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Sample records for ruthenium iii chloride

  1. Ruthenium(III Chloride Catalyzed Acylation of Alcohols, Phenols, and Thiols in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

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    Mingzhong Cai

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium(III chloride-catalyzed acylation of a variety of alcohols, phenols, and thiols was achieved in high yields under mild conditions (room temperature in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]. The ionic liquid and ruthenium catalyst can be recycled at least 10 times. Our system not only solves the basic problem of ruthenium catalyst reuse, but also avoids the use of volatile acetonitrile as solvent.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III), rhodium (III) and palladium (II) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, M.; Venkatesan, K.A. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Srinivasan, T.G. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)], E-mail: tgs@igcar.gov.in; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2009-11-01

    Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III), rhodium (III) and palladium (II) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl) and their ternary and binary solutions in bmimCl was studied at various working electrodes at 373 K by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Ruthenium (III) chloride forms a stable solution with bmimCl and the cyclic voltammogram of ruthenium (III) in bmimCl recorded at glassy carbon electrode consisted of several redox waves due to the complex nature of ruthenium to exist in several oxidation states. Electrolysis of ruthenium (III) chloride in bmimCl at the cathodic limit of bmimCl (-1.8 V (vs. Pd)) did not result in ruthenium metal deposition. However, it was deposited from bmimPF{sub 6} and bmimNTf{sub 2} room temperature ionic liquids at -0.8 V (vs. Pd). The electrochemical behavior of ruthenium (III) in bmimCl in the presence of palladium (II) and rhodium (III) was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The presence of palladium (II) in bmimCl favors underpotential deposition of ruthenium metal. The nuclear loop at -0.5 V (vs. Pd) was observed in all solutions when palladium (II) co-existed with other two metal ions. Nucleation and growth of the metal on glassy carbon working electrode was investigated by chronoamperometry. The growth and decay of chronocurrents has been found to follow the instantaneous nucleation model with three-dimensional growth of nuclei.

  3. Cathodic processes during ruthenium electrodeposition from a chloride melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokol'skij, D.V.

    1985-01-01

    Cathodic processes occurring during the electrolysis of chloride melts in the presence of oxygen-containing impurities were studied. The experiments were carried out at 500, 550 600 and 680 deg C, ruthenium ions concentration in KCl-NaCl-CsCl eutectic melt being 0.4-1.5 mol% and BaO additions 4.8x10 -2 mol%. Temperature dependence of Ru(3) ion diffusion coefficient in the chloride melt (lg D=3.25-1508/T+-0.02) and activation energy of the diffusion process (6.9 k cal/mol) were determined. It is shown that changes of the shape of E, t-curve and the deviation of values determined in the cause of chronopotentiometric investigations from the corresponding values of reversable processes are related in many respects to the participation of oxygen-containing compounds in the cathodic process. Irreversibility of the cathodic process is also connected with metal crystallization during electrodeposition

  4. Magnetic interactions in iron (III) porphyrin chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, J.; Subramanian, Japyesan; Fuhrhop, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    Intermolecular exchange interactions in iron(III) porphyrin chlorides (porphyrin = OEP, proto, TPP) have been studied by X-ray structure, EPR and magnetic susceptibility studies. The crystal structure of Fe(III)OEP-Cl was found to be different from that of the other two. Different types of exchange broadened EPR-spectra are obtained which are attributable to the arrangement in the crystals. The EPR results correlate well with magnetic susceptibility data. (orig.) [de

  5. The liquid-liquid extraction of chloro-(trichlorostannato)-rhodium(I/III) and -ruthenium (II) complexes from dilute hydrochloric acid into 4-methylpentan-2-one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrley-Birch, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    The effect of stannous chloride on the liquid-liquid extraction of rhodium and ruthenium from hydrochloric acid solutions into 4-methyl-pentan-2-one (MIBK)/hexane mixtures was studied in detail. Stannous chloride concentrations were found to considerably increase the efficiency of the extraction of rhodium and ruthenium into the organic phase. Chloro-(trichlorostannato)-rhodium (I/III) complexes were formed at room temperature. The rate of chloro-(trichlorostannato)-ruthenium (II) complex formation was extremely slow at room temperature, but increased on heating of the aqueous solutions. The amount of rhodium and ruthenium extracted into the organic phase depend on the Sn(II):M molar ratio, the HCl, H sup(+) and Cl sup(-) concentrations, as well as the equilibration time. A 119 Sn NMR study of the MIBK extracts, showed that the stoichiometry of the chloro-(trichlorostannato)-rhodium (I/III) complexes extracted into the organic phase was dependent on the Sn(II):Rh(III) molar ratio as well as the HCl, H sup(+) and Cl sup(-) concentrations in the aqueous phase. The predominant species observed in the organic phase from HCl solutions containing Sn(II):Rh(III) ratios >= 5:1, was shown to be an hydrido complex having the form [RhH(SnCl 3 ) 4 Cl] 3 sup(-) or [RhH(SnCl 3 ) 4 ]2 sup(-). An essentially quantitative separation of rhodium and ruthenium was achieved utilising the variation in the rates of rhodium-tin and ruthenium-tin complex formation

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after extraction of their cyclohexylthioglycolate complexes into chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, A.L.J.; Gupta, Usha; Puri, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclohexylthioglycolate has been used as a reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after the extraction of their complexes into chloroform. Various parameters involved in the extraction have been studied and the composition of the extracted complex has been established in each instance. Ruthenium and rhodium complexes are extracted into chloroform in the pH ranges 5.0-9.0 and 9.0-12.5, respectively. The ruthenium complex absorbs strongly at 365 nm, whereas the rhodium complex shows a maximum absorption at 345 nm. Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range 6-96 μg for ruthenium and 2-41 μg for rhodium in 10 ml of the chloroform solution. The molar absorptivities are 5.02 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 for ruthenium and 1.60 x 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 for rhodium. Ten replicate determinations on a sample solution containing 60.3 μg of ruthenium or 20.6 μg of rhodium gave mean absorbances of 0.300 and 0.320 with standard deviations of 0.0021 and 0.0025 and relative standard deviations of 0.70% and 0.78%, respectively. The interference of various ions has been studied and the method has been applied to the determination of the metals in various synthetic samples. Conditions have also been developed for the simultaneous determination of ruthenium and rhodium. (author)

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium (III) and rhodium (III) with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone monoxime after extraction into molten naphthalene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasey, A.; Bansal, R.K.; Puri, B.K.; Satake, Masatada.

    1983-01-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone monoxime has been used as a reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium(III) and rhodium(III) after extraction into molten naphthalene. The extracted mixture of the metal complex and naphthalene was dissolved in chloroform and ruthenium and rhodium were determined spectrophotometrically. Beer's law holds in the concentration range of 0.2-4.1 μg/cm 3 for ruthenium and 0.3-5.3 μg/cm 3 for rhodium in 10 cm 3 of the final solution. The molar absorptivities and Sandell sensitivities are calculated to be 9.70 x 10 3 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.01 μg/cmsup(2 ) (660 nm) for ruthenium and 1.13 x 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.009 μg/cm 2 (410 nm) for rhodium respectively. Aliquots containing 2.0 μg of ruthenium and 4.1 μg of rhodium give mean absorbances of 0.192 and 0.451 with standard deviations of 0.0017 and 0.0039, respectively. Interference of various ions has been studied and the method has been applied to the determination of ruthenium and rhodium in various synthetic mixtures. This procedure is also applied to the simultaneous determination of ruthenium and rhodium present together in a solution. (author)

  8. Synthesis of ruthenium (III) complexes with benzimidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, P.C.; Chahar, Yogesh K.; Garg, Yajula; Seth, Gita

    2003-01-01

    Complexes of ruthenium with biologically important benzimidazole derivatives, viz. 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazole (HOPBI), 2-2'- mercaptophenyl) benzimidazole (HSPBI), 2- (2'-hydroxynaphthyl) benzimidazole (HONBI) have been synthesized and characterized. (author)

  9. A New Homogeneous Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Dimethylamine Borane Starting with Ruthenium(III Acetylacetonate

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    Ebru Ünel Barın

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of ruthenium(III acetylacetonate was investigated for the first time in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane. During catalytic reaction, a new ruthenium(II species is formed in situ from the reduction of ruthenium(III and characterized using UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, 1H NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The most likely structure suggested for the ruthenium(II species is mer-[Ru(N2Me43(acacH]. Mercury poisoning experiment indicates that the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane is homogeneous catalysis. The kinetics of the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane starting with Ru(acac3 were studied depending on the catalyst concentration, substrate concentration and temperature. The hydrogen generation was found to be first-order with respect to catalyst concentration and zero-order regarding the substrate concentration. Evaluation of the kinetic data provides the activation parameters for the dehydrogenation reaction: the activation energy Ea = 85 ± 2 kJ·mol−1, the enthalpy of activation ∆H# = 82 ± 2 kJ·mol−1 and the entropy of activation; ∆S# = −85 ± 5 J·mol−1·K−1. The ruthenium(II catalyst formed from the reduction of ruthenium(III acetylacetonate provides 1700 turnovers over 100 hours in hydrogen generation from the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane before deactivation at 60 °C.

  10. Thermochemistry of alkali chloride - lanthanoide(III) chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachnik, R.; Selle, D.

    1979-01-01

    The phase diagrams of the mixtures KCl + GdCl 3 resp. DyCl 3 and of CsCl + PrCl 3 (DyCl 3 , ErCl 3 , and YbCl 3 ) were investigated by differential thermal analysis. In the mixtures of lanthanoide(III) chlorides with CsCl resp. KCl three different stoichiometries of the compounds were found, namely A 3 MCl 6 , A 2 MCl 5 , and AM 2 Cl 7 . Debyeograms of the compounds A 3 MCl 6 and AM 2 Cl 7 reveal, that in the case of the latter type all compounds with the same alkali halide have identical structure, whereas in the A 3 MCl 6 compounds three different types of X-ray patterns were observed. The stabilities of the congruently melting compounds can be estimated by comparing the melting point of the compound with the temperature of an extrapolated eutectic point. (author)

  11. General synthesis of (salen)ruthenium(III) complexes via N...N coupling of (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Lam, William W Y; Xiang, Jing; Wong, Tsz-Wing; Lam, Wing-Hong; Wong, Wing-Tak; Peng, Shie-Ming; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2008-07-07

    Reaction of [Ru (VI)(N)(L (1))(MeOH)] (+) (L (1) = N, N'-bis(salicylidene)- o-cyclohexylenediamine dianion) with excess pyridine in CH 3CN produces [Ru (III)(L (1))(py) 2] (+) and N 2. The proposed mechanism involves initial equilibrium formation of [Ru (VI)(N)(L (1))(py)] (+), which undergoes rapid N...N coupling to produce [(py)(L (1))Ru (III) N N-Ru (III)(L (1))(py)] (2+); this is followed by pyridine substituion to give the final product. This ligand-induced N...N coupling of Ru (VI)N is utilized in the preparation of a series of new ruthenium(III) salen complexes, [Ru (III)(L)(X) 2] (+/-) (L = salen ligand; X = H 2O, 1-MeIm, py, Me 2SO, PhNH 2, ( t )BuNH 2, Cl (-) or CN (-)). The structures of [Ru (III)(L (1))(NH 2Ph) 2](PF 6) ( 6), K[Ru (III)(L (1))(CN) 2] ( 9), [Ru (III)(L (2))(NCCH 3) 2][Au (I)(CN) 2] ( 11) (L (2) = N, N'-bis(salicylidene)- o-phenylenediamine dianion) and [N ( n )Bu 4][Ru (III)(L (3))Cl 2] ( 12) (L (3) = N, N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion) have been determined by X-ray crystallography.

  12. Flotation-spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium in the Ru(IV)-chloride-rhodamine 6G-toluene system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcerzak, M.

    1985-01-01

    The reduction of RuO 4 in hydrochloric acid has been examined. A sensitive flotation-spectrophotometric method of the determination of ruthenium based on the ion associate formed by the anionic chlorid complex of ruthenium RuCl 2- 6 with the basic dye Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been developed. The solution of the ion associate obeys Beer's law up to the concentration of 0.25 μg Ru/ml. The ion associate precipitates when the aqueous solution is shaken with toluene. The separated compound is dissolved in acetone. The molar absorptivity (epsilon) at 530 nm is 5.1 x 10 5 l x mole -1 x cm -1 . The relative standard deviation is 3-7%. The mole ratio of Ru:R6G in the complex is 1:5. Osmium reacts similarly. The determination of ruthenium can be selective after the preliminary separation of osmium as OsO 4 . The method was applied to the determination of microgram amounts of ruthenium in crucible platinum. (Author)

  13. Synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium(III) complexes with benzimidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, P.C.; Kaur, N.; Goel, A.K.; Vyas, S.

    1995-01-01

    Complexes of ruthenium trichloride with biologically important benzimidazole derivatives, viz., 2-(hydroxy methyl) benzimidazole, 2-(l-hydroxy ethyl) benzimidazole, 2-(mercapto methyl) benzimidazole, 2-(l-mercapto ethyl) benzimidazole, and 2,2'-bis-benzimidazole have been synthesized by reacting the above metal chloride and ligands respectively in 1:3 molar ratio. These complexes are characterised on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductance data, room temperature, magnetic moment values, electronic spectral and IR spectral studies. (author). 17 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Cytogenotoxic effects of two potential anticancer Ruthenium(III Schiff Bases complexes

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    Izet Eminovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of cancer has been subject of great interest. Researchers are continuously searching for new medicines. In this sense, ruthenium complexes have big potential. Some evidences suggest that ruthenium compounds possess anticancer activities. We synthesized two recently published ruthenium(III complexes with bidentate O,N and tridentate O,O,N Schiff bases derived from 5-substituted salicylaldehyde and aminophenol or anilineare. These compounds showed affinity for binding to the DNA molecule, however, insufficient data are available regarding their possible toxic effects on biological systems.Methods: In the present study we evaluated genotoxic, cytotoxic, and cytostatic effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22], using the Allium cepa assay.Results: Different toxic effects were observed depending on the substance, tested concentration, and endpoint measured. In general, the tested compounds significantly lowered the root growth and mitotic index values as compared to the control group. Additionally, a wide range of abnormal mitotic stages, both clastogenic and non-clastogenic were observed in the treated cells. Na[RuCl2(L12] significantly increased the frequency of sticky metaphases, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, impaired chromosome segregation, as well as number of apoptotic and necrotic cells over the controls. In contrast, Na[Ru(L22] did not show significant evidence of genotoxicity with regard to chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, however, significant differences were detected in the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells when the highest concentration was applied.Conclusions: In this study we demonstrated antiproliferative effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22]. At clinical level, these results could be interesting for further studies on anticancer potential of the ruthenium(III complexes using animal models.

  15. Oxidative dehydrogenation of the 2-aminomethylpyridine (EDTA) ruthenium (III) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, H.E.; Tsurumaki, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of the 2-aminomethylpyridine (ampy) ligand coordinated to the (EDTA)RU(III) complex was investigated based on cyclic voltammetry, spectoelectrochemistry and stopped-flow kinetic measurements in aqueous solution. The reaction mechanism is consistent with the deprotonation of the ampy ligand (pk a =7.48), followed by a reversible one-electron transfer step. The intermediate species generated at this step undergoes a metal-induced electron transfer process, with k=227 s -1 , converting into the corresponding 2-iminomethylpyridine complex. (author) [pt

  16. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  17. Crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride and its copper(II) and cobalt(III) chloride complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Bocelli, G.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Shova, S. G.; Gulea, A. P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of salicylideneguanylhydrazinium chloride hydrate hemiethanol solvate (I), salicylideneguanylhydrazinium trichloroaquacuprate(II) (II), and bis(salicylideneguanylhydrazino)cobalt(III) chloride trihydrate (III) are determined using X-ray diffraction. The structures of compounds I, II, and III are solved by direct methods and refined using the least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms to the final factors R = 0.0597, 0.0212, and 0.0283, respectively. In the structure of compound I, the monoprotonated molecules and chlorine ions linked by hydrogen bonds form layers aligned parallel to the (010) plane. In the structure of compound II, the salicylaldehyde guanylhydrazone cations and polymer chains consisting of trichloroaquacuprate(II) anions are joined by an extended three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds. In the structure of compound III, the [Co(LH) 2 ] + cations, chloride ions, and molecules of crystallization water are linked together by a similar network

  18. cis-Dichloridobis(1,10-phenanthrolinechromium(III chloride

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    Xiaoli Gao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [CrCl2(C12H8N22]Cl, the CrIII ion is situated on a twofold rotation axis and displays a slightly distorted octahedral CrCl2N4 coordination geometry. The Cr environment is composed of a cis arrangement of two 1,10-phenanthroline and two chloride ligands. The chloride counter-anion exhibits half-occupation and is equally disordered over two positions.

  19. Synthesis of PVP-stabilized ruthenium colloids with low boiling point alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Yu, Jiulong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hanfan

    2007-09-15

    A route to the preparation of poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP)-stabilized ruthenium colloids by refluxing ruthenium(III) chloride in low boiling point alcohols was developed. Deep purple colloids with shuttle-like ruthenium particles were also synthesized. XPS measurement verified the nanoparticles were in the metallic state. The morphology of metal nanoparticles was characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, TEM and XRD.

  20. Titanocene(III) chloride mediated radical induced addition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reduction of the aldehyde 10 with sodium boro- hydride in the presence of CeCl3.7H2O furnished the alcohol 11 which was finally brominated using PBr3 to yield the dibromo compound 12.13. Thus, a series of bromoepoxides were prepared and subjected to radical cyclization using titanocene(III) chloride and the results ...

  1. Through-Space Paramagnetic NMR Effects in Host-Guest Complexes: Potential Ruthenium(III) Metallodrugs with Macrocyclic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Jan; Novák, Martin; Munzarová, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Marek, Radek

    2018-04-05

    The potential of paramagnetic ruthenium(III) compounds for use as anticancer metallodrugs has been investigated extensively during the past several decades. However, the means by which these ruthenium compounds are transported and distributed in living bodies remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we prepared several novel ruthenium(III) compounds with the general structure Na + [ trans-Ru III Cl 4 (DMSO)(L)] - (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide), where L stands for pyridine or imidazole linked with adamantane, a hydrophobic chemophore. The supramolecular interactions of these compounds with macrocyclic carriers of the cyclodextrin (CD) and cucurbit[ n]uril (CB) families were investigated by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and relativistic DFT methods. The long-range hyperfine NMR effects of the paramagnetic guest on the host macrocycle are related to the distance between them and their relative orientation in the host-guest complex. The CD and CB macrocyclic carriers being studied in this account can be attached to a vector that attracts the drug-carrier system to a specific biological target and our investigation thus introduces a new possibility in the field of targeted delivery of anticancer metallodrugs based on ruthenium(III) compounds.

  2. 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical complexes of ruthenium(III), osmium(III) and rhodium(III) and redox series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Manas Kumar; Patra, Sarat Chandra; Maity, Amarendra Nath; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Ghosh, Prasanta

    2013-05-14

    Reactions of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) in toluene with [M(II)(PPh3)3X2] at 298 K afford green complexes, trans-[M(PQ)(PPh3)2X2] (M = Ru, X = Cl, 1; M = Os, X = Br, 2) in moderate yields. Reaction of anhydrous RhCl3 with PQ and PPh3 in boiling ethanol affords the dark brown paramagnetic complex, cis-[Rh(PQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] (3) in good yields. Diffusion of iodine solution in n-hexane to the trans-[Os(PQ) (PPh3)2(CO)(Br)] solution in CH2Cl2 generates the crystals of trans-[Os(PQ)(PPh3)2(CO)(Br)](+)I3(-), (4(+))I3(-)), in lower yields. Single crystal X-ray structure determinations of 1·2toluene, 2·CH2Cl2 and 4(+)I3(-), UV-vis/NIR absorption spectra, EPR spectra of 3, electrochemical activities and DFT calculations on 1, 2, trans-[Ru(PQ)(PMe3)2Cl2] (1Me), trans-[Os(PQ)(PMe3)2Br2] (2Me), cis-[Rh(PQ)(PMe3)2Cl2] (3Me) and their oxidized and reduced analogues including trans-[Os(PQ)(PMe3)2(CO)(Br)](+) (4Me(+)) substantiated that 1-3 are the 9,10-phenanthrenesemiquinone radical (PQ(˙-)) complexes of ruthenium(III), osmium(III) and rhodium(III) and are defined as trans/cis-[M(III)(PQ(˙-))(PPh3)2X2] with a minor contribution of the resonance form trans/cis-[M(II)(PQ)(PPh3)2X2]. Two comparatively longer C-O (1.286(4) Å) and the shorter C-C lengths (1.415(7) Å) of the OO-chelate of 1·2toluene and 2·CH2Cl2 and the isotropic fluid solution EPR signal at g = 1.999 of 3 are consistent with the existence of the reduced PQ(˙-) ligand in 1-3 complexes. Anisotropic EPR spectra of the frozen glasses (g11 = g22 = 2.0046 and g33 = 1.9874) and solids (g11 = g22 = 2.005 and g33 = 1.987) instigate the contribution of the resonance form, cis-[Rh(II)(PQ)(PPh3)2Cl2] in 3. DFT calculations established that the closed shell singlet (CSS) solutions of 1Me and 2Me are unstable due to open shell singlet (OSS) perturbation. However, the broken symmetry (BS) (1,1) Ms = 0 solutions of 1Me and 2Me are respectively 22.6 and 24.2 kJ mole(-1) lower in energy and reproduced the experimental bond

  3. Amine and Titanium (IV Chloride, Boron (III Chloride or Zirconium (IV Chloride-Promoted Baylis-Hillman Reactions

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    Shi-Cong Cui

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The Baylis-Hillman reactions of various aryl aldehydes with methyl vinyl ketone at temperatures below -20oC using Lewis acids such as titanium (IV chloride, boron (III chloride or zirconium (IV chloride in the presence of a catalytic amount of selected amines used as a Lewis bases afford the chlorinated compounds 1 as the major product in very high yields. Acrylonitrile can also undergo the same reaction to give the corresponding chlorinated product in moderate yield. A plausible reaction mechanism is proposed. However, if the reaction was carried out at room temperature (ca. 20oC, then the Z-configuration of the elimination product 3, derived from 1, was formed as the major product.

  4. Ruthenium(III) diphenyldithiocarbamate as mediator for the electrocatalytic oxidation of sulfhydryl compounds at graphite electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalini, B.; Sriman Narayanan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) diphenyldithiocarbamate was used as mediator to modify graphite electrode by abrasive method. The modified electrode was characterized electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry. The electrode was scanned between 0.0 V to +0.8 V. An anodic peak at + 0.39 V and a cathodic peak at +0.24 V have been observed for a scan rate of 100 mV/s. The electrode has been characterized at various scan rate and pHs in 0.1 M KNO 3 solution. Sulfhydryl compounds, cysteine and glutathione, were electro catalytically oxidised at the modified electrode. pH variation was studied to optimize the conditions for their estimation. Linear response for cysteine is in the range of 0.00-15.20 ppm, with a correlation coefficient (r), of 0.9993. The linear range for glutathione is 0.00-30.40 ppm, with a value of 0.999 for r. The electrocatalytic oxidation of both cysteine and glutathione gave reproducible current values with a standard deviation of 0.1686 for 10 repetitive determinations. The stability and reproducibility of the electrode for the determination of cysteine and glutathione were also discussed. The electrocatalytic oxidation of the sulfhydryl compounds were also studied in hydrodynamic environment. (author)

  5. p-chloro- and p-bromo-benzoylacetoneoxime as the spectrophotometric reagents for palladium and ruthenium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeole, V.V.; Langade, A.D.; Shinde, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure is described for the extractive spectrophotometric determination of palladium or ruthenium(III) using p-chloro or p-bromobenzoylacetoneoxime as the reagent. The yellow palladium complexes which are extracted into chloroform from an aqueous solution of pH 3.5, absorb as 400 nm and conform to Beer's law in the range of 10 to 100 μg of Pd/10 ml of organic phase. The orange-red ruthenium complexes which are extracted into ethylacetate from an aqueous solution of pH 5.0, absorbs at 475 nm and conforms to Beer's law in the range of 20 to 200 μg of Ru/10 ml of organic phase. The molar absorptivities, Sandell's sensitivities and instability constants are reported. (author)

  6. Properties and reactivities of pentadentate ethylenediaminetetraacetate complexes of ruthenium(III) and -(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, T.; Creutz, C.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of the pentadentate edta complex of ruthenium(III) with various entering ligands L has been studied as a function of pH, temperature, and L at 0.2 M ionic strength in aqueous solution. Over the pH range 0.8 to 8.5, the species Ru/sup III/(edta)H 2 O - is the sole form reactive in the substitution processes. Both forward (k 1 ) and reverse (k/sub -1/) rate constants Ru(edta)H 2 O - + L in equilibrium (k 1 ,k/sub -1/) Ru(edta)L - + H 2 O have been determined, as well as activation parameters for the complexation (k 1 ) process (L, k 1 in M -1 s -1 (25 0 C), k/sub -1/ in s -1 (25 0 C), ΔH 1 + in kcal mol -1 , ΔS 1 + in cal deg -1 mol -1 ): acetonitrile, 30 +- 7, 3.2 +- 0.2, 8.3 +- 0.5, -24 +- 4; thiocyanate, 270 +- 20, 0.5 +- 0.1, 8.9 +- 0.5, -18 +- 3; pyridine, 6300 +- 500, 0.061 +- 0.002; isonicotinamide, 8300 +- 600, 0.7 +- 0.2, 6.6 +- 0.5, -19 +- 3; pyrazine, 20,000 +- 1000, 2.0 +- 0.5, 5.7 +- 0.5, -20 +- 3. Forward rate constants for the analogous substitution reaction for Ru/sup II/(edta) H 2 O 2- (25 0 C, 0.2 M ionic strength) are as follows: thiocyanate, 2.7 +- 0.2 M -1 s -1 ; acetonitrile, 13 +- 1 M -1 s -1 ; isonicotinamide, 30 +- 15 M -1 s -1 . The substitution reactions of Ru/sup III/(edta)H 2 O - proceed by an associative mechanism, while those of Ru/sup II/(edta)H 2 O 2 - appear to be dissociative in nature. Spectra and reduction potentials for the Ru(edta)L/sup -/2-/ complexes are reported. 4 figures, 11 tables

  7. Ruthenium(η6,η1-arene-CH2-NHC Catalysts for Direct Arylation of 2-Phenylpyridine with (HeteroAryl Chlorides in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Kaloğlu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of new benzimidazolium halides were synthesized in good yields as unsymmetrical N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC precursors containing the N–CH2–arene group. The benzimidazolium halides were readily converted into ruthenium(II–NHC complexes with the general formula [RuCl2(η6,η1–arene–CH2–NHC]. The structures of all new compounds were characterized by 1H NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 13C NMR, FT-IR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis techniques. The single crystal structure of one benzimidazole ruthenium complex, 2b, was determined. The complex is best thought of as containing an octahedrally coordinated Ru center with the arene residue occupying three sites, the remaining sites being occupied by a (carbeneC–Ru bond and two Ru–Cl bonds. The catalytic activity of [RuCl2(η6,η1–arene–CH2–NHC] complexes was evaluated in the direct (heteroarylation of 2-phenylpyridine with (heteroaryl chlorides in water as the nontoxic reaction medium. These results show that catalysts 2a and 2b were the best for monoarylation with simple phenyl and tolyl chlorides. For functional aryl chlorides, 2d, 2e, and 2c appeared to be the most efficient.

  8. Development of a method for analyzing traces of ruthenium in plant materials and determination of the transfer factors soil/plant for ruthenium compounds from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Huth, R.; Neumann, W.

    1988-01-01

    In an artificial humous and sandy soil spiked with 106 Ru as RuO 2 and RuCl 3 , pasture grass was grown under artificial illumination in our laboratory. The amounts of ruthenium taken up by the plants were determined by γ-spectrometry. For open-air investigations with pasture grass, wheat and potatoes inactive ruthenium(III) chloride and ruthenium nitrosylchloride were used. Ruthenium was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after destroying the organic material and concentrating the solution. The concentration and chemical form of the ruthenium exert an unimportant influence on the transfer factor. For the pasture-grass, the stems of wheat and the weed of potatoes it amounts to 0.00005 to 0.0015, for the ear of wheat to about 0.00005. In peeled potatoes there was no ruthenium detectable, therefore the limit of detection leads to a transfer factor ≤ 0.00001. So it is evident that ruthenium is little available for the roots of the plants. In the event of an accident in a nuclear plant the uptake of radioactive ruthenium by roots has only negligible radioecological consequences. This applies even if 50 years of ruthenium enrichment in the soil are assumed. (orig./RB)

  9. Separation studies of La(III) and Ce(III)/Nd(III)/Pr(III)/Sm(III) from chloride solution using DEHPA/PC88A in petrofin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Sagarika; Mishra, Sujata; Bhatta, B.C.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of La(III) and four other lanthanides. Ce, Nd, Pr and Sm from chloride solution has been studied using the two acidic organophosphorous extractants, DEHPA and PC88A in petrofin at pH 4.3. The metal content analysis was done using an ICP-OES spectrophotometer. The separation factors (β) was calculated and for La-Sm pair highest value of 9.7 was obtained. (author)

  10. Electrochemical Sensing of Casein Based on the Interaction between Its Phosphate Groups and a Ruthenium(III) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Iku; Kuramitz, Hideki; Sugawara, Kazuharu

    2016-01-01

    A reaction to casein, along with β-lactoglobulin, is a main cause of milk allergies, and also is a useful indicator of protein in allergic analyses. In the present study, a simple casein sensor was developed based on the interaction between a phosphate group of casein and electroactive [Ru(NH3)6](3+). We evaluated the voltammetric behavior of a casein-[Ru(NH3)6](3+) complex using a glassy carbon electrode. When the ruthenium(III) complex was combined with the phosphate groups of casein, the structure of the casein was changed. Since the hydrophobicity of casein was increased due to the binding, the casein was adsorbed onto the electrode. Furthermore, we modified an electrode with a ruthenium(III) ions/collagen film. When the sensor was applied to the detection of the casein contained in milk, the values coincided with those indicated by the manufacturer. Accordingly, this electrode could be a powerful sensor for the determination of casein in several foods.

