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Sample records for safety training basic

  1. Safety Training: Basic safety courses

    CERN Document Server

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Safety Training: Basic safety courses Due to the 50th anniversary events, basic safety courses are cancelled  during  week 43. We remind that in general, courses take place each Tuesday morning in French and Tuesday afternoon in English in Bdg.65-1-003. The duration of the course is 1h30. There are two half day sessions: 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. in French, and 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. in English. Thanks for your  understanding.  SC-DI FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch

  2. Safety Training: basic safety and access courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the basic safety courses is to increase awareness for everyone working on the CERN site (CERN staff, associates, outside companies, students and apprentices) of the various hazards existing on site, and how to recognise and avoid them. Safety course changes The current organisation of basic safety courses is changing. There will be two main modifications: the organisation of the courses and the implementation of a specific new training course for the LHC machine during the LHC tests and hardware commissioning phase. Organisational changes This concerns the existing basic safety training, currently called level 1, level 2 and level 3. Under the new procedure, a video will be projected in registration building 55 and will run every day at 14.00 and 15.00 in English. The duration of the video will be 50 minutes. The course contents will be the same as the slides currently used, plus a video showing real situations. With this new organization, participants will systematically follow...

  3. Safety Training: Basic Safety and Access Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Vignes

    2005-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the basic safety courses is to increase awareness for everyone working on the CERN site (CERN staff, associates, outside companies, students and apprentices) of the various existing on-site hazards, and how to recognize and avoid them. Safety course changes The current organization for basic safety courses is changing. There will be two main modifications: the organization of the courses and the implementation of a specific new training course for the LHC machine during the LHC tests and hardware commissioning phase. Organizational changes This concerns the existing basic safety training, currently called level1, level2 and level3. Under the new procedure, a video will be projected in registration building 55 and will run every day at 14.00 and 15.00 in English. The duration of the video will be 50 minutes. The course contents will be the same as the slides currently used, plus a video showing real situations. With this new organization, attendees will systematically follow the...

  4. Safety Training: Basic safety courses available everyday in building 55

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    One month ago, SC launched the new organization for basic safety courses. A video lasting 50 minutes runs daily at 14.00 and 15.00 in the registration building. The first session started on 13 October. For your information, since the video was first shown, 260 people have attended the English basic safety course. This means an average of 60 people per week. SC would like to thank the Departments who permitted this project to reach its goal, and particularly IT, TS and FI. The French version of this course will run daily from 30 November , at 9:00 am and at 10:00 am. SC would like to thank you all in advance for contributing to change the old habits of the past organization by encouraging people you work with to follow the safety courses upon arrival, and not only on Tuesdays. For more information, please go to the following link: http://safety-commission.web.cern.ch/safety-commission/SC-site/sc_pages/training/basic.html FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING safety.training@cern.ch

  5. Training safely, Training safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is the basic requirement of maritime safety education to guarantee the safety of teaching operation while training the crew's occupation safety capability. Marine Training Center of Shanghai Maritime University has undertaken the practical teaching of "marine survival" for many years and come up with the whole safety procedures of training. Based on the requirements of SOLAS convention and regulations of STCW over crew training, this paper introduces the safety allocation, utilization and maintenance of teaching equipments. Through the investigation of the safety situation of students' practical operation, the safety teaching method named "four in one" has been put forward, which includes the pre-teaching safety precaution, the whole monitor during the teaching process, the post-teaching summary evaluation, and the reset and standby of teaching facilities. Finally, during the learning and training of "marine survival", crews and students are called on to place priority on personal safety rather than acquisition of knowledge and skills. Only in this way can they be capable of self-protection and protection of others in the career of seafaring.

  6. The Investigation of the Effects of Life Safety Basic Training Program on the Knowledge of Safety of Six-Year Old Children

    OpenAIRE

    Medera HALMATOV; Halmatov, Sultanberk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of Basic Life Safety Training Program on the life safety knowledge of children those trained by the researchers. The program was developed for six to seven-year-old children and composed of twelve different lectures. The survey took place at two preschool educational facility in Agri region and applied to a total of 30 children, i.e., 18 girls and 12 boys, studying in a six-year-old learning group.  The final intent of the program i...

  7. Safety training

    CERN Document Server

    SC Unit

    2009-01-01

    Habilitation électrique A course entitled "Habilitation électrique pour personnel de laboratoire" (electrical safety qualification for laboratory personnel) will be held on 22 and 23 June. Registration by e-mail to isabelle.cusato@cern.ch. Explosion Hazards in the handling of flammable solvents and gases A course entitled "Explosion Hazards in the handling of flammable solvents and gases" given in French will be held on 18-19 June 2009. This course is obligatory for all FGSOs at CERN, and it is recommended for anyone handling flammable gas or solvents. To sign up please visit this page. For more information please contact Isabelle Cusato, tel. 73811.

  8. Criticality safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Criticality safety training is an important element of the Plutonium Facility safety program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Training consists of student self-study handbooks and hands-on performance-based training in a mock-up laboratory containing gloveboxes, trolley conveyor system, and self-monitoring instruments. A 10-minute video tape and lecture was presented to describe how training in this area is conducted.

  9. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  10. Advanced Messaging Concept Development Basic Safety Message

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Contains all Basic Safety Messages (BSMs) collected during the Advanced Messaging Concept Development (AMCD) field testing program. For this project, all of the Part...

  11. Seattle I-405 Simulated Basic Safety Message

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Data provided consists of Basic Safety Messages (BSM) generated by the Trajectory Converter Analysis (TCA) tool with input from VISSIM calibrated simulations of the...

  12. 46 CFR 129.220 - Basic safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basic safety. 129.220 Section 129.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS General Requirements § 129.220 Basic safety. (a) Electrical equipment and installations must be suitable...

  13. Fire Safety Training Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Dept. of Fire and Rescue Services, Rockville, MD. Div. of Fire Prevention.

    Designed for a community fire education effort, particularly in which local volunteers present general information on fire safety to their fellow citizens, this workbook contains nine lessons. Included are an overview of the household fire problem; instruction in basic chemistry and physics of fire, flammable liquids, portable fire extinguishers,…

  14. Safety training news

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

      SELF-RESCUE MASK The "Self-Rescue Mask" face-to-face training course has been replaced by a revised version. This measure concerns both the initial and the refresher course. For personnel who have successfully attended the initial or refresher Self-Rescue Mask training within the last three years, their Self-Rescue Mask training will still be valid.  The course description and registration form can be found in the training catalogue on the Safety Training Service’s website or catalogue. The Self-Rescue Mask training course is a mandatory prerequisite for following the new "Portable ODH Detector" e-learning course.   PORTABLE ODH DETECTOR A new e-learning awareness course, "Portable ODH Detector", is available via the SIR application on CERN’s intranet. Personnel requiring a portable ODH detector of the DRÄGER x-am 5000 type to allowed access th...

  15. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  16. Validity of your safety awareness training

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2010-01-01

    AIS is setting up an automatic e-mail reminder system for safety training. You are invited to forward this message to everyone concerned. Reminder: Please check the validity of your Safety courses Since April 2009 the compulsory basic Safety awareness courses (levels 1, 2 and 3) have been accessible on a "self-service" basis on the web (see CERN Bulletin). Participants are required to pass a test at the end of each course. The test is valid for 3 years so courses must be repeated on a regular basis. A system of automatic e-mail reminders already exists for level 4 courses on SIR and will be extended to the other levels shortly. The number of levels you are required to complete depends on your professional category. Activity Personnel concerned Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4     Basic safety Basic Safety ...

  17. Safety research basic plan of JNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) formally succeeded to Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) on October, 1 1998. This report describes the basic plan for major program of JNC which consists of two parts: management philosophy of the new institute and the latest revised medium term program. In the first part, the primary mission of JNC is to perform its R and D concentrating on fast breeder reactor and its fuel cycle, and treatment and disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, while at the same time giving special consideration to safety. In the second, individual programs in the new basic plan are discussed in detail. The outline and schedule of each program are also attached in the table form. (H. Itami)

  18. Medical Holography for Basic Anatomy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    and anatomy course directors. Clinical Anatomy , 12(1), 55-65. de Jong, T. (2010). Cognitive load theory , educational research, and instructional design...Interservicel!ndustry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (l/ITSEC) 2013 Medical Holography for Basic Anatomy Training Matthew Hackett...to the complex 3D structures inherent in human anatomy . One potential solution to this problem is to present medical content in three dimensions

  19. All aboard the Safety Train(ing)!

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    Would you like to influence CERN’s safety courses? Do you want to help build better training courses? If your answer is yes to one or both of these questions: now is the time! The Safety Training section is looking for volunteers from the whole CERN community to test new courses before they go online for all members of the personnel.    The Safety Training section is redesigning the CERN e-learning package in order to adopt a more educational approach and to make the courses a more enjoyable experience. The section is now calling for volunteers. “We know we can do much more with testers’ help and feedback,” explains Christoph Balle, Safety Training section leader. “By having the end users actively involved in the process, we’ll achieve our goal of communicating safety in the best possible way. As the volunteers will play an active role in the development of the courses, they will be providing a service to the whole community.&am...

  20. Safety Training: "Manual Handling" course in September

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2016-01-01

    The next "Manual Handling" course will be given, in French, on 26 September 2016. This course is designed for anyone required to carry out manual handling of loads in the course of their work.   The main objective of this course is to adopt and apply the basic principles of physical safety and economy of effort. There are places available. If you are interested in following this course, please fill an EDH training request via our catalogue. 

  1. Microfinance safety net: back to basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Deborah; Shi, Qiuhu; Murthy, Padmini

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition among families living in poorer communities has increased in the past two decades. Initiatives advocated by the World Bank include microfinance programs. Research attributing the success of these programs however, has mixed results. In this article we investigate how additional income provided by microfinance is associated with increased consumption of nondurables for households in rural villages in Bangladesh. For our purposes we compare consumption or money expensed on food, medicine, doctor fees, and smoking. Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) procedure was used to address multiple comparison issues among households. Our findings reinforce the importance of microfinance credit as a safety net. Access to additional income for poor villagers improves the consumption of basic needs as expected, regardless of how many loans are taken; consumption of "bads" remains virtually the same.

  2. Laser safety tools and training

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Lasers perform many unique functions in a plethora of applications, but there are many inherent risks with this continually burgeoning technology. Laser Safety: Tools and Training presents simple, effective ways for users in a variety of facilities to evaluate the hazards of any laser procedure and ensure they are following documented laser safety standards.Designed for use as either a stand-alone volume or a supplement to Laser Safety Management, this text includes fundamental laser and laser safety information and critical laser use information rarely found in a single source. The first lase

  3. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications

  4. 29 CFR 1960.56 - Training of safety and health specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.56 Training of safety and health specialists. (a) Each agency... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of safety and health specialists. 1960.56 Section...

  5. 29 CFR 1960.58 - Training of collateral duty safety and health personnel and committee members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.58 Training of... training shall include: The agency occupational safety and health program; section 19 of the Act; Executive...

  6. 29 CFR 1960.57 - Training of safety and health inspectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.57 Training of safety and health inspectors. Each agency shall... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of safety and health inspectors. 1960.57 Section...

  7. Improving basic life support training for medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Lami M; Nair P; Gadhvi K

    2016-01-01

    Mariam Lami, Pooja Nair, Karishma GadhviFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, London, UKAbstract: Questions have been raised about basic life support (BLS) training in medical education. This article addresses the research evidence behind why BLS training is inadequate and suggests recommendations for improving BLS training for medical students.Keywords: medical education, basic life support

  8. Safety Training: Access rights underground and safety training

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    This is to remind all CERN Group Leaders/GLIMOS of their obligation to ensure that members of their group/experiment or personnel belonging to firms holding contracts under their responsibility have received the necessary training/instruction in safety before start of work. Access underground will only be authorized upon attendance at safety courses level 1, 2 and 3, provided by the CERN Fire Brigade. All persons not having attended these courses will be locked out. All individuals concerned, as well as their Group Leaders/GLIMOS should check the access rights of their staff at the URL: https://hrt.cern.ch/servlet/cern.hrt.Access.Access In case you or your collaborators do not have the requested authorisation, you/they must attend the safety courses provided every Tuesday by the Fire Brigade or the additional courses on: 16 June, course given in French, 9 a.m. - 12 a.m., AB Auditorium I (Bldg. 6/2-024), 17 June, course given in English, 2 p.m. - 5 p.m., AB Auditorium I (Bldg. 6/2-024). Formation en SEC...

  9. Integrating system safety into the basic systems engineering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    The basic elements of a systems engineering process are given along with a detailed description of what the safety system requires from the systems engineering process. Also discussed is the safety that the system provides to other subfunctions of systems engineering.

  10. Opportunistic Sensing in Train Safety Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Johan; Bakker, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Train safety systems are complex and expensive, and changing them requires huge investments. Changes are evolutionary and small. Current developments, like faster - high speed - trains and a higher train density on the railway network, have initiated research on safety systems that can cope with the

  11. Highway Maintenance Equipment Operator: Basic Core. Training Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perky, Sandra Dutreau; And Others

    This basic core curriculum is part of a three-part series of instructional guides designed for use in teaching a course in highway maintenance equipment operation. Addressed in the individual units of the curriculum, after an orientation unit, are safety; basic math; basic hand tools; procedures for loading. lashing, and unloading equipment;…

  12. Private Security Training. Phase 1: Basic. Instructor Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This basic module on private security training was designed under the direction of the Oklahoma Council on Law Enforcement Education and Training to teach basic skills necessary for entry-level employment in this field. This module contains six instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) interpreting the Oklahoma Security Guard and…

  13. Safety Training: places available in October 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. Safety Training, HSE Unit safety-training@cern.ch Title of the course EN Title of the course FR Date Hours Language Chemical Safety ATEX Habilitation - Level 2 Habilitation ATEX - Niveau 2 16-Oct-14 to 17-Oct-14 9:00 - 17:30 French Cryogenic Safety Cryogenic Safety - Fundamentals Sécurité Cryogénie - Fondamentaux 23-Oct-14 10:00 - 12:00 English Cryogenic Safety - Helium Transfer Sécurité Cryogénie - Transfert d'hélium 30-Oct-14 9:30 - 12:00 English Electrical Safety Habilitation Electrique - Electrician Low Voltage - Initial Habilitation électrique - Électricien basse tension - Initial 02-Oct-14 to 06-Oct-14 9:00 - 17:30 English 20-Oct-14 to 22-Oct-14 9:00 -...

  14. CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02

    The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

  15. Safety Training: places available in June

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. June 2012 (alphabetical order) Champs magnétiques 08-JUN-12, 09h30 – 12h00, en anglais Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Cherry-picker training) 11-JUN-12 to 12-JUN-12, 08.00 – 17.00, in French (with possibility to have the handouts in English) Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace 14-JUN-12, 09.00 – 12.00, in French First Aiders - Basic Course 06-JUN-12 to 07-JUN-12, 08.00 – 17.00, in French (total : 1.5 days) First Aiders - Refresher Course 07-JUN-12, 13.00 – 17.00, in French 12-JUN-12, 08.00 – 12.00, in English 12-JUN-12, 13.00 – 17.00, in English Habilitation ATEX niveau 2 (ATEX certification –  level 2) 07-JUN-12 to 08-JUN-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation &eacut...

  16. Safety training: places available in September 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   Please note that there are 7 places left on the “Territorial Safety Officer (TSO) – Initial” course on September 23-25, 2014 (in French).

  17. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  18. The role of general practice in postgraduate basic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Kodal, Troels; Qvesel, Dorte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, there has been growing interest in the role of primary care in postgraduate training. Relatively little has been published about benefits of early and sustained postgraduate basic training in general practice, especially for doctors with other ambitions than family...... understanding of the health care system but also strengthens the ability to collaborate with general practitioners upon entering another specialty. It also develops important medical and communicative competences. The training in general practice is considered beneficial for the development of professional...... identity. The educational environment in general practice is rated highly. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of family medicine in postgraduate basic training should be considered for all doctors....

  19. Training Groups: A Basic Life Cycle Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadbourne, Joan

    1980-01-01

    Describes group training model that differs from the traditional T-group model in structure, leadership, and assumptions about learning. The life-cycle model is based on situational leadership, differential structures based on group maturity, and integration of conceptual and experiential learning. (Author)

  20. Safety Training - places available in October

    CERN Document Server

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. October 2012 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) – Cherry-picker driving 08-OCT-12 to 09-OCT-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French 11-OCT-12 to 12-OCT-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French 17-OCT-12 to 18-OCT-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French 29-OCT-12 to 30-OCT-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French With the possibility to have the handouts in English Echafaudages - Réception, conformité (Scaffolding - reception, conformity) 24-OCT-12 to 26-OCT-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in French (location: Domarin, French department 38) First Aiders - Basic Course 04-OCT-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel non électricien (non electricians) 03-OCT-12 to 04-OCT-12, 9.00 – 17.30 (total 1.5 day), in English...

  1. Safety Training: places available in April

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. April 2012 (alphabetical order) Noise - Understanding the risks 18-APR-12, 10.00 – 12.30, in French Conduite de chariots élévateurs / Driving of forklifts 23-APR-12 to 24-APR-12, 09.00 – 17.30, in French (with possibility to have the handouts in English) First-aiders – Basic course 23-APR-12 to 24-APR-12, 08.30 – 17.30 and 08.30 – 12.30 (total: one day and a half), in French First Aiders - Refresher Course 24-APR-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique personnel non électricien / Habilitation électrique for non electricians 02-APR-12 to 03-APR-12, 09.00 – 17.30 and 09.00 – 12.30 (total: one day and a half), in French Manipulation d’extincteurs : exercices sur feux réels / Use of fire extinguisher ...

  2. Safety Training: places available in March 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle Cusato, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registration, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   March 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (cherry-picker driving) 18-MAR-13 to 19-MAR-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English First-Aiders – Basic course 14-MAR-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in French 21-MAR-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in English 28-MAR-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse et haute tension (habilitation électrique for electricians in low and high voltage) 11-MAR-13 to 22-MAR-13 (total hours : 32), 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel non électricien (electrical habilitation for non electricians) 27-MAR-13 to 28-MAR-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique perso...

  3. Safety Training: places available in June 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   June 2013 (alphabetical order) First Aiders - Basic Course 13-JUN-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in English First Aiders - Refresher Course 06-JUN-13, 8.15 – 12.30, in French 06-JUN-13, 13.15 – 17.30, in French Habilitation ATEX niveau 1 (Habilitation ATEX level 1) 28-JUN-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse et haute tensions (habilitation électrique for electricians in low and high voltage) 10-JUN-13 to 13-JUN-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel non électricien (habilitation électrique for non electricians) 03-JUN-13 (afternoon) to 04-JUN-13 (full day), 9.00 – 17.30, in English Laser Experts 03-JUN-13 to 04-JUN-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Laser Users 28-JUN-...

  4. Safety Training: places available in April 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   April 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (cherry-picker driving) 15-APR-13 to 16-APR-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French, with handouts in English Être TSO au CERN 09-APR-13 to 11-APR-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French First-Aiders – Basic Course 18-APR-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in French First-Aiders – Refresher Course 04-APR-13, 8.15 – 12.30, in French 04-APR-13, 13.15 – 17.30, in French Habilitation ATEX niveau 2 (ATEX habilitation level 2) 11-APR-13 to 12-APR-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (electricial habilitation for electricians in low voltage) 08-APR-13 to 10-APR-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation &eac...

  5. Risk analysis to optimise safety during basic tunnel design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molag, M.; Jansen, C.M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The risk analysis to select the preferred basic tunnel design for the tunnels in the High Speed Train Link South from Amsterdam to Antwerp is described. The risk analysis has been split up in two stages: a broad qualitative risk analysis and a quantitative risk analysis. The results of the

  6. Radiation protection education and training in Germany in the frame of the draft of the EU BSS (basic safety standards): how to deal with the RPE (radiation protection expert) and the RPO (radiation protection officer); Strahlenschutzaus- und -weiterbildung in Deutschland im Kontext des Entwurfs der EU-BSS. Wie gehen wir mit dem RPE und dem RPO um?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Ulla [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Holl, Matthias [Strahlenschutzschulung, Andernach (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    The amendment of the EU-BSS (basic safety standards) is of great importance for the practical radiation protection concept. In the BSS the main functions in radiation protection and the respective requirements are defined for the radiation protection education and training system. This is supposed to allow the harmonization and comparability of the different systems established in the different European member states in order to perform mutual approvals of the education and training. The authors describe the German radiation protection organizations and the mandatory qualifications and responsibilities and compared these with the EU BSS requirements.

  7. Final report on the safety assessment of Basic Blue 99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    both reverse and frameshift mutations, but did not induce mutations in Escherichia coli or in any mammalian cells tested. In a modified repeated-insult patch test (RIPT), no volunteers had any reaction to Basic Blue 99 after a 1-h occlusive challenge. Case reports have documented positive patch test results to 1% Basic Blue 99 in three patients. A current review of the hair dye epidemiology literature identified that use of direct hair dyes, although not the focus in all investigations, appears to have little evidence of an association with cancer or other adverse events. The Panel recognizes that hair dye epidemiology studies do not address the safety of individual hair dyes. Based on the available safety test data on Basic Blue 99, however, the Panel determined that this ingredient would not likely have carcinogenic potential as used in hair dyes. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel concluded that Basic Blue 99 is safe as a hair dye ingredient in the practice of use and concentration as described in this safety assessment.

  8. Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is Comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, L. D.; Løfgren, Bo; Jessen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study.......Pediatric Basic Life Support Self-training is comparable to Instructor-led Training: A randomized manikin study....

  9. Radiation protection and safety of radiation sources international basic safety standards

    CERN Document Server

    International Atomic Energy Agency. Vienna

    2014-01-01

    The Board of Governors of the IAEA first approved Basic Safety Standards in June 1962; they were published by the IAEA as IAEA Safety Series No. 9. A revised edition was issued in 1967. A third revision was published by the IAEA as the 1982 Edition of IAEA Safety Series No. 9 ; this edition was jointly sponsored by the IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and the WHO. The next edition was International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, published by the IAEA as IAEA Safety Series No. 115 in February 1996, and jointly sponsored by the FAO, IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO and the WHO.

  10. Study of basic-life-support training for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivilaithon, Winchana; Amnaumpatanapon, Kumpon; Limjindaporn, Chitlada; Imsuwan, Intanon; Daorattanachai, Kiattichai

    2015-03-01

    To study about attitude and knowledge regarding basic-life-support among college students outside medical system. The cross-sectional study in the emergency department of Thammasat Hospital. The authors included college students at least aged 18 years old and volunteers to be study subjects. The authors collected data about attitudes and knowledge in performing basic-life-support by using set of questionnaires. 250 college students participated in the two hours trainingprogram. Most ofparticipants (42.4%) were second-year college students, of which 50 of 250 participants (20%) had trained in basic-life-support program. Twenty-seven of 250 participants (10.8%) had experience in basic-life-support outside the hospital. Most of participants had good attitude for doing basic-life-support. Participants had a significant improved score following training (mean score 8.66 and 12.34, respectively, pbasic-life-support to cardiac arrest patient. The training program in basic-life-support has significant impact on knowledge after training.

  11. State and prospects of basic computer training in engineering education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Arkhipov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic computer training is an important part of the fundamental training for engineers in each application area. The article shows that the purpose of such training has been always the formation of the basic theoretical concepts and practical skills to solve problems by programming with computers.All the formation periods and the following improvement of basic computer training were analyzed by the example of the National Research University «Moscow Power Engineering Institute» (NRU MPEI. Special role of the structured programming technology is mentioned, the use of which allows you to effectively develop easy understood algorithms and computer programs with a minimal number of errors.Particular attention is drawn to the serious methodological support in the 80th (the last century, the basic computer training of students by the Ministry of Higher Education of the USSR and the Research Institute of Higher School Problems. The important role of methodical councils of universities on the computer technology application to coordinate in those years the basic computer training at the University is mentioned. The article shows the new teaching methods of the main discipline with generally accepted today in Russia term “Informatics”. This method was developed in the National Research University «Moscow Power Engineering Institute» at the Applied Mathematics Department, providing the basic computer training of students in 1–2 semesters. This new teaching method has such a «reference point» as fundamental programming concepts «task – method of this task solution – algorithm for solving the task – computer program».The main tasks of the discipline of the basic computer training were defined:– formation of students’ formal logic, algorithmic thinking;– learning of modern technology of structured programming, providing efficient development of algorithms and computer programs;– formation of practical skills of designing

  12. Safety, training focus of combined organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toop, L.

    2006-03-15

    This article presented details of Enform, a company that coordinates safety programs and training for new employees in the oil and gas industry. Enform was created when the Petroleum Industry Training Services merged with the Canadian Petroleum Safety Council. The aim of Enform is to ensure continuous improvements in health and safety within the industry by reducing working injuries and promoting health and safety practices. The companies merged to eliminate duplication of services and allow associates further opportunities for advanced training. In 2005, Enform trained an estimated 155,000 students, and a number of new courses were introduced and updated. A franchise program was extended and a training council was formed to offer direction and guidance to the oil industry. Enform focuses on sharing information among companies, as well as working to harmonize safety regulations across provincial borders. A task force was recently created by the company with a specific focus on drug and alcohol abuse. Other concerns include driver safety and driver interactions with wildlife. Enform is mainly focused on the traditional oil industry, and has had little entry into the oil sands industry. It was concluded that increased activity in the oil and gas industry will remain Enform's biggest challenge in the next few years. Plans for Enform's increased involvement in the offshore oil and gas industry were also discussed. 4 figs.

  13. Safety Training: a right or an obligation?

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    CERN’s Safety Training programme currently offers around 50 classroom courses and 17 e-learning courses. Although anyone can attend any of these courses, some are compulsory for everyone working at CERN. In particular, “CERN Safety Introduction” and “Safety during LS1” are compulsory for all new arrivals.   The "Self-Rescue Mask" training course. Photo: Christoph Balle. However, depending on the type of activities, the type of workstation, the role you have been assigned (TSO, project leader, etc.) and/or the area where you will be working (e.g. confined spaces), you might be required to follow additional safety training provided by CERN. In accordance with the provisions of the CERN Safety Policy, members of the personnel must keep themselves informed of their obligations in terms of safety training and of the actions they must take to keep up to date. Most training courses are valid for three years, and as they reach the ...

  14. Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-09-06

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document.

  15. Training Methods and Training Instructors' Qualification Are Related to Recruits' Fitness Development During Basic Military Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Lilian; Hofstetter, Marie-Claire; Mäder, Urs; Wyss, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Adequate physical fitness is essential for successful military service. Military organizations worldwide therefore make continuous efforts to improve their army's physical training (PT) programs. To investigate the effect of the training methods and the qualification of PT instructors on the development of recruits' physical fitness, the present study compared the outcomes of 2 training groups. Both study groups participated in approximately 145 minutes per week of PT. The control group executed the standard army PT prepared and supervised by army PT instructors. Content of the PT in the intervention group was similar to that of the control group, but their training sessions' methods were different. Their training sessions were organized, prepared, and delivered by more and better-qualified supervisors (tertiary-educated physical education teachers). After 10 weeks of training, the participants of the intervention group experienced a significantly greater physical fitness improvement than those of the control group (positive change in endurance 32 and 17%, balance 30 and 21%, and core strength 74 and 45%, respectively). In both groups, the recruits with the lowest initial fitness levels significantly increased their performance. In the intervention group, but not the control, one-third of the recruits with the highest initial fitness levels were able to further improve their general fitness performance. This study demonstrates that the training methods and quality of instruction during PT sessions are relevant for recruits' fitness development in basic military training.

  16. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix A. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the course manual and materials.

  17. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

  18. Building Action for Stability in Communities (BASIC) : Training for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Action for Stability in Communities (BASIC) : Training for Community Planning (Philippines). The Philippines is the second largest country in Southeast Asia after Indonesia, and its population is set to increase by 70% within the next 45 years. Already the population density per square mile is more than twice the ...

  19. Building Action for Stability in Communities (BASIC) : Training for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Building Action for Stability in Communities (BASIC) : Training for Community Planning (Philippines). The Philippines is the second largest country in Southeast Asia after ... New website will help record vital life events to improve access to services for all. A new website and resource library will help improve developing ...

  20. Basic Skill Requirements for Selected Army Occupational Training Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nancy K.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Judgments of 126 military instructors on 129 candidate skills were factor analyzed to identify the basic cognitive skills soldiers must possess before entering the Army. Results suggest that for all occupational specialties studied, skills related to the learning process are as crucial as academic skills for successful training course completion.…

  1. SafetyNet. Human factors safety training on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauland, G.; Pedrali, M.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes user requirements to an Internet based distance learning system of human factors training, i.e. the SafetyNet prototype, within the aviation (pilots and air traffic control), maritime and medical domains. User requirements totraining have been elicited through 19 semi...

  2. Implementation of the INEEL safety analyst training standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. E. Hochhalter

    2000-04-28

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) safety analysis units at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) are in the process of implementing the recently issued INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107). Safety analyst training and qualifications are integral to the development and maintenance of core safety analysis capabilities. The INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard (STD-1107) was developed directly from EFCOG Training Subgroup draft safety analyst training plan template, but has been adapted to the needs and requirements of the INEEL safety analysis community. The implementation of this Safety Analyst Training Standard is part of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Implementation currently underway at the INEEL. The objective of this paper is to discuss (1) the INEEL Safety Analyst Training Standard, (2) the development of the safety analyst individual training plans, (3) the implementation issues encountered during this initial phase of implementation, (4) the solutions developed, and (5) the implementation activities remaining to be completed.

  3. Optimization of training load among weightlifters during pre-basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Orlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : develop and experimentally based methods of individualization of the training process weightlifters during pre-basic training for groups of first year students. Material : The study involved 20 weightlifters aged 12-13 years. To assess the level of special physical preparation of athletes were used control tests which are recommended curriculum in weightlifting. Results : Appropriateness optimize training load of athletes in the group of first year students in the preparatory and competitive period. Recommends the following training load: number of workouts in a week microcycle - 5; the ratio of general and special physical training is 55: 45%. Necessary to exclude training loads in classical exercises with intensity of 90%, 90%, and not to use the various drafts. Conclusions : It was found that the optimization of the training load weightlifters during pre-basic training, can significantly improve the competitive outcome athletes improve the technique of classical exercises, raise special physical preparedness and reduce injuries.

  4. Enhancing the Flight Safety Culture Through Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    In the 1970's, flight safety professionals became profoundly concerned about the prevalence of crew-caused accidents and incidents, and the role of human error in flight operations. As result, they initiated a change in the flight safety culture which has grown to significant proportions today. At the heart of the evolution were crew concepts such as flightdeck management, crew coordination, and cockpit resource management, concepts which seemed to target critical deficiencies. In themselves, the concepts were not new but their incorporation into training as a direct means of changing the flight safety culture was an untried, almost 'grassroots' approach. The targeted crew concepts and skills were not an integral part of the typical training program; the methods, curriculum, media, and even course content itself, would have to be developed and implemented from the bottom up. A familiar truism in the pilot culture is that you should 'Train the way you fly; Fly the way you train'. In short, training was expected to provide the pilot with practical operational skills that were consistent with the performance standards they were required to maintain and the operational demands they met on a daily basis. In short, one could not simply command crews to use good CRM; one would have to research and define these skills operationally as well as develop and implement a consistent and effective training program. Furthermore, one would need active support and collaboration among the research, industry and government communities in order to ensure acceptance and continued commitment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Optimization of training load among weightlifters during pre-basic training

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Orlov

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : develop and experimentally based methods of individualization of the training process weightlifters during pre-basic training for groups of first year students. Material : The study involved 20 weightlifters aged 12-13 years. To assess the level of special physical preparation of athletes were used control tests which are recommended curriculum in weightlifting. Results : Appropriateness optimize training load of athletes in the group of first year students in the preparatory and co...

  6. Safety Training Parks – Cooperative Contribution to Safety and Health Trainings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Arto; Pedersen, Louise Møller; Väyrynen, Seppo

    2017-01-01

    Recent debate regarding the possibility for decreasing the risk of accidents within the construction industry has emphasized the need for innovative training methods. Training should combine behavior- and culture-based approaches, simulate real-life situations, and involve multiple methods. The c...... commitment, a long-term perspective, and a strong safety climate are identified as preconditions for the STP concept to work....

  7. Availabilities in the June Safety Training sessions

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    A few places are still available on the safety courses mentioned below. Please consult the Safety training catalogue to obtain all the latest information and to register. Clearance for work with electrical equipment ("Habilitation électrique") for non-electricians (classroom-based course), 9 June, in French, 8 hours from 9.00 am to 5.30 pm (10 places available) Safety in Cryogenics level 1, 14 June, in English, 3 hours from, 9.00 am to 12 noon (5 places available) Lift-truck operation ("Conduite de chariots élévateurs"), 24-25 June, in French, 2 days from 8.00 am to 5.30 pm (3 places available).

  8. Safety Training: places available in the forthcoming sessions in May

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. MAY 2010: Confined spaces – for supervisors, 4 May, in French, 1 day, 09:00 – 17:30 Laser safety, 5 May, in French, 4 hours, 13:30 – 17:30 Radiological Protection, 7 May, in English, 4 hours, 13:30 – 17:30 Secourisme - Cours de recyclage, 7 May, in French, 4 hours, 08:30 – 12:30 Secourisme - Cours de recyclage, 7 May, in French, 4 hours, 12:30 – 17:30 Cherry-picker driving (basic course), 10-11 May, in French, 2 days, 08:00 – 17:30 Habilitation électrique : Personnel électricien effectuant des opérations du domaine de tension BTA, 10-11 May, in English, 2 days, 09:00 – 17:30 Biocell Training, 11 May, in French, 1.5 hour, 08:30 – 10:00 Biocell Training, 11 May, in French, 1.5 hour, 10:30 – 12:00 Radiological Protection, 11 May, in English, ...

  9. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in April

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in April. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Biocell Training 26-APR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 26-APR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) 28-APR-11 to 29-APR-11 (08.00 – 17.30) in French* Sécurité chimique – Introduction 29-APR-11 (09.00 – 11.30) in French (*) session in French with the possibility of receiving the documentation in English   By Isabelle Cusato (H...

  10. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in March

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in March. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Biocell Training 08-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 08-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 15-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 15-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 17-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 17-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in English 22-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 22-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 24-MAR-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 24-MAR-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 29-MAR...

  11. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in May

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle Cusato (HSE Unit)

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in March. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year.   Biocell Training 10-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 10-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 12-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 12-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in English 19-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in French 19-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in French 24-MAY-11 (08.30 – 10.00) in English 24-MAY-11 (10.30 – 12.00) in English   Champs Magnétiques 13-MAY-11 (09.30 – 11.30) in French...

  12. The training program in basic gymnastics jumps at the stage of initial training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Zaplatynska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: improving of the technical training of girls that are engaged in rhythmic gymnastics at the stage of initial training. Materials and Methods: for the development of a training program for jumping in athletes who are engaged in rhythmic gymnastics at the stage of initial training conducted analysis of scientific literature. Results: it was determined that the absorption of the rhythmic structure of elements greatly accelerates and facilitates the process of studying in a cyclic (athletics and acyclic sports (judo, wrestling. This is a prerequisite for the development of the training program of the jumps through assimilation rates their performance. These various methods of influence on the development of sense of rhythmic gymnasts at the stage of initial preparation and learning the rhythmic structure of the basic jumps. Conclusions: the program of teaching basic jumping for gymnasts at the stage of initial training, a variety of methods of influence on the development of sense of rhythm and learning the rhythmic structure of the elements was developed. The project of the training session for the development of a sense of rhythm and learning the rhythmic structure of the basic jumps was developed.

  13. Safety training for working youth: Methods used versus methods wanted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierold, Kristina M

    2016-04-07

    Safety training is promoted as a tool to prevent workplace injury; however, little is known about the safety training experiences young workers get on-the-job. Furthermore, nothing is known about what methods they think would be the most helpful for learning about safe work practices. To compare safety training methods teens get on the job to those safety training methods teens think would be the best for learning workplace safety, focusing on age differences. A cross-sectional survey was administered to students in two large high schools in spring 2011. Seventy percent of working youth received safety training. The top training methods that youth reported getting at work were safety videos (42%), safety lectures (25%), and safety posters/signs (22%). In comparison to the safety training methods used, the top methods youth wanted included videos (54%), hands-on (47%), and on-the-job demonstrations (34%). This study demonstrated that there were differences in training methods that youth wanted by age; with older youth seemingly wanting more independent methods of training and younger teens wanting more involvement. Results indicate that youth want methods of safety training that are different from what they are getting on the job. The differences in methods wanted by age may aid in developing training programs appropriate for the developmental level of working youth.

  14. Validation of a new basic virtual reality simulator for training of basic endoscopic skills: the SIMENDO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaasdonk, E G G; Stassen, L P S; Monteny, L J; Dankelman, J

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish content, face, concurrent, and the first step of construct validity of a new simulator, the SIMENDO, in order to determine its usefulness for training basic endoscopic skills. The validation started with an explanation of the goals, content, and features of the simulator (content validity). Then, participants from eight different medical centers consisting of experts (> or =100 laparoscopic procedures performed) and surgical trainees (reality (VR) trainer. Subsequently, they were asked to answer 28 structured questions about the simulator (face validity). Ratings were scored on a scale from 1 (very bad/useless) to 5 (excellent/very useful). Additional comments could be given as well. Furthermore, two experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, aimed at establishing concurrent validity, the training effect of a single-handed hand-eye coordination task in the simulator was compared with a similar task in a conventional box trainer and with the performance of a control group that received no training. In experiment 2 (first step of construct validity), the total score of task time, collisions, and path length of three consecutive runs in the simulator was compared between experts (>100 endoscopic procedures) and novices (no experience). A total of 75 participants (36 expert surgeons and 39 surgical trainees) filled out the questionnaire. Usefulness of tasks, features, and movement realism were scored between a mean value of 3.3 for depth perception and 4.3 for appreciation of training with the instrument. There were no significant differences between the mean values of the scores given by the experts and surgical trainees. In response to statements, 81% considered this VR trainer generally useful for training endoscopic techniques to residents, and 83% agreed that the simulator was useful to train hand-eye coordination. In experiment 1, the training effect for the single-handed task showed no significant difference between the

  15. Investigating attitude toward safety isuues among agricultural Jihad professionals with an emphasis on safety training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Karami

    2016-04-01

      Conclusion: Considering the importance of safety training, identifying the factors pertinent to agricultural experts' safety attitude would help safety experts to develop and implement strategies in order to reduce occupational accidents in this sector.

  16. Safety Training: places available in July - August 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   July - August 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Cherry-picker training) 01-JUL-13 to 02-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First-Aiders – Basic Course 31-JUL-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (electrical habilitation for low voltage) 01-JUL-13 to 03-JUL-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Pontier-élingueur (Crane training) 03-JUL-13 to 04-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Radiological Protection - Controlled Radiation Area - Course A for CERN employees and CERN associates 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in English 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in French 12-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, i...

  17. Safety Training: places available in July - August 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   July - August 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Cherry-picker training) 01-JUL-13 to 02-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First-Aiders – Basic Course 31-JUL-13, 8.15 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (electrical habilitation for low voltage) 01-JUL-13 to 03-JUL-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Pontier-élingueur (Crane training) 03-JUL-13 to 04-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French (with handouts in English) Radiological Protection - Controlled Radiation Area - Course A for CERN employees and CERN associates 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in English 11-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in French 12-JUL-13, 8.30 – 17.00, in...

  18. Basic Laboratory Safety and General Survey of The Turkish Laboratory Safety Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Karaman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and research laboratory employees have to face various hazards and biological risk factors in the working environment due to laboratory structures and regulations. In order to protect personnelfrom these occupational hazards and laboratory acquired infections, basic microbiological practices which are the major factors of biosafety concept should be well known, appropriate and safe laboratory equipments (primary barriers should be used and functional working areas (secondary barriers should be designed. We have limited data regarding biosafety profiles of the laboratories and laboratory staff in our country. Nevertheless, in the light of the existing studies, it is thought that technical and infrastructural facilities are inadequate and also biosafety levels and related applications are either not well known or not properly carried out by the staff. Implementing theoretically accepted basic microbiological practices, a certain quality and cosciousness level of the staff, continuous in-service training are important factors of a safe and efficient working environment in the laboratories.

  19. Basic CNC Operation. Training Workbook [and] Assessment and Training Guide [and] Hands-on Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoka-Hennepin Technical Coll., Minneapolis, MN.

    This workbook is intended for students taking a course in basic computer numerical control (CNC) operation that was developed during a project to retrain defense industry workers at risk of job loss or dislocation because of conversion of the defense industry. The workbook contains daily training guides for each of the course's 13 sessions. Among…

  20. 10 CFR 35.50 - Training for Radiation Safety Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or nuclear medicine physics and in radiation safety; or (b)(1) Has completed a structured educational... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for Radiation Safety Officer. 35.50 Section 35.50... Requirements § 35.50 Training for Radiation Safety Officer. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall...

  1. Protected training time is essential for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Wendy

    2016-04-20

    The Commission on Education and Training for Patient Safety has recommended that Health Education England (HEE) review mandatory training and the delivery of continuing professional development (CPD) relating to patient safety (news, March 16). All staff and trainees need to be empowered to raise concerns and they need support from managers to learn about and improve patient safety.

  2. Improving health, safety and energy efficiency in New Zealand through measuring and applying basic housing standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Keall, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Baker, Michael G

    2013-08-02

    Substandard housing is a problem in New Zealand. Historically there has been little recognition of the important aspects of housing quality that affect people's health and safety. In this viewpoint article we outline the importance of assessing these factors as an essential step to improving the health and safety of New Zealanders and household energy efficiency. A practical risk assessment tool adapted to New Zealand conditions, the Healthy Housing Index (HHI), measures the physical characteristics of houses that affect the health and safety of the occupants. This instrument is also the only tool that has been validated against health and safety outcomes and reported in the international peer-reviewed literature. The HHI provides a framework on which a housing warrant of fitness (WOF) can be based. The HHI inspection takes about one hour to conduct and is performed by a trained building inspector. To maximise the effectiveness of this housing quality assessment we envisage the output having two parts. The first would be a pass/fail WOF assessment showing whether or not the house meets basic health, safety and energy efficiency standards. The second component would rate each main assessment area (health, safety and energy efficiency), potentially on a five-point scale. This WOF system would establish a good minimum standard for rental accommodation as well encouraging improved housing performance over time. In this article we argue that the HHI is an important, validated, housing assessment tool that will improve housing quality, leading to better health of the occupants, reduced home injuries, and greater energy efficiency. If required, this tool could be extended to also cover resilience to natural hazards, broader aspects of sustainability, and the suitability of the dwelling for occupants with particular needs.

  3. 29 CFR 1926.21 - Safety training and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety training and education. 1926.21 Section 1926.21... Provisions § 1926.21 Safety training and education. (a) General requirements. The Secretary shall, pursuant to section 107(f) of the Act, establish and supervise programs for the education and training of...

  4. Safety Training: places available in March

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. MARCH 2012 (alphabetical order, titles of courses in the original language) Echafaudages, réception et conformité (Scaffolding, reception and conformity): From 29-FEB-12 to 02-MAR-12, 09.00 – 17.30, in French (in Domarin, dept. 38) Laser Users : 09-MAR-12, 09.00 – 12.30, in English Self-Rescue Mask training : 08-MAR-12, 08.30 – 10.00, in French 08-MAR-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 13-MAR-12, 08.30 – 10.00, in French 13-MAR-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 20-MAR-12, 08.30 – 10.00, in French 20-MAR-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 22-MAR-12, 08.30 – 10.00, in French 22-MAR-12, 10.30 – 12.00, , in English 27-MAR-12, 08.30 – 10.00, in French 27-MAR-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English Habilitation électrique pour Electriciens en b...

  5. Safety Training: places available in January 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   January 2013 (alphabetical order) Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace 24-JAN-13 to 24-JAN-13, 9:00 – 12:00, in English Etre TSO au CERN 23-JAN-13 to 25-JAN-13, 9:00 – 17:30, in French Self-Rescue Mask training 08-JAN-13 to 08-JAN-13, 8:30 – 10:00, in French 08-JAN-13 to 08-JAN-13, 10:30 – 12:00, in French 10-JAN-13 to 10-JAN-13, 8:30 – 10:00, in English 10-JAN-13 to 10-JAN-13, 10:30 – 12:00, in English 15-JAN-13 to 15-JAN-13, 8:30 – 10:00, in French 15-JAN-13 to 15-JAN-13, 10:30 – 12:00, in French 17-JAN-13 to 17-JAN-13, 8:30 – 10:00, in English 17-JAN-13 to 17-JAN-13, 10:30 – 12:00, in English 22-JAN-13 to 22-JAN-13, 8:30 – 10:00, in French 22-JAN-13 to 22-JAN-13, 10:30 – 12:00, in French 24-JAN-13 to 24-JAN-13,...

  6. Safety Training: places available in February 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   February 2013 (alphabetical order) Noise - Understanding the risks 01-FEB-13, 10.00 – 12.30, in French Magnetic Fields 08-FEB-13, 9.00 – 11.30, in French Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) – Cherry-picker driving 18-FEB-13 to 19-FEB-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French Self-Rescue Mask Training 05-FEB-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 05-FEB-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 12-FEB-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 12-FEB-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 14-FEB-13, 8.30 – 10.00, en anglais 14-FEB-13, 10.30 – 12.00, en anglais 19-FEB-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 19-FEB-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 21-FEB-13, 8.30 – 10.00, en anglais 21-FEB-13, 10.30 – 12.00, en anglais 26-FEB-13, 8.30 &ndash...

  7. Safety Training: places available in October 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   October 2013 (alphabetical order) Habilitation ATEX niveau 1 (ATEX habilitation level 1) 08-OCT-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Driving cherry-pickers) 21-OCT-13 to 22-OCT-13, 08.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace 03-OCT-13, 9.00 – 12.00, in English Être TSO au CERN (Being a TSO at CERN) 29-OCT-13 to 31-OCT-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Self-Rescue Mask Training 01-OCT-13, 10.30 – 12.30, in French 03-OCT-13, 10.30 – 12.30, in English 04-OCT-13, 8.30 – 10.30, in English 08-OCT-13, 10.30 – 12.30, in French 09-OCT-13, 10.30 – 12.30, in English 15-OCT-13, 10.30 – 12.30, in French 17-OCT-13, 10.30...

  8. Safety Training: places available in May 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   May 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de chariots élévateurs (driving of forklifts) 06-MAY-13 to 07-MAY-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Self Rescue Mask Training 02-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in English 02-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 07-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 07-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 14-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 14-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 16-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in English 16-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 21-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 21-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 23-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in English 23-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 28-MAY-13, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 28-MAY-13, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 30-MAY-1...

