a marine species. Minor compounds can be characterized using these techniques thus avoiding long isolation processes that may alter the structure of the natural products. These results are also of interest to identify putative bioactive compounds present at low concentration in a complex mixture.

  11. A Metabolomic Perspective on Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Calabrò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is an “omic” science that is now emerging with the purpose of elaborating a comprehensive analysis of the metabolome, which is the complete set of metabolites (i.e., small molecules intermediates in an organism, tissue, cell, or biofluid. In the past decade, metabolomics has already proved to be useful for the characterization of several pathological conditions and offers promises as a clinical tool. A metabolomics investigation of coeliac disease (CD revealed that a metabolic fingerprint for CD can be defined, which accounts for three different but complementary components: malabsorption, energy metabolism, and alterations in gut microflora and/or intestinal permeability. In this review, we will discuss the major advancements in metabolomics of CD, in particular with respect to the role of gut microbiome and energy metabolism.

  12. Diagnostic potential of saliva: current state and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffe, Tina; Cooper-White, Justin; Beyerlein, Peter; Kostner, Karam; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2011-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, the use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid has gained attention and has become a translational research success story. Some of the current nanotechnologies have been demonstrated to have the analytical sensitivity required for the use of saliva as a diagnostic medium to detect and predict disease progression. However, these technologies have not yet been integrated into current clinical practice and work flow. As a diagnostic fluid, saliva offers advantages over serum because it can be collected noninvasively by individuals with modest training, and it offers a cost-effective approach for the screening of large populations. Gland-specific saliva can also be used for diagnosis of pathology specific to one of the major salivary glands. There is minimal risk of contracting infections during saliva collection, and saliva can be used in clinically challenging situations, such as obtaining samples from children or handicapped or anxious patients, in whom blood sampling could be a difficult act to perform. In this review we highlight the production of and secretion of saliva, the salivary proteome, transportation of biomolecules from blood capillaries to salivary glands, and the diagnostic potential of saliva for use in detection of cardiovascular disease and oral and breast cancers. We also highlight the barriers to application of saliva testing and its advancement in clinical settings. Saliva has the potential to become a first-line diagnostic sample of choice owing to the advancements in detection technologies coupled with combinations of biomolecules with clinical relevance.

  13. Metabolomics for Biomarker Discovery: Moving to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Yan, Guangli; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xijun

    2015-01-01

    To improve the clinical course of diseases, more accurate diagnostic and assessment methods are required as early as possible. In order to achieve this, metabolomics offers new opportunities for biomarker discovery in complex diseases and may provide pathological understanding of diseases beyond traditional technologies. It is the systematic analysis of low-molecular-weight metabolites in biological samples and has become an important tool in clinical research and the diagnosis of human disease and has been applied to discovery and identification of the perturbed pathways. It provides a powerful approach to discover biomarkers in biological systems and offers a holistic approach with the promise to clinically enhance diagnostics. When carried out properly, it could provide insight into the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of diseases, help to identify patients at risk of disease, and predict the response to specific treatments. Currently, metabolomics has become an important tool in clinical research and the diagnosis of human disease and becomes a hot topic. This review will highlight the importance and benefit of metabolomics for identifying biomarkers that accurately screen potential biomarkers of diseases. PMID:26090402

  14. Computational Metabolomics Operations at BioCyc.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Karp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BioCyc.org is a genome and metabolic pathway web portal covering 5500 organisms, including Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. These organism-specific databases have undergone variable degrees of curation. The EcoCyc (Escherichia coli Encyclopedia database is the most highly curated; its contents have been derived from 27,000 publications. The MetaCyc (Metabolic Encyclopedia database within BioCyc is a “universal” metabolic database that describes pathways, reactions, enzymes and metabolites from all domains of life. Metabolic pathways provide an organizing framework for analyzing metabolomics data, and the BioCyc website provides computational operations for metabolomics data that include metabolite search and translation of metabolite identifiers across multiple metabolite databases. The site allows researchers to store and manipulate metabolite lists using a facility called SmartTables, which supports metabolite enrichment analysis. That analysis operation identifies metabolite sets that are statistically over-represented for the substrates of specific metabolic pathways. BioCyc also enables visualization of metabolomics data on individual pathway diagrams and on the organism-specific metabolic map diagrams that are available for every BioCyc organism. Most of these operations are available both interactively and as programmatic web services.

  15. The Landscape of MicroRNA, Piwi-Interacting RNA, and Circular RNA in Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Jae Hoon; Zhang, Qing; Li, Feng; Chan, Tak-Ming; Lin, Xianzhi; Kim, Yong; Wong, David T.W.; Xiao, Xinshu

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) in human body fluids are emerging as effective biomarkers for detection of diseases. Saliva, as the most accessible and noninvasive body fluid, has been shown to harbor exRNA biomarkers for several human diseases. However, the entire spectrum of exRNA from saliva has not been fully characterized. METHODS Using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we conducted an in-depth bioinformatic analysis of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in human cell-free saliva (CFS) from healthy individuals, with a focus on microRNAs (miRNAs), piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). RESULTS Our data demonstrated robust reproducibility of miRNA and piRNA profiles across individuals. Furthermore, individual variability of these salivary RNA species was highly similar to those in other body fluids or cellular samples, despite the direct exposure of saliva to environmental impacts. By comparative analysis of >90 RNA-Seq data sets of different origins, we observed that piRNAs were surprisingly abundant in CFS compared with other body fluid or intracellular samples, with expression levels in CFS comparable to those found in embryonic stem cells and skin cells. Conversely, miRNA expression profiles in CFS were highly similar to those in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Using a customized bioinformatics method, we identified >400 circRNAs in CFS. These data represent the first global characterization and experimental validation of circRNAs in any type of extracellular body fluid. CONCLUSIONS Our study provides a comprehensive landscape of ncRNA species in human saliva that will facilitate further biomarker discoveries and lay a foundation for future studies related to ncRNAs in human saliva. PMID:25376581

  16. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna C Bonaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak.The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological relevance of this finding, regarding the contribution

  17. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Ribeiro, Ieda P; Lima, Noemia S; Dos Santos, Alexandre A C; Menezes, Lidiane S R; da Cruz, Stephanie O D; de Mello, Iasmim S; Furtado, Nathália D; de Moura, Elaine E; Damasceno, Luana; da Silva, Kely A B; de Castro, Marcia G; Gerber, Alexandra L; de Almeida, Luiz G P; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Brasil, Patrícia

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak. The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological relevance of this finding, regarding the contribution of alternative non

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of human whole saliva of children with protein-energy undernutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteles, Cristiane Sá Roriz; Dos Santos, Cláudia Ferreira; da Silva Alves, Karla Shangela; de Miranda Mota, Ana Catarina; Damasceno, Juliana Ximenes; Fonteles, Manassés Claudino

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein profile of children with different levels of protein-energy undernutrition (PEU) through a proteomic approach of human whole saliva. Initially, saliva samples of children with mild, moderate, and severe PEU were collected and lyophilized. Saliva samples of healthy children were used as controls. Samples were analyzed for total protein using the Bradford method. Saliva samples were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis according to their isoelectric point (pI) and their molecular weights (MWs). Comparisons of protein bands among the healthy and mildly, moderately, and severely undernourished children showed significant differences in the MWs (P = 0.001) and pI values (P = 0.03). In total 159 spots were identified in the healthy children; 156, 168, and 221 spots were observed in mildly, moderately, and severely undernourished children, respectively. Mildly undernourished children presented with the spot with the highest MW of 293 kDa (pI = 7.77) and the lowest MW of 5 kDa (pI = 4.83). Moderately undernourished children were the only ones who did not present with a protein band with an MW of 30 kDa. The presence of a protein band with an MW of 123 kDa (pI = 516), possibly a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, was also observed only in this group. The protein profile in saliva varies according to the presence or absence of PEU, and these variations are specifically expressed in different grades of undernutrition. Thus, saliva may be an important diagnostic tool for the assessment of PEU. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Kely A. B.; de Castro, Marcia G.; Gerber, Alexandra L.; de Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak. Conclusions/Significance The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological

  20. Characterization of the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and detergent: Laboratory practicals for studying the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and various commercial detergents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia‐Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    ...) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative...

  1. Longitudinal Study of Hepatitis A Infection by Saliva Sampling: The Kinetics of HAV Markers in Saliva Revealed the Application of Saliva Tests for Hepatitis A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado Leon, Luciane Almeida; de Almeida, Adilson José; de Paula, Vanessa Salete; Tourinho, Renata Santos; Villela, Daniel Antunes Maciel; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing numbers of studies investigating hepatitis A diagnostic through saliva, the frequency and the pattern of hepatitis A virus (HAV) markers in this fluid still remains unknown. To address this issue, we carried on a longitudinal study to examine the kinetics of HAV markers in saliva, in comparison with serum samples. The present study followed-up ten patients with acute hepatitis A infection during 180 days post diagnosis (dpd). Total anti-HAV was detected in paired serum and saliva samples until the end of the follow-up, showing a peak titer at 90th. However, total anti-HAV level was higher in serum than in saliva samples. This HAV marker showed a probability of 100% to be detected in both serum and saliva during 180 dpd. The IgM anti-HAV could be detected in saliva up to 150 dpd, showing the highest frequency at 30th, when it was detected in all individuals. During the first month of HAV infection, this acute HAV marker showed a detection probability of 100% in paired samples. The detection of IgM anti-HAV in saliva was not dependent on its level in serum, HAV-RNA detection and/or viral load, since no association was found between IgM anti-HAV positivity in saliva and any of these parameter (p>0.05). Most of the patients (80%) were found to contain HAV-RNA in saliva, mainly at early acute phase (30th day). However, it was possible to demonstrate the HAV RNA presence in paired samples for more than 90 days, even after seroconversion. No significant relationship was observed between salivary HAV-RNA positivity and serum viral load, demonstrating that serum viral load is not predictive of HAV-RNA detection in saliva. Similar viral load was seen in paired samples (on average 104 copies/mL). These data demonstrate that the best diagnostic coverage can be achieved by salivary anti-HAV antibodies and HAV-RNA tests during 30–90 dpd. The long detection and high probability of specific-HAV antibodies positivity in saliva samples make the assessment of

  2. Longitudinal Study of Hepatitis A Infection by Saliva Sampling: The Kinetics of HAV Markers in Saliva Revealed the Application of Saliva Tests for Hepatitis A Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado Leon, Luciane Almeida; de Almeida, Adilson José; de Paula, Vanessa Salete; Tourinho, Renata Santos; Villela, Daniel Antunes Maciel; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing numbers of studies investigating hepatitis A diagnostic through saliva, the frequency and the pattern of hepatitis A virus (HAV) markers in this fluid still remains unknown. To address this issue, we carried on a longitudinal study to examine the kinetics of HAV markers in saliva, in comparison with serum samples. The present study followed-up ten patients with acute hepatitis A infection during 180 days post diagnosis (dpd). Total anti-HAV was detected in paired serum and saliva samples until the end of the follow-up, showing a peak titer at 90th. However, total anti-HAV level was higher in serum than in saliva samples. This HAV marker showed a probability of 100% to be detected in both serum and saliva during 180 dpd. The IgM anti-HAV could be detected in saliva up to 150 dpd, showing the highest frequency at 30th, when it was detected in all individuals. During the first month of HAV infection, this acute HAV marker showed a detection probability of 100% in paired samples. The detection of IgM anti-HAV in saliva was not dependent on its level in serum, HAV-RNA detection and/or viral load, since no association was found between IgM anti-HAV positivity in saliva and any of these parameter (p>0.05). Most of the patients (80%) were found to contain HAV-RNA in saliva, mainly at early acute phase (30th day). However, it was possible to demonstrate the HAV RNA presence in paired samples for more than 90 days, even after seroconversion. No significant relationship was observed between salivary HAV-RNA positivity and serum viral load, demonstrating that serum viral load is not predictive of HAV-RNA detection in saliva. Similar viral load was seen in paired samples (on average 104 copies/mL). These data demonstrate that the best diagnostic coverage can be achieved by salivary anti-HAV antibodies and HAV-RNA tests during 30-90 dpd. The long detection and high probability of specific-HAV antibodies positivity in saliva samples make the assessment of

  3. Longitudinal Study of Hepatitis A Infection by Saliva Sampling: The Kinetics of HAV Markers in Saliva Revealed the Application of Saliva Tests for Hepatitis A Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Almeida Amado Leon

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing numbers of studies investigating hepatitis A diagnostic through saliva, the frequency and the pattern of hepatitis A virus (HAV markers in this fluid still remains unknown. To address this issue, we carried on a longitudinal study to examine the kinetics of HAV markers in saliva, in comparison with serum samples. The present study followed-up ten patients with acute hepatitis A infection during 180 days post diagnosis (dpd. Total anti-HAV was detected in paired serum and saliva samples until the end of the follow-up, showing a peak titer at 90th. However, total anti-HAV level was higher in serum than in saliva samples. This HAV marker showed a probability of 100% to be detected in both serum and saliva during 180 dpd. The IgM anti-HAV could be detected in saliva up to 150 dpd, showing the highest frequency at 30th, when it was detected in all individuals. During the first month of HAV infection, this acute HAV marker showed a detection probability of 100% in paired samples. The detection of IgM anti-HAV in saliva was not dependent on its level in serum, HAV-RNA detection and/or viral load, since no association was found between IgM anti-HAV positivity in saliva and any of these parameter (p>0.05. Most of the patients (80% were found to contain HAV-RNA in saliva, mainly at early acute phase (30th day. However, it was possible to demonstrate the HAV RNA presence in paired samples for more than 90 days, even after seroconversion. No significant relationship was observed between salivary HAV-RNA positivity and serum viral load, demonstrating that serum viral load is not predictive of HAV-RNA detection in saliva. Similar viral load was seen in paired samples (on average 104 copies/mL. These data demonstrate that the best diagnostic coverage can be achieved by salivary anti-HAV antibodies and HAV-RNA tests during 30-90 dpd. The long detection and high probability of specific-HAV antibodies positivity in saliva samples make the