  11. Absorption spectra analysis of hydrated uranium(III) complex chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowiak, M.; Gajek, Z.; Drożdżyński, J.

    2000-11-01

    Absorption spectra of powdered samples of hydrated uranium(III) complex chlorides of the formulas NH 4UCl 4 · 4H 2O and CsUCl 4 · 3H 2O have been recorded at 4.2 K in the 4000-26 000 cm -1 range. The analysis of the spectra enabled the determination of crystal-field parameters and assignment of 83 and 77 crystal-field levels for the tetrahydrate and trihydrate, respectively. The energies of the levels were computed by applying a simplified angular overlap model as well as a semiempirical Hamiltonian representing the combined atomic and crystal-field interactions. Ab initio calculations have enabled the application of a simplified parameterization and the determination of the starting values of the AOM parameters. The received results have proved that the AOM approach can quite well predict both the structure of the ground multiplet and the positions of the crystal-field levels in the 17 000-25 000 cm -1 range, usually obscured by strong f-d bands.

  12. A new ion imprinted polymer based on Ru(III)-thiobarbituric acid complex for solid phase extraction of ruthenium(III) prior to its determination by ETAAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    A new ruthenium ion imprinted polymer was prepared from the Ru(III) 2-thiobarbituric acid complex (the template), methacrylic acid or acrylamide (the functional monomers), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (the cross-linking agent) using 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile as the radical initiator. The ion imprinted polymer was characterized and used as a selective sorbent for the solid phase extraction of Ru(III) ions. The effects of type of functional monomer, sample volume, solution pH and flow rate on the extraction efficiency were studied in the dynamic mode. Ru(III) ion was quantitatively retained on the sorbents in the pH range from 3.5 to 10, and can be eluted with 4 mol L−1 aqueous ammonia. The affinity of Ru(III) for the ion imprinted polymer based on the acrylamide monomer is weaker than that for the polymer based on the methacrylic acid monomer, which therefore was used in interference studies and in analytical applications. Following extraction of Ru(III) ions with the imprint and their subsequent elution from the polymer with aqueous ammonia, Ru(III) was detected by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a detection limit of 0.21 ng mL −1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of Ru(III) in water, waste, road dust and platinum ore (CRM SARM 76) with a reproducibility (expressed as RSD) below 6.4 %. (author)

  13. Flow injection chemiluminescent determination of N-nitrosodimethylamine using photogenerated tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ruiz, Tomas; Martinez-Lozano, Carmen; Tomas, Virginia; Martin, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    A flow injection configuration was developed and evaluated for the chemiluminescent determination of N-nitrosodimethylamine. The method is based on the on-line cleavage of the N-NO bond of the nitrosamine by irradiation with ultraviolet light. The dimethylamine generated was subsequently reacted with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (III), which was generated through the on-line photo-oxidation of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (II) with peroxydisulfate. After selecting the best operating parameters, the emitted light showed a linear relationship with the concentration of N-nitrosodimethylamine between 1.5 and 148 ng ml -1 , with a detection limit of 0.29 ng ml -1 . The repeatability was 1.6% expressed as relative standard deviation (n = 10) and the reproducibility, studied on five consecutive days, was 3.2%. The sample throughput was 50 injections per hour. The method was applied to studying the recoveries of N-nitrosodimethylamine in water and different cured meat products

  14. Interaction between gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (II/III)-Does it lead to gold analogue of Prussian blue?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harish, S. [Electrodics and Electrocatalysis Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India); Joseph, James, E-mail: jameskavlam@yahoo.com [Electrodics and Electrocatalysis Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India); Phani, K.L.N. [Electrodics and Electrocatalysis Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-06-30

    Highlights: > In group IB, Cu and Ag form Prussian blue analogues but similar formation of gold hexacyanoferrate was not found in the literature and non-existence of gold hexacyanoferrate remains a mystery. > Potential cycling of gold chloride and potassium ferro/ferri cyanide was resulted in the formation of Au-PB nano-composite. > Redox reaction between gold chloride and potassium ferrocyanide ion is spontaneous but no reaction occurs when gold chloride and potassium ferricyanide is mixed. > We are proposing the formation of a compound with general formula 'KFe{sub x}[Au(CN){sub 2}]{sub y}' and discussing the formation of gold hexacyanoferrate is not feasible by simple chemical or electrochemical reaction in contrast to other PB analogues. - Abstract: Prussian blue analogues are a class of compounds formed by the reaction between metal salt and potassium hexacyanoferrate (II/III). In our earlier report, the formation of Au-Prussian blue nano-composite was noticed on potential cycling the glassy carbon electrode in a medium containing gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III). Hence in this work, the formation of gold hexacyanoferrate was attempted by a simple chemical reaction. The reaction of gold (III) chloride with potassium hexacyanoferrate (II/III) was examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy and found that there is no redox reaction between gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III). However, the redox reaction occurs between gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) leading to the formation of charge transfer band and the conversion of hexacyanoferrate (II) to hexacyanoferrate (III) was evidenced by the emergence of new absorption peaks in UV-Vis spectra. The oxidation state of gold in Au-Fe complex was found to be +1 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The stability of the Au-Fe complex was also studied by cyclic voltammetry. Cyclic voltammetric results indicated the presence of high spin iron in Au

  15. Interaction between gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (II/III)-Does it lead to gold analogue of Prussian blue?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, S.; Joseph, James; Phani, K.L.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In group IB, Cu and Ag form Prussian blue analogues but similar formation of gold hexacyanoferrate was not found in the literature and non-existence of gold hexacyanoferrate remains a mystery. → Potential cycling of gold chloride and potassium ferro/ferri cyanide was resulted in the formation of Au-PB nano-composite. → Redox reaction between gold chloride and potassium ferrocyanide ion is spontaneous but no reaction occurs when gold chloride and potassium ferricyanide is mixed. → We are proposing the formation of a compound with general formula 'KFe x [Au(CN) 2 ] y ' and discussing the formation of gold hexacyanoferrate is not feasible by simple chemical or electrochemical reaction in contrast to other PB analogues. - Abstract: Prussian blue analogues are a class of compounds formed by the reaction between metal salt and potassium hexacyanoferrate (II/III). In our earlier report, the formation of Au-Prussian blue nano-composite was noticed on potential cycling the glassy carbon electrode in a medium containing gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III). Hence in this work, the formation of gold hexacyanoferrate was attempted by a simple chemical reaction. The reaction of gold (III) chloride with potassium hexacyanoferrate (II/III) was examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy and found that there is no redox reaction between gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III). However, the redox reaction occurs between gold (III) chloride and potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) leading to the formation of charge transfer band and the conversion of hexacyanoferrate (II) to hexacyanoferrate (III) was evidenced by the emergence of new absorption peaks in UV-Vis spectra. The oxidation state of gold in Au-Fe complex was found to be +1 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The stability of the Au-Fe complex was also studied by cyclic voltammetry. Cyclic voltammetric results indicated the presence of high spin iron in Au-Fe complex. Hence 'as

  16. Liquid-liquid extraction of ruthenium(III) thiocyanate with hexamethylphosphoramide: direct spectrophotometric determination in the organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, B.K.; Pal, B.K.; Chowdhury, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    Ru(III) thiocyanate has been extracted with hexamethylphosphoramide(HMPA) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Thus the extractability, sensitivity and selectivity are improved over the simple binary Ru(III) thiocyanate system in spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium in the organic phase. The maximum colour develops on the steam bath, at the acidity range of 1.5 - 2.5 M with HCl and ammonium thiocyanate concentration range of 0.25 - O.5 M. The colour is completely extractable in MIBK when 1.5 - 3.0 ml HMPA is used and show maximum absorbance at 570 nm. The colour system obeys Beer's law for 0.7 - 13 μg Ru/ml and the optimum concentration range is 2 - 13 μg/ml. The molar absorptivity and sensitivity are 6940 l . mole -1 cm -1 and 0.0145 μg/cm 2 respectively. The percent relative error is 2.72%. The method is very simple and does not require oxidation and subsequent distillation. The method can be applied in the presence of osmium. (Author)

  17. Kinetics and Mechanistic Study of the Ruthenium(III Catalysed Oxidative Decarboxylation of L-Proline by Alkaline Heptavalent Manganese (Stopped flow technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Shettar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of ruthenium(III catalysed oxidation of L-Proline by permanganate in alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength has been studied spectrophotometrically using a rapid kinetic accessory. The reaction between permanganate and L-Proline in alkaline medium exhibits 2:1 stoichiometry (KMnO4: L-Proline. The reaction shows first order dependence on [permanganate] and [ruthenium(III] and apparent less than unit order dependence each in L-Proline and alkali concentrations. Reaction rate increases with increase in ionic strength and decrease in solvent polarity of the medium. Initial addition of reaction products did not affect the rate significantly. A mechanism involving the formation of a complex between catalyst and substrate has been proposed. The activation parameters were computed with respect to the slow step of the mechanism and discussed

  18. Catalytic water oxidation by ruthenium(II) quaterpyridine (qpy) complexes: evidence for ruthenium(III) qpy-N,N'''-dioxide as the real catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Ng, Siu-Mui; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-12-22

    Polypyridyl and related ligands have been widely used for the development of water oxidation catalysts. Supposedly these ligands are oxidation-resistant and can stabilize high-oxidation-state intermediates. In this work a series of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(qpy)(L)2 ](2+) (qpy=2,2':6',2'':6'',2'''-quaterpyridine; L=substituted pyridine) have been synthesized and found to catalyze Ce(IV) -driven water oxidation, with turnover numbers of up to 2100. However, these ruthenium complexes are found to function only as precatalysts; first, they have to be oxidized to the qpy-N,N'''-dioxide (ONNO) complexes [Ru(ONNO)(L)2 ](3+) which are the real catalysts for water oxidation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Mechanistic study of ruthenium (III) catalysed oxidation of L-lysine by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    MS received 15 April 2008; revised 2 July 2008. Abstract. The kinetics of Ru(III) catalysed oxidation of L-lysine by diperiodatoargentate (III) (DPA) in alkaline medium at 298 K and a constant ionic strength of 0⋅50 mol dm. –3 was studied spectrophotometri- cally. The oxidation products are aldehyde (5-aminopentanal) and ...

  20. Alkali metal bismuth(III) chloride double salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Andrew W. [Department of Chemistry, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Nicholas, Aaron; Ahern, John C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Chan, Benny [Department of Chemistry, College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628-0718 (United States); Patterson, Howard H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 (United States); Pike, Robert D., E-mail: rdpike@wm.edu [Department of Chemistry, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Evaporative co-crystallization of MCl (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs) with BiOCl in aqueous HCl produces double salts: M{sub x}Bi{sub y}Cl{sub (x+3y)}·zH{sub 2}O. The sodium salt, Na{sub 2}BiCl{sub 5}·5H{sub 2}O (monoclinic P2{sub 1}/c, a = 8.6983(7) Å, b = 21.7779(17) Å, c = 7.1831(6) Å, β = 103.0540(10)°, V = 1325.54(19) Å{sup 3}, Z = 4) is composed of zigzag chains of μ{sub 2}-Cl-cis-linked (BiCl{sub 5}){sub n}{sup 2n–} chains. Edge-sharing chains of NaCl{sub n}(OH{sub 2}){sub 6−n} octahedra (n = 0, 2, 3) are linked through μ{sub 3}-Cl to Bi. The potassium salt, K{sub 7}Bi{sub 3}Cl{sub 16} (trigonal R−3c, a = 12.7053(9) Å, b = 12.7053(9) Å, c = 99.794(7) Å, V = 13,951(2) Å{sup 3}, Z = 18) contains (Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 10}){sup 4–} edge-sharing dimers of octahedra and simple (BiCl{sub 6}){sup 3–} octahedra. The K{sup +} ions are 5- to 8-coordinate and the chlorides are 3-, 4-, or 5-coordinate. The rubidium salt, Rb{sub 3}BiCl{sub 6}·0.5H{sub 2}O (orthorhombic Pnma, a = 12.6778(10) Å, b = 25.326(2) Å, c = 8.1498(7) Å, V = 2616.8(4) Å{sup 3}, Z = 8) contains (BiCl{sub 6}){sup 3–} octahedra. The Rb{sup +} ions are 6-, 8-, and 9-coordinate, and the chlorides are 4- or 5-coordinate. Two cesium salts were formed: Cs{sub 3}BiCl{sub 6} (orthorhombic Pbcm, a = 8.2463(9) Å, b = 12.9980(15) Å, c = 26.481(3) Å, V = 2838.4(6) Å{sup 3}, Z = 8) being comprised of (BiCl{sub 6}){sup 3–} octahedra, 8-coordinate Cs{sup +}, and 3-, 4-, and 5-coordinate Cl{sup −}. In Cs{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9} (orthorhombic Pnma, a = 18.4615(15) Å, b = 7.5752(6) Å, c = 13.0807(11) Å, V = 1818.87(11) Å{sup 3}, Z = 4) Bi octahedra are linked by μ{sub 2}-bridged Cl into edge-sharing Bi{sub 4} squares which form zigzag (Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9}){sub n}{sup 3n–} ladders. The 12-coordinate Cs{sup +} ions bridge the ladders, and the Cl{sup −} ions are 5- and 6-coordinate. Four of the double salts are weakly photoluminescent at 78 K, each showing a series of three excitation peaks

  1. Sulphate analysis in uranium leach iron(III) chloride solutions by inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Lakhani, S.; Yunus, M.Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    Inductively coupled Argon Plasma Spectrometry is used for the indirect determination of sulphate in iron(III) chloride leach solution of Elliot Lake uranium ores via addition of a known amount of barium ions and analyzing for excess of barium. The ore contains ∼ 7 wt% pyrite, FeS 2 , as the major mineral which oxidizes to generate sulphate during leaching with Fe(III). The effects of pH, the concentrations of Fe(III) and chloride ions and for presence of ethanol in the test samples on the accuracy of analysis are studied. It is found that unlike the Rhodizonate method, removal of iron(III) from or addition of ethanol to the test sample prior to analysis are not required. Linear calibration curves are obtained. (author)

  2. Molecular mass spectrometry in metallodrug development: A case of mapping transferrin-mediated transformations for a ruthenium(III) anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarosz, Maciej [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Matczuk, Magdalena, E-mail: mmatczuk@ch.pw.edu.pl [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Pawlak, Katarzyna [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Timerbaev, Andrei R. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 19, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-03

    Highlights: • Extra- and intra-cellular interactions of Ru(III) anticancer drug candidate. • ESI-TOF-MS mapping of the ruthenium species bound to transferring. • ESI-QqQ-MS identification of released Ru species under cytosol simulated conditions. - Abstract: Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques have been used to characterize the speciation of a Ru(III) anticancer drug, indazolium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole) ruthenate(III)], upon its binding to transferrin and the impact of cellular reducing components on drug–transferrin adducts. Using time-of-flight ESI-MS, the polymorphism of apo- (iron-free) and holo-form (iron-saturated) of the protein was confirmed. While the ruthenium moieties bound to each of five isoforms under simulated extracellular conditions are essentially identical in numbers for apo- and holo-transferrin, distinct differences were found in the composition of Ru(III) species attached to either of the protein forms, which are dominated by differently coordinated aquated complexes. On the other hand, at least one of the Ru-N bonds in metal-organic framework remains intact even after prolonged interaction with the protein. Triple quadrupole tandem ESI-MS measurements demonstrated that the ruthenium species released from drug adducts with holo-transferrin in simulated cancer cytosol are underwent strong ligand exchange (as compared to the protein-bound forms) but most strikingly, they contain the metal center in the reduced Ru(II) state. In vitro probing the extra- and intracellular interactions of promising Ru(III) drug candidate performed by ESI-MS is thought to shed light on the transportation to tumor cells by transferrin and on the activation to more reactive species by the reducing environment of solid tumors.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride Terrain...

  4. Some mixed ligand hydridocarbonyl and hydridophosphine complexes of ruthenium(II) and iridium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.N.; Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed-ligand hydridocarbonyl and hydridophosphine complexes of Ru II and Ir III have been isolated from the displacement reaction of [RuH(CO)(Pφ 3 ) 3 Cl] with ligand isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) in benzene medium. Most probable structures are assigned on the basis of elemental analysis, electronic, infrared and far-infrared spectral studies. In all cases bonding of INAH occurs through amino nitrogen of hydrazine residue. (author). 15 refs., 1 tab

  5. Uranium (III)-Plutonium (III) co-precipitation in molten chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2018-02-01

    Co-management of the actinides in an integrated closed fuel cycle by a pyrochemical process is studied at the laboratory scale in France in the CEA-ATALANTE facility. In this context the co-precipitation of U(III) and Pu(III) by wet argon sparging in LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) molten salt at 705 °C is studied. Pu(III) is prepared in situ in the molten salt by carbochlorination of PuO2 and U(III) is then introduced as UCl3 after chlorine purge by argon to avoid any oxidation of uranium up to U(VI) by Cl2. The oxide conversion yield through wet argon sparging is quantitative. However, the preferential oxidation of U(III) in comparison to Pu(III) is responsible for a successive conversion of the two actinides, giving a mixture of UO2 and PuO2 oxides. Surprisingly, the conversion of sole Pu(III) in the same conditions leads to a mixture of PuO2 and PuOCl, characteristic of a partial oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV). This is in contrast with coconversion of U(III)-Pu(III) mixtures but in agreement with the conversion of Ce(III).

  6. Electrochemical behavior of rhodium(III) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, M.; Venkatesan, K.A. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Srinivasan, T.G. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)], E-mail: tgs@igcar.gov.in

    2008-02-15

    Electrochemical behavior of rhodium(III) chloride in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride was investigated by various electrochemical transient techniques at glassy carbon working electrode at different temperatures (343-373 K). Cyclic voltammogram of rhodium(III) in bmimCl consisted of a surge in reduction current occurring at a potential of -0.48 V (vs. Pd) is due to the reduction of Rh(III) to metallic rhodium and a very small oxidation wave occurring at -0.1 V. Increase of scan rate increases the peak current and remarkably shifts the cathodic peak potential (E{sub p}{sup c1}) in negative direction indicating the irreversibility of electroreduction of rhodium(III). The diffusion coefficient of rhodium(III) in bmimCl ({approx}10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}/s) was determined and the energy of activation ({approx}25 kJ/mol) was deduced from cyclic voltammograms at various temperatures. The cathodic ({tau}{sub r}) and anodic ({tau}{sub o}) transition times were measured from chronopotential transients and the ratio {tau}{sub o}/{tau}{sub r} was found to be 1:7. Electrowinning of rhodium from bmimCl medium results in a deposition of metallic rhodium with lower (20-25%) Faradaic efficiency. A separation factor of rhodium from co-existing noble metal fission product palladium in bmimCl was determined during electrodeposition.

  7. (III) chloride

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were possibly higher as volatile solid (VS) degradation increased in all ADs during the dosing period. ... level before it reaches electric generators, gas storage units ..... A disadvantage is the iron consumption by other reactions in the liquid ...

  8. Determination of lutetium (III) hydrolysis constants in the middle of ion force 1M sodium chloride at 303 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.J.; Ramirez G, J.J.; Rojas H, A.

    1997-01-01

    With the purpose to complete information about the lutetium (III) hydrolysis constants here is used the potentiometric method to determine those in the middle of ion force 1M sodium chloride at 303 K. (Author)

  9. Studies on the interaction of benzotriazole (a corrosion inibitor) with the ruthenium (II) (III) ammincomplexes and pentacyanoferrate (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza R, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some studies on the interaction of benzotriazole with the aquapentacyanoferrate (II), aquapentaamminruthenium (II) and cis-and trans-(NH 3 ) 4 Ru(H 2 O) 2 2+ complexes are described. The reactions, substituted products and complexes production are demonstrated. The absorption bands for the ammine (benzotriazole) and ruthenium (II) complexes as well as the activation parameters and kinetics of reactions are discussed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  10. Determination of indium(III) with 3,4,5,6-tetrachlorogallein and cetylpyridinium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Itsuo; Fujita, Yoshikazu; Ida, Masako; Enoki, Takehisa

    1976-01-01

    Rapid and highly sensitive methods have been developed for the spectrophotometric and titrimetric determination of indium(III) with 3,4,5,6-tetrachlorogallein(3,4,5,6-T. Cl, Gal.) and cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC) in aqueous solutions of pH 4.2--5.2. The absorbance of the indium(III)-3,4,5,6-T. Cl. Gal. complex at 620 nm and the color change (pure blue - weak violetish red) were used to indicate the end point in the EDTA titration. The calibration curve for the spectrophotometry was linear in the range 0--45.0 μg In(III)/10 ml. According to Sandell's expression, the sensitivity was 0.0032 μg In(III)/cm 2 for an absorbance of 0.001. To the solution containing less than 45.0 μg of indium(III), 2.0 ml of 1.0x10 -2 M CPC solution, 3.0 ml of Walpole buffer solution(pH 4.4; acetic acid-sodium acetate), and 2.0 ml of 1.0x10 -3 M 3,4,5,6-T.Cl.Gal. methanol solution were added and the volume was made up to 10.0 ml with water. The solution was kept at (20--25) 0 C for 30 minutes and then the absorbance was measured at 620 nm against the reagent blank. The mole ratio of indium(III), 3,4,5,6-T.Cl.Gal. and CPC in the complex was estimated to be 1 : 2 : 2 by the continuous variation and the mole ratio methods. (auth.)

  11. Potentiometric titration of selenic and telluric acids with titanium(III) chloride in nonaqueous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Chozo; Miyamoto, Kiyoshige

    1985-01-01

    Selenic and Telluric acids were titrated potentiometrically with titanium(III) chloride solution by using Pt-Cu · Hg bimetallic electrodes in nonaqueous solvents such as N, N-dimethyl-formamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and the mixtures of these solvents. It was found that selenic and telluric acids were titrated directly at room temperature in DMF solution without hydrochloric acid. The molar ratios of selenic and telluric acids to titanium(III) chloride was 1 : 6. However, the corresponding reactions to SeO 4 2- → SeO 3 2- or TeO 4 2- → TeO 3 2- were not confirmed in the titration curve in DMF. In the titration of selenic acid in mixed solvents of DMF and IPA in 1 : 1 or 1 : 2 ratio, two steps were observed. The first and the second steps were appeared on the titration curve at molar ratios of 1 : 2 and 1 : 6, respectively. It was interpreted that the first step corresponded to the intermediate reaction of SeO 4 2- → SeO 3 2- . Mixed solution of selenic and telluric acids were determined by the proposed method. Three steps were observed on the titration curve. It was interpreted that the first, second and third steps corresponded to the reaction of SeO 4 2- → SeO 3 2- , SeO 3 2- → Se(0), and TeO 4 2- → Te(0), respectively. Less than 5 % of water gave no influence on the titration. (author)

  12. Anticancer ruthenium(III) complex KP1019 interferes with ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadafi, Fabrizio-Zagros; Massai, Lara; Bartolommei, Gianluca; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Messori, Luigi; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), a P-type ATPase that sustains Ca2+ transport and plays a major role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, represents a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Here, we investigated whether ruthenium-based anticancer drugs, namely KP1019 (indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)]), NAMI-A (imidazolium [trans-tetrachloro(1H-imidazole)(S-dimethylsulfoxide)ruthenate(III)]) and RAPTA-C ([Ru(η6-p-cymene)dichloro(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)]), and cisplatin (cis-diammineplatinum(II) dichloride) might act as inhibitors of SERCA. Charge displacement by SERCA adsorbed on a solid-supported membrane was measured after ATP or Ca2+ concentration jumps. Our results show that KP1019, in contrast to the other metal compounds, is able to interfere with ATP-dependent translocation of Ca2+ ions. An IC50 value of 1 μM was determined for inhibition of calcium translocation by KP1019. Conversely, it appears that KP1019 does not significantly affect Ca2+ binding to the ATPase from the cytoplasmic side. Inhibition of SERCA at pharmacologically relevant concentrations may represent a crucial aspect in the overall pharmacological and toxicological profile of KP1019. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ruthenium(III) Complexes of Heterocyclic Tridentate (ONN) Schiff Base: Synthesis, Characterization and its Biological Properties as an Antiradical and Antiproliferative Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejidike, Ikechukwu P.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The current work reports the synthesis, spectroscopic studies, antiradical and antiproliferative properties of four ruthenium(III) complexes of heterocyclic tridentate Schiff base bearing a simple 2′,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone functionality and ethylenediamine as the bridging ligand with RCHO moiety. The reaction of the tridentate ligands with RuCl3·3H2O lead to the formation of neutral complexes of the type [Ru(L)Cl2(H2O)] (where L = tridentate NNO ligands). The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis, conductivity measurements, FTIR spectroscopy and confirmed the proposed octahedral geometry around the Ru ion. The Ru(III) compounds showed antiradical potentials against 2,2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radicals, with DPPH scavenging capability in the order: [(PAEBOD)RuCl2] > [(BZEBOD)RuCl2] > [(MOABOD)RuCl2] > [Vit. C] > [rutin] > [(METBOD)RuCl2], and ABTS radical in the order: [(PAEBOD)RuCl2] < [(MOABOD)RuCl2] < [(BZEBOD)RuCl2] < [(METBOD)RuCl2]. Furthermore, in vitro anti-proliferative activity was investigated against three human cancer cell lines: renal cancer cell (TK-10), melanoma cancer cell (UACC-62) and breast cancer cell (MCF-7) by SRB assay. PMID:26742030

  14. Ruthenium(III Complexes of Heterocyclic Tridentate (ONN Schiff Base: Synthesis, Characterization and its Biological Properties as an Antiradical and Antiproliferative Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikechukwu P. Ejidike

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work reports the synthesis, spectroscopic studies, antiradical and antiproliferative properties of four ruthenium(III complexes of heterocyclic tridentate Schiff base bearing a simple 2′,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone functionality and ethylenediamine as the bridging ligand with RCHO moiety. The reaction of the tridentate ligands with RuCl3·3H2O lead to the formation of neutral complexes of the type [Ru(LCl2(H2O] (where L = tridentate NNO ligands. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis, conductivity measurements, FTIR spectroscopy and confirmed the proposed octahedral geometry around the Ru ion. The Ru(III compounds showed antiradical potentials against 2,2-Diphenyl-1-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radicals, with DPPH scavenging capability in the order: [(PAEBODRuCl2] > [(BZEBODRuCl2] > [(MOABODRuCl2] > [Vit. C] > [rutin] > [(METBODRuCl2], and ABTS radical in the order: [(PAEBODRuCl2] < [(MOABODRuCl2] < [(BZEBODRuCl2] < [(METBODRuCl2]. Furthermore, in vitro anti-proliferative activity was investigated against three human cancer cell lines: renal cancer cell (TK-10, melanoma cancer cell (UACC-62 and breast cancer cell (MCF-7 by SRB assay.

  15. Uranium determination by spectrophotometry, in chloride solutions, using titanium (III) as reducer; Determinacao de uranio por espectrofotometria, em solucoes cloridricas, utilizando titanio (III) como redutor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, E T.R.; Bastos, M B.R.

    1986-08-01

    A simple method for determining uranium in uranium (VI) solutions with the presence of uranium (IV), iron (II), and titanium (IV) in chloridic solution is described. The method comprises in uranium (VI) reduction with titanium (III), acidity adjustment and uranium (IV) spectrophotometry in hydrochloric acid 2 M. (C.G.C.).

  16. Enhanced corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AM60 by cerium(III) in chloride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heakal, F. El-Taib, E-mail: fakihaheakal@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Shehata, O.S. [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Tantawy, N.S. [Girl' s College of Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Asma Fahmi Street, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion rate of AM60 in Cl{sup -} solution decreases with increasing [Ce{sup 3+}] up to 1 mM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beyond that level the corrosion rate increases and then stabilizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spontaneously formed film characterises by increasing resistance with time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The converted film after 10 d immersion exhibits self-healing in plain Cl{sup -} solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ce(III) should be present in the corrodent to form a more compact surface coating. - Abstract: Cerium(III) was utilised to enhance the corrosion resistance of AM60 in NaCl solution. Ce{sup 3+} can suppress corrosion deterioration up to 1.0 mM. Beyond that level corrosion rate increases till a steady value. Surface film resistance increases with time evolution until 24 h, then decreases and stabilizes. The converted film after 240 h immersion exhibits self-healing and thickening when re-exposed to plain chloride solution. SEM and EDX confirmed that when Ce is present as additive in solution, more compact coating is formed better than its presence as a post coating on the alloy surface before being immersed in the corrosive environment.