  9. Safety Training: places available in April 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training team, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   April 2014 (alphabetical order) ATEX Habilitation - Level 2 03-APR-14 to 04-APR-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Cryogenic Safety - Level 1 10-APR-14, 10.00 – 12.00, in English Electrical Palett Truck – Driving 15-APR-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in French (hand-outs in English for non-French-speaking participants) Fire Extinguisher 09-APR-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 16-APR-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 23-APR-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in English First Aider - Level 1 – Initial 03-APR-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in French 10-APR-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in English 16-APR-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in English 24-APR-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in English First Aider - Level 1 – Refresher 17-APR-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 17-APR-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in...

  10. Safety training parks – A case study on the effectiveness of the trainings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räsänen, Tuula; Sormunen, E.; Reiman, Arto

    2017-01-01

    The Safety Training Park (STP) concept is a unique Finnish safety training innovation. The STP provides different actors of the construction industry and other branches a practical occupational safety and health (OSH) training area. To the authors’ knowledge, no such parks exist in Europe besides...

  11. Challenges in Developing Competency-based Training Curriculum for Food Safety Regulators in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippaiah, Anitha; Allagh, Komal Preet; Murthy, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1) Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2) Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3) Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level), II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing) were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting. PMID:25136155

  12. Challenges in Developing Competency-based Training Curriculum for Food Safety Regulators in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippaiah, Anitha; Allagh, Komal Preet; Murthy, G V

    2014-07-01

    The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. 1) Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2) Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3) Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. THE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FOOD SAFETY OFFICERS WAS DESIGNED TO COMPRISE OF FIVE MODULES TO INCLUDE: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level), II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing) were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  13. Challenges in developing competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Thippaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1 Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2 Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3 Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level, II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  14. Examining the Efficacy of a Basic Functional Behavioral Assessment Training Package for School Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Sheldon L.; Horner, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of manualized training in "Basic" functional behavioral assessment (FBA) for typical school professionals on the ability of these professionals to complete technically adequate FBAs. Twelve school professionals participated in four 1-hr training sessions using the Basic FBA training handbook. After…

  15. Safety Training: places available in February

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. FEBRUARY 2012 (alphabetical order) Conduite de Plates-Formes Elevatrices Mobiles de Personnel (PEMP) / Cherry-picker driving : 09-FEB-12 au 10-FEB-12, 08.00 – 17.30, in French (with possibility to have handouts in English) Magnetic Fields : 03-FEB-12, 9.30 – 12.00, in French Self-rescue mask : 02-FEB-12, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 02-FEB-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 07-FEB-12, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 07-FEB-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 14-FEB-12, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 14-FEB-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 16-FEB-12, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 16-FEB-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 21-FEB-12, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 21-FEB-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 28-FEB-12, 8.30 – 10.00, in French 28-FEB-12, 10.30 – 12.00, in English Radiologic...

  16. Safety Training: places available in September 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle Cusato, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue. September 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Cherry-picker driving) 12-SEP-13 au 13-SEP-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace 19-SEP-13, 9.00 – 12.00, in French Être TSO au CERN (Being TSO at CERN) 10-SEP-13 to 12-SEP-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French Habilitation ATEX - niveau 2 (ATEX habilitation - level 2) 19-SEP-13 to 20-SEP-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (electrical habilitation for electricians in low voltage) 11-SEP-13 to 13-SEP-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English 23-SEP-13 to 25-SEP-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique personnel non &eacut...

  17. Safety Training: places available in March 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training team, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   March 2014 (alphabetical order) Ergonomics - Worksite and Workshop 24-MAR-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Fire Extinguisher 05-MAR-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 12-MAR-14, 8.30 – 10.00, in English 12-MAR-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in English First Aider - Level 1 – Initial 27-MAR-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in English First Aider – Refresher 20-MAR-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in French 20-MAR-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low Voltage – Initial 17-MAR-14 to 19-MAR-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French 24-MAR-14 to 26-MAR-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low and High Voltage – Initial 18-MAR-14 to 21-MAR-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation &eacut...

  18. Safety Training: places available in January 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training Team, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   January 2014 (alphabetical order) Confined space 28-JAN-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Ergonomics – Office 30-JAN-14, 9.00 – 12.00, in French Fire Extinguisher 08-JAN-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 24-JAN-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 31-JAN-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French First Aider - Level 1 – Initial 16-JAN-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in French 30-JAN-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First Aider – Refresher 09-JAN-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in French 09-JAN-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low Voltage - Initial 22-JAN-14 au 24-JAN-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low and High Voltage - Initial 28-JAN-14 au 31-JAN-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French ...

  19. Safety Training: places available in February 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    The Safety Training Team, HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   February 2014 (alphabetical order) ATEX Habilitation - Level 1 04-FEB-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Electrical Work - Lock-out 05-FEB-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in French Ergonomics – Office 06-FEB-14, 9.00 – 12.00, in English Fire Extinguisher 26-FEB-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 05-FEB-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in English First Aider - Level 1 – Initial 20-FEB-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First Aider - Refresher 06-FEB-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in French 06-FEB-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in French 13-FEB-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 13-FEB-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low Voltage – Initial 10-FEB-14 to 12-FEB-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique - Electrician ...

  20. Safety Training: places available in January 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training Team, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   January 2014 (alphabetical order) Confined space 28-JAN-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Ergonomics – Office 30-JAN-14, 9.00 – 12.00, in French Fire Extinguisher 08-JAN-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French 24-JAN-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in English 31-JAN-14, 10.30 – 12.00, in French First Aider - Level 1 – Initial 16-JAN-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in French 30-JAN-14, 8.30 – 17.30, in French First Aider – Refresher 09-JAN-14, 8.30 – 12.30, in French 09-JAN-14, 13.30 – 17.30, in French Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low Voltage - Initial 22-JAN-14 au 24-JAN-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique - Electrician Low and High Voltage - Initial 28-JAN-14 au 31-JAN-14, 9.00 – 17.30, in French ...

  1. General practitioners' approach to malingering in basic military training centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokcu, Alper Tunga; Kurt, E

    2017-04-01

    Malingering can be defined as the abuse of the right to benefit from the health services. In this study, the frequency of the malingering cases in Basic Military Training Centres (BMTCs) and the behaviours and the attitudes of the military physicians towards the recruits who are suspected malingerers were described. A total of 17 general practitioners in nine different BMTCs in different regions of Turkey constitute the universe of this descriptive study. In the questionnaire, there were a total of 30 questions about the descriptive characteristics of the participants and their attitudes and behaviours towards malingering. Informed consent form and a questionnaire were applied through the intranet via participants' emails. In the study, 15 physicians were reached with a response rate of 88.2%. All of the physicians suspected malingering in some of the soldiers who were examined. A total of 80% of the physicians (n=12) suspected malingering in at least 10% of the patients they examined. Only 13.3% of the physicians (n=2) had officially diagnosed a case of malingering in the last training period. All of the participants stated that they did not report the official decision for every soldier suspected of malingering. Instead of reporting official decision for malingering, the military physicians apply alternative procedures for suspected malingerers. In countries where the military service is compulsory, prevalence of malingering is estimated to be higher (approximately 5-25%). The problem of malingering is often underestimated due to the fact it is usually overlooked. Malingering remains a problem for the entire military healthcare system, due to the difficulties in exact diagnosis. Therefore, it can be useful to take some practical administrative measures for the soldiers who are prone to malingering, in order to discourage the behaviour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  2. Surgical Safety Training of World Health Organization Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Toll, Edward C; Cole, Matthew; Smith, Frank C T; Stark, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate training in surgical safety is essential to maximize patient safety. This national review quantified undergraduate surgical safety training. Training of 2 international safety initiatives was quantified: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" and (2) Department of Health (DoH) "Principles of the Productive Operating Theatre." Also, 13 additional safety skills were quantified. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. In all, 23 universities entered the study (71.9% response). Safety skills from WHO and DoH documents were formally taught in 4 UK medical schools (17.4%). Individual components of the documents were taught more frequently (47.6%). Half (50.9%) of the additional safety skills identified were taught. Surgical societies supplemented safety training, although the total amount of training provided was less than that in university curricula (P < .0001). Surgical safety training is inadequate in UK medical schools. To protect patients and maximize safety, a national undergraduate safety curriculum is recommended. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  3. Comparison of results of virtual-reality simulator and training model for basic ureteroscopy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, David S; Abdelshehid, Corollos; Clayman, Ralph V; McDougall, Elspeth M

    2006-04-01

    The traditional method of acquiring surgical skills is by apprenticeship and involves an extensive period of training with patients. Model-based and virtual reality simulation is gaining interest as alternative training, allowing repetitive practice in a low-risk environment. The objective of this study was to determine if a materials, model-based training format and an interactive virtual-reality simulator could provide equivalent teaching of basic ureteroscopy skills to the inexperienced medical student. Sixteen first-year medical students received the same didactic session and video viewing on cystoscopy, guidewire access to the upper urinary tract, and ureteroscopy with intracorporeal laser lithotripsy and stone extraction by the same instructor. The participants were then randomized into two study groups: Group 1 was trained on the ureteroscopy training model (TMU) from Limbs & Things and Group 2 on the Simbionix UROMentor virtual-reality simulator (VRS) until the participants could perform the procedure independently. Two months later, the participants independently performed a ureteroscopic procedure on a pig kidney/ureter model and were graded from 1 to 5 on their ability to complete the steps of the procedure and the quality of their performance (handling of tissue, efficiency, instrument handling, knowledge of instruments, flow of operation, use of assistants, and knowledge of the specific procedure) for a possible total of 35 points. All participants were able to perform the steps of the procedure correctly. The TMU group and the VRS group received a mean of 22.9 +/- 4.8 and 23.6 +/- 5.4 points, respectively (P = 0.38) for their qualitative assessment. The medical students' skills and ability to perform a basic ureteroscopic stone-management procedure was independent of the training modality (VRS or TMU). Incorporating either of these devices into the preliminary training of urology residents may improve their initial clinical performance of these skills.

  4. Physical fitness and depressive symptoms during army basic combat training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Shannon K; Wilkinson, Larrell L; Wigfall, Lisa T; Reynolds, Alexandria M; Muraca, Stephanie T; Glover, Saundra H; Wooten, Nikki R; Sui, Xuemei; Beets, Michael W; Durstine, J Larry; Newman-Norlund, Roger D; Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2015-01-01

    Mental health-related problems are a significant cause of attrition during basic combat training (BCT). Evidence in civilian populations suggests that physical fitness is associated with psychological benefits in civilians, but little is known about the association between physical fitness and psychological adjustment during BCT. This study prospectively examined the association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms in 300 BCT soldiers from May to July 2012 at Fort Jackson, Columbia, SC. Soldiers completed a baseline Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and survey within 1 wk of arriving at BCT and an end-of-cycle survey after 8 wk of BCT. Soldiers were assigned to the "high" fitness category if they had a passing score on the standard APFT of greater than or equal to 180 out of 300 points. Soldiers scoring less than 180 points on the APFT were assigned to the "low" fitness category. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for baseline demographics, self-reported sleep before BCT, BCT confidence, Army identification, and depressive symptoms, the odds of reporting depressive symptoms were 60% lower for soldiers in the high fitness category (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.84) compared with soldiers in the low fitness category. Analogous to other positive outcomes of soldier fitness, improvement of soldier physical fitness before BCT might improve soldiers' psychological health outcomes.

  5. INFLUENCE OF BASIC SHOOTING TRAINING ON POLICEMEN DEPENDING ON SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vučković

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Resume: A sample of 71 students of VSUP (Internal Affairs College, 46 male and 25 female sex, without any previous knowledge in handling the fi rearms, have undergone the basic shooting training.During the training course the examinees had three testings: at the beginning of the training (TEST 1, after 50% of realized training (TEST 2 and at the end of training (TEST 3.The testing conveyed a precise shooting of 10 bullets from the CZ99 gun at the distance of 10m.The results showed that the initial level of knowledge/skill (TEST 1 for men was 50.74 of the sum of circles shot with individual results ranging from 2 to 83, where the value of the variable coeffi cient (cV% was at the level of 40.60%.For women these values were 28.92 of the realized sum of the target circles shot with individual results ranging from 0 to 64 and the value of the variation coeffi cient ((cV% was 58.78%.On transitive testing (TEST 2 the effi ciency for men was at the level of 70.70 of the realized sum of the target circles shot, while individual results were ranging from 33 to 92 with the average value of the variation coeffi cient (cV% at the level of 20.23%.For women these values were 66.80 of the realized sum of the target circles shot with individual results ranging from 42 to 86 and the value of variation coeffi cient (cV% was 20.53%.At the last testing (TEST 3 the achieved effi ciency for men was at the level of 74.86 of the realized sum of the target circles shot, while individual results were ranging from 47 to 97 with the average value of the variation coeffi cient (cV% was 14.84% ANOVA showed that there was a general statistically important difference between testings, both for men and women (F= 29,965, p= 0,000 and F= 69,348, p= 0,000 respectively. The results of the Student’s t test point out that between all pairs of variables reffering to the achieved results, for men in the fi rst (TEST 1 and second test (TEST 2,and third (TEST 3 there is a statistically

  6. Occupational safety and health training in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, C M

    1992-01-01

    We have eleven years of experience delivering a wide variety of worker education programs in cross-cultural settings to reduce the levels of occupational fatalities and injuries in Alaska. We published an instructional manual and informational poster for workers, on Alaska's "Right-To-Know" law regarding chemical and physical hazards. The "Job Hazard Recognition Program" curriculum for high school students has received national acclaim for being proactive in dealing with worker safety education before the student becomes a member of the work force. Adult educational programs and materials have been designed to include less lecture and formal presentation, and more practical "hands on" and on-the-job experience for specific trades and hazards. New industry specific manuals deal with hazardous waste reduction as a method to reduce harm to the employee. Difficulty in getting instructors and training equipment to rural locations is dealt with by becoming creative in scheduling classes, using locally available equipment, and finding regional contacts who support the overall program. Alternative approaches to funding sources include building on regional long-term plans and establishing complementary program objectives.

  7. An investigation into the basic safety and security status of schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety at schools is beginning to receive attention in South Africa as articulated in various media reports. Schools as sites of teaching and learning can deliver their educational mandate only in safe and secure conditions, free from injuries, crime, and violence. Basic school safety and security features are therefore essential ...

  8. 41 CFR 102-80.10 - What are the basic safety and environmental management policies for real property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... safety and environmental management policies for real property? 102-80.10 Section 102-80.10 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT General Provisions § 102-80.10 What are the basic safety and environmental management policies for real property? The basic safety and...

  9. Related Factors of the Influence on Mental Symptoms of the Recruits in the Basic Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-zheng, Li; Mei-ying, Lei; Dong-hai Zhao; Li-qiong, Zhao; Geng, Liu; Hong-kui, Zhou; Mei, Qin; Jie-feng, Li; Jian, Wen; Pin-de, Huang; Yi, Li; Chuang, Wang; Zhou-ran, Wang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to explore the psychosocial characteristics of recruits for mental health education during the basic military training. A total of 1,366 male recruits were assessed during the basic military training. The psychosocial characteristics, such as effects of LE (life events), mental symptoms, personality trait coping style…

  10. Dynamics of general and specially trained of women-weightlifters at the stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Slobodyanuk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the dynamics of the general and special training of women-weightlifters different groups weight categories for annual macrocycle at the stage of specialized basic training. Materials and Methods: indexes long jump, running 30 meters, push-ups, jumps on how Abalakova index and wrist strength athletes different schools of Ukraine. Results: found dynamic indicators of general and special training of women-weightlifters different groups weight categories at the stage of basic training six specialized schools in Ukraine. Conclusions: the results of the study provide an opportunity to consider certain indicators in planning differentiated training programs to improve the training process athletes for women-weightlifters at the stage of specialized basic training different groups weight categories in the annual macrocycle.

  11. Water in Fire Control--Basic Training Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Prepared by a team of fire control officers, the training guide is designed to help fire crewmen learn the fundamentals of water use. The entire package can be used for a complete course or individual lessons and can be adapted to specific training needs. Throughout the guide, emphasis is placed on one primary training objective, performance in…

  12. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredfeldt, Christine E; Awad, Elias Bruce; Joseph, Kenneth; Snyder, Mark H

    2013-12-02

    Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers' effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case-control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria.

  13. Evaluation of a standardized physical training program for basic combat training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph; Darakjy, Salima; Scott, Shawn J; Hauret, Keith G; Canada, Sara; Marin, Roberto; Rieger, William; Jones, Bruce H

    2005-05-01

    A control group (CG, n = 1,138) that implemented a traditional Basic Combat Training (BCT) physical training (PT) program was compared to an evaluation group (EG, n = 829) that implemented a PT program newly designed for BCT. The Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) was taken at various points in the PT program, and injuries were obtained from a medical surveillance system. After 9 weeks of training, the proportion failing the APFT was lower in the EG than in the CG (1.7 vs. 3.3%, p = 0.03). After adjustment for initial fitness levels, age, and body mass index, the relative risk of an injury in the CG was 1.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] =1.2-2.0) and 1.5 (95% CI = 1.2-1.8) times higher than in the EG for men and women, respectively. The newly designed PT program resulted in higher fitness test pass rates and lower injury rates compared to a traditional BCT physical training program.

  14. An evaluation of the 18- and 12-month basic postgraduate training programmes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Niels Kristian; Qvesel, Dorte; Kodal, Troels

    2010-01-01

    and new programmes evaluate their training, and it explores their attitudes towards the new postgraduate training programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We developed a questionnaire by which quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The questionnaire was sent to all physicians following basic...... equipped and less ready for continued specialisation than doctors of the 18-month programme and they requested a downward adjustment of the learning objectives associated with the educational positions which follow their basic training. Physicians do not expect the increased focus on learning...... and supervision to compensate for the six-month reduction of the training period. Internal medicine should be included in the basic postgraduate training of all physicians. Training in secondary as well as primary health care was requested. CONCLUSION: The young physicians were reluctant towards the new basic...

  15. Effects of Stress, Coping Style, and Confidence on Basic Combat Training Performance, Discipline, and Attrition

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Thomas Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The attrition rate of enlistees in basic combat training is of particular concern to all Branches of the military due to the high cost associated with recruiting and training a new enlistee. Each year the military loses hundreds of millions of dollars invested in enlistees whom never make it to their first duty station. Investigators have extensively examined the impact of physiological injuries on the rate of enlistee discharge from basic combat training. Also, investigators have ...

  16. Virtual records : standardized safety training and web-based record keeping reduces training duplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stastny, R.P.

    2010-02-15

    Duplication in safety training is having a significant impact on the oil and gas industry in Canada. This article discussed a method of standardizing safety training and ensuring that accredited courses are completed by individual workers. Internet servers provided by the Alberta government are being used by the Health and Safety Association Network (HSAN) to provide access to safety training records. The program was initiated in collaboration with local governments, unions, labour providers, and other safety associations. The industry training and tracking system (ITTS) database was made fully operational in 2009. The ITTS aims to have the safety records of over a million people stored in its database within a 5-year period. The list of safety courses accepted by the HSAN administrator will also continue to expand.

  17. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  18. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  19. 100 years of occupational safety research: From basic protections and work analysis to a multilevel view of workplace safety and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, David A; Burke, Michael J; Zohar, Dov

    2017-03-01

    Starting with initiatives dating back to the mid-1800s, we provide a high-level review of the key trends and developments in the application of applied psychology to the field of occupational safety. Factory laws, basic worker compensation, and research on accident proneness comprised much of the early work. Thus, early research and practice very much focused on the individual worker, the design of their work, and their basic protection. Gradually and over time, the focus began to navigate further into the organizational context. One of the early efforts to broaden beyond the individual worker was a significant focus on safety-related training during the middle of the 20th century. Toward the latter years of the 20th century and continuing the move from the individual worker to the broader organizational context, there was a significant increase in leadership and organizational climate (safety climate) research. Ultimately, this resulted in the development of a multilevel model of safety culture/climate. After discussing these trends, we identify key conclusions and opportunities for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. A multi-media computer program for training in basic professional counseling skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, J.; Van Der Zee, K. I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of a self-instructional program for training in basic counseling skills. The product was a multimedia computer program, named GEVAT. The training under consideration was based on a traditional training in which students enhance these skills under supervision.

  1. Basic models modeling resistance training: an update for basic scientists interested in study skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Jason; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; da Silva Teixeira, Tamiris; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, Xia; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Lodetti, Alice; Cardozo, Mayara Quadros; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-09-01

    Human muscle hypertrophy brought about by voluntary exercise in laboratorial conditions is the most common way to study resistance exercise training, especially because of its reliability, stimulus control and easy application to resistance training exercise sessions at fitness centers. However, because of the complexity of blood factors and organs involved, invasive data is difficult to obtain in human exercise training studies due to the integration of several organs, including adipose tissue, liver, brain and skeletal muscle. In contrast, studying skeletal muscle remodeling in animal models are easier to perform as the organs can be easily obtained after euthanasia; however, not all models of resistance training in animals displays a robust capacity to hypertrophy the desired muscle. Moreover, some models of resistance training rely on voluntary effort, which complicates the results observed when animal models are employed since voluntary capacity is something theoretically impossible to measure in rodents. With this information in mind, we will review the modalities used to simulate resistance training in animals in order to present to investigators the benefits and risks of different animal models capable to provoke skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Our second objective is to help investigators analyze and select the experimental resistance training model that best promotes the research question and desired endpoints. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A case for safety leadership team training of hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Vogt, Jay W; Sales, Michael; Aristidou, Angela; Gray, Garry C; Kiang, Mathew V; Meyer, Gregg S

    2011-01-01

    Delivering safe patient care remains an elusive goal. Resolving problems in complex organizations like hospitals requires managers to work together. Safety leadership training that encourages managers to exercise learning-oriented, team-based leadership behaviors could promote systemic problem solving and enhance patient safety. Despite the need for such training, few programs teach multidisciplinary groups of managers about specific behaviors that can enhance their role as leadership teams in the realm of patient safety. The aims of this study were to describe a learning-oriented, team-based, safety leadership training program composed of reinforcing exercises and to provide evidence confirming the need for such training and demonstrating behavior change among management groups after training. Twelve groups of managers from an academic medical center based in the Northeast United States were randomly selected to participate in the program and exposed to its customized, experience-based, integrated, multimodal curriculum. We extracted data from transcripts of four training sessions over 15 months with groups of managers about the need for the training in these groups and change in participants' awareness, professional behaviors, and group activity. Training transcripts confirmed the need for safety leadership team training and provided evidence of the potential for training to increase targeted behaviors. The training increased awareness and use of leadership behaviors among many managers and led to new routines and coordinated effort among most management groups. Enhanced learning-oriented leadership often helped promote a learning orientation in managers' work areas. Team-based training that promotes specific learning-oriented leader behaviors can promote behavioral change among multidisciplinary groups of hospital managers.

  3. 40 CFR 170.230 - Pesticide safety training for handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... acute and chronic effects, delayed effects, and sensitization. (iii) Routes by which pesticides can... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pesticide safety training for handlers...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS WORKER PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Pesticide Handlers § 170.230 Pesticide safety...

  4. Health and Safety Legislation in Australia: Complexity for Training Remains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Susanne; Barratt-Pugh, Llandis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that examined the impact of the National Occupational Health and Safety Strategy 2002-2012 and the harmonisation of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 on Australian training design, delivery and outcomes. There has been a comparative reduction in work related injuries, fatalities and disease, and…

  5. 75 FR 6070 - Notice of Public Meeting on the International Atomic Energy Agency Basic Safety Standards Version...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Public Meeting on the International Atomic Energy Agency Basic Safety Standards Version 3.0, Draft Safety Requirements DS379 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Public... open forum with the public and other stakeholders on a revision to the International Basic Safety...

  6. Demonstration of the LHC Safety Training Tunnel Mock-Up

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    Members of CERN's management visit the LHC tunnel mock-up at the Safety Training Centre on the Prévessin site. The facility is used to train personnel in emergency responses including the use of masks and safe evacuation.

  7. Classroom instruction versus roadside training in traffic safety education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schagen, I; Rothengatter, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of different approaches to training complex cognitive and psychomotor skills within the framework of road safety education for primary school children. A method involving roadside behavioral training, a classroom instruction method and a method combining these

  8. Management commitment to safety vs. employee perceived safety training and association with future injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Verma, Santosh K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Courtney, Theodore K; Lombardi, David A; Brennan, Melanye J; Perry, Melissa J

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore and examine, specific to the restaurant industry, two important constructs emerging from the safety climate literature: employee perceptions of safety training and management commitment to safety. Are these two separate constructs? Are there both individual- and shared group-level safety perceptions for these two constructs? What are the relationships between these two constructs and future injury outcomes? A total of 419 employees from 34 limited-service restaurants participated in a prospective cohort study. Employees' perceptions of management commitment to safety and safety training and demographic variables were collected at the baseline. The survey questions were made available in three languages: English, Spanish, and Portuguese. For the following 12 weeks, participants reported their injury experience and weekly work hours. A multivariate negative binomial generalized estimating equation model with compound symmetry covariance structure was used to assess the association between the rate of self-reported injuries and measures of safety perceptions. Even though results showed that the correlation between employees'perceived safety training and management commitment to safety was high, confirmatory factor analysis of measurement models showed that two separate factors fit the model better than as two dimensions of a single factor. Homogeneity tests showed that there was a shared perception of the factor of management commitment to safety for the restaurant workers but there was no consistent perception among them for the factor of perceived safety training. Both individual employees'perceived management commitment to safety and perceptions of safety training can predict employees' subsequent injuries above and beyond demographic variables. However, there was no significant relationship between future injury and employees' shared perception of management commitment to safety. Further, our results suggest that the

  9. Basic surgical training in Ireland: the impact of operative experience, training program allocation and mentorship on trainee satisfaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K E

    2013-12-01

    Application to the Irish basic surgical training (BST) program in Ireland has decreased progressively over the past 5 years. We hypothesised that this decline was secondary to dissatisfaction with training correlated with reduced operative experience and lack of mentorship among BSTs.

  10. Earthquake Safety Training through Virtual Drills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changyang; Liang, Wei; Quigley, Chris; Zhao, Yibiao; Yu, Lap-Fai

    2017-04-01

    Recent popularity of consumer-grade virtual reality devices, such as the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive, has enabled household users to experience highly immersive virtual environments. We take advantage of the commercial availability of these devices to provide an immersive and novel virtual reality training approach, designed to teach individuals how to survive earthquakes, in common indoor environments. Our approach makes use of virtual environments realistically populated with furniture objects for training. During a training, a virtual earthquake is simulated. The user navigates in, and manipulates with, the virtual environments to avoid getting hurt, while learning the observation and self-protection skills to survive an earthquake. We demonstrated our approach for common scene types such as offices, living rooms and dining rooms. To test the effectiveness of our approach, we conducted an evaluation by asking users to train in several rooms of a given scene type and then test in a new room of the same type. Evaluation results show that our virtual reality training approach is effective, with the participants who are trained by our approach performing better, on average, than those trained by alternative approaches in terms of the capabilities to avoid physical damage and to detect potentially dangerous objects.

  11. Validation of a novel basic virtual reality simulator, the LAP-X, for training basic laparoscopic skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Egi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Minoru; Sawada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takahisa; Ohdan, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    Virtual reality surgical simulators are becoming popular as a means of providing trainees with an opportunity to practice laparoscopic skills. The Lap-X (Epona Medical, Rotterdam, the Netherlands) is a novel VR simulator for training basic skills in laparoscopic surgery. The objective of this study was to validate the LAP-X laparoscopic virtual reality simulator by assessing the face and construct validity in order to determine whether the simulator is adequate for basic skills training. The face and content validity were evaluated using a structured questionnaire. To assess the construct validity, the participants, nine expert surgeons (median age: 40 (32-45)) (>100 laparoscopic procedures) and 11 novices performed three basic laparoscopic tasks using the Lap-X. The participants reported a high level of content validity. No significant differences were found between the expert surgeons and the novices (Ps > 0.246). The performance of the expert surgeons on the three tasks was significantly better than that of the novices in all parameters (Ps home and hospital training device.

  12. Basic Microsurgery Training Using the Laboratory Rat (Rattus norvegicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    Rattus norvegicus)" PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI) / TRAINING COORDINATOR (TC): Maj Ryan Diepenbrock DEPARTMENT: SGDS PHONE #: 707-423-7085 INITIAL...Include Name, Protocol function - PI/CI/AI/TC/lnstructor, IACUC approval -Yes/No) Maj Ryan Diepenbrock (PI) IACUC Approval Yes 18Jun 15 DELETIONS

  13. Safety Training and Awareness: a team at your service

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    Ever wondered who is on the other end of the safety-training@cern.ch e-mail address? If so, you might like to know that all the activities relating to safety training and awareness (“Safety Training" for short) are managed by a team dedicated to ensuring the smooth running of CERN’s safety training courses.    Photo: Christoph Balle. This team currently consists of five people: the manager in charge of coordinating all the projects, two administrative assistants who provide logistical support and two technicians who manage the training centre. This team, which has seen its workload and the number of challenges it faces increase considerably with LS1, is responsible for organising classroom training sessions (in partnership with some 15 training bodies) and for the management of online e-learning courses in partnership with the GS-AIS Group. The members of the team don't just deal with enrolment on the courses: they also help with the development...

  14. Comparison between Training Models to Teach Veterinary Medical Students Basic Laparoscopic Surgery Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Ohad; Michelotti, Kurt; Schmidt, Peggy; Lagman, Minette; Fahie, Maria; Griffon, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two different laparoscopic training models in preparing veterinary students to perform basic laparoscopic skills. Sixteen first- and second-year veterinary students were randomly assigned to a box trainer (Group B) or tablet trainer (Group T). Training and assessment for both groups included two tasks, "peg transfer" and "pattern cutting," derived from the well-validated McGill University Inanimate System for Training and Evaluation of Laparoscopic Skills. Confidence levels were compared by evaluating pre- and post-training questionnaires. Performance of laparoscopic tasks was scored pre- and post-training using a rubric for precision and speed. Results revealed a significant improvement in student confidence for basic laparoscopic skills (pstudents to perform basic laparoscopic skills on a model.

  15. Implementation of a Cross-specialty Training Program in Basic Laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Sorensen, Jette Led; Thinggaard, Jette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several surgical specialties use laparoscopy and share many of the same techniques and challenges, such as entry approaches, equipment, and complications. However, most basic training programs focus on a single specialty. The objective of this study was to describe...... the implementation of a regional cross-specialty training program for basic laparoscopy, to increase the flexibility of educational courses, and to provide a more efficient use of simulation equipment. METHODS: Using a regional training program in basic laparoscopy for gynecology as a model, we developed a cross......-specialty training program for residents in surgery, gynecology, urology, and thoracic surgery. We reviewed data on training for the first year of the program and evaluated the program by using a scoring system for quality criteria for laparoscopic curricula and skills. RESULTS: We held 6 full-day theoretical...

  16. The Effects of Basketball Basic Skills Training on Gross Motor Skills Development of Female Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayazit, Betul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of basketball basic skills training on gross motor skills development of female children in Turkey. For that purpose, 40 female children took part in the study voluntarily. Basketball basic skills test was used to improve the gross motor skills of the female children in the study. Also,…

  17. Factors Associated with Discharge During Marine Corps Basic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    risk for discharge have been numerous, likely due to tiie personal infor- mation contained in readily available databases. Results of these studies...MCRD San Diego from February to April 2003 were asked to participate in the current study during tiie second day of platoon formation, 3 days before...Of tiie 2,137 male participants, 10.4% (n = 223) were dis- charged from training. The most common reason for attrition included a medical-related

  18. BASIC VALUE ORIENTATIONS OF POLICE EMPLOYEES ON PHYSICAL TRAINING

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Dadov

    2016-01-01

    The main task of the police is to protect public order and combating crime. Perform this task in the process of performance management; police officers have to carry out suppression of crimes and administrative offenses and detention of persons who committed them. Of particular importance in this case become the system of training and tactics use by law-enforcement bodies to combat fighting techniques in the performance of their duties. Terms and conditions of professional activity by employe...

  19. Training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.G. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The site specific analysis of nuclear criticality training needs is very briefly described. Analysis indicated that the four major components required were analysis, surveillance, business practices or administration, and emergency preparedness. The analysis component was further divided into process analysis, accident analysis, and transportation analysis. Ten subject matter areas for the process analysis component were identified as candidates for class development. Training classes developed from the job content analysis have demonstrated that the specialized information can be successfully delivered to new entrants. 1 fig.

  20. Study on Innovation of Teacher Training Model in Basic Education from the Perspective of "Blended Learning"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Huabai; Bu, Shizhen

    2012-01-01

    Gradual integration of synergetic technology, P2P technology and online learning community furnishes a new research field for innovation of teacher training model in a knowledge economy era. This article proposes the innovative model of "whole of three lines" in teacher training in basic education from the perspective of "blended…

  1. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  2. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: Time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Willem; de Angst, Isabel; Schreuder, Henk; Schout, Barbara; Draaisma, Werner; Verweij, Lisanne; Hendrikx, Ad; van der Poel, Henk

    Introduction The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary basic skills

  3. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.; Angst, I. de; Schreuder, H.; Schout, B.M.A.; Draaisma, W.; Verweij, L.; Hendrikx, A.; Poel, H. van der

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary basic skills

  4. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  5. Factors determining the effectiveness of basic training in calisthenics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belokopitova J.A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of questionnaire of leading trainers of Ukraine are presented. The factors of initial preparation of gymnasts are exposed 7-9 years. The high level of influence on efficiency of trainings employments of such factors is set as: individual development of perception of time (on age, sporting preparation, in the period of mastering of simple and difficult elements, special preparation, morphophysiological signs, co-ordinating capabilities, optimum age of reception in child-youth sporting school, account of orientation of base preparation.

  6. Efficacy of short-term training for acquisition of basic laparoscopic skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takeda

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Use of the virtual reality laparoscopic surgery simulator allowed us to objectively assess residents' acquisition of basic laparoscopic skills. We found that residents more readily acquired dominant-hand skills during their 2-month training. We conclude that our training system serves as an effective initial step towards the acquisition of the necessary laparoscopic surgery skills, even though residents do not actually perform surgeries during the training period.

  7. 78 FR 18238 - Safety Zone; SFPD Training Safety Zone; San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... William Hawn, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Francisco; telephone (415) 399-7442 or email at D11-PF-Marine... navigable waters around the SFPD's maritime interdiction training exercises. The SFPD Training Safety ] Zone... Hunters Point in San Francisco, CA in support of the San Francisco Police Department's maritime...

  8. Proposals of new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste and of new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor based on these basic concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Masuro, E-mail: ogawa.masuro@jaea.go.jp

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The author proposed new basic concepts on safety and radioactive waste. • A principle of ‘continue confining’ to realize the basic concept on safety is also proposed. • It is indicated that only a HTGR can attain the conditions required from the principle. • Technologies to realize the basic concept on radioactive waste are also discussed. • A New HTGR system based on the new basic concepts is proposed. - Abstract: A new basic concept on safety of ‘Not causing any serious catastrophe by any means’ and a new basic concept on radioactive waste of ‘Not returning any waste that possibly affects the environment’ are proposed in the present study, aiming at nuclear power plants which everybody can accept, in consideration of the serious catastrophe that happened at Fukushima Japan in 2011. These new basic concepts can be found to be valid in comparison with basic concepts on safety and waste in other industries. The principle to realize the new basic concept on safety is, as known well as the inherent safety, to use physical phenomena such as Doppler Effect and so on which never fail to work even if all equipment and facilities for safety lose their functions. In the present study, physical phenomena are used to ‘continue confining’, rather than ‘confine’, because the consequence of emission of radioactive substances to the environment cannot be mitigated. To ‘continue confining’ is meant to apply natural correction to fulfill inherent safety function. Fission products must be detoxified to realize the new basic concept on radioactive waste, aiming at the final processing and disposal of radioactive wastes as same as that in the other wastes such as PCB, together with much efforts not to produce radioactive wastes and to reduce their volume nevertheless if they are emitted. Technology development on the detoxification is one of the most important subjects. A new High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor, namely the New HTGR

  9. Comparison of 2 training programs for basic laparoscopic skills and simulated surgery performance in veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ya; Ragle, Claude A; Lencioni, Rachael; Fransson, Boel A

    2017-11-01

    To compare the effects of 2 training curricula on laparoscopic skills and performance of simulated surgery in veterinary students. Prospective study. Veterinary students (n = 33) with no prior hands-on experience in minimally invasive surgery. Basic laparoscopic skills (BLS) were assessed based on 5 modified McGill inanimate system for training and evaluation of laparoscopic skills. Motion metrics and an objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) were used to evaluate surgical skills during a simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed in an augmented reality simulator. Students were randomly assigned to either skill-based (group A) or procedural-based (group B) training curriculum. Both tests were performed prior to and after a 10-session training curriculum. Post-training BLS results were improved in both training groups (P difference was detected in OSATS before and after training. Both training curricula improved BLS, but significant differences were not detected between the procedural-based training program and basic skills training alone in veterinary students. Motion metrics such as time, economy of movement, and instrument path were superior to an OSATS, when assessing surgical performance. Further studies are needed to compare the effects of different simulators on the training of veterinarians with diverse laparoscopic surgical experience. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTED RESISTANCE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kacin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood flow restricted resistance (BFRR training with pneumatic tourniquet has been suggested as an alternative for conventional weight training due to the proven benefits for muscle strength and hypertrophy using relatively low resistance, hence reducing the mechanical stress across a joint. As such, it has become an important part of rehabilitation programs used in either injured or operated athletes. Despite a general consensus on effectiveness of BFRR training for muscle conditioning, there are several uncertainties regarding the interplay of various extrinsic and intrinsic factors on its safety and efficiency, which are being reviewed from a clinical perspective. Among extrinsic factors tourniquet cuff pressure, size and shape have been identified as key for safety and efficiency. Among intrinsic factors, limb anthropometrics, patient history and presence of cardiac, vascular, metabolic or peripheral neurologic conditions have been recognized as most important. Though there are a few potential safety concerns connected to BFRR training, the following have been identified as the most probable and health-hazardous: (a mechanical injury to the skin, muscle, and peripheral nerves, (b venous thrombosis due to vascular damage and disturbed hemodynamics and (c augmented arterial blood pressure responses due to combined high body exertion and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Based on reviewed literature and authors’ personal experience with the use of BFRR training in injured athletes, some guidelines for its safe application are outlined. Also, a comprehensive risk assessment tool for screening of subjects prior to their inclusion in a BFRR training program is being introduced.

  11. An experimental program for physical education of rugby players at the stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Martyrosyan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a program of general physical training of rugby players at the stage of specialized basic training and to investigate the dynamics of indicators of general physical preparedness using computer technology. Material & Methods: study involved 60 athletes aged 16-18 years. Results: content of the comprehensive program of general physical training of rugby athletes at the stage of specialized basic training and the results of an experimental verification of its implementation are presented. Conclusion: in the course of the pedagogical experiment, the effectiveness of using the developed experimental program for improving the training process of rugby players of 16-18 years is proved, which is confirmed by the results of the research.

  12. Mandatory radiation safety training for interventionalists: the European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, Eliseo

    2010-09-01

    Radiation protection (RP) knowledge is of paramount importance for interventionalists. All international bodies acknowledge the importance of education and training in reducing patient doses while maintaining the desired level of quality in medical exposures. The basic recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on RP training for Interventional Radiology (IR) are summarized as follows: a second, specific level of training in RP; specific additional training whenever new X-ray systems or techniques are implemented, and quality assurance programs, including RP training. The European perspective is discussed in the framework of the Directive on Medical Exposures: Competence in RP must be certified. The Member States of the European Union shall ensure that appropriate curricula are established and shall recognize the corresponding diplomas, certificates, or formal qualifications. Some examples of the accredited training courses on RP organized by national IR Societies are described (content, training strategy, training material available, and results obtained). The work carried out in this area and the training material produced by the International Atomic Energy Agency are also quoted, together with a new set of recommendations on RP training and the certification produced by the ICRP that will be published in 2010. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Positive effects of basic training on cognitive performance and mood of adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Karl, J Philip; Niro, Philip J; Williams, Kelly W; Farina, Emily K; Cable, Sonya J; McClung, James P

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated whether a stressful military training program, the 9- to 10-week U.S. Army basic combat training (BCT) course, alters the cognitive performance and mood of healthy young adult females. Structured training programs including adolescent boot camps, sports training camps, learning enrichment programs, and military basic training are accepted methods for improving academic and social functioning. However, limited research is available on the behavioral effects of structured training programs in regard to cognitive performance and mood. Two separate, within-subject studies were conducted with different BCT classes; in total 212 female volunteers were assessed before and after BCT. In Study 1, Four-Choice Reaction Time, Match-to-Sample, and Grammatical Reasoning tests were administered. The Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) was administered in Study 2. The Profile of Mood States (POMS) was administered in both studies. In Study 1, reaction time to correct responses on all three of the performance tests improved from pre- to post-BCT. In Study 2, PVT reaction time significantly improved. All POMS subscales improved over time in the second study, whereas POMS subscales in the first study failed to meet criteria for statistically significant differences over time. Cognition and mood substantially improved over military basic training. These changes may be a result of structured physical and mental training experienced during basic training or other factors not as yet identified. Properly structured training may have extensive, beneficial effects on cognitive performance and mood; however, additional research is needed to determine what factors are responsible for such changes.

  14. Changing conversations: teaching safety and quality in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, John D; May, Natalie B; Schorling, John B; Lyman, Jason A; Schectman, Joel M; Wolf, Andrew M D; Nadkarni, Mohan M; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    Improving patient safety and quality in health care is one of medicine's most pressing challenges. Residency training programs have a unique opportunity to meet this challenge by training physicians in the science and methods of patient safety and quality improvement (QI).With support from the Health Resources and Services Administration, the authors developed an innovative, longitudinal, experiential curriculum in patient safety and QI for internal medicine residents at the University of Virginia. This two-year curriculum teaches the critical concepts and skills of patient safety and QI: systems thinking and human factors analysis, root cause analysis (RCA), and process mapping. Residents apply these skills in a series of QI and patient safety projects. The constructivist educational model creates a learning environment that actively engages residents in improving the quality and safety of their medical practice.Between 2003 and 2005, 38 residents completed RCAs of adverse events. The RCAs identified causes and proposed useful interventions that have produced important care improvements. Qualitative analysis demonstrates that the curriculum shifted residents' thinking about patient safety to a systems-based approach. Residents completed 237 outcome assessments during three years. Results indicate that seminars met predefined learning objectives and were interactive and enjoyable. Residents strongly believe they gained important skills in all domains.The challenge to improve quality and safety in health care requires physicians to learn new knowledge and skills. Graduate medical education can equip new physicians with the skills necessary to lead the movement to safer and better quality of care for all patients.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  15. Basic science research and education: a priority for training and capacity building in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckelbaum, Richard J; Ntambi, James M; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2011-09-01

    This article provides evidence that basic science research and education should be key priorities for global health training, capacity building, and practice. Currently, there are tremendous gaps between strong science education and research in developed countries (the North) as compared to developing countries (the South). In addition, science research and education appear as low priorities in many developing countries. The need to stress basic science research beyond the typical investment of infectious disease basic service and research laboratories in developing areas is significant in terms of the benefits, not only to education, but also for economic strengthening and development of human resources. There are some indications that appreciation of basic science research education and training is increasing, but this still needs to be applied more rigorously and strengthened systematically in developing countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modernisation and consolidation of the European radiation protection legislation: the new Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundigl, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    With the publication of new basic safety standards for the protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation, foreseen in Article 2 and Article 30 of the Euratom Treaty, the European Commission modernises and consolidates the European radiation protection legislation. A revision of the Basic Safety Standards was needed in order (1) to take account of the scientific and technological progress since 1996 and (2) to consolidate the existing set of Euratom radiation protection legislation, merging five Directives and upgrading a recommendation to become legally binding. The new Directive offers in a single coherent document basics safety standards for radiation protection, which take account of the most recent advances in science and technology, cover all relevant radiation sources, including natural radiation sources, integrate protection of workers, members of the public, patients and the environment, cover all exposure situations, planned, existing, emergency, and harmonise numerical values with international standards. After the publication of the Directive in the beginning of 2014, Member States have 4 y to transpose the Directive into national legislation and to implement the requirements therein. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The use of a basic safety investment model in a practical risk management context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aven, Terje, E-mail: terje.aven@uis.no [University of Stavanger (Norway); Hiriart, Yolande [University of Franche-Comte, Besancon (France)

    2011-11-15

    We consider a basic model in economic safety analysis: a firm is willing to invest an amount x in safety measures to avoid an accident A, which in the case of occurrence, leads to a loss of size L. The probability of an accident is a function of x. The optimal value of x is determined by minimizing the expected costs. In the paper, we re-examine this model by adopting a practical risk/safety management perspective. We question how this model can be used for guiding the firm and regulators in determining the proper level of investment in safety. Attention is given to issues like how to determine the probability of an accident and how to take into account uncertainties that extend beyond the expected value. It is concluded that the model, with suitable extensions and if properly implemented, provides a valuable decision support tool. By focusing on investment levels and stimulating thereby the generation of alternative risk-reducing measures, the model is considered particularly useful in risk reduction (ALARP) processes. - Highlights: > It is shown how to use a basic investment model in a practical risk management setting. > The model may be a valuable decision support tool if properly implemented. > It guides decision makers on risk reduction and how to determine what is ALARP. > The model stimulates the generation of alternative risk-reducing measures.

  18. Evaluation of the food safety training for food handlers in restaurant operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sung-Hee Park; Tong-Kyung Kwak; Hye-Ja Chang

    2010-01-01

    .... The training program and questionnaires for evaluating employee knowledge and practices concerning food safety, and a checklist for determining food safety performance of restaurants were developed...

  19. Building a culture of safety through team training and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lily; Galla, Catherine

    2013-05-01

    Medical errors continue to occur despite multiple strategies devised for their prevention. Although many safety initiatives lead to improvement, they are often short lived and unsustainable. Our goal was to build a culture of patient safety within a structure that optimised teamwork and ongoing engagement of the healthcare team. Teamwork impacts the effectiveness of care, patient safety and clinical outcomes, and team training has been identified as a strategy for enhancing teamwork, reducing medical errors and building a culture of safety in healthcare. Therefore, we implemented Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS), an evidence-based framework which was used for team training to create transformational and/or incremental changes; facilitating transformation of organisational culture, or solving specific problems. To date, TeamSTEPPS (TS) has been implemented in 14 hospitals, two Long Term Care Facilities, and outpatient areas across the North Shore LIJ Health System. 32 150 members of the healthcare team have been trained. TeamSTEPPS was piloted at a community hospital within the framework of the health system's organisational care delivery model, the Collaborative Care Model to facilitate sustainment. AHRQ's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, (HSOPSC), was administered before and after implementation of TeamSTEPPS, comparing the perception of patient safety by the heathcare team. Pilot hospital results of HSOPSC show significant improvement from 2007 (pre-TeamSTEPPS) to 2010. System-wide results of HSOPSC show similar trends to those seen in the pilot hospital. Valuable lessons for organisational success from the pilot hospital enabled rapid spread of TeamSTEPPS across the rest of the health system.