  4. Development of isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for mouse urine metabolomics: quantitative metabolomic study of transgenic mice related to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jun; Guo, Kevin; Xia, Jianguo; Zhou, Jianjun; Yang, Jing; Westaway, David; Wishart, David S; Li, Liang

    2014-10-03

    Because of a limited volume of urine that can be collected from a mouse, it is very difficult to apply the common strategy of using multiple analytical techniques to analyze the metabolites to increase the metabolome coverage for mouse urine metabolomics. We report an enabling method based on differential isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for relative quantification of over 950 putative metabolites using 20 μL of urine as the starting material. The workflow involves aliquoting 10 μL of an individual urine sample for ¹²C-dansylation labeling that target amines and phenols. Another 10 μL of aliquot was taken from each sample to generate a pooled sample that was subjected to ¹³C-dansylation labeling. The ¹²C-labeled individual sample was mixed with an equal volume of the ¹³C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was then analyzed by LC-MS to generate information on metabolite concentration differences among different individual samples. The interday repeatability for the LC-MS runs was assessed, and the median relative standard deviation over 4 days was 5.0%. This workflow was then applied to a metabolomic biomarker discovery study using urine samples obtained from the TgCRND8 mouse model of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) throughout the course of their pathological deposition of beta amyloid (Aβ). It was showed that there was a distinct metabolomic separation between the AD prone mice and the wild type (control) group. As early as 15-17 weeks of age (presymptomatic), metabolomic differences were observed between the two groups, and after the age of 25 weeks the metabolomic alterations became more pronounced. The metabolomic changes at different ages corroborated well with the phenotype changes in this transgenic mice model. Several useful candidate biomarkers including methionine, desaminotyrosine, taurine, N1-acetylspermidine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were identified. Some of them were found in previous

  5. Saliva: Physiology and Diagnostic Potential in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien J. C. Farnaud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliva has been described as the mirror of the body. In a world of soaring healthcare costs and an environment where rapid diagnosis may be critical to a positive patient outcome, saliva is emerging as a viable alternative to blood sampling. In this review, we discuss the composition and various physiological roles of saliva in the oral cavity, including soft tissue protection, antimicrobial activities, and oral tissue repair. We then explore saliva as a diagnostic marker of local oral disease and focus particularly on oral cancers. The cancer theme continues when we focus on systemic disease diagnosis from salivary biomarkers. Communicable disease is the focus of the next section where we review the literature relating to the direct and indirect detection of pathogenic infections from human saliva. Finally, we discuss hormones involved in appetite regulation and whether saliva is a viable alternative to blood in order to monitor hormones that are involved in satiety.

  6. Susceptibility of anthocyanins to ex vivo degradation in human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonpatana, Kom; Giusti, M. Mónica; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; MorenoCruz, Maria; Riedl, Ken M.; Kumar, Purnima; Failla, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Some fruits and their anthocyanin-rich extracts have been reported to exhibit chemopreventive activity in the oral cavity. Insights regarding oral metabolism of anthocyanins remain limited. Anthocyanin-rich extracts from blueberry, chokeberry, black raspberry, red grape, and strawberry were incubated ex vivo with human saliva from 14 healthy subjects. All anthocyanins were partially degraded in saliva. Degradation of chokeberry anthocyanins in saliva was temperature dependent and decreased by heating saliva to 80 °C and after removal of cells. Glycosides of delphinidin and petunidin were more susceptible to degradation than those of cyanidin, pelargonidin, peonidin and malvidin in both intact and artificial saliva. Stability of di- and tri-saccharide conjugates of anthocyanidins slightly, but significantly, exceeded that of monosaccharide compounds. Ex vivo degradation of anthocyanins in saliva was significantly decreased after oral rinsing with antibacterial chlorhexidine. These results suggest that anthocyanin degradation in the mouth is structure-dependent and largely mediated by oral microbiota. PMID:22868153

  7. On the saliva proteome of the Eastern European house mouse (Mus musculus musculus) focusing on sexual signalling and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopka, Pavel; Kuntová, Barbora; Klempt, Petr; Havrdová, Leona; Černá, Martina; Stopková, Romana

    2016-08-31

    Chemical communication is mediated by sex-biased signals abundantly present in the urine, saliva and tears. Because most studies concentrated on the urinary signals, we aimed to determine the saliva proteome in wild Mus musculus musculus, to extend the knowledge on potential roles of saliva in chemical communication. We performed the gel-free quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses of saliva and identified 633 proteins with 134 (21%) of them being sexually dimorphic. They include proteins that protect and transport volatile organic compounds in their beta barrel including LCN lipocalins, major urinary proteins (MUPs), and odorant binding proteins (OBPs). To our surprise, the saliva proteome contains one MUP that is female biased (MUP8) and the two protein pheromones MUP20 (or 'Darcin') and ESP1 in individuals of both sex. Thus, contrary to previous assumptions, our findings reveal that these proteins cannot function as male-unique signals. Our study also demonstrates that many olfactory proteins (e.g. LCNs, and OBPs) are not expressed by submandibular glands but are produced elsewhere-in nasal and lacrimal tissues, and potentially also in other oro-facial glands. We have also detected abundant proteins that are involved in wound healing, immune and non-immune responses to pathogens, thus corroborating that saliva has important protective roles.

  8. Realising the Potential of Urine and Saliva as Diagnostic Tools in Sport and Exercise Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Angus; Costello, Joseph T

    2017-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of homeostatic perturbations following various psychophysiological stressors is essential in sports and exercise medicine. Various biomarkers are routinely used as monitoring tools in both clinical and elite sport settings. Blood collection and muscle biopsies, both invasive in nature, are considered the gold standard for the analysis of these biomarkers in exercise science. Exploring non-invasive methods of collecting and analysing biomarkers that are capable of providing accurate information regarding exercise-induced physiological and psychological stress is of obvious practical importance. This review describes the potential benefits, and the limitations, of using saliva and urine to ascertain biomarkers capable of identifying important stressors that are routinely encountered before, during, or after intense or unaccustomed exercise, competition, over-training, and inappropriate recovery. In particular, we focus on urinary and saliva biomarkers that have previously been used to monitor muscle damage, inflammation, cardiovascular stress, oxidative stress, hydration status, and brain distress. Evidence is provided from a range of empirical studies suggesting that urine and saliva are both capable of identifying various stressors. Although additional research regarding the efficacy of using urine and/or saliva to indicate the severity of exercise-induced psychophysiological stress is required, it is likely that these non-invasive biomarkers will represent "the future" in sports and exercise medicine.

  9. Create, run, share, publish, and reference your LC-MS, FIA-MS, GC-MS, and NMR data analysis workflows with the Workflow4Metabolomics 3.0 Galaxy online infrastructure for metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitton, Yann; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Martin, Jean-François; Pétéra, Mélanie; Roger-Mele, Pierrick; Delabrière, Alexis; Goulitquer, Sophie; Monsoor, Misharl; Duperier, Christophe; Canlet, Cécile; Servien, Rémi; Tardivel, Patrick; Caron, Christophe; Giacomoni, Franck; Thévenot, Etienne A

    2017-12-01

    Metabolomics is a key approach in modern functional genomics and systems biology. Due to the complexity of metabolomics data, the variety of experimental designs, and the multiplicity of bioinformatics tools, providing experimenters with a simple and efficient resource to conduct comprehensive and rigorous analysis of their data is of utmost importance. In 2014, we launched the Workflow4Metabolomics (W4M; http://workflow4metabolomics.org) online infrastructure for metabolomics built on the Galaxy environment, which offers user-friendly features to build and run data analysis workflows including preprocessing, statistical analysis, and annotation steps. Here we present the new W4M 3.0 release, which contains twice as many tools as the first version, and provides two features which are, to our knowledge, unique among online resources. First, data from the four major metabolomics technologies (i.e., LC-MS, FIA-MS, GC-MS, and NMR) can be analyzed on a single platform. By using three studies in human physiology, alga evolution, and animal toxicology, we demonstrate how the 40 available tools can be easily combined to address biological issues. Second, the full analysis (including the workflow, the parameter values, the input data and output results) can be referenced with a permanent digital object identifier (DOI). Publication of data analyses is of major importance for robust and reproducible science. Furthermore, the publicly shared workflows are of high-value for e-learning and training. The Workflow4Metabolomics 3.0 e-infrastructure thus not only offers a unique online environment for analysis of data from the main metabolomics technologies, but it is also the first reference repository for metabolomics workflows. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The human plasma-metabolome: Reference values in 800 French healthy volunteers; impact of cholesterol, gender and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabado, Séverine; Al-Salameh, Abdallah; Croixmarie, Vincent; Masson, Perrine; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Fève, Bruno; Colle, Romain; Ripoll, Laurent; Walther, Bernard; Boursier-Neyret, Claire; Werner, Erwan; Becquemont, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches are increasingly used to identify new disease biomarkers, yet normal values of many plasma metabolites remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to define the "normal" metabolome in healthy volunteers. We included 800 French volunteers aged between 18 and 86, equally distributed according to sex, free of any medication and considered healthy on the basis of their medical history, clinical examination and standard laboratory tests. We quantified 185 plasma metabolites, including amino acids, biogenic amines, acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and hexose, using tandem mass spectrometry with the Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ p180 kit. Principal components analysis was applied to identify the main factors responsible for metabolome variability and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis was employed to confirm the observed patterns and identify pattern-related metabolites. We established a plasma metabolite reference dataset for 144/185 metabolites. Total blood cholesterol, gender and age were identified as the principal factors explaining metabolome variability. High total blood cholesterol levels were associated with higher plasma sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines concentrations. Compared to women, men had higher concentrations of creatinine, branched-chain amino acids and lysophosphatidylcholines, and lower concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines. Elderly healthy subjects had higher sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines plasma levels than young subjects. We established reference human metabolome values in a large and well-defined population of French healthy volunteers. This study provides an essential baseline for defining the "normal" metabolome and its main sources of variation.

  11. Use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović Tatjana; Dožić Ivan; Pavlica Dušan; Marković Dejan; Ivanović Mirjana; Brajović Gavrilo; Stefanović Gordana; Mirković Silvija; Anđelski Biljana

    2005-01-01

    Saliva is a secretion of the salivary and mucous glands and is of major importance in the maintainance of oral health. Over the last few decades, saliva has been evaluated as a diagnostic fluid in medicine for determining systemic disease markers as well as for monitoring numerous drugs, narcotics, and hormones. The biochemical analysis of saliva is particularly important in dentistry. The estimation of the risk of appearance and diagnosis of disease, monitoring of disease progression, evalua...

  12. The influence of tooth brushing time over saliva buffering capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Mulyanti; Hetty Anggrawati

    2014-01-01

    Saliva gives a considerable influence against the growth of dental caries as a natural defense against caries. the things very important about saliva are its flow rate and buffering capacity. the decrease in saliva flow rate might cause food retention that furthermore would turn into dental plaques, meanwhile it’s buffering capacity will play a considerable role in maintaining the saliva’s pH and remineralization process of the teeth. One of the mechanisms which are considered to be effective...

  13. Susceptibility of anthocyanins to ex vivo degradation in human saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Kamonpatana, Kom; Giusti, M. Mónica; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; MorenoCruz, Maria; Riedl, Ken M.; Kumar, Purnima; Failla, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Some fruits and their anthocyanin-rich extracts have been reported to exhibit chemopreventive activity in the oral cavity. Insights regarding oral metabolism of anthocyanins remain limited. Anthocyanin-rich extracts from blueberry, chokeberry, black raspberry, red grape, and strawberry were incubated ex vivo with human saliva from 14 healthy subjects. All anthocyanins were partially degraded in saliva. Degradation of chokeberry anthocyanins in saliva was temperature dependent and decreased by...

  14. Pengaruh Larutan Kumur Ekstrak Siwak (Salvadora Persica) Terhadap Ph Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Kusumasari, Nila; Santoso, Oedijani

    2012-01-01

    Latar belakang : pH saliva merupakan salah satu komponen yang memberikan kontribusi terhadap pH mulut. Bakteri patogen dalam rongga mulut memfermentasi gula menjadi asam laktat yang akan menurunkan keasaman mulutsehingga menyebabkan demineralisasi email gigi. Untuk mencegah penurunan pH saliva dapat dilakukan secara kimiawi. Pada penelitian ini digunakan larutan ekstrak siwak (Salvadora persica) sebagai obat kumur karena terdapat fitokemikal yang mampu mencegah penurunan pH saliva dengan cara...

  15. Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis for Metabolomic Data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyamundanda, Gift

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background Data from metabolomic studies are typically complex and high-dimensional. Principal component analysis (PCA) is currently the most widely used statistical technique for analyzing metabolomic data. However, PCA is limited by the fact that it is not based on a statistical model. Results Here, probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) which addresses some of the limitations of PCA, is reviewed and extended. A novel extension of PPCA, called probabilistic principal component and covariates analysis (PPCCA), is introduced which provides a flexible approach to jointly model metabolomic data and additional covariate information. The use of a mixture of PPCA models for discovering the number of inherent groups in metabolomic data is demonstrated. The jackknife technique is employed to construct confidence intervals for estimated model parameters throughout. The optimal number of principal components is determined through the use of the Bayesian Information Criterion model selection tool, which is modified to address the high dimensionality of the data. Conclusions The methods presented are illustrated through an application to metabolomic data sets. Jointly modeling metabolomic data and covariates was successfully achieved and has the potential to provide deeper insight to the underlying data structure. Examination of confidence intervals for the model parameters, such as loadings, allows for principled and clear interpretation of the underlying data structure. A software package called MetabolAnalyze, freely available through the R statistical software, has been developed to facilitate implementation of the presented methods in the metabolomics field.