  17. Enhanced corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy AM60 by cerium(III) in chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heakal, F. El-Taib; Shehata, O.S.; Tantawy, N.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion rate of AM60 in Cl − solution decreases with increasing [Ce 3+ ] up to 1 mM. ► Beyond that level the corrosion rate increases and then stabilizes. ► The spontaneously formed film characterises by increasing resistance with time. ► The converted film after 10 d immersion exhibits self-healing in plain Cl − solution. ► Ce(III) should be present in the corrodent to form a more compact surface coating. - Abstract: Cerium(III) was utilised to enhance the corrosion resistance of AM60 in NaCl solution. Ce 3+ can suppress corrosion deterioration up to 1.0 mM. Beyond that level corrosion rate increases till a steady value. Surface film resistance increases with time evolution until 24 h, then decreases and stabilizes. The converted film after 240 h immersion exhibits self-healing and thickening when re-exposed to plain chloride solution. SEM and EDX confirmed that when Ce is present as additive in solution, more compact coating is formed better than its presence as a post coating on the alloy surface before being immersed in the corrosive environment.

  18. An Efficient Synthesis of Substituted Quinolines via Indium(III) Chloride Catalyzed Reaction of Imines with Alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Mei; Fu, Weijun; Xun, Chen; Zou, Guanglong

    2012-01-01

    An efficient synthetic method for the preparation of quinolines through indium(III) chloride-catalyzed tandem addition-cyclization-oxidation reactions of imines with alkynes was developed. The processes can provide a diverse range of quinoline derivatives in good yields from simple imines and alkynes

  19. Synthesis of Ruthenium(III Phthalocyanine with Di-axial Bromo Ligands - A Promising Molecular Conductor with Giant Negative Magnetoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A.V. Gamboa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron transport of Phthalocyanines (Pc with central metal and di-axial ligands (such as FeIII(PcL2; where L = CN, Cl, Br originates from its intermolecular Pc π-π orbital overlap while its giant negative magnetoresistance (GNMR arises from its intramolecular Pc-π(HOMO and Fe-d (s=1/2 interaction. However, the π-d interaction tends to localize itinerant electrons resulting in the decrease in the conductivity of the FeIII(PcL2 series compared to the non-magnetic CoIII(PcL2 where π-d interaction is absent. More so, the axial ligand field energy of the FeIII(PcL2 system is found to have the ability to proportionally modulate the π-d interaction. In reference thereof, theoretical calculations point that isostructural RuIII(PcBr2 would provide the best balance of π-d orbital energy interplay. That is, RuIII(PcBr2 is expected to be a molecule with high electrical conductivity and GNMR which would make it an ideal magnetic molecular conductor. This paper reports on the synthesis of RuIII(PcBr2.

  20. A study of the solvent effect on the chemical interaction between ortho-positronium and iron(III)-chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical rate constant (k) between ortho-positronium (o-Ps) and iron(III)-chloride was measured in donor solvents as benzene, acetone, pyridine and ethanol. The minimal k was obtained in benzene and the maximal one in acetone. The minimal k value was explained by the low dispersity of FeCl 3 in benzene, and the high rate of the interaction in acetone was considered to be the result of the presence of monomer and dimer iron(III)-species and of the chloride coordination to iron(III). The probability of Ps formation depended only on the character of the solvent and not on the concentration of the FeCl 3 solute. (author)

  1. Radiochemistry of ruthenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W W; Metcalf, S G; Barney, G S

    1984-06-01

    Information on ruthenium is presented. Topics include the following; isotopes and nuclear properties of ruthenium; review of the chemistry of ruthenium including metal and alloys, compounds of ruthenium, and solution chemistry; separation methods including volatilization of RuO{sub 4}, precipitation and coprecipitation, solvent extraction, chromatographic techniques, and analysis for radioruthenium. 445 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. Radiochemistry of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.; Metcalf, S.G.; Barney, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    Information on ruthenium is presented. Topics include the following; isotopes and nuclear properties of ruthenium; review of the chemistry of ruthenium including metal and alloys, compounds of ruthenium, and solution chemistry; separation methods including volatilization of RuO 4 , precipitation and coprecipitation, solvent extraction, chromatographic techniques, and analysis for radioruthenium. 445 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs

  3. Chlorido[1-diphenylphosphanyl-3-(phenylsulfanylpropane-κ2P,S](η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyliridium(III chloride monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Ludwig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, [Ir(C10H15Cl(C21H21PS]Cl·H2O, consists of discrete [Ir(η5-C5Me5Cl{Ph2P(CH23SPh-κP,κS}]+ cations, chloride anions and water molecules. The IrIII atom is coordinated by an η5-C5Me5 ligand, a chloride and a Ph2P(CH23SPh-κP,κS ligand, leading to a three-legged piano-stool geometry. In the crystal, two water molecules and two chloride anions are linked by weak O—H...Cl hydrogen bonding into tetramers that are located on centers of inversion. The H atoms of one of the methyl groups are disordered and were refined using a split model.

  4. Studies on the ruthenium complexes. IX. Kinetic studies on the deaquation-anation reaction of aquapentaammineruthenium(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyoshi, A; Hiraki, S I; Odate, T; Kohata, S; Oda, J [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1975-01-01

    The deaquation-anation reaction of (Ru(OH/sub 2/)(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 3/-type complexes in the solid state, as shown by the (Ru(OH/sub 2/)(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 3/(s)..-->..(RuX(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 2/(s)+H/sub 2/O(g) equation, where X is Cl, Br, I, and NO/sub 3/ respectively, was kinetically studied by means of thermogravimetry (TG) along with differential thermal analysis (DTA). The activation energy and entropy in the reaction process (Esub(a) kcal/mol, ..delta..S c.u.) are, respectively, found by isothermal kinetic study to be (22.7, - 7.1) for the chloride, (23.4, - 5.2) for the bromide, (26.7, 5.8) for the iodide, and (19.3 - 15.9) for the nitrate. The reaction seems to proceed through the following two steps, except in the case of the iodide: (Ru(OH/sub 2/)(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 3/..-->..(RuX(OH/sub 2/)(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 2/..-->..(RuX(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 2/+H/sub 2/O. The first step is regarded as the rate-determining one.

  5. Chemical Castration Using Iron (III Chloride Hexahydrate (KEBIRI KIMIAWI MENGGUNAKAN FERIKLORIDA HEKSAHIDRAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Fakhrul Ulum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical castration is a method that can be applied easily without any surgical intervention in animals. This study utilized iron (III chloride hexahydrate (FeCl3.6H2O as a new material for chemical castration in mice. Twenty seven adult male mice were divided into five groups: FeCl3 20% (n = 6, FeCl3 10% (n = 6, FeCl3 5.0% (n = 6, FeCl3 2.5% (n = 6, and control NaCl 0.9% (n = 3. A 0.2 mL of NaCl 0.9% or FeCl3 in various concentrations was injected intra-testicularly on each testis of the mice. Post-castration survival rate with LD50 values was obtained at the concentrations between 2.5-5.0% of FeCl3 groups, and 100% mice survived in the control group. The size of testis and concentration of spermatozoa decreased, in contrast with the increased concentration of FeCl3 solution used seven days post-injection compared to the control group. ABSTRAK Kebiri/kastrasi kimiawi secara injeksi intra-testis merupakan metode pengebiriam yang dapat dilakukan dengan mudah tanpa prosedur bedah pada hewan. Penelitian ini memanfaatkan larutan besi (ferri/III klorida (FeCl3 sebagai bahan baru untuk tindakan kebiri kimiawi pada mencit. Mencit jantan dewasa umur lima bulan sebanyak 27 ekor dibagi dalam lima kelompok yaitu FeCl3 20% (n=6, FeCl3 10% (n=6, FeCl3 5,0% (n=6, FeCl3 2,5% (n=6 dan kontrol NaCl 0,9% (n=3. Larutan FeCl3 sebanyak 0,2 mL diinjeksikan secara intra-testikel pada setiap organ testis. Daya hidup pascakebiri injeksi nilai LD 50 diperoleh pada kelompok FeCl3 konsentrasi di antara 2,5-5,0 % dan kelompok kontrol 100 % hidup. Organ testis dalam skrotum mengalami pengecilan ukuran dan konsentrasi spermatozoa mengalami penurunan seiring dengan peningkatan konsentrasi larutan FeCl3 yang digunakan setelah tujuh hari pasca injeksi dibandingkan dengan kontrol.

  6. Electrocatalytic oxidation of organic substrates with molecular oxygen using tetradentate ruthenium(III)-Schiff base complexes as catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ourari, Ali; Khelafi, Mostefa; Aggoun, Djouhra; Jutand, Anny; Amatore, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Three complexes Ru(III)ClL n involving different tetradentate Schiff base ligands L n (see L 1 , L 2 and L 3 in ) were used as catalysts in the oxidation of cyclooctene and tetraline in the presence of molecular dioxygen associated with benzoic anhydride. The efficiency of this oxidation reaction was tested in the presence of two apical bases: 1- or 2-methylimidazole. All complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible redox system. The electrolysis experiments were carried out at controlled potential for each complex, using different substrates such as cyclooctene and tetraline. The oxidized products are cyclooctene oxide (turnover 6.7), a mixture of 1-tetralol and 1-tetralone (turnover 7.6) respectively.

  7. Removal of Sb(III and Sb(V by Ferric Chloride Coagulation: Implications of Fe Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Inam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation and precipitation appear to be the most efficient and economical methods for the removal of antimony from aqueous solution. In this study, antimony removal from synthetic water and Fe solubility with ferric chloride (FC coagulation has been investigated. The effects of pH, FC dosage, initial antimony loading and mixed Sb(III, Sb(V proportions on Fe solubility and antimony removal were studied. The results showed that the Sb(III removal efficiency increased with the increase of solution pH particularly due to an increase in Fe precipitation. The Sb(V removal was influenced by the solution pH due to a change in Fe solubility. However, the Fe solubility was only impaired by the Sb(III species at optimum pH 7. The removal efficiencies of both Sb species were enhanced with an increase in FC dose. The quantitative analysis of the isotherm study revealed the strong adsorption potential of Sb(III on Fe precipitates as compared to Sb(V. Furthermore, the removal behavior of antimony was inhibited in mixed proportion with high Sb(V fraction. In conclusion, this study contributes to better understanding the fate of Sb species, their mobilities, and comparative removal behavior, with implications for Fe solubility using ferric chloride in different aqueous environments.

  8. Investigation of the extraction equilibrium of ternary ionassociation complex of thallium(III) with iodo-nitro-tetrazolium chlorid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Dimitrov, A.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of the ternary ion-association complex of iodo-nitro-tetrazolium [3-(4-iodophenyl)2-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride] with the chlorocomplex of thallium(III) is investigated radiochemically. The molar ratio of the ion-associate is found to be 1:1, the association constant has a value of 3.2x10 3 in aqueous solution and the distribution constant is 8.9. The extraction constant which gives a quantitative characterization of the equilibrium is 2.3x10 4 . From the investigation performed it can be concluded that a quite satisfactory extraction of thallium(III) by means of iodo-nitro-tetrazole in benzene can be carried out. The extraction constant has a relatively high value which allows to use this system conveniently for the extraction-photometric determination of thallium(III). (T.C.)

  9. Physicochemical properties of the electrolyte system lithium tetrachloraluminate(III)-thionyl chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demakhin, A.G.; Kuznetsov, N.N.

    1992-07-20

    The solubility of lithium chloroaluminate in thionyl chloride has been determined over the temperature range 233-323 K. The composition of solid phases in equilibrium with saturated solution was found. The density, viscosity, and electrical conductance of lithium chloroaluminate solutions in thionyl chloride were determined over the temperature range 263-333 K and pseudomolar volumes of the solution and apparent molar volumes of the electrolyte calculated. Activation energies for viscous flow and conductance have been calculated. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Galvanic reduction of uranium(III) chloride from LiCl-KCl eutectic salt using gadolinium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Prashant; Zhang, Chao; Simpson, Michael F.

    2017-09-01

    The drawdown of actinides is an important unit operation to enable the recycling of electrorefiner salt and minimization of waste. A new method for the drawdown of actinide chlorides from LiCl-KCl molten salt has been demonstrated here. Using the galvanic interaction between the Gd/Gd(III) and U/U(III) redox reactions, it is shown that UCl3 concentration in eutectic LiCl-KCl can be reduced from 8.06 wt.% (1.39 mol %) to 0.72 wt.% (0.12 mol %) in about an hour via plating U metal onto a steel basket. This is a simple process for returning actinides to the electrorefiner and minimizing their loss to the salt waste stream.

  11. Modification of Natural Zeolite with Fe(III) and Its Application as Adsorbent Chloride and Carbonate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartana; Sukmasari, Emmanuella; Azmiyawati, Choiril

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the research is to natural zeolite with Fe(III) using anion exchange process to improve the anion exchange capacity. Natural zeolite was activated using HNO3 1 N and then mixed with FeCl3 solution and refluxed followed by oven and calcination at a temperature of 550°C. The influence of Fe(III) to zeolite was characterized by FTIR while presence of Fe in zeolite characterized by AAS. Zeolite and Zeolite-Fe adsorption capacity of chloride and carbonate anions were determined through adsorption test by variation of pH and contact time. In advanced, and then to determining the Fe adsorbed concentration at Zeolite using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis result showed that the addition of Fe does not affect the zeolite’s structure but change the intensity of the zeolite spectra. The Fe concentration in Zeolite-Fe of 714 mg L-1, indicate that Fe was present in the zeolite. Both Zeolite and Zeolite-Fe adsorbtion results showed that optimum pH of Chloride anion is 2, with adsorption capacity 2,33 x 10-3 gg-1 and optimum contact time is 8 minutes. While Zeolite and Zeolite-Fe adsorbtion results showed that optimum pH of Carbonate anion is 5, with adsorption capacity 5,31 x 10-3 gg-1 and optimum contact time is 8 minutes.

  12. Light-induced reduction of rhodium(III) and palladium(II) on titanium dioxide dispersions and the selective photochemical separation and recovery of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) in chloride media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgarello, E.; Serpone, N.; Emo, G.; Harris, R.; Pelizzetti, E.; Minero, C.

    1986-12-03

    Irradiation of aqueous TiO/sub 2/ dispersions containing palladium(II) or rhodium(III) chloride salts with AM1 simulated sunlight leads to the photoreduction of these metals, which are deposited on the semiconductor particle surface. Oxygen is detrimental to the photoreduction of rhodium(III) but not the photoreduction of palladium(II). However, in both cases the reduction process is most efficient if the solution contains CH/sub 3/OH, which acts to scavenge valence band holes of the illuminated TiO/sub 2/ semiconductor. The selective photoreduction and recovery of precious metals from a dilute solution (as might be found in industrial wastes) have been investigated for a mixture of gold(III), platinum(IV), and rhodium(III) chloride salts as a function of various parameters (pH, presence or absence of O/sub 2/, presence or absence of a hole scavenger, and the concentration of the semiconductor). At pH 0, gold is easily separated from platinum and rhodium. The rate of photoreduction of gold(III) on TiO/sub 2/ is nearly independent of the concentration of the semiconductor, under the experimental conditions employed; the limiting rate is 2.7 x 10/sup -7/ M s/sup -1/. The potential utility of this selective photochemical technique is discussed.

  13. Biophysical analysis of natural, double-helical DNA modified by anticancer heterocyclic complexes of ruthenium(III) in cell-free media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malina, Jaroslav; Nováková, Olga; Keppler, B. K.; Alessio, E.; Brabec, Viktor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2001), s. 435-445 ISSN 0949-8257 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/99/0695; GA ČR GA204/97/P028; GA MZd NL6058; GA MZd NL6069; GA MŠk OC D8.50 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA * ruthenium * cisplatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.392, year: 2001

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, solid state d.c. electrical conductivity and biological studies of some lanthanide(III chloride complexes with a heterocyclic Schiff base ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condensation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde with 2-amino-3-carboxyethyl-4,5-dimethylthiophene in 1:1 molar ratio, yielded a potentially tridentate Schiff base viz. 2-[N-(2′-hydroxy-1-naphthylideneamino]-3-carboxyethyl-4,5-dimethylthiophene (HNAT. This ligand formed complexes with lanthanum(III, cerium(III, praseodymium(III, neodymium(III, samarium(III, europium(III and gadolinium(III chloride under well defined conditions. These complexes were characterized through elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements, IR, UV–Vis, FAB mass and 1H NMR spectral studies. Analytical data showed that all the metal complexes exhibited 1:1 metal–ligand ratio. Molar conductance values adequately confirmed the non-electrolytic nature of the metal complexes. The proton NMR spectral observations supplement the IR spectral assignments. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acted as neutral tridentate, coordinating to the metal ion through azomethine nitrogen, ester carbonyl and naphtholate oxygen without deprotonation. The ligand and its lanthanum(III chloride complex were subjected to XRD studies. The lanthanum(III chloride complex has undergone a facile transesterification reaction. The solid state d.c. electrical conductivity of some selected complexes were measured as a function of temperature, indicating the semiconducting nature of the metal complexes. The antimicrobial activities were examined by disk diffusion method against some pathogenic bacterial and fungal species.

  15. Iron(III) chloride catalyzed glycosylation of peracylated sugars with allyl/alkynyl alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanaperumal, Senthil; Silva, Rodrigo Cesar da; Monteiro, Julia L.; Correa, Arlene G.; Paixao, Marcio W., E-mail: mwpaixao@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2012-11-15

    In this work, the use of ferric chloride as an efficient catalyst in glycosylation reactions of sugars in the presence of allyl and alkynyl alcohols is described. The corresponding glycosides were obtained with moderate to good yields. This new procedure presented greater selectivity when compared to classic methods found in the literature. Principal features of this simple method include non-hazardous reaction conditions, low-catalyst loading, good yields and high anomeric selectivity (author)

  16. Ruthenium on chitosan: A recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium has been immobilized over chitosan by simply stirring an aqueous suspension of chitosan in water with ruthenium chloride and has been utilized for the oxidation of nitriles to amides; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity, which procee...

  17. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shaobo; Pan Tonglin; Liu Xinqiang; Yuan Lei; Wang Jinchao; Zhang Yongjian; Guo Zhanchen

    2010-01-01

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K d ) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q max based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 deg. C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process.

  18. Separation of holmium (III) from aqueous chloride medium by Amberlite IRC748

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Anitha, M.; Singh, D.K.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    High purity holmium finds applications in nuclear reactors as control rod, rare earth based magnetic alloys, lasers, medical applications, etc. Holmium belongs to the heavier group of rare earths and its content is very less (<0.5%) in Monazite mineral, hence its recovery from various potential sources becomes essential. Ion exchange technique is a well known method for effective separation, purification, recovery, and concentration of metal ions from lean aqueous solutions. It has also been widely used for separation and purification of rare earths. In the present investigation application of Amberlite IRC748, a chelating type of resin containing iminodiacetic acid functional group for separation of Ho(III) was explored. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, weight of resin, initial metal concentration and temperature on the adsorption characteristics of Ho(III) were investigated in detail. The loading of Ho(III) ion onto resin increased with increasing the initial concentration. The adsorption was strongly dependent on pH of the medium with enhanced adsorption as the pH turned from 1 to 4. In the batch system, the Amberlite IRC748 resin exhibited the highest Ho(III) ion uptake as 180 mg/g at 298 K, at an initial pH value of 4. The adsorption data gave good fit with Langmuir isotherm which was better than the Freundlich curve. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH, ΔS and ΔG were evaluated from the temperature variation data. Negative value of ΔH (-11.5 kJ/mole), indicated that the adsorption of Ho(III) ion onto Amberlite resin was exothermic in nature. ΔS was found to be 5.52 J/mole/K. Kinetic study indicated that the adsorption data fitted the pseudo second order kinetic equation. (author)

  19. Electrochemical properties of the hexacyanoferrate(II)–ruthenium(III) complex immobilized on silica gel surface chemically modified with zirconium(IV) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panice, Lucimara B.; Oliveira, Elisangela A. de; Filho, Ricardo A.D. Molin; Oliveira, Daniela P. de; Lazarin, Angélica M.; Andreotti, Elza I.S.; Sernaglia, Rosana L.; Gushikem, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The cyano-bridged mixed valence ruthenium composite material was synthesized. • This newly synthesized compound was incorporated into a carbon paste electrode. • The electrode did not show significant changes in response after six months of use. • The modified electrode is very stable and reproducible. • The electrode sensor was successfully applied for ascorbic acid determination. - Abstract: The chemically modified silica gel with zirconium(IV) oxide was used to immobilize the [Fe(CN) 6 ] 4− complex ion initially. The reaction of this material with [Ru(edta)H 2 O] − complex ion formed the immobilized cyano-bridged mixed valence ruthenium complex, (≡Zr) 5 [(edta)RuNCFe(CN) 5 ]. This material was incorporated into a carbon paste electrode and, its electrochemical properties were investigated. However, for an ascorbic acid solution, an enhancement of the anodic peak current was detected due to electrocatalytic oxidation. The electrode presented the same response for at least 150 successive measurements, with a good repeatability. The modified electrode is very stable and reproducible. The sensor was applied for ascorbic acid determination in pharmaceutical preparation with success

  20. Polarographic determination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jifu; Duan Shirong; Wu Xi

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested to use 0.5 mol/l HClO 4 -0.5 mol/l NaNO 3 -0.1 mol/l NaClO 4 as supporting electrolyte for determining ruthenium. In the supporting electrolyte there is a clear polarographic wave of ruthenium (IV) at -0.8 V vs. SCE. The wave height of ruthenium(IV) is linear in the range from 0.1 to 0.4 μg. ml -1 . The effect of the component of supporting electroylte and the other ion in the samples on the measurement of ruthenium are studied. The analysis methods for measuring ruthenium in both acidic or basic imitative radioactive waste solutions which is used in study of glass solidification are worked out. Imitative samples are analysised

  1. Synthesis of ruthenium phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernogorenko, V.B.; Lynchak, K.A.; Kulik, L.Ya.; Shkaravskij, Yu.F.; Klochkov, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of ampoule synthesis of ruthenium phosphides, Ru 2 P, RuP, and RuP 2 , with stepwise heating of stoichimetric charges in a single-zone furnace is developed. A method for synthesizing ruthenium diphosphide by phosphidization of a ruthenium powder with phosphine at 1150 deg C is worked out. The optimum conditions of its manufacture are found by planning an extremal experiment. Interaction of PH 3 with ruthenium proceeds by the diffusion mechanism and obeys the parabolic law. An extraction-photometric method for determining phosphorus in phosphides is elaborated. Ruthenium phosphides are extremely corrosion-resistant in acids and alkalis. Ru 2 P and RuP exhibit metallic conductivity

  2. Precipitation of gold by the reaction of aqueous gold(III)-chloride with cyanobacteria at 25-80 C -- Studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengke, M. F.; Ravel, B.; Fleet, M. E.; Wanger, G.; Gordon, R. A.; Southam, G.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of gold precipitation by the interaction of cyanobacteria (Plectonema boryanum UTEX 485) and gold(III) chloride aqueous solutions (7.6 mmol/L final gold) have been studied at 25, 60, and 80 C, using both laboratory and real-time synchrotron radiation absorption spectroscopy experiments. Addition of aqueous gold(III) chloride to the cyanobacterial culture initially promoted the precipitation of amorphous gold(I) sulfide at the cell walls and finally caused the formation of octahedral (111) platelets (<1 to 6 (micro)m) of gold metal near cell surfaces and in solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results confirmed that the reduction mechanism of gold(III) chloride to elemental gold by cyanobacteria involves the formation of an intermediate Au(I) species, gold(I) sulfide, with sulfur originating from cyanobacterial proteins, presumably cysteine or methionine. Although the bioreduction of gold(III) chloride to gold(I) sulfide was relatively rapid at all temperatures, the reaction rate increased with the increase in temperature. At the completion of the experiments, elemental gold was the major species present at all temperatures

  3. One-pot synthesis of 2H-pyrans by indium(III) chloride-catalyzed reactions. efficient synthesis of pyranocoumarins, pyranophenalenones, and pyranoquinolinones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Rok; Kim, Do Hoon; Shim, Jae Jin; Kim, Seog K.; Park, Jung Hag; Cha, Jin Soon; Lee, Chong Soon

    2002-01-01

    An efficient synthesis of 2H-pyrans is achieved by indium (III) chloride-catalyzed reactions of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with a variety of α.β-unsaturated aldehydes in moderates yields. This method has been applied to the synthesis of pyranocoumarins, pyranophenaleneones, and pyranoquinolinone alkaloids

  4. Liquid-liquid extraction/separation of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) from acidic chloride solutions using tri-iso-octylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Young, E-mail: jinlee@kigam.re.kr [Metals Recovery Department, Minerals Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gahangno, Yuesong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Rajesh Kumar, J., E-mail: rajeshkumarphd@rediffmail.com [Metals Recovery Department, Minerals Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gahangno, Yuesong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon-Soo; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Yoon, Ho-Sung [Metals Recovery Department, Minerals Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gahangno, Yuesong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-30

    Liquid-liquid extraction/separation of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) from acidic chloride solutions was carried out using tri-iso-octylamine (Alamine 308) as an extractant diluted in kerosene. The percentage extraction of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) increased with increase in acid concentration up to 8 mol L{sup -1}. However, at 10 mol L{sup -1} HCl concentration, the extraction behavior was reversed, indicating the solvation type mechanism during extraction. The quantitative extraction of {approx}98% platinum(IV) and 36% rhodium(III) was achieved with 0.01 mol L{sup -1} Alamine 308. The highest separation factor (S.F. = 184.7) of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) was achieved with 0.01 mol L{sup -1} Alamine 308 at 1.0 mol L{sup -1} of hydrochloric acid concentration. Alkaline metal salts like sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, sodium thiocyanate, lithium chloride, lithium nitrate, potassium chloride and potassium thiocyanate used for the salting-out effect. LiCl proved as best salt for the extraction of platinum(IV). Temperature effect demonstrates that the extraction process is exothermic. Hydrochloric acid and thiourea mixture proved to be better stripping reagents when compared with other mineral acids and bases.

  5. One-pot synthesis of 2H-pyrans by indium(III) chloride-catalyzed reactions. efficient synthesis of pyranocoumarins, pyranophenalenones, and pyranoquinolinones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Rok; Kim, Do Hoon; Shim, Jae Jin; Kim, Seog K.; Park, Jung Hag; Cha, Jin Soon; Lee, Chong Soon [Yeungnam Univ., Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    An efficient synthesis of 2H-pyrans is achieved by indium (III) chloride-catalyzed reactions of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with a variety of {alpha}.{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes in moderates yields. This method has been applied to the synthesis of pyranocoumarins, pyranophenaleneones, and pyranoquinolinone alkaloids.

  6. EXAFS studies on the reaction of gold (III) chloride complex ions with sodium hydroxide and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacławski, K; Zajac, D A; Borowiec, M; Kapusta, Cz; Fitzner, K

    2010-11-11

    EXAFS and QEXAFS experiments were carried out at Hasylab laboratory in DESY center (X1 beamline, Hamburg, Germany) to monitor the course of the hydrolysis reactions of [AuCl(4)](-) complex ions as well as their reduction using glucose. As a result, changes in the spectra of [AuCl(4)](-) ions and disappearance of absorption Au-L(3) edge were registered. From the results of the experiments we have carried out, the changes in bond lengths between Au(3+) central ion and Cl(-) ligands as well as the reduction of Au(3+) to metallic form (colloidal gold was formed in the system) are evident. Good quality spectra obtained before and after the reactions gave a chance to determine the bond length characteristic of Au-Cl, Au-OH and Au-Au pairs. Additionally, the obtained results were compared with the simulated spectra of different gold (III) complex ions, possibly present in the solution. Finally, the mechanism of these reactions was suggested. Unfortunately, it was not possible to detect the changes in the structure of gold (III) complex ions within the time of reaction, because of too high rates of both processes (hydrolysis and reduction) as compared with the detection time.

  7. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extraction of iron(III) with diphenyl-2-pyridylmethane dissolved in benzene from aqueous chloride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhail Ahmed; Shamas-Ud-Zuha; Abdul Ghafoor; Ejaz, M.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of extraction has been investigated by partition, slope analysis and loading-ratio data. The results obtained give a picture of the mechanism of extraction of FeCl 4 - ions in relation to the hydration and solvation of the compound extracted. The possible formula of the extracted species is (DPPM)sub(3)Hsub(3)Osup(+)(Hsub(2)O)sub(n)-FeClsub(4)sup(-). In dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid systems the influence of the concentration of a number of salts with cations of different electrical potentials (Ze/r), on iron(III) extraction, has been studied. Splitting of the organic phases occurs at high acid and/or high salt concentrations. The phenomenon is explained on the basis of the variability of the hydration number. Investigations have been made to understand the parameters controlling the extraction of the metal and it is shown that the extraction offers a simple, fast and selective separation method of iron from solutions. (author)

  9. Ruthenium removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masafumi; Shirado, Katsuyuki.

    1990-01-01

    A processing gas supply system and a NO x supply system for supplying NO x to be mixed with processed gases are connected to the gas plenum in the lower portion of reaction vessel. Further, a cleaning station is disposed above the gas plenum for introducing a mixed gas stream from the gas plenum into a liquid detergent thereby trapping NO x and ruthenium reduction products into the liquid detergent. Volatile ruthenium contained in the processed gases is reduced into ruthenium reduction products and formed as mists. They are trapped in the cleaning liquid and the remaining gases are discharged out of the liquid detergent to the outside of the reaction vessel. Accordingly, solid radioactive wastes are not formed and the decontaminating efficiency for volatile ruthenium can be improved. (T.M.)