  20. SNAP Employment and Training: Washington's Basic Food Employment & Training Program (BFET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Lavanya

    2014-01-01

    SNAP Employment & Training (E&T) is an important component of SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program) that supports a variety of education, training, employment, and related services for SNAP recipients. It gives recipients opportunities to gain skills, training, or experience that will…

  1. AN EMPIRICAL SURVEY ON BASIC MILITARY TRAINING IN SLOVENIAN ARMED FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja GARB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Before employment in the Slovenian Armed Forces, all candidates have to finish basic military training. The empirical survey, done in 2011 on a group of military candidates in a Slovenian Training Center, checked the motivation, level of skills and education, attitudes of leaders, military identity, prestige and social support of these candidates. The results confirmed the skills’ and fighters’ orientation of Slovenian soldiers, but surprised with the paleomodern motivators for military job.

  2. Basic Abdominal Point-of-Care Ultrasound Training in the Undergraduate: Students as Mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Casasola, Gonzalo; Sánchez, Francisco Javier García; Luordo, Davide; Zapata, Deborah Forrester; Frías, María Carnevali; Garrido, Victoria Villena; Martínez, Javier Villanueva; de la Sotilla, Alberto Forero; Rojo, José Manuel Casas; Macho, Juan Torres

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the ability of medical students to be integrated in the teaching of basic abdominal ultrasound using a peer-mentoring design. Thirty medical students previously trained in basic abdominal ultrasound (mentors) had to teach all fourth-year students (n = 136) from a single academic year the same training they had received. There were 3 stages to the ultrasound teaching: theoretical (online course); basic training (3 practical sessions in which students were guaranteed to have had a minimum of 15 hours of practical experience with ultrasound and performed at least 20 basic abdominal ultrasound studies); and evaluation (objective structured clinical examination in which students had to obtain the basic abdominal views and to identify 17 structures). The mean grade ± SD obtained was 8.71 ± 1.53 of a possible 10 points. Only 2 students (1.56%) obtained a grade lower than 5, and 14 students (10.86%) obtained a grade lower than 7. A total of 33 students (25.5%) achieved the maximum grade. The structures most easily identified were the liver, the right kidney, and the urinary bladder, with 97.7% of correct answers. Students obtained the poorest results when trying to identify the left and right cardiac cavities (subxiphoid view), with only 53.5% and 55.8% of correct answers, respectively. Teaching based on peer mentoring achieved an adequate level of training in basic abdominal ultrasound. The students acquired these skills in a relatively short training period. These results suggest that peer mentoring can facilitate the large-scale implementation of ultrasound teaching in undergraduate students. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Natural Gas Vehicle Cylinder Safety, Training and Inspection Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hank Seiff

    2008-12-31

    Under the auspices of the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the US Department of Energy, the Clean Vehicle Education Foundation conducted a three-year program to increase the understanding of the safe and proper use and maintenance of vehicular compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel systems. High-pressure fuel systems require periodic inspection and maintenance to insure safe and proper operation. The project addressed the needs of CNG fuel containers (cylinders) and associated high-pressure fuel system components related to existing law, codes and standards (C&S), available training and inspection programs, and assured coordination among vehicle users, public safety officials, fueling station operators and training providers. The program included a public and industry awareness campaign, establishment and administration of a cylinder inspector certification training scholarship program, evaluation of current safety training and testing practices, monitoring and investigation of CNG vehicle incidents, evaluation of a cylinder recertification program and the migration of CNG vehicle safety knowledge to the nascent hydrogen vehicle community.

  4. Pre-training evaluation and feedback improved skills retention of basic life support in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Rong-hua; Liu, Jin; Lin, Jing; Ma, Er-Li; Liang, Peng; Shi, Ting-wei; Fang, Li-qun; Xiao, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Pre-training evaluation and feedback have been shown to improve medical students' skills acquisition of basic life support (BLS) immediately following training. The impact of such training on BLS skills retention is unknown. This study was conducted to investigate effects of pre-training evaluation and feedback on BLS skills retention in medical students. Three hundred and thirty 3rd year medical students were randomized to two groups, the control group (C group) and pre-training evaluation and feedback group (EF group). Each group was subdivided into four subgroups according to the time of retention-test (at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-month following the initial training). After a 45-min BLS lecture, BLS skills were assessed (pre-training evaluation) in both groups before training. Following this, the C group received 45 min training. 15 min of group feedback corresponding to students' performance in pre-training evaluation was given only in the EF group that was followed by 30 min of BLS training. BLS skills were assessed immediately after training (post-test) and at follow up (retention-test). No skills difference was observed between the two groups in pre-training evaluation. Better skills acquisition was observed in the EF group (85.3 ± 7.3 vs. 68.1 ± 12.2 in C group) at post-test (pskills retention was observed in each EF subgroup, compared with its paired C subgroup. Pre-training evaluation and feedback improved skills retention in the EF group for 12 months after the initial training, compared with the control group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors Affecting the Transfer of Basic Combat Skills Training in the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Studies, Vol. 9, 1-16. Beck, G. M. (2004). An analysis of the Air Force Basic Comunications Officer Training course : the impact of trainee and...battlefield/stories/MYSA012506.01A.airman_killed.12d18 6c2.html Clark, R., & Kwinn, A. (2005). Aligning training to business results. T + D, 59(6), 34...lead you to victory? Harvard Business Review, 80(4), 57. Colquitt, J. A., LePine, J. A., & Noe, R. A. (2000). Toward an integrative theory of training

  6. Emotional Intelligence as a Basic Competency in Pre-Service Teacher Training: Some Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomera, Raquel; Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo; Brackett, Marc A.

    2008-01-01

    This article calls for the inclusion of emotional competencies within basic competencies considered in compulsory schooling and in the objectives of pre-service teacher training that is now being designed within the European Space for Higher Education. Toward this end, we review current research on the fundamental role of emotional competencies,…

  7. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Task-shifting at this time in South Sudan is a controversial topic and is not presently government policy. Please send us your views and tell us if you agree with the authors of this article. For example: Can rural middle level non-medical health staff be trained to safely carry out basic emergency surgical procedures?

  8. Improving the Quality of Experience Journals: Training Educational Psychology Students in Basic Qualitative Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds-Keefer, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of teaching basic qualitative methodology to preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course in the quality of observation journals. Preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course requiring 45 hr of field experience were given qualitative methodological training as a part of the…

  9. Evaluating the role of Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET), in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although literacy efforts in South Africa were standardised and legitimised by the establishment of the National Qualifications Framework in 1995, Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) programmes are dwindling in numbers. Firstly, this paper seeks to position ABET within the National Qualifications Framework in a ...

  10. Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST). Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Washington's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training Program (I-BEST) quickly teaches students literacy, work, and college-readiness skills so they can move through school and into living wage jobs faster. Pioneered by Washington's community and technical colleges, I-BEST uses a team-teaching approach to combine college-readiness classes…

  11. Face validity of a Wii U video game for training basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalink, Maarten B.; Goris, Jetse; Heineman, Erik; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.; Hoedemaker, Henk O. ten Cate

    a BACKGROUND: Although the positive effects of playing video games on basic laparoscopic skills have been studied for several years, no games are actually used in surgical training. This article discusses the face validity of the first video game and custom-made hardware, which takes advantage of

  12. Using e-learning to support the Basic Medical Training programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    postgraduate Basic Medical Training (BMT) has now re- started in Juba. This entails ... the case that further improvements could well be of benefit, they are certainly adequate to be able to ... the following applicants from South Sudan and to organisations supporting students at universities in the Sudan. MagHRabI bEQuEST.

  13. Pesticide safety training and practices in women working in small-scale agriculture in South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naidoo, S.; London, L.; Rother, H.A.; Burdorf, A.; Naidoo, R.N.; Kromhout, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Unregulated use of pesticides continues in developing countries in the presence of illiteracy and limited safety training and practices. This paper describes training and safety practices when mixing and spraying pesticides, and acetylcholinesterase levels among women farmers in

  14. Cycling in the African American Community : safety training guidelines and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report is a program users manual for the Cycling in the African American Community (CAAC) safety training intervention. The CAAC safety training intervention was designed to nudge more African Americans, who are often beginning cyclists...

  15. Evaluation of Basic Life Support Training Program Provided for Nurses in A University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Terzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was conducted to assess the efficiency of the basic life support (BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. To evaluate the efficiency of the BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. Methods: In this a quasi-experimental study, a total of 404 nurses who received BLS training were enrolled. The study was performed in two stages. In stage one, the participant nurses were given a pre-test that consisted of 25 questions, four points each, before the training on the first day of the 2-day BLS training. The post-test was conducted in addition to practical exams on manikins to determine nurses’ practice skills on BLS. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the nurses with previous BLS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.05, and high statistically significant difference was found between the nurses with previous advanced life support (ALS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.001. Conclusion: Nurses should receive BLS training in hospitals and the training should be repeated on a regular basis. The BLS training that the nurses received in this study was effective and increased their knowledge level on BLS

  16. Improving technical preparedness of archers using directional development of their coordination skills on stage using the specialized basic training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonov Sergiy; Briskin Yuriy; Perederiy Alina; Pityn Maryan; Khimenes Khrystyna; Zadorozhna Olha; Semeryak Zoryana; Svystelnyk Irina

    2017-01-01

    .... The ways of improving the technical preparedness archer at the stage of basic training specialist associated with playing rhythmic, dynamic structure and maintain stability kinematic characteristics...

  17. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada tel. 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 11 mars 2004. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Clemente Pilly et Ribordy Marion de « PM postures...

  18. Knowledge of the Portuguese population on Basic Life Support and availability to attend training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria dos Anjos Coelho Rodrigues Dixe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo evaluate the level of knowledge and the availability of the Portuguese population to attend training in Basic Life Support (BLS and identify factors related to their level of knowledge about BLS.METHODObservational study including 1,700 people who responded to a questionnaire containing data on demography, profession, training, interest in training and knowledge about BLS.RESULTSAmong 754 men and 943 women, only 17.8% (303 attended a course on BLS, but 95.6% expressed willingness to carry out the training. On average, they did not show good levels of knowledge on basic life support (correct answers in 25.9 ± 11.5 of the 64 indicators. Male, older respondents who had the training and those who performed BLS gave more correct answers, on average (p<0.01.CONCLUSIONThe skill levels of the Portuguese population are low, but people are available for training, hence it is important to develop training courses and practice to improve their knowledge.

  19. Construction products performances and basic requirements for fire safety of facades in energy rehabilitation of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laban Mirjana Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction product means any product or kit which is produced and placed on the market for incorporation in a permanent manner in construction works, or parts thereof, and the performance of which has an effect on the performance of the construction works with respect to the basic requirements for construction works. Safety in case of fire and Energy economy and heat retention represent two among seven basic requirements which building has to meet according to contemporary technical rules on planning and construction. Performances of external walls building materials (particularly reaction to fire could significantly affect to fire spread on the façade and other building parts. Therefore, façade shaping and materialization in building renewal process, has to meet the fire safety requirement, as well as the energy requirement. Brief survey of fire protection regulations development in Serbia is presented in the paper. Preventive measures for fire risk reduction in building façade energy renewal are proposed according to contemporary fire safety requirements.

  20. MODEL OF TRAINING OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN LEARNING THE BASICS OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kushnir

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the adoption of a new version of the state standard of primary education and the introduction of a primary school subject "Steps to a informatics" is particularly important problem of training of primary school teachers for training in accordance with the requirements of the standard. The model of training of primary school teachers in learning the basics of information and communication technologies was based on the analysis of the scientific literature and the results of international research on the training of future teachers and the formation of their information and communications expertise, practical experience in high school,. The model provides for the implementation of competence, personal and activity approaches, taking into account psychological and educational characteristics and the educational expectations of today's students, especially in terms of selection methods, forms and means of education. Organizational and pedagogical conditions of formation of readiness of primary school teachers in learning the basics of information and communication technologies were defined. Particular attention is given to the selection of the content of training students to use digital technologies in the educational process in primary school. Criteria and indicators by which the level of readiness assessment was conducted of primary school teachers in learning the basics of information and communication technologies are shown. The model was probed on the faculty of pre-school and primary education at the Kherson State University.

  1. Essential training steps to achieving competency in the basic intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography examination for Chinese anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong G; Song, Haibo; Wang, E; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Guidelines for the intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination have defined a detailed standard for medical professionals, particularly anesthesiologists, on how a TEE exam should proceed. Over the years, TEE has gained substantial popularity and emerged as a preferred monitoring modality to aid in perioperative management and decision making during hemodynamic instability situations or critical care settings. TEE training pathways and practice guidelines have been well established in western countries and many regions of the world. However, TEE training and practice information for anesthesiologists are lacking in China. As innovative technologies develop, other educational models have emerged to aid in obtaining competency in basic TEE exam. Hence, establishing a consensus on the ideal TEE training approach for anesthesiologists in China is urgently needed. Developing an effective curriculum that can be incorporated into an anesthesiology resident's overall training is also necessary to provide knowledge and skills toward competency in basic TEE exam. With evolving medical system reforms and increasing demands for intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring to accommodate surgical innovations, anesthesiology professionals are increasingly obliged to perform intraoperative TEE exams in their current and future practices. To overcome obstacles and achieve significant progress in using the TEE modality to help in intraoperative management and surgical decision making, publishing basic TEE training guidelines for China's anesthesiologists is an important endeavor.

  2. Safety Training: Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle Cusato

    2010-01-01

        We propose a half day awareness session on the hazards posed by a poor posture while working on a screen (back pain, eyestrain, sore wrists…) and best practices to address them. The next sessions will be held on 18 November 2010 (morning session in French and afternoon session in English). The registration via the Safety Training catalogue is mandatory. Places will be allocated in order of receipt. For any further information, please contact Isabelle Cusato, 73811.  

  3. A safety culture training program enhanced the perceptions of patient safety culture of nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Ding, Si-Qing; Zhong, Zhu-Qing; Zeng, Sai-Nan; Qin, Chun-Xiang; Yi, Qi-Feng; Gong, Li-Na; Zhou, Jian-da

    2017-11-01

    Positive perceptions of patient safety culture are associated with lower rates of adverse events, but they have not been widely established in many health care organizations. The purpose of this study is to examine the impacts of a safety culture training program (SCTP) on enhancing the perceptions of patient safety in nurse managers. This was a quasi-experimental design. 83 nurse managers were recruited from five randomly selected 2nd level hospitals. Sixty-seven nurse managers received training under the educational SCTP. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC) and Chinese Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (C-SAQ) were administered just before and six months after the educational program. The data of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, patient falls, and unplanned extubations were collected. The total positive scores of HSPSC were significantly improved and four dimensions of C-SAQ significantly increased six months after SCTP. The rate of patient falls and rate of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers decreased significantly six months post SCTP. In conclusion, nurse manager participation in a SCTP can enhance the perceptions of patient safety and reduce the rates of adverse events. More rigorous trials with larger numbers of participants and a control group are needed to strengthen the conclusions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Incidence and Time to Return to Training for Stress Fractures during Military Basic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Wood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, little is known about the length of time required to rehabilitate patients from stress fractures and their return to preinjury level of physical activity. Previous studies have looked at the return to sport in athletes, in a general population, where rehabilitation is not as controlled as within a captive military population. In this study, a longitudinal prospective epidemiological database was assessed to determine the incidence of stress fractures and the time taken to rehabilitate recruits to preinjury stage of training. Findings demonstrated a background prevalence of 5% stress fractures in Royal Marine training; femoral and tibial stress fractures take 21.1 weeks to return to training with metatarsal stress fractures being the most common injury taking 12.2 weeks. Rehabilitation from stress fractures accounts for 814 weeks of recruit rehabilitation time per annum. Stress fracture incidence is still common in military training; despite this stress fracture recovery times remain constant and represent a significant interruption in training. It takes on average 5 weeks after exercise specific training has restarted to reenter training at a preinjury level, regardless of which bone has a stress fracture. Further research into their prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation is required to help reduce these burdens.

  5. Non-technical skills training to enhance patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris

    2013-06-01

      Patient safety is an increasingly recognised issue in health care. Systems-based and organisational methods of quality improvement, as well as education focusing on key clinical areas, are common, but there are few reports of educational interventions that focus on non-technical skills to address human factor sources of error. A flexible model for non-technical skills training for health care professionals has been designed based on the best available evidence, and with sound theoretical foundations.   Educational sessions to improve non-technical skills in health care have been described before. The descriptions lack the details to allow educators to replicate and innovate further.   A non-technical skills training course that can be delivered as either a half- or full-day intervention has been designed and delivered to a number of mixed groups of undergraduate medical students and doctors in postgraduate training. Participant satisfaction has been high and patient safety attitudes have improved post-intervention.   This non-technical skills educational intervention has been built on a sound evidence base, and is described so as to facilitate replication and dissemination. With the key themes laid out, clinical educators will be able to build interventions focused on numerous clinical issues that pay attention to human factor contributors to safety. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in September and October 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    DGS Unit

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in September – October. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Alphabetical order (original course titles are maintained) Chemical Safety – Introduction 11-OCT-11, 9.00 – 11.30, in English Conduite de chariots élévateurs 17-OCT-11 to 18-OCT-11, 8.00 – 17.30, in French * Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace 15-SEP-11, 9.00 – 12.30, in French 15-SEP-11, 14.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique : Personne...

  7. Train driving efficiency and safety: examining the cost of fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrian, Jillian; Hussey, Frank; Dawson, Drew

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of fatigue on train driving using data loggers on 50 locomotives operated by pairs of male train drivers (24-56 years) on an Adelaide-Melbourne corridor. Drivers' work history was used to calculate a fatigue score using Fatigue Audit Interdyne Software. Trains were assigned to one of three groups, based on drivers' maximum fatigue score: low (n = 15), moderate (n = 22) or high (n = 13) fatigue. Changes in driving parameters at different fatigue levels were investigated. A significant (P high group used 9% more fuel than drivers in the low group. As these trains run daily, taking horsepower into account, this represents an approximate extra weekly cost of AUD$3512 using high compared with low fatigue drivers. High fatigue-group drivers used less throttle and dynamic brake and engaged in more heavy brake and maximum speed violations. Comparison of three, 100 km track sub-sections with undulating, flat, and hilly grade indicated that fuel use increases occurred primarily during the undulating sub-section, and heavy brake and maximum speed violations occurred primarily in the flat sub-section. Fatigued driving becomes less well-planned, resulting in reduced efficiency (e.g. increased fuel consumption) and safety (e.g. braking and speeding violations). Fatigue may manifest differentially depending on track grade. In certain areas, fatigue will cause increased fuel use and economic cost, and in others, reduced safety through driving violations. These factors should be carefully examined in future railway operator research.

  8. Construct and concurrent validity of a Nintendo Wii video game made for training basic laparoscopic skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, M B; Goris, J; Heineman, E; Pierie, J P E N; ten Cate Hoedemaker, H O

    2014-02-01

    Virtual reality (VR) laparoscopic simulators have been around for more than 10 years and have proven to be cost- and time-effective in laparoscopic skills training. However, most simulators are, in our experience, considered less interesting by residents and are often poorly accessible. Consequently, these devices are rarely used in actual training. In an effort to make a low-cost and more attractive simulator, a custom-made Nintendo Wii game was developed. This game could ultimately be used to train the same basic skills as VR laparoscopic simulators ought to. Before such a video game can be implemented into a surgical training program, it has to be validated according to international standards. The main goal of this study was to test construct and concurrent validity of the controls of a prototype of the game. In this study, the basic laparoscopic skills of experts (surgeons, urologists, and gynecologists, n = 15) were compared to those of complete novices (internists, n = 15) using the Wii Laparoscopy (construct validity). Scores were also compared to the Fundamentals of Laparoscopy (FLS) Peg Transfer test, an already established assessment method for measuring basic laparoscopic skills (concurrent validity). Results showed that experts were 111 % faster (P = 0.001) on the Wii Laparoscopy task than novices. Also, scores of the FLS Peg Transfer test and the Wii Laparoscopy showed a significant, high correlation (r = 0.812, P concurrent validity.

  9. Effects of basic training on acute physiological responses to a combat loaded run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santtila, Matti; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kraemer, William J; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of an 8-week basic training (BT) with added strength training (ST) or endurance training (ET) on both the performance of a 3K-combat loaded run test and the acute neuromuscular and hormonal responses. All training groups improved (p < 0.001) their run-test times: ST by 12.4%, ET by 11.6%, and normal training (NT) by 10.2%. Significant acute decreases were observed in maximal isometric force of leg extensors (p < 0.01-0.05) in all subject groups following the run. Increases were observed in acute testosterone responses (p < 0.001) after the test in all groups both at pre- and post-training. However, ET and NT demonstrated lower (p < 0.001-0.05) acute post-training serum cortisol responses than ST. In conclusion, the present results indicate that within a demanding BT, the added training for ET and especially ST may be compromised in their adaptation potential due to interference from the demands of BT.

  10. Training basic laparoscopic skills using a custom-made video game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, Jetse; Jalink, Maarten B; Ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2014-09-01

    Video games are accepted and used for a wide variety of applications. In the medical world, research on the positive effects of playing games on basic laparoscopic skills is rapidly increasing. Although these benefits have been proven several times, no institution actually uses video games for surgical training. This Short Communication describes some of the theoretical backgrounds, development and underlying educational foundations of a specifically designed video game and custom-made hardware that takes advantage of the positive effects of games on basic laparoscopic skills.

  11. Effect of simulator orientation during skills training on performance of basic laparoscopic tasks by veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencioni, Rachael D; Ragle, Claude A; Kinser, Mathew L; Coffey, Todd; Fransson, Boel A

    2017-11-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether basic laparoscopic skills acquired during training in the horizontal plane would transfer to the vertical plane and vice versa. DESIGN Evaluation study. SAMPLE POPULATION 26 first- and second-year veterinary students with no prior laparoscopic skills training or surgical experience. PROCEDURES Participants were nonrandomly assigned to 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 15) underwent laparoscopic skills training in the horizontal plane, and group 2 (17) underwent laparoscopic skills training in the vertical plane. Following training, participants were tested on their ability to perform 5 laparoscopic tasks, first in the horizontal plane and then the vertical plane (group 1) or first in the vertical plane and then in the horizontal plane (group 2). All training and testing were performed with an augmented-reality laparoscopic simulator. RESULTS 3 participants in each group did not complete the study. For group 1, scores for 3 of the 5 tasks were significantly worse when tested in the vertical plane than when tested in the horizontal plane. For group 2, scores for 2 of the 5 tasks were significantly worse when tested in the horizontal plane than when tested in the vertical plane. For 3 tasks, the difference in scores for the training versus orthogonal plane was significantly lower for group 2 than for group 1. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that basic laparoscopic skills acquired in 1 plane frequently did not transfer to the orthogonal plane. Because veterinary surgeons may be required to treat patients in various positions, development of laparoscopic training models to simulate the vertical plane is recommended.

  12. Determining the effect of periodic training on the basic psychomotor skills of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Deniz; Çalışkan, Nurcan; Baykara, Zehra Gocmen; Karadağ, Ayise; Karabulut, Hatice

    2015-02-01

    Basic psychomotor skill training starts in the first year in nursing education. The psychomotor skills taught in the first year of nursing training constitute a foundation for all professional practices. Conducting periodic training for skills with which students are deficient can support mastery learning. The study was conducted as an interventional study for determining the effect of periodic training on the basic psychomotor skills learned in the Fundamentals of Nursing course. The sample consisted of 70 students attending the Fundamentals of Nursing course at nursing students in a university in Ankara, over 4 years between 2010 and 2013. The study was conducted as an interventional study for a period of 4 years. The data were collected through a questionnaire that was applied 4 times at the end of each academic year. According to the results of the forms evaluated at the end of each year, 4 additional laboratory activities were conducted addressing the deficient psychomotor skills of students at the beginning of the new academic semester in the 2nd and 3rd years. In the 4th-year clinic practice, courses were arranged to practice still deficient psychomotor skills. It was determined that students practiced nearly all of the basic psychomotor skills during clinical practice and that the practices with which they felt themselves to be inadequate gradually decreased following periodic training; this decrease was significant (ppsychomotor skills of nursing students was effective. We recommend that students' psychomotor skills be evaluated periodically and repetitive training based on the results of this evaluation be provided throughout the undergraduate nursing education process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. BASIC CONCEPTS OF INFORMATICS IN THE CONTENT OF TRAINING INVERSE PROBLEMS FOR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В С Корнилов

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In article the attention to identification of intersubject communications of applied mathematics and informatics when training students of higher educational institutions of the physical and mathematical and natural-science directions of preparation to the return tasks for the differential equations is paid. At such training at students creative abilities develop, are formed not only scientific outlook and fundamental knowledge in the field of the theory and practice of the return tasks, but also system of knowledge of basic concepts of informatics, as scientific discipline.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Supervised Strength Training Adopted in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Patrick J.; Poudevigne, Melanie S.; Cress, M. Elaine; Motl, Robert W.; Clapp, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Describe safety and efficacy of a supervised, low-to-moderate intensity strength training program adopted during pregnancy among women at increased risk for back pain. Methods 32 women adopted strength training twice per week for 12 weeks. Data on musculoskeletal injuries, symptoms, blood pressure, and the absolute external load used for 5 of 6 exercises were obtained during each session. A submaximal lumbar extension endurance exercise test was performed at weeks 5, 10, and 13. Results The mean (± SD) exercise session attendance rate was 80.5% (± 11.3%). No musculoskeletal injuries occurred. Potentially adverse symptoms (eg, dizziness) were infrequent (2.1% of sessions). Repeated-measures ANOVA showed large increases in the external load across 12 weeks (all P values < .001) and the percentage increases in external load from weeks 1 to 12 were 36% for leg press, 39% for leg curl, 39% for lat pull down, 41% for lumbar extension and 56% for leg extension. Training was associated with a 14% increase in lumbar endurance. Blood pressure was unchanged following acute exercise sessions and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Conclusion The adoption of a supervised, low-to-moderate intensity strength training program during pregnancy can be safe and efficacious for pregnant women. PMID:21487130

  15. Safety in the mountaineering practices: training in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Palacio

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education Teaching with Orientation in Regional Mountain Activities at the Universidad Nacional del Comahue (PEF-CRUB-UNCo is the only one in the country that has a history with over 20 years of training physical education teachers with a particular orientation. It was through dynamic and continuous work over the years that theoretical and practical appropriate contents could be defined for this career.(Palacios, Lopez, Schneider, 2011 Coincidences with those experiences made in other countries such as Spain and Germany where the climbing activities are part of the teacher training and educational curricula have been noticed. (Saez Padilla, Gimenez, Fuentes Guerra 2005; Arribas Cubero 2008; Winter, 2000. It was determined together with other authors (Hepp, Güllich and Heidorn, 2001 that the contents related to Trekking and Climbing are the correct ones to develop a Teaching Program with these characteristics. The handling of safety conditions as an educational content is a permanent concern that challenges the activity. This paper will explain the conditions of safety that had been compiled over the years from experience, permanent research, consultation of specialized literature and actions carried out in teacher training

  16. Safety Training: scheduled sessions in September and October 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The following training courses are scheduled in September – October. You can find the full Safety Training programme on the Safety Training online catalogue. If you are interested in attending any of the below courses, please talk to your supervisor, then apply electronically via EDH from the course description pages, by clicking on SIGN-UP. Registration for all courses is always open – sessions for the less-requested courses are organized on a demand-basis only. Depending on the demand, a session will be organised later in the year. Alphabetical order (original course titles are maintained) Conduite de chariots élévateurs 17-OCT-11 to 18-OCT-11, 8.00 – 17.30, in French * Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace 15-SEP-11, 9.00 – 12.30, in French 15-SEP-11, 14.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique : Personnel électricien effectuant des opérations du domaine de tension BTA...

  17. The Safety Training Centre is also used for recruitment

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The Safety Training Centre on the Prévessin site boasts not only a life-sized mock-up of the LHC accelerator but also a number of other simulators, such as those used for electrical work certification (“habilitation électrique"). What better place to test the technical competencies of candidates applying for a job in the CERN Fire Brigade?     Instructors put the technical competencies of candidates applying for positions in the CERN Fire Brigade to the test in the tunnel that houses the LHC mock-up.   On 4 and 5 November, the Fire and Rescue Service’s facilities were used for the first time by the selection committee for a staff position. This gave candidates the chance to show their abilities and physical fitness in practice. CERN’s Safety Training Centre, which was fitted with a mock-up of the LHC in 2013, is becoming more and more widely used: by the Fire Brigade for their professional training sessions, incl...

  18. Training basic laparoscopic skills using a custom-made video game

    OpenAIRE

    Goris, Jetse; Jalink, Maarten B; Ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2014-01-01

    Video games are accepted and used for a wide variety of applications. In the medical world, research on the positive effects of playing games on basic laparoscopic skills is rapidly increasing. Although these benefits have been proven several times, no institution actually uses video games for surgical training. This Short Communication describes some of the theoretical backgrounds, development and underlying educational foundations of a specifically designed video game and custom-made hardwa...

  19. The Spiritual Needs of the Religiously Unaffiliated Airmen and Trainees in Basic Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    and Trainees in Basic Military Training presented at/published to the Division 19 Section, APA Conference 2016, Denver, CO 5 Aug 2016 with MDWI 41...demonstrated at meeting: name of meeting, city, state. and date of meeting.) Division 19 Section, APA Conference 2016, Denver, CO, 05 AUG 16 D 11d. PLATFORM...of this population. The program includes an 8-week sequential format through the following topics: (1) Humanism, Communication, and Military Life, (2

  20. Standard basic emergency obstetric and neonatal care training in Addis Ababa; trainees reaction and knowledge acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkuzie, Alemnesh H; Sisay, Mitike Molla; Bedane, Mulu Muleta

    2014-09-24

    In 2010, the Federal Ministry of Health of Ethiopia (FMOH) has developed standard Basic Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (BEmONC) in-service training curricula to respond to the high demand for competency in EmONC. However, the effectiveness of the training curricula has not been well documented. A collaborative intervention project in Addis Ababa has trained providers using the standard BEmONC curricula where this paper presents Krikpartick level 1 and level 2 evaluation of the training. The project has been conducted in 10 randomly selected public health centers (HC) in Addis Ababa. Providers working in the labour wards of the selected HCs have received the standard BEmONC training between May and July 2013. Using standard tools, trainees' reaction to the course and factual knowledge during the immediate post-course and six months after the training were assessed. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were done. Of the total 82 providers who received the training, 30 (36.6%) were male, 61 (74.4%) were midwives. Providers' work experiences ranged from 1 month to 37 years. Seventy-four (89%) providers reported that the training was appropriate for their work, 95% reported that the training have updated their knowledge & skills, while 27 (32.9%) reported that the training facilities & arrangements were unsatisfactory. The mean immediate post-course knowledge score was 83.5% and 33 (40%) providers did not achieve knowledge-based mastery in their first attempt. The midwives were more likely to achieve knowledge-based mastery than the nurses (p knowledge score six-months post-training was 80.2% and 40% have scored knowledge based mastery. Being one of the first papers reporting the implementation of the standard in-service BEmONC training curriculum, we have identified an important limitation on the course evaluations of the curriculum, which need urgent consideration. The majority of the trainees has reported favourable reaction to the training, but many of them

  1. [Training in patient safety in medical and nursing schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, J J; Guilabert, M; Vitaller, J; Ignacio, E

    2016-01-01

    To compare the information on patient safety received by students of medicine and nursing. Cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenience sample of medical and nursing students of 3 Universities. The Latin Patient Safety Student Information and a test of 5 questions with 5 options were used. A sample of 79 students in each group was enrolled to detect differences of .3 units (bilateral estimation), considering 80% statistical power and 95% confidence interval. A total of 144 students replied (74 nursing and 70 medicine students). Nursing students achieved higher scores in the communication with patients factor (3.8 vs 3.2, P<.001) and proactive attitude to identify risks for patient safety (4.3 vs 3.8, P<.001). Medical students were more aware of the inevitability of adverse events (2.3 vs 3.1, P<.001). Ten (7%) students had only one fault in the test, and only one (1%) answered all questions correctly. The training in patient safety should be improved both in nursing and medicine, although nursing students receive more information. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. New safety training for access to the PS complex areas

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Since 10/08/2012, a new course dedicated to the specific radiological risks in the accelerators of the PS complex has been available on SIR (https://sir.cern.ch/). This course complements the general classroom-based Radiation Safety training. Successful completion of the course will be obligatory and verified by the access system as from 01/11/2012 for access to the following accelerator areas: LINAC2, BOOSTER, PS and TT2. Information and reminder e-mails will be sent to all persons currently authorized to access the accelerators of the PS complex. For questions please contact the HSE unit and in particular, the Radiation Protection Group (+41227672504 or safety-rp-ps-complex@cern.ch).

  3. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Basic Life Support Training on the Knowledge and Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzalimoghaddam M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Basic Life Support (BLS as the first level of medical care in sudden cardiac arrest and life-threatening illnesses can improve survival outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the knowledge and skills of BLS among medical students at the beginning and the end of the training course in the emergency department. Materials and Methods:This study was a descriptive analytic cross- sectional study among 90 medical students in their sixth academic year during emergency medicine training course. At first, a standard Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE was performed to obtain their basic knowledge and skills of BLS. Then a training course was provided in two theoretical and practical parts using the 2006 American Heart Association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care. At the end of the study, the same standard OSCE was performed. Results: The mean score of the primary OSCE was 4.9 with 55 students (61.11% having a score between zero to five and 35 (35.89% between five to ten.  The mean scores increased significantly after training regarding checking the patient's response, head tilt and chin lift maneuvers, number of massages and correct breathing (p

  4. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATORS OF BASIC EDUCATION TEACHERS IN A TRAINING CENTER IN MATO GROSSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARLI ELIZA DALMAZO AFONSO DE ANDRE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data from a study that investigated the professional development of teacher educators who work in the Training Centre for Basic Education Professionals (Cefapro in the state of Mato Grosso. They are responsible for the implementation of continuing education in schools. The methodological procedures included a survey with all teacher educators (PF, focus group with five PFs and systematic observation of the performance of a PF. The theoretical framework was based on studies of authors such as Carlos Marcelo (1992; 1996; 1999; 2009, Jacky Beillerot (1996 and Marguerite Altet (2003. The analysis focused on the relationship between Teacher educators and their functions, those prescribed by the Training Policy, as well as those determined by the training needs of teachers in school, understanding that this relationship guides the development of professionalism of this new educational actor.

  5. Impact of simulation training on Jordanian nurses' performance of basic life support skills: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubasi, Samar; Alosta, Mohammed R; Darawad, Muhammad W; Demeh, Waddah

    2015-09-01

    Providing efficient basic life support (BLS) training is crucial for practicing nurses who provide direct patient care. Nevertheless, data addressing the impact of BLS courses on the skills and performance of Jordanian nurses are scarce. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a BLS simulation training on Jordanian nurses' skill improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A prospective quasi-experimental, single group pretest-posttest design was used to study the effect of BLS simulation; using a 9-item checklist; on the spot training; American Heart Association, on a group of Jordanian nurses. A pre-test was conducted following a CPR scenario to test the skills using 9-item checklist extrapolated from the American Heart Association guidelines. After debriefing, an interactive on spot training was provided. Later, participants undertook an unscheduled post-test after four weeks that included the same nine items. Thirty registered nurses with a mean clinical experience of 6.1years participated in the study. Comparing pre-test (M=4.6, SD=2.9, range=0 to 9) with post-test results (M=7.5, SD=1.7, range=4 to 9) showed an overall improvement in skills and BLS scores after the simulation training program (t=7.4, df=29, pskills and performance among Jordanian nurses. A refreshment BLS training session for nurses is highly recommended to guarantee nurses' preparedness in actual CPR scenarios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on the Countermeasures Based on TTPM Theory for the Improvement of the Basic Education Teachers Training Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huabai, Bu; Dengyu, Zhang; Xiuying, Shen; Hao, Tu

    2012-01-01

    Many elements of the basic education teachers' training performance are embedded in the training interaction and sharing, so the enhancement of the training performance needs a whole process management and control. Based on TTPM theory, this paper has put forward four measures that must be pay attention to during the management of the basic…

  7. Maximising safety of cataract surgery training: improving patient safety by reducing cataract surgery complication rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, E-Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Cataract surgery is a highly successful, high-volume surgery, hence reducing surgical complications are imperative for organizations to deliver cost-effective, high-quality services that meet the needs of patients. This paper aims to describe 18-month results of a sustainable program to maximize the safety of cataract surgery training. Modifications to the comprehensive cataract-training program and tested were developed in a controlled, interventional case series to evaluate their effect on trainee complication rates. Data collection and interpretation were performed in a prospective and blind manner. Prior to intervention, PCR rates for trainee-surgeons averaged 3.34 per cent cf international published figures of 4.6-10 per cent. This compared with 1.89 per cent PCR rate for trained cataract surgeons (p safety. After 18 months follow-up data were consistent with a statistically significant reduction in trainee PCR rates (1.53 per cent, p goals can be extrapolated to other surgical disciplines. This is the first study to demonstrate maximally safe and effective cataract surgery training in a large patient group, over sustained periods.

  8. The effect of strength training on quality of prolonged basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; Szarpak, Łukasz; García-García, Óscar; Paz-Domínguez, Álvaro; López-García, Sergio; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Providing high-quality chest compressions and rescue breaths are key elements in the effectiveness of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. To investigate the effects of a strength training programme on the quality of prolonged basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin. This was a quasi-experimental trial. Thirty-nine participants with prior basic life support knowledge were randomised to an experimental or control group. They then performed a test of 10 min of chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth ventilation on manikins equipped with a skill reporter tool (baseline or test 1). The experimental group participated in a four-week strength training programme focused on the muscles involved in chest compressions. Both groups were subsequently tested again (test 2). After training, the experimental group significantly increased the mean depth of compression (53.7 ± 2.3 mm vs. 49.9 ± 5.9 mm; p = 0.003) and the correct compression fraction (68.2 ± 21.0% vs. 46.4 ± 29.1%; p = 0.004). Trained subjects maintained chest compression quality over time better than the control group. The mean tidal volume delivered was higher in the experimental than in the control group (701.5 ± 187.0 mL vs. 584.8 ± 113.6 mL; p = 0.040) and above the current resuscitation guidelines. In test 2, the percentage of rescue breaths with excessive volume was higher in the experi-mental group than in the controls (31.5 ± 19.6% vs. 15.6 ± 13.0%; p = 0.007). A simple strength training programme has a significant impact on the quality of chest compressions and its maintenance over time. Additional training is needed to avoid over-ventilation of potential patients.

  9. How to design a genetic mating scheme: a basic training package for Drosophila genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roote, John; Prokop, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for biological research. The essential and common instrument of fly research is genetics, the art of applying Mendelian rules in the specific context of Drosophila with its unique classical genetic tools and the breadth of modern genetic tools and strategies brought in by molecular biology, transgenic technologies and the use of recombinases. Training newcomers to fly genetics is a complex and time-consuming task but too important to be left to chance. Surprisingly, suitable training resources for beginners currently are not available. Here we provide a training package for basic Drosophila genetics, designed to ensure that basic knowledge on all key areas is covered while reducing the time invested by trainers. First, a manual introduces to fly history, rationale for mating schemes, fly handling, Mendelian rules in fly, markers and balancers, mating scheme design, and transgenic technologies. Its self-study is followed by a practical training session on gender and marker selection, introducing real flies under the dissecting microscope. Next, through self-study of a PowerPoint presentation, trainees are guided step-by-step through a mating scheme. Finally, to consolidate knowledge, trainees are asked to design similar mating schemes reflecting routine tasks in a fly laboratory. This exercise requires individual feedback but also provides unique opportunities for trainers to spot weaknesses and strengths of each trainee and take remedial action. This training package is being successfully applied at the Manchester fly facility and may serve as a model for further training resources covering other aspects of fly research.

  10. 49 CFR 238.105 - Train electronic hardware and software safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Train electronic hardware and software safety. 238... and General Requirements § 238.105 Train electronic hardware and software safety. The requirements of this section apply to electronic hardware and software used to control or monitor safety functions in...

  11. Evaluation of the food safety training for food handlers in restaurant operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hee; Kwak, Tong-Kyung; Chang, Hye-Ja

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the extent of improvement of food safety knowledge and practices of employee through food safety training. Employee knowledge and practice for food safety were evaluated before and after the food safety training program. The training program and questionnaires for evaluating employee knowledge and practices concerning food safety, and a checklist for determining food safety performance of restaurants were developed. Data were analyzed using the SPSS program. Twelve restaurants participated in this study. We split them into two groups: the intervention group with training, and the control group without food safety training. Employee knowledge of the intervention group also showed a significant improvement in their score, increasing from 49.3 before the training to 66.6 after training. But in terms of employee practices and the sanitation performance, there were no significant increases after the training. From these results, we recommended that the more job-specific and hand-on training materials for restaurant employees should be developed and more continuous implementation of the food safety training and integration of employee appraisal program with the outcome of safety training were needed.

  12. Perceptions of basic, advanced, and pediatric life support training in a United States medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Malford Tyson; Stader, Donald; Nguyen, Matthew; Cao, Dazhe; McArthur, Robert; Hoxhaj, Shkelzen

    2014-05-01

    Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) are integral parts of emergency resuscitative care. Although this training is usually reserved for residents, introducing the training in the medical student curriculum may enhance acquisition and retention of these skills. We developed a survey to characterize the perceptions and needs of graduating medical students regarding BLS, ACLS, and PALS training. This was a study of graduating 4th-year medical students at a U.S. medical school. The students were surveyed prior to participating in an ACLS course in March of their final year. Of 152 students, 109 (71.7%) completed the survey; 48.6% of students entered medical school without any prior training and 47.7% started clinics without training; 83.4% of students reported witnessing an average of 3.0 in-hospital cardiac arrests during training (range of 0-20). Overall, students rated their preparedness 2.0 (SD 1.0) for adult resuscitations and 1.7 (SD 0.9) for pediatric resuscitations on a 1-5 Likert scale, with 1 being unprepared. A total of 36.8% of students avoided participating in resuscitations due to lack of training; 98.2%, 91.7%, and 64.2% of students believe that BLS, ACLS, and PALS, respectively, should be included in the medical student curriculum. As per previous studies that have examined this topic, students feel unprepared to respond to cardiac arrests and resuscitations. They feel that training is needed in their curriculum and would possibly enhance perceived comfort levels and willingness to participate in resuscitations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Analysis of Trainers' Perspectives within an Ecological Framework: Factors that Influence Mine Safety Training Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Haas

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: This study offers a new technique to identify limitations in safety training systems and processes. The analysis suggests that training should be developed and disseminated with consideration of various levels—individual, interpersonal, organizational, and community—to promote skills. If factors identified within and between levels are addressed, it may be easier to sustain mineworker competencies that are established during safety training.

  14. Efficacy of the Stranger Safety Abduction-Prevention Program and Parent-Conducted in Situ Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Fogel, Victoria A.; Beck, Kimberly V.; Koehler, Shannon; Shayne, Rachel; Noah, Jennifer; McFee, Krystal; Perdomo, Andrea; Chan, Paula; Simmons, Danica; Godish, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Using a control group design, we evaluated the effectiveness of the "Stranger Safety" DVD (The Safe Side, 2004) and parent training of abduction-prevention skills with 6- to 8-year-old children. Children in the training or control group who did not demonstrate the safety skills received in situ training from their parents. There was no…

  15. Safety training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 8 juillet 2004. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures » . L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation et Développement (groupe sécurité) de HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.chFORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch

  16. Safety Training: Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons un nouveau cours de sécurité lié aux manutentions manuelles (durée 1 jour) : Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail. Si vous êtes amené à manipuler régulièrement des charges lourdes ou volumineuses, cette formation peut vous aider à prévenir les lésions musculaires ou dorsales. A l'issue de cette formation, vous serez capable d'adopter et d'appliquer les principes de base de sécurité physique et d'économie d'efforts dans les manipulations d'objets. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité. L'inscription EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité). FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch

  17. Level of knowledge among the population of radiation safety basic issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Zelencova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of research was to determine the level of knowledge among the population on issues like sources of ionising radiation, methods of ionising radiation measurement, measures of self-protection in case of threating or actual radioactive pollution in the district, and to study self-estimation by the population of their knowledge of radiation safety issues. Research was carried out using the method of questioning of population groups in three regions close to the places of previous peaceful nuclear explosions (Arkhangelsk, Murmansk and Tyumen regions, and in five Far East regions of the Russian Federation (Kamchatka, Khabarovsk, Primorsky, Magadan and South-Sakhalin regions after radiation accident in Japan at "Fukushima-1" NPP. This research included processing of 243 questionnaires from the regions close to places of previous peaceful nuclear explosions and 216 questionnaires from the Far East regions.The analysis of obtained questioning results enabled to make the following conclusions: the level of knowledge among the population about the basic concepts of radiation safety appeared to be generally low among respondents of all eight territories. Considerable number of respondents in seven groups correctly mentioned the x-ray device as a source of ionising radiation (from 71 to 88 % of answers. In Murmansk region – only 52 % of the answers. Respondents of the same seven groups often correctly answered the question on how to detect ionising radiation (only with devices – from 68 to 98 % in different groups. The smallest number of correct answers to this question (42 % is also noted among respondents from the Murmansk region.Level of knowledge on self-protection measures at threating or actual radioactive pollution of the places of residence appeared a little higher among the Far East region population, who had actual concerns regarding the threat of radioactive pollution at the present time. However, in all eight investigated groups

  18. Face validity of a Wii U video game for training basic laparoscopic skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, Maarten B; Goris, Jetse; Heineman, Erik; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; Ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2015-06-01

    Although the positive effects of playing video games on basic laparoscopic skills have been studied for several years, no games are actually used in surgical training. This article discusses the face validity of the first video game and custom-made hardware, which takes advantage of these effects. Participants were recruited at the Chirurgendagen 2013 and the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons 2014 annual meeting. In total, 72 laparoscopic surgeons completed a demo of the game and filled in a questionnaire. On a 1-to-10 scale, the mean score for hardware realism was 7.2 and the mean score for usefulness as a training tool was 8.4. Participants did not mind the fact that the workspace does not look like an abdominal cavity, but do have some trouble with the absence of tactile feedback. We obtained face validity for both the hardware and the usefulness of Underground, a video game made for training basic laparoscopic skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. UPDATING THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF PROJECT EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY IN FUTURE MUSIC TEACHERS’ VOCAL AND CHORAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Haiye

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to characterizing features of implementing project technology into future music teachers’ vocal and choral training. The analysis of scientific papers of outstanding scientists in philosophy, psychology, and art education, which deal with modern directions of using project technology, highlight its role in art education process. A methodological base is supported by considering contemporary scientific researches, in particular the theory and methodology of musical studies in accordance with forming students’ independence in the process of solving educational problems by means of project technology; developing principles of students’ professional training optimization on the basis of project activity; innovative development of future music teachers’ professional training that gives to the presented material novelty and presentable appearance. Studying future music teachers’ vocal and choral training as a process of constructing that has a special purpose of improving the quality descriptions of educational vocal and choral collective sound functioning, the author of the article discloses the basic principles of implementing project technology into future music teachers’ vocal and choral training. The author of the article pays the special attention to revealing specific features and maintenance of project technology in vocal and choral training of future leaders of child's art groups. An emphasis is made on the following basic factors that influence development of students’ creative individuality: constructing projects of their own becoming; setting aims, tasks, strategies and facilities of vocal and choral work; directing to the result; independent creative activity; presentation, reflection and correction of a project. On the basis of the obtained data the following principles of project technology are put forward in future music teachers’ vocal and choral training: principle of independence; principle of

  20. [A first step to teaching basic life support in schools: Training the teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel López, María; Martínez-Isasi, Santiago; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; Fernández-Méndez, Felipe; Vázquez Santamariña, David; Sánchez-Santos, Luis; Rodríguez-Nuñez, Antonio

    2017-12-07

    Teachers may have an essential role in basic life support (BLS) training in schoolchildren. However, few data are available about their BLS learning abilities. To quantitatively assess the quality of BLS when performed by school teachers after a brief and simple training program. A quasi-experimental study with no control group, and involving primary and secondary education teachers from four privately managed and public funded schools was conducted in 3 stages: 1st. A knowledge test, 2nd: BLS training, and 3rd: Performance test. Training included a 40minutes lecture and 80minutes hands-on session with the help feedback on the quality of the chest compressions. A total of 81 teachers were included, of which 60.5% were women. After training, the percentage of subjects able to perform the BLS sequence rose from 1.2% to 46% (P<.001). Chest compression quality also improved significantly in terms of: correct hands position (97.6 vs. 72.3%; P<.001), mean depth (48.1 vs. 38.8mm; P<.001), percentage that reached recommended depth (46.5 vs. 21.5%; P<.001), percentage of adequate decompression (78.7 vs. 61.2%; P<.05), and percentage of compressions delivered at recommended rate (64.2 vs. 26.9%; P<.001). After and brief and simple training program, teachers of privately managed public funded schools were able to perform the BLS sequence and to produce chest compressions with a quality similar to that obtained by staff with a duty to assist cardiac arrest victims. The ability of schoolteachers to deliver good-quality BLS is a pre-requisite to be engaged in BLS training for schoolchildren. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  1. Using a Training Video to Improve Agricultural Workers' Knowledge of On-Farm Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Morley, Katija; Chapman, Benjamin; Powell, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A training video was produced and evaluated to assess its impact on the food safety knowledge of agricultural workers. Increasing food safety knowledge on the farm may help to improve the safety of fresh produce. Surveys were used to measure workers' food safety knowledge before and after viewing the video. Focus groups were used to determine…

  2. Low-fidelity bench models for basic surgical skills training during undergraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Denadai

    Full Text Available It is remarkable the reduction in the number of medical students choosing general surgery as a career. In this context, new possibilities in the field of surgical education should be developed to combat this lack of interest. In this study, a program of surgical training based on learning with models of low-fidelity bench is designed as a complementary alternative to the various methodologies in the teaching of basic surgical skills during medical education, and to develop personal interests in career choice.