  16. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur S. Edison

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields important synergies as discoveries in one area of science for a given organism shed light on biological processes in other areas, even for other organisms. Furthermore, the extensive knowledge bases compiled for each model organism enable systems-level understandings of these species, which enhance the overall biological and biomedical knowledge for all organisms, including humans. Building upon extensive genomics research, we argue that the time is now right to focus intensively on model organism metabolomes. We propose a grand challenge for metabolomics studies of model organisms: to identify and map all metabolites onto metabolic pathways, to develop quantitative metabolic models for model organisms, and to relate organism metabolic pathways within the context of evolutionary metabolomics, i.e., phylometabolomics. These efforts should focus on a series of established model organisms in microbial, animal and plant research.

  17. Solid-Phase Microextraction and the Human Fecal VOC Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Emma; Clubb, Cynthia; Pittman, Sara; Ammann, Larry; Rasheed, Zeehasham; Kazmi, Nazia; Keshavarzian, Ali; Gillevet, Pat; Rangwala, Huzefa; Couch, Robin D.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic potential and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in human feces has begun to receive considerable attention. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has greatly facilitated the isolation and analysis of VOCs from human feces. Pioneering human fecal VOC metabolomic investigations have utilized a single SPME fiber type for analyte extraction and analysis. However, we hypothesized that the multifarious nature of metabolites present in human feces dictates the use of several diverse SPME fiber coatings for more comprehensive metabolomic coverage. We report here an evaluation of eight different commercially available SPME fibers, in combination with both GC-MS and GC-FID, and identify the 50/30 µm CAR-DVB-PDMS, 85 µm CAR-PDMS, 65 µm DVB-PDMS, 7 µm PDMS, and 60 µm PEG SPME fibers as a minimal set of fibers appropriate for human fecal VOC metabolomics, collectively isolating approximately 90% of the total metabolites obtained when using all eight fibers. We also evaluate the effect of extraction duration on metabolite isolation and illustrate that ex vivo enteric microbial fermentation has no effect on metabolite composition during prolonged extractions if the SPME is performed as described herein. PMID:21494609

  18. Serum metabolomics in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Gokul; Ramani, Pratibha; Patankar, Sangeeta

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is a core discipline of system biology focusing on the study of low molecular weight compounds in biological system. Analysis of human metabolome, which is composed of diverse group of metabolites, can aid in diagnosis and prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of the present study is to analyze and identify serum metabolites in oral leukoplakia and OSCC as a potential diagnostic biomarker and a predictor for malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia. Serum metabolomic profile of patients diagnosed with oral leukoplakia (n = 21) and OSCC (n = 22) was compared with normal controls (n = 18) using quadrupole time of flight-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. MassHunter profile software was used for metabolite identification, and statistical analysis to assess the variation of the metabolites was performed using Mass Profiler Professional software. Statistical significance between the three groups was expressed using ANOVA (P oral leukoplakia and OSCC than in normal controls. Furthermore, significant upregulation of 5,6-dihydrouridine, 4-hydroxypenbutolol glucuronide, 8-hydroxyadenine, and putrescine was evident in OSCC group than in oral leukoplakia. Upregulation of L-carnitine, lysine, 2-methylcitric acid, putrescine; 8-hydroxyadenine; 17-estradiol; 5,6-dihydrouridine; and MTA suggests their diagnostic potential in oral leukoplakia and OSCC. Further, a significant upregulation of putrescine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5,6-dihydrouridine in OSCC than in oral leukoplakia indicates their potential role in predicting the malignant transformation of oral leukoplakia.

  19. Solid-phase microextraction and the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Dixon

    Full Text Available The diagnostic potential and health implications of volatile organic compounds (VOCs present in human feces has begun to receive considerable attention. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME has greatly facilitated the isolation and analysis of VOCs from human feces. Pioneering human fecal VOC metabolomic investigations have utilized a single SPME fiber type for analyte extraction and analysis. However, we hypothesized that the multifarious nature of metabolites present in human feces dictates the use of several diverse SPME fiber coatings for more comprehensive metabolomic coverage. We report here an evaluation of eight different commercially available SPME fibers, in combination with both GC-MS and GC-FID, and identify the 50/30 µm CAR-DVB-PDMS, 85 µm CAR-PDMS, 65 µm DVB-PDMS, 7 µm PDMS, and 60 µm PEG SPME fibers as a minimal set of fibers appropriate for human fecal VOC metabolomics, collectively isolating approximately 90% of the total metabolites obtained when using all eight fibers. We also evaluate the effect of extraction duration on metabolite isolation and illustrate that ex vivo enteric microbial fermentation has no effect on metabolite composition during prolonged extractions if the SPME is performed as described herein.

  20. The metabolomic profile of red non-V. vinifera genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Silvia; Stefanini, Marco; Stanstrup, Jan; Perenzoni, Daniele; Mattivi, Fulvio; Vrhovsek, Urska

    2017-08-01

    Wild American genotypes represent an important part of the Vitis germplasm in relation to grape improvement. Today, these genotypes are currently involved in breeding programmes in order to introgress traits resistant to pests and diseases in V. vinifera cultivars. Nevertheless, the metabolic composition of their grapes has not been widely investigated. This study aimed to explore in detail the metabolomic profile in terms of simple phenolic, proanthocyanidin, anthocyanin and lipid compounds in two hybrids and five American genotypes. The results were compared with those of two V. vinifera cultivars. A multi-targeted metabolomics approach using a combination of LC-MS and LC-DAD methods was used to identify and quantify 124 selected metabolites. The genotypes studied showed considerable variability in the metabolomic profile according to the grape composition of V. vinifera and other Vitis genotypes. As regards the composition of anthocyanins, not all wild genotypes contained both mono- and di-glucoside derivatives. Wild genotype 41B and V. vinifera cultivars contained only monoglucoside anthocyanins. The proanthocyanidins of non-V. vinifera genotypes were mainly rich in oligomers and short-chain polymers. The analysis of lipids in wild Vitis genotypes, here reported for the first time, showed the existence of a certain diversity in their composition suggesting a strong influence of the environmental conditions on the general lipid pattern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomarker discovery in neurological diseases: a metabolomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf El-Ansary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Afaf El-Ansary, Nouf Al-Afaleg, Yousra Al-YafaeeBiochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Biomarkers are pharmacological and physiological measurements or specific biochemicals in the body that have a particular molecular feature that makes them useful for measuring the progress of disease or the effects of treatment. Due to the complexity of neurological disorders, it is very difficult to have perfect markers. Brain diseases require plenty of markers to reflect the metabolic impairment of different brain cells. The recent introduction of the metabolomic approach helps the study of neurological diseases based on profiling a multitude of biochemical components related to brain metabolism. This review is a trial to elucidate the possibility to use this approach to identify plasma metabolic markers related to neurological disorders. Previous trials using different metabolomic analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis will be traced.Keywords: metabolic biomarkers, neurological disorders. metabolome, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography

  2. An NMR metabolomics approach for the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hye Rim; Wen, He; Ryu, Young Jin; An, Yong Jin; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Moon, Woo Kyung; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sunghyouk; Choi, Seung Hong

    2012-10-15

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is the third most common metastatic complication of the central nervous system. However, the current modalities to reliably diagnose this condition are not satisfactory. Here, we report a preclinical proof of concept for a metabolomics-based diagnostic strategy using a rat LC model incorporating glioma cells that stably express green fluorescent protein. Cytologic diagnoses gave 66.7% sensitivity for the 7-day LC group and 0% for the 3-day LC group. MR imaging could not diagnose LC at these stages. In contrast, nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics on cerebrospinal fluid detected marked differences between the normal and LC groups. Predictions based on the multivariate model provided sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of 88% to 89% in both groups for LC diagnosis. Further statistical analyses identified lactate, acetate, and creatine as specific for the 7-day LC group, with glucose a specific marker of the normal group. Overall, we showed that the metabolomics approach provided both earlier and more accurate diagnostic results than cytology and MR imaging in current use.

  3. Metabolomics as a promising tool for early osteoarthritis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, E B; Dos Santos, G C; Duarte, M E L; Moura, V; Aguiar, D P

    2017-09-21

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the main cause of disability worldwide, due to progressive articular cartilage loss and degeneration. According to recent research, OA is more than just a degenerative disease due to some metabolic components associated to its pathogenesis. However, no biomarker has been identified to detect this disease at early stages or to track its development. Metabolomics is an emerging field and has the potential to detect many metabolites in a single spectrum using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques or mass spectrometry (MS). NMR is a reproducible and reliable non-destructive analytical method. On the other hand, MS has a lower detection limit and is more destructive, but it is more sensitive. NMR and MS are useful for biological fluids, such as urine, blood plasma, serum, or synovial fluid, and have been used for metabolic profiling in dogs, mice, sheep, and humans. Thus, many metabolites have been listed as possibly associated to OA pathogenesis. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the studies in animal models and humans, regarding the use of metabolomics as a tool for early osteoarthritis diagnosis. The concept of osteoarthritis as a metabolic disease and the importance of detecting a biomarker for its early diagnosis are highlighted. Then, some studies in plasma and synovial tissues are shown, and finally the application of metabolomics in the evaluation of synovial fluid is described.

  4. Rumen fluid metabolomics analysis associated with feed efficiency on crossbred steers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rumen has a central role in the efficiency of digestion in ruminants. To identify potential differences in rumen function that lead to differences in feed efficiency, rumen fluid metabolomic analysis by LC-MS and multivariate/univariate statistical analysis were used to identify differences in r...

  5. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metabolome

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    Cseke Leland J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. Results We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. Conclusions The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  6. Molecular alterations of parotid saliva in infantile chronic recurrent parotitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Bozo, Irene; Urzúa-Orellana, Blanca; Landaeta, Mirtha; Montalbán, Raúl; Torres, Jimena; Pinochet, Alvaro; Valverde, Gustavo; Muñoz-Martínez, Andrea

    2007-02-01

    Infantile chronic recurrent parotitis (ICRP) is an insidious disease whose etiopathogenesis remains an enigma. Alterations in the physical appearance of parotid saliva from ICRP patients have been frequently reported. However, sialochemical studies in regard to ICRP are very rare. The aim of this study was to determine whether saliva of ICRP patients presents major physicochemical and biochemical alterations compared with saliva from paired healthy controls. Parotid, whole, and submandibular/sublingual saliva was collected at an asymptomatic stage from 33 ICRP patients (5-16 y old, both sexes) and from 33 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Saliva was analyzed for protein concentration, mode of protein diffusion on cellulose membranes, unidimensional sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles and zymographic profiles of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Parotid saliva of ICRP patients showed an increased protein concentration, altered mode of protein diffusion, a higher frequency of polypeptide bands of 43, 37, 33, 29, 26, 16, and 10 kD, higher asymmetry in the polypeptide profiles of both contralateral parotid saliva, and an increase in the frequency of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Parotid saliva of patients with ICRP is molecularly altered with respect to normal saliva. Some of the molecular differences could be related to the etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Short overview on metabolomic approach and redox changes in psychiatric disorders

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    Gordana Nedic Erjavec

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are severe mental disorders and complicated diagnostic entities, due to their phenotypic, biological and genetic heterogeneity, unknown etiology, and poorly understood alterations in biological pathways and biological mechanisms. Disturbed homeostasis between overproduction of oxidant species, overcoming redox regulation and a lack of cellular antioxidant defenses, resulting in free radical-mediated pathology and subsequent neurotoxicity contributes to development of depression, schizophrenia and PTSD, their heterogeneous clinical presentation and resistance to treatment. Metabolomics is a discipline that combines different strategies with the aim to extract, detect, identify and quantify all metabolites that are present in a biological sample and might provide mechanistic insights into the etiology of various psychiatric disorders. Therefore, oxidative stress research combined with metabolomics might offer a novel approach in dissecting psychiatric disorders, since these data-driven but not necessarily hypothesis-driven methods might identify new targets, molecules and pathways responsible for development of schizophrenia, depression or PTSD. Findings from the oxidative research in psychiatry together with metabolomics data might facilitate development of specific and validated prognostic, therapeutic and clinical biomarkers. These methods might reveal bio-signatures of individual patients, leading to individualized treatment approach. In reviewing findings related to oxidative stress and metabolomics in selected psychiatric disorders, we have highlighted how these novel approaches might make a unique contribution to deeper understanding of psychopathological alterations underlying schizophrenia, depression and PTSD. Keywords: Schizophrenia, Depression, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Oxidative stress, Lipid peroxidation, Metabolomics, Biomarkers

  8. Agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic characterisation of Sicilian Origanum vulgare (L.) ecotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Martinelli, Federico; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Leto, Claudio; Maggio, Antonella; La Bella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Although Origanum vulgare (L.) has been deeply analysed at phytochemical level, poor knowledge is available regarding non-volatile compounds such as lipids. The aim of this work was to characterise five wild Sicilian Origanum ecotypes from an agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic perspective. Serradifalco presented higher dry weight and inflorescences/plant than the others while Favara had a significantly higher number of branches per plant and more extensive flowered stratum. Metabolomic analysis, performed with LC-MS-TOF, allowed a preliminary characterisation of the non-volatile metabolome of the five oregano ecotypes Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum. Twenty-five metabolites were identified belonging to organic acids, amino acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, carnithines, nucleic bases and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. Lipidomic analysis identified 115 polar plant membrane glycerolipid species. Thirteen of them were differentially present in the two chosen ecotypes. The role of these metabolites in plant physiology from a qualitative and pharmacological point of view was discussed.