  10. Oxygen perovskites with pentavalent ruthenium A/sub 2/sup(II)Bsup(III)Rusup(V)O/sub 6/ with Asup(II) = Ba, Sr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, H; Kemmler-Sack, S [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie 2

    1980-07-01

    The perovskites Ba/sub 2/Bsup(III)Rusup(V)O/sub 6/ with Bsup(III) = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Y are cubic (Bsup(III) = La: a = 8.54 A; Y: a = 8.33 A) with a partial order for Bsup(III) and Rusup(V). The Sc compound, Ba/sub 2/ScRuO/sub 6/, has a hexagonal 6L structure (a = 5.79 A; c = 14.22 A; sequence (hcc)/sub 2/). The lattice of the Sr perovskites, Sr/sub 2/Bsup(III)Rusup(V)O/sub 6/, with Bsup(III) = Eu, Gd, Dy, Y is rhombic distorted. The IR and FIR spectra are discussed.

  11. Scientific Opinion on the safety of the complexation product of sodium tartrate and iron(III) chloride as a food additive

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The complexation product of sodium tartrates and iron(III) chloride (Fe mTA) is proposed for use as an anti-caking agent, only in salt or its substitutes, with a maximum use level of 106 mg Fe mTA/kg salt. Fe mTA can be expected to dissociate into its constituent iron(III) and tartrate components upon ingestion. Studies in rats demonstrated that up to 90 % of ingested DL-tartrate or tartaric acid were absorbed, studies in humans suggested that only 20 % of an ingested dose of tartaric acid we...

  12. Susceptibility of In Vitro Melanoma Skin Cancer to Photoactivated Hypericin versus Aluminium(III Phthalocyanine Chloride Tetrasulphonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Ndhundhuma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of human melanoma cells to photoactivated Hypericin (Hyp compared to aluminium(III phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulphonate (AlPcS4Cl is reported in this study. Melanoma cells (A375 cell line were treated with various concentrations of Hyp or AlPcS4Cl alone, for 1, 4, and 24 hrs; varying doses of laser irradiation alone (594 or 682 nm; or optimal concentrations of PSs combined with laser irradiation. Changes in cell morphology, viability, membrane integrity, and proliferation after treatment of cells were determined using inverted microscopy, Trypan blue cell exclusion, Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH membrane integrity, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP cell proliferation assay, respectively. More than 60% of cell survival was observed when cells were treated with 2.5 μM of Hyp or AlPcS4Cl alone at all incubation times or with 5 J/cm2 of 594 or 682 nm laser alone. Combination of PSs and respective lasers leads to a statistically significant incubation time-dependent decrease in survival of cells. Flow cytometry using the FITC Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit demonstrated that cell death induced after Hyp-PDT is via early and late apoptosis whereas early apoptosis was the main mechanism observed with AlPcS4Cl-PDT. Hyp-PDT compared to AlPcS4Cl-PDT is indicated to be a more effective cancer cell death inducer in melanoma cells.

  13. Separation of carrier-free rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets by the extraction of nitrosylruthenium from hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasbroek, F.J.; Strelow, F.W.E.; Van der Walt, T.N.

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for the separation of rhodium isotopes from ruthenium cyclotron targets. After bombardment with deuterons and dissolution of the target material, the ruthenium is converted into a nitrosyl complex by treatment with hydroxylammonium chloride. Aluminium and other elements which have been introduced in the dissolution step, are separated by cation exchange. Ruthenium is then separated by extraction with a mixture of tri-n-butyl phosphate and hexane (4:1), leaving the rhodium in the aqueous phase. No ruthenium is found in the rhodium fraction and the recovery of rhodium is better than 90 per cent [af

  14. Analysis of radioactive ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This manual explains the procedures of analysis of radioactive ruthenium in the drain water from atomic energy plants. The most important radioactive ruthenium is 106 Ru, and the method of measurement described in this manual is to measure the beta ray of the daughter nuclide 106 Rh. The samples to be measured are collected from seawater, marine living things, and sediment of sea bottom near atomic energy plants. In case of sea water, the ruthenium is separated by the co-precipitation with magnesium hydroxide and distillation or the extraction with carbon tetrachloride, reduction and precipitation. The beta ray of the obtained sample is measured by a gas-flow type low background β counting system. Alkali dissolution-distillation or nitric acid extraction-distillation, reduction and precipitation are applied for marine living things. The sediment of sea bottom is treated with nitric acid or strong phosphoric acid, and distilled then the ruthenium is reduced and precipitated, and the beta-counting of the precipitation is made. The method to fix radioactive ruthenium on polyethylene films after the co-precipitation is also described for reference. The detectable levels by the present methods are 0.05 pCi/l for sea water, 0.1 pCi/g for marine living things, and 20 pCi/kg for the sediment of sea bottom. (Kato, T.)

  15. Synthesis, magnetic and spectral studies of lanthanide(III) chloride complexes of hydrazones of isonicotinic acid hydrazide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.K.; Agarwal, Himanshu; Prasad, Ram

    1996-01-01

    The synthesis, magnetic and spectral properties of trivalent lanthanide chlorides with N-isonicotinamidobenzalaldimine (INH-BENZ), N-isonicotinamidoanisalaldimine (INH-ANSL) and N-isonicotinamido-p-dimethylaminobenzalaldimine (INH-PDAB) are described. 13 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Reactions of uranium (III) and (IV) compounds with ketones, nitriles and acid chlorides. Towards a use of uranium complexes in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author shows that various organic molecules can be interestingly transformed into uranium complexes with degrees of oxidation of +3 or +4. In a first part, the author describes reactions of carbonyl compounds with the UCl 4 -Na(Hg) reducing system. Then, he addresses reductions of ketones, nitriles and acid chlorides by a uranium (III) complex: Cp 3 U(THF). The third part reports a detailed study of the reduction of ketones by U(BH 4 ) 4 [fr

  17. Studies of ruthenium complexes, 8. Kinetic studies of the thermal substitution reaction of hexaammine and cis--dihalogenotetraammineruthenium(III) complexes in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyoshi, A; Hiraki, S; Odate, T; Kohata, S; Oda, J [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of the thermal substitution reaction of hexaamineruthenium (III) halides and cis-dihalogenotetraamineruthenium (III) halides have been studied in the solid state. The reaction rates and kinetic parameters were determined for these two reactions; (Ru(NH/sub 3/)/sub 6/)X/sub 3/..-->..(RuX(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 2/+NH/sub 3/, (X=Br, I) and cis - (RuX/sub 2/(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/)X..-->..(RuX/sub 3/(NH/sub 3/)/sub 3/)+NH/sub 3/, (X=Cl, Br). The values of the rate constant, the activation energy, and the activation entropy were 2.10x10/sup -5/ s/sup -1/ (at 161/sup 0/C), 23.2 kcal mol/sup -1/, and -29.3 e.u. for the hexaamine bromide, and 2.92x10/sup -5/ s/sup -1/ (at 162/sup 0/C), 31.3 kcal mol/sup -1/, and -10.1 e.u. for the cis-dibromotetraamine bromide. The Ssub(N)2 mechanism is more probable for the former reaction, while the Ssub(N)1 mechanism is more probable for the latter reaction.

  18. Structure of chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride). III. Preparation of poly(vinyl chloride)-β,β-d2 as a model for the study of the mechanism of chlorination and of the chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, R.; Kolinsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the preparation of poly(vinyl chloride)-β,β-d 2 (PVC-β,β-d 2 ) as a model for the investigation of the mechanism of chlorination and of the CPVC structure has been suggested. The conditions of preparation of deuterated intermediates of a multistage synthesis of vinyl chloride-β,β-d 2 and of suspension-polymerized PVC-β,β-d 2 have been described including the mass balance. Malonic acid was used as the starting compound. Tacticity values of a sample of PVC-β,β-d 2 and its infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are presented and compared with the data already published

  19. Titrimetric determination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, V.V.; Belyaeva, T.I.; Kudinova, V.K.; Usatenko, Yu.I.

    1978-01-01

    Titration of ruthenium(4) hydrochloric-acid solutions with Mohr's salt, hydroquinone, and thiourea has been studied with the use of biampero- and potentiometric indication of the titration end point (t.e.p.) Potentiometric and amperometric indication of the t.e.p. is applicable when Ru(4) concentration is from 20 to 6000 mkg in 20 ml of the titrated solution; biamperometric indication can be used at a concentration of 5-1000 mkg in the same volume. It has been established that titration of Ru(4) (in the form of the Na 2 RuCl 6 solution) with Mohr's salt is not hindered by the presence of 1000-fold excess of alkaline and alkali-earth metals, Al, Ti(4), Mn(2), Cr(3), Fe(3), Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge(4), As, Se, Mo(6), Cd, In, and Te; 100-fold excess of Rh, Pd, W, Bi, and Sn; 10-fold excess of Ag, Au, Pt, Hg, Os. Along with Ru(4) titrated are Ir(4), Te(3), V(5), and Ce(4). Selectivity of hydroquinone and thiourea is lower. Titrimetric procedure of determining ruthenium has been tested for ruthenium alloy containing cobalt tungsten. It cannot be recommended for analysis of the samples which dissolve in aqua regia

  20. Ground vs. excited state interaction in ruthenium-thienyl dyads : implications for through bond interactions in multicomponent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, William; Browne, Wesley R.; Ronayne, Kate L.; O’Boyle, Noel M.; Vos, Johannes G.; McGarvey, John J.

    2005-01-01

    The vibrational and photophysical properties of mononuclear ruthenium(II) and ruthenium(III) polypyridyl complexes based on the, ligands 2-(5-(pyridin-2"-yl)-1'H-1',2',4'-triaz-3'-yl)-thiophene, 2-(5-(pyrazin-2"-yl)-1'H-1',2,4-triaz-3'-yl)-thiophene, are reported. The effect of the introduction of

  1. Ruthenium separation device from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayabe, Osao.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently oxidize ruthenium in radioactive wastes and evaporize ruthenium tetraoxide after oxidization thereof, thereby improve the separation and recovery rate. Constitution: The device comprises an oxidization vessel for supplying an oxidizing agent into radioactive wastes to oxidize ruthenium in the wastes into ruthenium tetraoxide, and a distillation vessel for introducing radioactive wastes after oxidization, distillating under heating ruthenium tetraoxide leached into the wastes and evaporizing ruthenium tetraoxide. By dividing the device into the oxidizing vessel and the distillation vessel, the oxidizing treatment and the distilling treatment can individually be operated optimally to improve the separation and recovery rate of ruthenium. (Takahashi, M.)

  2. Extraction of ruthenium thiocyanate and its separation from rhodium by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bazi, S.J.; Chow, A.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for the formation and extraction of the thiocyanate complex of ruthenium are reported. Distribution coefficients of more than 10 4 and a capacity of about 0.24 mole per kg of foam were obtained. The effect of the chloride salts of various univalent cations on the extraction of Ru(SCN) 6 3- indicated that the efficiency of ruthenium extraction depends on how well the cation fits into the polyether segment of the polyurethane foam, which agrees with the 'cation-chelation' mechanism. The separation of ruthenium and rhodium indicated that more than 95% of the rhodium remained in the aqueous phase and about 95% of the ruthenium was retained by the polyurethane foam and could be easily recovered. (author)

  3. User-friendly aerobic reductive alkylation of iridium(III) porphyrin chloride with potassium hydroxide: scope and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Huiping; Liu, Zhipeng; Yang, Wu; Zhou, Zhikuan; Chan, Kin Shing

    2015-12-21

    Alkylation of iridium 5,10,15,20-tetrakistolylporphyrinato carbonyl chloride, Ir(ttp)Cl(CO) (1), with 1°, 2° alkyl halides was achieved to give (ttp)Ir-alkyls in good yields under air and water compatible conditions by utilizing KOH as the cheap reducing agent. The reaction rate followed the order: RCl < RBr < RI (R = alkyl), and suggests an SN2 pathway by [Ir(I)(ttp)](-). Ir(ttp)-adamantyl was obtained under N2 when 1-bromoadamantane was utilized, which could only undergo bromine atom transfer pathway. Mechanistic investigations reveal a substrate dependent pathway of SN2 or halogen atom transfer.

  4. Spectroscopic and biological approach in the characterization of a novel 14-membered [N4] macrocyclic ligand and its palladium(II), platinum(II), ruthenium(III) and iridium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Soni; Kumar, Sumit; Chandra, Sulekh

    2014-01-24

    A novel, tetradentate nitrogen donor [N4] macrocyclic ligand, i.e. 3,5,14,16-tetramethyl-2,6,13,17-tetraazatricyclo[12,0,0(7-12)] cosa-1(22),2,5,7,9,11,13,16,18,20-decaene(L), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, Mass, and (1)H NMR spectral studies. Complexes of Pd(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Ir(III) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, Mass, electronic spectral and thermal studies. On the basis of molar conductance the complexes may be formulated as [PdL]Cl2, [PtL]Cl2, [Ru(L)Cl2]Cl and [Ir(L)Cl2]Cl. The complexes are insoluble in most common solvents, including water, ethanol, carbon tetrachloride and acetonitrile, but soluble in DMF/DMSO. The value of magnetic moment indicates that all the complexes are diamagnetic except Ru(III) complex which shows magnetic moment corresponding to one unpaired electron. The magnetic moment of Ru(III) complex is 1.73 B.M. at room temperature. The antimicrobial activities of ligand and its complexes have been screened in vitro, as growth inhibiting agents. The antifungal and antibacterial screening were carried out using Food Poison and Disc Diffusion Method against plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria Alternaria porri, Fusarium oxysporum, Xanthomonas compestris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. The compounds were dissolved in DMSO to get the required solutions. The required medium used for these activities was PDA and nutrient agar. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectroscopic and biological approach in the characterization of a novel 14-membered [N4] macrocyclic ligand and its Palladium(II), Platinum(II), Ruthenium(III) and Iridium(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Soni; Kumar, Sumit; Chandra, Sulekh

    2014-01-01

    A novel, tetradentate nitrogen donor [N4] macrocyclic ligand, i.e. 3,5,14,16-tetramethyl-2,6,13,17-tetraazatricyclo[12,0,07-12] cosa-1(22),2,5,7,9,11,13,16,18,20-decaene(L), has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, Mass, and 1H NMR spectral studies. Complexes of Pd(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Ir(III) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, Mass, electronic spectral and thermal studies. On the basis of molar conductance the complexes may be formulated as [PdL]Cl2, [PtL]Cl2, [Ru(L)Cl2]Cl and [Ir(L)Cl2]Cl. The complexes are insoluble in most common solvents, including water, ethanol, carbon tetrachloride and acetonitrile, but soluble in DMF/DMSO. The value of magnetic moment indicates that all the complexes are diamagnetic except Ru(III) complex which shows magnetic moment corresponding to one unpaired electron. The magnetic moment of Ru(III) complex is 1.73 B.M. at room temperature. The antimicrobial activities of ligand and its complexes have been screened in vitro, as growth inhibiting agents. The antifungal and antibacterial screening were carried out using Food Poison and Disc Diffusion Method against plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria Alternaria porri, Fusarium oxysporum, Xanthomonas compestris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively. The compounds were dissolved in DMSO to get the required solutions. The required medium used for these activities was PDA and nutrient agar.

  6. Preparation and Eh-pH diagrams of Fe(II)-Fe(III) green rust compounds; hyperfine interaction characteristics and stoichiometry of hydroxy-chloride, -sulphate and -carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genin, J.-M.R.; Refait, Ph.; Simon, L.; Drissi, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxy-chloride, -sulphate and -carbonate were prepared by oxidation of a ferrous hydroxide precipitate in anion-containing aqueous solutions. The compounds are characterized by monitoring the redox potential E h and the pH of stochiometric suspension vs time with the appropriate concentration ratios. X-ray diffraction allows us to characterize the crystal structure by distinguishing 'green rust one' (GR1) from 'green rust two' (GR2). Since green rusts (GRs) are of a pyroaurite-sjoegrenite-like structure, i.e., consisting of intercalated foreign anions and water molecules in the interlayers between the brucite-like layers of Fe(OH) 2 , their chemical formulae can be determined from the Moessbauer spectra. Three quadrupole doublets are observed: D 1 and D 2 correspond to a ferrous state with isomershift IS of about 1.27 mm s -1 and quadrupole splittings QS of about 2.85 and 2.60 mm s -1 , respectively, whereas D 3 corresponds to a ferric state with IS and QS of about 0.4 mm s -1 . The hyperfine parameters of these doublets are similar from one green rust to another but their intensity ratios vary considerably. Finally, E h and pH equilibrium diagrams of the Fe species in the presence of chloride, sulphate and carbonate anions contained within the water solution are drawn and the thermodynamic conditions of existence and degrees of oxidation of green rusts are discussed

  7. Method of dissolving metal ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuno, Masao; Soda, Yasuhiko; Kuroda, Sadaomi; Koga, Tadaaki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To dissolve and clean metal ruthenium deposited to the inner surface of a dissolving vessel for spent fuel rods. Method: Metal ruthenium is dissolved in a solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to which potassium permanganate is added. As the alkali metal hydroxide used herein there can be mentioned potassium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide can be mentioned, which is used as an aqueous solution from 5 to 20 % concentration in view of the solubility of metal ruthenium and economical merit. Further, potassium permanganate is used by adding to the solution of alkali metal hydroxide at a concentration of 1 to 5 %. (Yoshihara, H.)

  8. A technique for studying digestion by grasshoppers using a 103Ruthenium-labelled marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandar, M.V.

    1981-01-01

    103 Ru-labelled tris (I,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium (II) chloride has proved to be a convenient marker in investigating digestion in grasshoppers. Assimilation efficiencies and the retension time of the food in the gut were measured. It is surmised that the technique described in this paper will be applicable to studies of a variety of chewing herbivorous insects. (author)

  9. Studies On An Aerobic Oxidation Of Dibenzothiophene And Related Compounds Using Ruthenium Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishita Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An aerobic oxidation of dibenzothiophene and related compounds using a catalytic amount of ruthenium chloride in hydrocarbon solvents at 80°C for 20 h gave the corresponding sulfones in almost quantitative yields. The reaction might proceed via autoxidation of solvents to hydroperoxides and the reaction of sulfur compounds with the resulting hydroperoxides.

  10. cis,cis,cis-(Acetato-κ2O,O′bis[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphanylethane-κ2P,P′]ruthenium(II 0.75-trifluoromethanesulfonate 0.25-chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Figueira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title RuII carboxylate compound, [Ru(C2H3O2(C26H24P22](CF3O3S0.75Cl0.25, the distorted tris-bidentate octahedral stereochemistry about the RuII atom in the complex cation comprises four P-atom donors from two 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphanylethane ligands [Ru—P = 2.2881 (13–2.3791 (13 Å] and two O-atom donors from the acetate ligand [Ru—O = 2.191 (3 and 2.202 (3 Å]. The disordered counter-anions are located on the same site in the structure in a 3:1 ratio, the expanded formula comprising four complex cations, three trifluoromethanesulfonate anions and one chloride anion, with two such formula units in the unit cell.

  11. The lanthanoid(III) chloride oxoselenates(IV) MCl[SeO3] (M = Sm - Lu) with HoCl[TeO3]- or B-type structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipp, C.; Schleid, T.

    2008-01-01

    The B-type lanthanoid(III) chloride oxoselenates(IV) MCl[SeO 3 ] (M = Sm - Lu) crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (no. 62) with Z = 4 in the structure type of HoCl[TeO 3 ]. Their lattice constants are decreasing following the lanthanoid contraction from a = 730.01(7), b = 707.90(7), c 895.64(9) pm for SmCl[SeO 3 ] to a = 714.63(7), b = 681.76(7), c = 864.05(9) pm for LuCl[SeO 3 ]. In contrast to NdCl[SeO 3 ], the only representative of the A-type structure, where the coordination numbers of the Nd 3+ cations are 7+2 and 8, the B-type structure is dominated by pentagonal bipyramids [MO 5 Cl 2 ] 9- (CN(M 3+ ) = 7), which are connected via trans-oriented O..O edges to ∞ 1 {[MO 4/2 e O 1/1 t Cl 2/1 t ] 5- } chains (e = edge-sharing, t = terminal) running parallel to the [010] direction. Their inclination relative to each other allows for an alternating interconnection of these chains via Cl - and ψ 1 -tetrahedral [SeO 3 ] 2- anions to form a three-dimensional structure. The distances within the [SeO 3 ] 2- groups are in the normal range (d(Se-O) = 165 - 172 pm), while those of the O 2- and Cl - anions to the central M 3+ cation diminish in dependence of the increasing atomic number (d(M-O) = 226 - 244 pm / 216 - 232 pm, d(M-Cl) 277 - 278 pm / 266 - 270 pm, M = Sm / Lu). For the synthesis of the chloride oxoselenates(IV) MCl[SeO 3 ] the respective lanthanoid sesquioxide (M 2 O 3 ) and selenium dioxide (SeO 2 ) were reacted with either an eutectic mixture of RbCl and LiCl or with the corresponding lanthanoid trichloride (MCl 3 ) in evacuated silica ampoules for either five weeks at 500 C or one week at 850 C. (orig.)

  12. Thermodynamic behaviour of ruthenium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations are used to determine the chemical speciation of ruthenium under postulated reactor accident conditions. The speciation of ruthenium is determined for various values of temperature, pressure, oxygen partial pressure and ruthenium concentration. The importance of these variables, in particular the oxygen partial pressure, in determining the volatility of ruthenium is clearly demonstrated in this report. Reliable thermodynamic data are required to determine the behaviour of ruthenium using equilibrium calculations. Therefore, it was necessary to compile a thermodynamic database for the ruthenium species that can be formed under reactor accident conditions. The origin of the thermodynamic data for the ruthenium species included in our calculations is discussed in detail in Appendix A. 23 refs

  13. Several novel Ru(II) and Ru(III) complexes formed by reduction of (RuO4bipy) and (RuO3phen)2O with hydroquinone and methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Toshio

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical isomers, cis-dichloro-trans-(methanol)(hydroquinone)(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) and cis-dichloro-cis-(methanol)(hydroquinone)(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), [RuCl 2 (MeOH)(QH 2 )bipy] (complex I and II), were synthesized by reduction and substitution reactions of [RuO 4 bipy] and [RuO 2 (OH) 2 bipy] with hydroquinone in hydrochloric acid solution, and methanol. cis-Chloro(hydroquinonato)bis(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), cis-[RuCl(QH)(bipy) 2 ], was obtained from the substitution reaction of complex I or II with 2,2'-bipyridine in methanol, and cis-chloro(hydroquinone)bis(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride, cis-[RuCl(QH 2 )(bipy) 2 ]Cl, was also obtained from the substitution of cis-trans-[RuCl 2 (MeOH)(QH 2 )bipy] in methanol containing hydrochloric acid. cis-Dihydroxobis(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), cis-[Ru(OH) 2 (bipy) 2 ], was obtained by heating an aqueous solution of cis-[RuCl(QH)(bipy) 2 ]. Trihydroxoaquo(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(III), [Ru(OH) 3 (H 2 O)phen] was also synthesized from [RuO 3 phen] 2 O and [Ru(OH) 3 phen] 2 O by reduction reactions similar to those used for [RuCl 2 (MeOH)(QH 2 )bipy]. These complexes were characterized by the infrared, visible and ultraviolet absorption spectra, and also by polarographic and magnetic measurements. The structures are discussed. (auth.)

  14. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride...

  15. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of ruthenium oxide nanodots on reduced graphene oxide sheets for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yao [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Xiong [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Dacheng [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma Yanwei, E-mail: ywma@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Graphite oxide instead of graphene as precursor has been used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites by a hydrothermal treatment. > Using NaOH solution to adjust pH of GO colloids leads to homogeneous ruthenium oxide deposited on reduced graphene oxide sheets. > A maximum capacitance of 471 F g{sup -1} is obtained at 0.5 A g{sup -1} for the composites when loading 40% of RuO{sub 2} and its life retention reaches 92% after 3000 cycles. - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide nanodots have been deposited on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets homogeneously by hydrothermal and annealing methods. Adding NaOH solution in GO colloids prevents the restack and agglomeration of GO sheets when mixed with ruthenium chloride solution. Local crystallization of RuO{sub 2} in the composites is revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The element mapping image demonstrates the uniform distribution of Ru on RGO sheets. Unlike the pure crystalline RuO{sub 2} exhibiting poor electrochemical performance, the composites present superior capacitive properties. The hydrothermal time is optimized and a maximum of 471 F g{sup -1} is measured in the composites at 0.5 A g{sup -1} when loaded with 45 wt% of RuO{sub 2}. After 3000 cycles, its specific capacitance remains 92% of the maximum capacitance. Our results suggest potential application of the reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites to supercapacitors.

  16. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of ruthenium oxide nanodots on reduced graphene oxide sheets for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yao; Zhang Xiong; Zhang Dacheng; Ma Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Graphite oxide instead of graphene as precursor has been used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites by a hydrothermal treatment. → Using NaOH solution to adjust pH of GO colloids leads to homogeneous ruthenium oxide deposited on reduced graphene oxide sheets. → A maximum capacitance of 471 F g -1 is obtained at 0.5 A g -1 for the composites when loading 40% of RuO 2 and its life retention reaches 92% after 3000 cycles. - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide nanodots have been deposited on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets homogeneously by hydrothermal and annealing methods. Adding NaOH solution in GO colloids prevents the restack and agglomeration of GO sheets when mixed with ruthenium chloride solution. Local crystallization of RuO 2 in the composites is revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The element mapping image demonstrates the uniform distribution of Ru on RGO sheets. Unlike the pure crystalline RuO 2 exhibiting poor electrochemical performance, the composites present superior capacitive properties. The hydrothermal time is optimized and a maximum of 471 F g -1 is measured in the composites at 0.5 A g -1 when loaded with 45 wt% of RuO 2 . After 3000 cycles, its specific capacitance remains 92% of the maximum capacitance. Our results suggest potential application of the reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites to supercapacitors.

  17. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic acidosis ) or when a person hyperventilates (causing respiratory alkalosis ). A decreased level of blood chloride (called hypochloremia) ... disease , emphysema or other chronic lung diseases (causing respiratory ... metabolic alkalosis). An increased level of urine chloride can indicate ...

  18. Gold chloride clusters with Au(III) and Au(I) probed by FT-ICR mass spectrometry and MP2 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Kono H

    2014-05-07

    Microsolvated clusters of gold chloride are probed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and scalar relativistic electronic structure calculations. Electrospray ionization of aqueous AuCl3 leads to mononuclear clusters of types [AuCl2](+)(H2O)n (n = 0-4), [AuOHCl](+)(H2O)n (n = 0-1) and [AuCl2](+)(HCl)2(H2O)n (n = 0-4). In addition, strong ion signals due to dinuclear [Au2Cl5-xOHx](+)(H2O)n (x = 0-1) are present in ESI mass spectra of aqueous AuCl3, with the abundance of individual dinuclear species controlled by the concentration-dependent variation of the precursor complexes [AuCl2-xOHx](+)(H2O)n and AuCl3. Equilibrium structures, energies and thermodynamic properties of mono- and dinuclear gold clusters have been predicted using MP2 and CCSD(T) theory, and these data have been applied to examine the influence of microsolvation on cluster stability. Specifically, results from CCSD(T) calculations indicate that non-covalently bound ion-neutral complexes Au(+)(Cl2)(H2O)n, with formal Au(I), are the dominant forms of mononuclear gold with n = 0-2, while higher hydrates (n > 2) are covalently bound [AuCl2](+)(H2O)n complexes in which gold exists as Au(III). MP2 calculations show that the lowest energy structure of dinuclear gold is an ion-molecule cluster [Au2Cl(Cl2)2](+) consisting of a single-bridged digold-chloronium ion bound end-on to two dichlorine ligands, with two higher energy isomers, single-bridged [Au2Cl3(Cl2)](+) and double-bridged [Au2Cl5](+) clusters. Finally, AuAu interactions in the singly-bridged clusters [Au2Cl(Cl2)2](+)(H2O)n and [Au2Cl3(Cl2)](+)(H2O)n are examined employing a wide range of computational tools, including natural bond order (NBO) analysis and localized orbital locator (LOL) profiles.