  3. Evaluating Behavioral Skills Training with and without Simulated in Situ Training for Teaching Safety Skills to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Raymond; Gross, Amy; Knudson, Peter; Bosch, Amanda; Jostad, Candice; Breitwieser, Carrie Brower

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) to BST plus simulated in situ training (SIT) for teaching safety skills to children to prevent gun play. The results were evaluated in a posttest only control group design. Following the first assessment, participants in both training groups and the control group who did not…

  4. Improvement of technical training of sportswomen in rhythmic gymnastics by means of acrobatics at the stage of preliminary basic preparation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyzim, Petro; Batieieva, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to prove experimentally the technique of improvement of technical training of sportswomen in rhythmic gymnastics by means of acrobatics at the stage of preliminary basic preparation. Material & Methods...

  5. Wilderness First Aid Training as a Tool for Improving Basic Medical Knowledge in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Lindsay B; Douglas, William S; Lena, Sean R; Ratner, Kyle G; Crothers, Daniel; Zondervan, Robert L; Radis, Charles D

    2015-12-01

    The challenges presented by traumatic injuries in low-resource communities are especially relevant in South Sudan. This study was conducted to assess whether a 3-day wilderness first aid (WFA) training course taught in South Sudan improved first aid knowledge. Stonehearth Open Learning Opportunities (SOLO) Schools designed the course to teach people with limited medical knowledge to use materials from their environment to provide life-saving care in the event of an emergency. A pre-test/post-test study design was used to assess first aid knowledge of 46 community members in Kit, South Sudan, according to a protocol approved by the University of New England Institutional Review Board. The course and assessments were administered in English and translated in real-time to Acholi and Arabic, the two primary languages spoken in the Kit region. Descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, and correlation analyses were conducted. Results included a statistically significant improvement in first aid knowledge after the 3-day training course: t(38)=3.94; Pfirst of its kind in South Sudan, provides evidence that a WFA training course in South Sudan is efficacious. These findings suggest that similar training opportunities could be used in other parts of the world to improve basic medical knowledge in communities with limited access to medical resources and varying levels of education and professional experiences.

  6. The effect of training and job interruptions on logging crews' safety in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out in Sokoine University of Agriculture Training Forest to assess the effect of training and job interruptions on logging crews' safety during tree cutting using chainsaw and two-man cross cut saws. For each cutting method, experienced and inexperienced crews were studied before training, after training ...

  7. Safety Training - places available in November - December 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   November - December 2012 (alphabetical order) Conduite de chariots élévateurs (Driving of Forklifts) 08-NOV-12 to 09-NOV-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in French 22-NOV-12 to 23-NOV-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in French 10-DEC-12 to 11-DEC-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in French With the possibility to have the handouts in English Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Driving of Cherry-pickers) 05-NOV-12 to 06-NOV-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in French 19-NOV-12 to 20-NOV-12, 8.30 – 17.30, in French With the possibility to have the handouts in English Echafaudages - Réception, conformité (Scaffolding – Reception and conformity) 20-NOV-12 to 21-NOV-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French (outside CERN, Bourg-en-Bresse) First-Aiders – bas...

  8. Safety Training: places available in July / August 2012

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and to register, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue.   July / August 2012 (alphabetical order)   Radiological Protection 02-JUL-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 06-JUL-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English 12-JUL-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 19-JUL-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English 27-JUL-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 10-AUG-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 21-AUG-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 24-AUG-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English 28-AUG-12, 8.30 – 12.30, in English 31-AUG-12, 13.30 – 17.30, in English Refresher course for driving forklifts 03-JUL-12, 8.00 – 17.30, in French (with possibility to have the handouts in English) Refresher course for Electricians in Low voltage 29-AUG-12 to 30-AUG-12, 9.00 – 17.30, in French Refresher course for Electricians in Low and High voltage 30-AUG-12 to 31-AUG-12, .00 ...

  9. Safety Training: places available in November - December 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   November - December 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de chariots élévateurs (Driving of forklifts) 04-NOV-13 to 05-NOV-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Driving of cherry-pickers) 09-DEC-13 to 10-DEC-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (Electrical habilitation for electricians in low voltage) 30-OCT-13 to 01-NOV-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English 04-NOV-13 to 06-NOV-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse et haute tensions (Electrical habilitation for electricians in low and high voltage) 16-DEC-13 to 19-DEC-13, 9.00 &...

  10. Safety Training: places available in November - December 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle CUSATO, HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    There are places available in the forthcoming Safety courses. For updates and registrations, please refer to the Safety Training Catalogue (see here).   November - December 2013 (alphabetical order) Conduite de chariots élévateurs (Driving of forklifts) 04-NOV-13 to 05-NOV-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Conduite de plates-formes élévatrices mobiles de personnel (PEMP) (Driving of cherry-pickers) 09-DEC-13 to 10-DEC-13, 8.30 – 17.30, in French with handouts in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse tension (Electrical habilitation for electricians in low voltage) 30-OCT-13 to 01-NOV-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English 04-NOV-13 to 06-NOV-13, 9.00 – 17.30, in English Habilitation électrique personnel électricien basse et haute tensions (Electrical habilitation for electricians in low and high voltage) 16-DEC-13 to 19-DEC-13, 9.00 &am...

  11. [Use of a virtual immersion computer simulator as a model for basic training in laparoscopic urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Covarrubias, F; Martínez Liévano, L; Gabilondo Pliego, B; Gabilondo Navarro, F; Atisha-Fregoso, Y; Arroyo, C

    2006-09-01

    to date, it has not been defined the best method for teaching urologic laparoscopy, however it is well recognized that it involves a steep learning curve. A course of Laparoscopic Urology was done in our Institute. The program included skill practices in a virtual immersion simulator which evaluated, the score and time to complete each activity. This was done in a group of residents with previous experience with this virtual simulator (group 1) and another group of residents with no experience (group 2). Four different basic tasks were performed in the virtual simulator, which included: coordination, cutting, clip application and performing a simple suture. When we compared the scores between both groups the mean scores for each task were superior in group 1 compared to the group 2, with no statistically significant difference, however when we compared the time to complete each task, it was shorter in group 1 compared to group 2 with a statistically significant difference. The performance of residents without experience in a virtual simulator was similar to that of previously trained residents, however it takes less time to complete each task as the resident gains experience in these simulators. The use of virtual simulators for laparoscopy training are useful when learning basic techniques allowing the surgeon to improve hand dexterity and coordination in laparoscopic surgery.

  12. Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Foot Shape in Air Force Basic Military Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Brosch, Lorie C; Venuto, Margaret; Swedler, David I; Bullock, Steven H; Gaines, Lorraine S; Murphy, Ryan J; Canada, Sara E; Hoedebecke, Edward L; Tobler, Steven K

    2008-01-01

    In response to a request from the Military Training Task Force of the Defense Safety Oversight Council this study examined whether prescribing running shoes based on the shape of the plantar surface...

  13. Basic and safety principles for man-machine interface, marking and identification - Identification of conductors by colours or numerals

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Provides general rules for the use of certain colours or numerals to identify conductors with the aim of avoiding ambiguity and ensuring safe operation. These conductors may be applied in cables or cores, busbars, electrical equipment and installations. Has the status of a basic safety publication in accordance with the principles given in IEC Guide 104 and ISO/IEC Guide 51.

  14. Multimedia for occupational safety and health training: a pilot study examining a multimedia learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Erik S; Mulloy, Karen B

    2006-10-01

    Occupational diseases are a significant problem affecting public health. Safety training is an important method of preventing occupational illness. Training is increasingly being delivered by computer although theories of learning from computer-based multimedia have been tested almost entirely on college students. This study was designed to determine whether these theories might also be applied to safety training applications for working adults. Participants viewed either computer-based multimedia respirator use training with concurrent narration, narration prior to the animation, or unrelated safety training. Participants then took a five-item transfer test which measured their ability to use their knowledge in new and creative ways. Participants who viewed the computer-based multimedia trainings both did significantly better than the control group on the transfer test. The results of this pilot study suggest that design guidelines developed for younger learners may be effective for training workers in occupational safety and health although more investigation is needed.

  15. Sex and age differences in physical performance: A comparison of Army basic training and operational populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Esther O; Anderson, Morgan K; Grier, Tyson; Alemany, Joseph A; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-11-01

    To determine the age- and sex-specific differences of physical fitness performances and Body Mass Index (BMI) in basic training and the operational Army. Cross-sectional Study. This secondary analysis utilizes retrospective surveys of U.S. Army Soldiers in Basic Combat Training (BCT) and operational units to compare physical performances between men and women as measured by the Army Physical Readiness Test (APFT). An ANOVA was used to compare mean differences in APFT results and BMI within sex-specific populations. A post hoc Tukey test identified specific mean differences. Adjusting for age, an ANCOVA was used to compare sex and occupation (infantry and non-infantry) differences in APFT results. Surveyed populations consisted of 2216 BCT Soldiers (1573 men and 643 women) and 5515 Operational Soldiers (4987 men and 528 women). Male and female operational Soldiers had greater muscular performance (79%-125% higher APFT push-ups, 66%-85% higher APFT sit-ups) and cardiorespiratory performance (22%-24% faster APFT 2-mile run times) than BCT Soldiers. Male BCT and operational Soldiers outperform their female counterparts on tests of muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance. Sex differences in physical performances attenuated among female Soldiers in operational units compared to BCT. Among male operational Soldiers, infantry Soldiers exhibited greater cardiorespiratory and muscular performance than non-infantry Soldiers. Higher BMI was associated with higher age groups, except for female BCT Soldiers. Gaps in cardiorespiratory and muscular performances between men and women should be addressed through targeted physical training programs that aim to minimize physiological differences. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Impact of Super Monkey Ball and Underground video games on basic and advanced laparoscopic skill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, James C; Liu, Xinwei; Jacobs, Charles; Choi, Katherine Mia; Jalink, Maarten B; Ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2017-04-01

    This abstract profiles the comparison of correlations between previously validated Super Monkey Ball (SMB) and recently introduced Underground (U) video game on the Nintendo Wii U to multiple validated tasks used for developing basic and advanced laparoscopic skills. Sixty-eight participants, 53 residents and 15 attending surgeons, performed the Top Gun Pea Drop, FLS Peg Pass, intracorporeal suturing, and two video games (SMB and U). SMB is an over-the-counter game, and U was formulated for laparoscopic skill training. Spearman's rank correlations were performed looking at performance comparing the three validated laparoscopic training tasks, and SMB/U. The SMB score had a moderate correlation with intracorporeal suturing (ρ = 0.39, p < 0.01), and the final score involving all three tasks (ρ = 0.39, p < 0.01), but low correlations with Pea Drop Drill and FLS Peg Transfer (ρ = 0.11, 0.18, p < 0.01). The U score had a small correlation with intracorporeal suturing and final score (ρ = 0.09, 0.13, p < 0.01). However, there were correlations between U score and Pea Drop Drill, and FLS Peg Transfer (ρ = 0.24, 0.27, p < 0.01, respectively). In this study, SMB had a very significant correlation with intracorporeal suturing. U demonstrated more of a correlation with basic skills. At this point, our conclusion would be that both are effective for laparoscopic skill training, and they should be used in tandem rather than alone.

  17. Meta-analysis of food safety training on hand hygiene knowledge and attitudes among food handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Jan Mei; Baines, Richard; Seaman, Phillip

    2012-04-01

    Research has shown that traditional food safety training programs and strategies to promote hand hygiene increases knowledge of the subject. However, very few studies have been conducted to evaluate the impact of food safety training on food handlers' attitudes about good hand hygiene practices. The objective of this meta-analytical study was to assess the extent to which food safety training or intervention strategies increased knowledge of and attitudes about hand hygiene. A systematic review of food safety training articles was conducted. Additional studies were identified from abstracts from food safety conferences and food science education conferences. Search terms included combinations of "food safety," "food hygiene," "training," "education," "hand washing," "hand hygiene," "knowledge," "attitudes," "practices," "behavior," and "food handlers." Only before- and after-training approaches and cohort studies with training (intervention group) and without training (control group) in hand hygiene knowledge and including attitudes in food handlers were evaluated. All pooled analyses were based on a random effects model. Meta-analysis values for nine food safety training and intervention studies on hand hygiene knowledge among food handlers were significantly higher than those of the control (without training), with an effect size (Hedges' g) of 1.284 (95% confidence interval [CI] ∼ 0.830 to 1.738). Meta-analysis of five food safety training and intervention studies in which hand hygiene attitudes and self-reported practices were monitored produced a summary effect size of 0.683 (95% CI ∼ 0.523 to 0.843). Food safety training increased knowledge and improved attitudes about hand hygiene practices. Refresher training and long-term reinforcement of good food handling behaviors may also be beneficial for sustaining good hand washing practices.

  18. Modeling of physical fitness of young karatyst on the pre basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galimskyi V.A.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop a program of physical fitness for the correction of the pre basic training on the basis of model performance. Material: 57 young karate sportsmen of 9-11 years old took part in the research. Results : the level of general and special physical preparedness of young karate 9-11 years old was determined. Classes in the control group occurred in the existing program for yous sports school Muay Thai (Thailand boxing. For the experimental group has developed a program of selective development of general and special physical qualities of model-based training sessions. Special program contains 6 direction: 1. Development of static and dynamic balance; 2. Development of vestibular stability (precision movements after rotation; 3. Development rate movements; 4. The development of the capacity for rapid restructuring movements; 5. Development capabilities to differentiate power and spatial parameters of movement; 6. Development of the ability to perform jumping movements of rotation. Development of special physical qualities continued to work to improve engineering complex shock motions on the place and with movement. Conclusions : the use of selective development of special physical qualities based models of training sessions has a significant performance advantage over the control group.

  19. [The "BTE"(basic knowledge--training--execution) method for teaching-learning surgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, F; Cannizzaro, A; Ferrante Bannera, A

    1993-11-01

    For teaching-learning operative procedures the authors propose a new method ("KTE" method) in three progressive phases (step "K" or "basic knowledge"; step "T" or "training"; step "E" or "execution") that allow the student to achieve gradually the psychomotorial adaptation needed for the correct execution of surgical procedures. After preliminary study of the general features of the procedure (step B1) the student learns its operative features (step B2) on appositely constructed didactical tools ("Self-learning and learning maintenance boxes") that, together with the "observational" training (step A1), allow him to create in his mind an "operation image" and then, following an "operative" simulators training (step A2), to pass from that image to its carrying out (psychomotorial adaptation) that in the last phase (steps E1 and E2) concludes in the partial or complete execution of the surgical procedure in the patient. This didactic method can be apply to classic or endoscopic surgery and even to a lot of not surgical practical procedures.

  20. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Factsheet Traffic safety basic facts 2010 : seasonality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broughton, J. Knowles, J. Kirk, A. Yannis, G. Evgenikos, P. Argyropoulou, E. Papantoniou, P. Brandstaetter, C. Candappa, N. Christoph, M. Vis, M. Pace, J.-F. López de Cozar, E. Pérez-Fuster, P. Sanmartín, J. Haddak, M. & Moutengou, E.

    2012-01-01

    This Basic Fact Sheet examines the extent to which the number of people killed in road accidents varies by month across the EU. Most other Basic Fact Sheets focus on particular groups of accidents or casualties; this one examines general patterns in the CARE data so its approach is slightly

  1. Assessment of Native Languages for Food Safety Training Programs for Meat Industry Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sherrlyn S.; Cordray, Joseph C.; Sapp, Stephen; Sebranek, Joseph G.; Anderson, Barbara; Wenger, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Challenges arise when teaching food safety to culturally diverse employees working in meatpacking and food manufacturing industries. A food safety training program was developed in English, translated into Spanish, and administered to 1,265 adult learners. Assessments were conducted by comparing scores before and immediately following training.…

  2. Basic critical care echocardiography by pulmonary fellows: learning trajectory and prognostic impact using a minimally resourced training model*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Kay Choong; Ong, Venetia; Ng, Jeffrey; Tan, Rou An; Phua, Jason

    2014-10-01

    The spread of basic critical care echocardiography may be limited by training resources. Another barrier is the lack of information about the learning trajectory and prognostic impact of individual basic critical care echocardiography domains like acute cor pulmonale determination and left ventricular function estimation. We thus developed a minimally resourced training model and studied the latter outcomes. Prospective observational study. Twenty-bed medical ICU. Echocardiography-naive trainees enrolled in the first year of our Pulmonary Medicine Fellowship Program from September 2012 to September 2013. We described the learning trajectory in six basic critical care echocardiography domains (adequate views, pericardial effusion, acute cor pulmonale, left ventricular ejection fraction, mitral regurgitation, and inferior vena cava variability) and correlated abnormalities in selected basic critical care echocardiography domains with clinical outcomes (mortality and length of stay). Three-hundred forty-three basic critical care echocardiography scans were done for 318 patients by seven fellows (median of 40 scans per fellow; range, 34-105). Only one-third patients had normal basic critical care echocardiography studies. Accuracy in various basic critical care echocardiography domains was high (> 90%), especially beyond the first 30 examinations. Acute cor pulmonale was associated with ICU mortality when adjusted for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score and presence of sepsis, whereas mitral regurgitation was associated with longer hospitalization only on univariate analysis. Basic critical care echocardiography training using minimal resources is feasible. New trainees can achieve reasonable competency in most basic critical care echocardiography domains after performing about 30 examinations within the first year. The relatively high prevalence of abnormalities and the significant association of acute cor pulmonale with ICU mortality support the

  3. Dynamics of athletes choreographic preparedness levelat the stage of specialized basic training (on the basis of sports aerobics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentуna Todorova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Article shows the effectiveness of the author's program of choreographic training at the stage of specialized basic training in sports aerobics. Purpose: revealing changes in the level of choreographic preparedness of young athletes at the stage of specialized basic training. Material & Methods: method of expert evaluation, statistical methods of research. Results: a methodology for assessing the choreographic preparedness of athletes at the stage of specialized basic training was introduced. Objectivity of the methods consisted in counting the indices of choreographic readiness. On the basis of the data obtained, it was established that in the experimental group of gymnasts a significant increase in the choreographic skill took place, which was recorded by the group indicator of the formation of the choreographic readiness, and also by all the criteria for choreographic readiness. Conclusion: experimentally proved the effectiveness of the introduction of the author's program of choreographic training in the training process of gymnastics at the stage of specialized basic training to improve their choreographic skills.

  4. Evaluation of a newly developed media-supported 4-step approach for basic life support training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopka Saša

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The quality of external chest compressions (ECC is of primary importance within basic life support (BLS. Recent guidelines delineate the so-called 4“-step approach” for teaching practical skills within resuscitation training guided by a certified instructor. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a “media-supported 4-step approach” for BLS training leads to equal practical performance compared to the standard 4-step approach. Materials and methods After baseline testing, 220 laypersons were either trained using the widely accepted method for resuscitation training (4-step approach or using a newly created “media-supported 4-step approach”, both of equal duration. In this approach, steps 1 and 2 were ensured via a standardised self-produced podcast, which included all of the information regarding the BLS algorithm and resuscitation skills. Participants were tested on manikins in the same mock cardiac arrest single-rescuer scenario prior to intervention, after one week and after six months with respect to ECC-performance, and participants were surveyed about the approach. Results Participants (age 23 ± 11, 69% female reached comparable practical ECC performances in both groups, with no statistical difference. Even after six months, there was no difference detected in the quality of the initial assessment algorithm or delay concerning initiation of CPR. Overall, at least 99% of the intervention group (n = 99; mean 1.5 ± 0.8; 6-point Likert scale: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree agreed that the video provided an adequate introduction to BLS skills. Conclusions The “media-supported 4-step approach” leads to comparable practical ECC-performance compared to standard teaching, even with respect to retention of skills. Therefore, this approach could be useful in special educational settings where, for example, instructors’ resources are sparse or large-group sessions

  5. Constructing safety through “contrast” during training in scuba diving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety is a very important aspect in scuba diving, as not complying with safety regulations can lead to serious injury or even death. In this article the researchers focused on the discursive construction of safety during training in scuba diving. The research position fell within the field of discursive psychology. The researcher ...

  6. Discharges during U.S. Army basic training: injury rates and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, J J; Canham-Chervak, M; Hauret, K; Hoedebecke, E; Laurin, M J; Cuthie, J

    2001-07-01

    This study examined injury rates and risk factors for discharge in a cohort of 756 men and 474 women in U.S. Army basic combat training (BCT) at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Investigators systematically screened trainee medical records for injuries and collected medical recommendations to temporarily remove a trainee from BCT to allow recovery from an injury. The BCT unit provided Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and trainee demographic data. Discharges were identified by reviewing discharge packets and were confirmed through rosters from the BCT units. There were 102 men and 108 women discharged. Person-time injury incidence rates (for time-loss injuries) among discharged and nondischarged men were 1.87 and 0.45 cases/100 person-days, respectively (p APFT events, and lower educational level. Women with more body mass or a higher body mass index also had a marginally higher risk of discharge.

  7. How many employees receive safety training during their first year of a new job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter M; Mustard, Cameron A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the provision of safety training to Canadian employees, specifically those in their first year of employment with a new employer. Design Three repeated national Canadian cross‐sectional surveys. Subjects 59 159 respondents from Statistics Canada's Workplace and Employee Surveys (1999, 2001 and 2003), 5671 who were in their first year of employment. Main outcome Receiving occupational health and safety training, orientation training or office or non‐office equipment training in either a classroom or on‐the‐job in the previous 12 months. Results Only 12% of women and 16% of men reported receiving safety training in the previous 12 months. Employees in their first 12 months of employment were more likely to receive safety training than employees with >5 years of job tenure. However, still only one in five new employees had received any safety training while with their current employer. In a fully adjusted regression model, employees who had access to family and support programs, women in medium‐sized workplaces and in manufacturing, and men in large workplaces and in part‐time employment all had an increased probability of receiving safety training. No increased likelihood of safety training was found in younger workers or those in jobs with higher physical demands, both of which are associated with increased injury risk. Conclusions From our results, it would appear that only one in five Canadian employees in their first year of a new job received safety training. Further, the provision of safety training does not appear to be more prevalent among workers or in occupations with increased risk of injuries. PMID:17296687

  8. How many employees receive safety training during their first year of a new job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter M; Mustard, Cameron A

    2007-02-01

    To describe the provision of safety training to Canadian employees, specifically those in their first year of employment with a new employer. Three repeated national Canadian cross-sectional surveys. 59 159 respondents from Statistics Canada's Workplace and Employee Surveys (1999, 2001 and 2003), 5671 who were in their first year of employment. Receiving occupational health and safety training, orientation training or office or non-office equipment training in either a classroom or on-the-job in the previous 12 months. Only 12% of women and 16% of men reported receiving safety training in the previous 12 months. Employees in their first 12 months of employment were more likely to receive safety training than employees with >5 years of job tenure. However, still only one in five new employees had received any safety training while with their current employer. In a fully adjusted regression model, employees who had access to family and support programs, women in medium-sized workplaces and in manufacturing, and men in large workplaces and in part-time employment all had an increased probability of receiving safety training. No increased likelihood of safety training was found in younger workers or those in jobs with higher physical demands, both of which are associated with increased injury risk. From our results, it would appear that only one in five Canadian employees in their first year of a new job received safety training. Further, the provision of safety training does not appear to be more prevalent among workers or in occupations with increased risk of injuries.

  9. Training Children in Pedestrian Safety: Distinguishing Gains in Knowledge from Gains in Safe Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Pedestrian injuries contribute greatly to child morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that training within virtual pedestrian environments may improve children’s street crossing skills, but may not convey knowledge about safety in street environments. We hypothesized that (a) children will gain pedestrian safety knowledge via videos/software/internet websites, but not when trained by virtual pedestrian environment or other strategies; (b) pedestrian safety knowledge will be associated with safe pedestrian behavior both before and after training; and (c) increases in knowledge will be associated with increases in safe behavior among children trained individually at streetside locations, but not those trained by means of other strategies. We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating pedestrian safety training. We randomly assigned 240 children ages 7–8 to one of four training conditions: videos/software/internet, virtual reality (VR), individualized streetside instruction, or a no-contact control. Both virtual and field simulations of street crossing at 2-lane bi-directional mid-block locations assessed pedestrian behavior at baseline, post-training, and 6-month follow-up. Pedestrian knowledge was assessed orally on all three occasions. Children trained by videos/software/internet, and those trained individually, showed increased knowledge following training relative to children in the other groups (ps trained using videos/software/internet gained knowledge but did not change their behavior. Children trained individually gained in both knowledge and safer behavior. Children trained virtually gained in safer behavior but not knowledge. If VR is used for training, tools like videos/internet might effectively supplement training. We discovered few associations between knowledge and behavior, and none between changes in knowledge and behavior. Pedestrian safety knowledge and safe pedestrian behavior may be orthogonal constructs that

  10. Research on Secondary Impact Safety of Train Driver based on THUMS Dummy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Wenbin; Ji Jiawei; Yue Zhitao; Zhang Dongdong; Tian Honglei; Zhao Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Based on biomechanical Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) dummy and traditional rigid dummy, the train driver injury of secondary impact in railway crash events is analyzed and the results are compared. The results of THUMS dummy are more detail and comprehensive to describe the injury of train driver. It could be applied to the safety research of crashworthiness of train driver cab in future. The driver injury is serious and needed to be optimized the parameter of cab console to reduce inj...

  11. Improving staff perception of a safety climate with crew resource management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L

    2017-06-01

    Communication failure is one of the top root causes in patient safety adverse events. Crew resource management (CRM) is a team building communication process intended to improve patient safety by improving team dynamics. First, to describe implementation of CRM in a Veterans Affair (VA) surgical service. Second, to assess whether staff CRM training is related to improvement in staff perception of a safety climate. Mandatory CRM training was implemented for all surgical service staff at a VA Hospital at 0 and 12 mo. Safety climate questionnaires were completed by operating room staff at a baseline, 6 and 12 mo after the initial CRM training. Participants reported improvement on all 27 points on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo compared with the baseline. At 12 mo, there was sustained improvement in 23 of the 27 areas. This is the first published report about the effect of CRM training on staff perception of a safety climate in a VA surgical service. We demonstrate that CRM training can be successfully implemented widespread in a surgical program. Overall, there was improvement in 100% of areas assessed on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo after CRM training. By 1 y, this improvement was sustained in 23 of 27 areas, with the areas of greatest improvement being the performance of briefings, collaboration between nurses and doctors, valuing nursing input, knowledge about patient safety, and institutional promotion of a patient safety climate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Numerical Analysis of a Train-Bridge System Subjected to Earthquake and Running Safety Evaluation of Moving Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic response of a train-bridge system subjected to earthquakes, and the running safety indices of the train on the bridge under earthquake are studied. Taking a long span cable-stayed bridge across the Huangpu River as an example, a full three-dimensional finite element model of the train-bridge system was established, in which the soil-bridge and rail-train interactions were considered. Parallel computing based on contact balance was utilized to deal with this large-scale numerical simulation problem. The dynamic nonlinear analysis was performed on a Hummingbird supercomputer using the finite element code LS-DYNA 971. The results show that the acceleration responses of the train subjected to an earthquake are much greater than the ones without earthquake input, and the running safety of a moving train is affected by both the earthquake intensity and the running speed of the train. The running safety of the moving train can be evaluated by the threshold curve between earthquake intensity and train speed. The proposed modeling strategies and the simulated results can give a reference prediction of the dynamic behaviour of the train-bridge subjected to an earthquake.

  13. Evaluation of a Radiation Worker Safety Training Program at a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiation safety course was evaluated using the Kirkpatrick criteria of training evaluation as a guide. Thirty-nine employees were given the two-day training course and were compared with 15 employees in a control group who did not receive the training. Cognitive results show an immediate gain in knowledge, and substantial retention at 6 months. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of applications to current radiation safety training was well as follow-on training research and development requirements.

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype and physical performance during US Army basic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonna, L A; Sharp, M A; Knapik, J J; Cullivan, M; Angel, K C; Patton, J F; Lilly, C M

    2001-09-01

    Prior studies have suggested that angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype correlates with superior physical performance in highly selected populations. This study assessed whether such an association exists in a heterogeneous population. Using polymerase chain reaction techniques, we determined the ACE genotypes (insertion/insertion, deletion/insertion, or deletion/deletion) of 62 male and 85 female US Army recruits. Before and after 8 wk of basic training, we determined peak oxygen uptake and performance on the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT), which includes standardized measures of muscular endurance (sit-ups, push-ups) and a 2-mile run. Subjects of different ACE genotypes had similar peak oxygen uptakes and APFT scores, both before and after training. Subjects with genotype II had higher APFT scores than others, but the differences were not statistically significant. Furthermore, no ACE genotype group had a performance advantage in analyses that adjusted for baseline fitness. We conclude that ACE genotype does not have a strong effect on aerobic power or muscular endurance in healthy, young American adults drawn from an ethnically and geographically diverse population.

  15. Hair cortisol concentration is unaffected by basic military training, but related to sociodemographic and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Maria; Sefidan, Sandra; Annen, Hubert; Ehlert, Ulrike; Roos, Lilian; Van Uum, Stan; Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; La Marca, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) is a promising new biomarker for retrospective measurement of chronic stress. The effect of basic military training (BMT) on chronic stress has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 10-week BMT on HCC, while further exploring the role of known and novel covariates. Young healthy male recruits of the Swiss Army participated twice, 10 weeks apart, in data collection (1st examination: n = 177; 2nd examination: n = 105). On two occasions, we assessed HCC, perceived stress and different candidate variables that may affect HCC (e.g. socioeconomic status, meteorological data). Military training increased perceived stress from the first to the second examination, but did not affect HCC. In line with this, there was no correlation between HCC and perceived stress ratings. This could be interpreted as a missing influence of mainly physical stress (e.g. exercise) on HCC. In contrast, significant correlations were found between HCC and ambient temperature, humidity and education. Future studies should control for meteorological data and educational status when examining HCC.

  16. Overcoming language and literacy barriers in safety and health training of agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcury, Thomas A; Estrada, Jorge M; Quandt, Sara A

    2010-07-01

    The workforce in all areas of United States agriculture and forestry is becoming increasingly diverse in language, culture, and education. Many agricultural workers are immigrants who have limited English language skills and limited educational attainment. Providing safety and health training to this large, diverse, dispersed, and often transient population of workers is challenging. This review, prepared for the 2010 Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health conference, "Be Safe, Be Profitable: Protecting Workers in Agriculture," is divided into five sections. First, we describe the occupational and demographic characteristics of agricultural workers in the United States to highlight their safety and health training needs. Second, we summarize current research on the social and cultural attributes of agricultural workers and agricultural employers that affect the provision of safety and health training. Worker and employer attributes include language, literacy, financial limitations, work beliefs, and health beliefs. Third, we review current initiatives addressing safety and health training for agricultural workers that consider worker language and literacy. These initiatives are limited to a few specific topics (e.g., pesticides, heat stress); they do not provide general programs of safety training that would help establish a culture of workplace safety. However, several innovative approaches to health and safety training are being implemented, including the use of community-based participatory approaches and lay health promoter programs. Fourth, the limited industry response for safety training with this linguistically diverse and educationally limited workforce is summarized. Finally, gaps in knowledge and practice are summarized and recommendations to develop educationally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate safety and health training are presented.

  17. 77 FR 15261 - Safety Zone; Non-Compliant Vessel Pursuit Training Course, Wando River, Charleston, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Pursuit Training Course in Charleston, South Carolina from Monday, March 19, 2012 through Friday, March 23... enforcement tactics and high speed maneuvers during the training course. Discussion of Rule From Monday, March... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Non-Compliant Vessel Pursuit Training...

  18. One size fits all: Safety training for 10,000 workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March, J.

    1998-04-27

    Last summer, the author participated in a major, orchestrated, training event at Los Alamos designed to convey some of the key components of ISM to the workforce. The event was called Safety Days 1997. The objectives were to produce a genuine training event that was logical, focused, interactive, well-written, easy to follow, and that provided people with choices rather than a rigid script. This was the first effort at the Laboratory to organize a way for middle managers to become the safety trainers of their work teams. While upper management supported the concept and product, many were satisfied with the notion of simply creating a time for workers to discuss safety concerns. This paper considers the context of Safety Days 1997, how the training was received, the response to that training, and recommendations for Safety Days 1998.

  19. An Analysis of Trainers' Perspectives within an Ecological Framework: Factors that Influence Mine Safety Training Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Emily J; Hoebbel, Cassandra L; Rost, Kristen A

    2014-09-01

    Satisfactory completion of mine safety training is a prerequisite for being hired and for continued employment in the coal industry. Although training includes content to develop skills in a variety of mineworker competencies, research and recommendations continue to specify that specific limitations in the self-escape portion of training still exist and that mineworkers need to be better prepared to respond to emergencies that could occur in their mine. Ecological models are often used to inform the development of health promotion programs but have not been widely applied to occupational health and safety training programs. Nine mine safety trainers participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews. A theoretical analysis of the interviews was completed via an ecological lens. Each level of the social ecological model was used to examine factors that could be addressed both during and after mine safety training. The analysis suggests that problems surrounding communication and collaboration, leadership development, and responsibility and accountability at different levels within the mining industry contribute to deficiencies in mineworkers' mastery and maintenance of skills. This study offers a new technique to identify limitations in safety training systems and processes. The analysis suggests that training should be developed and disseminated with consideration of various levels-individual, interpersonal, organizational, and community-to promote skills. If factors identified within and between levels are addressed, it may be easier to sustain mineworker competencies that are established during safety training.

  20. Skill retention in adults and in children 3 months after basic life support training using a simple personal resuscitation manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Meyhoff, Christian S; Lippert, Freddy K

    2007-01-01

    As 70-80% of cardiac arrests occur at home, widespread training is needed to increase the likelihood of basic life support (BLS) being performed before the arrival of Emergency Medical Services personnel. Teaching BLS in public schools has been recommended to achieve this.......As 70-80% of cardiac arrests occur at home, widespread training is needed to increase the likelihood of basic life support (BLS) being performed before the arrival of Emergency Medical Services personnel. Teaching BLS in public schools has been recommended to achieve this....

  1. [Strategic patient safety action plan for the anesthesiology and intensive care service of Ukraine: basic modules and their components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Федосюк, Роман Н

    In recent years, the problem of patient safety has become top-priority in further improvement of national healthcare systems in all developed countries. To develop a modular structure and a component composition of the strategic patient safety action plan for the anesthesiology and intensive care service of Ukraine as a part of the National Action Plan. Major domestic priorities, substantiated and made public by the author in previous works, are taken as the basis for the modular structuring of the action plan. Existing foreign prototypes, evaluated for the patient safety effectiveness and the potential for the adaptation to domestic conditions, as well as author's own innovations are offered for a component filling-up of each module. Eight modules - infectious safety, surgical safety, pharmaceutical safety, infrastructural safety, incident monitoring and reporting, education and training, research and awards - have been proposed. Individual components for each of the modules are selected from a variety of foreign prototypes and author's own developments. Inter-modular stratification of the components into short-term perspective tools and long-term perspective tools, depending on the amount of resources needed for their implementation, is carried out. The strategic patient safety action plan for the anesthesiology and intensive care service of Ukraine is the embodiment, within a particular specialty, of the wider National Action Plan developed by the First National Congress on Patient Safety (Kiev, 2012) on the initiative of the Council of Europe and aimed at the fulfillment of international obligations of Ukraine in the healthcare sector. Its implementation will contribute to enhancing the safety of anesthesia and intensive care services in Ukraine and further development of the specialty.

  2. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Factsheet Traffic safety basic facts 2010 : single vehicle accidents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yannis, G. Evgenikos, P. Argyropoulou, E. Papantoniou, P. Kirk, A. Broughton, J. Knowles, J. Brandstaetter, C. Candappa, N. Christoph, M. Vis, M. Pace, J.-F. López de Cozar, E. Pérez-Fuster, P. Sanmartín, J. Haddak, M. & Moutengou, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this Basic Fact Sheet, "single vehicle accident" or single vehicle collision is a type of road traffic accident in which only one vehicle and no other road user is involved. Run-off-road collisions, collisions with fallen rocks or debris in the road, rollover crashes within the roadway and

  3. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Factsheet Traffic safety basic facts 2010 : children (aged

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broughton, J. Knowles, J. Kirk, A. Yannis, G. Evgenikos, P. Argyropoulou, E. Papantoniou, P. Brandstaetter, C. Candappa, N. Christoph, M. Vis, M. Pace, J.-F. López de Cozar, E. Pérez-Fuster, P. Sanmartín, J. Haddak, M. & Moutengou, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this Basic Fact Sheet, ‘children’ are defined as those who are aged below 15 years. (The age at which people are allowed to drive a motor vehicle varies across the EU, but 14 year olds appear, on the whole, to fit into this group rather than with ‘young people’.) Children tend to be thought of as

  4. European consensus on a competency-based virtual reality training program for basic endoscopic surgical psychomotor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Koen W; Ahlberg, Gunnar; Bonavina, Luigi; Carter, Fiona J; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Hyltander, Anders; Schijven, Marlies P; Stefani, Alessandro; van der Zee, David C; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators have been demonstrated to improve basic psychomotor skills in endoscopic surgery. The exercise configuration settings used for validation in studies published so far are default settings or are based on the personal choice of the tutors. The purpose of this study was to establish consensus on exercise configurations and on a validated training program for a virtual reality simulator, based on the experience of international experts to set criterion levels to construct a proficiency-based training program. A consensus meeting was held with eight European teams, all extensively experienced in using the VR simulator. Construct validity of the training program was tested by 20 experts and 60 novices. The data were analyzed by using the t test for equality of means. Consensus was achieved on training designs, exercise configuration, and examination. Almost all exercises (7/8) showed construct validity. In total, 50 of 94 parameters (53%) showed significant difference. A European, multicenter, validated, training program was constructed according to the general consensus of a large international team with extended experience in virtual reality simulation. Therefore, a proficiency-based training program can be offered to training centers that use this simulator for training in basic psychomotor skills in endoscopic surgery.

  5. Effect of Mixed Basic Military Training on the Physical Fitness of Male and Female Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paola S; Grant, Catharina C; du Toit, Peet J; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2017-07-01

    Mixed gender basic military training (BMT) is adopted to integrate the female South African soldier into the military. This study aimed to assess gender differences before, during (12 weeks), and after a 20-week mixed BMT course and determine if BMT significantly reduced these differences. A total of 186 soldiers (114 male: mean age = 21.0 ± 1.1 year; 72 female: mean age = 20.5 ± 1.2 year) completed the BMT course and all anthropometric, physical fitness, explosive power, and hand grip strength measurements. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to model BMT data with main effects for gender comparison between males and females, and time main effect for evaluation of differences between weeks 1, 12, and 20 of BMT, as well as an interaction effect for differences in changes over time for males and females. Alpha was set at α ≤0.05. Male soldiers were significantly taller (p fitness test. Differences in power output and hand grip strength remained unchanged. Large initial anthropometrical and physical fitness differences decreased but were still obvious at the end of BMT. BMT should bridge the physical gap between male and female soldiers to ensure they can all perform the same duties. The enforcing of equal minimum physical fitness requirements for acceptance into BMT; conditional acceptance into the military subject to the successful completion of a bridging course aimed at improving physical fitness in individuals who do not meet the minimum physical fitness requirements for acceptance; and developing a cyclic physical training program with different entry points, dependent on initial physical performance at the start of BMT, ensuring adequate progression and overload for all soldiers are possible avenues to explore to achieve this goal. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  6. Establishing Fire Safety Skills Using Behavioral Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houvouras, Andrew J., IV; Harvey, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    The use of behavioral skills training (BST) to educate 3 adolescent boys on the risks of lighters and fire setting was evaluated using in situ assessment in a school setting. Two participants had a history of fire setting. After training, all participants adhered to established rules: (a) avoid a deactivated lighter, (b) leave the training area,…

  7. Features of influence of different modes of training on the dynamics of power performance bodybuilders on stage-specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavityak O.S.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : study the effect of various features on the structure and orientation of exercise routines on the level of development of force capabilities bodybuilders on stage specialized basic training. Material : studies participated 60 athletes (age 18-19 years, the experience of training - 5 years. The study used a method of determining the index of the training load for the power sports. Level security features athletes determined by control testing. Control of the studied parameters was carried out for 4 months training at intervals of 1 month. Results : it was found that under conditions similar level of fitness athletes and structure your workout performance power load and the nature of their changes depend on the particular mode of training (in this study - from the application of the basic sequence variative and isolation exercises. Conclusions : the use of pilot training in integrated mode with alternating motor activity using the basic priority and isolation exercises for no more than 2 microcycles have the most significant positive impact on the increase in power performance parameters of athletes (on average by 26.5% p <0.05

  8. Training Cognitive Control in Older Adults with the Space Fortress Game: The Role of Training
    Instructions and Basic Motor Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M Blumen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if and how cognitively-healthy older adults can learn to play a complex computer-based action game called the Space Fortress (SF as a function of training instructions (Standard vs. Emphasis Change (EC; e.g. Gopher, Weil & Siegel, 1989 and basic motor ability. A total of 35 cognitively-healthy older adults completed a 3-month SF training program with three SF sessions weekly. Twelve 3-minute games were played during each session. Basic motor ability was assessed with an aiming task, which required rapidly rotating a spaceship to shoot targets. Older adults showed improved performance on the SF task over time, but did not perform at the same level as younger adults. Unlike studies of younger adults, overall SF performance in older adults was greater following standard instructions than following EC instructions. However, this advantage was primarily due to collecting more bonus points and not – the primary goal of the game – shooting and destroying the fortress, which in contrast benefitted from EC instructions. Basic motor ability was low and influenced many different aspects of SF game learning, often interacted with learning rate, and influenced overall SF performance. These findings show that older adults can be trained to deal with the complexity of the SF task but that overall SF performance, and the ability to capitalize on EC instructions, differs when a basic ability such as motor control is low. Hence, the development of this training program as a cognitive intervention that can potentially compensate for age-related cognitive decline should consider that basic motor ability can interact with the efficiency of training instructions that promote the use of cognitive control (e.g. EC instructions – and the confluence between such basic abilities and higher-level cognitive control abilities should be further examined.

  9. The Results of Open-Label, Multicenter, Non-Randomized Study on the Efficacy and Safety of Insulins: Insuman Basal®, Insuman Comb 25®, Insuman Rapid® in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Who Underwent Basic Training in Diabetes Schools (SPIRIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Larin

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions. Treatment with Insuman® insulins of patients with DM-2, who were not compensated while taking OADs, was associated with improved glycemic control without an increase in the incidence of severe hypoglycemia. There was no statistically significant increase in the effectiveness of therapy in patients, who have successfully completed a training program at diabetes school, compared with evaluation of overall efficiency. The state of young studied population of patients with inadequate control at baseline, and those who had developed cardiovascular complications associated with DM, improved in most cases in terms of glycemic control, and, at that, episodes of severe hypoglycemia were not detected. This may be due to the positive influence of training in diabetes school.

  10. A paradigm shift in organisational safety culture evaluation and training

    OpenAIRE

    Cram, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research is to explore the issues surrounding traditional approaches towards understanding the safety culture of an organisation operating in a high risk environment and to identify an effective technique to educate corporate management in how to measure and evaluate the underlying safety culture of their own organisations. The results of the first part of the research highlight the concerns being expressed by both academic and industrial communities that current safety cult...