  9. anNET: a tool for network-embedded thermodynamic analysis of quantitative metabolome data

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    Zamboni Nicola

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to other omics techniques, quantitative metabolomics is still at its infancy. Complex sample preparation and analytical procedures render exact quantification extremely difficult. Furthermore, not only the actual measurement but also the subsequent interpretation of quantitative metabolome data to obtain mechanistic insights is still lacking behind the current expectations. Recently, the method of network-embedded thermodynamic (NET analysis was introduced to address some of these open issues. Building upon principles of thermodynamics, this method allows for a quality check of measured metabolite concentrations and enables to spot metabolic reactions where active regulation potentially controls metabolic flux. So far, however, widespread application of NET analysis in metabolomics labs was hindered by the absence of suitable software. Results We have developed in Matlab a generalized software called 'anNET' that affords a user-friendly implementation of the NET analysis algorithm. anNET supports the analysis of any metabolic network for which a stoichiometric model can be compiled. The model size can span from a single reaction to a complete genome-wide network reconstruction including compartments. anNET can (i test quantitative data sets for thermodynamic consistency, (ii predict metabolite concentrations beyond the actually measured data, (iii identify putative sites of active regulation in the metabolic reaction network, and (iv help in localizing errors in data sets that were found to be thermodynamically infeasible. We demonstrate the application of anNET with three published Escherichia coli metabolome data sets. Conclusion Our user-friendly and generalized implementation of the NET analysis method in the software anNET allows users to rapidly integrate quantitative metabolome data obtained from virtually any organism. We envision that use of anNET in labs working on quantitative metabolomics will provide the

  10. Characterization of the antioxidant profile of human saliva in peri-implant health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskmann, Stanislav; Vihalemm, Tiiu; Salum, Olev; Zilmer, Kersti; Fischer, Krista; Zilmer, Mihkel

    2007-02-01

    Peri-implant disease is considered to be an inflammatory disease, but many aspects of its pathogenesis remain unknown. At present, peri-implant disease is considered to be initiated and perpetuated by a small group of predominantly Gram-negative, anaerobic, or micro-aerophilic bacteria that colonize the subgingival area. Bacteria cause the observed tissue destruction directly by toxic products and indirectly by activating host defence systems, i.e. inflammation. A variety of molecular species appears in the inflamed tissues, among them are reactive species such as free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The purpose of this study was to assess levels of various antioxidants in saliva to identify differences between the saliva of patients with healthy peri-implant tissues and patients with peri-implant disease, and to examine whether the whole saliva of those with peri-implant disease conditions might have lower levels of antioxidants than that of healthy individuals. Thirty healthy adult volunteers (14 men and 16 women) with implant-supported overdentures (Ankylos Biofunctional Implants) were selected from the group of patients from Tallinn Dental Clinic. Biochemical and clinical parameters evaluated were the following ones: the levels of urate, ascorbate, myeloperoxidase in saliva, total antioxidant status of saliva, pocket probing depth (mm), gingival index (0, 1, 2, or 3), and bleeding on probing (0 or 1). Total antioxidant status (TAS) of saliva and concentration of uric acid and ascorbate, which are the main salivary antioxidants, are significantly decreased in patients with peri-implant disease. TAS in healthy subjects was 0.41+/-0.10 for resting saliva and 0.31+/-0.09 for stimulated saliva; in diseased subjects TAS was 0.19+/-0.07 and 0.12+/-0.03, respectively. In healthy subjects, the concentration of urate was 307.2+/-78.06 microM/l in resting saliva and 241.5+/-89.09 microM/l in stimulated saliva. In diseased patients, the concentration of urate

  11. Composition of betel specific chemicals in saliva during betel chewing for the identification of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Adrian A; Mendez, Ana Joy; Lai, Jennifer F; Arat-Cabading, Celine; Li, Xingnan; Custer, Laurie J

    2015-06-01

    Betel nut chewing causes cancer in humans, including strong associations with head and neck cancer in Guam. In the search for biomarkers of betel chewing we sought to identify chemicals specific for the 3 most commonly consumed betel preparations in Guam: nut ('BN'), nut + Piper betle leaf ('BL'), and betel quid ('BQ') consisting of nut + lime + tobacco + Piper betle leaf. Chemicals were extracted from the chewing material and saliva of subjects chewing these betel preparations. Saliva analysis involved protein precipitation with acetonitrile, dilution with formic acid followed by LCMS analysis. Baseline and chewing saliva levels were compared using t-tests and differences between groups were compared by ANOVA; p < 0.05 indicated significance. Predominant compounds in chewing material were guvacine, arecoline, guvacoline, arecaidine, chavibetol, and nicotine. In chewing saliva we found significant increases from baseline for guvacine (BN, BQ), arecoline (all groups), guvacoline (BN), arecaidine (all groups), nicotine (BQ), and chavibetol (BL, BQ), and significant differences between all groups for total areca-specific alkaloids, total tobacco-specific alkaloids and chavibetol. From this pilot study, we propose the following chemical patterns as biomarkers: areca alkaloids for BN use, areca alkaloids and chavibetol for BL use, and areca alkaloids plus chavibetol and tobacco-specific alkaloids for BQ use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NMR-based metabolomic profiling of overweight adolescents – an elucidation of the effects of inter-/intra-individual differences, gender, pubertal development and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian Clement; Arnberg, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The plasma and urine metabolome of 192 overweight 12-15-year-old adolescents (BMI of 25.4 ± 2.3 kg/m(2)) were examined in order to elucidate gender, pubertal development measured as Tanner stage, physical activity measured as number of steps taken daily, and intra-/interindividual differences...... in the metabolome are being commenced already in childhood. The relationship between Tanner stage and the metabolome showed that pubertal development stage was positively related to urinary creatinine excretion and negatively related to urinary citrate content. No relations between physical activity...... and the metabolome could be identified. The present study for the first time provides comprehensive information about associations between the metabolome and gender, pubertal development, and physical activity in overweight adolescents, which is an important subject group to approach in the prevention of obesity...

  13. Using metabolomics to evaluate food intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manach, Claudine; Brennan, Lorraine; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2015-01-01

    Improving dietary assessment is essential for modern nutritional epidemiology. This chapter discusses the potential of metabolomics for the identification of new biomarkers of intake and presents the first candidate biomarkers discovered using this approach. It then describes the challenges...

  14. Metabolomics Application in Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Fanos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics in maternal-fetal medicine is still an “embryonic” science. However, there is already an increasing interest in metabolome of normal and complicated pregnancies, and neonatal outcomes. Tissues used for metabolomics interrogations of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns are amniotic fluid, blood, plasma, cord blood, placenta, urine, and vaginal secretions. All published papers highlight the strong correlation between biomarkers found in these tissues and fetal malformations, preterm delivery, premature rupture of membranes, gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, neonatal asphyxia, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The aim of this review is to summarize and comment on original data available in relevant published works in order to emphasize the clinical potential of metabolomics in obstetrics in the immediate future.

  15. Metabolomics in Population-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics is the study of small molecules of both endogenous and exogenous origin, such as metabolic substrates and their products, lipids, small peptides, vitamins and other protein cofactors generated by metabolism, which are downstream from genes.

  16. Development of quantitative metabolomics for Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnicer, M.; Canelas, A.B.; Ten Pierick, A.; Zeng, Z.; Van Dam, J.; Albiol, J.; Ferrer, P.; Heijnen, J.J.; Van Gulik, W.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and reproducible measurement of intracellular metabolite levels has become important for metabolic studies of microbial cell factories. A first critical step for metabolomic studies is the establishment of an adequate quenching and washing protocol, which ensures effective arrest

  17. The development of metabolomic sampling procedures for Pichia pastoris, and baseline metabolome data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Tredwell

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling is increasingly being used to investigate a diverse range of biological questions. Due to the rapid turnover of intracellular metabolites it is important to have reliable, reproducible techniques for sampling and sample treatment. Through the use of non-targeted analytical techniques such as NMR and GC-MS we have performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of sampling techniques for Pichia pastoris. It was clear that quenching metabolism using solutions based on the standard cold methanol protocol caused some metabolite losses from P. pastoris cells. However, these were at a low level, with the NMR results indicating metabolite increases in the quenching solution below 5% of their intracellular level for 75% of metabolites identified; while the GC-MS results suggest a slightly higher level with increases below 15% of their intracellular values. There were subtle differences between the four quenching solutions investigated but broadly, they all gave similar results. Total culture extraction of cells + broth using high cell density cultures typical of P. pastoris fermentations, was an efficient sampling technique for NMR analysis and provided a gold standard of intracellular metabolite levels; however, salts in the media affected the GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, there was no benefit in including an additional washing step in the quenching process, as the results were essentially identical to those obtained just by a single centrifugation step. We have identified the major high-concentration metabolites found in both the extra- and intracellular locations of P. pastoris cultures by NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS. This has provided us with a baseline metabolome for P. pastoris for future studies. The P. pastoris metabolome is significantly different from that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the most notable difference being the production of high concentrations of arabitol by P. pastoris.

  18. Identifikasi epitop dari Streptococcus mutans terhadap sekretori Imunoglobulin A saliva (The identification of Streptococcus mutans epitopes to secretory Immunoglobulin A saliva

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    Anita Yuliati

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available S. mutans is one of the etiology agent of dental caries, these bacteria have a surface protein of about 185 kDa named Ag I/II. The secretory of sIgA saliva to Ag I/II of S.mutans has shown to be able to prevent colonization in human oral cavity. Peptides derived from the 824 to 853 residues of the P region of antigen I/II S. mutans related to the pathogenesis of dental caries. The aim of this study was to identify the overlapping sequence of amino acids (epitope derived from the 624 to 853 residues of P of antigen I/II S. mutans to sIgA saliva on caries and caries-free subject in a observational cross sectional study. The P region of antigen I/II S.mutans was cut into 22 peptides of 9 mer sequences with an overlapping of 8 mer and an offset of 1 mer, synthesized on polyethylene pins and tested for the reactivity with an ELISA indirect method to sIgA saliva on caries and caries-free subject. The results of this study showed that amino acid sequences with TPPVKP (832–837 and TAPTKPTY (838–845 were reactive to sIgA saliva on caries and caries-free subject. The conclusion of this study was that the overlapping common sequence of amino acid (epitopes corresponding to TPPVKP (832–837 and TAPTKPTY (838–845 was identified as caries marker epitopes in human.

  19. Mixture model normalization for non-targeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisetter, Anna C; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Bain, James R; Nodzenski, Michael; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Metzger, Boyd E; Newgard, Christopher B; Lowe, William L; Scholtens, Denise M

    2017-02-02

    Metabolomics offers a unique integrative perspective for health research, reflecting genetic and environmental contributions to disease-related phenotypes. Identifying robust associations in population-based or large-scale clinical studies demands large numbers of subjects and therefore sample batching for gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) non-targeted assays. When run over weeks or months, technical noise due to batch and run-order threatens data interpretability. Application of existing normalization methods to metabolomics is challenged by unsatisfied modeling assumptions and, notably, failure to address batch-specific truncation of low abundance compounds. To curtail technical noise and make GC/MS metabolomics data amenable to analyses describing biologically relevant variability, we propose mixture model normalization (mixnorm) that accommodates truncated data and estimates per-metabolite batch and run-order effects using quality control samples. Mixnorm outperforms other approaches across many metrics, including improved correlation of non-targeted and targeted measurements and superior performance when metabolite detectability varies according to batch. For some metrics, particularly when truncation is less frequent for a metabolite, mean centering and median scaling demonstrate comparable performance to mixnorm. When quality control samples are systematically included in batches, mixnorm is uniquely suited to normalizing non-targeted GC/MS metabolomics data due to explicit accommodation of batch effects, run order and varying thresholds of detectability. Especially in large-scale studies, normalization is crucial for drawing accurate conclusions from non-targeted GC/MS metabolomics data.