  19. Electrochemical studies of ruthenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar Ghosh, B.; Chakravorty, A.

    1989-01-01

    In many ways the chemistry of transition metals is the chemistry of multiple oxidation states and the associated redox phenomena. If a particular element were to be singeld out to illustrate this viewpoint, a model choice would be ruthenium - an element that is directly or indirectly the active centre of a plethora of redox phenomena encompassing ten different oxidation states and a breathtaking diversity of structure and bonding. In the present review the authors are primarily concerned with the oxidation states of certain ligands coordinated to ruthenium. This choice is deliberate since this is one area where the unique power of electrochemical methods is splendidly revealed. Without these methods, development in this area would have been greatly hampered. A brief summary of metal oxidation states is also included as a prelude to the main subject of this review. The authors have generally emphasize the information derived which is of chemical interest leaving the details of formal electrochemical arguments in the background. The authors have reviewed the pattern and systematics of ligand redox in ruthenium complexes. The synergistic combination of electrochemical and spectroscopic methods have vastly increased our understanding of ligand phenomena during the last 15 years or so. This in turn has led to better understanding and new developments in other fields. Photophysics and photochemistry could be cited as examples. (author). 176 refs.; 10 figs.; 10 tabs

  20. Solventless synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Peña, Nidia G. [Departmento de Tecnociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico); Redón, Rocío, E-mail: rredon@unam.mx [Departmento de Tecnociencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510 Coyoacán, México D.F. (Mexico); Herrera-Gomez, Alberto [Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro (Mexico); Fernández-Osorio, Ana Leticia [FES-Cuautitlán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Bravo-Sanchez, Mariela; Gomez-Sosa, Gustavo [Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Campus Juriquilla, Querétaro (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successful synthesis of Ru nanoparticles by a cheap, fast and solventless approach was achieved. • The zero-valent state as well as the by-product/impurity free of the mechanochemical obtained Ru nanoparticles was proven by XPS, TEM and XRD. • Compared to two other synthesis strategies, the above-mentioned synthesis was more suitable to obtain smaller particles with fewer impurities in shorter time. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel solventless method for the synthesis of zero-valent ruthenium nanoparticles Ru(0). The proposed method, although not entirely new in the nanomaterials world, was used for the first time to synthesize zero-valent ruthenium nanoparticles. This new approach has proved to be an environmentally friendly, clean, cheap, fast, and reproducible technique which employs low amounts of solvent. It was optimized through varying amounts of reducing salt on a determined quantity of precursor and measuring the effect of this variation on the average particle size obtained. The resulting products were fully characterized by powder XRD, TEM, HR-TEM, and XPS studies, all of which corroborated the purity of the nanoparticles achieved. In order to verify the advantages of our method over other techniques, we compared our nanoparticles with two common colloidal-synthesized ruthenium nanoparticles.

  1. Gold(III) chloride catalyzed regioselective synthesis of pyrano[3,4-b]indol-1(9H)-ones and evaluation of anticancer potential towards human cervix adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Chandrasekaran; Ayyanar, Asairajan; Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai

    2011-07-15

    A highly regioselective synthesis of pyrano[3,4-b]indol-1(9H)-ones via gold(III) chloride catalyzed cycloisomerization of 3-ethynyl-indole-2-carboxylic acid was achieved in good to excellent yields. These compounds were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity against human cervical (HeLa) cell lines. Out of ten compounds, three compounds (7d, 7e and 7j) showed comparable proliferation inhibitory activity against the standard drug cisplatin. Compound 7d was found to be the most efficacious with IC(50) value of 0.22μM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ruthenium-modified cytochrome c: temperature dependence of the rate of intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isied, S.S.; Kuehn, C.; Worosila, G.

    1984-01-01

    The ruthenium-modified horse heart cytochrome c, Ru(III)-cyt c(III), where the ruthenium is bound to the histidines-33 residue has been synthesized and characterized by ruthenium analysis, UV-vis and CD spectra, and differential pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry. The intermediate Ru(III)-cyt c(III) has been generated by pulse-radioanalysis with use of four different radicals, CO 2 -., (CH 3 )COH., (CH 2 OH) 3 CCHOH, and -OCCH(OH)C(OH)CO 2 -. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer within the Ru(III)-cyt c(III) complex and its temperature dependence were determined over a 40 0 C temperature range with the CO 2 -. radical. At 25 0 C, these values are k/sub u/=53 +/- s/sup -1/ (pH 7.01 M phosphate buffer, 0.1 M NaHCO 2 ), ΔH/sup +/=3.5 +/- 0.2 kcal mol/sup -1/, and ΔS/sup +/=-39 +/- 1 eu

  3. IR-doped ruthenium oxide catalyst for oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for preparing a metal-doped ruthenium oxide material by heating a mixture of a doping metal and a source of ruthenium under an inert atmosphere. In some embodiments, the doping metal is in the form of iridium black or lead powder, and the source of ruthenium is a powdered ruthenium oxide. An iridium-doped or lead-doped ruthenium oxide material can perform as an oxygen evolution catalyst and can be fabricated into electrodes for electrolysis cells.

  4. Graphene/Ruthenium Active Species Aerogel as Electrode for Supercapacitor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigot, Arnaud; Fontana, Marco; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Rivolo, Paola

    2017-12-30

    Ruthenium active species containing Ruthenium Sulphide (RuS₂) is synthesized together with a self-assembled reduced graphene oxide (RGO) aerogel by a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis. Ruthenium Chloride and L-Cysteine are used as reactants. The hydrothermal synthesis of the innovative hybrid material occurs at 180 °C for 12 h, by using water as solvent. The structure and morphology of the hybrid material are fully characterized by Raman, XRD, XPS, FESEM and TEM. The XRD and diffraction pattern obtained by TEM display an amorphous nanostructure of RuS₂ on RGO crystallized flakes. The specific capacitance measured in planar configuration in 1 M NaCl electrolyte at 5 mV s -1 is 238 F g -1 . This supercapacitor electrode also exhibits perfect cyclic stability without loss of the specific capacitance after 15,000 cycles. In summary, the RGO/Ruthenium active species hybrid material demonstrates remarkable properties for use as active material for supercapacitor applications.

  5. Utilization of ruthenium volatilization at heating of residue containing phosphates and nitrates for ruthenium separation and for its qualitative proof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holgye, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The volatility of ruthenium during the heating of a residue after evaporation of a solution containing ruthenium, phosphates and nitrates may be utilized for the separation of ruthenium from various substances. Sup(103,106) Ru may be rapidly, selectively, and quantitatively separated from fission products mixture. Ruthenium may be also separated in this way from various inorganic salts or from biological material. The volatility of ruthenium may be used also for its qualitative proof. (author)

  6. Phenylalanine-a biogenic ligand with flexible η6- and η6:κ1-coordination at ruthenium(ii) centres

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas; Jantke, Dominik; Miao, Xiaohe; Marziale, Alexander N.; Kiefer, Florian J.; Eppinger, Jö rg

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of (S)-2,5-dihydrophenylalanine 1 with ruthenium(iii) chloride yields the μ-chloro-bridged dimeric η6-phenylalanine ethyl ester complex 3, which can be converted into the monomeric analogue, η6:κ1-phenylalanine ethyl ester complex 12, under basic conditions. Studies were carried out to determine the stability and reactivity of complexes bearing η6- and η6: κ1-chelating phenylalanine ligands under various conditions. Reaction of 3 with ethylenediamine derivatives N-p-tosylethylenediamine or 1,4-di-N-p-tosylethylenediamine results in the formation of monomeric η6:κ1-phenylalanine ethyl ester complexes 14 and 15, which could be saponified yielding complexes 16 and 17 without changing the inner coordination sphere of the metal centre. The structure of η6:κ1-phenylalanine complex 17 and an N-κ1-phenylalanine complex 13 resulting from the reaction of 3 with an excess of pyridine were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}]: a praseodymium(III) sulfide chloride thioarsenate(III) with double chains of condensed [SPr{sub 4}]{sup 10+} tetrahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong-Hee [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, ON (Canada); Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ledderboge, Florian; Schleid, Thomas [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Kleinke, Holger [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Single crystals of Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}] were obtained by reacting praseodymium sesquisulfide and trichloride with arsenic and sulfur (molar ratio: 7:4:6:9) in torch-sealed evacuated silica ampoules at 850 C for a week and subsequent slow cooling to room temperature. The transparent, pale yellowish green platelets crystallize monoclinically (Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}]: a = 2190.96(9) pm, b = 685.49(3) pm, c = 701.87(3) pm, β = 98.752(3) ) in the non-centrosymmetric space group Cc with Z = 4. The crystal structure of Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}] comprises three crystallographically different Pr{sup 3+} cations. (Pr1){sup 3+} and (Pr2){sup 3+} exhibit bicapped trigonal prismatic environments of five sulfur and three chlorine atoms (C.N. = 8) each, whereas only seven sulfur atoms arranged as capped trigonal prism (C.N. = 7) are present in the case of (Pr3){sup 3+}. Two of the five crystallographically different sulfur atoms (S1 and S2) are coordinated by four Pr{sup 3+} cations, each in the shape of slightly distorted [SPr{sub 4}]{sup 10+} tetrahedra (d(S-Pr) = 278-294 pm). Hence, the crystal structure of Pr{sub 3}S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}[AsS{sub 3}] contains double chains with the composition {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[S_2Pr_3]"5"+}, consisting of two parallel edge-fused chains of anti-SiS{sub 2}-analogous single strands {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[SPr_2]"4"+}, formed by trans-edge sharing [SPr{sub 4}]{sup 10+} tetrahedra. The arrangement of the {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[S_2Pr_3]"5"+} double chains running along [001] can be described as a hexagonal rod-packing. Chloride anions (Cl1 and Cl2) as well as the isolated, ψ{sup 1}-tetrahedral thioarsenate(III) groups [AsS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} (d(As-S) = 228-229 pm) consisting of three sulfur atoms (S3, S4, and S5) and an As{sup 3+} cation carrying a stereochemically active non-bonding electron pair take care of the three-dimensional interconnection and the charge balance of the {sup 1}{sub ∞}{[S_2Pr_3]"5"+} double

  8. Interface behaviour and electrical performance of ruthenium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry; Raman spectroscopy; oxidation; silicide; Schottky barrier diodes; ruthenium ... water and then dried with nitrogen gas before being loaded into the vacuum ... laser of wavelength 514.6 nm. Full I–V and ...

  9. Ruthenium complexing in sorption by granulated sorbents with ethylene diamine and diethyl amine groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanova, S.A.; Kolmakova, A.I.; Konovalov, L.V.; Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Kalalova, E.

    1986-01-01

    The sorption process of ruthenium (4) chlorocomplexes - K 2 (RuCl 6 ) macroporous granulated copolymers of glycidylmethacrylate ethylene dimethacrylate with ethylene diamine and diethyl amine has been studied. Sorption has been carried out under the static conditions (at 20 and 98 deg C) from 0.1-2.0 MxHCl and 1.0 M NaCl solutions. It is established that the sorption from acidic solutions proceeds according to anion exchange mechanism with formation of onium chlorocomplexes in the sorbent phase, subjecting to Anderson regrouping during the heating. During the sorption from neutral solutions the second-sphere coordination of polymer amino groups accirs near ruthenium atom and amino-chloride complexes are formed in the sorbent phase

  10. Extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of iron and ruthenium by using potassium xanthates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, M; Kiboku, M [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1981-06-01

    Potassium xanthates (potassium o-alkyl dithiocarbonate; KRX) react with many metal ions, and so the complex formation with iron (II, III) ion and the extraction of their complexes has been studied to some extent, but those of ruthenium (III) have not been. Iron-xanthate and ruthenium-xanthate complexes can be extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from weakly acidic solution to weakly alkaline solution. For quantitative extraction of iron (20 ..mu..g/40 ml), KRX concentration should be above 2.0 x 10/sup -2/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KEtX, 1.0 x 10/sup -2/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KPrX, and 5.0 x 10/sup -3/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KBtX and KPeX, and for that of ruthenium (202 ..mu..g/40 ml), it should be above 2.0 x 10/sup -1/ mol dm/sup -3/ of KEtX and KPrX. Formation constant of ruthenium-xanthate complexes is presumed to be small. A 100-fold excess of Ni(II), Co(II), Cu(II), WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup 2 -/ interfered with the determination of iron, however, the interferences are eliminated by adding 5 ml of 0.1 mol dm/sup -3/ ascorbic acid solution. For the determination of ruthenium, a 50-fold excess of Ag(I), Hg(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), and Pt(II), or a 100-fold excess of NO/sub 2//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, CrO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup 2 -/, respectively, interfered. The coefficient of variation after each ten runs, ranges from 0.9% to 3.2% in the determination of 10 ..mu..g, 20 ..mu..g, and 30 ..mu..g of iron, and from 1.4% to 4.3% in the determination of 100 ..mu..g, 200 ..mu..g, and 300 ..mu..g of ruthenium. The determination limit in aqueous samples is 0.02 ppm for iron and 0.2 ppm for ruthenium, when the volume ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase (MIBK) is 10:1.

  11. cis-Tetrachlorido-bis(indazole)osmium(iv) and its osmium(iii) analogues: paving the way towards the cis-isomer of the ruthenium anticancer drugs KP1019 and/or NKP1339

    KAUST Repository

    Büchel, Gabriel E.

    2017-08-15

    The relationship between cis-trans isomerism and anticancer activity has been mainly addressed for square-planar metal complexes, in particular, for platinum(II), e.g., cis- and trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(2)], and a number of related compounds, of which, however, only cis-counterparts are in clinical use today. For octahedral metal complexes, this effect of geometrical isomerism on anticancer activity has not been investigated systematically, mainly because the relevant isomers are still unavailable. An example of such an octahedral complex is trans-[RuCl4(Hind)(2)](-), which is in clinical trials now as its indazolium (KP1019) or sodium salt (NKP1339), but the corresponding cis-isomers remain inaccessible. We report the synthesis of Na[cis-(OsCl4)-Cl-III(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] . (Na[1]) suggesting a route to the cis-isomer of NKP1339. The procedure involves heating (H(2)ind)[(OsCl5)-Cl-IV(kappa N1-2H-ind)] in a high boiling point organic solvent resulting in an Anderson rearrangement with the formation of cis-[(OsCl4)-Cl-IV(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] ([1]) in high yield. The transformation is accompanied by an indazole coordination mode switch from kappa N1 to kappa N2 and stabilization of the 1H-indazole tautomer. Fully reversible spectroelectrochemical reduction of [1] in acetonitrile at 0.46 V vs. NHE is accompanied by a change in electronic absorption bands indicating the formation of cis-[(OsCl4)-Cl-III(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)](-) ([1](-)). Chemical reduction of [1] in methanol with NaBH4 followed by addition of nBu(4)NCl afforded the osmium(III) complex nBu(4)N[cis-(OsCl4)-Cl-III(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] (nBu(4)N [1]). A metathesis reaction of nBu(4)N[1] with an ion exchange resin led to the isolation of the water-soluble salt Na[1]. The X-ray diffraction crystal structure of [1] . Me2CO was determined and compared with that of trans-[(OsCl4)-Cl-IV(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] . 2Me(2)SO (2 . 2Me(2)SO), also prepared in this work. EPR spectroscopy was performed on the Os-III complexes and

  12. cis-Tetrachlorido-bis(indazole)osmium(iv) and its osmium(iii) analogues: paving the way towards the cis-isomer of the ruthenium anticancer drugs KP1019 and/or NKP1339

    KAUST Repository

    Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Kossatz, Susanne; Sadique, Ahmad; Rapta, Peter; Zalibera, Michal; Bucinsky, Lukas; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Telser, Joshua; Eppinger, Jö rg; Reiner, Thomas; Arion, Vladimir B.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between cis-trans isomerism and anticancer activity has been mainly addressed for square-planar metal complexes, in particular, for platinum(II), e.g., cis- and trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(2)], and a number of related compounds, of which, however, only cis-counterparts are in clinical use today. For octahedral metal complexes, this effect of geometrical isomerism on anticancer activity has not been investigated systematically, mainly because the relevant isomers are still unavailable. An example of such an octahedral complex is trans-[RuCl4(Hind)(2)](-), which is in clinical trials now as its indazolium (KP1019) or sodium salt (NKP1339), but the corresponding cis-isomers remain inaccessible. We report the synthesis of Na[cis-(OsCl4)-Cl-III(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] . (Na[1]) suggesting a route to the cis-isomer of NKP1339. The procedure involves heating (H(2)ind)[(OsCl5)-Cl-IV(kappa N1-2H-ind)] in a high boiling point organic solvent resulting in an Anderson rearrangement with the formation of cis-[(OsCl4)-Cl-IV(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] ([1]) in high yield. The transformation is accompanied by an indazole coordination mode switch from kappa N1 to kappa N2 and stabilization of the 1H-indazole tautomer. Fully reversible spectroelectrochemical reduction of [1] in acetonitrile at 0.46 V vs. NHE is accompanied by a change in electronic absorption bands indicating the formation of cis-[(OsCl4)-Cl-III(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)](-) ([1](-)). Chemical reduction of [1] in methanol with NaBH4 followed by addition of nBu(4)NCl afforded the osmium(III) complex nBu(4)N[cis-(OsCl4)-Cl-III(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] (nBu(4)N [1]). A metathesis reaction of nBu(4)N[1] with an ion exchange resin led to the isolation of the water-soluble salt Na[1]. The X-ray diffraction crystal structure of [1] . Me2CO was determined and compared with that of trans-[(OsCl4)-Cl-IV(kappa N2-1H-ind)(2)] . 2Me(2)SO (2 . 2Me(2)SO), also prepared in this work. EPR spectroscopy was performed on the Os-III complexes and

  13. Prism inside. Spectroscopic and magnetic properties of the lanthanide(III) chloride oxidotungstates(VI) Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[WO{sub 6}] (Ln = La - Nd, Sm - Tb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, Katharina V.; Blaschkowski, Bjoern; Hartenbach, Ingo [Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Foerg, Katharina; Netzsch, Philip; Hoeppe, Henning A. [Institute for Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany)

    2017-11-17

    The lanthanide(III) chloride oxidotungstates(VI) with the formula Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[WO{sub 6}] for Ln = La - Nd, Sm - Tb were synthesized by solid-state reactions utilizing the respective lanthanide trichloride, lanthanide sesquioxide (where available), and tungsten trioxide together with lithium chloride as flux. The title compounds crystallize hexagonally in space group P6{sub 3}/m (no. 176, a = 941-909, c = 543-525 pm, Z = 2). The structures comprise crystallographically unique Ln{sup 3+} cations surrounded by six O{sup 2-} and four Cl{sup -} anions (C.N. = 10) forming distorted tetracapped trigonal prisms as well as rather uncommon trigonal prismatic [WO{sub 6}]{sup 6-} units, whose edges are coordinated by nine Ln{sup 3+} cations. Thus, a {sup 3}{sub ∞}{([WO_6]Ln"e_9_/_3)"3"+} framework (e = edge-sharing) is created, which contains tube-shaped channels along [001] lined with chloride anions. To elucidate the spectroscopic and magnetic properties of the obtained pure phase samples, single-crystal Raman (for Ln = La - Nd, Sm-Tb), diffuse reflectance (for Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Gd), and luminescence spectroscopy (for bulk Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[WO{sub 6}] (Ln = La, Eu, Gd, Tb) and Eu{sup 3+}- or Tb{sup 3+}-doped derivatives of La{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[WO{sub 6}] and Gd{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[WO{sub 6}], respectively) were performed and their temperature-dependent magnetic moments (for Ln = Pr, Nd, Gd) were determined. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Ruthenium (4) and ruthenium (3) state in hydrochloric acid solutions under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashilov, A.V.; Kuz'min, N.M.; Nesterov, A.A.; Runov, V.K.

    2000-01-01

    Reactions of hydration, poly- and depolymerization, oxidation-reduction processes with ruthenium (4) and ruthenium (3) participation are investigated in hydrochloric acid solutions under microwave irradiation by the methods of molecular absorption spectroscopy in UV visible region taking K 4 [Ru 2 OCl 10 ] as an example. Content of state forms of ruthenium (4) and ruthenium (3), absorption characteristics of forming complexes are calculated. Variation of microwave irradiation parameters and HCl concentration permits to prepare solutions containing [RuCl 6 ] 2+ (95 %) and [(RuOH) 2 (H 2 O) 6 (OH) 2 ] 4+ (98 %) preeminently predominant forms. The role of microwave effect directly is established taking as an example the process of ruthenium (4) hydration [ru

  15. Cyclotron production of ruthenium-97 for radiopharmaceutical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Ruthenium-97 is of interest for clinical practice in nuclear medicine. The combination of the excellent physical and chemical properties of Ruthenium-97 make this isotope worth evaluating. Ruthenium-97 has been prepared by irradiation of a sheet of molybdenum with the internal alpha-beam of the Ruthenium-97 as a function of the alpha particle energy has been measured. The radiochemical separation and its possible clinical applications have been discussed. (author)

  16. Ruthenium sulfoxides structure and reactivity with nitrogen heterocyclic bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Denise de.

    1990-01-01

    Ruthenium (II) sulfoxides are compounds of great interest in oxidative catalysis and in chemotherapy. In order to contribute for the understanding of the chemistry and electronic structure of this class of compounds, it has been studied a series of [Ru Cl 2 (S-DMSO) 2 L x ] complexes, where x = 1 (polymeric compounds) or 2 (monomers) and L N-heterocyclic ligands (pyridine, pyrazine and imidazole derivatives). The nature of N-heterocyclic ligand and their coordination are of great relevance to the stability, spectroscopic and electrochemical characteristics of the complexes. The trans-interactions are extremely important in this series, influencing the strength of the Ru(II)-> S-DMSO and Ru(II)-> L π-back donation. The DMSO and L ligands are π-acceptors. The metal-> ligand π-back donation is strengthened when the ligand is trans to chloride, which is π-donor, due to trans-cooperative interactions of the type: π-donor -> Ru(II) π-acceptor. Another interesting aspect in the series of [Ru Cl 2 (S-DMSO) 2 L 2 ] complexes is the occurrence of dissociative equilibria in the solution, due to the existence of three types of ligands. It was observed that the trans-N isomer of 2,6-dimethyl pyrazine derivative undergoes thermal substitution, with preferential liabilization of the N-heterocyclic ligand. Chloride ion is the most inert ligand in this complex. (author). 145 refs., 76 figs., 21 tabs

  17. Analysis of uranium and its compounds. Ruthenium spectrographic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Ruthenium determination in uranium and its compounds, suitable for content greater than 0.1 ppm with respect to uranium, by dissolution in sulfuric acid and addition of palladium as an internal standard, separation of the precipitated ruthenium, in the presence of gold, by reduction with zinc, the precipitate is calcined and ruthenium is determined by spectrography [fr

  18. Half -sand wish ruthenium complexes of heterocyclic-dithio carboxylato ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-khateeb, M.; Al-Noaimi, M.; Harb, M.; Gorls, H.; Weigand, W.

    2008-01-01

    The heterocyclic-dithio carboxylato complexes Cp Ru(PPh 3 )(κ 2 S,S-S 2 C-h et) [h et= 2-C 4 H 3 O (1), 2-C 4 H 3 S (2), 1-C 4 H 8 N (3)] are obtained by the reaction of the ruthenium chloride, Cp Ru(PPh 3 ) 2 CI, with the anions, h et-CS 2 . The X-ray structure of Cp Ru(PPh 3 )(κ 2 S, S-S 2 C-1- C 4 H 8 N) (3) is determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  19. Method of suppressing evaporation loss of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muromura, Tadazumi; Sato, Tadashi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent evaporation loss of ruthenium from liquid wastes by adding an aluminum compound upon applying evaporating and drying to solid treatment to reprocessing liquid wastes for spent fuels. Method: An aluminum compound such as aluminum nitrate or aluminum hydroxide to reprocessing liquid wastes of spent fuels such that aluminum/ruthenium mixing ratio corresponds to 1.3 - 70.0 by g/atom ratio (0.34 - 187 by weight ratio), and the liquid mixture is heated to a temperature of about 130 deg C to be evaporated and dried to solidness. This enables to recover ruthenium without settling and depositing insoluble matters in the liquid wastes and without decomposing nitric acid. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Reaction of a (Salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex with thiols. C-H bond activation by (Salen)ruthenium(IV) sulfilamido species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Peng, Shie-Ming; Wong, Wing-Tak; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2010-01-04

    The reaction of [Ru(VI)(N)(L)(MeOH)](PF(6)) [1; L = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-o-cyclohexyldiamine dianion] with a stoichiometric amount of RSH in CH(3)CN gives the corresponding (salen)ruthenium(IV) sulfilamido species [Ru(IV){N(H)SR}(L)(NCCH(3))](PF(6)) (2a, R = (t)Bu; 2b, R = Ph). Metathesis of 2a with NaN(3) in methanol affords [Ru(IV){N(H)S(t)Bu}(L)(N(3))] (2c). 2a undergoes further reaction with 1 equiv of RSH to afford a (salen)ruthenium(III) sulfilamine species, [Ru(III){N(H)(2)S(t)Bu}(L)(NCCH(3))](PF(6)) (3). On the other hand, 2b reacts with 2 equiv of PhSH to give a (salen)ruthenium(III) ammine species [Ru(III)(NH(3))(L)(NCCH(3))](PF(6)) (4); this species can also be prepared by treatment of 1 with 3 equiv of PhSH. The X-ray structures of 2c and 4 have been determined. Kinetic studies of the reaction of 1 with excess RSH indicate the following schemes: 1 --> 2a --> 3 (R = (t)Bu), 1 --> 2b --> 4 (R = Ph). The conversion of 1 to 2 probably involves nucleophilic attack of RSH at the nitrido ligand, followed by a proton shift. The conversions of 2a to 3 and 2b to 4 are proposed to involve rate-limiting H-atom abstraction from RSH by 2a or 2b. 2a and 2b are also able to abstract H atoms from hydrocarbons with weak C-H bonds. These reactions occur with large deuterium isotope effects; the kinetic isotope effect values for the oxidation of 9,10-dihydroanthracene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, and fluorene by 2a are 51, 56, and 11, respectively.

  1. From polyethylene waxes to HDPE using an α,α'-bis(arylimino)-2,3:5,6-bis(pentamethylene)pyridyl-chromium(iii) chloride pre-catalyst in ethylene polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Shizhen; Solan, Gregory A; Sun, Yang; Sun, Wen-Hua

    2017-05-30

    Five examples of α,α'-bis(arylimino)-2,3:5,6-bis(pentamethylene)pyridyl-chromium(iii) chlorides (aryl = 2,6-Me 2 Ph Cr1, 2,6-Et 2 Ph Cr2, 2,6-i-Pr 2 Ph Cr3, 2,4,6-Me 3 Ph Cr4, 2,6-Et 2 -4-MePh Cr5) have been synthesized by the one-pot template reaction of α,α'-dioxo-2,3:5,6-bis(pentamethylene)pyridine, CrCl 3 ·6H 2 O and the corresponding aniline. The molecular structures of Cr1 and Cr4 reveal distorted octahedral geometries with the N,N,N-ligand adopting a mer-configuration. On activation with an aluminium alkyl co-catalyst, Cr1-Cr5 exhibited high catalytic activities in ethylene polymerization and showed outstanding thermal stability operating effectively at 80 °C with activities up to 1.49 × 10 7 g of PE (mol of Cr) -1 h -1 . Significantly, the nature of the co-catalyst employed had a dramatic effect on the molecular weight of the polymeric material obtained. For example, using diethylaluminium chloride (Et 2 AlCl) in combination with Cr4 gave high density/high molecular weight polyethylene with broad molecular weight distributions (30.9-39.3). By contrast, using modified methylaluminoxane (MMAO), strictly linear polyethylene waxes of lower molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution (1.6-2.0) were obtained with vinyl end-groups.

  2. Adsorption of aliphatic alcohols on ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalova, L.B.; Zakumbaeva, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption is studied of allyl-, propyl- and propargyl alcohols on a ruthenium catalyst-electrode at 20, 30 and 40 deg C in H 2 SO 4 in helium. Above adsorption has been found to grow with increased concentration of the alcohols in the solution. In solutions with the same concentration, propargyl alcohol has been noted to show highest sorptive capacity, followed by that of allyl- and propyl alcohols. With variations in the ruthenium electrode potential, alcohol adsorption occurs via maximum at potential = 0.18

  3. Processing of radioactive ruthenium with aluminosilicate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Takuji; Ichinose, Yasuhiro; Ito, Katsuo

    1979-01-01

    Coprecipitation of radioactive Ru with hydroxides has been studied for the purpose of the management of the high level waste from the nuclear fuel reprocessing. Aluminosilicate gel used as coprecipitant was prepared by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide to sodium aluminate-sodium silicate solution containing ruthenium nitrate. Ruthenium quantitatively precipitates under the conditions, aluminate > 4 x 10 -2 M, Al/Si 0 C. However, volatilization rate of Ru is suppressed by coating with mullite phase into which aluminosilicate gel transformes above 900 0 C. The amount of Ru volatilized in Ar-flow was reduced to about 10% of that in air-flow. (author)

  4. Preparation of Chloro Penta Amine Cobalt(III Chloride and Study of Its Influence on the Structural and Some Optical Properties of Polyvinyl Acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada K. Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloro penta amine cobalt(III cloride [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 was prepared and then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The obtained results indicated the formation of orthorhombic [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 nanoparticles of ≈28.75 nm size. Polymeric films based on polyvinyl acetate (PVAc doped with chloro penta amine cobalt(III cloride [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 in different weight percent ratios were prepared using the solvent cast technique. The complexation of the additive with the polymer was confirmed by FTIR and SEM studies. The XRD pattern revealed that the amorphousicity of PVAc polymer matrix increased with raising the [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 content. Parameters such as extinction coefficient, refractive index, real and imaginary parts, and optical conductivity were studied by using the absorbance and measurements from computerized UV-visible spectrophotometer in the spectral range 190–800 nm. This study showed that the optical properties of PVAc were affected by the doping of [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 where the absorption increased by leveling up [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 concentration. The nature of electronic transition from valence band to conduction band was determined and the energy band gaps of the composite films samples were estimated by UV-visible spectrum. It was observed that the optical conductivity increased with photon energy and with the increase of [Co(NH35Cl]Cl2 concentration.