  11. Basic cardiopulmonary life support (BCLS for cardiopulmonary resuscitation by trained paramedics and medics outside the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiopulmonary resuscitation guideline of Basic Cardiopulmonary Life Support (BCLS for management of adult victims with cardiopulmonary arrest outside the hospital provides an algorithmic stepwise approach for optimal outcome of the victims by trained medics and paramedics. This guideline has been developed considering the need to have a universally acceptable practice guideline for India and keeping in mind the infrastructural limitations of some areas of the country. This guideline is based on evidence elicited in the international and national literature. In the absence of data from Indian population, the excerpts have been taken from international data, discussed with Indian experts and thereafter modified to make them practically applicable across India. The optimal outcome for a victim with cardiopulmonary arrest would depend on core links of early recognition and activation; early high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and early transfer to medical facility. These links are elaborated in a stepwise manner in the BCLS algorithm. The BCLS also emphasise on quality check for various steps of resuscitation.

  12. Effect on injuries of assigning shoes based on foot shape in air force basic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Brosch, Lorie C; Venuto, Margaret; Swedler, David I; Bullock, Steven H; Gaines, Lorraine S; Murphy, Ryan J; Tchandja, Juste; Jones, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether assigning running shoes based on the shape of the bottom of the foot (plantar surface) influenced injury risk in Air Force Basic Military Training (BMT) and examined risk factors for injury in BMT. Data were collected from BMT recruits during 2007; analysis took place during 2008. After foot examinations, recruits were randomly consigned to either an experimental group (E, n=1042 men, 375 women) or a control group (C, n=913 men, 346 women). Experimental group recruits were assigned motion control, stability, or cushioned shoes for plantar shapes indicative of low, medium, or high arches, respectively. Control group recruits received a stability shoe regardless of plantar shape. Injuries during BMT were determined from outpatient visits provided from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Other injury risk factors (fitness, smoking, physical activity, prior injury, menstrual history, and demographics) were obtained from a questionnaire, existing databases, or BMT units. Multivariate Cox regression controlling for other risk factors showed little difference in injury risk between the groups among men (hazard ratio [E/C]=1.11, 95% CI=0.89-1.38) or women (hazard ratio [E/C]=1.20, 95% CI= 0.90-1.60). Independent injury risk factors among both men and women included low aerobic fitness and cigarette smoking. This prospective study demonstrated that assigning running shoes based on the shape of the plantar surface had little influence on injury risk in BMT even after controlling for other injury risk factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Development of a hazard-based method for evaluating the fire safety of passenger trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The fire safety of U.S. passenger rail trains currently is addressed through small-scale flammability and smoke emission tests and performance criteria promulgated by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The FRA approach relies heavily on test ...

  14. Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, A D; Myer, G D

    2010-01-01

    A literature review was employed to evaluate the current epidemiology of injury related to the safety and efficacy of youth resistance training. Several case study reports and retrospective questionnaires regarding resistance exercise and the competitive sports of weightlifting and powerlifting reveal that injuries have occurred in young lifters, although a majority can be classified as accidental. Lack of qualified instruction that underlies poor exercise technique and inappropriate training loads could explain, at least partly, some of the reported injuries. Current research indicates that resistance training can be a safe, effective and worthwhile activity for children and adolescents provided that qualified professionals supervise all training sessions and provide age-appropriate instruction on proper lifting procedures and safe training guidelines. Regular participation in a multifaceted resistance training programme that begins during the preseason and includes instruction on movement biomechanics may reduce the risk of sports-related injuries in young athletes. Strategies for enhancing the safety of youth resistance training are discussed.

  15. Skill retention in adults and in children 3 months after basic life support training using a simple personal resuscitation manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Meyhoff, Christian S; Lippert, Freddy K

    2007-01-01

    As 70-80% of cardiac arrests occur at home, widespread training is needed to increase the likelihood of basic life support (BLS) being performed before the arrival of Emergency Medical Services personnel. Teaching BLS in public schools has been recommended to achieve this....

  16. Indexes of development of sensomotor coordination of people that training calisthenics on the stages of preproduction basic and special basic training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva M.O.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The studies sensomotory coordination (SMC engaged in rhythmic gymnastics at the age of 9-11 years. The estimation of specific technical preparedness of young gymnasts, based on analysis of the implementation of basic exercises with objects. Revealed substantial reserves in the movements of the subjects to improve the quality management system as the basis of technical competencies in the performance of throwing and catching objects

  17. Learning basic laparoscopic skills: a randomized controlled study comparing box trainer, virtual reality simulator, and mental training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Mubashir; Sharma, Davendra; Moghul, Masood; Kailani, Obeda; Dockery, Judith; Ayis, Salma; Grange, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to compare different methods of learning basic laparoscopic skills using box trainer (BT), virtual reality simulator (VRS) and mental training (MT); and (2) to determine the most effective method of learning laparoscopic skills. Randomized controlled trial. King's College, London. 41 medical students were included in the study. After randomization, they were divided into 5 groups. Group 1 was the control group without training; group 2 was box trained; group 3 was also box trained with an additional practice session; group 4 was VRS trained; and group 5 was solely mentally trained. The task was to cut out a circle marked on a stretchable material. All groups were assessed after 1 week on both BT and VRS. Four main parameters were assessed, namely time, precision, accuracy, and performance. Time: On BT assessment, the box-trained group with additional practice group 3 was the fastest, and the mental-trained group 5 was the slowest. On VRS assessment, the time difference between group 3 and the control group 1 was statistically significant. Precision: On BT assessment, the box-trained groups 2 and 3 scored high, and mental trained were low on precision. On VRS assessment, the VRS-trained group ranked at the top, and the MT group was at the bottom on precision. Accuracy: On BT assessment, the box-trained group 3 was best and the mental-trained group was last. On VRS assessment, the VRS-trained group 4 scored high closely followed by box-trained groups 2 and 3. Performance: On BT assessment, the box-trained group 3 ranked above all the other groups, and the mental-trained group ranked last. On VRS assessment, the VRS group 4 scored best, followed closely by box-trained groups 2 and 3. The skills learned on box training were reproducible on both VRS and BT. However, not all the skills learned on VRS were transferable to BT. Furthermore, VRS was found to be a reliable and the most convenient method of assessment. MT alone cannot

  18. Occupational Health and Safety. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Kangan; Tully, Chris

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with occupational safety and…

  19. Development of an Evaluation Tool for Online Food Safety Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jack A., Jr.; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Crandall, Philip G.; O'Bryan, Corliss A.; Keifer, Elizabeth; Ricke, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide the person in charge and food safety instructors an assessment tool to help characterize, identify strengths and weaknesses, determine the completeness of the knowledge gained by the employee, and evaluate the level of content presentation and usability of current retail food safety training platforms. An…

  20. The Strategy to Align Road Safety Education to the Further Education and Training Band Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Lianne; van Dijk, Gerda; Fourie, David

    2016-01-01

    Road safety education is a complex phenomenon which should be viewed holistically if taken into account the interconnectedness of education, infrastructure and enforcement. Effective road safety education is specifically important for learners in the Further Education and Training (FET) band, as they are active contributors to a community. The…

  1. 77 FR 58567 - Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Information Collection Activities: Well Control and... of the paperwork requirements in the regulations under Subpart O, ``Well Control and Production... 250, Subpart O, Well Control and Production Safety Training. OMB Control Number: 1014-0008. Abstract...

  2. 77 FR 22602 - Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Information Collection Activities: Well Control and... paperwork requirements in the regulations under Subpart O, ``Well Control and Production Safety Training... sufficient to prevent or minimize the likelihood of blowouts, loss of well control, fires, spillages...

  3. Revamping occupational safety and health training: Integrating andragogical principles for the adult learner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Albert

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite attempts to improve safety performance, the construction industry continues to account for a disproportionate rate of injuries. A large proportion of these injuries occur because workers are unable to recognize and respond to hazards in dynamic and unpredictable environments. Unrecognized hazards expose workers to unanticipated risks and can lead to catastrophic accidents. In order to enhance hazard recognition skills, employers often put new and experienced workers through formal hazard recognition training programs. Unfortunately, current training programs primarily rely on instructor-centric pedagogical approaches, which are insensitive to the adult learning process. In order to ensure effective adult learning, training programs must integrate learner-centric andragogical principles to improve engagement and retention in adult trainees. This paper aims to discuss training program elements that can potentially accelerate the adult learning process while improving safety knowledge retention. To this end, the researchers reviewed relevant literature on the cognitive processes of adult learning, essential components of effectual training programs and developed a reliable framework for the training and transfer of safety knowledge. A case example of successfully using the framework is also presented. The results of the study will provide safety trainers and construction professionals with valuable information on developing effective hazard recognition and receptor training programs, with the goal of improving construction safety performance.

  4. Running Safety of Trains under Vessel-Bridge Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the sensor placement of the health monitoring system, the dynamic behavior of the train-bridge system subjected to vessel-collision should be studied in detail firstly. This study thus focuses on the characteristics of a train-bridge system under vessel-bridge collision. The process of the vessel-bridge collision is simulated numerically with a reliable finite element model (FEM. The dynamic responses of a single car and a train crossing a cable-stayed bridge are calculated. It is shown that the collision causes significant increase of the train’s lateral acceleration, lateral wheelset force, wheel unloading rate, and derailment coefficient. The effect of the collision on the train’s vertical acceleration is much smaller. In addition, parametric studies with various train’s positions, ship tonnage, and train speed are performed. If the train is closer to the vessel-bridge collision position or the ship tonnage is larger, the train will be more dangerous. There is a relatively high probability of running danger at a low speed, resulting from longer stay of the train on the bridge. The train’s position, the ship tonnage, and the train speed must be considered when determining the most adverse conditions for the trains running on bridges under vessel-bridge collision.

  5. Basic life support skills of high school students before and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation training: a longitudinal investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meissner Theresa M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediate bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR significantly improves survival after a sudden cardiopulmonary collapse. This study assessed the basic life support (BLS knowledge and performance of high school students before and after CPR training. Methods This study included 132 teenagers (mean age 14.6 ± 1.4 years. Students completed a two-hour training course that provided theoretical background on sudden cardiac death (SCD and a hands-on CPR tutorial. They were asked to perform BLS on a manikin to simulate an SCD scenario before the training. Afterwards, participants encountered the same scenario and completed a questionnaire for self-assessment of their pre- and post-training confidence. Four months later, we assessed the knowledge retention rate of the participants with a BLS performance score. Results Before the training, 29.5% of students performed chest compressions as compared to 99.2% post-training (P P Conclusions BLS training in high school seems highly effective considering the minimal amount of previous knowledge the students possess. We observed significant improvement and a good retention rate four months after training. Increasing the number of trained students may minimize the reluctance to conduct bystander CPR and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiopulmonary collapse.

  6. Teaching basic life support: a prospective randomized study on low-cost training strategies in secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Raemdonck, Veerle; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Aerenhouts, Dirk; De Martelaer, Kristine

    2014-08-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training at school is recommended. Limited school resources prevent implementation. The learning efficacy of low-cost training strategies is unknown. To evaluate the efficacy of different CPR learning strategies using low-cost didactic tools. Children (n=593, 15-16 years) were randomized to four training conditions: (1) manikin+teacher instruction (control group), (2) manikin+video instruction, (3) foam dice+plastic bag+peer training+teacher instruction, and (4) foam dice+plastic bag+peer training+video instruction. After a 50 min training, a 3 min CPR test on a manikin was performed using SkillReporting Software (Laerdal, Norway), and repeated after 6 months. The data of children without previous CPR training were analysed. Analysis of variance and the χ-test assessed differences between groups. Complete data sets were available for 165 pupils. Initially, group 3 scored lower on the mean ventilation volume (PTraining efficacy with low-cost equipment was not different from training with a manikin. The outcome for all training strategies was suboptimal. The basics of CPR can be taught with alternative equipment if manikins are not available.

  7. The effects of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training on flight attendants' safety attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jane; Henderson, Robert; O'Hare, David

    2014-02-01

    A number of well-known incidents and accidents had led the aviation industry to introduce Crew Resource Management (CRM) training designed specifically for flight attendants, and joint (pilot and flight attendant) CRM training as a way to improve teamwork and communication. The development of these new CRM training programs during the 1990s highlighted the growing need for programs to be evaluated using research tools that had been validated for the flight attendant population. The FSAQ (Flight Safety Attitudes Questionnaire-Flight Attendants) was designed specifically to obtain safety attitude data from flight attendants working for an Asia-Pacific airline. Flight attendants volunteered to participate in a study before receiving CRM training (N=563) and again (N=526) after CRM training. Almost half (13) of the items from the 36-item FSAQ showed highly significant changes following CRM training. Years of experience, crew position, seniority, leadership roles, flight attendant crew size, and length of route flown were all predictive of safety attitudes. CRM training for flight attendants is a valuable tool for increasing positive teamwork behaviors between the flight attendant and pilot sub-groups. Joint training sessions, where flight attendants and pilots work together to find solutions to in-flight emergency scenarios, provide a particularly useful strategy in breaking down communication barriers between the two sub-groups. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Instructor qualification for radiation safety training at a national laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1994-10-01

    Prior to 1993, Health Physics Training (HPT) was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) health physics group. The job requirements specified a Masters Degree and experience. In fact, the majority of Health Physicists in the group were certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Under those circumstances, it was assumed that individuals in the group were technically qualified and the HPT instructor qualification stated that. In late 1993, the Health Physics Group at the LLNL was restructured and the training function was assigned to the training group. Additional requirements for training were mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE), which would necessitate increasing the existing training staff. With the need to hire, and the policy of reassignment of employees during downsizing, it was imperative that formal qualification standards be developed for technical knowledge. Qualification standards were in place for instructional capability. In drafting the new training qualifications for instructors, the requirements of a Certified Health Physicists had to be modified due to supply and demand. Additionally, for many of the performance-based training courses, registration by the National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists is more desirable. Flexibility in qualification requirements has been incorporated to meet the reality of ongoing training and the compensation for desirable skills of individuals who may not meet all the criteria. The qualification requirements for an instructor rely on entry-level requirements and emphasis on goals (preferred) and continuing development of technical and instructional capabilities.

  9. Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

  10. Workplace safety and health improvements through a labor/management training and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Bruce; Morawetz, John; Ruttenberg, Ruth; Workman, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Seven hundred thirty-nine workers at Merck's Stonewall plant in Elkton, Virginia, have a safer and healthier workplace because four of them were enthusiastic about health and safety training they received from the union's training center in Cincinnati, Ohio. What emerged was not only that all 739 plant employees received OSHA 10-hour General Industry training, but that it was delivered by "OSHA-authorized" members of the International Chemical Workers Union Council who worked at the plant. Merck created a new full-time position in its Learning and Development Department and filled it with one of the four workers who had received the initial training. Strong plant leadership promoted discussions both during the training, in evaluation, and in newly energized joint labor-management meetings following the training. These discussions identified safety and health issues needing attention. Then, in a new spirit of trust and collaboration, major improvements occurred.

  11. High-Speed Maglev Trains; German Safety Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This document is a translation of technology-specific safety requirements developed : for the German Transrapid Maglev technology. These requirements were developed by a : working group composed of representatives of German Federal Railways (DB), Tes...

  12. An Analysis of Trainers' Perspectives within an Ecological Framework: Factors that Influence Mine Safety Training Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Emily J.; Cassandra L. Hoebbel; Kristen A. Rost

    2014-01-01

    Background: Satisfactory completion of mine safety training is a prerequisite for being hired and for continued employment in the coal industry. Although training includes content to develop skills in a variety of mineworker competencies, research and recommendations continue to specify that specific limitations in the self-escape portion of training still exist and that mineworkers need to be better prepared to respond to emergencies that could occur in their mine. Ecological models are ofte...

  13. Social validation and training of emergency fire safety skills for potential injury prevention and life saving.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, R T; Kazdin, A E; Haney, J I

    1981-01-01

    A multifaceted behavioral program designed to teach emergency fire escape procedures to children was evaluated in a multiple-baseline design. Five children were trained to respond correctly to nine home emergency fire situations under simulated conditions. The situations and responses focused upon in training were identified by a social validation procedure involving consultation with several safety agencies, including the direct input of firefighters. Training, carried out in simulated bedro...

  14. Research on Secondary Impact Safety of Train Driver based on THUMS Dummy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on biomechanical Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS dummy and traditional rigid dummy, the train driver injury of secondary impact in railway crash events is analyzed and the results are compared. The results of THUMS dummy are more detail and comprehensive to describe the injury of train driver. It could be applied to the safety research of crashworthiness of train driver cab in future. The driver injury is serious and needed to be optimized the parameter of cab console to reduce injury risk for the driver in the next work.

  15. Academic training in radiation safety awareness and practice among Iranian residents/fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Morteza; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Namazi, Mohammad Hassan; Vakili, Hossein; Saadat, Habibollah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the current state of radiation safety awareness and practice among Iranian radiology/cardiology residents. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 725 Iranian cardiology/radiology fellows/residents (685 residents and 40 fellows) were studied. Radiation safety awareness and practice were assessed using a 13-item survey questionnaire. Based on academic trainings provided in their medical centres, the subjects were divided into two groups (trained vs untrained). Results Trained residents/fellows had better performance compared with untrained ones regarding awareness of radiation dealing instructions, knowing safety experts of their centres (43.8% vs 20.1%, plead glass (61.6% vs 41.8%, p=0.003), apron (94.5% vs 90%, p=0.016) and radiation shield (71.2% vs 46.2%, p<0.001). Conclusions Awareness/practice of Iranian cardiology/radiology residents/fellows about radiation exposure safety issues is not acceptable currently. Those who received formal training courses at their academic centres about the safety measures had significantly better knowledge compared with those who did not. It is suggested that radiation safety training be offered at the beginning of residency/fellowship for residents/fellows in a comprehensive and uniform way throughout medical universities. PMID:27326189

  16. Academic training in radiation safety awareness and practice among Iranian residents/fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Morteza; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Namazi, Mohammad Hassan; Vakili, Hossein; Saadat, Habibollah

    2014-01-01

    To determine the current state of radiation safety awareness and practice among Iranian radiology/cardiology residents. In this cross-sectional study, 725 Iranian cardiology/radiology fellows/residents (685 residents and 40 fellows) were studied. Radiation safety awareness and practice were assessed using a 13-item survey questionnaire. Based on academic trainings provided in their medical centres, the subjects were divided into two groups (trained vs untrained). Trained residents/fellows had better performance compared with untrained ones regarding awareness of radiation dealing instructions, knowing safety experts of their centres (43.8% vs 20.1%, plead glass (61.6% vs 41.8%, p=0.003), apron (94.5% vs 90%, p=0.016) and radiation shield (71.2% vs 46.2%, p<0.001). Awareness/practice of Iranian cardiology/radiology residents/fellows about radiation exposure safety issues is not acceptable currently. Those who received formal training courses at their academic centres about the safety measures had significantly better knowledge compared with those who did not. It is suggested that radiation safety training be offered at the beginning of residency/fellowship for residents/fellows in a comprehensive and uniform way throughout medical universities.

  17. THE TRANSFORMATIONAL PROCESSES INVOLVING MOTOR SKILLS THAT OCCUR UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF BASIC PRELIMINARY TRAINING IN YOUNG HANDBALL PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markovic Sasa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The population from which we extracted a sample of 76 subjects consisted of elementary school students in Kursumlija, all male, aged 12-13, who were divided into a sub-sample consisting of 38 young handball players who took part in the training sessions of a school of handball and another sub-sample consisting of 38 non-athletes, who only took part in their regular physical education classes. The aim of the research was to determine the transformation processes involving motor skills, which occur under the influence of basic preliminary training in young handball players. The subject matter of the study was to examine whether a statistically significant increase in the level of motor skills would occur under the influence of physical exercise as part of basic preliminary training in the final as compared to the initial state. Six motor tests which define the dimensions of explosive and repetitive strength were used. The results of the research indicate that significant transformational processes involving the motor skills of young handball players occurred in the final as compared to the initial measuring, under the influence of basic preliminary training.

  18. Using Expert Panel Data to Guide Youth Agricultural Safety and Health Training Resources in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Mann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The US Department of Labor (US DOL oversees the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs, which identifies specific tasks that youth are prohibited from performing for hire on American farms and ranches. An educational exemption from this public policy is currently in place that allows youth, 14–15 years old, to complete a certification program prior to engaging in agricultural work involving tractors and machinery. However, limited guidance is provided in the legislation regarding the format or content of the tractor and machinery certification exemption. Four AgHOs (tractor and machinery studies were identified and included in this meta-analysis publication. The research goals of this analysis were to determine basic trends of learning outcomes, and identify educational content to be delivered as a result of these studies. Within each of the four studies, expert panels were used to identify educational learning outcomes. The analysis revealed that 48.0% (n = 184 of all learning outcome items fell within the Tractor-based (Tractor learning outcome category, 29.8% (n = 114 within General Safety and Health (General, and 22.2% (n = 85 of items in the Machinery-based (Machinery category. Ultimately, sound educational methods and understanding of fundamental student competence are essential components for any training program, including youth who complete AgHOs tractor and machinery certification programs.

  19. Creating a culture of safety in the emergency department: the value of teamwork training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Florence; Podila, Pradeep; Powers, Cynthia

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if teamwork training improved employees' perception of the culture of safety in the emergency department. Communication failure is frequently the root cause of medication errors, delays in treatment, and wrong-site surgery, leading to an estimated 200 000 deaths annually in the United States. Independent sample comparison study with a quantitative design was conducted with staff who received teamwork training. Posttraining perceptions were measured using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety culture survey. The average score for the 12 domains increased by 9% in positive responses after training. One domain (nonpunitive response to error) had a decrease in the percentage positive score. Training on teamwork skills can lead to a positive improvement of staff perception related to a culture of safety among emergency department staff.

  20. THE FIRE SAFETY TRAINING OF THE PRIMERY SCHOOL CHILDREN: MODERN STATE OF THE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Cherkashyn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the informative material which is based on the fire safety is studied and the effectiveness of its use in the educational process of younger students is evaluated. The attention is focused on the compliance of its content for a practical way usage by students in terms of professional readiness for self-defence. Author’s textbook on challenges of teaching children of primary school age fire safety is reviewed. On the basis of educational-methodical and scientific literature analysis, the conclusions about the systematization and the need for a unified approach to solving the designated problems, and developing a new system of organization of teaching children the basics of fire safety that requires a more thorough scientific understanding were made. The causes of the ignorance by younger students the basics of fire safety were revealed and methodical recommendations for improving the formation of their fire prevention knowledge were elaborated.

  1. [Peer-led training in basic life support and resuscitation using an automatic external defibrillator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løfgren, Bo; Petersen, Christina Børlum; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Secher, Niels; Eika, Berit; Grove, Erik L

    2009-11-30

    Peer-led training has been identified as a useful tool for delivering undergraduate healthcare training. In this paper we describe the implementation of the European Resuscitation Council BLS/AED Course as a peer-led training program for medical students.

  2. Peer-led training in basic life support and resuscitation using an automatic external defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfgren, Bo; Petersen, Christina Børlum; Mikkelsen, Ronni

    2009-01-01

    Peer-led training has been identified as a useful tool for delivering undergraduate healthcare training. In this paper we describe the implementation of the European Resuscitation Council BLS/AED Course as a peer-led training program for medical students....

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Method for Basic Marksmanship Training on an Australian Army Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Marksmanship Training Simulator: Effects of Feedback on Training and Transfer. Unpublished Masters Thesis . School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Griffith...to Train for Live Fire. Unpublished Masters Thesis . Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School. Keefe, A.A., & Tikuisis, P. (2003). A...comparison of target detection and rifle marksmanship during live and simulator firing with and without caffeine consumption. Technical Report 2003- 003

  4. Using basic ethical principles to evaluate safety efforts in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jay P

    2012-01-01

    Pursuit of pharmaceutical purity of the blood in the bag has led to a shrinking donor base and a significantly more expensive product. Decisions regarding new infectious marker testing and donor deferrals have typically been made emphasizing decreasing one specific risk without considering the effect the intervention will have on the overall safety and availability of blood transfusion. Regulations have been formulated by governmental agencies with limited input from the medical community. The decision making process has lacked risk benefit analyses and has not had the robustness associated with spirited discussions. Policies made in this manner may result in certain risks being decreased but can also have adverse unintended consequences. Being guided by the ethical principles of nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, and justice, we need to evaluate our actions in the context of overall blood safety rather than narrowly focusing on any one area.

  5. Using Basic Ethical Principles to Evaluate Safety Efforts in Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P. Brooks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pursuit of pharmaceutical purity of the blood in the bag has led to a shrinking donor base and a significantly more expensive product. Decisions regarding new infectious marker testing and donor deferrals have typically been made emphasizing decreasing one specific risk without considering the effect the intervention will have on the overall safety and availability of blood transfusion. Regulations have been formulated by governmental agencies with limited input from the medical community. The decision making process has lacked risk benefit analyses and has not had the robustness associated with spirited discussions. Policies made in this manner may result in certain risks being decreased but can also have adverse unintended consequences. Being guided by the ethical principles of nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, and justice, we need to evaluate our actions in the context of overall blood safety rather than narrowly focusing on any one area.

  6. Outcomes of a virtual-reality simulator-training programme on basic surgical skills in robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Cattarino, Susanna; Parra, Jérôme; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Ambrogi, Vanina; Vaessen, Christophe; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2017-06-01

    The utility of the virtual-reality robotic simulator in training programmes has not been clearly evaluated. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of a virtual-reality robotic simulator-training programme on basic surgical skills. A simulator-training programme in robotic surgery, using the da Vinci Skills Simulator, was evaluated in a population including junior and seasoned surgeons, and non-physicians. Their performances on robotic dots and suturing-skin pod platforms before and after virtual-simulation training were rated anonymously by surgeons experienced in robotics. 39 participants were enrolled: 14 medical students and residents in surgery, 14 seasoned surgeons, 11 non-physicians. Junior and seasoned surgeons' performances on platforms were not significantly improved after virtual-reality robotic simulation in any of the skill domains, in contrast to non-physicians. The benefits of virtual-reality simulator training on several tasks to basic skills in robotic surgery were not obvious among surgeons in our initial and early experience with the simulator. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Basic safety rule number no.2002-01; Regle fondamentale de surete no. 2002-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-12-15

    The purpose of this rule is to define acceptable methods for the development of probabilistic safety assessments(P.S.A.) and proven applications of P.S.A. for operating or future pressurized water reactors (PWR type reactors) of the French nuclear power programme, incorporating available French and international experience in this area. The standing group of experts for nuclear reactors has been consulted for the drafting of this rule. (N.C.)

  8. The effects of the European Working Time Directive on surgical training: the basic surgical trainee's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, B D

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: On the 1 August 2009, the implementation of European Working Time Directive became European law and was implemented in Galway University Hospital (GUH). AIMS: The aim of the study is to ascertain the opinion of the 25 surgical SHOs in GUH on the effect of the implementation of an EWTD compliant roster had on the quality of their training. METHODS: A questionnaire was circulated to all 25 surgical SHOs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (88%) SHOs report a reduction in the quality of their training. 18 (72%) report a reduction in the development of their operative skills. The SHOs believed the EWTD Rotas would encourage Irish graduates to train abroad. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical training faces a challenge with the implementation of EWTD Rotas. Major changes need to be made to the surgical training structure to train surgeons to the highest standard and to retain Irish-trained surgeons in the Irish healthcare system.

  9. The Effect of the Duration of Basic Life Support Training on the Learners’ Cardiopulmonary and Automated External Defibrillator Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyuck Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Basic life support (BLS training with hands-on practice can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest, although the optimal duration for BLS training is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of various BLS training durations for acquiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED skills. Methods. We randomised 485 South Korean nonmedical college students into four levels of BLS training: level 1 (40 min, level 2 (80 min, level 3 (120 min, and level 4 (180 min. Before and after each level, the participants completed questionnaires regarding their willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs, and their psychomotor skills for CPR and AED use were assessed using a manikin with Skill-Reporter™ software. Results. There were no significant differences between levels 1 and 2, although levels 3 and 4 exhibited significant differences in the proportion of overall adequate chest compressions (p<0.001 and average chest compression depth (p=0.003. All levels exhibited a greater posttest willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs (all, p<0.001. Conclusions. Brief BLS training provided a moderate level of skill for performing CPR and using AEDs. However, high-quality skills for CPR required longer and hands-on training, particularly hands-on training with AEDs.

  10. Radiation safety requirements for training of users of diagnostic X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Globally, the aim of requirements regarding the use and ownership of diagnostic medical X-ray equipment is to limit radiation by abiding by the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. The ignorance of radiographers with regard to radiation safety requirements, however, is currently a cause of ...

  11. Designing for the Elderly User: Internet Safety Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, Lianne C.

    2016-01-01

    The following qualitative study examines the usability of a custom-designed Internet safety tutorial, targeted at elderly individuals who use the Internet regularly, for effectively conveying critical information regarding online fraud, scams, and other cyber security. The elderly population is especially at risk when it comes to fraudulent…

  12. Comparison of an interactive CD-based and traditional instructor-led Basic Life Support skills training for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardegan, Karen J; Schofield, Margot J; Murphy, Gregory C

    2015-08-01

    Basic Life Support (BLS) is a life-saving and fundamental skill in resuscitation. However, studies have reported limitations in BLS training outcomes for both health professional and lay populations, and noted the resource and time-intensive nature of traditional training approaches. This exploratory study evaluated the effectiveness of an interactive CD-based BLS training programme that included unsupervised manikin practice compared with a traditional instructor-led BLS training programme involving demonstration and supervised practice. A quasi-experimental post-test with follow-up design was used. The sample was comprised of two cohorts: Novice second-year undergraduate Nursing students (n=187) and Practising Nurses (n=107) in their first year of hospital employment. BLS skill outcomes were assessed at one week and again at eight weeks post training. No statistically significant differences were found between the CD and traditional instructor-led BLS training methods in BLS skills of Novice and Practising Nurses at one week and eight weeks post training. However, there was a decrement in skill between one week and eight weeks post-training across both groups and an overall low level of competence. The failure to find a difference between the CD-based BLS programme with unsupervised manikin practice and a resource-intensive traditional instructor-led BLS training programme may indicate equivalence of the programmes or, even study design limitations. It is concerning that competence displayed by trainees from both groups was less than optimal and suggests the need for renewed efforts to develop and evaluate BLS training programmes which can achieve high rates of competence with acceptable skill retention over time. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Basic Training of Student’s Outdoor Club Increases Muscle Mass after Five Weeks of Exercise in Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novie Salsabila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aerobic and anaerobic exercises, may lead to increase muscle mass. The aim of this study was to determine the change in muscle mass during basic training of students’ outdoor club. Methods: This was an observational analytic study to college students who joined basic training of students’ outdoor club for 19 weeks. Subjects consisted of 17 male and 15 female students, measured five times consecutively by using Body Fat/Hydration monitor scale, with Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis principle. Data collection was performed five times, from February to July 2012 in Bandung. Statistical analysis was processed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Results: The result in males showed the mean 43.35±3.15 on the initial measurement. The muscle mass further increased significantly after five, ten, fifteen, and nineteen weeks of exercise (43.73±3.18 (p0.05; 38.08±1.67 (p>0.05 ; 38.23±1.52 (p>0.05 ; 38.61±1.52 (p<0.05 vs 37.77±2.00 respectively. Conclusion: Basic training of student’s outdoor club increases muscle mass significantly after five weeks of exercise in males, but not in females

  14. Does classroom-based Crew Resource Management training improve patient safety culture? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek-van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine C; Zwijnenberg, Nicolien C; Jansma, Elise P; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of classroom-based Crew Resource Management training on safety culture by a systematic review of literature. Studies were identified in PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Educational Resources Information Center up to 19 December 2012. The Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews was used to assess the risk of bias in the individual studies. In total, 22 manuscripts were included for review. Training settings, study designs, and evaluation methods varied widely. Most studies reporting only a selection of culture dimensions found mainly positive results, whereas studies reporting all safety culture dimensions of the particular survey found mixed results. On average, studies were at moderate risk of bias. Evidence of the effectiveness of Crew Resource Management training in health care on safety culture is scarce and the validity of most studies is limited. The results underline the necessity of more valid study designs, preferably using triangulation methods.

  15. Basic training module for vitreoretinal surgery and the Casey Eye Institute Vitrectomy Indices Tool for Skills Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Steven Yeh1, Brian T Chan-Kai2, Andreas K Lauer31Emory Eye Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to design and implement a vitreoretinal training module that would be useful for ophthalmology residents and fellows to learn the basic maneuvers required in vitreoretinal surgery.Methods: A prospective pilot study evaluating the training module was undertaken in 13 ophthalmology trainees (residents and vitreoretinal fellows with varying levels of vitreoretinal training experience. A vitreoretinal training module was designed and consisted of a three-port vitrectomy setup (sclerotomy wound construction, infusion placement, intraocular tasks (core vitrectomy, driving the operating microscope, membrane peel, air–fluid exchange, and wound closure. Standard vitrectomy instrumentation, the VitRet eye (Phillips Studio, Bristol, UK and vitreous-like fluid using dairy creamer and balanced saline were utilized. A five-point Likert scale, ie, the Casey Eye Institute Vitrectomy Indices Tool for Skills Assessment (CEIVITS, was devised to evaluate each component of the module. Vitreoretinal surgical maneuvers were digitally recorded and graded by an attending vitreoretinal surgeon. Linear regression and correlation were performed to evaluate the relationship between prior vitreoretinal experience and CEIVITS performance. The main outcome measures were correlation of vitreoretinal surgical experience and CEIVITS performance on simulated tasks using a basic vitreoretinal training module.Results: Thirteen participants from postgraduate year 2 to postgraduate year 6 levels were evaluated. Nine participants were male and four were female. The median age of participants was 32 (range 30–36 years and surgical experience was 0–410 prior vitreoretinal

  16. In-Hospital Basic Life Support: Major Differences in Duration, Retraining Intervals, and Training Methods - A Danish Nationwide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditte K; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Staerk, Mathilde

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: High-quality chest compressions and early defibrillation is essential to improve survival following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Efficient training in basic life support (BLS) for clinical staff is therefore important. This study aimed to investigate duration, training methods......%) or on a gurney (29%). Backboards were used in 2% of hospitals. Work position during chest compressions was part of training, and included adjusting the bed height (70%), removing the bed rail (59%), and/or jumping onto the bed (41%). CPR feedback devices were used by 85%. An end-of-course test for BLS skills...... different methods to optimize work position. Backboards are very rarely used. Most hospitals did not use end-of-course tests for BLS skills.Author Disclosures: D.K. Rasmussen: None. K.G. Lauridsen: None. M. Staerk: None. T. Mygind: None. B. Loefgren: None....

  17. Handbook of driver assistance systems basic information, components and systems for active safety and comfort

    CERN Document Server

    Hakuli, Stephan; Lotz, Felix; Singer, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This fundamental work explains in detail systems for active safety and driver assistance, considering both their structure and their function. These include the well-known standard systems such as Anti-lock braking system (ABS), Electronic Stability Control (ESC) or Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC). But it includes also new systems for protecting collisions protection, for changing the lane, or for convenient parking. The book aims at giving a complete picture focusing on the entire system. First, it describes the components which are necessary for assistance systems, such as sensors, actuators, mechatronic subsystems, and control elements. Then, it explains key features for the user-friendly design of human-machine interfaces between driver and assistance system. Finally, important characteristic features of driver assistance systems for particular vehicles are presented: Systems for commercial vehicles and motorcycles.

  18. 38 CFR 21.8070 - Basic duration of a vocational training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Training and Rehabilitation..., as § 21.8120 describes, for a period that VA determines the child needs to reach the level employers...: 38 U.S.C. 1804(c), 1814) (d) Approval of training beyond the entry level. To qualify for employment...

  19. A randomized clinical trial comparing fitness and biofeedback training versus basic treatment in patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, Marijke; Bolwijn, Paulien; Verstappen, Frans; Bakker, Carla; Hidding, Alita; Houben, Harry; van der Heijde, Desiree; Landewé, Robert; van der Linden, Sjef

    2002-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of physical fitness training or biofeedback training with the results of usual care in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). One hundred forty-three female patients with FM (American College of Rheumatology criteria) were randomized into 3 groups: a fitness program (n =

  20. Current training on the basics of robotic surgery in the Netherlands: Time for a multidisciplinary approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Brinkman (Willem); I. de Angst (Isabel); H.W.R. Schreuder (Henk); B. Schout (Barbara); W.A. Draaisma (Werner); L.M. Verweij (Lisanne); A.J.M. Hendrikx (A. J M); H.G. van der Poel (Henk G.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The following research questions were answered: (1) What are the training pathways followed by the current robot professionals? (2) Are there any differences between the surgical specialties in robot training and robot use? (3) What is their opinion about multidisciplinary

  1. Basic Botany On-Line: A Training Tool for the Master Gardener Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerZanden, Ann Marie; Rost, Bob; Eckel, Rick

    2002-01-01

    A noncredit, online training module on botany was offered to participants in the Oregon Master Gardener program. The 48 participants felt the module was a useful training tool. They also noted that the convenience of completing the material at their own pace and during a time that fit into their schedule. (SK)

  2. Effectiveness of basic clinical skills training programmes : a cross-sectional comparison of four medical schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmen, R; Scherpbier, A; van der Vleuten, C; Denekens, J; Derese, A; van Rossum, Herman; Hoogenboom, R; Kramer, A; Van Royen, P; Bossaert, L

    Objective Training in physical diagnostic skills is an important part of undergraduate medical education. The objective of this study was to study the outcome of skills training at four medical schools. Context At the time of the study, three schools had a traditional lecture-based curriculum and

  3. Basic Extension Skills Training (BEST): A Responsive Approach to Integrated Extension for Rural Development in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gboku, Matthew L. S.; Modise, Oitshepile M.

    2008-01-01

    In a rapidly changing society like Botswana, the competition for employment, training and progression on the job has become very high. The development of skills is therefore a crucial and integral part of nation building, which needs a direct link to a training programme to continuously help staff to cope with the different needs they meet in the…

  4. Knowledge, skills and professional ethics of real estate appraiser. Basic dimensions of a training plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomez-Bezares Revuelta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research conducted to support a training proposal which enables students to work as real estate appraisers. Nowadays in Spain it is enough to be an architect or an engineer to become a real estate appraiser, while further complementary training rests in the hands of the appraisal companies. Analyzing the knowledge needed to perform adjusted appraisals, the international standards and other empiric analysis, we will try to build a coherent training plan showing how the need for technical training emerges, especially in finance, in psychoeducational skills and professional ethics. Our aim is to claim the capacity of the pedagogic science as a relevant factor in solving important socio-economic problems by diagnosing training needs and the design of programs.

  5. Food Safety training: A Model HACCP Instructional Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Georgakopoulos, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    This research project reports the findings of an original study with regards to a new Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) instructional technique to be used for training purposes. The study investigated the effectiveness of a model HACCP instructional technique, the main characteristics of which are the adoption of a new methodology when teaching HACCP and the use of the emerging computer-based technology of Virtual Reality (VR). The findings highlight the advantages offered by the...

  6. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of these courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 8 juillet 2004. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation et Développement (groupe sécurité) de HR, ...

  7. Safety Training: Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt.Nous vous proposons un nouveau cours de sécurité lié aux manutentions manuelles (durée 1 jour) : Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail. Si vous êtes amené à manipuler régulièrement des charges lourdes ou volumineuses, cette formation peut vous aider à prévenir les lésions musculaires ou dorsales. A l'issue de cette formation, vous serez capable d'adopter et d'appliquer les principes de base de sécurité physique et d'&e...

  8. Adoption and adaptation of the International Basic Safety Standards to Cuban reality; Adopcion y adaptacion de las normas basicas internacionales de seguridad a la realidad cubana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo Garcia, J.R.; Lopez Forteza, Y.; Sarabia Molina, I.; Alonso Gonzalez, I.; Guillen Campos, A. [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: regulacion@cnsn.cu

    2001-07-01

    The new Cuban regulatory document homologous to the 'International Basic Safety Standards for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources' (IBSS) will be published in the near future. The document was accomplished on the basis of the IAEA Safety Series No 115 to which text it was performed the needed changes in order adapt it to the national reality in the field of protection and safety. The document is published with the consensus of the principal organizations and entities with specific responsibilities in relation to protection and safety as well as the consensus of the entities providing services in this field. The present paper presents and discusses the basic aspects included in the Cuban document that in one or another way should be considered as precision in reference to the IBSS. (author)

  9. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Ehiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Methods: PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014 with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Results: Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania, Central America (Belize, and Asia (Myanmar were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Conclusion: Although

  10. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiri, John E; Gunn, Jayleen K L; Center, Katherine E; Li, Ying; Rouhani, Mae; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2014-01-01

    Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs) and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014) with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only) conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania), Central America (Belize), and Asia (Myanmar) were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Although available evidence suggests a positive impact of training and deployment

  11. [E-learning and safety training: a precision teaching case study in Trenitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdina, Alessandro; Gatti, Maria

    2010-01-01

    For many safe behaviors, frequency is important but latency even more. Frequency is the number of times a man behaves in period, latency is measured by the time passed from discriminative stimulus and response. Safety is all about fluency: correctness and speed of response. In this article, authors present pre-requisites of an evidence based training and then a case study in train industry.

  12. Physical Performance and Attrition Among U.S. Air Force Trainees Participating in the Basic Military Training Fueling Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Carrissa G; Stankorb, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Dietary intake of military initial entry trainees is often inadequate because of the structured food environment, lack of snacking, and limited time for meals. Inadequate intake during training increases risk for injury, poor performance, and attrition from training. A performance nutrition initiative was implemented at Joint Base San Antonio Lackland to mitigate this inadequacy in Air Force trainees and better reflect recommendations for active populations and mitigate nutritional inadequacy. Trainees (N = 867) in two squadrons either received a nutrition bar before bed (snack squadron n = 423) or did not (standard squadron n = 444). This study retrospectively compared trainees' attrition and fitness measures as recorded in the Basic Military Training (BMT) Surveillance database. Both groups had similar rates of attrition and graduation at the end of 8 weeks (p = 0.23). At the start of training, only one out of four trainees in either Squadron passed the Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA). Although both squadrons' fitness measures improved as a result of the effects of training, the snack squadron had a significantly greater percent improvement in all PFA categories (p fitness measures (p fitness improves with a modest nutritional supplement and suggests that optimizing overall nutrition benefits trainees. Attrition from BMT costs the U.S. Air Force up to $22,000 per trainee lost. In contrast, a trainee could receive one nutrition bar per day during BMT for $34. As the nutrition bar initiative improves fitness as well as costs less than recruiting and medically treating trainees whom ultimately attrite from training, the snack intervention was beneficial. Future studies of strategic nutrition interventions in military training populations can help trainees to better meet their macronutrient and micronutrient needs and further optimize training performance. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Product, not process! Explaining a basic concept in agricultural biotechnologies and food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Most life scientists have relentlessly recommended any evaluative approach of agri-food products to be based on examination of the phenotype, i.e. the actual characteristics of the food, feed and fiber varieties: the effects of any new cultivar (or micro-organism, animal) on our health are not dependent on the process(es), the techniques used to obtain it.The so-called "genetically modified organisms" ("GMOs"), on the other hand, are commonly framed as a group with special properties - most frequently seen as dubious, or even harmful.Some social scientists still believe that considering the process is a correct background for science-based understanding and regulation. To show that such an approach is utterly wrong, and to invite scientists, teachers and science communicators to explain this mistake to students, policy-makers and the public at large, we imagined a dialogue between a social scientist, who has a positive opinion about a certain weight that a process-based orientation should have in the risk assessment, and a few experts who offer plenty of arguments against that view. The discussion focuses on new food safety.

  14. Community-based pedestrian safety training in virtual reality: A pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Combs, Tabitha; Rodriguez, Daniel; Severson, Joan; Sisiopiku, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Child pedestrian injuries are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity across the United States and the world. Repeated practice at the cognitive-perceptual task of crossing a street may lead to safer pedestrian behavior. Virtual reality offers a unique opportunity for repeated practice without the risk of actual injury. This study conducted a pre-post within-subjects trial of training children in pedestrian safety using a semi-mobile, semi-immersive virtual pedestrian environment placed at schools and community centers. Pedestrian safety skills among a group of 44 seven- and eight-year-old children were assessed in a laboratory, and then children completed six 15-minute training sessions in the virtual pedestrian environment at their school or community center following pragmatic trial strategies over the course of three weeks. Following training, pedestrian safety skills were re-assessed. Results indicate improvement in delay entering traffic following training. Safe crossings did not demonstrate change. Attention to traffic and time to contact with oncoming vehicles both decreased somewhat, perhaps an indication that training was incomplete and children were in the process of actively learning to be safer pedestrians. The findings suggest virtual reality environments placed in community centers hold promise for teaching children to be safer pedestrians, but future research is needed to determine the optimal training dosage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS) Training Improves First Responder Confidence to Face Mass-Casualty Incidents in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls, Deborah A; Chestovich, Paul J; Coule, Phillip; Carrison, Dale M; Chua, Charleston M; Wora-Urai, Nopadol; Kanchanarin, Tavatchai

    2017-10-01

    Medical response to mass-casualty incidents (MCIs) requires specialized training and preparation. Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS) is a course designed to prepare health care workers for a MCI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the confidence of health care professionals in Thailand to face a MCI after participating in a BDLS course. Basic Disaster Life Support was taught to health care professionals in Thailand in July 2008. Demographics and medical experience were recorded, and participants rated their confidence before and after the course using a five-point Likert scale in 11 pertinent MCI categories. Survey results were compiled and compared with PBasic Disaster Life Support significantly improves confidence to respond to MCI situations, but nurses and active duty military benefit the most from the course. Future courses should focus on these groups to prepare for MCIs. Kuhls DA , Chestovich PJ , Coule P , Carrison DM , Chua CM , Wora-Urai N , Kanchanarin T . Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS) training improves first responder confidence to face mass-casualty incidents in Thailand. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):492-500 .

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Labs at NIMH Labs ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ...

  17. Evaluating SafeClub: can risk management training improve the safety activities of community soccer clubs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, K; Klarenaar, P; Donaldson, A; Sherker, S

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate a sports safety-focused risk-management training programme. Controlled before and after test. Four community soccer associations in Sydney, Australia. 76 clubs (32 intervention, 44 control) at baseline, and 67 clubs (27 intervention, 40 control) at post-season and 12-month follow-ups. SafeClub, a sports safety-focused risk-management training programme (3x2 hour sessions) based on adult-learning principles and injury-prevention concepts and models. Changes in mean policy, infrastructure and overall safety scores as measured using a modified version of the Sports Safety Audit Tool. There was no significant difference in the mean policy, infrastructure and overall safety scores of intervention and control clubs at baseline. Intervention clubs achieved higher post-season mean policy (11.9 intervention vs 7.5 controls), infrastructure (15.2 vs 10.3) and overall safety (27.0 vs 17.8) scores than did controls. These differences were greater at the 12-month follow-up: policy (16.4 vs 7.6); infrastructure (24.7 vs 10.7); and overall safety (41.1 vs 18.3). General linear modelling indicated that intervention clubs achieved statistically significantly higher policy (pfoundations and processes for good risk-management practice, in a sustainable way.