  20. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease through metabolomics and investigating anti-Alzheimer's disease effects of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lunzhao; Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Zhe; Ren, Dabing; Peng, Weijun

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly people and is among the greatest healthcare challenges of the 21st century. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of AD remain poorly understood, and no curative treatments are available to slow down or stop the degenerative effects of AD. As a high-throughput approach, metabolomics is gaining significant attention in AD research, because it has a powerful potential to discover novel biomarkers, unravel new therapeutic targets for AD, and identify perturbed metabolic pathways involved in AD progression. Here, we systematically review metabolomics with regard to its recent advances and applications in the identification of potential biomarkers for early AD diagnosis and pathogenesis research. In addition, we illustrate the developments in metabolomics as an effective tool for understanding the anti-AD mechanisms of natural products. We believe that the insights from these advances can narrow the gap between metabolomics research and clinical applications of laboratory findings. Moreover, we discuss some limitations and perspectives of biomarker identification in metabolomics. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Pathophysiologic processes have an impact on the plasma metabolomic signature of endometriosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Muñoz, Sara; Morcillo, Inmaculada; Puchades-Carrasco, Leonor; Payá, Vicente; Pellicer, Antonio; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate potential variations in the plasma metabolomic profile of endometriosis patients as a consequence of pathophysiologic alterations associated with this disorder. Prospective study. For each subject, a plasma sample was collected after overnight fasting and before surgery. University medical center. The clinical cohort included 50 endometriosis patients, diagnosed at early (n = 6) and advanced (n = 44) stages of the disease, and 23 healthy women. All volunteers underwent diagnostic laparoscopy to visually confirm the presence or absence of endometriotic lesions. Metabolomic profiling of plasma samples based on (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with statistical approaches. Comparative identification of metabolites present in plasma from endometriosis patients and healthy women. The plasma metabolomic profile of endometriosis patients was characterized by increased concentration of valine, fucose, choline-containing metabolites, lysine/arginine, and lipoproteins and decreased concentration of creatinine compared with healthy women. Metabolic alterations identified in the plasma metabolomic profile of endometriosis patients correlate with pathophysiologic events previously described in the progression of this disease. The results highlight the potential of (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics to characterize metabolic alterations associated with endometriosis in plasma samples. This information could be useful to get a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis, thus facilitating the noninvasive diagnosis of this pathology at early stages. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Nontargeted UHPLC-HRMS Metabolomics Pipeline for Metabolite Identification: Application to Cardiac Remote Ischemic Preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi Nzoughet, Judith; Bocca, Cinzia; Simard, Gilles; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Bonneau, Dominique; Procaccio, Vincent; Prunier, Fabrice; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal

    2017-02-07

    In recent years, the number of investigations based on nontargeted metabolomics has increased, although often without a thorough assessment of analytical strategies applied to acquire data. Following published guidelines for metabolomics experiments, we report a validated nontargeted metabolomics strategy with pipeline for unequivocal identification of metabolites using the MSMLS molecule library. We achieved an in-house database containing accurate m/z values, retention times, isotopic patterns, full MS, and MS/MS spectra. A UHPLC-HRMS Q-Exactive method was developed, and experimental variations were determined within and between 3 experimental days. The extraction efficiency as well as the accuracy, precision, repeatability, and linearity of the method were assessed, the method demonstrating good performances. The methodology was further blindly applied to plasma from remote ischemic pre-conditioning (RIPC) rats. Samples, previously analyzed by targeted metabolomics using completely different protocol, analytical strategy, and platform, were submitted to our analytical pipeline. A combination of multivariate and univariate statistical analyses was employed. Selection of putative biomarkers from OPLS-DA model and S-plot was combined to jack-knife confidence intervals, metabolites' VIP values, and univariate statistics. Only variables with strong model contribution and highly statistical reliability were selected as discriminated metabolites. Three biomarkers identified by the previous targeted metabolomics study were found in the current work, in addition to three novel metabolites, emphasizing the efficiency of the current methodology and its ability to identify new biomarkers of clinical interest, in a single sequence. The biomarkers were identified to level 1 according to the metabolomics standard initiative and confirmed by both RPLC and HILIC-HRMS.

  3. LC-Mass Spectrometry for Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Allyson L

    2017-01-01

    The field of metabolomics is greatly being refined by the addition of new technologies. LC-MS has allowed researchers to explore additional metabolites which were not originally captured through GC-MS. Through the customizability of the LC columns and mass spectrometer, it is now easier to tailor the instrument to your research needs. Herein, we describe a protocol for sample preparation and data acquisition for a global metabolomic analysis of tissues or feces.

  4. Saliva: a potential media for disease diagnostics and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingyi; Duan, Yixiang

    2012-07-01

    Within the past 10 years, the use of saliva as a diagnostic tool has gained considerable attention and become a well-accepted method. As a diagnostic fluid, saliva offers superiority over serum due to both a noninvasive collection method by specially trained persons and a cost-effective approach for screening of large populations. Collection of saliva offers a reduced risk of infection compared to the collection of serum. Moreover, obtaining saliva samples from infant, disabled or anxious patients, is much easier than obtaining other samples. There is a lot of useful components-changing information in saliva when a person is in sick. Therefore, we define these changing components as "biomarkers". The utilization of biomarkers as early predictors for clinical disease not only contributes to the effective prevention and treatment of diseases, but also enhances the assessment of potential health risks. In this article, we have reviewed the properties of saliva, the salivary analysis method for biomarker discovery, and the diagnostic potentials of salivary biomarkers in monitoring and detecting periodontal disease, Oral and Breast cancers, and Sjögren's syndrome. We also discussed some barriers of applications of saliva as a diagnostic media as well as recent improvements. We also prospected the future processing directions of using biomarkers in disease diagnosis and draw a conclusion that saliva is indeed an effective media in various disease monitoring and diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Saliva and plasma TIMP-1 in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Lars; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims. A prospective cross-sectional study was designed to test if total levels of TIMP-1 in saliva and plasma correlated with the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in a population with symptoms consistent with this disease. Materials and methods. Stimulated whole saliva and bloo...

  6. The role of electrostatics in saliva-induced emulsion flocculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, Erika; Vingerhoeds, Monique H.; Norde, Willem; Van Aken, George A.

    Upon consumption food emulsions undergo different processes, including mixing with saliva. It has been shown that whole saliva induces emulsion flocculation [van Aken, G. A., Vingerhoeds, M. H., & de Hoog, E. H. A. (2005). Colloidal behaviour of food emulsions under oral conditions. In E. Dickinson

  7. Evaluation of wetting ability of five new saliva substitutes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate & compare the wetting ability of five saliva substitutes & distilled water on heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Contact angle of the saliva substitute on denture base can be taken as an indicator of wettability. Good wetting of heat-polymerized acrylic resin is critical for optimum ...

  8. Nonenzymatic antioxidants in saliva of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moori, M; Ghafoori, H; Sariri, R

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody-directed self-antigens, immune complex formation and immune deregulation, resulting in damage to essentially all the organs. SLE is associated with the increased production of free radicals. Increase in free radicals or impaired antioxidant defense system in SLE causes oxidative stress. Considering that saliva could be a reflection of the state of health, the purpose of this study was to evaluate some antioxidants in the saliva and serum of patients with SLE and compare these with healthy individuals. This could help us in obtaining a possible marker in saliva in the future. During the course of the practical part of the project, 30 patients with SLE and 30 healthy controls were investigated. After centrifugation of un-stimulated saliva and blood samples, they were examined using spectrophotometric methods and the results were analyzed by statistical software. According to the results, concentrations of malondialdehyde, uric acid and total antioxidants were significantly increased but the level of reduced glutathion was reduced significantly in the saliva and serum of SLE patients as compared to controls. It is therefore suggested that antioxidant power is impaired in saliva and serum of SLE patients. As there was a positive correlation between the antioxidant level of saliva and blood serum, the antioxidant status of saliva could be an indicator of serum antioxidants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Cell-derived vesicles exposing coagulant tissue factor in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, René J; Sturk, Auguste; van Tienen, Laurens M; Schaap, Marianne C L; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2011-03-17

    On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds.

  10. Saliva viscosity as a potential risk factor for oral malodor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masayuki; Takeuchi, Susumu; Takehara, Sachiko; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether saliva viscosity, measured by a viscometer, was a predictor of oral malodor. The subjects were 617 patients who visited an oral malodor clinic. The organoleptic test (OT) was used for diagnosis of oral malodor. An oral examination assessed the numbers of teeth present and decayed teeth as well as the presence or absence of dentures. Further, periodontal pocket depths (PD), gingival bleeding, dental plaque and tongue coating were investigated. Unstimulated saliva were collected for 5 min. Saliva viscosity was measured with a viscometer. Logistic regression analysis with oral malodor status by OT as a dependent variable was performed. Possible confounders including age, gender, number of teeth present, number of decayed teeth, number of teeth with PD ≥ 4 mm, number of teeth with bleeding on probing, presence or absence of dentures, plaque index, area of tongue coating, saliva flow rate, saliva pH and saliva viscosity were used as independent variables. Saliva viscosity (p = 0.047) along with the number of teeth with PD ≥4 mm (p = 0.001), plaque index (p = 0.037) and area of tongue coating (p viscosity (OR = 1.10) were more likely to have oral malodor compared to those with lower values. The results suggested that high saliva viscosity could be a potential risk factor for oral malodor.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine (Lamictal) in plasma and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnavska, Z; Krejcova, H; Tkaczykovam; Salcmanova, Z; Elis, J

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of lamotrigine (LTG) disposition in plasma and saliva was evaluated in patients undergoing long-term antiepileptic drug therapy. Blood and saliva samples were collected simultaneously at intervals during the study and the concentration of LTG was measured by HPLC. Concentrations of LTG in saliva were proportional to plasma LTG concentrations, with a significant (p) correlation of r = 0.95 + 0.18. The saliva concentration-time curves of LTG were parallel to those derived for plasma LTG. The kinetics of LTG absorption, elimination and mean residence time were identical in both saliva and plasma estimations. The saliva/plasma ratio, determined from the terminal phase of individual patient LTG concentration vs time curves, was used to predict plasma LTG concentrations from saliva determinations. The binding of LTG to plasma proteins remained constant in patients treated with sodium valproate and/or enzyme-inducing drugs. Thus, LTG determination in saliva represents a noninvasive alternative for therapeutic drug monitoring and may also be employed for studying LTG pharmacokinetics.

  12. Effects of different tastants on parotid saliva flow and composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neyraud, E.; Heinzerling, C.I.; Bult, J.H.F.; Mesmin, C.; Dransfield, E.

    2009-01-01

    Saliva from parotid glands plays a role in taste perception. Parotid saliva is also stimulated by tastants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of different tastants on the parotid salivary response in six subjects. Five tastants were given in different concentrations in solution and

  13. Effects of Different Tastants on Parotid Saliva Flow and Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neyraud, E.; Heinzerling, C.I.; Bult, J.H.F.; Mesmin, C.; Dransfield, E.

    2009-01-01

    Saliva from parotid glands plays a role in taste perception. Parotid saliva is also stimulated by tastants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of different tastants on the parotid salivary response in six subjects. Five tastants were given in different concentrations in solution and

  14. Growth of oral Streptococcus species and Actinomyces viscosus in human saliva.

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, M H; van der Hoeven, J S; van OS, J H; Olijve, J H

    1984-01-01

    Microorganisms in dental plaque live in constant association with saliva. The role of saliva in the adherence of bacteria to the teeth and the antibacterial properties of saliva have been well investigated; less interest has been shown in the possible role of saliva as a substrate for oral microorganisms. In this study it was shown that saliva can serve as a growth medium for oral Streptococcus spp. and Actinomyces viscosus. The cell production of these organisms on saliva was carbohydrate li...

  15. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human breath metabolomics using an optimized non-invasive exhaled breath condensate sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Aksenov, Alexander A; Pasamontes, Alberto; Brown, Joshua F; Pettit, Dayna R; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weimer, Bart C; Schivo, Michael; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Davis, Cristina E

    2016-12-22

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analysis is a developing field with tremendous promise to advance personalized, non-invasive health diagnostics as new analytical instrumentation platforms and detection methods are developed. Multiple commercially-available and researcher-built experimental samplers are reported in the literature. However, there is very limited information available to determine an effective breath sampling approach, especially regarding the dependence of breath sample metabolomic content on the collection device design and sampling methodology. This lack of an optimal standard procedure results in a range of reported results that are sometimes contradictory. Here, we present a design of a portable human EBC sampler optimized for collection and preservation of the rich metabolomic content of breath. The performance of the engineered device is compared to two commercially available breath collection devices: the RTube(™) and TurboDECCS. A number of design and performance parameters are considered, including: condenser temperature stability during sampling, collection efficiency, condenser material choice, and saliva contamination in the collected breath samples. The significance of the biological content of breath samples, collected with each device, is evaluated with a set of mass spectrometry methods and was the primary factor for evaluating device performance. The design includes an adjustable mass-size threshold for aerodynamic filtering of saliva droplets from the breath flow. Engineering an inexpensive device that allows efficient collection of metalomic-rich breath samples is intended to aid further advancement in the field of breath analysis for non-invasive health diagnostic. EBC sampling from human volunteers was performed under UC Davis IRB protocol 63701-3 (09/30/2014-07/07/2017).

  17. Current development of saliva/oral fluid-based diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Christodoulides, Nicolaos J; Floriano, Pierre N; Miller, Craig S; Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Weigum, Shannon E; McDevitt, John; Redding, Spencer W

    2010-07-01

    Saliva can be easily obtained in medical and non-medical settings, and contains numerous bio-molecules, including those typically found in serum for disease detection and monitoring. In the past two decades, the achievements of high-throughput approaches afforded by biotechnology and nanotechnology allow for disease-specific salivary biomarker discovery and establishment of rapid, multiplex, and miniaturized analytical assays. These developments have dramatically advanced saliva-based diagnostics. In this review, we discuss the current consensus on development of saliva/oral fluid-based diagnostics and provide a summary of recent research advancements of the Texas-Kentucky Saliva Diagnostics Consortium. In the foreseeable future, current research on saliva based diagnostic methods could revolutionize health care.

  18. Is parotid saliva sterile on entry to the oral cavity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Stine A; Bardow, Allan; Eickhardt-Dalbøge, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The present study indicates that parotid saliva is sterile on entry to the oral cavity. OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate if parotid saliva is sterile on entry to the oral cavity and, thus, prior to contamination by oral bacteria. METHOD: Forty healthy volunteers were...... included in sterile parotid saliva collection. Parotid saliva was collected using a sterile Lashley cup, placed over the papilla of the Stensen´s duct, as well as sterile tubes and syringes for collection. All collections were followed by collection of a positive control sample where some of the sterile...... there were no cultivable bacteria, whereas bacteria were cultivated in all positive control samples. In eight of 10 PCR samples no bacterial DNA was detected. The most frequent bacteria in the remaining non-sterile parotid saliva samples and positive control samples were non-haemolytical streptococci...