  5. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  6. Structure and reactivity of Ruthenium nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for obtaining detailed structural information of ruthenium nanoparticles in at least the diameter range from 1.5 to 5 nm. The method is based on an ensemble approach where a large number of low-energy structures are collected in an ensemble, from which average properties can...

  7. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous ruthenium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miradji, Faoulat; Souvi, Sidi; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent; Vallet, Valérie

    2015-05-21

    The review of thermodynamic data of ruthenium oxides reveals large uncertainties in some of the standard enthalpies of formation, motivating the use of high-level relativistic correlated quantum chemical methods to reduce the level of discrepancies. The reaction energies leading to the formation of ruthenium oxides RuO, RuO2, RuO3, and RuO4 have been calculated for a series of reactions. The combination of different quantum chemical methods has been investigated [DFT, CASSCF, MRCI, CASPT2, CCSD(T)] in order to predict the geometrical parameters, the energetics including electronic correlation and spin-orbit coupling. The most suitable method for ruthenium compounds is the use of TPSSh-5%HF for geometry optimization, followed by CCSD(T) with complete basis set (CBS) extrapolations for the calculation of the total electronic energies. SO-CASSCF seems to be accurate enough to estimate spin-orbit coupling contributions to the ground-state electronic energies. This methodology yields very accurate standard enthalpies of formations of all species, which are either in excellent agreement with the most reliable experimental data or provide an improved estimate for the others. These new data will be implemented in the thermodynamical databases that are used by the ASTEC code (accident source term evaluation code) to build models of ruthenium chemistry behavior in severe nuclear accident conditions. The paper also discusses the nature of the chemical bonds both from molecular orbital and topological view points.

  8. Enyne Metathesis Catalyzed by Ruthenium Carbene Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carina Storm; Madsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Enyne metathesis combines an alkene and an alkyne into a 1,3-diene. The first enyne metathesis reaction catalyzed by a ruthenium carbene complex was reported in 1994. This review covers the advances in this transformation during the last eight years with particular emphasis on methodology...

  9. Support Effect in Hydrodesulfurization over Ruthenium Sulfide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Kaluža, Luděk; Vít, Zdeněk; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2009), s. 146-149 ISSN 1337-7027 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/06/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ruthenium sulfide * hydrodesulfurization * support effect Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  10. Polyvinyl chloride resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Jae

    1976-06-01

    This book contains polyvinyl chloride resin industry with present condition such as plastic industry and polyvinyl chloride in the world and Japan, manufacture of polyvinyl chloride resin ; suspension polymerization and solution polymerization, extruding, injection process, hollow molding vinyl record, vacuum forming, polymer powders process, vinyl chloride varnish, vinyl chloride latex, safety and construction on vinyl chloride. Each chapter has descriptions on of process and kinds of polyvinyl chloride resin.

  11. Ruthenium transport experiments in air ingress accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teemu, Karkele; Ulrika, Backman; Ari, Auvinen; Unto, Tapper; Jorma, Jokiniemi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Fine Particles (Finland); Riitta, Zilliacus; Maija, Lipponen; Tommi, Kekki [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Accident Management (Finland); Jorma, Jokiniemi [Kuopio Univ., Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Fine Particle and Aerosol Technology Lab. (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    In this study the release, transport and speciation of ruthenium in conditions simulating an air ingress accident was studied. Ruthenium dioxide was exposed to oxidising environment at high temperature (1100-1700 K) in a tubular flow furnace. At these conditions volatile ruthenium species were formed. A large fraction of the released ruthenium was deposited in the tube as RuO{sub 2}. Depending on the experimental conditions 1-26 wt% of the released ruthenium was trapped in the outlet filter as RuO{sub 2} particles. In stainless steel tube 0-8.8 wt% of the released ruthenium reached the trapping bottle as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. A few experiments were carried out, in which revaporization of ruthenium deposited on the tube walls was studied. In these experiments, oxidation of RuO{sub 2} took place at a lower temperature. During revaporization experiments 35-65 % of ruthenium was transported as gaseous RuO{sub 4}. In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution 4 experiments were carried out using a radioactive tracer. In these experiments ruthenium profiles were measured. These experiments showed that the most important retention mechanism was decomposition of gaseous RuO{sub 3} into RuO{sub 2} as the temperature of the furnace was decreasing. In these experiments the transport rate of gaseous ruthenium was decreasing while the release rate was constant.

  12. A cerium(III) selective polyvinyl chloride membrane sensor based on a Schiff base complex of N,N'-bis[2-(salicylideneamino)ethyl]ethane-1,2-diamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Singh, A.K.; Gupta, Barkha

    2006-01-01

    A polyvinyl chloride (PVC) based membrane sensor for cerium ions was prepared by employing N,N'-bis[2-(salicylideneamino)ethyl]ethane-1,2-diamine as an ionophore, oleic acid (OA) as anion excluder and o-nitrophenyloctyl ether (o-NPOE) as plasticizer. The plasticized membrane sensor exhibits a Nernstian response for Ce(III) ions over a wide concentration range (1.41 x 10 -7 to 1.0 x 10 -2 M) with a limit of detection as low as 8.91 x 10 -8 M. It has a fast response time (<10 s) and can be used for 4 months. The sensor revealed a very good selectivity with respect to common alkali, alkaline earth and heavy metal ions. The response of the proposed sensor is independent of pH between 3.0 and 8.0. It was used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of fluoride, carbonate and oxalate anions and determination of cerium in simulated mixtures

  13. In-situ carboxylation and synthesis of two novel Sm(III) coordination polymers assembled from 5-hydroxyisophthalate and nitrate, chloride in hydrothermal reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yan; Yan Bing; Shao Min

    2008-01-01

    By reactions of 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (H 2 hisp) with Sm(NO 3 ) 3 .6H 2 O or SmCl 3 .6H 2 O in the presence of NaOH, two kinds of samarium coordination polymers, [Sm(H 2 hbtc)(ox) 0.5 (H 2 O) 3 ] n .nH 2 O (1) (H 2 hbtc 2- =6-hydroxy-1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate) and [Sm(hisp)(Hhisp)(H 2 O) 2 ] n .2nH 2 O (2), have been hydrothermal synthesized and characterized. Single-crystal X-ray analyses reveal that compound 1 features a novel two-dimensional (2D) stair-like structure with oxalate ligands and the new organic ligand (H 2 hbtc 2- ) but without 5-hydroxyisophthalate ligands, while compound 2 gives the expected product and displays a novel layer structure. The oxalate ligands have been formed via the in-situ reductive coupling of CO 2 molecules released from the decomposition of carboxylate ligands with the reduction of NO 3 - and the new organic ligands have been formed via the in-situ carboxylation under the presence of NO 3 - . Reported herein are the syntheses of compounds 1 and 2, crystal structures and possible mechanism information regarding the in-situ carboxylation. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal reactions of Sm(NO 3 ) 3 .6H 2 O or SmCl 3 .6H 2 O with 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (H 2 hisp) have given rise to two different kinds of Sm(III) coordination polymers. Single-crystal X-ray analyses reveal that compound 1 features a novel 2D stair-like structure with oxalate and a new organic ligand, 6-hydroxy-1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate, while compound 2 gives the normal product and displays a novel 2D layer structure. Oxalate ligands have been formed via the in-situ reductive coupling of CO 2 molecules released from the decomposition of 5-hydroxyisophthalate ligands with the reduction of NO 3 - and the new organic ligands have been formed via the in-situ carboxylation under the presence of NO 3 -

  14. Ruthenium(II) bipyridine complexes bearing new keto-enol azoimine ligands: synthesis, structure, electrochemistry and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Noaimi, Mousa; Awwadi, Firas F; Mansi, Ahmad; Abdel-Rahman, Obadah S; Hammoudeh, Ayman; Warad, Ismail

    2015-01-25

    The novel azoimine ligand, Ph-NH-N=C(COCH3)-NHPh(C≡CH) (H2L), was synthesized and its molecular structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. Catalytic hydration of the terminal acetylene of H2L in the presence of RuCl3·3H2O in ethanol at reflux temperature yielded a ketone (L1=Ph-N=N-C(COCH3)=N-Ph(COCH3) and an enol (L2=Ph-N=N-C(COCH3)=N-PhC(OH)=CH2) by Markovnikov addition of water. Two mixed-ligand ruthenium complexes having general formula, trans-[Ru(bpy)(Y)Cl2] (1-2) (where Y=L1 (1) and Y=L2 (2), bpy is 2.2'-bipyrdine) were achieved by the stepwise addition of equimolar amounts of (H2L) and bpy ligands to RuCl3·3H2O in absolute ethanol. Theses complexes were characterized by elemental analyses and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis, and NMR (1D (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (DEPT-135), (DEPT-90), 2D (1)H-(1)H and (13)C-(1)H correlation (HMQC) spectroscopy)). The two complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 604 mV vs. ferrocene/ferrocenium (Cp2Fe(0/+)) couple along with one electron ligand reduction at -1010 mV. The crystal structure of complex 1 showed that the bidentate ligand L1 coordinates to Ru(II) by the azo- and imine-nitrogen donor atoms. The complex adopts a distorted trans octahedral coordination geometry of chloride ligands. The electronic spectra of 1 and 1+ in dichloromethane have been modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased electrochemical properties of ruthenium oxide and graphene/ruthenium oxide hybrid dispersed by polyvinylpyrrolidone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Dacheng; Ma, Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A good dispersion of RuO 2 and graphene/RuO 2 is obtained by polyvinylpyrrolidone. ► PVP as a dispersant also can prevent the formation of metal Ru in graphene/RuO 2 . ► The max capacitances of the hybrid and RuO 2 reach 435 and 597 F g −1 at 0.2 A g −1 . ► The hybrid shows the best rate capability of 39% at 50 A g −1 . - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide has been prepared by a sol–gel method. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as an excellent polymeric dispersant is adopted to prevent aggregation of ruthenium oxide. In order to enhance the rate capability of ruthenium oxide, graphene with residual oxygen functional groups as a 2D support has been merged into ruthenium oxide. These oxygen functional groups not only favor to form stable few layers of graphene colloids, but also offer the sites to anchor ruthenium oxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction infers that PVP can also hinder the partial formation of Ru by blocking the direct contact between the Ru 3+ and the graphene in the sol–gel synthesis of the hybrids. The ruthenium oxide and the graphene/ruthenium oxide hybrids dispersed by PVP have superior electrochemical properties due to good dispersing and protecting ability of PVP. Especially, the hybrids using PVP exhibit the best rate capability, indicating that the composites possess an advanced structure of combining sheets and particles in nano-scale.

  16. Studying the effect of Ruthenium on High Temperature Mechanical Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys and Determining the Universal Behavior of Ruthenium at Atomic Scale with respect to alloying elements, Stress and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriswaroop Dasari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Any property of a material is a function of its microstructure and microstructure is a function of material composition. So, to maximize the desired properties of a material, one has to understand the evolution of microstructure which in turn is nothing but the reflection of the role of alloying elements. Research has not been done to understand the universal behavior of a certain base/alloying element. Let’s take the example of Cl- ion in HCl, we all know that in general, chloride ion can only be replaced by Fluoride or oxygen ion and that no other ion can replace it. But when you consider a metal like Ni, Co, Cr, Fe etc. there is no establishment that it behaves only in a certain way. Though I concord to the fact that discovery of universal behavior of Ni is lot complex than chloride ion, I think that future research should be focused in this direction also. Superalloys are the candidate materials required to improve thermal efficiency of a gas turbine by allowing higher turbine inlet gas temperatures. Gas turbines are the heart of local power systems, next generation jet engines and high performance space rockets. Recent research in superalloys showed that addition of some alloying elements in minor quantities can result in drastic change in properties. Such an alloying element is Ruthenium (Ru. Addition of Ruthenium to superalloys has shown improvement in mechanical properties by an order of magnitude. However reasons for such improvement are not known yet. Hence, there is a need to identify its role and discover the universal behavior of ruthenium to utilize it efficiently. In this proposal, we study materials with different compositions that are derived based on one ruthenium containing superalloy, and different thermomechanical history. Based on the evolution of microstructures and results of mechanical testing, we plan to determine the exact role of Ruthenium and prediction of its behavior with respect to other elements in the material

  17. Contribution to the study of ruthenium fluorides, oxyfluorides and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbin, Odile.

    1982-08-01

    Studies on the dry processing of spent fuels reveal a poor ruthenium decontamination of plutonium. For a better understanding of this result a study of ruthenium fluorides, oxyfluorides and oxides is carried out here as follows: - bibliographical review; - thermochromatographic identification of the number and nature of compounds formed by fluorination of microquantities of ruthenium; - confirmation of the thermochromatographic results by two other analytical methods: thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy [fr

  18. New superhindered polydentate polyphosphine ligands P(CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)3, PhP(CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)2, P(CH2CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)3, and their ruthenium(II) chloride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Wilson, Ryan; Field, Leslie D; Bhadbhade, Mohan M

    2012-03-05

    The synthesis and characterization of the extremely hindered phosphine ligands, P(CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(3) (P(2)P(3)(tBu), 1), PhP(CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(2) (PhP(2)P(2)(tBu), 2), and P(CH(2)CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(3) (P(3)P(3)(tBu), 3) are reported, along with the synthesis and characterization of ruthenium chloro complexes RuCl(2)(P(2)P(3)(tBu)) (4), RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5), and RuCl(2)(P(3)P(3)(tBu)) (6). The bulky P(2)P(3)(tBu) (1) and P(3)P(3)(tBu) (3) ligands are the most sterically encumbered PP(3)-type ligands so far synthesized, and in all cases, only three phosphorus donors are able to bind to the metal center. Complexes RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5) and RuCl(2)(P(3)P(3)(tBu)) (6) were characterized by crystallography. Low temperature solution and solid state (31)P{(1)H} NMR were used to demonstrate that the structure of RuCl(2)(P(2)P(3)(tBu)) (4) is probably analogous to that of RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5) which had been structurally characterized.

  19. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidation of Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ritwika; Hazari, Arijit Singha; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar; Maiti, Debabrata

    2018-01-18

    Amine oxidation is one of the fundamental reactions in organic synthesis as it leads to a variety of value-added products such as oximes, nitriles, imines, and amides among many others. These products comprise the key N-containing building blocks in the modern chemical industry, and such transformations, when achieved in the presence of molecular oxygen without using stoichiometric oxidants, are much preferred as they circumvent the production of unwanted wastes. In parallel, the versatility of ruthenium catalysts in various oxidative transformations is well-documented. Herein, this review focuses on aerobic oxidation of amines specifically by using ruthenium catalysts and highlights the major achievements in this direction and challenges that still need to be addressed. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Characterization of self-assembled monolayers on a ruthenium surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaheen, Amrozia; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Ricciardi, R.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    We have modified and stabilized the ruthenium surface by depositing a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 1-hexadecanethiol on a polycrystalline ruthenium thin film. The growth mechanism, dynamics, and stability of these monolayers were studied. SAMs, deposited under ambient conditions, on

  1. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontaine, A.; Berger, D.

    1965-01-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [fr

  2. Volatilization and trapping of ruthenium in high temperature processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This experimental study has indicated the importance of moisture and NO/sub x/ vapors on the volatility and trapping conditions of ruthenium in high temperature processes. Also the process operating conditions have a great influence on the ruthenium behavior in the off-gas purification units. Of particular interest is the observation that the ruthenium release during direct vitrification of simulated high-level liquid waste is a factor of about 5 smaller than the ruthenium release during calcination of this type of waste. Moreover, in the direct vitrification case the ruthenium escapes mostly in the form of an aerosol whereas in the calcination case a volatile ruthenium compound is dominating. Consequently, a specific ruthenium filter is not needed in the off-gas line of a direct vitrifier simplifying in this way the number of units in this off-gas line and avoiding the handling and controlling problems of such a ruthenium filter. In the future, a similar program will be started on the volatility of cesium and antimony in a liquid fed melter and on the technical reliability of the liquid fed melter and its associated gas purification units on a semi-pilote scale under simulated conditions

  3. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

  4. Characterization of a trinuclear ruthenium species in catalytic water oxidation by Ru(bda)(pic)2 in neutral media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biaobiao; Li, Fei; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Chengbing; Chen, Lin; Sun, Licheng

    2016-06-30

    A Ru(III)-O-Ru(IV)-O-Ru(III) type trinuclear species was crystallographically characterized in water oxidation by Ru(bda)(pic)2 (H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; pic = 4-picoline) under neutral conditions. The formation of a ruthenium trimer due to the reaction of Ru(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O with Ru(II)-OH2 was fully confirmed by chemical, electrochemical and photochemical methods. Since the oxidation of the trimer was proposed to lead to catalyst decomposition, the photocatalytic water oxidation activity was rationally improved by the suppression of the formation of the trimer.

  5. Electrochemical behavior of ruthenium-hexacyanoferrate modified glassy carbon electrode and catalytic activity towards ethanol electro oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Wendell M.; Marques, Aldalea L.B., E-mail: aldalea.ufma@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Tecnologica; Cardoso, William S.; Marques, Edmar P.; Bezerra, Cicero W.B. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Departamento de Qumica; Ferreira, Antonio Ap. P. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Song, Chaojie; Zhang, Jiujun [Energy, Mining and Environment Portfolio, National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Ruthenium-based hexacyanoferrate (RuHCF) thin film modified glassy carbon electrode was prepared by drop evaporation method. The RuHCF modified electrode exhibited four redox couples in strong acidic solution (pH 1.5) attributed to Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} ion and three ruthenium forms (Ru(II), Ru(III) and Ru(IV)), characteristic of ruthenium oxide compounds. The modified electrode displayed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ethanol oxidation in the potential region where electrochemical processes Ru(III)-O-Ru(IV) and Ru(IV)-O-Ru(VI) occur. Impedance spectroscopy data indicated that the charge transfer resistance decreased with the increase of the applied potential and ethanol concentration, indicating the use of the RuHCF modified electrode as an ethanol sensor. Under optimized conditions, the sensor responded linearly and rapidly to ethanol concentration between 0.03 and 0.4 mol L{sup -1} with a limit of detection of 0.76 mmol L{sup -1}, suggesting an adequate sensitivity in ethanol analyses. (author)

  6. Kinetic investigation of the chlorine reduction reaction on electrochemically oxidised ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, M.; Karlsen, C.; Borresen, B.; Tunold, R.

    2006-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of the electroreduction of chlorine on electrooxidised ruthenium has been investigated with focus on the effect of solution pH. Current/potential curves for the reduction process in solutions with constant chloride concentration of 1.0 mol dm -3 and varying H + concentration have been obtained with the use of the rotating disk electrode technique (RDE). It was found that the chlorine reduction rate is highly inhibited in solutions with high H + concentrations and that it can be satisfactorily described by the Erenburg mechanism, previously suggested for the chlorine evolution on RuO 2 and RTO. The expression of the kinetic current as a function of chlorine and H + concentration was obtained by solving the elementary rate equations of the kinetic mechanism. The kinetic constants obtained from the correlation of the kinetic current expression to the experimental data were used to simulate the dependence of the surface coverages and elementary reaction rates on overpotential

  7. Amide Synthesis from Alcohols and Amines Catalyzed by Ruthenium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Johan Hygum; Osztrovszky, Gyorgyi; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik Rubæk

    2010-01-01

    The direct synthesis of amides from alcohols and amines is described with the simultaneous liberation of dihydrogen. The reaction does not require any stoichiometric additives or hydrogen acceptors and is catalyzed by ruthenium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes. Three different catalyst systems...... are presented that all employ 1,3-diisopropylimidazol-2-ylidene (IiPr) as the carbene ligand. In addition, potassium tert-butoxide and a tricycloalkylphosphine are required for the amidation to proceed. In the first system, the active catalyst is generated in situ from [RuCl2(cod)] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene), 1...... chloride and base. A range of different primary alcohols and amines have been coupled in the presence of the three catalyst systems to afford the corresponding amides in moderate to excellent yields. The best results are obtained with sterically unhindered alcohols and amines. The three catalyst systems do...

  8. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, Ul; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2007-03-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a severe accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium may oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species, it is of interest to know, how they are formed and how they behave. In our experiments the formation and transport of volatile ruthenium oxides was studied by exposing RuO2 powder to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. Transport of gaseous RuO4 was further investigated by injecting it into the facility in similar conditions. Upon cooling of the gas flow RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed from the gas stream with plane filters. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close the mass balance and to achieve better time resolution seven experiment were carried out using radioactive tracer. In this report, the facility for the ruthenium behaviour study and results from experiments are presented. Preliminary conclusions from the experiments are reported as well. Final conclusions will be made after modelling of the facility is completed in a continuation work of this study. (au)

  9. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, Ul; Auvinen, A.; Zilliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland)

    2007-03-15

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a severe accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium may oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species, it is of interest to know, how they are formed and how they behave. In our experiments the formation and transport of volatile ruthenium oxides was studied by exposing RuO2 powder to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. Transport of gaseous RuO4 was further investigated by injecting it into the facility in similar conditions. Upon cooling of the gas flow RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed from the gas stream with plane filters. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close the mass balance and to achieve better time resolution seven experiment were carried out using radioactive tracer. In this report, the facility for the ruthenium behaviour study and results from experiments are presented. Preliminary conclusions from the experiments are reported as well. Final conclusions will be made after modelling of the facility is completed in a continuation work of this study. (au)

  10. Chloride test - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum chloride test ... A greater-than-normal level of chloride is called hyperchloremia. It may be due to: Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (used to treat glaucoma) Diarrhea Metabolic acidosis Respiratory alkalosis (compensated) Renal ...

  11. Chloride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002417.htm Chloride in diet To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chloride is found in many chemicals and other substances ...

  12. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002474.htm Mercuric chloride poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It ...

  13. Characterization of ultrasonic spray pyrolysed ruthenium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, P.S.; Ennaoui, E.A.; Lokhande, C.D.; Mueller, M.; Giersig, M.; Diesner, K.; Tributsch, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany). Bereich Physikalische Chemie

    1997-11-21

    The ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) technique was employed to deposit ruthenium oxide thin films. The films were prepared at 190 C substrate temperature and further annealed at 350 C for 30 min in air. The films were 0.22 {mu} thick and black grey in color. The structural, compositional and optical properties of ruthenium oxide thin films are reported. Contactless transient photoconductivity measurement was carried out to calculate the decay time of excess charge carriers in ruthenium oxide thin films. (orig.) 28 refs.

  14. Hazards and control of ruthenium in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichholz, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of present information on the possible hazards of radioruthenium in the nuclear fuel cycle and its behaviour in nuclear operations and in the environment. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: basic chemical and nuclear properties of ruthenium; chemistry (including the ruthenium-nitric acid system, electrochemistry, extraction processes); ruthenium toxicity; generation of radioruthenium (fallout sources, reactor sources, fuel reprocessing operations); waste treatment (cementation and bitumenization, calcining processes, vitrification); movement in the environment (movement of airborne effluents, liquid effluents and the freshwater environment, marine environment, bottom sediments, marine organisms, terrestrial environments, uptake in vegetation and animals); conclusion. (U.K.)

  15. Scaling-resistance of ruthenium- and ruthenium phosphides powders in argon and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernogorebko, V.B.; Semenov-Kobzar', A.A.; Kulik, L.Ya.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal stability of ruthenium phosphides in air diminishes as the content of phosphorus in the compound increases. The temperatures at which active oxidation of the powders starts are as follows: Ru-600, Ru 2 P-590, RuP-390, and RuP 2 -270 0 C. The oxidation of phosphorus in the phosphides proceeds in steps. The atoms of phosphorus which are most accessible to oxygen are first oxidated. Phosphorus atoms in the octahedral spaces are oxidated less easily, simultaneously with the oxidation of the ruthenium atoms. When heated in argon, Ru 2 P and RuP fuse congruently at 1,500 and 1,555 0 C respectively, while RuP 2 dissociates at 950 0 C. (author)

  16. Ceria-supported ruthenium nanoparticles as highly active and long-lived catalysts in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbayrak, Serdar; Tonbul, Yalçın; Özkar, Saim

    2016-07-05

    Ruthenium(0) nanoparticles supported on ceria (Ru(0)/CeO2) were in situ generated from the reduction of ruthenium(iii) ions impregnated on ceria during the hydrolysis of ammonia borane. Ru(0)/CeO2 was isolated from the reaction solution by centrifugation and characterized by ICP-OES, BET, XRD, TEM, SEM-EDS and XPS techniques. All the results reveal that ruthenium(0) nanoparticles were successfully supported on ceria and the resulting Ru(0)/CeO2 is a highly active, reusable and long-lived catalyst for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane with a turnover frequency value of 361 min(-1). The reusability tests reveal that Ru(0)/CeO2 is still active in the subsequent runs of hydrolysis of ammonia borane preserving 60% of the initial catalytic activity even after the fifth run. Ru(0)/CeO2 provides a superior catalytic lifetime (TTO = 135 100) in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C before deactivation. The work reported here includes the formation kinetics of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles. The rate constants for the slow nucleation and autocatalytic surface growth of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles were obtained using hydrogen evolution as a reporter reaction. An evaluation of rate constants at various temperatures enabled the estimation of activation energies for both the reactions, Ea = 60 ± 7 kJ mol(-1) for the nucleation and Ea = 47 ± 2 kJ mol(-1) for the autocatalytic surface growth of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles, as well as the activation energy of Ea = 51 ± 2 kJ mol(-1) for the catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

  17. Ruthenium, osmium and rhodium complexes of polypyridyl ligands ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Discipline of Silicates and Catalysis, Central Salt and Marine Chemicals ... However, synthetic methods have also been developed to prepare complexes with ... 3.2 Synthesis and characterisation of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) complexes18, ...

  18. Unsaturated carbone and allenylidene ruthenium complexes from alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, Yu.L.; Diznev, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author's studies aimed at activation of terminal alkynes by metal complexes, reactivity patterns and selective preparations of unsaturated carbene, allenylidene and cumulenylidene derivatives of (arene)ruthenium complexes are reviewed. 48 refs

  19. Supercapacitive performance of hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gel method have been employed to prepare ruthenium oxide thin films. Recently ... the potentiostat (263A EG&G, Princeton Applied Research. Potentiostat). .... is a mixed conductor that conducts protons and electrons in acidic solution (as ...

  20. Rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Sebastian; Kersting, Marcel; Heletta, Lukas; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-07-01

    Eight new intermetallic rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium compounds have been synthesized from the elements in sealed niobium ampoules using different annealing sequences in muffle furnaces. The compounds have been characterized by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Sm{sub 9.2}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.8} (a=939.6(2), c=1779(1) pm), Gd{sub 11}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16} (a=951.9(2), c=1756.8(8) pm), and Tb{sub 10.5}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16.5} (a=942.5(1), c=1758.3(4) pm) crystallize with the tetragonal Nd{sub 9.34}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.66} type structure, space group I4/mmm. This structure exhibits a complex condensation pattern of square-prisms and square-antiprisms around the magnesium and ruthenium atoms, respectively. Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=344.0(1), c=2019(1) pm) and Tb{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=341.43(6), c=2054.2(7) pm) adopt the Er{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} structure and Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg (a=337.72(9), c=1129.8(4) pm) is isotypic with Sc{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg. Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=337.35(9), c=2671(1) pm) and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=335.83(5), c=2652.2(5) pm) are the first ternary ordered variants of the Ti{sub 3}Cu{sub 4} type, space group I4/mmm. These five compounds belong to a large family of intermetallics which are completely ordered superstructures of the bcc subcell. The group-subgroup scheme for Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} is presented. The common structural motif of all three structure types are ruthenium-centered rare earth cubes reminicent of the CsCl type. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} samples revealed Pauli paramagnetism of the conduction electrons.

  1. Pretreatment with U(IV) solution for improving the decontamination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Haoxin; Qi Zhanshun; Zhu Guohui

    1993-01-01

    The ruthenium decontamination factor in Purex process falls quickly in successive TBP cycles. So, it is necessary to change the chemical states of RuNO complexes in order to improve DF Ru in the uranium purification cycle. Hydrazine nitrate is being used to transform RuNO complexes into in-extractable Ru(III)and Ru(IV). However, hydrazine nitrate may be inverted into hydrazoic acid which is dangerous and can bring an unstable factor. Pretreatment using U(IV) solution provides another method to improve the decontamination of ruthenium in Purex process. 0.02 mol/lU(IV) solution can transform RuNO complexes into inextricable species by heating in water bath. The D Ru can be decreased by a factor of 10-20. U(IV) pretreatment does not bring any harmful chemical in process. The acidity has a very large influence on the effect of pretreatment. The higher the acidity is, the worse the effect will be

  2. Nanoengineering of Ruthenium and Platinum-based Nanocatalysts by Continuous-Flow Chemistry for Renewable Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan Mohammed

    2017-04-15

    This thesis presents an integrated study of nanocatalysts for heterogenous catalytic and electrochemical processes using pure ruthenium (Ru) with mixed-phase and platinum-based nanomaterials synthesized by continuous-flow chemistry. There are three major challenges to the application of nanomaterials in heterogenous catalytic reactions and electrocatalytic processes in acidic solution. These challenges are the following: (i) controlling the size, shape and crystallography of nanoparticles to give the best catalytic properties, (ii) scaling these nanoparticles up to a commercial quantity (kg per day) and (iii) making stable nanoparticles that can be used catalytically without degrading in acidic electrolytes. Some crucial limitations of these nanostructured materials in energy conversion and storage applications were overcome by continuous-flow chemistry. By using a continuous-flow reactor, the creation of scalable nanoparticle systems was achieved and their functionality was modified to control the nanoparticles’ physical and chemical characteristics. The nanoparticles were also tested for long-term stability, to make sure these nanoparticles were feasible under realistic working conditions. These nanoparticles are (1) shape- and crystallography-controlled ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles, (2) size-controlled platinum-metal (Pt-M= nickel (Ni) & copper (Cu)) nanooctahedra (while maintaining morphology) and (3) core-shell platinum@ruthenium (Pt@Ru) nanoparticles where an ultrathin ruthenium shell was templated onto the platinum core. Thus, a complete experimental validation of the formation of a scalable amount of these nanoparticles and their catalytic activity and stability towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in acid medium, hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB) along with plausible explanations were provided.