  18. How do children learn to cross the street? The process of pedestrian safety training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Shen, Jiabin; McClure, Leslie A

    2016-08-17

    Pedestrian injuries are a leading cause of child death and may be reduced by training children to cross streets more safely. Such training is most effective when children receive repeated practice at the complex cognitive-perceptual task of judging moving traffic and selecting safe crossing gaps, but there is limited data on how much practice is required for children to reach adult levels of functioning. Using existing data, we examined how children's pedestrian skills changed over the course of 6 pedestrian safety training sessions, each composed of 45 crossings within a virtual pedestrian environment. As part of a randomized controlled trial on pedestrian safety training, 59 children ages 7-8 crossed the street within a semi-immersive virtual pedestrian environment 270 times over a 3-week period (6 sessions of 45 crossings each). Feedback was provided after each crossing, and traffic speed and density were advanced as children's skill improved. Postintervention pedestrian behavior was assessed a week later in the virtual environment and compared to adult behavior with identical traffic patterns. Over the course of training, children entered traffic gaps more quickly and chose tighter gaps to cross within; their crossing efficiency appeared to increase. By the end of training, some aspects of children's pedestrian behavior was comparable to adult behavior but other aspects were not, indicating that the training was worthwhile but insufficient for most children to achieve adult levels of functioning. Repeated practice in a simulated pedestrian environment helps children learn aspects of safe and efficient pedestrian behavior. Six twice-weekly training sessions of 45 crossings each were insufficient for children to reach adult pedestrian functioning, however, and future research should continue to study the trajectory and quantity of child pedestrian safety training needed for children to become competent pedestrians.

  19. Can primary health care staff be trained in basic life-saving surgery?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... Introduction. Two billion people in low- and middle-income countries have no access to basic surgical care. Surgical conditions account for a significant proportion of the global health burden. Surgery is still not considered a public health priority even though surgical services may be as cost- effective as ...

  20. Training basic laparoscopic skills using a custom-made video game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goris, Jetse; Jalink, Maarten B; Ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    Video games are accepted and used for a wide variety of applications. In the medical world, research on the positive effects of playing games on basic laparoscopic skills is rapidly increasing. Although these benefits have been proven several times, no institution actually uses video games for

  1. Basic Warehousing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on basic warehousing is designed to provide Marines with Military Occupation Speciality 3051 in the rank of private through corporal with instruction in those basic principles, methods, and procedures that can be applied to any warehousing or storage…

  2. Improvement of technical training of sportswomen in rhythmic gymnastics by means of acrobatics at the stage of preliminary basic preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro Kyzim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to prove experimentally the technique of improvement of technical training of sportswomen in rhythmic gymnastics by means of acrobatics at the stage of preliminary basic preparation. Material & Methods: the following methods of the research were used: analysis and synthesis of references, pedagogical observations, pedagogical testing, pedagogical experiment, method of expert assessment (qualimetry, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: the level of technical skill of performance of pre-acrobatic elements by sportswomen of rhythmic gymnastics before carrying out the pedagogical experiment is determined. The dynamics of indicators of the level of technical preparedness of sportswomen of rhythmic gymnastics is defined. Conclusions: it is established that additional resources of acrobatics influence significantly the level of technical preparedness of sportswomen of rhythmic gymnastics at the stage of preliminary basic preparation.

  3. The effect of injection safety training on knowledge and attitude of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than half of both the intervention (58%) and control (76.9%) had good attitude at pre intervention with no statistical difference in both groups at post intervention phase. Conclusion; It was concluded that training on injection safety improved the knowledge of Primary Health Care Workers with no significant effect on their ...

  4. Occupational Health and Safety. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three communication skills units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in the area of occupational health and safety: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her written and spoken communication skills needed…

  5. 77 FR 74784 - Safety Zone for Recovery Operations for East Jefferson Street Train Derailment, Mantua Creek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... safety zone is intended to restrict vessel traffic movement to protect mariners from the hazards associated with an ongoing recovery operation to remove the derailed train cars and address hazardous... agency to issue a rule without prior notice and opportunity to comment when the agency for good cause...

  6. Relational Safety and Liberating Training Spaces: An Application with a Focus on Sexual Orientation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Pilar; Rankin, Pressley, IV

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and discusses a teaching case of a clinical training situation involving a gay marriage and family therapy student working with a same-sex affectional couple. The conceptual pillars of this teaching case, relational safety and liberating spaces, are advanced as illustrations of how the student developed his voice in the…

  7. A Model Train-The-Trainer Program for HACCP-Based Food Safety Training in the Retail/Food Service Industry: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kenneth E.; Knabel, Steve; Mendenhall, Von

    1999-01-01

    A survey showed states are adopting higher training and certification requirements for food-service workers. A train-the-trainer model was developed to prepare extension agents, health officers, and food-service managers to train others in food-safety procedures. (SK)

  8. Safety and efficacy of resistance training in germ cell cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Frank; Jones, L W; Tolver, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bleomycin–etoposid–cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy is curative in most patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) but also associated with toxic actions and dysfunction in non-targeted tissues. We investigated changes in muscle function during BEP and the safety...... and efficacy of resistance training to modulate these changes. Methods: Thirty GCC patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (resistance training group (INT), n=15) or usual care (CON, n=15) during 9 weeks of BEP therapy. Resistance training consisted of thrice weekly sessions of four exercises, 3...... changes compared with the INT-group (PBEP was associated with significant reduction in lean mass and strength and trends toward unfavourable changes in muscle fibre size and phenotype composition. Resistance training was safe and attenuated dysfunction in selected endpoints, but BEP...

  9. Improving workplace safety training using a self-directed CPR-AED learning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Mary E; Cazzell, Mary; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Cason, Carolyn L

    2009-04-01

    Adequate training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) is an important component of a workplace safety training program. Barriers to traditional in-classroom CPR-AED training programs include time away from work to complete training, logistics, learner discomfort over being in a classroom setting, and instructors who include information irrelevant to CPR. This study evaluated differences in CPR skills performance between employees who learned CPR using a self-directed learning (SDL) kit and employees who attended a traditional instructor-led course. The results suggest that the SDL kit yields learning outcomes comparable to those obtained with traditional instructor-led courses and is a more time-efficient tool for CPR-AED training. Furthermore, the SDL kit overcomes many of the barriers that keep individuals from learning CPR and appears to contribute to bystanders' confidently attempting resuscitation.

  10. Dynamics of psychophysiological state of the boxers influenced by the standard of specialized demands of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martsiv V.P.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Examined the psychophysiological state of boxers with 9 types of reactions to the anticipation stage of the specialized basic training. In the experiment involved 18 male boxers aged 18-20 years. We investigated the dynamics of the reactions of anticipation in boxers under the influence of standard specialized loads. In the main part of the session boxers improved individual series 4-5 shock the boxing bag with the installation of the most strongly and quickly strike (loading dose - 9 rounds of 3 minutes each with an interval of 1 minute rest. Upon completion of the boxers performed strength training with weightlifting neck and stuffed ball. The regularities of the occurrence of each type of response in this group of athletes, provides a way of their use as criteria for assessing the psycho-physiological state of boxers.

  11. How to bring issues of health and safety closer to young workers during their work training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Mesarič

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data collected by the European Community indicates that the young, economically active population, aged from 18 to 24 years, is more likely to suffer from occupational injuries and occupational diseases in comparison with the rest of the working population, due to the lack of experience and knowledge about health and safety in the workplace, and insufficient training for safe and healthy work practices. Employers must establish an adequate system to ensure workplace health and safety, with an emphasis on providing safety training for pupils and students undergoing apprenticeship and the newly-employed young people. The Ministry of Labour, Family, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities runs a series of projects aiming to promote health and safety culture among young people in Slovenia. The goal of the national programme for introducing occupational health and safety into the education process is offering a variety of tools and devices for educators and teachers, which can be employed to introduce the issues of occupational health and safety to young people in an exciting and engaging manner.

  12. Applying Learning Theory to Safety and Health Training for Hispanic Immigrant Dairy Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Carrillo, Patricia M; Liebman, Amy K; Reyes, Iris Anne C; Ninco Sánchez, Yurany V; Keifer, Matthew C

    2017-07-01

    We designed a safety and health curriculum for dairy immigrant workers aiming to increase knowledge, encourage safe behavior, and reduce worker communication inequalities to prevent occupational injury and diseases. The design is largely based on the Taxonomy of Significant Learning and incorporated behavioral and adult learning theories and principles of occupational hazard control. Trainings were implemented with 836 Spanish-speaking workers from 67 farms in Wisconsin. Sixty-seven percent of workers reported never being trained before in dairy safety, 65% of these worked in dairy for 5 or fewers years, and 26% of workers reported being ever injured while working on dairy. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the trainings suggest that our curriculum successfully increased worker knowledge and promoted contemplation of safe practices. The overall knowledge gain of 25% was statistically significant ( p job stages.

  13. Construct and concurrent validity of a Nintendo Wii video game made for training basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalink, M. B.; Goris, J.; Heineman, E.; Pierie, J. P. E. N.; ten Cate Hoedemaker, H. O.

    Background Virtual reality (VR) laparoscopic simulators have been around for more than 10 years and have proven to be cost-and time-effective in laparoscopic skills training. However, most simulators are, in our experience, considered less interesting by residents and are often poorly accessible.

  14. 38 CFR 21.6070 - Basic duration of a vocational training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Temporary Program of Vocational... the level generally recognized as necessary for entry into employment in a suitable occupational... employment, the veteran may be trained to that level. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1524(b)) (d) When duration of the...

  15. A survey of nurses' basic life support knowledge and training at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Survival after cardiac arrest is related to time taken for resuscitation, and defibrillation, to commence. At many hospitals, the healthcare worker most likely to be present when a patient suffers a cardiac arrest is a nurse. This study was performed to assess BLS knowledge and training of nurses, and thus to ...

  16. Methodic of coordination’s perfection of junior taekwondo athletes at stage of pre-basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashkov I.N.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: experimental substantiation of effectiveness of coordination training methodic of junior taekwondo athletes at stage of pre-basic training. Material: in the research 30 taekwondo athletes of 12-14 yrs age, who composed control and experimental groups, participated. Results: we determined means and methods of training of taekwondo athletes coordination abilities. Correlation of exercises for sense of space, muscular sense, sense of time took from 15 to 25% of total time of training. During 5 seconds’ work quantity of repetitions was from 8 to 12-15 times. Rest pauses between exercises were from 1 to 1-2 minutes. The offered methodic facilitated improvement of coordination fitness indicators of taekwondo athletes: keeping of static balance with open eyes - by 5.08 % and with closed eyes - by 5.63 %; Romberg’s test on left foot - by 11,4% and on tight - by 8.22%; response of choice - by 15.9%; high jump from the spot - by 11.39%; shuttle run - by 5.8%. Conclusions: in the process of perfection of taekwondo athletes coordination it is necessary to solve the following tasks: master more and more complex coordination structures of motor tasks; master quick re-switching of motor functioning, depending on change of situation; improve accuracy of required motor actions; develop stability of space orientation.

  17. Republished: Building a culture of safety through team training and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lily; Galla, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Medical errors continue to occur despite multiple strategies devised for their prevention. Although many safety initiatives lead to improvement, they are often short lived and unsustainable. Our goal was to build a culture of patient safety within a structure that optimised teamwork and ongoing engagement of the healthcare team. Teamwork impacts the effectiveness of care, patient safety and clinical outcomes, and team training has been identified as a strategy for enhancing teamwork, reducing medical errors and building a culture of safety in healthcare. Therefore, we implemented Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS), an evidence-based framework which was used for team training to create transformational and/or incremental changes; facilitating transformation of organisational culture, or solving specific problems. To date, TeamSTEPPS (TS) has been implemented in 14 hospitals, two Long Term Care Facilities, and outpatient areas across the North Shore LIJ Health System. 32 150 members of the healthcare team have been trained. TeamSTEPPS was piloted at a community hospital within the framework of the health system's organisational care delivery model, the Collaborative Care Model to facilitate sustainment. AHRQ's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, (HSOPSC), was administered before and after implementation of TeamSTEPPS, comparing the perception of patient safety by the heathcare team. Pilot hospital results of HSOPSC show significant improvement from 2007 (pre-TeamSTEPPS) to 2010. System-wide results of HSOPSC show similar trends to those seen in the pilot hospital. Valuable lessons for organisational success from the pilot hospital enabled rapid spread of TeamSTEPPS across the rest of the health system.

  18. Water safety in the bush: strategies for addressing training needs in remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, N; Shaw, P; Larson, A

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a unique, remote, water safety-training program delivered to 11 remote Australian communities during 2006-2007. The program, known as 'Water Safety in the Bush', was developed by Combined Universities Centre for Rural Health in Geraldton Western Australia in consultation with the Commonwealth Government Department of Health and Ageing, and the Royal Life Saving Society of Australia. Drowning and near drowning are major causes of childhood death and injury in rural and remote Australia, making improved water safety awareness and skills a public health priority. Water Safety in the Bush employed a flexible, community development model to meet the special requirements of remote and isolated communities. The model had three elements: coordination by a local organisation; a water safety instruction program based on a Royal Life Saving Society of Australia curriculum adapted to meet local priorities; and strategies for sustainability. In the delivery of the program a total of 873 children and 219 adults received swimming and water safety instruction; 47 adults and older children received first-aid training; and 38 community members became AUSTAWIM (the Australian Council for the Teaching of Swimming and Water Safety) accredited instructors. Project evaluation showed parents and community organisations were very satisfied with the program which met a real need. Parents and instructors gave evidence of children's increased skills in water safety, swimming ability, life-saving and water confidence. Training programs with greater contact hours showed greater skill gains. Sustainability strategies included accreditation of local AUSTSWIM instructors, the erection of water safety signs, sourcing of continuing funding, and the introduction of water safety theory into the school curriculum. Flexibility was the major success factor. Within the parameters of minimum guidelines, communities were encouraged to choose the timing, venue and delivery mode of the

  19. Integrated Design of Basic Training, Practicum and End-of-Course Assignment Modules in the Teacher Training Degree: Perception of University Teachers, Students, and School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torremorell, Maria Carme Boqué; de Nicolás, Montserrat Alguacil; Valls, Mercè Pañellas

    Teacher training at the Blanquerna Faculty of Psychology and Educational and Sports Sciences (FPCEE), in Barcelona, has a long pedagogical tradition based on teaching innovation. Its educational style is characterised by methods focused on the students' involvement and on close collaboration with teaching practice centres. Within a core subject in the Teacher Training diploma course, students were asked to assess different methodological proposals aimed at promoting the development of their personal, social, and professional competences. In the assessment surveys, from a sample of 145 students, scores for variables very satisfactory or satisfactory ranged from 95.8 % to 83.4 % for the entire set of methodological actions under analysis. Data obtained in this first research phase were very useful to design basic training modules for the new Teacher Training Degree. In the second phase (in process), active teachers are asked for their perception on the orientation of the practicum, its connection with the end-of-course assignment, and the in-service student's incidence on innovation processes at school.

  20. Safety of High Speed Magnetic Levitation Transportation Systems : German High-Speed Maglev Train Safety Requirements - Potential For Application in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The safety of various magnetically levitated (maglev) trains underdevelopment for possible : implementation in the United States is ofdirect concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). : This report is the second in a series of reports addr...

  1. Integration of basic clinical skills training in medical education: an interprofessional simulated teaching experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Janet Fraser; Cahan, Mitchell A; Zanetti, Mary L

    2011-01-01

    A 2004 survey reveals that the implementation of the 1998 AAMC report on medical student clinical skills training is slow. Given the importance of intravenous catheter placement, a creative approach evolved to educate medical students on this important skill. As part of a community service learning initiative, six graduate nursing students developed, implemented, and evaluated a pilot IV Cannulation Education Module taught to medical students. Data analysis of 63 participants reveals improved knowledge and confidence in medical students' ability to place an intravenous catheter. The objectives were met and the process enjoyed by students of both professions. Opportunities for interprofessional teaching and learning include clinical skills training. Medical students learned an important skill taught by graduate nursing students who developed and evaluated a curriculum that met their own graduate course objectives. Both professions appreciated the opportunity to work collaboratively to achieve their respective programmatic goals.

  2. Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Assigning Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape in Marine Corps Basic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    Army Physical Training Footwear Studies Experimental Group Shoes Service Marine Corps Air Force Army Motion Control Shoe New Balance 587 New...AJSM PreView, publIshed on June 24, 2010 as doi:10.1177/0363546510369548 Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Assigning Running Shoes Based on Plantar...34Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Eastern Recruiting Region, Parris Island, South Carolina Background: Shoe manufacturers market motion control. stability

  3. The effect of safety training involving non-destructive testing among students at specialized vocational high schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Young Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education amd Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    By examining the safety issues involved in on-site training sessions conducted at specialized vocational high schools, and by analyzing the effects of non-destructive testing (NDT) safety training, this study aims to contribute to ensuring the general safety of high school students. Students who expressed an interest in participation were surveyed regarding current NDT training practices, as well as NDT safety training. A total of 361 students from 4 schools participated in this study; 37.7% (136 students) were from the Seoul metropolitan area and 62.3% (225 students) were from other areas. Of the respondents, 2.2% (8 students) reported having engaged in NDT. As a result of safety training, statistically significant improvements were observed in most areas, except for individuals with previous NDT experience. The areas of improvement included safety awareness, acquisition of knowledge, subjective knowledge levels, objective knowledge levels, and adjustments to existing personal attitudes. Even at absolutely necessary observation-only training sessions, it is crucial that sufficient safety training and additional safety measures be adequately provided.

  4. From beginners to trained users: an advanced tool to guide experimenters in basic applied fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingand, Philippe B.; Lerner, Dan A.

    1993-05-01

    UPY-F is a software dedicated to solving various queries issued by end-users of spectrofluorimeters when they come across a problem in the course of an experiment. The main goal is to provide a diagnostic for the nonpertinent use of a spectrofluorimeter. Many artifacts may induce the operator into trouble and except for experts, the simple manipulation of the controls of a fluorimeter results in effects not always fully appreciated. The solution retained is an association between a powerful hypermedia tool and an expert system. A straight expert system offers a number of well-known advantages. But it is not well accepted by the user due to the many moves between the spectrofluorimeter and the diagnostic tool. In our hypermedia tool, knowledge can be displayed by the means of visual concepts through which one can browse, and navigate. The user still perceives his problem as a whole, which may not be the case with a straight expert system. We demonstrate typical situations in which an event will trigger a chain reasoning leading to the debugging of the problem. The system is not only meant to help a beginner but can conform itself to guide a well trained experimenter. We think that its functionalities and user-friendly interface are very attractive and open new vistas in the way future users may be trained, whether they work in research labs or industrial settings, as it could namely cut down on the time spent for their training.

  5. Evaluation of Basic Skills Improvement for Laparoscopy by Training with a Video Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Gómez-Ramírez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to the growing economical and ethical limitations in surgeons training for minimally invasive surgery (mis, e.g. laparoscopy, this study aims at evaluating the effect of a continuous practice of a particular videogame on the development of the fundamental and specific skills needed to perform this type of procedure successfully. Materials and methods: To evaluate the effectiveness of video game practicing, three essential and common activities were chosen (cutting, suturing, and eye-hand coordination to be performed in laparoscopic simulators. Eight different indexes or variables of performance were measured in the three activities. Fourteen voluntaries without previous experience in surgery were divided in two groups (intervention and control and their performance was evaluated before and after a one-month standardized training program with the video game Marble Mania®. Results: A general improvement of all the performance variables was observed after one month training in the intervention group. This improvement was significant with respect to the control group in three of the eight variables: suturing errors (p = 0.003, and the execution and number of errors in the eye-hand coordination (p = 0.025 and 0.001, respectively.

  6. Medical students' situational motivation to participate in simulation based team training is predicted by attitudes to patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Cecilia; Creutzfeldt, Johan; Meurling, Lisbet; Hedman, Leif; Kjellin, Ann; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2017-02-10

    Patient safety education, as well as the safety climate at clinical rotations, has an impact on students' attitudes. We explored medical students' self-reported motivation to participate in simulation-based teamwork training (SBTT), with the hypothesis that high scores in patient safety attitudes would promote motivation to SBTT and that intrinsic motivation would increase after training. In a prospective cohort study we explored Swedish medical students' attitudes to patient safety, their motivation to participate in SBTT and how motivation was affected by the training. The setting was an integrated SBTT course during the surgical semester that focused on non-technical skills and safe treatment of surgical emergencies. Data was collected using the Situational Motivation Scale (SIMS) and the Attitudes to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ). We found a positive correlation between students' individual patient safety attitudes and self-reported motivation (identified regulation) to participate in SBTT. We also found that intrinsic motivation increased after training. Female students in our study scored higher than males regarding some of the APSQ sub-scores and the entire group scored higher or on par with comparable international samples. In order to enable safe practice and professionalism in healthcare, students' engagement in patient safety education is important. Our finding that students' patient safety attitudes show a positive correlation to motivation and that intrinsic motivation increases after training underpins patient safety climate and integrated teaching of patient safety issues at medical schools in order to help students develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for safe practice.

  7. Evaluation of retention of knowledge and skills imparted to first-year medical students through basic life support training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Sushma; Pande, Santosh; Parate, Vrushali; Pande, Sanket; Sukhsohale, Neelam

    2014-03-01

    Poor awareness among medical graduates about basic life support (BLS) is a matter of great concern. The presence of a trained rescuer is the key determinant of ultimate survival from life-threatening emergencies. To achieve this goal, early exposure to such life-saving skills is the right decision to foster these skills for medical students, which can be reenforced in succeeding years. Forty-two first-year medical students participated in this study. The entire procedure consisted of faculty training, assessment of knowledge of students by a pretest questionnaire, a lecture, a demonstration, and hands-on training using a mannequin (with special emphasis on the site, depth, rate, and sustainment of uninterrupted chest compressions). Posttest 1 was conducted to assess the knowledge gained. The retention of knowledge and skills in the second year was evaluated by posttest 2 and directly observed procedural skills, respectively. Student feedback was collected on five-point Likert scale. Analysis using a Freidman test indicated the mean rank for posttest 1 (2.81) to be significantly higher than the pretest (1.26), indicating a gain in knowledge. The mean rank for posttest 2 (1.93) was lower than for posttest 1 (2.81) but was significantly higher compared with the pretest (1.26), indicating a significant retention of knowledge during the second year. Directly observed procedural skill evaluation showed that 7% students could perform all the seven steps correctly and that 74% students could perform three or more steps correctly, signifying a good retention of skill. Two students taught BLS skills to their family members as well. The results of this study suggest that the program provides students with sound basic knowledge and adequate practical skills in BLS.

  8. Doing It Old School: Peer-Led Occupational Safety Training in the U.S. Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyai, Clayton; Stafford, Pete; Trahan, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Many labour organizations that sponsor occupational health and safety training champion "peer training," preferring instructors drawn from the shopfloor over academically credentialed experts. But peer training is hardly new: in the skilled trades, master craftsmen have instructed apprentices since the Middle Ages. Building on the…

  9. Maximising harm reduction in early specialty training for general practice: validation of a safety checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowie Paul

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Making health care safer is a key policy priority worldwide. In specialty training, medical educators may unintentionally impact on patient safety e.g. through failures of supervision; providing limited feedback on performance; and letting poorly developed behaviours continue unchecked. Doctors-in-training are also known to be susceptible to medical error. Ensuring that all essential educational issues are addressed during training is problematic given the scale of the tasks to be undertaken. Human error and the reliability of local systems may increase the risk of safety-critical topics being inadequately covered. However adherence to a checklist reminder may improve the reliability of task delivery and maximise harm reduction. We aimed to prioritise the most safety-critical issues to be addressed in the first 12-weeks of specialty training in the general practice environment and validate a related checklist reminder. Methods We used mixed methods with different groups of GP educators (n = 127 and specialty trainees (n = 9 in two Scottish regions to prioritise, develop and validate checklist content. Generation and refinement of checklist themes and items were undertaken on an iterative basis using a range of methods including small group work in dedicated workshops; a modified-Delphi process; and telephone interviews. The relevance of potential checklist items was rated using a 4-point scale content validity index to inform final inclusion. Results 14 themes (e.g. prescribing safely; dealing with medical emergency; implications of poor record keeping; and effective & safe communication and 47 related items (e.g. how to safety-net face-to-face or over the telephone; knowledge of practice systems for results handling; recognition of harm in children were judged to be essential safety-critical educational issues to be covered. The mean content validity index ratio was 0.98. Conclusion A checklist was developed and

  10. Battery Safety Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Batteries commonly used in flashlights and other household devices produce hydrogen gas as a product of zinc electrode corrosion. The amount of gas produced is affected by the batteries' design and charge rate. Dangerous levels of hydrogen gas can be released if battery types are mixed, batteries are damaged, batteries are of different ages, or…

  11. Factorial analysis of tennis players’ psychological and technical-tactic fitness at the stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makuts T.B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the structure of tennis players’ psychological and technical-tactic fitness with principle component method. Material: 24 tennis players of 14-15 years’ age participated in the researches. For determination of personal psychological features of junior tennis players we used the following methodic: by Dembo-Rubinstein (testing of self-assessment, by Burdon-Anfimov (attention, by G. Ayzenk (type of temper, by T. Elers (motivation, Spilberg - Khanin (level of anxiety. Results: we have determined the structure of tennis players’ psychological and technical tactic fitness at stage of specialized basic training. For psychological fitness we found five factors, for technical-tactic - three factors. High level of inter-factorial connections was observed only in structure of technical-tactic fitness. We did not detect significant connections between five factors of psychological fitness. Conclusions: the determined features of factorial structure of tennis players’ fitness can be used for planning of psychological training programs and learning-training process of junior players.

  12. Factorial analysis of psychological and technical-tactic fitness of tennis players at stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makuts T.B.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: determination of structure of psychological and technical-tactic tennis players’ fitness by method of main components. Material: in the researches 24 tennis players of 14-15 years old age participated. For determination of personalities’ psychological components of junior tennis players the following methodic were used: Dembo- Rubinstein’s (self assessment, Burdon-Anfimov’s (attention, test by G. Izenko (type of temper, T.Elers’s (motivation, Sbilberger-Khanin’s (level of anxiety. Results: we have determined the structure of psychological and technical-tactic fitness of tennis players at stage of specialized basic training. For psychological fitness it was determined five factors, for technical-tactic fitness - three. High level of inter-factor interconnections was observed only if structure of technical-tactic fitness. Between five factors of psychological fitness we did not find any significant links. Conclusions: the determined peculiarities of factorial structure of tennis players’ fitness can be used for planning of psychological training programs and in the training process of junior tennis players.

  13. da Vinci skills simulator for assessing learning curve and criterion-based training of robotic basic skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Willem M; Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Kengen, Bas; Schout, Barbara M A; Witjes, J Alfred; Bekkers, Ruud L

    2013-03-01

    To answer 2 research questions: what are the learning curve patterns of novices on the da Vinci skills simulator parameters and what parameters are appropriate for criterion-based robotic training. A total of 17 novices completed 2 simulator sessions within 3 days. Each training session consisted of a warming-up exercise, followed by 5 repetitions of the "ring and rail II" task. Expert participants (n = 3) performed a warming-up exercise and 3 repetitions of the "ring and rail II" task on 1 day. We analyzed all 9 parameters of the simulator. Significant learning occurred on 5 parameters: overall score, time to complete, instrument collision, instruments out of view, and critical errors within 1-10 repetitions (P motion and excessive instrument force only showed improvement within the first 5 repetitions. No significant learning on the parameter drops and master workspace range was found. Using the expert overall performance score (n = 3) as a criterion (overall score 90%), 9 of 17 novice participants met the criterion within 10 repetitions. Most parameters showed that basic robotic skills are learned relatively quickly using the da Vinci skills simulator, but that 10 repetitions were not sufficient for most novices to reach an expert level. Some parameters seemed inappropriate for expert-based criterion training because either no learning occurred or the novice performance was equal to expert performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the quality of basic life support provided by rescuers trained using the 2005 or 2010 ERC guidelines

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    Jones Christopher M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Effective delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and prompt defibrillation following sudden cardiac arrest (SCA is vital. Updated guidelines for adult basic life support (BLS were published in 2010 by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC in an effort to improve survival following SCA. There has been little assessment of the ability of rescuers to meet the standards outlined within these new guidelines. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the performance of first year healthcare students trained and assessed using either the new 2010 ERC guidelines or their 2005 predecessor, within the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. All students were trained as lay rescuers during a standardised eight hour ERC-accredited adult BLS course. Results We analysed the examination records of 1091 students. Of these, 561 were trained and assessed using the old 2005 ERC guidelines and 530 using the new 2010 guidelines. A significantly greater proportion of candidates failed in the new guideline group (16.04% vs. 11.05%; p  Conclusions The new ERC guidelines lead to a greater proportion of lay rescuers performing chest compressions at an erroneously fast rate and may therefore worsen BLS efficacy. Additional study is required in order to define the clinical impact of compressions performed to a greater depth and at too fast a rate.

  15. Psychiatry chief resident opinions toward basic and clinical neuroscience training and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey I; Handa, Kamna; Mahajan, Aman; Deotale, Pravesh

    2014-04-01

    The authors queried attendees to a chief resident conference on whether program education and training in neuroscience or in translating neuroscience research into practice is sufficient and what changes are needed. The authors developed and administered a 26-item voluntary questionnaire to each attendee at the Chief Residents' Leadership Conference at the American Psychiatric Association 2013 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA. Out of 94 attendees, 55 completed and returned questionnaires (58.5%). A majority of respondents stated that their program provided adequate training in neuroscience (61.8%); opportunities for neuroscience research existed for them (78.2%), but that their program did not prepare them for translating future neuroscience research findings into clinical practice (78.9%) or educate them on the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (83.3%). A majority of respondents stated that the ACGME should require a specific neuroscience curriculum (79.6%). Chief residents believe that curricular and cultural change is needed in psychiatry residency neuroscience education.

  16. Values education for the initial teachers’ training of basic education in México

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    Azucena Ochoa Cervantes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins contextualizing theoretically the performance in values for teacher education, in order to define the criteria to make the analysis. Then analyzes the Mexican model of initial training of teachers. After an exegesis of legislation and technical documents, it lists the eight competencies to develop during the six grades of primary education, these are: 1 knowledge and care of himself, 2 self-regulation and responsible exercise of freedom, 3 respect and appreciation for diversity 4 sense of belonging to the community, nation and humanity, 5 management and conflict resolution, 6 social participation and policy, 7 attachment to the legality and 8 sense of Justice, understanding and appreciation for democracy. These are the keys to raise demands to train teachers. Then is carried out a mid-term discussion, between the two theoretical sections initials. Thus becomes to contrast - ought to reality. This is done through a case study. The conclusions follow this. And ends with proposals and references used.

  17. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Formation en SECURITE SAFETY Training Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 8 juillet 2004. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Clemente Pilly et Ribordy Marion de « PM postures &ra...

  18. A dependence of a sports result on physical development, morphofunctional and special strength preparedness data of weightlifters at the stage of preliminary basic training

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    Oleksandr Piven

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: establishing the nature of the relationship between the sporting result of weightlifters 15–17 years and the level of their special physical and morphofunctional preparedness at the stage of preliminary basic training. Material & Methods: 30 athletes of the group of preliminary basic training of the second year of training were involved in the experiment. The study was conducted on the basis of the department of weightlifting and boxing of the Kharkov State Academy of Physical Culture and Children's Sports School "KhTP". Result: correlation between the parameters of the morphofunctional, speed-power and special (competitive readiness of weightlifters of preliminary basic training are identified. The conducted research shows that the result of competitive exercises of athletes specializing in weightlifting, at the stage of preliminary basic training depends on the strength and speed-strength preparedness. Conclusion: it is established that the correlation between the results of competitive exercises and standing high jump, standing long jump, running at 30 m may indicate a correlation between the strength and speed-strength preparedness of athletes specializing in weightlifting at the stage of preliminary basic training.

  19. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons un nouveau cours d'ergonomie (durée : 1 jour) Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail. A l'issue de cette formation, vous serez capable d'adopter et d'appliquer les principes de base de sécurité physique et d'économie d'efforts dans les manipulations d'objets. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité. L'inscription EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité). FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch

  20. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic health records and mobile health applications. Such technologies can be harnessed to improve patient safety; however, if not used properly they can negatively impact on patient safety. In this issue we focus on advances in training that can improve patient safety and the optimal use of new technologies in healthcare. For example, use of clinical simulations and online computer based training can be employed both to facilitate learning about new clinical discoveries as well as to integrate technology into day to day healthcare practices. In this issue we are publishing papers that describe advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve patient safety as it relates to the use of educational technologies, health information technology and on-line health resources. In addition, in the special issue we describe new approaches to training and patient safety including, online communities, clinical simulations, on-the-job training, computer based training and health information systems that educate about and support safer patient care in real-time (i.e. when health professionals are providing care to patients. These educational and technological initiatives can be aimed at health professionals (i.e. students and those who are currently working in the field. The outcomes of this work are significant as they lead to safer care for patients and their family members. The issue has both theoretical and applied papers that describe advances in patient

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 , 21 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries by G. GABRIELSE / Professor of Physics and Chair of the Harvard Physics Department, Spokesperson for the ATRAP Collaboration Lecture 1: Particle Traps: the World's Tiniest Accelerators A single elementary particle, or a single ion, can be confined in a tiny accelerator called a particle trap. A single electron was held this way for more than ten months, and antiprotons for months. Mass spectroscopy of exquisite precision is possible with such systems. CERN's TRAP Collaboration thereby compared the charge-to-mass ratios of the antiproton and proton to a precision of 90 parts per trillion, by far the most stringent CPT test done with a baryon system. The important ratio of the masses of the electron and proton have been similarly measured, as have a variety of ions masses, and the neutron mass is most accurately known from such measurements. An i...

  2. A 'Communication and Patient Safety' training programme for all healthcare staff: can it make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter; Allen, Kellie; Daly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Communication breakdown is a factor contributing to most cases of patient harm, and this harm continues to occur at unacceptable levels. Responding to this evidence, the Metro South District of Queensland Health (Australia) has developed a communication skills training programme titled 'Communication and Patient Safety'. The three modules, each lasting 3½ h, cover both staff-to-patient and staff-to-staff communication issues, and an unusual feature is that clinical and non-clinical staff attend together. Following positive evaluation data from our initial pilot programme (involving 350 staff in a single hospital), the programme was expanded to all five hospitals in the district, and has now been completed by over 3000 staff. The results show that despite the significant time commitment, participants find the courses useful and relevant (Kirkpatrick level 1), they learn and retain new material (level 2), and they report changes in behaviour at individual, team and facility levels (level 3). Although it remains a challenge to obtain quantitative data showing that training such as this directly improves patient safety (level 4), our qualitative and informal feedback indicates that participants and their managers perceive clear improvements in the 'communication culture' after a workplace team has attended the courses. Improving 'communication for safety' in healthcare is a worldwide imperative, and other healthcare jurisdictions should be able to obtain similar results to ours if they develop and support interactive, non-didactic training in communication skills.

  3. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Traditional Training Methods in Non-Traditional Training Programs for Adult Learners through a Pre-Test/Post-Test Comparison of Food Safety Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Caleb D.; Burris, Scott; Fraze, Steve; Doerfert, David; McCulloch, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of hot and cold food bars into grocery stores in an effort to capture a portion of the home meal replacement industry is presenting new challenges for retail food establishments. To ensure retail success and customer safety, employees need to be educated in food safety practices. Traditional methods of training are not meeting…

  4. The TRIPOD e-learning Platform for the Training of Earthquake Safety Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, S.; Di Pasquale, G.; Goretti, A.; Papa, F.; Papa, S.; Paoli, G.; Pizza, A. G.; Severino, M.

    2008-07-01

    The paper summarizes the results of the in progress EU Project titled TRIPOD (Training Civil Engineers on Post-Earthquake Safety Assessment of Damaged Buildings), funded under the Leonardo Da Vinci program. The main theme of the project is the development of a methodology and a learning platform for the training of technicians involved in post-earthquake building safety inspections. In the event of a catastrophic earthquake, emergency building inspections constitute a major undertaking with severe social impact. Given the inevitable chaotic conditions and the urgent need of a great number of specialized individuals to carry out inspections, past experience indicates that inspection teams are often formed in an adhoc manner, under stressful conditions, at a varying levels of technical expertise and experience, sometime impairing the reliability and consistency of the inspection results. Furthermore each Country has its own building damage and safety assessment methodology, developed according to its experience, laws, building technology and seismicity. This holds also for the partners participating to the project (Greece, Italy, Turkey, Cyprus), that all come from seismically sensitive Mediterranean countries. The project aims at alleviating the above shortcomings by designing and developing a training methodology and e-platform, forming a complete training program targeted at inspection engineers, specialized personnel and civil protection agencies. The e-learning platform will provide flexible and friendly authoring mechanisms, self-teaching and assessment capabilities, course and trainee management, etc. Courses will be also made available as stand-alone multimedia applications on CD and in the form of a complete pocket handbook. Moreover the project will offer the possibility of upgrading different experiences and practices: a first step towards the harmonization of methodologies and tools of different Countries sharing similar problems. Finally, through wide

  5. Safety and efficacy of sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor using gelatin hydrogel in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Motoyuki; Marui, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Takahide; Yamamoto, Masaya; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Shiro; Yanagi, Shigeki; Ito-Ihara, Toshiko; Ikeda, Takafumi; Murayama, Toshinori; Teramukai, Satoshi; Katsura, Toshiya; Matsubara, Kazuo; Kawakami, Koji; Yokode, Masayuki; Shimizu, Akira; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2016-05-01

    As a form of therapeutic angiogenesis, we sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of a sustained-release system of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) using biodegradable gelatin hydrogel in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We conducted a phase I-IIa study that analyzed 10 CLI patients following a 200-μg intramuscular injection of bFGF-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microspheres into the ischemic limb. Primary endpoints were safety and transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcO2) at 4 and 24 weeks after treatment. During the follow-up, there was no death or serious procedure-related adverse event. After 24 weeks, TcO2 (28.4 ± 8.4 vs. 46.2 ± 13.0 mmHg for pretreatment vs after 24 weeks, p < 0.01) showed significant improvement. Regarding secondary endpoints, the distance walked in 6 min (255 ± 105 vs. 318 ± 127 m, p = 0.02), the Rutherford classification (4.4 ± 0.5 vs. 3.1 ± 1.4, p = 0.02), the rest pain scale (1.7 ± 1.0 vs. 1.2 ± 1.3, p = 0.03), and the cyanotic scale (2.0 ± 1.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.9, p < 0.01) also showed improvement. The blood levels of bFGF were within the normal range in all patients. A subanalysis of patients with arteriosclerosis obliterans (n = 7) or thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) (n = 3) revealed that TcO2 had significantly improved in both subgroups. TcO2 did not differ between patients with or without chronic kidney disease. The sustained release of bFGF from biodegradable gelatin hydrogel may offer a safe and effective form of angiogenesis for patients with CLI.

  6. Dynamics of the level of choreographic preparedness of athletes at the stage of preliminary basic training (on the basis of sports aerobics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Todorova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to reveal the change in the level of choreographic preparedness of young athletes at the stage of preliminary basic training. Material & Methods: an expert evaluation of 61 athletes, gymnasts, sports aerobics. Following research methods were used: theoretical analysis of literary sources, method of expert evaluation, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: a methodology for assessing the choreographic preparedness of athletes at the stage of preliminary basic training was introduced. Based on the data obtained, it was found that in the group of gymnasts there was a significant increase in the choreographic skill, which was recorded according to the group indices of the formation of the choreographic preparedness, as well as all the criteria for choreographic readiness. Conclusion: experimentally proved the effectiveness of the introduction of the author's program of choreographic training in the training process of gymnasts at all stages of training athletes in order to improve their choreographic skills.

  7. Dynamic simulation and safety evaluation of high-speed trains meeting in open air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songyan; Zheng, Zhijun; Yu, Jilin; Qian, Chunqiang

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic responses of a carriage under excitation with the German high-speed low-interference track spectrum together with the air pressure pulse generated as high-speed trains passing each other are investigated with a multi-body dynamics method. The variations of degrees of freedom (DOFs: horizontal movement, roll angle, and yaw angle), the lateral wheel-rail force, the derailment coefficient, and the rate of wheel load reduction with time when two carriages meet in open air are obtained and compared with the results of a single train travelling at specified speeds. Results show that the rate of wheel load reduction increases with the increase of train speed and meets some safety standard at a certain speed, but exceeding the value of the rate of wheel load reduction does not necessarily mean derailment. The evaluation standard of the rate of wheel load reduction is somewhat conservative and may be loosened. The pressure pulse has significant effects on the train DOFs, and the evaluations of these safety indexes are strongly suggested in practice. The pressure pulse has a limited effect on the derailment coefficient and the lateral wheel-rail force, and, thus, their further evaluations may be not necessary.

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Teaching Package Utilizing Behavioral Skills Training and In Situ Training to Teach Gun Safety Skills in a Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Laura A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Florentino, Samantha R.

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different safety threats that children face in their lives. One infrequent, but highly dangerous situation a child can face is finding a firearm. Hundreds of children are injured or killed by firearms each year. Fortunately, behavioral skills training (BST) and in situ training (IST) are effective approaches for teaching a…

  9. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible. PMID:18544173

  10. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelbach Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of virtual reality (VR has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72% from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%, two or more hours (42% and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  11. The exploration of effects of Chinese cultural values on the attitudes and behaviors of Chinese restaurateurs toward food safety training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Kwon, Junehee

    2013-06-01

    Foodborne illness is a challenge in the production and service of ethnic foods. The purpose of the study described in this article was to explore variables influencing the behaviors of U.S. Chinese restaurant owners/operators regarding the provision of food safety training in their restaurants. Seventeen major Chinese cultural values were identified through individual interviews with 20 Chinese restaurant owners/operators. Most participants felt satisfied with their previous health inspections. Several expressed having difficulty, however, following the health inspectors' instructions and in understanding the health inspection report. A few participants provided food safety training to their employees due to state law. Lack of money, time, labor/energy, and a perceived need for food safety training were recognized as major challenges to providing food safety training in Chinese restaurants. Videos, case studies, and food safety training handbooks were the most preferred food safety training methods of Chinese restaurant owners/operators, and Chinese was the preferred language in which to conduct the training.

  12. Evaluation of an Educational Model Based on the Development of Sustainable Competencies in Basic Teacher Training in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Vega-Marcote

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The environmental deterioration of the planet, caused by unsustainable development and an unfair model, requires global change on a political, social and environmental level. To boost this change, it is necessary to redirect education and, specifically, environmental education, to educate citizens so that they are capable of making responsible decisions and behaving sustainably. The purpose of this study is to evaluate an educational teacher training model based on the development of sustainable competencies and on the solving of environmental problems. Its final aim is to search for a model that enables students to participate, individually and collectively, in the solution of socio-environmental problems in their surroundings, but without losing the global perspective, and that fosters sustainable life styles. To do so, a quasi-experimental quantitative research was performed with two pretest-posttest phases to compare the results of an active and participative methodology with another more expository one. The results show significant differences in the knowledge, attitudes and intention of the behavior of the aspiring teachers. Thus, this first analysis shows that the experiential educational model promotes and favors sustainable actions in higher education (the faculty of educational science, responsible for basic teacher training more efficiently and could be the basis for future proposals in this field.

  13. Comparison of basic life support (BLS video self-instructional system and traditional BLS training in first year nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nikandish

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: For several years, educators have criticized the lecture-based  approach  to teaching and learning. Experts have rightly stressed on acquisition  of a number of critical  skills rather than focusing on lectures. Purpose. To compare students'  pe1jormance after self-education  with VCD and manikin,  with thei performance after standard BLS training.Methods: In this randomized controlled study, twenty first-year nursing students were divided into two groups randomly, and were provided with basic life support (BLS instruction either in the traditional format of lecturing or with VCD and manikin without tutor. The students’ Performance was evaluated on a manikin with a checklist including all steps in BLS.Results: With traditional  instruction,  students'  mean score was 42.2±3.91, while it was 46.3±3.86 with self-education,  showing no significant  difference.Conclusion: In nursing students with no previous BLS training, access to VCD and manikin facilitates immediate achievement of educational objectives similar to those  of a standard  BLS course.  Self­ learning BLS with VCD should be enhanced with a short period of hands-on practice.Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, nursing students, cpr skills, education

  14. Life After the Event: A Review of Basic Life Support Training for Parents Following Apparent Life-Threatening Events and Their Experience and Practices Following Discharge

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-05-01

    Apparent Life-Threatening Events (ALTEs) are a common presentation to paediatric hospitals and represent a significant cause of parental anxiety. Basic Life Support (BLS) training is recommended for all caregivers following ALTEs. This study aimed to assess the rate of caregiver BLS training and reviewed parents experience following discharge. Parents were interviewed by phone following discharge. Over the study period 25 children attended the Emergency Department with ALTE, 17\\/25 (68%) were trained and 13\\/17 (76%) were contactable for interview. All parents found training decreased their anxiety level and were interested in attending for re-training. BLS resuscitation was subsequently required by 2\\/13 (15%) of children. Non-medical grade monitors were in use by 10\\/13 (77%) of caregivers following discharge. Caregivers are eager to engage in BLS training and it effectively reduces their caregiver anxiety. We recommend an increase in instructor staff and use of group re-training post discharge

  15. Schoolbus driver performance can be improved with driver training, safety incentivisation, and vehicle roadworthy modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A van Niekerk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa (SA, the school transport industry provides millions of children with a means of travelling to and from school. The industry has, however, been reported to be plagued by widespread safety concerns. The consequent road traffic incidents have often been attributed to driver factors, including driving in excess of legal speeds or at inappropriate speeds; driving while under the influence of alcohol, while sleepy or fatigued; or driving without using protective equipment for vehicle occupants. There are currently very few SA interventions that specifically target this important industry role-player. The Safe Travel to School Programme was recently implemented by a national child safety agency, with a focus on driver road safety awareness, defensive driver training, eye- testing, vehicle roadworthy inspections with selected upgrades, incentives for safe performance, and implementation of a vehicle telematics tracking system with regular, individual driving behaviour information updates. This quasi-experimental study offers an evaluation of the initial impact on safety performance of this telematics-based driver and vehicle safety intervention in terms of speeding, acceleration, braking, cornering, and time-of-day driving, and compares the school transport driver performance with that of general motorists. Despite concerns that some school transport vehicles are used for multiple purposes outside of school transport duties, at night, and for longer distances, overall these vehicles recorded lower percentages of speeding, lower harsh braking, and lower average harsh cornering and acceleration than general drivers.