  19. Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Lin, Jinyong; Weng, Guo-Xing; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapidly non-invasive technique with great potential for biomedical research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on two groups of saliva samples: one group from patients (n=30) with confirmed AMI and the other group from healthy controls (n=31). The diagnostic performance for differentiating AMI saliva from normal saliva was evaluated by multivariate statistical analysis. The combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) of the measured Raman spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps, rendering the sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 80.6%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy of human saliva can serve as a potentially clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  20. Metabolomics continues to flourish: highlights from the 2014 Metabolomics Society Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessner, U.; Hall, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    The Metabolomics Society has now been organising its annual meetings for 10 years! The 10th annual conference returned, in June, to Tsuruoka, Japan where the very first meeting was also held in 2005—just shortly after our society had been formally established and our journal Metabolomics had brought

  1. Biomarkers for predicting type 2 diabetes development — Can metabolomics improve on existing biomarkers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savolainen, Otto; Fagerberg, Björn; Lind, Mads Vendelbo

    2017-01-01

    Aim The aim was to determine if metabolomics could be used to build a predictive model for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk that would improve prediction of T2D over current risk markers. Methods Gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics was used in a nested case-control study based...... on a screening sample of 64-year-old Caucasian women (n = 629). Candidate metabolic markers of T2D were identified in plasma obtained at baseline and the power to predict diabetes was tested in 69 incident cases occurring during 5.5 years followup. The metabolomics results were used as a standalone prediction...... model and in combination with established T2D predictive biomarkers for building eight T2D prediction models that were compared with each other based on their sensitivity and selectivity for predicting T2D. Results Established markers of T2D (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin...

  2. Two elephants in the room: new hybrid nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry approaches for metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes some of the advances made over the past year in NMR-based metabolomics for the elucidation of known and unknown compounds, including new ways of how to combine this information with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Recent findings A new method allows the back-calculation of mass spectra from NMR spectra that have been queried against databases improving the accuracy of the identified compounds by validation and consistency analysis. For the de-novo characterization of unknown compounds, an algorithm has been introduced that predicts all viable NMR spectra from accurate masses allowing, by comparison with experimental NMR data, the determination of the structures of new metabolites in complex mixtures. Summary Recent advances in NMR and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and their synergistic use promises to significantly improve metabolomics sample characterization both in terms of identification and quantitation, and accelerate metabolite discovery. PMID:26154280

  3. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of saliva reveals disease-associated microbiota in patients with periodontitis and dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Constancias, Florentin; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    characterization of the salivary microbiota and test the hypothesis that salivary microbial presence and activity could be an indicator of the oral health status. Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 30 individuals (periodontitis: n = 10, dental caries: n = 10, oral health: n = 10). Salivary microbiota...... fermentum was identified in saliva from patients with dental caries. Multiple genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were significantly more expressed in healthy controls compared to periodontitis patients. Using metagenomics and metatranscriptomics we show that relative abundance of specific oral...... bacterial species and bacterial gene expression in saliva associates with periodontitis and dental caries. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to evaluate if screening of salivary microbial activity of specific oral bacterial species and metabolic gene expression can identify periodontitis and dental...

  4. Human saliva exposure modulates bone cell performance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, Susanne; Steinberg, Thorsten; Keller, Constantin; Wolkewitz, Martin; Wiedmann-Al-Ahmad, Margit; Finkenzeller, Guenter; Hannig, Christian; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Various situations encountered by a clinician during the daily routine including surgical periodontitis therapy, dental implant insertion, or tooth extraction involve the contact of saliva with the jaw bone. However, there are only sparse data concerning the influence of saliva on bone cells. Saliva specimens were incorporated within culture medium and administered to murine MC3T3 osteoblasts, of which the morphology (REM), proliferation (EZ4U), and differentiation (qRT-PCR, alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix calcification) were assessed. Simultaneously, the composition of saliva media was analyzed with respect to the content of lactoferrin, activities of classical salivary enzymes, and the ability to provoke inflammatory cytokine production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in MC3T3 osteoblasts. The morphology, proliferation, and expression of differentiation-associated genes were seriously handicapped by saliva contact. Saliva-touched cells exhibited less alkaline phosphatase but normal levels of extracellular matrix mineralization. Saliva-containing culture media featured physiological activities of salivary enzymes and considerable amounts of lactoferrin but almost completely lacked salivary alkaline phosphatase and unspecific proteases. Upon saliva incubation, MC3T3 osteoblasts did not release noteworthy levels of interleukin-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha. Although saliva is generally considered to vitalize oral tissues, this study reveals that it harms osteoblast-like cells more due to the presence of salivary enzymes than by triggering of inflammation. This issue is clinically relevant because it broadens the understanding of the bone cell fate within the rather complex cosmos of the oral cavity thereby providing a basis for clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. It seems to be reasonable to restrict the contact period between saliva and bone.

  5. The Steroid Metabolome of Adrenarche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Juilee; Rainey, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenarche is an endocrine developmental process whereby humans and select nonhuman primates increase adrenal output of a series of steroids, especially dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). The timing of adrenarche varies between primates, but in humans, serum levels of DHEAS are seen to increase around 6 years of age. This phenomenon corresponds with the development and expansion of the zona reticularis (ZR) of the adrenal gland. The physiological phenomena that trigger the onset of adrenarche are still unknown; however the biochemical pathways leading to this event have been elucidated in detail. There are numerous reviews examining the process of adrenarche, most of which, have focused on the changes within the adrenal as well as the phenotypic results of adrenarche. This article reviews the recent and past studies that show the breadth of changes in the circulating steroid metabolome that occurs during the process of adrenarche. PMID:22715193

  6. A New Method for Noninvasive Genetic Sampling of Saliva in Ecological Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lobo

    Full Text Available Noninvasive samples for genetic analyses have become essential to address ecological questions. Popular noninvasive samples such as faeces contain degraded DNA which may compromise genotyping success. Saliva is an excellent alternative DNA source but scarcity of suitable collection methods makes its use anecdotal in field ecological studies. We develop a noninvasive method of collection that combines baits and porous materials able to capture saliva. We report its potential in optimal conditions, using confined dogs and collecting saliva early after deposition. DNA concentration in saliva extracts was generally high (mean 14 ng μl(-1. We correctly identified individuals in 78% of samples conservatively using ten microsatellite loci, and 90% of samples using only eight loci. Consensus genotypes closely matched reference genotypes obtained from hair DNA (99% of identification successes and 91% of failures. Mean genotyping effort needed for identification using ten loci was 2.2 replicates. Genotyping errors occurred at a very low frequency (allelic dropout: 2.3%; false alleles: 1.5%. Individual identification success increased with duration of substrate handling inside dog's mouth and the volume of saliva collected. Low identification success was associated with baits rich in DNA-oxidant polyphenols and DNA concentrations <1 ng μl(-1. The procedure performed at least as well as other noninvasive methods, and could advantageously allow detection of socially low-ranked individuals underrepresented in sources of DNA that are involved in marking behaviour (faeces or urine. Once adapted and refined, there is promise for this technique to allow potentially high rates of individual identification in ecological field studies requiring noninvasive sampling of wild vertebrates.

  7. A New Method for Noninvasive Genetic Sampling of Saliva in Ecological Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Diana; Godinho, Raquel; Álvares, Francisco; López-Bao, José V.; Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive samples for genetic analyses have become essential to address ecological questions. Popular noninvasive samples such as faeces contain degraded DNA which may compromise genotyping success. Saliva is an excellent alternative DNA source but scarcity of suitable collection methods makes its use anecdotal in field ecological studies. We develop a noninvasive method of collection that combines baits and porous materials able to capture saliva. We report its potential in optimal conditions, using confined dogs and collecting saliva early after deposition. DNA concentration in saliva extracts was generally high (mean 14 ng μl-1). We correctly identified individuals in 78% of samples conservatively using ten microsatellite loci, and 90% of samples using only eight loci. Consensus genotypes closely matched reference genotypes obtained from hair DNA (99% of identification successes and 91% of failures). Mean genotyping effort needed for identification using ten loci was 2.2 replicates. Genotyping errors occurred at a very low frequency (allelic dropout: 2.3%; false alleles: 1.5%). Individual identification success increased with duration of substrate handling inside dog’s mouth and the volume of saliva collected. Low identification success was associated with baits rich in DNA-oxidant polyphenols and DNA concentrations <1 ng μl-1. The procedure performed at least as well as other noninvasive methods, and could advantageously allow detection of socially low-ranked individuals underrepresented in sources of DNA that are involved in marking behaviour (faeces or urine). Once adapted and refined, there is promise for this technique to allow potentially high rates of individual identification in ecological field studies requiring noninvasive sampling of wild vertebrates. PMID:26496352

  8. [VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS IN SALIVA--BIOLOGICAL MARKERS FOR ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER POLLUTANTS ON CHILDREN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaizina, A E; Akaizin, E S; Starodumov, V L

    2015-01-01

    The use of modern methods of analysis is aimed to the search of ultimately novel biological markers. Volatile fatty acids in saliva were not used previously for the assessment of the effects of contaminating substances in the drinking water on the body of children. The aim of the study is to investigate the informative value of volatile fatty acids in saliva as biological markers of the impact for the assessment of the exposure to contaminating substances in the drinking water on the body of children. Hygienic assessment of drinking water quality was made according to data of the own research of drinking water from centralized supply system of the city of Ivanovo. For the comparison of indices there was investigated the drinking water from wells at the village Podvyaznovsky of the Ivanovo region. In the Ivanovo water from the distributing network of centralized drinking water supply system of the city of Ivanovo, there were identified indices of the permanganate oxidation and the total concentration of residual chlorine exceeding norms, and also chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were in concentrations not exceeding the norms. Studied by us the samples of drinking water from Podvyaznovsky village wells, the water met the standards for all investigated parameters. The was studied the informative value of volatile fatty acids in the saliva of children aged 9-14 years from the city of Ivanovo and the Podvyaznovsky village, Ivanovo region. There was established the fall in acetic, butyric, isovaleric acids and the total amount of volatile fatty acids in the saliva in children of the city of Ivanovo, consuming water treated with chlorine of Ivanovo centralized drinking water supply system. Indices of volatile fatty acids in saliva are informative for the assessment of the impact of organic pollutants, residual chlorine and organic chlorine compounds of drinking water on the body of children.

  9. Serum Metabolomics Profiling to Identify Biomarkers for Unstable Angina

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Yao; Yuxia Gao; Zheng Wan

    2017-01-01

    Although statistical evidence is clear regarding the dangerousness of unstable angina (UA), a form of coronary heart disease (CHD) characterised by high mortality and morbidity globally, it is important to recognise that diagnostic precision for the condition is unfavourable. In the present research, to gain insight into candidate biomarkers, the author draws on 1H NMR-based serum metabolic profiling to analyze the unstable angina pectoris (UAP) metabolic signatures; this constitutes an effec...

  10. Rheological behavior of food emulsions mixed with saliva : Effect of oil content, salivary protein content, and saliva type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, Erika; Vingerhoeds, Monique H.; Van Aken, George A.; Norde, Willem

    In this paper, we studied the effect of saliva on the rheological properties of beta-lactoglobulin- and lysozyme-stabilized emulsions, prepared at pH=6.7 in relation to variation of emulsions- and saliva-related parameters. The effect of oil-volume fraction (2.5% w/w to 10% w/w), salivary protein

  11. Rheological Behavior of Food Emulsions Mixed with Saliva: Effect of Oil Content, Salivary Protein Content, and Saliva Type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Aken, van G.A.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the effect of saliva on the rheological properties of ß-lactoglobulin- and lysozyme-stabilized emulsions, prepared at pH¿=¿6.7 in relation to variation of emulsions- and saliva-related parameters. The effect of oil¿volume fraction (2.5% w/w to 10% w/w), salivary protein

  12. Reduced Mucin-7 (Muc7) Sialylation and Altered Saliva Rheology in Sjögren's Syndrome Associated Oral Dryness*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Nayab M. A.; Proctor, Gordon B.; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Carpenter, Guy H.; Flowers, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration and hypofunction of salivary and lacrimal glands. This loss of salivary function leads to oral dryness, impaired swallowing and speech, and increased infection and is associated with other autoimmune diseases and an increased risk of certain cancers. Despite the implications of this prevalent disease, diagnosis currently takes years, partly due to the diversity in patient presentation. Saliva is a complicated biological fluid with major constituents, including heavily glycosylated mucins MUC5B and MUC7, important for its viscoelastic and hydrating and lubricating properties. This study investigated Sjögren's patient's perception of dryness (bother index questionnaires) along with the rheological, protein composition, and glycan analysis of whole mouth saliva and the saliva on the mucosal surface (residual mucosal saliva) to understand the properties that most affect patient wellbeing. Sjögren's patients exhibited a statistically significant reduction in residual mucosal saliva, salivary flow rate, and extensional rheology, spinnbarkeit (stringiness). Although the concentration of mucins MUC5B and MUC7 were similar between patients and controls, a comparison of protein Western blotting and glycan staining identified a reduction in mucin glycosylation in Sjögren's, particularly on MUC7. LC-MS/MS analysis of O-glycans released from MUC7 by β-elimination revealed that although patients had an increase in core 1 sulfation, the even larger reduction in sialylation resulted in a global decline of charged glycans. This was primarily due to the loss of the extended core 2 disialylated structure, with and without fucosylation. A decrease in the extended, fucosylated core 2 disialylated structure on MUC7, residual mucosal wetness, and whole mouth saliva flow rate appeared to have a negative and cumulative effect on the perception of oral dryness. The observed changes in MUC7