  3. Ruthenium Sensitizers and Their Applications in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuancheng Qin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs have attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the possibility of low-cost conversion of photovoltaic energy. The DSSCs-based ruthenium complexes as sensitizers show high efficiency and excellent stability, implying potential practical applications. This review focuses on recent advances in design and preparation of efficient ruthenium sensitizers and their applications in DSSCs, including thiocyanate ruthenium sensitizers and thiocyanate-free ruthenium sensitizers.

  4. Kinetics and Photochemistry of Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Diacetonitrile Complexes: An Interdisciplinary Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Teresa L.; Phillips, Susan R.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes can be widely applied across disciplines in the undergraduate curriculum. Ruthenium photochemistry has advanced many fields including dye-sensitized solar cells, photoredox catalysis, lightdriven water oxidation, and biological electron transfer. Equally promising are ruthenium polypyridyl complexes…

  5. Chloride ingress prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jens Mejer; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of chloride ingress into concrete is an important part of durability design of reinforced concrete structures exposed to chloride containing environment. This paper presents experimentally based design parameters for Portland cement concretes with and without silica fume and fly ash...... in marine atmospheric and submersed South Scandinavian environment. The design parameters are based on sequential measurements of 86 chloride profiles taken over ten years from 13 different types of concrete. The design parameters provide the input for an analytical model for chloride profiles as function...... of depth and time, when both the surface chloride concentration and the diffusion coefficient are allowed to vary in time. The model is presented in a companion paper....

  6. Towards PSII analogs driven by ruthenium photophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    A number of model complexes have been prepared in an attempt to develop models for photosystem II (PSII) in green plants. As replacement for the chlorophyll photosensitizer, we have used Ru(ll) tris-2,2-bipyridyl or Ru(ll) bis-2,2';6',2 - terpyridyl complexes linked to a pendant 2,2'-bipyridyl or 2,2';6',2''-terpyridyl moieties via spacers of varying lengths. Manganese (ll) has been covalently linked to the pendant 2,2'-bipyridyl /2,2';6',2''-terpyridyl moieties. The use of different ruthenium centres and spacers has made it possible to make assumptions about the way and how easily manganese is coordinated through self-assembly to the pendant 2,2'-bipyridyl or 2,2';6',2''-terpyridyl groups. Several polynuclear complexes containing a photoactive centre (Ru(ll) tris-2,2'-bipyridine or Ru(ll) bis-2,2';6',2''-terpyridine) or other metal ions (Co 2+ , Fe 2+ , Mn 2= ) have been prepared and characterised. The main work has been focused on organic synthesis and characterisation of polypyridine ligands and coordinated to different metal centres. The complexes have been investigated electrochemically and photophysically. Several new phenol-based ligands have been prepared by organic synthetic methods and characterised by various different methods. (author)

  7. Reactions of dihydridotetrakis(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(II) with olefins and isolation of new ruthenium-olefin complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiya, Sanshiro; Yamamoto, Akio

    1976-01-01

    Dihydridotetrakis(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium (II), RuH 2 (PPh 3 ) 4 , reacts with olefins (ethylene, propylene, stylene and butadiene) to give olefin-coordinated complexes of the type, Ru(olefin)(PPh 3 ) 3 and equimolar amounts of their hydrogenation products per mol of the dihydride complex. The olefin coordinated with ruthenium can be exchanged with other olefins. Olefin-coordinated complexes easily react with molecular hydrogen to afford tetrahydridotris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium, RuH 4 (PPh 3 ) 3 , releasing alkane at room temperature, Under hydrogen atmosphere catalytic hydrogenation of the olefins smoothly takes place with RuH 2 (PPh 3 ) 4 . (Ethylene)tris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium(0) reacts with methyl iodide to give propylene and a trace of butadiene along with methane, ethylene, and small amounts of ethane and butenes. The formation of propylene suggests that oxidative addition involving cleavage of the C-H bond of ethylene to ruthenium giving a hydridovinyl complex may be taking place. Reactions of Ru(C 2 H 4 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with methyl-d 3 iodide and ethyl iodide, and of Ru(C 3 H 6 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with methyl iodide were examined to test the generality of this type of reaction. The reaction of Ru(C 2 H 4 )(PPh 3 ) 3 with CD 3 I released CD 4 and CD 2 H 2 together with CD 3 H suggesting the involvement of α-hydrogen abstraction. (auth.)

  8. Ruthenium Dioxide Catalysts for the Selective Oxidation of Benzylamine to Benzonitrile: Investigating the Effect of Ruthenium Loading on Physical and Catalytic Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine; Schill, Leonhard; Riisager, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine to benzonitrile was studied in batch and continuous flow processes using ruthenium dioxide catalysts with varying ruthenium loadings. Increased conversions were observed in the continuous flow process compared with the batch process (up to 100% in the ......The oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine to benzonitrile was studied in batch and continuous flow processes using ruthenium dioxide catalysts with varying ruthenium loadings. Increased conversions were observed in the continuous flow process compared with the batch process (up to 100......% in the flow process compared with up to 92% in the batch process), with increased selectivity to benzonitrile (82 and 65%, respectively) and benzonitrile yields (84 and 58%, respectively). The major by-product was N-benzylidenebenzylamine. The ruthenium loading in the catalyst was successfully optimised...... and the most active catalyst had a ruthenium loading of 2.5-3.5 wt%....

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis and physicochemical properties of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikhtiarenko, A., E-mail: dikhtiarenkoalla@uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Khainakov, S.A.; Garcia, J.R.; Gimeno, J. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pedro, I. de; Fernandez, J. Rodriguez [CITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Blanco, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average size of the nanoparticles are depend on the reducing agent used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic response seems to be dominated by a paramagnetic contribution characteristic of the band electronic magnetism of the ruthenium(0) nanoparticles. - Abstract: The synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles in hydrothermal conditions using mild reducing agents (succinic acid, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate) is reported. The shape of the nanoparticles depends on the type of the reducing agent, while the size is more influenced by the pH of the medium. The magnetic response seems to be dominated by a paramagnetic contribution characteristic of the band electronic magnetism of the nanoparticles.

  10. Confinement of ruthenium oxides volatilized during nuclear fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, E.T. Jr.; Longo, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    While many materials have been suggested and employed as trapping agents for gaseous oxides of fission product ruthenium volatilized during nuclear fuels reprocessing, none that is known to form thermodynamically stable compounds with rutheniunm has been utilized. We have employed alkaline earth metal compounds for this purpose because of their ability to form stable mixed metal oxide phases with ruthenium. Results of experiments in which RuO 4 was volatilized from either a solid source (RuO 2 .xH 2 O) or from solution [Ru(NO)(NO 3 ) 3 ] in HNO 3 and passed through beds of alkaline earth metal carbonates and calcium oxide held at 600 to 750 0 C have demonstrated that compounds of formulation MRuO 3 (M = calcium, strontium, barium) are formed. Under oxidizing conditions, these materials exist as stable ceramic phases, whereas under reducing conditions, they are transformed into intimate mixtures of the alkaline earth metal oxide and nonvolatile ruthenium metal

  11. Device for separating ruthenium ion from spent fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Sasahira, Akira; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate plutonium ions efficiently and selectively from organic solvent containing tributyl phosphate used in the main step of reprocessing process. Constitution: The device comprises, as the main constituent factor, a liquid-liquid contact device for bringing not water soluble organic solvent into contact with a nitric acid solution of spent fuel substances and a liquid-liquid contact-separation device for bringing an organic solvent solution containing spent fuel substances separated with nitric acid into contact again with nitric acid. Then, a device is disposed between two liquid-liquid contact devices for staying ruthenium ions and organic solvent for a sufficient time. In this way, ruthenium ions in the organic solvent containing butyl phosphate are gradually converted into complex compounds combined with tributyl phosphate thereby enabling to separate ruthenium ions efficiently and remarkably reduce the corrosion of equipments. (Horiuchi, T.)

  12. Synthesis, structure and photoluminescence of (PLAGH)2[ZnCl4] and comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radanović, Mirjana M.; Jelić, Miodrag G.; Romčević, Nebojša Ž.; Boukos, Nikos; Vojinović-Ješić, Ljiljana S.; Leovac, Vukadin M.; Hadžić, Branka B.; Bajac, Branimir M.; Nađ, Laslo F.; Chandrinou, Chrysoula; Baloš, Sebastian S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New zinc(II) complex with pyridoxalaminoguanidine was synthesized. • The enhancement of the photoluminescence due to the compound formation was achieved. • Very high photoluminescence of Zn(II) compound was noticed. • Comparative analysis of photoluminescence with tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) was provided. - Abstract: The first compound of zinc(II) containing pyridoxalaminoguanidine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, conductometric measurements and X-ray crystallography. Single crystals of the compound were obtained in the reaction of methanolic solution of zinc(II) chloride and pyridoxalaminoguanidine hydrochloride. In this compound the coordination of chelate ligand is absent and tetrachlorido complex of zinc(II) with pyridoxalaminuguanidinium cation as contraion is obtained. Photoluminescence spectra were measured. Lorentzian multipeak technique was used to determine peak wavelengths and their intensities. Photoluminescence spectroscopy upon 325, 488 and 514 nm laser excitation light was used to obtain results. This novel compound of zinc(II) was compared to the well-known organic light emitting diode material—ruthenium(II) complex with bypiridine i.e., tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), under the same circumstances and the identical experimental setup. A scheme of energy levels and transitions is proposed to explain the obtained experimental results

  13. Thermodynamic data bases for multivalent elements: An example for ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rard, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A careful consideration and understanding of fundamental chemistry, thermodynamics, and kinetics is absolutely essential when modeling predominance regions and solubility behavior of elements that exhibit a wide range of valence states. Examples of this are given using the ruthenium-water system at 298.15 K, for which a critically assessed thermochemical data base is available. Ruthenium exhibits the widest range of known aqueous solution valence states. Known solid anhydrous binary oxides of ruthenium are crystalline RuO 2 , RuO 4 , and possibly RuO 3 (thin film), and known hydroxides/hydrated oxides (all amorphous) are Ru(OH) 3 . H 2 O, RuO 2 . 2H 2 O, RuO 2 . H 2 O, and a poorly characterized Ru(V) hydrous oxide. Although the other oxides, hydroxides, and hydrous oxides are generally obtained as precipitates from aqueous solutions, they are thermodynamically unstable with regard to RuO 2 (cr) formation. Characterized aqueous species of ruthenium include RuO 4 (which slowly oxidizes water and which dissociates as a weak acid), RuO 4 - and RuO 4 2- (which probably contain lesser amounts of RuO 3 (OH) 2 - and RuO 3 (OH) 2 2- , respectively, and other species), Ru(OH) 2 2+ , Ru 4 (OH) 12 4+ , Ru(OH) 4 , Ru 3+ , Ru(OH) 2+ , Ru(OH) 2 + , Ru 2+ , and some hydroxytetramers with formal ruthenium valences of 3.75 ≥ Z ≥ 2.0. Potential pH diagrams of the predominance regions change significantly with concentration due to polymerization/depolymerization reactions. Failure to consider the known chemistry of ruthenium can yield large differences in predicted solubilities

  14. CCDC 713129: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (eta^6^-Benzylammonium)-dichloro-(dimethylsulfoxide-S)-ruthenium(ii) chloride

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, T.; Waibel, M.; Marziale, Alexander N.; Jantke, Dominik; Kiefer, F.J.; Fassler, T.F.; Eppinger, Jö rg

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  15. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Method of removing clogging materials due to ruthenium precipitates and sealing them in device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshikawa, Tadahiro; Sasahira, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    In a facility, such as a reprocessing facility, for processing a solution containing a great amount of ruthenium, precipitates due to evaporated ruthenium and cooled NO x are brought into contact with each other to decompose the precipitates due to the evaporated ruthenium. Precipitates due to ruthenium evaporated from the solution are reacted with cooled NO x , and the precipitates of ruthenium are decomposed and returned to the solution in the form of extremely fine particles together with recycling flow from the inner wall of the device. Since the precipitates of ruthenium returned to the solution are stable, they are no more evaporated and precipitated on the inner wall of the device. In the solution processing device having a possibility of clogging, clogging can be prevented and the precipitates of ruthenium can be sealed by decomposing them. (T.M.)

  17. Ruthenium oxide resistors as sensitive elements of composite bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benassai, M.; Gallinaro, G.; Gatti, F.; Siri, S.; Vitale, S.

    1988-01-01

    Bolometers for particle detection made with Ruthenium oxide thermistors could be produced by means of a simple technique on a variety of different materials as substrata. Preliminary results on alpha particle detection with devices realized using commercial RuO 2 thick film resistor (Tfr) are considered positive for devices operating between. 3 and .1 k and determined us to pursue further the idea. Ruthenium oxide resistors on sapphire at the moment are being prepared. The behaviour of these devices st temperatures lower than .1 k has to be investigated in more detail

  18. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma Ribera, R., E-mail: r.colomaribera@utwente.nl; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-08-07

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO{sub 2} films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a gradual decrease in diffusion rates was observed with oxide growth, with the activation energy increasing from about 2.1 to 2.4 eV. Further exploration of the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor for diffusion process revealed that oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium joins the class of materials that obey the Meyer-Neldel rule.

  19. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes; L'application des proprietes chimiques du ruthenium a des procedes de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, A.; Berger, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [French] Les proprietes chimiques du ruthenium en solutions aqueuses nitriques et en solutions organiques de tributylphosphate, sont passees en revue. A partir de ces donnees, quelques exemples connus sont cites: ils exposent des procedes de separation ou d'elimination du ruthenium de dechets radioactifs. (auteurs)

  20. Application of the chemical properties of ruthenium to decontamination processes; L'application des proprietes chimiques du ruthenium a des procedes de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, A; Berger, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The chemical properties of ruthenium in the form of an aqueous solution of the nitrate and of organic tributylphosphate solution are reviewed. From this data, some known examples are given: they demonstrate the processes of separation or of elimination of ruthenium from radioactive waste. (authors) [French] Les proprietes chimiques du ruthenium en solutions aqueuses nitriques et en solutions organiques de tributylphosphate, sont passees en revue. A partir de ces donnees, quelques exemples connus sont cites: ils exposent des procedes de separation ou d'elimination du ruthenium de dechets radioactifs. (auteurs)

  1. Electro-volatilization of ruthenium in nitric medium: influences of ruthenium species nature and models solutions composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.

    2004-12-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products in the reprocessing of irradiated fuels that requires a specific processing management. Its elimination, upstream by the PUREX process, has been considered. A process, called electro-volatilization, which take advantage of the RuO 4 volatility, has been optimised in the present study. It consists in a continuous electrolysis of ruthenium solutions in order to generate RuO 4 species that is volatilized and easily trapped. This process goes to satisfying ruthenium elimination yields with RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 synthetic solutions but not with fuel dissolution solutions. Consequently, this work consisted in the speciation studies of dissolved ruthenium species were carried out by simulating fuel solutions produced by hot acid attack of several ruthenium compounds (Ru(0), RuO 2 ,xH 2 O, polymetallic alloy). In parallel with dissolution kinetic studies, the determination of dissolved species was performed using voltammetry, spectrometry and spectro-electrochemistry. The results showed the co-existence of Ru(IV) and RuNO(NO 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 3 . Although these species are different from synthetic RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 , their electro-oxidation behaviour are similar. The electro-volatilization tests of these dissolution solutions yielded to comparable results as the synthetic RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 solutions. Then, complexity increase of models solutions was performed by in-situ generation of nitrous acid during ruthenium dissolution. Nitrous acid showed a catalytic effect on ruthenium dissolution. Its presence goes to quasi exclusively RuNO(NO 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 3 species. It is also responsible of the strong n-bond formation between Ru 2+ and NO + . In addition, it has been shown that its reducing action on RuO 4 hinders the electro-volatilization process. Mn 2+ and Ce 3+ cations also reveal, but to a lesser extent, an electro-eater behaviour as well as Pu 4+ and Cr 3+ according to the thermodynamics data. These results allow one to

  2. Electrodeposition of ruthenium, rhodium and palladium from nitric acid and ionic liquid media: Recovery and surface morphology of the deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, M.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Sudha, R. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Srinivasan, T.G., E-mail: tgs@igcar.gov.com [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Platinum group metals are man-made noble metals. {yields} Electrochemical recovery of fission platinoids. {yields} Recovery from nitric acid medium. {yields} Recovery from ionic liquid medium. {yields} Platinoids with exotic surface morphologies. - Abstract: Electrodeposition is a promising technique for the recovery of platinum group metals with unique surface morphologies. The electrodeposition of palladium, ruthenium and rhodium from aqueous nitric acid, and non-aqueous 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid medium was studied at stainless steel electrode. The surface morphology and elemental composition of the resultant deposit were probed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis. Deposits with diverse surface morphologies and metal compositions were obtained by varying the composition of the electrolytic medium and applied potential. The results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the morphologies of PGMs by controlling the composition and potential needed for electrodeposition.

  3. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH)52-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH) 5 2- has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH) 5 2- complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  4. Effect of ozone on ruthenium species in alkaline medium. Pt. II. Oxidation of pentahydroxo nitrosyl ruthenate(II) ion RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Inst. Lavoisier, IREM UMR 8637, Univ. de Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles (France); Eysseric, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01

    Oxidation of the nitrosyl ruthenium complex RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} has been carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions in contact with a gas flow containing ozone. The RuNO(OH){sub 5}{sup 2-} complex is converted successively into ruthenate and perruthenate ions. An empirical kinetic rate law for the first step has been determined and was shown to depend on concentrations of (i) the ruthenium complex, (ii) the hydroxide ions and (iii) ozone concentration in the gas flow. The second step of the reaction, corresponding to the perruthenate ion formation, shows a complex mechanism and four competing reactions have been proposed to represent it. The influences on the second step kinetics of several parameters such as ozone or hydroxide concentrations or the conditions of the gas-liquid exchange area are also qualitatively discussed. (orig.)

  5. Electronic spectroscopy and ligand-field analysis of cis-carbonato (rac-5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) chromium(III) chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong-Ha; Oh, In-Gyung; Linder, Rolf; Schoenherr, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The absorption spectra of microcrystalline salts of cis-[Cr(cycb)(O 2 CO)] + (cycb=rac-5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) have been measured between 13,000 and 50,000 cm -1 at temperatures down to 2 K. The vibrational intervals of the electronic ground state were extracted by recording emission and far-IR spectra. The zero-phonon line in the sharp-line absorption spectrum splits into two components by 144 cm -1 . The nine electronic bands due to spin-allowed and spin-forbidden transitions were assigned. Using the observed transitions, a ligand-field analysis has been performed to probe the ligand-field properties of carbonato group in the chromium(III) complex. It is found that the carbonato oxygen has moderately strong σ- and π-donor properties toward chromium(III) ion

  6. The trans influence in mer-trichloronitridobis(triphenylarsine)ruthenium(VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The title compound, mer-[RuCl(3)N(C(18)H(15)As)(2)], is the first structurally characterized example of a nitride complex in which ruthenium is six-coordinated to monodentate ligands only. The Ru[triple-bond]N bond length [1.6161 (15) A] is relatively long, and the trans influence of the nitride...

  7. Polystyrene with pendant mixed functional ruthenium(II)-terpyridine complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, M.; Schubert, U.S.

    2002-01-01

    A vinyl substituted 2,2:6,2-terpyridine and a mixed, bifunctional ruthenium(II)-terpyridine complex bearing a vinyl and a hydroxymethyl group are utilized as comonomers for radical copolymerization with styrene. The resulting polymers are characterized by means of UV-vis spectroscopy and gel

  8. Electroerosion method for preparation of saturated solutions of ruthenium hydroxochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalev, V.A.; Andrianov, G.A.; Zhadanov, B.V.; Ryazanov, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    A pilot plant for carrying out electroerosion processes using pulse current of high unit power is developed. The solution process of metallic Ru in concentrated HCl is investigated. The possibility of preparation of ruthenium hydroxochloride solutions of 300 g/l concentration is established; it gives the possibility of Ru solution under conditions similar to the process of salting out

  9. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingfang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru_2P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru_2P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO_2 prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H_2-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru_2P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N_2 adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru_2P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  10. A new approach to synthesize supported ruthenium phosphides for hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingfang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Zhiqiang [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Yin, Xiaoqian; Zhou, Linxi [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Minghui, E-mail: zhangmh@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Kashgar University, Kashgar 844006 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We bring out a new method to synthesize noble metal phosphides at low temperature. • Both RuP and Ru{sub 2}P were synthesized using triphenylphosphine as phosphorus sources. • Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. • RuP/SiO{sub 2} prepared by new method had better HDS activity to that by TPR method. - Abstract: Supported noble metal ruthenium phosphides were synthesized by one-step H{sub 2}-thermal treatment method using triphenylphosphine (TPP) as phosphorus sources at low temperatures. Two phosphides RuP and Ru{sub 2}P can be prepared by this method via varying the molar ratio of metal salt and TPP. The as-prepared phosphides were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), low-temperature N{sub 2} adsorption, CO chemisorption and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The supported ruthenium phosphides prepared by new method and conventional method together with contradistinctive metallic ruthenium were evaluated in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). The catalytic results showed that metal-rich Ru{sub 2}P was the better active phase for HDS than RuP and metal Ru. Besides this, ruthenium phosphide catalyst prepared by new method exhibited superior HDS activity to that prepared by conventional method.

  11. Determination of oxygen diffusion kinetics during thin film ruthenium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray reflectivity was used to reveal oxygen diffusion kinetics for thermal oxidation of polycrystalline ruthenium thin films and accurate determination of activation energies for this process. Diffusion rates in nanometer thin RuO2 films were found to show Arrhenius behaviour. However, a

  12. An XPS study on ruthenium compounds and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, C.L.; Ragaini, V.; Cattania, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The binding energy (BE) of the relevant peaks of several ruthenium compounds have been measured with a monochromatic small spot XPS. The BE of the 3d 5/2 level of ruthenium is in the range 279.91-282.88 eV. The variation of BE is due either to the variation of the oxidation state or to the different counter-ion. A series of catalysts with varying amounts of ruthenium supported on alumina and prepared using different precursors was also analyzed. The presence of more ruthenium species other than the metal was observed. On the basis of the values previously obtained on unsupported compounds, the species with higher BE were assigned to oxides. On all the samples prepared from RuCl 3 , an additional peak at a very high BE (283.79 eV) has been observed. This peak is related to the presence of chlorine on the surface: it is suggested that it is related to a charge transfer interaction. The influence of this species on the CO reactivity in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Oxidation of ruthenium thin films using atomic oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, A.P.; Bogan, J.; Brady, A.; Hughes, G.

    2015-12-31

    In this study, the use of atomic oxygen to oxidise ruthenium thin films is assessed. Atomic layer deposited (ALD) ruthenium thin films (~ 3 nm) were exposed to varying amounts of atomic oxygen and the results were compared to the impact of exposures to molecular oxygen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal substantial oxidation of metallic ruthenium films to RuO{sub 2} at exposures as low as ~ 10{sup 2} L at 575 K when atomic oxygen was used. Higher exposures of molecular oxygen resulted in no metal oxidation highlighting the benefits of using atomic oxygen to form RuO{sub 2}. Additionally, the partial oxidation of these ruthenium films occurred at temperatures as low as 293 K (room temperature) in an atomic oxygen environment. - Highlights: • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the oxidation of Ru thin films • Oxidation of Ru thin films using atomic oxygen • Comparison between atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen treatments on Ru thin films • Fully oxidised RuO{sub 2} thin films formed with low exposures to atomic oxygen.

  14. The use of ruthenium in various fields of industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsin, N.M.

    1990-03-01

    Metallic ruthenium, its alloys, and compounds with other metals have a number of valuable and specific properties which allow the usage of ruthenium in various fields of modern technology, which is described here. In the atomic technology, Ru can be used in the building of reactors as a material of construction since its isotopes don't possess a high neutron capture cross section. Ruthenium is used for the preparation of γ- and β-ray emission sources. Isotopes Ru-103 and Ru-106 are widely used as tracers. They are successfully used for the monitoring of production, for the development of new technological and analytical methods of the extraction of Ru, for the cleansing of other valuable metals from Ru, for the monitoring of the thickness of Ru microfilm on the substrate, and for the monitoring of Ru losses in various processes. In the nuclear reactor, during the process of uranium and plutonium decay, large amounts of stable Ru isotopes are formed together with radioactive isotopes. In such a manner, a nuclear reactor can supply Ru. Special attention must be paid to the usage of direct coordination Ru compounds. Ru and its compounds possess a large number of very valuable properties, many of the secrets of Ru must still be discovered. It can be presumed that the demand for ruthenium will grow in the forthcoming years and the range and volume of its applications will increase

  15. Ruthenium based redox flow battery for solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, Mohammed Harun; Roberts, Edward Pelham Lindfield; Bae, Chulheung; Saleem, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Undivided redox flow battery employing porous graphite felt electrodes was used. → Ruthenium acetylacetonate dissolved in acetonitrile was the electrolyte. → Charge/discharge conditions were determined for both 0.02 M and 0.1 M electrolytes. → Optimum power output of 0.180 W was also determined for 0.1 M electrolyte. → 55% voltage efficiency was obtained when battery was full of electrolytes. -- Abstract: The technical performance for the operation of a stand alone redox flow battery system for solar energy storage is presented. An undivided reactor configuration has been employed along with porous graphite felt electrodes and ruthenium acetylacetonate as electrolyte in acetonitrile solvent. Limiting current densities are determined for concentrations of 0.02 M and 0.1 M ruthenium acetylacetonate. Based on these, operating conditions for 0.02 M ruthenium acetylacetonate are determined as charging current density of 7 mA/cm 2 , charge electrolyte superficial velocity of 0.0072 cm/s (through the porous electrodes), discharge current density of 2 mA/cm 2 and discharge electrolyte superficial velocity of 0.0045 cm/s. An optimum power output of 35 mW is also obtained upon discharge at 2.1 mA/cm 2 . With an increase in the concentration of ruthenium species from 0.02 M to 0.1 M, the current densities and power output are higher by a factor of five approximately (at same superficial velocities) due to higher mass transport phenomenon. Moreover at 0.02 M concentration the voltage efficiency is better for battery full of electrolytes prior to charging (52.1%) in comparison to an empty battery (40.5%) due to better mass transport phenomenon. Voltage efficiencies are higher as expected at concentrations of 0.1 M ruthenium acetylacetonate (55% when battery is full of electrolytes and 48% when empty) showing that the all-ruthenium redox flow battery has some promise for future applications in solar energy storage. Some improvements for the

  16. Recommendation of ruthenium source for sludge batch flowsheet studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-13

    Included herein is a preliminary analysis of previously-generated data from sludge batches 7a, 7b, 8, and 9 sludge simulant and real-waste testing, performed to recommend a form of ruthenium for future sludge batch simulant testing under the nitric-formic flowsheet. Focus is given to reactions present in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank cycle, given that this cycle historically produces the most changes in chemical composition during Chemical Process Cell processing. Data is presented and analyzed for several runs performed under the nitric-formic flowsheet, with consideration given to effects on the production of hydrogen gas, nitrous oxide gas, consumption of formate, conversion of nitrite to nitrate, and the removal and recovery of mercury during processing. Additionally, a brief discussion is given to the effect of ruthenium source selection under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet. An analysis of data generated from scaled demonstration testing, sludge batch 9 qualification testing, and antifoam degradation testing under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet is presented. Experimental parameters of interest under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet include N2O production, glycolate destruction, conversion of glycolate to formate and oxalate, and the conversion of nitrite to nitrate. To date, the number of real-waste experiments that have been performed under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet is insufficient to provide a complete understanding of the effects of ruthenium source selection in simulant experiments with regard to fidelity to real-waste testing. Therefore, a determination of comparability between the two ruthenium sources as employed under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet is made based on available data in order to inform ruthenium source selection for future testing under the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  17. Eco-physiological studies on Indian arid zone plants. III. Effect of sodium chloride and gibberellin on the activity of the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in leaves of Pennisetum typhoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, W.; Rustagi, P.N.; Sankhla, N.