  16. Increasing the physical fitness of low-fit recruits before basic combat training: an evaluation of fitness, injuries, and training outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Darakjy, Salima; Hauret, Keith G; Canada, Sara; Scott, Shawn; Rieger, William; Marin, Roberto; Jones, Bruce H

    2006-01-01

    Recruits arriving for basic combat training (BCT) between October 1999 and May 2004 were administered an entry-level physical fitness test at the reception station. If they failed the test, then they entered the Fitness Assessment Program (FAP), where they physically trained until they passed the test and subsequently entered BCT. The effectiveness of the FAP was evaluated by examining fitness, injury, and training outcomes. Recruits who failed the test, trained in the FAP, and entered BCT after passing the test were designated the preconditioning (PC) group (64 men and 94 women). Recruits who failed the test but were allowed to enter BCT without going into the FAP were called the no preconditioning (NPC) group (32 men and 73 women). Recruits who passed the test and directly entered BCT were designated the no need of preconditioning (NNPC) group (1,078 men and 731 women). Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and training outcomes were obtained from a company-level database, and injured recruits were identified from cases documented in medical records. The proportions of NPC, PC, and NNPC recruits who completed the 9-week BCT cycle were 59%, 83%, and 87% for men (p APFT, compared with 84% and 86% of the PC and NNPC groups, respectively. The proportions of NPC, PC, and NNPC recruits who passed the final APFT after all retakes were 88%, 92%, and 98% for men (p < 0.01) and 89%, 92%, and 97% for women (p < 0.01), respectively. Compared with NNPC men, injury risk was 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.2) and 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.1) times higher for PC and NPC men, respectively. Compared with NNPC women, injury risk was 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-1.6) and 1.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.1) times higher for PC and NPC women, respectively. This program evaluation showed that low-fit recruits who preconditioned before BCT had reduced attrition and tended to have lower injury risk, compared with recruits of similar low fitness who did not

  17. A prospective randomized study to test the transfer of basic psychomotor skills from virtual reality to physical reality in a comparable training setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Kai S; Ritz, Joerg P; Maass, Heiko; Cakmak, Hueseyin K; Kuehnapfel, Uwe G; Germer, Christoph T; Bretthauer, Georg; Buhr, Heinz J

    2005-03-01

    To test whether basic skills acquired on a virtual endoscopic surgery simulator are transferable from virtual reality to physical reality in a comparable training setting. For surgical training in laparoscopic surgery, new training methods have to be developed that allow surgeons to first practice in a simulated setting before operating on real patients. A virtual endoscopic surgery trainer (VEST) has been developed within the framework of a joint project. Because of principal limitations of simulation techniques, it is essential to know whether training with this simulator is comparable to conventional training. Devices used were the VEST system and a conventional video trainer (CVT). Two basic training tasks were constructed identically (a) as virtual tasks and (b) as mechanical models for the CVT. Test persons were divided into 2 groups each consisting of 12 novices and 4 experts. Each group carried out a defined training program over the course of 4 consecutive days on the VEST or the CVT, respectively. To test the transfer of skills, the groups switched devices on the 5th day. The main parameter was task completion time. The novices in both groups showed similar learning curves. The mean task completion times decreased significantly over the 4 training days of the study. The task completion times for the control task on Day 5 were significantly lower than on Days 1 and 2. The experts' task completion times were much lower than those of the novices. This study showed that training with a computer simulator, just as with the CVT, resulted in a reproducible training effect. The control task showed that skills learned in virtual reality are transferable to the physical reality of a CVT. The fact that the experts showed little improvement demonstrates that the simulation trains surgeons in basic laparoscopic skills learned in years of practice.

  18. Enhancing the quality of life for palliative care cancer patients in Indonesia through family caregivers: a pilot study of basic skills training

    OpenAIRE

    Kristanti, M.S.; Setiyarini, S.; Effendy, C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative care in Indonesia is problematic because of cultural and socio-economic factors. Family in Indonesia is an integral part of caregiving process in inpatient and outpatient settings. However, most families are not adequately prepared to deliver basic care for their sick family member. This research is a pilot project aiming to evaluate how basic skills training (BST) given to family caregivers could enhance the quality of life (QoL) of palliative care cancer patients in I...

  19. Developing nurse medication safety training in a health partnership in Mozambique using behavioural science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Eleanor Rose; Mason, Corina; Junior, Fonseca Domingos; Santos, Luana Vendramel; Scott, Abigail; Ademokun, Debo; Simião, Zeferina; Oliver, Wingi Manzungu; Joaquim, Fernando Francisco; Cavanagh, Sarah M

    2017-07-04

    Globally, safe and effective medication administration relies on nurses being able to apply strong drug calculation skills in their real-life practice, in the face of stressors and distractions. These may be especially prevalent for nurses in low-income countries such as Mozambique and Continuing Professional Development post-registration may be important. This study aimed to 1) explore the initial impact of an international health partnership's work to develop a drug calculation workshop for nurses in Beira, Mozambique and 2) reflect upon the role of health psychologists in helping educators apply behavioural science to the training content and evaluation. In phase one, partners developed a training package, which was delivered to 87 Portuguese-speaking nurses. The partnership's health psychologists coded the training's behaviour change content and recommended enhancements to content and delivery. In phase two, the refined training, including an educational game, was delivered to 36 nurses in Mozambique and recoded by the health psychologists. Measures of participant confidence and intentions to make changes to healthcare practice were collected, as well as qualitative data through post-training questions and 12 short follow-up participant interviews. In phase one six BCTs were used during the didactic presentation. Most techniques targeted participants' capability to calculate drug doses accurately; recommendations aimed to increase participants' motivation and perceived opportunity, two other drivers of practice change. Phase two training included an extra seven BCTs, such as action planning and further skills practice. Participants reported high confidence before and after the training (p = 0.25); intentions to use calculators to check drug calculations significantly increased (p = 0.031). Qualitative data suggested the training was acceptable, enjoyable and led to practice changes, through improved capability, opportunity and motivation. Opportunity

  20. Training of patient and consumer representatives in the basic competencies of evidence-based medicine: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    . Implementation of EBM skills was reported by 84 of the 129 (65% participants available for follow-up interviews. Barriers included lack of further support, limited possibilities to exchange experiences, and feeling discouraged by negative reactions of health professionals. Conclusions Training in basic EBM competencies for selected patient and consumer representatives is feasible and accepted and may affect counselling and advocacy activities. Implementation of EBM skills needs support beyond the training course.

  1. Training of patient and consumer representatives in the basic competencies of evidence-based medicine: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bettina; Steckelberg, Anke; Meyer, Gabriele; Kasper, Jürgen; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2010-02-11

    129 (65%) participants available for follow-up interviews. Barriers included lack of further support, limited possibilities to exchange experiences, and feeling discouraged by negative reactions of health professionals. Training in basic EBM competencies for selected patient and consumer representatives is feasible and accepted and may affect counselling and advocacy activities. Implementation of EBM skills needs support beyond the training course.

  2. 29 CFR 1960.55 - Training of supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) BASIC PROGRAM ELEMENTS FOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.55 Training of supervisors. (a) Each agency shall provide occupational safety and... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of supervisors. 1960.55 Section 1960.55 Labor...

  3. Community Safety and Recidivism in Australia: Breaking the Cycle of Reoffending to Produce Safer Communities through Vocational Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    This article links community safety with recidivism and argues that reintegration of offenders is a community responsibility. The paper discusses the role of vocational training for incarcerated offenders as a tool to reduce recidivism. Training and subsequent employment for released offenders are factors that assist them to become contributing…

  4. An Exploration of the Relationships between Language, Culture, Safety, and Training in the Construction Workforce in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, Luis G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of safety training is to avoid or at least decrease the number of work-related accidents and deaths. This study was concerned with the role that native language plays in effective training of adult construction workers in New Mexico. Specifically, this study examined workers' and trainers' perceptions of the effectiveness of safety…

  5. Risk, trust, and safety culture in U.K. train operating companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcott, Shelly; Pidgeon, Nick; Weyman, Andrew; Walls, John

    2006-10-01

    Organizational safety culture reflects the attitudes and behaviors that individuals share in considering and reacting to hazards and risks. We first argue that trust is an underdeveloped and important concept in relation to theories of safety culture and high-reliability organizations. The article then reports findings from a two-year qualitative study of train operating companies (TOCs) in the United Kingdom, which sought to explore in detail the linkages between safety culture and the postprivatized railway industry. In-depth interviews and focus groups were carried out with a sample of over 500 employees, from four organizations, and representing all key functional levels. Our analysis suggests that the 1993 privatization, and subsequent organizational restructuring of the U.K. railway industry, has had important repercussions for both safety culture and trust relationships. We explore our findings in relation to three key constructs within "safe organizations" theories (namely, flexibility, commitment, and learning), and discuss how the safe organization model might be usefully supplemented by a consideration of trust issues.

  6. Examining the effects of an interprofessional crew resource management training intervention on perceptions of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ting; Wu, Yung-Lung; Hou, Shaw-Min; Kang, Chun-Mei; Huang, Chi-Hung; Huang, Yu-Ju; Wang, Victoria Yue An; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2016-07-01

    This article reports the results from a study that employed an interprofessional crew resource management (CRM) education programme in the emergency and critical care departments. The study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of this intervention of participants' satisfaction and safety attitude changes using a satisfaction questionnaire and the Human Factors Attitude Survey (HFAS). Overall, participants responded positively to the CRM training-93.4% were satisfied, 93.1% agreed that it enhanced patient safety and care quality, 85.7% agreed that it increased their confidence, 86.4% agreed that it reduced practice errors, and 90.8% agreed that it would change their behaviours. Overall, the participants reported positive changes in their attitudes regarding 22 of the 23 HFAS questions.

  7. Validation of SINERGIA as training tool: a randomized study to test the transfer of acquired basic psychomotor skills to LapMentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano-Cuevas, J L; Sánchez-Margallo, F M; Sánchez-Peralta, L F; Pagador, J B; Enciso, S; Sánchez-González, P; Gómez-Aguilera, E J; Usón-Gargallo, J

    2011-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is commonly used in many surgical procedures but requires a learning process to develop the necessary skills. Virtual reality simulators play an essential role within the training curricula. This paper aims to determine whether training in SINERGIA VR simulator allows novice surgeons to improve their basic psychomotor laparoscopic skills. Forty-two people participated in this study, including 28 unexperience medical students and 14 expert surgeons who developed previously more than 100 laparoscopic procedures. Medical students made a pre-training test in LapMentor II; then, they trained in SINERGIA and they finally accomplished a post-training test in LapMentor II. Experts just made one trial in LapMentor II. A statistical analysis was carried out and results of pre- and post-training tests of novices were compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Pre- and post-training tests of novices were also compared with results of experts with Mann-Whitney U test. Most metrics provided by LapMentor II and included in this study show significant differences when comparing pre- and post-training tests of novices. Analysis of pre-training test of novices and experts results show significant differences in all analyzed metrics for all studied tasks. On the other hand, LapMentor was not able to distinguish between experts and novices after training in SINERGIA for any metric in the camera manipulation task and for some metrics of the other tasks. Training in SINERGIA VR simulator allows improvement of basic psychomotor laparoscpic skills and transferring them to another virtual simulator. Therefore, it could be used in laparoscopic surgery training programs.

  8. Safety of patient meals in 2 hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt before and after training of food handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Derea, H; Salem, E; Fawzi, M; Abdel Azeem, M

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the food safety knowledge and food handling practices of 23 food handlers in 2 hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt [Gamal Abdel Nasser (GAN) and Medical Research Institute (MRI)] before and after a food safety training programme, and also the bacteriological quality of patient meals and kitchen equipment. There was a significant improvement in all knowledge-associated parameters except for personal hygiene in GAN. There was an improvement in the food safety practices in both hospitals. The bacteriological quality of most patient meals and food preparation surfaces and utensils improved after training. The bacteriological quality of patients' meals served in GAN was generally better than that in MRI.

  9. Preparedness of fire safety in underground train station: Comparison between train operators in Malaysia with other operators from the developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajedi, Noor Aqilah A.; Sukor, Nur Sabahiah A.; Ismail, Mohd Ashraf M.; Shamsudin, Shahrul A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the fire evacuation plan and preparation at the underground train stations in the different countries. The methodology for this study was using the extended questionnaire survey to investigate the Rapid Rail Sdn Bhd, Malaysia's fire safety plan and preparation at the underground train stations. There were four sections in the questionnaire which included (i) background of the respondents, (ii) the details on the train stations, safety instruction and fire evacuation exercises (iii) technical systems, installation and equipment at the underground stations and (iv) procedures and technical changes related to fire safety that had been applied by the operators. Previously, the respondents from the different train operator services in the developed countries had completed the questionnaires. This paper extends the response from the Rapid Rail Sdn Bhd to compare the emergency procedures and preparation for fire event with the developed countries. As a result, this study found that the equipment and facilities that provided at the underground train stations that operated by Rapid Rail are relevant for fire safety procedures and needs. The main advantage for Rapid Rail is the underground stations were designed with two or more entrances/exits that may perform better evacuation compare to one main entrance/exit train stations in the other developed countries.

  10. Use of EMG biofeedback for basic activities of daily living training in stroke patients. Pilot randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Garrido-Montenegro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sequels in stroke patients include hemiparesis and dependency for performing basic activities of daily living (BADL. EMG biofeedback has yielded some benefits but has been limited to repetitive movement, therefore, it is insufficient for current task-oriented neurorehabilitation paradigms. Objective: To assess whether the application of EMG biofeedback in upper limbs during BADL training improves motor, occupational and satisfaction performances compared to BADL training without this feedback. Materials and methods: A pilot randomized clinical trial was conducted with stroke patients of more than six months of evolution, who showed hemiparesis and no cognitive deterioration. These patients were randomly classified into two groups: control group, who underwent conventional occupational therapy (COT, and experimental group, who underwent COT+EMG-BF. Patients were given 10 therapy sessions. Entry, evaluation and data analysis were masked. Results: Seven patients were included in each group, showing the same initial clinical and demographic characteristics (p>0.05. The group that underwent COT+EMG-BF showed a significantly better performance in all assessments. For example, the Barthel scale obtained a median of 100 points [85-100] for the COT+EMG-BF group versus 85 [80-90] for the control group (p<0.05, whereas ARAT score was 42 [40-47] points versus 20 [15-38] (p=0.03, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of COT+EMG-BF for BADL may be considered as an alternative for treatment of stroke patients.

  11. Safety and efficacy of resistance training in germ cell cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, J F; Jones, L W; Tolver, A.; J?rgensen, L W; Andersen, J. L.; Adamsen, L; H?jman, P; Nielsen, R.H.; R?rth, M; Daugaard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bleomycin?etoposid?cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy is curative in most patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) but also associated with toxic actions and dysfunction in non-targeted tissues. We investigated changes in muscle function during BEP and the safety and efficacy of resistance training to modulate these changes. Methods: Thirty GCC patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (resistance training group (INT), n=15) or usual care (CON, n=15) during 9 weeks...

  12. MODELING OF INTERACTION OF THE PASSENGER TRAIN VEHICLES, EQUIPPED BY PASSIVE SAFETY, AT ACCIDENTAL COLLISION WITH OBSTACLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ye. Naumenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of high-speed railway traffic requires the updating of requirements for the design of passenger rolling stock and revision of safety standards on emergency situation of trains with an obstacle. To the construction crews of the new generation demands by equipping them with passive crash systems, ensuring the safety of passengers and personnel in an emergency situation. In order to refine test scenarios train collision with an obstacle and evaluation indicators of energy absorption of the collision of the passive protection devices which are used in computer modeling. The first step in the research of dynamic processes in the train when excessive shock effects, is to assess the maximum values of the compressive forces generated in intercar compound trains, locomotive and cars which are equipped with passive safety systems.Methodology. Based on the concept of passive protection of passenger rolling stock for track with width of 1520 mm on emergency situation the conceptual passive safety system for passenger trains with locomotive traction are formed from the crews of the new generation was proposed. The passive safety system is recommended to be equipped both the locomotive and cars. For a preliminary assessment of compliance for the passive safety system of a passenger train on emergency situation, as a rule, the simplified discrete-mass model is used, in which the train is considered as one-dimensional chain of rigid bodies connected by nonlinear deformable elements. Findings. The algorithm for computing efforts in the inter-connections of the train locomotive traction of the permanent formation is developed, taking into account the specifics of work of coupling devices, devices, energy absorption and elastic-plastic properties of the body structure of crews at emergency situation. Originality. The proposed algorithm allows taking into account the peculiarities of train locomotives of the new generation and the work of

  13. Patient-led training on patient safety: a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V; Winterbottom, A; Symons, J; Thompson, Z; Quinton, N; Corrado, O J; Melville, C; Watt, I; Torgerson, D; Wright, J

    2013-09-01

    Training in patient safety is an important element of medical education. Most educational interventions on patient safety training adopt a 'health-professional lens' with limited consideration on the impact of safety lapses on the patient and their families and little or no involvement of patients in the design or delivery of the training. This paper describes a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a patient-led educational intervention to facilitate safety training amongst newly qualified doctors. Patients and/or carers who had experienced harm during their care shared narratives of their stories with trainees; this was followed by a focused discussion on patient safety issues exploring the causes and consequences of safety incidents and lessons to be learned from these. The intervention, which will be further tested in an NIHR-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT), was successfully implemented into an existing training programme and found acceptance amongst the patients and trainees. The pilot study proved to be a useful step in refining the intervention for the RCT including identifying appropriate outcome measures and highlighting organisational issues.

  14. Petrinet-based specification of safety relevant train control systems; Petrinetz-basierte Spezifikation sicherheitsrelevanter Eisenbahnleitsysteme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einer, S.; Schnieder, E. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Regelungs- und Automatisierungstechnik; Slovak, R. [Zilina Univ. (Czechoslovakia). Lehrstuhl fuer Informations- und Sicherungssysteme

    2000-07-01

    Higher Standards in performance and safety of future train control systems profit from the use of formal methods for the efficient system development in this domain. This paper considers the use of formal methods in the system requirements specification as the early phase in the system development process. The goal is proving the correctness of the specified requirements and to apply the global safety requirements to the system components. Aspects to be contained within the requirements specification are explained and an approach for modelling the train control system formally using timed petrinets is introduced. (orig.) [German] Erhoehte Anforderungen an Leistungsfaehigkeit und Sicherheit zukuenftiger Eisenbahnsicherungssysteme profitieren vom Einsatz formaler Techniken zur effizienten Systementwicklung in diesem Bereich. Dieser Beitrag betrachtet die Aufgabe, formale Techniken bereits in der Entwicklungsphase der Anforderungsspezifikation anzuwenden, mit dem Ziel, fruehzeitig die Korrektheit der Anforderungen ueberpruefen zu koennen und die Sicherheitsforderungen des Systems auf Anforderungen an einzelne Komponenten zu uebertragen. Es wird erlaeutert, welche Aspekte des Eisenbahnsicherungssystems dazu bereits in der Anforderungsspezifikation betrachtet werden muessen und wie diese unter Verwendung von zeitbewerteten Petrinetzen in einem formalen Modell des Systems abgebildet werden koennen. (orig.)

  15. Safety Training: Ergonomie - sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique - French version only

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 8 juillet 2004. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Clemente Pilly et Ribordy Marion de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation et Développement (groupe sécurité) de HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.ch Formation en SECURITE SAFETY Training Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch

  16. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 24 février 2005 (matin et après-midi). Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation et Développement (groupe sécurité) de HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.ch FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING safety.training@ce...

  17. Does training with human patient simulation translate to improved patient safety and outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shear, Torin D; Greenberg, Steven B; Tokarczyk, Arthur

    2013-04-01

    In this review, we evaluate several articles in an attempt to qualify the effect of human patient simulation in anaesthesia on patient outcome. The recognition of medical error as a significant cause of patient morbidity and mortality has sparked an increased focus on improving healthcare quality and patient safety. Simulation in anaesthesia is a potential tool to help achieve this goal by allowing anaesthesia providers to learn, practice and perfect their craft without a potential harm to patients. It has gained growing traction in the field and is recently a required element in the American Board of Anesthesiology's Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesia programme. Very few studies have evaluated the effect of simulation on patient outcome. To date, one study has demonstrated improved individual clinical performance in anaesthesia after simulation training. Research suggests that simulation-based team training can reduce patient mortality and improve the quality of care as measured by surgical quality improvement measures. Simulation may improve healthcare systems by serving as a tool to detect latent error and drive process improvement. Despite the adoption of simulation, further study is needed to better qualify its effect on patient safety and outcome.

  18. Safety Training: Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons un nouveau cours de sécurité lié aux manutentions manuelles (durée 1 jour) : Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail. Si vous êtes amené à manipuler régulièrement des charges lourdes ou volumineuses, cette formation peut vous aider à prévenir les lésions musculaires ou dorsales. A l'issue de cette formation, vous serez capable d'adopter et d'appliquer les principes de base de sécurité physique et d'économie d'efforts dans les manipulations d'objets. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité. L'inscription EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité). Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité) FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 safety.training@cern.ch

  19. Improving the level of physical development and functional preparedness athletes in sports dancing on the stage of specialized basic training means step aerobics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyna Artemyeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: make analyze the impact of the step aerobics on the indicators of physical development and functional preparedness of athletes in Dance Sport on the stage of specialized basic training. Material & Methods: 20 athletes (10 sport duets aged 14–15 years were divided into two groups: control (CG and experimental (EG. To achieve the objectives we used methods: theoretical - analysis and synthesis data of scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical methods: pedagogical observation; pedagogical testing; medical and biological methods: anthropometry, functional methods of research; methods of mathematical statistics. Results: after the implementation of a training process means step aerobics significantly improved indicators of cardio-respiratory system of athletes in Dance Sport. Conclusions: materials research to assess allow us to estimate the extent of influence of step aerobics on indicators of physical development and functional preparedness athletes in Dance Sport on the stage of specialized basic training.

  20. Safety and efficacy of exercise training in adults with Pompe disease: evalution of endurance, muscle strength and core stability before and after a 12?week training program

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, Linda E. M.; Favejee, Marein M.; Wens, Stephan C. A.; Kruijshaar, Michelle E.; Praet, Stephan F. E.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.; Bussmann, Johannes B. J.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; van der Ploeg, Ans T.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pompe disease is a proximal myopathy. We investigated whether exercise training is a safe and useful adjuvant therapy for adult Pompe patients, receiving enzyme replacement therapy. Methods: Training comprised 36 sessions of standardized aerobic, resistance and core stability exercises over 12 weeks. Before and after, the primary outcome measures safety, endurance (aerobic exercise capacity and distance walked on the 6 min walk test) and muscle strength, and secondary ...

  1. Teaching basic life support to school children using medical students and teachers in a 'peer-training' model--results of the 'ABC for life' programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, P; Connolly, M; Laverty, L; McGrath, P; Connolly, D; McCluskey, D R

    2007-10-01

    The 'ABC for life' programme was designed to facilitate the wider dissemination of basic life support (BLS) skills and knowledge in the population. A previous study demonstrated that using this programme 10-12-year olds are capable of performing and retaining these vital skills when taught by medical students. There are approximately 25,000 year 7 school children in 900 primary schools in Northern Ireland. By using a pyramidal teaching approach involving medical students and teachers, there is the potential to train BLS to all of these children each year. To assess the effectiveness of a programme of CPR instruction using a three-tier training model in which medical students instruct primary school teachers who then teach school children. School children and teachers in the Western Education and Library Board in Northern Ireland. A course of instruction in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)--the 'ABC for life' programme--specifically designed to teach 10-12-year-old children basic life support skills. Medical students taught teachers from the Western Education and Library Board area of Northern Ireland how to teach basic life support skills to year 7 pupils in their schools. Pupils were given a 22-point questionnaire to assess knowledge of basic life support immediately before and after a teacher led training session. Children instructed in cardiopulmonary resuscitation using this three-tier training had a significantly improved score following training (57.2% and 77.7%, respectively, pteachers, previously trained by medical students, can teach BLS effectively to 10-12-year-old children using the 'ABC for life' programme.

  2. Early-Warning Method of Train Running Safety of a High-Speed Railway Bridge Based on Transverse Vibration Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Liang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Making use of long-term transverse vibration monitoring data of DaShengGuan Bridge, the early-warning method of train running safety of the high-speed railway bridge is established by adopting principal component analysis (PCA method. Firstly, the root mean square (RMS of the transverse acceleration of the main girder is used as the monitoring parameter for the train running safety. The correlation model between the RMS values measured from different positions is further adopted as the evaluating model for the train running safety. Finally, the effects of the environmental changes on the evaluating model are eliminated using the PCA method and the warning index for the train running safety is further constructed. The analysis results show that the correlation between the RMS values of the accelerations from different measuring positions on the main girder can be analyzed by a quadratic polynomial fitting model. The PCA method can effectively remove the environmental effects on the quadratic polynomial fitting model. The proposed warning method provides a good capability for detecting the abnormal changes of the measured transverse accelerations and hence it is suitable for early-warning of the train running safety.

  3. [Strategic measures for patient safety in the National Health System: on-line training resources and access to scientific knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novillo-Ortíz, D; Agra, Y; Fernández-Maíllo, M M; del Peso, P; Terol, E

    2008-12-01

    Patient safety (PS) is a priority strategy included in the Quality Plan for the Spanish National Health System and its first objective is to promote PS culture among professionals and patients. The Internet is playing a key role in the access to clinical evidence and in the training of health professionals. A multidisciplinary working group was created, who defined the criteria to help improve clinical practice in the field of patient safety, by making available and using web-based patient safety training resources and information. Taking advantage of the possibilities offered by the Internet in terms of training, two online self-training tutorials were developed on risk management, patient safety and adverse event prevention. A Newsletter was also launched, together with two specific patient safety Supplements. Moreover, to extend the reach of the PS Strategy, a patient safety web page and weblog were created, in addition to a collaborative (internal) working group tool. Excelenciaclinica.net was also developed; a meta-search engine specialized in evidence-based information for health professionals, to make it easier to access reliable and valuable information. Health professionals were also allowed to consult, free of charge, reliable health information resources, such as the GuiaSalud platform, the Cochrane Library Plus and the resources of the Joanna Briggs Institute. The involvement of health professionals in these measures and the role that these measures may be expected to play in the development of a premium-quality health service.

  4. Effect of a manager training and certification program on food safety and hygiene in food service operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Hailu; Silverman, Gary S; Baroudi, Karim

    2010-05-06

    Food safety is an important public health issue in the U.S. Eating at restaurants and other food service facilities increasingly has been associated with food borne disease outbreaks. Food safety training and certification of food mangers has been used as a method for reducing food safety violations at food service facilities. However, the literature is inconclusive about the effectiveness of such training programs for improving food safety and protecting consumer health. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of food manger training on reducing food safety violations. We examined food inspection reports from the Toledo/Lucas County Health Department (Ohio) from March 2005 through February 2006 and compared food hygiene violations between food service facilities with certified and without certified food managers. We also examined the impact on food safety of a food service facility being part of a larger group of facilities.Restaurants with trained and certified food managers had significantly fewer critical food safety violations but more non-critical violations than restaurants without certified personnel. Institutional food service facilities had significantly fewer violations than restaurants, and the number of violations did not differ as a function of certification. Similarly, restaurants with many outlets had significantly fewer violations than restaurants with fewer outlets, and training was not associated with lower numbers of violations from restaurants with many outlets. The value of having certified personnel was only observed in independent restaurants and those with few branches. This information may be useful in indicating where food safety problems are most likely to occur. Furthermore, we recommend that those characteristics of institutional and chain restaurants that result in fewer violations should be identified in future research, and efforts made to apply this knowledge at the level of individual restaurants.

  5. Effect of a Manager Training and Certification Program on Food Safety and Hygiene in Food Service Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Kassa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Food safety is an important public health issue in the U.S. Eating at restaurants and other food service facilities increasingly has been associated with food borne disease outbreaks. Food safety training and certification of food mangers has been used as a method for reducing food safety violations at food service facilities. However, the literature is inconclusive about the effectiveness of such training programs for improving food safety and protecting consumer health. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of food manger training on reducing food safety violations. We examined food inspection reports from the Toledo/Lucas County Health Department (Ohio from March 2005 through February 2006 and compared food hygiene violations between food service facilities with certified and without certified food managers. We also examined the impact on food safety of a food service facility being part of a larger group of facilities. Restaurants with trained and certified food managers had significantly fewer critical food safety violations but more non-critical violations than restaurants without certified personnel. Institutional food service facilities had significantly fewer violations than restaurants, and the number of violations did not differ as a function of certification. Similarly, restaurants with many outlets had significantly fewer violations than restaurants with fewer outlets, and training was not associated with lower numbers of violations from restaurants with many outlets. The value of having certified personnel was only observed in independent restaurants and those with few branches. This information may be useful in indicating where food safety problems are most likely to occur. Furthermore, we recommend that those characteristics of institutional and chain restaurants that result in fewer violations should be identified in future research, and efforts made to apply this knowledge at the level of individual restaurants.

  6. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM): A tool for improved flight safety (United Airlines CRM training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J. E.; Taggart, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The approach and methodology used in developing cockpit management skills is effective because of the following features: (1) A comparative method of learning is used enabling crewmembers to study different forms of teamwork. (2) The learning comes about as a result of crewmembers learning from one another instead of from an expert instructor. (3) Key elements of cockpit teamwork and effective management are studied so that crewmembers can determine how these elements can improve safety and problem solving. (4) Critique among the crewmembers themselves rather than from outsiders is used as a common focusing point for crews to provide feedback to one another on how each can be a more effective crewmember. (5) The training is continuous in the sense that it becomes part of recurrent, upgrade, and other forms of crewmember training and development. And (6) the training results in sound and genuine insights that come about through solid education as opposed to tutoring, coaching, or telling crewmembers how to behave more effectively.

  7. Training the elderly in pedestrian safety: Transfer effect between two virtual reality simulation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Pauline; Dommes, Aurélie; Dang, Nguyen-Thong; Vienne, Fabrice

    2017-02-01

    A virtual-reality training program has been developed to help older pedestrians make safer street-crossing decisions in two-way traffic situations. The aim was to develop a small-scale affordable and transportable simulation device that allowed transferring effects to a full-scale device involving actual walking. 20 younger adults and 40 older participants first participated in a pre-test phase to assess their street crossings using both full-scale and small-scale simulation devices. Then, a trained older group (20 participants) completed two 1.5-h training sessions with the small-scale device, whereas an older control group received no training (19 participants). Thereafter, the 39 older trained and untrained participants took part in a 1.5-h post-test phase again with both devices. Pre-test phase results suggested significant differences between both devices in the group of older participants only. Unlike younger participants, older participants accepted more often to cross and had more collisions on the small-scale simulation device than on the full-scale one. Post-test phase results showed that training older participants on the small-scale device allowed a significant global decrease in the percentage of accepted crossings and collisions on both simulation devices. But specific improvements regarding the way participants took into account the speed of approaching cars and vehicles in the far lane were notable only on the full-scale simulation device. The findings suggest that the small-scale simulation device triggers a greater number of unsafe decisions compared to a full-scale one that allows actual crossings. But findings reveal that such a small-scale simulation device could be a good means to improve the safety of street-crossing decisions and behaviors among older pedestrians, suggesting a transfer of learning effect between the two simulation devices, from training people with a miniature device to measuring their specific progress with a full-scale one

  8. Effect of 3basic life support training programs in future primary school teachers. A quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Patón, R; Freire-Tellado, M; Basanta-Camiño, S; Barcala-Furelos, R; Arufe-Giraldez, V; Rodriguez-Fernández, J E

    2017-07-17

    To evaluate the learning of basic life support (BLS) measures on the part of laypersons after 3different teaching programs. A quasi-experimental before-after study involving a non-probabilistic sample without a control group was carried out. Primary school teacher students from the University of Santiago (Spain). A total of 124 students (68.8% women and 31.2% men) aged 20-39 years (M=22.23; SD=3.79), with no previous knowledge of BLS, were studied. Three teaching programs were used: a traditional course, an audio-visual approach and feedback devices. Chest compressions as sole cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill evaluation: average compression depth, compression rate, chest recoil percentage and percentage of correct compressions. Automated external defibrillator: time needed to apply a shock before and after the course. There were significant differences in the results obtained after 2minutes of chest compressions, depending on the training program received, with feedback devices having a clear advantage referred to average compression depth (p<0.001), compression rate (p<0.001), chest recoil percentage (p<0.001) and percentage of correct compressions (p<0.001). Regarding automated external defibrillator, statistically significant differences were found in Tafter (p=0.025). The teaching course using feedback devices obtained the best results in terms of the quality of chest compressions, followed by the traditional course and audio-visual approach. These favorable results were present in both men and women. All 3teaching methods reached the goal of reducing defibrillation time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of peer-group size on the delivery of feedback in basic life support refresher training: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Roh, Hye Rin; Chang, Chulho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Taeho

    2016-07-04

    Students are largely providing feedback to one another when instructor facilitates peer feedback rather than teaching in group training. The number of students in a group affect the learning of students in the group training. We aimed to investigate whether a larger group size increases students' test scores on a post-training test with peer feedback facilitated by instructor after video-guided basic life support (BLS) refresher training. Students' one-rescuer adult BLS skills were assessed by a 2-min checklist-based test 1 year after the initial training. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of student number in a group on BLS refresher training. Participants included 115 final-year medical students undergoing their emergency medicine clerkship. The median number of students was 8 in the large groups and 4 in the standard group. The primary outcome was to examine group differences in post-training test scores after video-guided BLS training. Secondary outcomes included the feedback time, number of feedback topics, and results of end-of-training evaluation questionnaires. Scores on the post-training test increased over three consecutive tests with instructor-led peer feedback, but not differ between large and standard groups. The feedback time was longer and number of feedback topics generated by students were higher in standard groups compared to large groups on the first and second tests. The end-of-training questionnaire revealed that the students in large groups preferred the smaller group size compared to their actual group size. In this BLS refresher training, the instructor-led group feedback increased the test score after tutorial video-guided BLS learning, irrespective of the group size. A smaller group size allowed more participations in peer feedback.

  10. Normas básicas de seguridad durante el manejo de equipos de radiaciones no ionizantes Safety basic rules when handling non-ionizing radiation equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Armida Bretones

    2012-03-01

    this Prevention Department in cooperation with The Medical Physics Department a procedure based on basic preventive criteria has been elaborated to guarantee health and safety of the employees who handle non-ionizing radiation emitting equipment in our hospital and specialized centers. To draw the procedure: scientific literature related to the electromagnetic fields effects over health has been checked, periodical working meetings have been held between both above mentioned departments; non-ionizing radiation equipment have been identified as well as the places they are based or used; and expert people advice has been used. The procedure sets control and follow-up measurements both for people and equipment such as follows: Shortwave, microwave and magnetic therapy, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Laser, Ultraviolet radiation. The procedure and illustrative posters have been deployed to the linked departments, the information and training having been given to the employees who work with kind of equipment.

  11. Methodological proposals to elevate the quality of the training in the field of Health and Safety Policy in the Work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortensia Hernández Fernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The training and the development of the Human Capital as regards Health and Safety Policy are important challenges that at the present time have the organizations, fundamentally because they are directed to the prevention of work accidents and professional illnesses. This work is a contribution to the methodological proposals to elevate the quality of the training process in the field of Health and Safety Policy for persons attending the activity and that don't have pedagogic formation. For its development theoretical and empiric investigation methods were used, obtaining the elaboration of methodological proposals which is about the main theoretical aspects that facilitate the elaboration of the objectives from the methodological and didactic point of view, the selection of the methods, teaching means and types of evaluations that can be applied during the training process according to the focuses of the formation, professional development and organizational forms to impart the educational actions in the field of Health and Safety Policy.

  12. A comparative study of vocational education and occupational safety and health training in China and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Baisheng; Huang, Xin; Xue, Fei; Chen, Jiang; Liu, Xiaobing; Meng, Yangyang; Huang, Jinxin

    2017-01-16

    In order to enhance Chinese workers' occupational safety awareness, it is essential to learn from developed countries' experiences. This article investigates thoroughly occupational safety and health (OSH) in China and the UK; moreover, the article performs a comparison of Chinese and British OSH training-related laws, regulations and education system. The following conclusions are drawn: China's work safety continues to improve, but there is still a large gap compared with the UK. In China a relatively complete vocational education and training (VET) system has been established. However, there exist some defects in OSH. In the UK, the employer will not only pay attention to employees' physiological health, but also to their mental health. The UK's VET is characterized by classification and grading management, which helps integrate OSH into the whole education system. China can learn from the UK in the development of policies, VET and OSH training.

  13. Building Collaboration: A Scoping Review of Cultural Competency and Safety Education and Training for Healthcare Students and Professionals in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Olivia; Kurtz, Donna

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: This scoping literature review summarizes current Canadian health science education and training aimed to lessen health gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples. Keyword searches of peer-reviewed and gray literature databases, websites, and resources recommended by local Aboriginal community members identified 1,754 resources. Using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, 26 resources relevant to education and training of healthcare professionals and students in Canada were selected. Information included self-assessment for cultural competency/safety skills, advocacy within Canadian healthcare, and descriptions of current programs and training approaches. In spite of increasing awareness and use of cultural competency and safety concepts, few programs have been successfully implemented. Insights: A concerted effort among health science education and training bodies to develop integrated and effective programs could result in comprehensive processes that hasten the Canadian culturally safe healthcare provision, thus reducing the gaps among populations.

  14. Computer-Based Simulation in Blended Learning Curriculum for Hazardous Waste Site Worker Health and Safety Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Cheryl; Slatin, Craig; Sanborn, Wayne; Volicer, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Intended for the interest of individuals and organizations who provide adult/worker training and education, we present a discussion of a computer-based simulation training tool used as part of a hazardous waste site worker health and safety training curriculum. Our objective is to present the simulation's development, implementation, and assessment for learning utility from both trainee and trainer perspectives. The simulation is blended with other curriculum components of training courses and supports small group learning. Assessment included end-of-course trainee questionnaires and trainer focus groups to addressing simulation utility as a user-oriented learning tool. A majority of trainees reported simulation trainings as useful learning tools with numerous advantages that support a participatory, blended learning curriculum, and raise awareness of potential work site risks and hazards. Trainers reported that the simulation advanced training impact. Evaluation results indicate that the simulation successfully supports small group learning activities.

  15. Establishing the minimal number of virtual reality simulator training sessions necessary to develop basic laparoscopic skills competence: evaluation of the learning curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jordao Duarte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Medical literature is scarce on information to define a basic skills training program for laparoscopic surgery (peg and transferring, cutting, clipping. The aim of this study was to determine the minimal number of simulator sessions of basic laparoscopic tasks necessary to elaborate an optimal virtual reality training curriculum. Materials and Methods Eleven medical students with no previous laparoscopic experience were spontaneously enrolled. They were submitted to simulator training sessions starting at level 1 (Immersion Lap VR, San Jose, CA, including sequentially camera handling, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting. Each student trained twice a week until 10 sessions were completed. The score indexes were registered and analyzed. The total of errors of the evaluation sequences (camera, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting were computed and thereafter, they were correlated to the total of items evaluated in each step, resulting in a success percent ratio for each student for each set of each completed session. Thereafter, we computed the cumulative success rate in 10 sessions, obtaining an analysis of the learning process. By non-linear regression the learning curve was analyzed. Results By the non-linear regression method the learning curve was analyzed and a r2 = 0.73 (p < 0.001 was obtained, being necessary 4.26 (∼five sessions to reach the plateau of 80% of the estimated acquired knowledge, being that 100% of the students have reached this level of skills. From the fifth session till the 10th, the gain of knowledge was not significant, although some students reached 96% of the expected improvement. Conclusions This study revealed that after five simulator training sequential sessions the students' learning curve reaches a plateau. The forward sessions in the same difficult level do not promote any improvement in laparoscopic basic surgical skills, and the students should be introduced to a more difficult training

  16. Adult Education and Training in Europe: Programmes to Raise Achievement in Basic Skills. Country Descriptions. Eurydice Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocanova, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    This inventory of adult basic education and basic skills programmes takes the form of 35 system descriptions, covering 32 countries (all EU Member States as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Turkey). Its main goal is to support mutual understanding and dialogue between countries. The document has been drafted on the basis of a standalone…

  17. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  18. Safety of sports facilities and training of graduates in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano Spica, V; Giampaoli, S; Di Onofrio, V; Liguori, G

    2015-01-01

    Post-industrial societies have to face the problem of physical inactivity and inappropriate lifestyles. Programs to promote physical activity are strongly supported by supranational, national and local institutions and organizations. These programs can be developed in sport facilities but also in places that are not institutionally dedicated to sport. The use of urban and working sites has the advantage of better reach the various segments of the population, but at the same time requires coordination between various professionals in structuring an effective intervention. Bibliographical research in the historical archives of the library of the University of Rome Foro Italico, online databases, paleoigiene (wikigiene), documents archives (GSMS-SItI, WHO, ISS, OsEPi, INAIL, ISTAT, national laws). Several guidelines and regulations face the problem of safety in sport environments. The context is in rapid evolution and directions are provided by public health authorities. Graduates in Sport and Physical Activity, represent an additional resource in terms of: prevention and safety in the workplace, health education, application of preventive and adapted physical activities in the territory. These tasks can be integrated in all prevention stages: e.g. childhood and primary prevention programs in school, adapted physical activity for the elderly. The contribution of public health specialists is strategic in the surveillance and coordination of integrated projects. At the same time, graduates in Physical Education appear to be pivots for health promotion and qualified resources for institutions in the territory. Their training should always include contents related to prevention and safety, regulations on sport and working environments, along with bases of preventive medicine related to the context of physical activity.

  19. A Guide to the Design of Occupational Safety and Health Training for Immigrant, Latino/a Dairy Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Lauren M; Rosecrance, John; Stallones, Lorann; Roman-Muniz, Ivette Noami

    2016-01-01

    Industrialized dairy production in the U.S. relies on an immigrant, primarily Latino/a, workforce to meet greater production demands. Given the high rates of injuries and illnesses on U.S. dairies, there is pressing need to develop culturally appropriate training to promote safe practices among immigrant, Latino/a dairy workers. To date, there have been few published research articles or guidelines specific to developing effective occupational safety and health (OSH) training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. Literature relevant to safety training for immigrant workers in agriculture and other high-risk industries (e.g., construction) was examined to identify promising approaches. The aim of this paper is to provide a practical guide for researchers and practitioners involved in the design and implementation of effective OSH training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. The search was restricted to peer-reviewed academic journals and guidelines published between 1980 and 2015 by universities or extension programs, written in English, and related to health and safety training among immigrant, Latino/a workers within agriculture and other high-risk industries. Relevant recommendations regarding effective training transfer were also included from literature in the field of industrial-organizational psychology. A total of 97 articles were identified, of which 65 met the inclusion criteria and made a unique and significant contribution. The review revealed a number of promising strategies for how to effectively tailor health and safety training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry grouped under five main themes: (1) understanding and involving workers; (2) training content and materials; (3) training methods; (4) maximizing worker engagement; and (5) program evaluation. The identification of best practices in the design and implementation of training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers within

  20. MINE DEGASIFICATION AS BASIC SAFETY ELEMENT IN THE UNDERGROUND PARTS OF GASSY COAL MINES IN THE OSTRAVA – KARVINÁ COALFIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastimil Hudeček

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, degasification methods to drain the gas from the underground parts of coal mines in the Czech Republic are described. The authors are concerned with the possibilities of and new trends in ensuring safety by means of drilling operations. Examples of applications of degasification in mine plants in the Czech Republic, above all in a hard coal deposit in the Ostrava-Karviná Coalfield in the Upper Silesian Basin are presented.

  1. Workplace training for senior trainees: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of current approaches to promote patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Merrilyn; Harrison, Reema; Burgess, Annette; Foster, Kirsty

    2015-10-01

    Preventable harm is one of the top six health problems in the developed world. Developing patient safety skills and knowledge among advanced trainee doctors is critical. Clinical supervision is the main form of training for advanced trainees. The use of supervision to develop patient safety competence has not been established. To establish the use of clinical supervision and other workplace training to develop non-technical patient safety competency in advanced trainee doctors. Keywords, synonyms and subject headings were used to search eight electronic databases in addition to hand-searching of relevant journals up to 1 March 2014. Titles and abstracts of retrieved publications were screened by two reviewers and checked by a third. Full-text articles were screened against the eligibility criteria. Data on design, methods and key findings were extracted. Clinical supervision documents were assessed against components common to established patient safety frameworks. Findings from the reviewed articles and document analysis were collated in a narrative synthesis. Clinical supervision is not identified as an avenue for embedding patient safety skills in the workplace and is consequently not evaluated as a method to teach trainees these skills. Workplace training in non-technical patient safety skills is limited, but one-off training courses are sometimes used. Clinical supervision is the primary avenue for learning in postgraduate medical education but the most overlooked in the context of patient safety learning. The widespread implementation of short courses is not matched by evidence of rigorous evaluation. Supporting supervisors to identify teaching moments during supervision and to give weight to non-technical skills and technical skills equally is critical. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Interpreting without a safety harness: the purpose and power of participants in interpreted health and safety training for the construction industry in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    O'Byrne, Martina

    2013-01-01

    The boom in the construction industry became one of the symbols for the period of Irish economic growth dubbed ‘the Celtic Tiger’. After the accession of ten new countries to the EU in May 2004, Irish construction sites welcomed thousands of needed international workers from these new member states. Ensuring their health and safety at work became a fundamental issue. In the presence of linguistic and cultural differences interpreters were called upon to interpret during H&S training sessions ...

  3. Effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Training on Health Care Worker Safety: A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Morgan Anne; Stallones, Lorann

    2017-10-01

    The study assessed the impact of mindfulness training on occupational safety of hospital health care workers. The study used a randomized waitlist-controlled trial design to test the effect of an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course on self-reported health care worker safety outcomes, measured at baseline, postintervention, and 6 months later. Twenty-three hospital health care workers participated in the study (11 in immediate intervention group; 12 in waitlist control group). The MBSR training decreased workplace cognitive failures (F [1, 20] = 7.44, P = 0.013, (Equation is included in full-text article.)) and increased safety compliance behaviors (F [1, 20] = 7.79, P = 0.011, (Equation is included in full-text article.)) among hospital health care workers. Effects were stable 6 months following the training. The MBSR intervention did not significantly affect participants' promotion of safety in the workplace (F [1, 20] = 0.40, P = 0.54, (Equation is included in full-text article.)). Mindfulness training may potentially decrease occupational injuries of health care workers.