  13. Recuperación de veillonellas a partir de saliva Recovery of Veillonella from saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Gutiérrez De Ferro

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Las veillonellas son cocos gram-negativos anaerobios asociados con salud oral. Para su aislamiento, se han reportado diferentes medios de cultivo. Las colonias de Veillonella spp. producen fluorescencia roja visible con luz ultravioleta, que desaparece en contacto con oxígeno. Esta propiedad sería útil para su identificación presuntiva rápida. Los objetivos de este trabajo fueron: 1- comparar el medio selectivo para Veillonella de Rogosa con los medios de cultivo recomendados por diferentes autores para determinar en cual de ellos se obtiene una mejor recuperación de veillonellas a partir de saliva, ya que esta muestra es generalmente utilizada para determinar la presencia y predominio de esta bacteria; 2- detectar la producción de fluorescencia en estos medios de cultivo como método rápido de identificación. Los medios de cultivo estudiados fueron: medio selectivo para Veillonella, agar Schaedler para anaerobios con vitamina K, agar tioglicolato, agar infusión cerebro corazón, agar Brucella, agar tripteína soja y agar Columbia con y sin el agregado de vancomicina y sangre lacada. La muestra ensayada fue un pool de saliva. Se hicieron recuentos de colonias de veillonellas y de microorganismos totales expresados en UFC/ml de saliva. La mayor recuperación de veillonellas en saliva se obtuvo en el medio selectivo para Veillonella con vancomicina y sangre lacada. Sólo se observó producción de fluorescencia en este medio.Veillonella spp. are anaerobic gram-negative cocci associated to oral health. Different types of cultures have been reported for the isolation of these microorganisms. Veillonella spp. colonies produce a red fluorescence, which is made visible through ultraviolet light and disappears in contact with oxygen. This feature would be very useful for rapid presumptive identification. The aims of this study were: 1. to compare the Rogosa selective medium for Veillonella with the cultures recommended by different authors in

  14. Haystack, a web-based tool for metabolomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Stephen C; Embry, Stephen; Luo, Heng

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LCMS) has become a widely used technique in metabolomics research for differential profiling, the broad screening of biomolecular constituents across multiple samples to diagnose phenotypic differences and elucidate relevant features. However, a significant limitation in LCMS-based metabolomics is the high-throughput data processing required for robust statistical analysis and data modeling for large numbers of samples with hundreds of unique chemical species. To address this problem, we developed Haystack, a web-based tool designed to visualize, parse, filter, and extract significant features from LCMS datasets rapidly and efficiently. Haystack runs in a browser environment with an intuitive graphical user interface that provides both display and data processing options. Total ion chromatograms (TICs) and base peak chromatograms (BPCs) are automatically displayed, along with time-resolved mass spectra and extracted ion chromatograms (EICs) over any mass range. Output files in the common .csv format can be saved for further statistical analysis or customized graphing. Haystack's core function is a flexible binning procedure that converts the mass dimension of the chromatogram into a set of interval variables that can uniquely identify a sample. Binned mass data can be analyzed by exploratory methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) to model class assignment and identify discriminatory features. The validity of this approach is demonstrated by comparison of a dataset from plants grown at two light conditions with manual and automated peak detection methods. Haystack successfully predicted class assignment based on PCA and cluster analysis, and identified discriminatory features based on analysis of EICs of significant bins. Haystack, a new online tool for rapid processing and analysis of LCMS-based metabolomics data is described. It offers users a range of data visualization options and supports non

  15. NMR and pattern recognition methods in metabolomics: From data acquisition to biomarker discovery: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: A.Smolinska@science.ru.nl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blanchet, Lionel [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buydens, Lutgarde M.C.; Wijmenga, Sybren S. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Procedures for acquisition of different biofluids by NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recent developments in metabolic profiling of different biofluids by NMR are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crucial steps involved in data preprocessing and multivariate chemometric analysis are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emphasis is given on recent findings on Multiple Sclerosis via NMR and pattern recognition methods. - Abstract: Metabolomics is the discipline where endogenous and exogenous metabolites are assessed, identified and quantified in different biological samples. Metabolites are crucial components of biological system and highly informative about its functional state, due to their closeness to functional endpoints and to the organism's phenotypes. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, next to Mass Spectrometry (MS), is one of the main metabolomics analytical platforms. The technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy have enabled the identification and quantitative measurement of the many metabolites in a single sample of biofluids in a non-targeted and non-destructive manner. Combination of NMR spectra of biofluids and pattern recognition methods has driven forward the application of metabolomics in the field of biomarker discovery. The importance of metabolomics in diagnostics, e.g. in identifying biomarkers or defining pathological status, has been growing exponentially as evidenced by the number of published papers. In this review, we describe the developments in data acquisition and multivariate analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data, with particular emphasis on the metabolomics of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and biomarker discovery in Multiple Sclerosis (MScl).

  16. Untargeted 1H-NMR metabolomics in CSF: toward a diagnostic biomarker for motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Hélène; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Pradat, Pierre-François; Gordon, Paul H; Antar, Catherine; Veyrat-Durebex, Charlotte; Moreau, Caroline; Devos, David; Mavel, Sylvie; Emond, Patrick; Andres, Christian R; Corcia, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    To develop a CSF metabolomics signature for motor neuron disease (MND) using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and to evaluate the predictive value of the profile in a separate cohort. We collected CSF from patients with MND and controls and analyzed the samples using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. We divided the total patient sample in a 4:1 ratio into a training cohort and a test cohort. First, a metabolomics signature was created by statistical modeling in the training cohort, and then the analyses tested the predictive value of the signature in the test cohort. We conducted 10 independent trials for each step. Finally, we identified the compounds that contributed most consistently to the metabolome profile. Analysis of CSF from 95 patients and 86 controls identified a diagnostic profile for MND (R(2)X > 22%, R(2)Y > 93%, Q(2) > 66%). The best model selected the correct diagnosis with mean probability of 99.31% in the training cohort. The profile discriminated between diagnostic groups with 78.9% sensitivity and 76.5% specificity in the test cohort. Metabolites linked to pathophysiologic pathways in MND (i.e., threonine, histidine, and molecules related to the metabolism of branched amino acids) were among the discriminant compounds. CSF metabolomics using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy can detect a reproducible metabolic signature for MND with reasonable performance. To our knowledge, this is the first metabolomics study that shows that a validation in separate cohorts is feasible. These data should be considered in future biomarker studies. This study provides Class III evidence that CSF metabolomics accurately distinguishes MNDs from other neurologic diseases.

  17. NMR-based Metabolomics Applications in Biological and Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a complimentary tool to other omics platforms, metabolomics is increasingly being used bybiologists to study the dynamic response of biological systems (cells, tissues, or wholeorganisms) under diverse physiological or pathological conditions. Metabolomics deals with the quali...

  18. Statistical methods for handling unwanted variation in metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Livera, Alysha M; Sysi-Aho, Marko; Jacob, Laurent; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann A; Castillo, Sandra; Simpson, Julie A; Speed, Terence P

    2015-04-07

    Metabolomics experiments are inevitably subject to a component of unwanted variation, due to factors such as batch effects, long runs of samples, and confounding biological variation. Although the removal of this unwanted variation is a vital step in the analysis of metabolomics data, it is considered a gray area in which there is a recognized need to develop a better understanding of the procedures and statistical methods required to achieve statistically relevant optimal biological outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the causes of unwanted variation in metabolomics experiments, review commonly used metabolomics approaches for handling this unwanted variation, and present a statistical approach for the removal of unwanted variation to obtain normalized metabolomics data. The advantages and performance of the approach relative to several widely used metabolomics normalization approaches are illustrated through two metabolomics studies, and recommendations are provided for choosing and assessing the most suitable normalization method for a given metabolomics experiment. Software for the approach is made freely available.

  19. Hemolysin activities as virulence factor of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from saliva and periapical abscess (gene detection by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewa Ayu N.P.A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus faecalis is a normal flora of the oral cavity, commonly detected in saliva and persistence in endodontic infections. These bacteria have diverse survival and virulence factors. Hemolysin is one of the factor and still had unclear role as a virulence factor of the Enterococcus faecalis to survive in the root canal. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to analyze the presence and activity of hemolysin gene and its activity as a virulence factor isolated from saliva and root canals with periapical abscess. Yet by understanding one of the phenotypes characters which is hemolysin, it is expected a successful endodontic treatment can be provided with the persistent of Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. Methods: Method of the research starting with the identification of Enterococcus faecalis bacteria in isolated saliva and periapical abscess was done in the first part of the study. Then the phenotypes character of Enterococcus faecalis such as gene detection and expression of hemolysin in blood agar cultures of the 60 colonies samples were performed in the later part. Results: Not all of the colonies cultured were identified as Enterococcus faecalis. All positive detection on hemolysin gene showed hemolysin expresion in both isolated samples. However, there were samples with hemolysin expression eventough no hemolysin gene detected. Hemolysin expression detection in saliva was higher due to different activation phase of hemolysin in saliva. The study with just one primer could lead to the possibility of undetected hemolysin gene, eventough there were samples that did not have hemolysin gene. The proportion of hemolysin expression in root canals were less than saliva, this could be influenced by environmental factors. However, Hemolysin was considered as important virulence factor, particularly for disease therapy. Conclusion: The conclusion of this research was hemolysin gene discovered in clinical isolated saliva and root

  20. Biomarker discovery in human cerebrospinal fluid: The need for integrative metabolome and proteome databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Schwarz (Emanuel); F.E. Torrey; P.C. Guest (Paul); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe number of metabolites identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has steadily increased over the past 5 years, and in this issue of Genome Medicine David Wishart and colleagues provide a comprehensive update that brings the number of metabolites listed in the CSF metabolome

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profiling in tuberculous and viral meningitis: Screening potential markers for differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zihui; Du, Boping; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jinli; Zheng, Xiaojing; Jia, Hongyan; Xing, Aiying; Sun, Qi; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Zongde

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most severe and frequent form of central nervous system tuberculosis. The current lack of efficient diagnostic tests makes it difficult to differentiate TBM from other common types of meningitis, especially viral meningitis (VM). Metabolomics is an important tool to identify disease-specific biomarkers. However, little metabolomic information is available on adult TBM. We used (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics to investigate the metabolic features of the CSF from 18 TBM and 20 VM patients. Principal component analysis and orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) were applied to analyze profiling data. Metabolites were identified using the Human Metabolome Database and pathway analysis was performed with MetaboAnalyst 3.0. The OSC-PLS-DA model could distinguish TBM from VM with high reliability. A total of 25 key metabolites that contributed to their discrimination were identified, including some, such as betaine and cyclohexane, rarely reported before in TBM. Pathway analysis indicated that amino acid and energy metabolism was significantly different in the CSF of TBM compared with VM. Twenty-five key metabolites identified in our study may be potential biomarkers for TBM differential diagnosis and are worthy of further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasma metabolomics combined with personalized diagnosis guided by Chinese medicine reveals subtypes of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: This study suggests that combining metabolomics with traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis can reveal metabolic signatures for CHF syndrome subtypes. The plasma metabolites identified might be of special clinical relevance for subtypes of CHF, which could lead to further understanding of mechanisms involved and an improvement in personalized treatment for CHF.

  3. Establishment of quantitative severity evaluation model for spinal cord injury by metabolomic fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jin; Zeng, Jun; Cai, Bin; Yang, Hao; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Chen, Wei; Sun, Ming-Wei; Lu, Charles Damien; Jiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event with a limited hope for recovery and represents an enormous public health issue. It is crucial to understand the disturbances in the metabolic network after SCI to identify injury mechanisms and opportunities for treatment intervention. Through plasma 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) screening, we identified 15 metabolites that made up an "Eigen-metabolome" capable of distinguishing rats with severe SCI from healthy control rats. Forty enzymes regulated these 15 metabolites in the metabolic network. We also found that 16 metabolites regulated by 130 enzymes in the metabolic network impacted neurobehavioral recovery. Using the Eigen-metabolome, we established a linear discrimination model to cluster rats with severe and mild SCI and control rats into separate groups and identify the interactive relationships between metabolic biomarkers in the global metabolic network. We identified 10 clusters in the global metabolic network and defined them as distinct metabolic disturbance domains of SCI. Metabolic paths such as retinal, glycerophospholipid, arachidonic acid metabolism; NAD-NADPH conversion process, tyrosine metabolism, and cadaverine and putrescine metabolism were included. In summary, we presented a novel interdisciplinary method that integrates metabolomics and global metabolic network analysis to visualize metabolic network disturbances after SCI. Our study demonstrated the systems biological study paradigm that integration of 1H-NMR, metabolomics, and global metabolic network analysis is useful to visualize complex metabolic disturbances after severe SCI. Furthermore, our findings may provide a new quantitative injury severity evaluation model for clinical use.

  4. Establishment of quantitative severity evaluation model for spinal cord injury by metabolomic fingerprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Peng

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating event with a limited hope for recovery and represents an enormous public health issue. It is crucial to understand the disturbances in the metabolic network after SCI to identify injury mechanisms and opportunities for treatment intervention. Through plasma 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR screening, we identified 15 metabolites that made up an "Eigen-metabolome" capable of distinguishing rats with severe SCI from healthy control rats. Forty enzymes regulated these 15 metabolites in the metabolic network. We also found that 16 metabolites regulated by 130 enzymes in the metabolic network impacted neurobehavioral recovery. Using the Eigen-metabolome, we established a linear discrimination model to cluster rats with severe and mild SCI and control rats into separate groups and identify the interactive relationships between metabolic biomarkers in the global metabolic network. We identified 10 clusters in the global metabolic network and defined them as distinct metabolic disturbance domains of SCI. Metabolic paths such as retinal, glycerophospholipid, arachidonic acid metabolism; NAD-NADPH conversion process, tyrosine metabolism, and cadaverine and putrescine metabolism were included. In summary, we presented a novel interdisciplinary method that integrates metabolomics and global metabolic network analysis to visualize metabolic network disturbances after SCI. Our study demonstrated the systems biological study paradigm that integration of 1H-NMR, metabolomics, and global metabolic network analysis is useful to visualize complex metabolic disturbances after severe SCI. Furthermore, our findings may provide a new quantitative injury severity evaluation model for clinical use.

  5. Soluble toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2) is increased in saliva of children with dental caries

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Alyssa; Blackburn, Corinne; Chin, Judith; Srinivasan, Mythily

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries is the most common microbial disease affecting mankind. Caries risk assessment methods, identification of biomarkers and vaccine development strategies are being emphasized to control the incidence of the largely preventable disease. Pattern recognition receptors such as the toll like receptors (TLR) have been implicated as modulators of host-microbial interactions. Soluble TLR-2 and its co-receptor, CD14 identified in saliva can bind the cell wall components of cario...

  6. Metabolomic profiles delineate signature metabolic shifts during estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in rat by GC-TOF/MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ma

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a complicated and multi-factorial disease. To study the metabolic profiles and pathways activated in osteoporosis, Eight rats were oophorectomized (OVX group to represent postmenopausal osteoporosis and the other eight rats were sham operated (Sham group to be the control. The biochemical changes were assessed with metabolomics using a gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Metabolomic profile using serial blood samples obtained prior to and at different time intervals after OVX were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA and Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA. The conventional indicators (bone mineral density, serum Bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP and N-telopeptide of type I collagen (NTx of osteoporosis in rats were also determined simultaneously. In OVX group, the metabolomics method could describe the endogenous changes of the disease more sensitively and systematically than the conventional criteria during the progression of osteoporosis. Significant metabolomic difference was also observed between the OVX and Sham groups. The metabolomic analyses of rat plasma showed that levels of arachidonic acid, octadecadienoic acid, branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine, homocysteine, hydroxyproline and ketone bodies (3-Hydroxybutyric Acid significantly elevated, while levels of docosahexaenoic acid, dodecanoic acid and lysine significantly decreased in OVX group compared with those in the homeochronous Sham group. Considering such metabolites are closely related to the pathology of the postmenopausal osteoporosis, the results suggest that potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis or the pathogenesis of osteoporosis might be identified via metabolomic study.

  7. 1H NMR studies distinguish the water soluble metabolomic profiles of untransformed and RAS-transformed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Marks

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic profiling is an increasingly important method for identifying potential biomarkers in cancer cells with a view towards improved diagnosis and treatment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR provides a potentially noninvasive means to accurately characterize differences in the metabolomic profiles of cells. In this work, we use 1H NMR to measure the metabolomic profiles of water soluble metabolites extracted from isogenic control and oncogenic HRAS-, KRAS-, and NRAS-transduced BEAS2B lung epithelial cells to determine the robustness of NMR metabolomic profiling in detecting differences between the transformed cells and their untransformed counterparts as well as differences among the RAS-transformed cells. Unique metabolomic signatures between control and RAS-transformed cell lines as well as among the three RAS isoform-transformed lines were found by applying principal component analysis to the NMR data. This study provides a proof of principle demonstration that NMR-based metabolomic profiling can robustly distinguish untransformed and RAS-transformed cells as well as cells transformed with different RAS oncogenic isoforms. Thus, our data may potentially provide new diagnostic signatures for RAS-transformed cells.

  8. Metabolomics data normalization with EigenMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Karpievitch

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry has become one of the analytical platforms of choice for metabolomics studies. However, LC-MS metabolomics data can suffer from the effects of various systematic biases. These include batch effects, day-to-day variations in instrument performance, signal intensity loss due to time-dependent effects of the LC column performance, accumulation of contaminants in the MS ion source and MS sensitivity among others. In this study we aimed to test a singular value decomposition-based method, called EigenMS, for normalization of metabolomics data. We analyzed a clinical human dataset where LC-MS serum metabolomics data and physiological measurements were collected from thirty nine healthy subjects and forty with type 2 diabetes and applied EigenMS to detect and correct for any systematic bias. EigenMS works in several stages. First, EigenMS preserves the treatment group differences in the metabolomics data by estimating treatment effects with an ANOVA model (multiple fixed effects can be estimated. Singular value decomposition of the residuals matrix is then used to determine bias trends in the data. The number of bias trends is then estimated via a permutation test and the effects of the bias trends are eliminated. EigenMS removed bias of unknown complexity from the LC-MS metabolomics data, allowing for increased sensitivity in differential analysis. Moreover, normalized samples better correlated with both other normalized samples and corresponding physiological data, such as blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, exercise central augmentation pressure normalized to heart rate of 75, and total cholesterol. We were able to report 2578 discriminatory metabolite peaks in the normalized data (p<0.05 as compared to only 1840 metabolite signals in the raw data. Our results support the use of singular value decomposition-based normalization for metabolomics data.

  9. Análise da saliva de pacientes com ardência bucal por espectroscopia de Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR)

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Lais Morandini [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    The optical biopsy techniques consist in the analysis of tissues through its physical properties. Among these techniques, there is a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, which has been used to identify patterns of molecular changes through vibrational modes. The aim of this study was to evaluate by FT-IR spectroscopy saliva samples from 14 patients complaining of burning mouth aiming to study global biochemical changes and compare the saliva of 14 patients without any complaint, m...

  10. Human Saliva Collection Devices for Proteomics: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in the interest and adaptation of saliva as a diagnostic specimen over the last decade, and in the last few years in particular, there have been major developments involving the application of saliva as a clinically relevant specimen. Saliva provides a “window” into the oral and systemic health of an individual, and like other bodily fluids, saliva can be analyzed and studied to diagnose diseases. With the advent of new, more sensitive technologies to detect smaller concentrations of analytes in saliva relative to blood levels, there have been a number of critical developments in the field that we will describe. In particular, recent advances in standardized saliva collection devices that were not available three to four years ago, have made it easy for safe, simple, and non-invasive collection of samples to be carried out from patients. With the availability of these new technologies, we believe that in the next decade salivary proteomics will make it possible to predict and diagnose oral as well as systemic diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases, among others. The aim of this article is to review recent developments and advances in the area of saliva specimen collection devices and applications that will advance the field of proteomics.

  11. Determination of ovulation in women using saliva ferning test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riska Mutia Ersyari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Every human being experiences growth and development, starting from childhood to adulthood. Women who have entered puberty will experience monthly menstrual cycle. One phase of the menstrual cycle is ovulation or the fertile phase of a woman. The fertile period is the period in which there is an egg ready to be fertilized by sperm. At the time of fertility, there is an increase in the amount of estrogen and progesterone hormones. Increase in these hormones is also found in saliva. Saliva as a biological fluid in the body can be used as a diagnostic fluid. Woman’s fertile period can be assessed from the saliva. Saliva containing high estrogen hormones can form a ferning picture on saliva dried on object glass. The type of research is the study of literature. A literature study was conducted to discuss the determining of the fertile woman with saliva ferning test. The results of previous studies showed the existence of differences in saliva pictures at the time of the fertile period and the infertile period. Salivary ferning was very clearly seen in the woman’s fertile period.

  12. [Serology of the human immunodeficiency virus in saliva].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcaba, V; Fernández, E; Rodríguez Junquera, M; García Amorín, Z; Alfonso, J; García Alonso, S

    1993-07-03

    The presence of immunoglobulins in saliva has allowed it to be proven that they are specific against certain antigens. Antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been observed in saliva. The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection of the same by commercial enzymoinmmunoassay (EIA) and standardize the technique. In 78 intravenous drug user patients the presence of antibodies against HIV in serum and saliva were determined by recombinant EIA (Abbott HIV-1/HIV-2 recombinant EIA). The determinations in saliva were made taking volumes of 10 and 50 microliters. In 43 patients the presence of antibodies against HIV-1 was demonstrated in serum, 42 of which were positive in saliva in the determination with 50 microliters and 16 with 10 microliters. No false positives were reported. With the use of 50 microliters of saliva the test showed a sensitivity of 0.98, specificity of 1, predictive value of a positive result of 1, predictive value of negative result of 0.98 and diagnostic efficacy of 0.99. The determination of antibodies against HIV in saliva in intravenous drug users is a highly sensitive and specific method with the use of volumes of 50 microliters in the tests.

  13. Quantitative analysis of differentially expressed saliva proteins in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Nawei; Zhang, Zhenyu [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Feng, Shan [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wang, Qingtao [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Malamud, Daniel [NYU College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010 (United States); Deng, Haiteng, E-mail: dht@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-04-24

    Highlights: ► A high-throughput method for profiling and quantification of the differentially expressed proteins in saliva samples was developed. ► Identified that DMBT1, S100A7, S100A8, S100A9 and alpha defensin were up-regulated in saliva from HIV-1 seropositive patients. ► Established analytical strategies are translatable to the clinical setting. -- Abstract: In the present study, we have established a new methodology to analyze saliva proteins from HIV-1-seropositive patients before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and seronegative controls. A total of 593 and 601 proteins were identified in the pooled saliva samples from 5 HIV-1 subjects and 5 controls, respectively. Forty-one proteins were found to be differentially expressed. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed salivary proteins showed an increase of antimicrobial proteins and decrease of protease inhibitors upon HIV-1 infection. To validate some of these differentially expressed proteins, a high-throughput quantitation method was established to determine concentrations of 10 salivary proteins in 40 individual saliva samples from 20 seropositive patients before HAART and 20 seronegative subjects. This method was based on limited protein separation within the zone of the stacking gel of the 1D SDS PAGE and using isotope-coded synthetic peptides as internal standards. The results demonstrated that a combination of protein profiling and targeted quantitation is an efficient method to identify and validate differentially expressed salivary proteins. Expression levels of members of the calcium-binding S100 protein family and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) were up-regulated while that of Mucin 5B was down-regulated in HIV-1 seropositive saliva samples, which may provide new perspectives for monitoring HIV-infection and understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 infectivity.

  14. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human saliva and semen stains--results of a third collaborative EDNAP exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Claus; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J

    2013-01-01

    A third collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling was organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP). Twenty saliva and semen stains, four dilution series (10-0.01 µl saliva, 5-0.01 µl semen) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework...... samples of human or non-human origin were analyzed by 20 participating laboratories using an RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction method. Two novel mRNA multiplexes were used: a saliva triplex (HTN3, STATH and MUC7) and a semen pentaplex (PRM1, PRM2, PSA, SEMG1 and TGM4). The laboratories used......), but allowed an STR profile of the stain donor to be obtained as well. The method proved to be reproducible and sensitive, with as little as 0.05 µl saliva or semen, using different analysis strategies. Additionally, we demonstrated the ability to positively identify the presence of saliva and semen, as well...

  15. Distinct properties of proteases and nucleases in the gut, salivary gland and saliva of southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Bonning, Bryony C

    2016-06-10

    Stink bugs negatively impact numerous plant species of agricultural and horticultural importance. While efforts to develop effective control measures are underway, the unique digestive physiology of these pests presents a significant hurdle for either protein- or nucleotide-based management options. Here we report the comparative biochemical and proteomic characterization of proteases and nucleases from the gut, salivary gland and saliva of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula. The pH optimum for protease activity was acidic (5 to 6) in the gut with the primary proteases being cysteine proteases, and alkaline (8 to 9) in the saliva and salivary gland with the primary proteases being serine proteases. The serine proteases in saliva differ biochemically from trypsin and chymotrypsin, and the cathepsins in the gut and saliva showed distinct properties in inhibitor assays. Nuclease activity (DNase, RNase, dsRNase) was concentrated in the salivary gland and saliva with negligible activity in the gut. The most abundant proteins of the gut (530) and salivary gland (631) identified by proteomic analysis included four gut proteases along with eight proteases and one nuclease from the salivary gland. Understanding of N. viridula digestive physiology will facilitate the design of new strategies for management of this significant pest.

  16. Fish mucus metabolome reveals fish life-history traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter, M.; Sasal, P.; Banaigs, B.; Lecchini, D.; Lecellier, G.; Tapissier-Bontemps, N.

    2017-06-01

    Fish mucus has important biological and ecological roles such as defense against fish pathogens and chemical mediation among several species. A non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomic approach was developed to study gill mucus of eight butterflyfish species in Moorea (French Polynesia), and the influence of several fish traits (geographic site and reef habitat, species taxonomy, phylogeny, diet and parasitism levels) on the metabolic variability was investigated. A biphasic extraction yielding two fractions (polar and apolar) was used. Fish diet (obligate corallivorous, facultative corallivorous or omnivorous) arose as the main driver of the metabolic differences in the gill mucus in both fractions, accounting for 23% of the observed metabolic variability in the apolar fraction and 13% in the polar fraction. A partial least squares discriminant analysis allowed us to identify the metabolites (variable important in projection, VIP) driving the differences between fish with different diets (obligate corallivores, facultative corallivores and omnivorous). Using accurate mass data and fragmentation data, we identified some of these VIP as gl