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness of a radiation safety training intervention for oncology nurses: a pretest – intervention – posttest study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horan Christopher L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation, for either diagnosis or treatment, is used extensively in the field of oncology. An understanding of oncology radiation safety principles and how to apply them in practice is critical for nursing practice. Misconceptions about radiation are common, resulting in undue fears and concerns that may negatively impact patient care. Effectively educating nurses to help overcome these misconceptions is a challenge. Historically, radiation safety training programs for oncology nurses have been compliance-based and behavioral in philosophy. Methods A new radiation safety training initiative was developed for Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC adapting elements of current adult education theories to address common misconceptions and to enhance knowledge. A research design for evaluating the revised training program was also developed to assess whether the revised training program resulted in a measurable and/or statistically significant change in the knowledge or attitudes of nurses toward working with radiation. An evaluation research design based on a conceptual framework for measuring knowledge and attitude was developed and implemented using a pretest-intervention-posttest approach for 15% of the study population of 750 inpatient registered oncology nurses. Results As a result of the intervention program, there was a significant difference in nurse's cognitive knowledge as measured with the test instrument from pretest (58.9% to posttest (71.6%. The evaluation also demonstrated that while positive nursing attitudes increased, the increase was significant for only 5 out of 9 of the areas evaluated. Conclusion The training intervention was effective for increasing cognitive knowledge, but was less effective at improving overall attitudes. This evaluation provided insights into the effectiveness of training interventions on the radiation safety knowledge and attitude of oncology nurses.

  5. Non-technical skills training to enhance patient safety: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris; Darbyshire, Daniel; Baker, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Many quality improvement education programmes have been introduced over the last decade with the purpose of enhancing patient safety. The importance of non-technical skills training is becoming increasingly prominent, but the extent to which educational interventions have been used and the theoretical underpinnings of such interventions remain unclear. These issues were investigated through a systematic review of the literature. Any studies involving an educational intervention to improve non-technical skills amongst undergraduate or postgraduate staff in an acute health care environment were considered. A standardised search of online databases was carried out independently by two authors and consensus reached on the inclusion of studies. Data extraction and multimodal quality assessment were completed independently, followed by a content analysis of interventions and the extraction of key themes. A total of 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Measured outcomes were variable, as was the strength of conclusions. Theoretical underpinning of interventions was not described in any studies. Content analysis revealed reasonable consistency with the emergence of five key themes: error; communication; teamwork and leadership; systems, and situational awareness. Teaching was often multidisciplinary and methods used included simulation and role-play exercises, and observation. The methodological quality of published studies is reasonable, although the reporting of specific interventions is poor. Although a recognised model to support the design of patient safety education is lacking, a number of theories have been applied to guide educators in future instructional design. Further published work should clearly describe interventions and their theoretical underpinnings, and should aim to further explore which specific aspects of interventions are effective and why. Such research should also try to assess whether such interventions can impact patient outcomes. © Blackwell

  6. Evaluation of Medical Students' Attitudes and Performance of Basic Surgery Skills in a Training Program Using Fresh Human skin, Excised During Body Contouring Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Jens; Seyed Jafari, Seyed Morteza; Schnabel, Kai P; Tschumi, Christian; Angermeier, Sarina; Shafighi, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Learning surgical skills in the operating room may be a challenge for medical students. Therefore, more approaches using simulation to enable students to develop their practical skills are required. We hypothesized that (1) there would be a need for additional surgical training for medical students in the pre-final year, and (2) our basic surgery skills training program using fresh human skin would improve medical students' surgical skills. We conducted a preliminary survey of medical students to clarify the need for further training in basic surgery procedures. A new approach using simulation to teach surgical skills on human skin was set up. The procedural skills of 15 randomly selected students were assessed in the operating room before and after participation in the simulation, using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills. Furthermore, subjective assessment was performed based on students' self-evaluation. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 21 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL). The study took place at the Inselspital, Bern University Hospital. A total of 186 pre-final-year medical students were enrolled into the preliminary survey; 15 randomly selected medical students participated in the basic surgical skills training course on the fresh human skin operating room. The preliminary survey revealed the need for a surgical skills curriculum. The simulation approach we developed showed significant (p students become more proficient in handling surgical instruments before stepping into a real surgical situation. We suggest further studies evaluating our proposed teaching method and the possibility of integrating this simulation approach into the medical school curriculum. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A study to assess the influence of interprofessional point of care simulation training on safety culture in the operating theatre environment of a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Theresa; Gale, Thomas; Anderson, Ian; Roberts, Martin; Sice, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional point of care or in situ simulation is used as a training tool in our operating theatre directorate with the aim of improving crisis behaviours. This study aimed to assess the impact of interprofessional point of care simulation on the safety culture of operating theatres. A validated Safety Attitude Questionnaire was administered to staff members before each simulation scenario and then re-administered to the same staff members after 6-12 months. Pre- and post-training Safety Attitude Questionnaire-Operating Room (SAQ-OR) scores were compared using paired sample t-tests. Analysis revealed a statistically significant perceived improvement in both safety (p safety culture) 6-12 months after interprofessional simulation training. A growing body of literature suggests that a positive safety culture is associated with improved patient outcomes. Our study supports the implementation of point of care simulation as a useful intervention to improve safety culture in theatres.

  8. Preliminary safety analysis of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in persons with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Daniel L; Boyne, Pierce; Rockwell, Bradley; Gerson, Myron; Khoury, Jane; Kissela, Brett; Dunning, Kari

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess safety via electrocardiographic (ECG), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and orthopedic responses to 3 different high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols in persons with stroke. Eighteen participants (10 male; 61.9 + 8.3 years of age; 5.8 + 4.2 years poststroke) completed a symptom-limited graded exercise test (GXT) with ECG monitoring to screen for eligibility and determine HR peak. The 3 HIIT protocols involved repeated 30 s bursts of treadmill walking at maximum speed alternated with rest periods of 30 s (P30), 1 min (P60), or 2 min (P120). Sessions were performed in random order and included 5 min warm up, 20 min HIIT, and 5 min cool down. Variables measured included ECG activity, BP, HR, signs and symptoms of cardiovascular intolerance, and orthopedic concerns. Generalized linear mixed models and Tukey-Kramer adjustment were used to compare protocols using p HIIT session. HIIT elicited HRs in excess of 88% of measured HR peak including 6 (P30), 8 (P60), and 2 (P120) participants eliciting a HR response above their GXT HR peak . Both maximum BP and HR were significantly higher in P30 and P60 relative to P120. Preliminary data indicate that persons with chronic stroke who have been prescreened with an ECG stress test, a symptom-limited GXT, and a harness for fall protection may safely participate in HIIT, generating substantially higher HRs than what is seen in traditional moderate intensity training.

  9. The TRAIN-project: railway safety and the train driver information environment and work situation. A summary of the main results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecklund, L. [MTO Psychology and Swedish National Rail Administration (Sweden); Ingre, M.; Kecklund, G.; Soederstroem, M.; Aakerstedt, T. [National Inst. for Psychosocial Factors and Health (Sweden); Lindberg, E. [Swedish National Rail Administration (Sweden); Jansson, A.; Olsson, E.; Sandblad, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Human-Computer Interaction; Almqvist, P. [Swedish State Railways (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    The TRAIN project investigates traffic safety related risks, focusing in particular on the train driver work situation, use of information but also on the supporting safety organisation. It is an on-going project funded and managed by Swedish National Rail Administration and carried out by independent researchers. The project provides a multi-disciplinary investigation by use of a man-technology-organisation (MTO) perspective. Activities performed are task analysis, evaluation of the drivers use of information and interaction with the ATP system as well as analyses of stress, mental workload and work hours. Several methods are being used such as interviews, questionnaires, diaries, activity monitoring and videotapes. This paper gives an overview of the project as well as a short summary of the main results. Detailed results are presented in separate reports as started in the reference list. Some of the main results are that the drivers report severe problems concerning sleepiness on early morning shifts, problems with maintenance on vehicles, lack of information supporting the planning task as well as problems in understanding ATP functions. Two groups of drivers having a feed-back related as opposed to a feed-forward driving style could be identified. In conclusion there is a great need to perform more scientific studies of human factors and railway safety as well as to implement safety management programs including professional human factors competence in the railway industries. (orig.)

  10. Changes of indicators of special physical fitness of young female tennis-players at the stage of basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Shevchenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve performance of special physical qualities of young tennis players at the stage of initial training. Material and Methods: analysis of scientific and methodical literature, test of physical fitness, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics. The study involved 11 women aged 7–8 years in the group of initial training. In the training sessions of physical training of young tennis players the game has been used teaching method. Results: to investigate the changes in the indices of physical fitness of young tennis players 7–8 years. Analyzed the impact of the development on the physical qualities of assimilation techniques. Pointed out that for the qualitative development of physical qualities necessary to use outdoor games and relay races. Revealed that the results of the physical fitness of young tennis players after the pedagogical experiment and had risen significantly different to those in the beginning of the study (P<0,05, except for indicators exercises "run on 18 meters". Conclusions: it was found that the use of training sessions on physical preparation of mobile games and relays increase the interest and motivation for tennis lessons for children in the group of initial training.

  11. Improvement of special training of weight-lifters by means of various groove machines in the preparatory period at the stage of preliminary basic preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Piven

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve special training of heavyweights of 14–16 years old by means of various groove machines in the preparatory period at the stage of preliminary basic preparation. Material & Methods: 30 young weight-lifters at the age of 14–16 years were involved to the experiment; all of them had II and III sports categories. Results: it is revealed that sportsmen of the experimental group, who used nonconventional methods of training on special groove machines such as medicine ball, Sandbag, rubber tube, with the general training loads of classical technique of trainings, which has made 779 raising of the bar, equal to 90 tons, improved power indicators in the sum of double-event on 16,5 kg after the experiment, and also set own records unlike the control group, which trained by the traditional technique and used the loading volume, which has made 910 raising of the bar and 111 tons, and has improved power results on 7,2 kg. Conclusions: it is established that use of these machines promotes more effective development of high-speed-power and power qualities and consequently, leads to the growth of sports results in weightlifting.

  12. Influence of the experimental program of trainings in armsport on the power indexes of basic muscle groups of 16-17-years-old armwrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaev O. I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of influence of the experimental program of trainings are considered in armsport. The program is developed taking into account age-dependent changes in the organism of young sportsmen, features of development of force and power endurance, structure of long-term preparation. The program is directed on development of force and static power endurance of basic muscle groups of sportsmen. In researches took part 30 sportsmen aged 16-17 years old. It is set that the stage of the specialized base training is foreseen by the increase of time on perfection of technique of fight at the table to 15 %. The special attention must be spared the special physical youth development. The block of the specialized training to send to development of explosive force, workings of weak corners, change of character of work is recommended. It is set that trainings with the static loadings are obligatory and in the general volume of loadings must make no less than 20 %. It is necessarily necessary to plan the block of the restoration training for physical and psychological renewal of sportsmen after the conducted setup time and appearance on competitions, exposure and comprehension of sufferet errors and search of methods of their removal.

  13. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2005-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 24 février 2005 (matin et après-midi). Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation et Développement (groupe sécurité) de HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.ch FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada ...

  14. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. La prochaine session aura lieu le 30 septembre 2004 (matin). Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité) des HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.ch FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 ...

  15. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2005-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. Les prochaines sessions auront lieu le 24 février 2005 (matin et après-midi). Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation et Développement (groupe sécurité) de HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.ch FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 7...

  16. Safety Training: Ergonomie - Sensibilisation à l'ergonomie bureautique

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons une 1/2 journée de sensibilisation sur les risques engendrés par une mauvaise posture lors du travail sur écran (mal de dos, fatigue visuelle, douleurs des poignets...) et des bonnes pratiques pour y remédier. La prochaine session aura lieu le 30 septembre 2004 (matin). Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité et animés par Pily Clemente et Marion Ribordy de « PM postures ». L'inscription via EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information et inscription par EDH à ce cours, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité) des HR, ou contacter l'organisateur. Les places seront attribuées dans l'ordre de réception des inscriptions. Organisateur : Ana-Paula Bernardes/SC-GS (71385) Ana-paula.bernardes@cern.ch FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 ...

  17. Safety Training: Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    Nous vous proposons un nouveau cours de sécurité lié aux manutentions manuelles (durée 1 jour) : Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail. Si vous êtes amené à manipuler régulièrement des charges lourdes ou volumineuses, cette formation peut vous aider à prévenir les lésions musculaires ou dorsales. A l'issue de cette formation, vous serez capable d'adopter et d'appliquer les principes de base de sécurité physique et d'économie d'efforts dans les manipulations d'objets. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité. L'inscription EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité). Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité) FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 sa...

  18. Safety Training: Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail

    CERN Multimedia

    Laetitia Laddada

    2004-01-01

    >Nous vous proposons un nouveau cours de sécurité lié aux manutentions manuelles (durée 1 jour) : Sensibilisation aux gestes et postures de travail. Si vous êtes amené à manipuler régulièrement des charges lourdes ou volumineuses, cette formation peut vous aider à prévenir les lésions musculaires ou dorsales. A l'issue de cette formation, vous serez capable d'adopter et d'appliquer les principes de base de sécurité physique et d'économie d'efforts dans les manipulations d'objets. Les cours sont pris en charge par la Commission de Sécurité. L'inscription EDH est obligatoire. Pour plus d'information, veuillez consulter les pages Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité). Formation & Développement (Groupe Sécurité) FORMATION EN SECURITE SAFETY TRAINING Laetitia Laddada 73811 - 79236 s...

  19. European consensus on a competency-based virtual reality training program for basic endoscopic surgical psychomotor skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Koen W.; Ahlberg, Gunnar; Bonavina, Luigi; Carter, Fiona J.; Grantcharov, Teodor P.; Hyltander, Anders; Schijven, Marlies P.; Stefani, Alessandro; van der Zee, David C.; Broeders, Ivo A. M. J.

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators have been demonstrated to improve basic psychomotor skills in endoscopic surgery. The exercise configuration settings used for validation in studies published so far are default settings or are based on the personal choice of the tutors. The purpose of this study was

  20. Simba Study: Undergraduate module in simulation training and basic life support to improve undergraduate confidence in paediatrics

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruell, H

    2013-08-20

    There are significant differences in resuscitation algorithms for children versus adults. We aimed to enhance confidence of our students in the assessment and management of sick children by developing a simple program with emphasis on Basic Airway management, CPR, and clinical assessment and treatment of children using the A\\/B\\/C\\/D\\/E system. \\r\

  1. European consensus on a competency-based virtual reality training program for basic endoscopic surgical psychomotor skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Koen W.; Ahlberg, Gunnar; Bonavina, Luigi; Carter, Fiona J.; Grantcharov, Teodor P.; Hyltander, Anders; Schijven, Marlies P.; Stefani, Alessandro; van der Zee, David C.; Broeders, Ivo A. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators have been demonstrated to improve basic psychomotor skills in endoscopic surgery. The exercise configuration settings used for validation in studies published so far are default settings or are based on the personal choice of the tutors. The purpose of this study was

  2. How a health and safety management training program may improve the working environment in small- and medium-sized companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this controlled intervention study was to investigate the effects of a 2-year training program in health and safety (H&S) management for managers at small- and medium-sized companies. A total of 113 managers of motor vehicle repair garages participated in the training and another 113 garage managers served as a comparison group. The effects were measured using questionnaires sent before and after the intervention to the managers and blue-collar workers at the garages. The intervention group managers reported significantly greater improvement of their H&S management system than the managers in the comparison group. The results also indicate that the management training positively affected how the workers regarded their supportive working environment. H&S management training may positively affect measures at both garage and individual levels.

  3. Gait training after spinal cord injury: safety, feasibility and gait function following 8 weeks of training with the exoskeletons from Ekso Bionics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Baunsgaard, Carsten; Vig Nissen, Ulla; Katrin Brust, Anne; Frotzler, Angela; Ribeill, Cornelia; Kalke, Yorck-Bernhard; León, Natacha; Gómez, Belén; Samuelsson, Kersti; Antepohl, Wolfram; Holmström, Ulrika; Marklund, Niklas; Glott, Thomas; Opheim, Arve; Benito, Jesus; Murillo, Narda; Nachtegaal, Janneke; Faber, Willemijn; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-11-06

    Prospective quasi-experimental study, pre- and post-design. Assess safety, feasibility, training characteristics and changes in gait function for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) using the robotic exoskeletons from Ekso Bionics. Nine European rehabilitation centres. Robotic exoskeleton gait training, three times weekly over 8 weeks. Time upright, time walking and steps in the device (training characteristics) were recorded longitudinally. Gait and neurological function were measured by 10 Metre Walk Test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI) II and Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS). Fifty-two participants completed the training protocol. Median age: 35.8 years (IQR 27.5-52.5), men/women: N = 36/16, neurological level of injury: C1-L2 and severity: AIS A-D (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale). Time since injury (TSI)  1 year, N = 27. No serious adverse events occurred. Three participants dropped out following ankle swelling (overuse injury). Four participants sustained a Category II pressure ulcer at contact points with the device but completed the study and skin normalized. Training characteristics increased significantly for all subgroups. The number of participants with TSI  1 year and gait function, increased from 41 to 44% and TUG and BBS results improved (P < 0.05). Exoskeleton training was generally safe and feasible in a heterogeneous sample of persons with SCI. Results indicate potential benefits on gait function and balance.

  4. Participatory Training to Improve Safety and Health in Small Construction Sites in Some Countries in Asia: Development and Application of the WISCON Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    A participatory training program, Work Improvement in Small Construction Sites, was developed to provide practical support measures to the small construction sector. Managers and workers from selected small sites were interviewed about their occupational safety and health risks. The Work Improvement in Small Construction Sites training program comprised a 45-item action checklist, photos, and illustrations showing local examples and group work methods. Pilot training workshops were carried out with workers and employers in Cambodia, Laos, Mongolia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Participants subsequently planned, and using locally available low-cost materials, implemented their own improvements such as hand-made hand trucks to carry heavy materials, removal of projecting nails from timber materials, and fences to protect roof workers from falling. Local Work Improvement in Small Construction Sites trainers consisting of government officials, workers, employers, and nongovernment organization representatives were then trained to implement the Work Improvement in Small Construction Sites training widely. Keys to success were easy-to-apply training tools aiming at immediate, low-cost improvements, and collaboration with various local people's networks. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Joint Judge Advocate Officer Basic Course: A Curriculum and Training Based Analysis of the Feasibility of Combining Judge Advocate Initial Officer Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Bar Association AFJAGS Air Force Judge Advocate General’s School APFT Army Physical Fitness Test BLC Basic Lawyer Course BRAC Base Realignment and...Physical Fitness Test ( APFT ), graduation rehearsals, and graduation. The eight hours of leadership includes various topics spread throughout the course in

  6. The problem of search safe and effective method in reducing injuries in bodybuilding stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavityak O.S.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the most frequently used coaches and athletes in bodybuilding principles that can help to reduce the injuries of athletes while maintaining the progressivity results. Material : a survey participated 86 coaches and 120 athletes, bodybuilders from 5 to 8 years. Results : It was found that most of the coaches used in the course of employment principles generally accepted system of training. In such circumstances, the risk of injury to athletes is large enough. When using pre-exhaustion principle to increase the intensity of the training process increases the risk of overloading the body athletes. Conclusions : Athletes with a longer training experience (about 8 years, more likely to use the principle of prior exhaustion. In this case athletes try using this principle to reduce the operating parameters of volume load. This helps to reduce the level of injury and maintain positive dynamics performance.

  7. The problem of search safe and effective method in reducing injuries in bodybuilding stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Slavityak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the most frequently used coaches and athletes in bodybuilding principles that can help to reduce the injuries of athletes while maintaining the progressivity results. Material : a survey participated 86 coaches and 120 athletes, bodybuilders from 5 to 8 years. Results : It was found that most of the coaches used in the course of employment principles generally accepted system of training. In such circumstances, the risk of injury to athletes is large enough. When using pre-exhaustion principle to increase the intensity of the training process increases the risk of overloading the body athletes. Conclusions : Athletes with a longer training experience (about 8 years, more likely to use the principle of prior exhaustion. In this case athletes try using this principle to reduce the operating parameters of volume load. This helps to reduce the level of injury and maintain positive dynamics performance.

  8. Enhancing the quality of life for palliative care cancer patients in Indonesia through family caregivers: a pilot study of basic skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanti, Martina Sinta; Setiyarini, Sri; Effendy, Christantie

    2017-01-17

    Palliative care in Indonesia is problematic because of cultural and socio-economic factors. Family in Indonesia is an integral part of caregiving process in inpatient and outpatient settings. However, most families are not adequately prepared to deliver basic care for their sick family member. This research is a pilot project aiming to evaluate how basic skills training (BST) given to family caregivers could enhance the quality of life (QoL) of palliative care cancer patients in Indonesia. The study is a prospective quantitative with pre and post-test design. Thirty family caregivers of cancer patients were trained in basic skills including showering, washing hair, assisting for fecal and urinary elimination and oral care, as well as feeding at bedside. Patients' QoL were measured at baseline and 4 weeks after training using EORTC QLQ C30. Hypothesis testing was done using related samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank. A paired t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to check in which subgroups was the intervention more significant. The intervention showed a significant change in patients' global health status/QoL, emotional and social functioning, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation and financial hardship of the patients. Male patient's had a significant effect on global health status (qol) (p = 0.030); female patients had a significant effect on dyspnea (p = 0.050) and constipation (p = 0.038). Younger patients had a significant effect in global health status/QoL (p = 0.002). Patients between 45 and 54 years old had significant effect on financial issue (p = 0.039). Caregivers between 45 and 54 years old had significant effect on patients' dyspnea (p = 0.031). Basic skills training for family caregivers provided some changes in some aspects of QoL of palliative cancer patients. The intervention showed promises in maintaining the QoL of cancer patients considering socio-economic and cultural challenges in the provision of

  9. Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software for train control applications : system safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using commercial off-the-shelf(COTS)processor-based systems for safety- related railroad applications. From the safety perspective,the fundamental challenges of using COTS products are most...

  10. A randomized control trial to evaluate the importance of pre-training basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills upon the learning curve of laparoscopic intra-corporeal knot tying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinas, Carlos Roger; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Sisa, Cesar Manuel; Campo, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    Training of basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills improves the acquisition of more advanced laparoscopic tasks, such as laparoscopic intra-corporeal knot tying (LICK). This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate whether pre-training of basic skills, as laparoscopic camera navigation (LCN), hand-eye coordination (HEC), and bimanual coordination (BMC), and the combination of the three of them, has any beneficial effect upon the learning curve of LICK. The study was carried out in a private center in Asunción, Paraguay, by 80 medical students without any experience in surgery. Four laparoscopic tasks were performed in the ENCILAP model (LCN, HEC, BMC, and LICK). Participants were allocated to 5 groups (G1-G5). The study was structured in 5 phases. In phase 1, they underwent a base-line test ( T 1 ) for all tasks (1 repetition of each task in consecutive order). In phase 2, participants underwent different training programs (30 consecutive repetitions) for basic tasks according to the group they belong to (G1: none; G2: LCN; G3: HEC; G4: BMC; and G5: LCN, HEC, and BMC). In phase 3, they were tested again ( T 2 ) in the same manner than at T 1 . In phase 4, they underwent a standardized training program for LICK (30 consecutive repetitions). In phase 5, they were tested again ( T 3 ) in the same manner than at T 1 and T 2 . At each repetition, scoring was based on the time taken for task completion system. The scores were plotted and non-linear regression models were used to fit the learning curves to one- and two-phase exponential decay models for each participant (individual curves) and for each group (group curves). The LICK group learning curves fitted better to the two-phase exponential decay model. From these curves, the starting points ( Y 0), the point after HEC training/before LICK training ( Y 1), the Plateau, and the rate constants ( K ) were calculated. All groups, except for G4, started from a similar point ( Y 0). At Y 1, G5 scored already

  11. A model based safety architecture framework for Dutch high speed train lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, K.; Braakhuis, J.G.; Rajabali Nejad, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based safety architecture framework (MBSAF) for capturing and sharing architectural knowledge of safety cases of safetycritical systems of systems (SoS). Whilst architecture frameworks in the systems engineering domain consider safety often as dependent attribute, this

  12. Assessment of Knowledge of Participants on Basic Molecular Biology Techniques after 5-Day Intensive Molecular Biology Training Workshops in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yisau, J. I.; Adagbada, A. O.; Bamidele, T.; Fowora, M.; Brai, B. I. C.; Adebesin, O.; Bamidele, M.; Fesobi, T.; Nwaokorie, F. O.; Ajayi, A.; Smith, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    The deployment of molecular biology techniques for diagnosis and research in Nigeria is faced with a number of challenges, including the cost of equipment and reagents coupled with the dearth of personnel skilled in the procedures and handling of equipment. Short molecular biology training workshops were conducted at the Nigerian Institute of…

  13. Learning Strategies in Play during Basic Training for Medal of Honor and Call of Duty Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaeehezarjeribi, Yadi

    2010-01-01

    This study, based on experiential play methodology was used to explore student engagement while playing "Medal of Honor (2002)" and "Call of Duty (2003)". It identifies some of the key issues related to the use of video games and simulations during the training phase of game play. Research into the effects of gaming in education has been extremely…

  14. da Vinci Skills Simulator for Assessing Learning Curve and Criterion-based Training of Robotic Basic Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Luursema, J.M.; Kengen, B.; Schout, B.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Bekkers, R.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To answer 2 research questions: what are the learning curve patterns of novices on the da Vinci skills simulator parameters and what parameters are appropriate for criterion-based robotic training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 17 novices completed 2 simulator sessions within 3 days.

  15. 29 CFR Appendix V to Part 1918 - Basic Elements of a First Aid Training Program (Non-mandatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., lacerations, punctures, avulsions, amputations, and crush injuries. d. the principles of wound care including... wounds. 6. Abdomen a. blunt injuries, penetrating injuries, and protruding organs. 7. Hand, Finger, and... their training. 2. Trainees should be exposed to acute injury and illness settings as well as the...

  16. Health Risk Factors Associated with Acute Respiratory Illness Among U.S. Army Recruits Attending Basic Combat Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    energy, stamina , improved mood, weight control, mobility, maintenance of muscle and bone density, as well as improved immune function.18...Competitive athletes recognize peak performance on the field requires consistent intense practice off the field. Recreational sports enthusiasts to Olympic...intentionally train under frequent strenuous (intensity and duration) periods to build physical stamina . 16   Additionally, competitive athletes

  17. The translational science training program at NIH: Introducing early career researchers to the science and operation of translation of basic research to medical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, C Taylor; Sittampalam, G Sitta; Wang, Philip Y; Ryan, Philip E

    2017-01-02

    Translational science is an emerging field that holds great promise to accelerate the development of novel medical interventions. As the field grows, so does the demand for highly trained biomedical scientists to fill the positions that are being created. Many graduate and postdoctorate training programs do not provide their trainees with sufficient education to take advantage of this growing employment sector. To help better prepare the trainees at the National Institutes of Health for possible careers in translation, we have created the Translational Science Training Program (TSTP). The TSTP is an intensive 2- to 3-day training program that introduces NIH postdoctoral trainees and graduate students to the science and operation of turning basic research discoveries into a medical therapeutic, device or diagnostic, and also exposes them to the variety of career options in translational science. Through a combination of classroom teaching from practicing experts in the various disciplines of translation and small group interactions with pre-clinical development teams, participants in the TSTP gain knowledge that will aid them in obtaining a career in translational science and building a network to make the transition to the field. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):13-24, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Influence of learning styles on the practical performance after the four-step basic life support training approach – An observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Alexandra; Stieger, Lina; Beckers, Stefan; Biermann, Henning; Rossaint, Rolf; Sopka, Saša

    2017-01-01

    Background Learning and training basic life support (BLS)—especially external chest compressions (ECC) within the BLS-algorithm—are essential resuscitation training for laypersons as well as for health care professionals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of learning styles on the performance of BLS and to identify whether all types of learners are sufficiently addressed by Peyton’s four-step approach for BLS training. Methods A study group of first-year medical students (n = 334) without previous medical knowledge was categorized according to learning styles using the German Lernstilinventar questionnaire based on Kolb’s Learning Styles Inventory. Students’ BLS performances were assessed before and after a four-step BLS training approach lasting 4 hours. Standardized BLS training was provided by an educational staff consisting of European Resuscitation Council-certified advanced life support providers and instructors. Pre- and post-intervention BLS performance was evaluated using a single-rescuer-scenario and standardized questionnaires (6-point-Likert-scales: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree). The recorded points of measurement were the time to start, depth, and frequency of ECC. Results The study population was categorized according to learning styles: diverging (5%, n = 16), assimilating (36%, n = 121), converging (41%, n = 138), and accommodating (18%, n = 59). Independent of learning styles, both male and female participants showed significant improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. Based on the Kolb learning styles, no significant differences between the four groups were observed in compression depth, frequency, time to start CPR, or the checklist-based assessment within the baseline assessment. A significant sex effect on the difference between pre- and post-interventional assessment points was observed for mean compression depth and mean compression frequency. Conclusions The findings

  19. Influence of learning styles on the practical performance after the four-step basic life support training approach - An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Hanna; Henke, Alexandra; Stieger, Lina; Beckers, Stefan; Biermann, Henning; Rossaint, Rolf; Sopka, Saša

    2017-01-01

    Learning and training basic life support (BLS)-especially external chest compressions (ECC) within the BLS-algorithm-are essential resuscitation training for laypersons as well as for health care professionals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of learning styles on the performance of BLS and to identify whether all types of learners are sufficiently addressed by Peyton's four-step approach for BLS training. A study group of first-year medical students (n = 334) without previous medical knowledge was categorized according to learning styles using the German Lernstilinventar questionnaire based on Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory. Students' BLS performances were assessed before and after a four-step BLS training approach lasting 4 hours. Standardized BLS training was provided by an educational staff consisting of European Resuscitation Council-certified advanced life support providers and instructors. Pre- and post-intervention BLS performance was evaluated using a single-rescuer-scenario and standardized questionnaires (6-point-Likert-scales: 1 = completely agree, 6 = completely disagree). The recorded points of measurement were the time to start, depth, and frequency of ECC. The study population was categorized according to learning styles: diverging (5%, n = 16), assimilating (36%, n = 121), converging (41%, n = 138), and accommodating (18%, n = 59). Independent of learning styles, both male and female participants showed significant improvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. Based on the Kolb learning styles, no significant differences between the four groups were observed in compression depth, frequency, time to start CPR, or the checklist-based assessment within the baseline assessment. A significant sex effect on the difference between pre- and post-interventional assessment points was observed for mean compression depth and mean compression frequency. The findings of this work show that the four-step-approach for

  20. Appraisal on Rail Transit Development: A Review on Train Services and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Noor Hafiza binti; Masirin, Mohd Idrus Haji Mohd; Ghazali, Mohd Imran bin; Azis, Mohd Isom bin

    2017-08-01

    The ever increasing problems faced by population around the world have made demands that transportation need to be improved as an effective and efficient communication means. It is considered as a necessity especially when rapid development and economic growth of a country is the agenda. Among the transportation modes being focused as critical facilities are the bus system, rail system, road network, shipping system and air transportation system. Rail transport is a means of conveyance of passengers and goods by way of wheeled vehicles running on rail tracks. In Malaysia, the railway network has evolved tremendously since its inception in the early 19th century. It has grown proportionally with the national development. Railway network does not only mean for rural transportation, but it also considered as a solution to urban congestion challenges. Currently, urban rail transit is the most popular means of urban transportation system especially as big cities such as Kuala Lumpur. This paper presents the definition of rail transportation system and its role in urban or sub-urban operation. It also describes the brief history of world railway transportation including a discussion on Malaysian rail history perspective. As policy and standard are important in operating a railway system, this paper also illustrates and discusses some elements which have an impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of train operation. Towards the end, this paper also shares the importance of railway safety based on real case studies around the world. Thus, it is hoped that this paper will enable the public to understand the rail transit development and appreciate its existence as a public transportation system.

  1. [Predonation interview by a trained and authorized paramedical staff: feasibility, reliability and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Romieu, B; Adjou, C; Giraudeau, B; Bastard, B; Danic, B; Pelletier, B

    2011-04-01

    Predonation interview accounts for a major step in transfusion safety. In France, it must be performed by a physician, following a methodical questioning and a standardized questionnaire. Faced with this evolution, the value of a strictly medical expertise has been progressively losing importance. In many countries, blood donor selection is being organized by non medical trained staff (Québec, Switzerland, e.g.). A decree of April 30, 2006 allowed the Établissement français du sang to experiment a predonation interview by an authorized paramedical staff in the form of a two-phase prospective multicenter study over a year. Phase I "experimental situation": six physician/nurse teams among three blood transfusion centres interviewed 1940 blood-donation candidates, including 253 new donors (13% out of total). Phase 2 "observational study": 3222 blood-donation candidates were interviewed either by a physician or a nurse. In phase I, nurses were able to make a decision without the physician's help in 1921 cases. A total of 1628 candidates were decided capable of donating blood both by physicians and nurses, 174 donors were rejected both by physicians and nurses and 69 were rejected either by physicians or nurses. In phase 2, out of 3222 blood-donation candidates, an average of 12.1% were rejected by nurses and 10% by physicians. The study reported a weaker variability among nurses. Results show that nurses were able to perform predonation interviews with high reliability, without additional risk. The reproducibility of their answers in the field of recipient-risk evaluation was better than the physicians. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Integration of Behaviour-Based Safety Programme into Engineering Laboratories and Workshops Conceptually

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kean Eng; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md; Zainal, Siti Rohaida Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual research framework is to develop and integrate a safety training model using a behaviour-based safety training programme into laboratories for young adults, during their tertiary education, particularly in technical and vocational education. Hence, this research will be investigating the outcome of basic safety…

  3. An effectiveness analysis of a developed differentiated program for dancer’s motor quality development at the stage of specialized basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Trakaliuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: practical substantiation of the effectiveness of using the developed differentiated program for the development of motor qualities of skilled dancers in sports dances at the stage of specialized basic training. Material & Methods: in the study involved 30 athletes, dancers aged 14–18 years who were engaged in a differentiated program for the development of motor qualities (experimental group and the generally accepted program of a sports and dance club (control group. Methods: analysis and generalization of information of special literature, method of pedagogical observation, method of pedagogical experiment, method of pedagogical testing, method of mathematical statistics. Result: analysis of the state of special physical preparation of dancers before and after using the developed differentiated program for the development of motor qualities is presented and obtained results of the values of the indices of their leading motor qualities. Conclusion: the efficiency of application of the developed differentiated program for the development of motor qualities of qualified dancers has been proved at the stage of specialized basic training.

  4. The Tulip GT® airway versus the facemask and Guedel airway: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers in anaesthetised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, A; Robinson, P N; Hasan, M

    2016-03-01

    We performed a randomised, controlled, cross-over study of lung ventilation by Basic Life Support-trained providers using either the Tulip GT® airway or a facemask with a Guedel airway in 60 anaesthetised patients. Successful ventilation was achieved if the provider produced an end-tidal CO2 > 3.5 kPa and a tidal volume > 250 ml in two of the first three breaths, within 60 sec and within two attempts. Fifty-seven (95%) providers achieved successful ventilation using the Tulip GT compared with 35 (58%) using the facemask (p Tulip GT and facemask, the mean (SD) end-tidal CO2 was 5.0 (0.7) kPa vs 2.5 (1.5) kPa, tidal volume was 494 (175) ml vs 286 (186) ml and peak inspiratory pressure was 18.3 (3.4) cmH2 O vs 13.6 (7) cmH2 O respectively (all p Tulip GT airway. These results are similar to a previous manikin study using the same protocol, suggesting a close correlation between human and manikin studies for this airway device. We conclude that the Tulip GT should be considered as an adjunct to airway management both within and outside hospitals when ventilation is being undertaken by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. INFLUENCE OF BASIC IN SHOOTING TRAINING REALIZED ACCORDING TO INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON THE EFFICIENCY OF A GUN USED BY POLICEWOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vučković

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A sample of 25 female students of the second year of VSUP –Advanced School of Internal Affairs from Belgrade, without any previous knowledge in handling the firearms, went the shooting training according to the international standards.During the programme the candidates were tested three times: at the beginning of the training (TEST 1, after the 50% of the realized training (TEST 2 and at the end of the training (TEST 3.The testing included a precise shooting with 10 bullets from the CZ99 gun at the distance of 10 meters. The results showed that the initial level of knowledge (TEST 1 was 29.32 ± 16.76 of the achieved sum of the hit circles.At the transitive testing (TEST 2 the efficiency was at the level of 63.04 ±16.34 of the achieved sum of the hit circles, while at the end of the testing (TEST 3 the efficiency was at the level of 69.32 ± 10.82 of the achieved sum of the hit circles. The variance analyses (ANOVA showed that there was a general statistics difference between the results of testing at the level F=52.19648, p=0.000.A student t test showed that between the TEST 1 and TEST 2, as well as between the TEST 1 and TEST 3 there was a significant difference in shooting efficiency, at the level t = 8.547, p<0.000 and t=11.105, p<0.000, respectively, while between the TEST 2 and TEST 3 the difference was at the very edge of the statistics importance, t=1.708, p= 0.050.The mathematics model was received, described with the equation of following form: y = 24.5894x0.2315 and the model has a prediction strength at the level of reliability of 99.50%.

  6. Virtual Reality Simulation Training for Ebola Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzoni, Luca; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Echeverri, Lina; Maccapani, Fabio; Berryman, Lizzy; Burkle, Frederick M; Della Corte, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Both virtual and hybrid simulation training offer a realistic and effective educational framework and opportunity to provide virtual exposure to operational public health skills that are essential for infection control and Ebola treatment management. This training is designed to increase staff safety and create a safe and realistic environment where trainees can gain essential basic and advanced skills.

  7. Special physical preparation of athletes in motor sport during testing methods basic training level of preparedness for competitive athlete load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednychenko M.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish the reasons for the high fatigue pilots during passage race course. Material : the study involved athletes and race car drivers depending on the rank of the competition. The total number surveyed was 140 people. Results : in vitro studies have established a pattern of growth of errors in the evaluation of the available jobs at different levels of fatigue. This asymmetry observed in the haptic display and reflex mean arterial pressure when simultaneous registration on the left and right side body. After the competition and training at a special physical training were examined 36 athletes. Comparison of the results display asymmetry haptic reflex and mean arterial pressure showed reliable changes in the resistance of the organism to a specific exertion racers. Conclusions : the optimal load is characterized by indicators of coordination and reflex reaction haptic mean arterial pressure. These indicators do not go beyond the norms of its symmetrical appearance. This characterizes a uniform and sufficient blood supply body during the execution of competitive and training load.

  8. Special physical preparation of athletes in motor sport during testing methods basic training level of preparedness for competitive athlete load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cherednychenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish the reasons for the high fatigue pilots during passage race course. Material : the study involved athletes and race car drivers depending on the rank of the competition. The total number surveyed was 140 people. Results : in vitro studies have established a pattern of growth of errors in the evaluation of the available jobs at different levels of fatigue. This asymmetry observed in the haptic display and reflex mean arterial pressure when simultaneous registration on the left and right side body. After the competition and training at a special physical training were examined 36 athletes. Comparison of the results display asymmetry haptic reflex and mean arterial pressure showed reliable changes in the resistance of the organism to a specific exertion racers. Conclusions : the optimal load is characterized by indicators of coordination and reflex reaction haptic mean arterial pressure. These indicators do not go beyond the norms of its symmetrical appearance. This characterizes a uniform and sufficient blood supply body during the execution of competitive and training load.

  9. Maximising harm reduction in early specialty training for general practice: validation of a safety checklist

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowie, Paul; McKay, John; Kelly, Moya

    2012-01-01

    .... Doctors-in-training are also known to be susceptible to medical error. Ensuring that all essential educational issues are addressed during training is problematic given the scale of the tasks to be undertaken...

  10. Evaluating a Training Intervention to Prepare Geriatric Case Managers to Assess for Suicide and Firearm Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Natalie D.; Slovak, Karen L.; Giger, Jarod T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on the implementation and initial evaluation of a 1-day training intervention targeting direct care providers in the Ohio aging services network. A primary objective is to describe the training intervention that consisted of two parts: (a) a gatekeeper training for assessing suicide risk among older adults,…

  11. Development and Assessment of a Novel Training Package for Basic Maneuvering Tasks on a Flight Simulator Using Self Instruction Methods and Above Real Time Training (ARTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia J.; Heath, Bruce e.; Crane, Peter; Ward, Marcus; Crier, Tomyka; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2007-01-01

    One result of the relatively recent advances in computing technology has been the decreasing cost of computers and increasing computational power. This has allowed high fidelity airplane simulations to be run on personal computers (PC). Thus, simulators are now used routinely by pilots to substitute real flight hours for simulated flight hours for training for an aircraft type rating thereby reducing the cost of flight training. However, FAA regulations require that such substitution training must be supervised by Certified Flight Instructors (CFI). If the CFI presence could be reduced or eliminated for certain tasks this would mean a further cost savings to the pilot. This would require that the flight simulator have a certain level of 'intelligence' in order to provide feedback on pilot performance similar to that of a CFI. The 'intelligent' flight simulator would have at least the capability to use data gathered from the flight to create a measure for the performance of the student pilot. Also, to fully utilize the advances in computational power, the simulator would be capable of interacting with the student pilot using the best possible training interventions. This thesis reports on the two studies conducted at Tuskegee University investigating the effects of interventions on the learning of two flight maneuvers on a flight simulator and the robustness and accuracy of calculated performance indices as compared to CFI evaluations of performance. The intent of these studies is to take a step in the direction of creating an 'intelligent' flight simulator. The first study deals with the comparisons of novice pilot performance trained at different levels of above real-time to execute a level S-turn. The second study examined the effect of out-of-the-window (OTW) visual cues in the form of hoops on the performance of novice pilots learning to fly a landing approach on the flight simulator. The reliability/robustness of the computed performance metrics was assessed

  12. Apprentice or Student? The Structures of Construction Industry Vocational Education and Training in Denmark and Sweden and their Possible Consequences for Safety Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grytnes, Regine; Grill, Martin; Pousette, Anders

    2017-01-01

    for their safety practices and also for the teachers’ position to influence safety learning and practices during company-based training. An analysis of interview and survey data focusing on how VET students enact safety ‘knowings’ across learning sites, suggest how different forms of connectivity models in VET......There is a notable difference in occupational injury rates in the two Scandinavian countries, Sweden and Denmark, with the latter having a 40% higher rate of fatal occupational injuries in the construction industry. This study explored differences in the vocational education and training (VET......) systems between Sweden and Denmark that may be important for students’ safety learning and practice during VET. In both countries, students participate in full-time education, and the curriculum includes school-based as well as company- based training. However, during company- based training Swedish...

  13. Effects of Different Types of Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function, Brain Structure, and Driving Safety in Senior Daily Drivers: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Kanno, Akitake; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Ihara, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Ogawa, Takeshi; Goto, Takakuni; Sunda, Takashi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Tozuka, Eiji; Hirose, Satoru; Nanbu, Tatsuyoshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Background. Increasing proportion of the elderly in the driving population raises the importance of assuring their safety. We explored the effects of three different types of cognitive training on the cognitive function, brain structure, and driving safety of the elderly. Methods. Thirty-seven healthy elderly daily drivers were randomly assigned to one of three training groups: Group V trained in a vehicle with a newly developed onboard cognitive training program, Group P trained with a similar program but on a personal computer, and Group C trained to solve a crossword puzzle. Before and after the 8-week training period, they underwent neuropsychological tests, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and driving safety tests. Results. For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory. For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations. Group P showed no significant improvements in either test, and Group C showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude but not in the on-road evaluations. Conclusion. The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly's abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach. PMID:26161000

  14. Effects of Different Types of Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function, Brain Structure, and Driving Safety in Senior Daily Drivers: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Nozawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing proportion of the elderly in the driving population raises the importance of assuring their safety. We explored the effects of three different types of cognitive training on the cognitive function, brain structure, and driving safety of the elderly. Methods. Thirty-seven healthy elderly daily drivers were randomly assigned to one of three training groups: Group V trained in a vehicle with a newly developed onboard cognitive training program, Group P trained with a similar program but on a personal computer, and Group C trained to solve a crossword puzzle. Before and after the 8-week training period, they underwent neuropsychological tests, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and driving safety tests. Results. For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory. For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations. Group P showed no significant improvements in either test, and Group C showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude but not in the on-road evaluations. Conclusion. The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly’s abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach.

  15. 78 FR 42452 - Safety Zone; Kentucky Air National Guard Vessel for Parachute Rescue Jumpmaster Training, Lake...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... operations. C. Discussion of the Final Rule With the aforementioned hazards in mind, the Captain of the Port... Notices to Mariners will be made via radio prior to all jump evolutions. This moving safety zone will... evolution. Entry into, transiting, or anchoring within the safety zone is prohibited unless authorized by...

  16. Mathematics training for the teaching of basic knowledge in times of teaching school reform of Parana (Year 1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara da Silva França

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The article discusses the mathematical training of primary teachers in Paraná and aims to understand how elementary mathematical knowledge was included in the reform carried out by Lysimaco Ferreira da Costa, in the 1920’s and directed by Prieto Martinez for the modernization of the state’s primary education. Supported by theoretical and methodological framework of cultural history, this study is guided by the question: Considering the Reform of teaching school and thinking about the mathematics education of Paraná teachers, what has changed, why has it changed and what for? With the reform subjects more focused on practical teaching in primary school were introduced, and that favored the renewal of teaching methods and teaching resources, curriculum reorganization which reflected in the quality of Math education of future teachers in the state’s primary education. Keywords: Mathematics Teaching. Primary Education Teacher. History of Education.

  17. The Impact of Patient Safety Training on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents' Attitudes and Knowledge: A Mixed Method Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that in the United States, more than 40,000 patients are injured each day because of preventable medical errors. Patient safety experts and graduate medical education accreditation leaders recognize that medical education reform must include the integration of safety training focused on error causation, system engineering, and…

  18. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  19. SAFETY

    CERN Document Server

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  20. Significance of debriefing methods in simulation-based sedation training courses for medical safety improvement in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Sanuki, Takuro; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Haba, Masanori; Ueki, Ryusuke; Kaminoh, Yoshiroh; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Practice Guidelines for Sedation and Analgesia by Non-Anesthesiologists (ASA-SED), a sedation training course aimed at improving medical safety was developed by the Japanese Association for Medical Simulation in 2011. This study evaluated the effect of debriefing on participants' perceptions of the essential points of the ASA-SED. A total of 38 novice doctors participated in the sedation training course during the research period. Of these doctors, 18 participated in the debriefing group, and 20 participated in non-debriefing group. Scoring of participants' guideline perceptions was conducted using an evaluation sheet (nine items, 16 points) created based on the ASA-SED. The debriefing group showed a greater perception of the ASA-SED, as reflected in the significantly higher scores on the evaluation sheet (median, 16 points) than the control group (median, 13 points; p Debriefing after sedation training courses may contribute to better perception of the ASA-SED, and may lead to enhanced attitudes toward medical safety during sedation and analgesia.