    1974-01-01

    Seedlings of Pennisetum typhoides were grown in sodium chloride (NaCl) and gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) separately and in combination, and the effects on the activity of amylase, phosphorylase, aldolase, invertase, hexose-phosphateisomerase, sucrose-synthetase and sucrose-6-phosphate-synthetase were studied. Treatment of the seedlings with NaCl caused an inhibition of the activity of amylase and invertase in the leaf homogenate, but enhanced that of phosphorylase, aldolase, sucrose-synthetase and sucrose-6-phosphate-synthetase. GA/sub 3/ alone, as observed earlier, promoted the activity of invertase but indicated no significant influence on the other enzymes tested. In combination with salt, however, GA/sub 3/ tended to counteract, partially or wholly, the effect of NaCl on the activity of severe enzymes tested. The possible significance of the similarities between the action of abscisic acid (ABA) and salinity in influencing growth and metabolism of plants during stress is discussed. 34 references, 3 figures.

  18. Iodide Ion Pairing with Highly Charged Ruthenium Polypyridyl Cations in CH3CN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Wesley B; Li, Guocan; Meyer, Gerald J

    2015-05-04

    A series of three highly charged cationic ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes of the general formula [Ru(deeb)3-x(tmam)x](PF6)2x+2, where deeb is 4,4'-diethyl ester-2,2'-bipyridine and tmam is 4,4'-bis[(trimethylamino)methyl]-2,2'-bipyridine, were synthesized and characterized and are referred to as 1, 2, or 3 based on the number of tmam ligands. Crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography were obtained for the homoleptic complex 3, which was found to possess D3 symmetry over the entire ruthenium complex. The complexes displayed visible absorption spectra typical of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) transitions. In acetonitrile, quasi-reversible waves were assigned to Ru(III/II) electron transfer, with formal reduction potentials that shifted negative as the number of tmam ligands was increased. Room temperature photoluminescence was observed in acetonitrile with quantum yields of ϕ ∼ 0.1 and lifetimes of τ ∼ 2 μs. The spectroscopic and electrochemical data were most consistent with excited-state localization on the deeb ligand for 1 and 2 and on the tmam ligand for 3. The addition of tetrabutylammonium iodide to the complexes dissolved in a CH3CN solution led to changes in the UV-vis absorption spectra consistent with ion pairing. A Benesi-Hildebrand-type analysis of these data revealed equilibrium constants that increased with the cationic charge 1 10(8) s(-1). The possible relevance of this work to solar energy conversion and dye-sensitized solar cells is discussed.

  19. Electrochemical properties of actinides in molten chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, D.; Lacquement, J.; Sanchez, S.; Picard, G.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical properties of plutonium and cerium chlorides have been studied in the fused CaCl 2 -NaCl equimolar mixture at 550 deg. C using a tungsten working electrode and a pO 2- indicator electrode. The standard potential of Pu(III)/Pu was determined using cyclic voltammetry. The solubility product of Pu 2 O 3 was calculated by potentiometric titration. The standard potential of Ce(III)/Ce have been determined by a potentiometry method. Potentiometric titrations of Ce(III) have been shown the existence of a soluble cerium oxychloride. All these data allowed us to draw the potential-pO 2- diagram which summarises the properties of plutonium and cerium compounds in the melt. (authors)

  20. Study on volatilization mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide from nitrosyl ruthenium nitrate by using mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Tetsuya, E-mail: tkato@criepi.denken.or.jp [Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi [Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Shibata, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi [Safety Technology Division, Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    In a cooling malfunction accident of a high-level liquid waste (HLLW) tank, behavior of ruthenium (Ru) attracts much attention, since Ru could be oxidized to a volatile chemical form in the boiling and drying of HLLW, and part of radioactive Ru can potentially be released to the environment. In this study, nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) dissolved in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), which is commonly contained in a simulated HLLW, was dried and heated up to 723 K, and the evolved gas was introduced into a mass spectrometer. The well-known volatile species, ruthenium tetroxide (RuO{sub 4}) was detected in a temperature range between 390 K and 500 K with the peak top around 440 K. Various gases such as HNO{sub 3}, nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitrogen monoxide (NO) also evolved due to evaporation of the nitric acid and decomposition of the nitrate ions. The ion current of RuO{sub 4} seems to increase with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO{sub 3} decreases. More volatilization of RuO{sub 4} was observed from the HNO{sub 3} solution containing not only Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} but also cerium nitrate (Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O) which was added for extra supply of nitrate ion, compared with that from the HNO{sub 3} solution containing only Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. These experimental results suggest that Ru could be oxidized to form RuO{sub 4} by the nitrate ion as well as HNO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Ion current intensities of the mass numbers corresponding to O, NO, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and RuO{sub 4} obtained in mass spectrometry for dried nitric acid solution containing Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Heating rate: 5 K min{sup −1}, sample solution weight: 6.61 mg, contained Ru weight: 0.56 mg. The ion current of RuO{sub 4} increases with the increasing decomposition of nitrate, while the evaporation of HNO{sub 3} decreases. - Highlights: • Nitrosyl Ru nitrate (Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) dissolved in

  1. C-N bond cleavage of anilines by a (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Xie, Jianhui; Pan, Yi; Lam, William W Y; Kwong, Hoi-Ki; Ip, Kwok-Wa; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2013-04-17

    We report experimental and computational studies of the facile oxidative C-N bond cleavage of anilines by a (salen)ruthenium(VI) nitrido complex. We provide evidence that the initial step involves nucleophilic attack of aniline at the nitrido ligand of the ruthenium complex, which is followed by proton and electron transfer to afford a (salen)ruthenium(II) diazonium intermediate. This intermediate then undergoes unimolecular decomposition to generate benzene and N2.

  2. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaathaug, E.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  3. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations

  4. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, U.; Auvinen, A.; Ziliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2006-02-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In an accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium can oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species it is of interest to know, how it is formed and how it behaves. In our experiments RuO2 is exposed to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. In this report, the experimental system for the ruthenium behaviour study is presented. Also preliminary results from experiments carried out during year 2005 are reported. In the experiments gaseous ruthenium oxides were produced in a furnace. Upon cooling RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed with plane filters from the gas stream. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution three experiment using radioactive tracer were carried out. (au)

  5. Optimization of screen-printed ruthenium dioxide electrodes for pH measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyzkiewicz, I.

    2002-01-01

    Optimization of disposable, screen-printed pH-sensors based on ruthenium dioxide is described in this paper. The electrodes were prepared with the use of thick-film technology. The pH-sensitive layers were deposited onto polyester foil. Polymer graphite paste containing ruthenium dioxide from 0% to 90% has been investigated. The dependence of the pH-sensitive layers related to ruthenium dioxide content is presented. The investigation proved that the electrodes containing 40-60% ruthenium dioxide exhibit linear high sensitivity (∼ 50 mV/pH) in the wide range of pH (2 - 11) as well as very good reproducibility. (author)

  6. Ruthenium determination in new composite materials by coulometric titration with generated iron(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butakova, N.A.; Oganesyan, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    A coulometric technique is developed for ruthenium (4) titration with generated iron (2) in a mixture of hydrochloric-, sulfuric- and phosphoric acids with potentiometric and biammetric indication of the final titration point. Bi (3), Pd (2), Nb (5), Pt (4) Pb (2), Rh (3) do not interfere with the titration. Together with Ru (4) titrated are Ir (4), V (5), Au (3). The method is applied to analyze commercial samples of ruthenium dioxides, lead- and bismuth ruthenites, ruthenium pentafluorides containing 30-80% of ruthenium. The Ssub(r) values do not exceed 0.002

  7. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F. [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E. [FOM Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2014-09-29

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low density and high density oxides. Nano-columns grow at the surface of the low density oxide layer, with the growth rate being limited by diffusion of ruthenium through the formed oxide film. Simultaneously, with the growth of the columns, sub-surface high density oxide continues to grow limited by diffusion of oxygen or ruthenium through the oxide film.

  8. Experiments on the behaviour of ruthenium in air ingress accidents - Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Backman, U.; Auvinen, A.; Ziliacus, R.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2006-02-15

    During routine nuclear reactor operation, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In an accident in a nuclear power plant it is possible that air gets into contact with the reactor core. In this case ruthenium can oxidise and form volatile ruthenium species, RuO3 and RuO4, which can be transported into the containment. In order to estimate the amount of gaseous ruthenium species it is of interest to know, how it is formed and how it behaves. In our experiments RuO2 is exposed to diverse oxidising atmospheres at a relatively high temperature. In this report, the experimental system for the ruthenium behaviour study is presented. Also preliminary results from experiments carried out during year 2005 are reported. In the experiments gaseous ruthenium oxides were produced in a furnace. Upon cooling RuO2 aerosol particles were formed in the system. They were removed with plane filters from the gas stream. Gaseous ruthenium species were trapped in 1M NaOH-water solution, which is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. Ruthenium in the solution was filtered for analysis. The determination of ruthenium both in aerosol and in liquid filters was made using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). In order to close mass balance and achieve better time resolution three experiment using radioactive tracer were carried out. (au)

  9. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  10. The medical sodium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the institute was investigated the chemical composition of rock salt of some deposits of Tajikistan and was show the presence in it admixture of ions of Ca 2 + , Mg 2 + a nd SO 2 - a nd absence of heavy metals, ammonium salts, iron, potassium and arsenic. Was elaborated the fundamental instrument-technologic scheme of sodium chloride receiving

  11. Detection of pyrrolizidine alkaloids using flow analysis with both acidic potassium permanganate and tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chemiluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, Bree A.; Barnett, Neil W.; Bos, Richard

    2005-01-01

    For the first time, analytically useful chemiluminescence was elicited from the reactions of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Heliotrine, retronecine, supinine, monocrotaline and echinatine N-oxide yielded chemiluminescence upon reaction with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) whilst lasiocarpine, its N-oxide and supinine elicited light upon reaction with acidic potassium permanganate. Detection limits for heliotrine were 1.25 x 10 -7 M and 9 x 10 -9 M for tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(III) perchlorate with flow injection analysis (FIA) and the silica-immobilised reagent (4-[4-(dichloromethylsilanyl)-butyl]-4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine)bis (2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) with sequential injection analysis (SIA), respectively. Lasiocarpine was detectable at 1.4 x 10 -7 M using acidic potassium permanganate with FIA. Additionally, the silica-immobilised reagent was optimised with respect to the oxidant (ammonium ceric nitrate) concentration and the aspiration times which afforded a detection limit for codeine of 5 x 10 -10 M using SIA

  12. Detection of pyrrolizidine alkaloids using flow analysis with both acidic potassium permanganate and tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Bree A. [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic. 3217 (Australia); Barnett, Neil W. [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic. 3217 (Australia)]. E-mail: barnie@deakin.edu.au; Bos, Richard [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic. 3217 (Australia)

    2005-06-13

    For the first time, analytically useful chemiluminescence was elicited from the reactions of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Heliotrine, retronecine, supinine, monocrotaline and echinatine N-oxide yielded chemiluminescence upon reaction with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) whilst lasiocarpine, its N-oxide and supinine elicited light upon reaction with acidic potassium permanganate. Detection limits for heliotrine were 1.25 x 10{sup -7} M and 9 x 10{sup -9} M for tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(III) perchlorate with flow injection analysis (FIA) and the silica-immobilised reagent (4-[4-(dichloromethylsilanyl)-butyl]-4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine)bis (2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) with sequential injection analysis (SIA), respectively. Lasiocarpine was detectable at 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M using acidic potassium permanganate with FIA. Additionally, the silica-immobilised reagent was optimised with respect to the oxidant (ammonium ceric nitrate) concentration and the aspiration times which afforded a detection limit for codeine of 5 x 10{sup -10} M using SIA.

  13. Evaluation of radiolabeled ruthenium compounds as tumor-localizing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.; Meinken, G.E.; Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Larson, S.M.; Grunbaum, Z.; Rasey, J.S.; Clarke, M.H.; Dowling, M.

    1979-01-01

    This work introduces a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on ruthenium-97. The excellent physical properties of Ru-97, the high chemical reactivity of Ru, the potential antitumor activity of several Ru coordination compounds, and BLIP production of Ru-97, provide a unique combination for the application of this isotope in nuclear oncology. A systematic study was undertaken on the synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of a number of ruthenium-labeled compounds. In a variety of animal tumor models, several compounds show considerable promise as tumor-localizing agents when compared to gallium-67 citrate. The compounds studied (with Ru in different oxidation states) include ionic Ru, a number of hydrophilic and lipophilic chelates, and various ammine derivatives

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin Jinhong; Waheed, Abdul; Winkenwerder, Wyatt A.; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Agapiou, Kyriacos; Jones, Richard A.; Hwang, Gyeong S.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO 2 containing ∼ 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH 2 (PMe 3 ) 4 (Me = CH 3 ) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase

  15. Ruthenium Complexes as NO Donors for Vascular Relaxation Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Galvão de Lima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO donors are substances that can release NO. Vascular relaxation induction is among the several functions of NO, and the administration of NO donors is a pharmacological alternative to treat hypertension. This review will focus on the physicochemical description of ruthenium-derived NO donor complexes that release NO via reduction and light stimulation. In particular, we will discuss the complexes synthesized by our research group over the last ten years, and we will focus on the vasodilation and arterial pressure control elicited by these complexes. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC and potassium channels are the main targets of the NO species released from the inorganic compounds. We will consider the importance of the chemical structure of the ruthenium complexes and their vascular effects.

  16. Committee's report on ruthenium fall-out incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Crawford, J.H.; Livingston, R.; Ritchie, R.H.; Rupp, A.F.; Taylor, E.H.

    1983-07-01

    Investigations of the fall-out incident of November 11 and 12, 1959, by responsible parties (Health Physics Division and Operations Division personnel) established beyond reasonable doubt that the incident had its origin in the expulsion of particles, heavily contaminated with ruthenium, which had been detached from the walls of the electric fan housing and ducts in the off-gas system associated with the brick stack. All available evidence indicates that the particles were loosened during maintenance work on the exhaust damper and the bearings of the electric fan and were carried up the stack in two bursts as particulate fall-out when this fan was put back into service. Radiographic and chemical analysis showed the activity to be almost entirely ruthenium (Ru 106 ) and its daughter rhodium (Rh 106 ) with very little, if any, strontium being present. This report summarizes the findings and sets forth the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee asked to investigate the incident

  17. Sythesis of rare earth metal - GIC graphite intercalation compound in molten chloride system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masafumi; Hagiwara, Rika; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1994-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds of ytterbium and neodymium have been prepared by interacting graphite and metals in molten chlorides. These rare earth metals can be suspended in molten chlorides in the presence of trichlorides via disproportionation reaction RE(0) + RE(III) = 2RE(II) at lower than 300 degC. Carbides-free compounds are obtained in these systems. (author)

  18. The Biological Side of Water-Soluble Arene Ruthenium Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Therrien, Bruno; Furrer, Julien

    2014-01-01

    This review article covers the synthetic strategies, structural aspects, and host-guest properties of ruthenium metalla-assemblies, with a special focus on their use as drug delivery vectors. The two-dimensional metalla-rectangles show interesting host-guest possibilities but seem less appropriate for being used as drug carriers. On the other hand, metalla-prisms allow encapsulation and possible targeted release of bioactive molecules and consequently show some potential as drug delivery vect...

  19. THE SYNTHESIS AND THE REACTIVITY OF ARENE RUTHENIUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    [RuCl(η6-p-cymene)(η2-dppm)][PF6] ruthenium complexes with C2O4(Me4N)2 in the ... the Service de Microanalyse du CNRS (Vernaison/France). .... Once bonded to the Ru(II), the characterization of the oxalato ligand by infrared .... The 1H NMR spectrum shows signals of the aromatic proton resonances at 5.45 and 5.15,.

  20. Allenylidene Complexes of Ruthenium: Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Electron Transfer Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winter, R. F.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 248, 15/16 (2004), s. 1565-1583 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0821; GA MŠk OC D14.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : spectroscopy * allenylidine complexes of ruthenium * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.446, year: 2004

  1. Behaviour of ruthenium (3) bromocomplexes in nonaqueous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnitskaya, O.V.; Miroshnichenko, I.V.; Pichkov, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Behaviour of K 3 [RuBr 6 ] · H 2 O and K 3 [Ru 2 Br 9 ] in solutions of dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide is investigated by absorption and ESR spectroscopy. Complexes are shown to be labile in solutions, interact easily with solvents. Formation of ruthenium (3) and (2) bromide-dimethylsulfoxide complexes occurs gradually in DMSO, final product is trans-[Ru(DMSO) 4 Br 2

  2. Role of ligands in controlling the regioselectivity in ruthenium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of Hay and Wadt (LANL2DZ)11 for ruthenium atom and 6-31G(d)12 for other .... C2 atom in 3x/3′ x. To understand the wider role of lig- ands in modulating the regio-selectivity of product for- mation, we have studied the benzoic acid addition to the selected .... at C1 and the localization of electron density in the. M=C double ...

  3. Mechanism of ruthenium dioxide crystallization during high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucetta, H.

    2012-01-01

    Ruthenium, arising from the reprocessing of spent uranium oxide fuel, has a low solubility in glass melt. It crystallizes in the form of particles of RuO 2 of acicular or polyhedral morphology dispersed in fission product and actinides waste containment glass. Since the morphology of these particles strongly influences the physico-chemical properties, the knowledge and the control of their mechanism of formation are of major importance. The goal of this work is to determine the chemical reactions responsible for the formation of RuO 2 particles of acicular or polyhedral shape during glass synthesis. Using a simplification approach, the reactions between RuO 2 -NaNO 3 , and more complex calcine RuO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -Na 2 O and a sodium borosilicate glass are studied. In situ scanning electron microscopy and XANES at increasing temperatures are used to follow changes in composition, speciation and morphology of the ruthenium intermediate species. Those compounds are thoroughly characterised by SEM, XRD, HRTEM, and ruthenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This combined approach allows us to show that the ruthenium speciation modification during vitrification is the key of control of the morphology of RuO 2 particles in the glass. In particular, the formation of a specific intermediate compound (Na 3 RuO 4 ) is one of the main steps that lead to the precipitation of needle-shaped RuO 2 particles in the melt. The formation of polyhedral particles, on the contrary, results from the direct incorporation of RuO 2 crystals in the melt followed by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. (author) [fr

  4. Ruthenium and iron complexes with benzotriazole and benzimidazole derivatives as simple models for proton-coupled electron transfer systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Reginaldo C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ruthenium complexes of the type [M-LH]n (where M = RuII,III(NH35(2+,3+, RuII,III(edta2-,- [edta = ethylenedinitrilotetraacetate], or FeII,III(CN5(3-,2- and LH = benzotriazole or benzimidazole were prepared and characterized in aqueous solutions by means of electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical methods. Special emphasis was given to the pH-dependent redox processes, exhibited by all the investigated complexes. From their related Pourbaix diagrams, which displayed a typically Nernstian behavior, the pKa and formal reduction potential values were extracted. In addition, these E1/2 versus pH curves were also used to illustrate the partitioning relationship concerning the redox and acid-base species, and their interconversion equilibria. The active area in which the dependence of the M III/M II couple on the pH takes place, as delimited by pKaIII and pKaII, was taken into account in order to evaluate the usefulness of such simple complexes as models for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET. The results were interpreted in terms of the acceptor/donor electronic character of the ligands and sigma,pi-metal-ligand interactions in both redox states of the metal ion.

  5. A nanoporous ruthenium oxide framework for amperometric sensing of glucose and potentiometric sensing of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, J.H.; Kang, M.; Lee, Y.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous ruthenium oxide frameworks (L 2 -eRuO) were electrodeposited on gold substrates by repetitive potential cycling in solutions of ruthenium(III) ions in the presence of reverse neutral micelles. The L 2 -eRuO was characterized in terms of direct oxidation of glucose and potentiometric response to pH values. The surface structures and morphologies of the L 2 -eRuO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their surface area was estimated via underpotential deposition of copper. L 2-eRuO-modified electrodes showed a 17-fold higher sensitivity (40 μA mM -1 cm -2 towards glucose in 0-4 mM concentration in solution of pH 7.4) than a RuO electrode prepared in the absence of reverse micelles. Potential interferents such as ascorbic acid, 4-acetamidophenol, uric acid and dopamine displayed no effect. The new electrode also revealed improved potentiometric response to pH changes compared to a platinum electrode of the same type. (author)

  6. Preparation, characterization and electrocatalytic behavior of zinc oxide/zinchexacyanoferrate and ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate hybrid film-modified electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, H.-W.; Thangamuthu, R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: smchen78@ms15.hinet.net

    2008-02-15

    Polynuclear mixed-valent hybrid films of zinc oxide/zinchexacyanoferrate and ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate (ZnO/ZnHCF-RuOHCF) have been deposited on electrode surfaces from H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution containing Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, RuCl{sub 3} and K{sub 3}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] by potentiodynamic cycling method. Simultaneous cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements demonstrate the steady growth of hybrid film. Surface morphology of hybrid film was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) data confirm existence of zinc oxide and ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate (RuOHCF) in the hybrid film. The effect of type of monovalent cations on the redox behavior of hybrid film was investigated. In pure supporting electrolyte, electrochemical responses of Ru{sup II/III} redox transition occurring at negative potential region resemble with that of a surface immobilized redox couple. The electrocatalytic activity of ZnO/ZnHCF-RuOHCF hybrid film was investigated towards oxidation of epinephrine, dopamine and L-cysteine, and reduction of S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2-} and SO{sub 5}{sup 2-} as well as IO{sub 3}{sup -} using cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) techniques.

  7. Preparation and characterization of LTA-type zeolite framework dispersed ruthenium nanoparticles and their catalytic application in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia–borane for efficient hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ru(0)NPs-ZK-4 were prepared and characterized by advanced analytical techniques. ► They achieve the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane with TOF = 5410 h −1 and TTO = 36700. ► They maintain 85% of their activity even at the fifth catalytic run. - Abstract: The safe and efficient hydrogen storage and production are major obstacles to use hydrogen as an energy carrier. Therefore, significant efforts have been focused on the development of new materials for the chemical hydrogen storage and production. Of particular importance, ammonia–borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) is emerging as one of the most promising solid hydrogen carrier due to its high gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (19.6 wt.%) and low molecular weight (30.8 g/mol). ammonia–borane can release hydrogen gas upon catalytic hydrolysis under mild conditions. Herein, the discovery of a new catalytic material, ruthenium nanoparticles stabilized by ZK-4 zeolite framework, for this important reaction has been reported. This new catalyst system was prepared by borohydride reduction of ruthenium(III)-exchanged ZK-4 zeolite in water at room temperature. The characterization of the resulting material by advanced analytical tools shows the formation of ZK-4 zeolite dispersed ruthenium nanoparticles (2.9 ± 0.9 nm). The catalytic performance of the resulting supported ruthenium nanoparticles depending on activity, lifetime and reusability was demonstrated in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia–borane. They were found to be highly active (initial TOF = 5410 h −1 ), long-lived (TTO = 36,700) and reusable catalyst (retaining of >85% of initial activity in the 5th reuse) in this important catalytic reaction at room temperature under air.

  8. Behaviour of ruthenium dioxide particles in borosilicate glasses and melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflieger, Rachel [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)], E-mail: rachel_pflieger@yahoo.fr; Lefebvre, Leila [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Malki, Mohammed [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Polytech Orleans, Universite d' Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci, 45072 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Allix, Mathieu [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium-glass systems are formed during the vitrification of nuclear waste. They are also widely used in micro-electronics because of their unique electrical properties. However, the interaction of this element with the glass matrix remains poorly understood. This work focuses on a RuO{sub 2} particles-nuclear alumino-borosilicate glass system in which the electrical conductivity is known to vary considerably with the RuO{sub 2} content and to become electronic above about 0.5-0.7 vol.% RuO{sub 2} [R. Pflieger, M. Malki, Y. Guari, J. Larionova, A. Grandjean, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., accepted for publication]. Some RuO{sub 2} segregation was observed in SEM/TEM investigations but no continuous chain of RuO{sub 2} particles could be seen. Electron relays between the particles are then necessary for a low-rate percolation, such as the nanoclusters suggested by Adachi et al. [K. Adachi, S. Iida, K. Hayashi, J. Mater. Res. 9 (7) (1994) 1866; K. Adachi, H. Kuno, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 83 (10) (2000) 2441], which could consist in dissolved ruthenium. Indeed, several observations made here clearly indicate the presence of dissolved ruthenium in the glass matrix, like the modification of the glass density in presence of RuO{sub 2} particles or the diffusion-limited growth of RuO{sub 2} particles in the melt.

  9. Fundamental Factors Impacting the Stability of Phosphonate-Derivatized Ruthenium Polypyridyl Sensitizers Adsorbed on Metal Oxide Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, McKenzie; Brady, Matthew David; Troian-Gautier, Ludovic; Dickenson, John; Marquard, Seth L; Hyde, Jacob; Lopez, Santiago; Meyer, Gerald J; Meyer, Thomas J; Harrison, Daniel P

    2018-06-08

    A series of 18 ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and evaluated under electrochemically oxidative conditions, which generates the Ru(III) oxidation state and mimics the harsh conditions experienced during the kinetically-limited regime that can occur in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs), to further develop fundamental insights into the factors governing molecular sensitizer surface stability in aqueous 0.1 M HClO4 (aq). Both desorption and oxidatively induced ligand substitution were observed on planar fluorine doped tin oxide, FTO, electrodes, with a dependence on the E1/2 Ru(III/II) redox potential dictating the comparative ratios of the processes. Complexes such as RuP4OMe (E1/2 = 0.91 vs Ag/AgCl) displayed virtually only desorption, while complexes such as RuPbpz (E1/2 > 1.62 V vs Ag/AgCl) displayed only chemical decomposition. Comparing isomers of 4,4'- and 5,5-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridine ancillary polypyridyl ligands, a dramatic increase in the rate of desorption of the Ru(III) complexes was observed for the 5,5'-ligands. Nanoscopic indium doped tin oxide thin films, nanoITO, were also sensitized and analyzed with cyclic voltammetry, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, and XPS, allowing for further distinction of desorption versus ligand substitution processes. Desorption loss to bulk solution associated with the planar surface of FTO is essentially non-existent on nanoITO, where both desorption and ligand substitution are shut down with RuP4OMe. These results revealed that minimizing time spent in the oxidized form, incorporating electron donating groups, maximizing hydrophobicity, and minimizing molecular bulk near the adsorbed ligand are critical to optimizing the performance of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes in dye-sensitized solar cell devices.

  10. Synthesis, structures, and luminescent properties of sodium rare-earth metal(III) chloride oxotellurates(IV), Na{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 4} (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Dorofeev, Sergey G.; Berdonosov, Peter S.; Dolgikh, Valery A. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Zitzer, Sabine; Greiner, Stefan; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Olenev, Andrei V. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Sine Theta Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-17

    Six sodium rare-earth metal(III) chloride oxotellurates(IV), Na{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 4}, isostructural to Na{sub 2}Y{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 4}, were synthesized by flux techniques and characterized by single-crystal XRD. The compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group C2/c with lattice constants a = 23.967(1), b = 5.6342(3), c = 16.952(1) Aa, β = 134.456(5) for Ln = Sm, a = 23.932(2), b = 5.6044(5), c = 17.134(1) Aa, β = 135.151(6) for Ln = Eu, a = 23.928(1), b = 5.5928(1), c = 17.1133(8) Aa, β = 135.366(3) for Ln = Gd, a = 23.907(1), b = 5.569(3), c = 16.745(1) Aa, β = 134.205(3) for Ln = Tb, a = 23.870(1), b = 5.547(3), c = 16.665(1) Aa, β = 134.102(3) for Ln = Dy, and a = 23.814(1), b = 5.526(3), c = 16.626(1) Aa, β = 134.016(3) for Ln = Ho and Z = 4. Their crystal structure can be considered as a framework built of intergrowing Ln-O and Na-(O,Cl) slabs with channel walls decorated by tellurium atoms of [TeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} groups. The luminescent properties of the new compounds due to the Ln{sup 3+} cations are described and discussed. We also discuss the crystal chemistry of various alkali-metal rare-earth metal(III) halide oxochalcogenates(IV). (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium with TiN Interface for Sub-10 nm Advanced Interconnects beyond Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Liang Gong; Roussel, Philippe; Pedreira, Olalla Varela

    2016-01-01

    . These extremely scaled ruthenium lines show excellent electromigration behavior. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements reveal negligible ruthenium ion drift into low-kappa dielectrics up to 200 degrees C, demonstrating that ruthenium can be used as a barrierless metallization in interconnects...

  12. Ruthenium release from thermally overheated nitric acid solution containing ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate and sodium nitrate to solidify

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Kayo; Ueda, Yasuyuki; Enokida, Youichi [Nuclear Chemical Engineering Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 4648603 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Radioactive ruthenium (Ru) is one of the dominant elemental species released into the environment from a fuel reprocessing plant in a hypothetical design accident due to its relatively higher fission yield and longer half-life. After the hypothetical accident assuming the loss of all electric power and cooling functions, high-level liquid waste (HLLW) may be overheated by the energetic decays of many fission products in it, and Ru may be oxidized to the volatile tetroxide, RuO{sub 4}, which is released through the off-gas pathway. At a reprocessing plant in Japan, alkaline solution from the solvent scrubbing stream is sometimes mixed with the HLLW followed by vitrification, which can be influenced by the addition of sodium nitrate to a simulated HLLW containing ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate that was experimentally evaluated on a small scale using the overheated nitric acid solution of 2 mol/dm{sup 3}, which was kept at 180 Celsius degrees in a glass evaporator placed in a thermostatic bath. The release fraction of Ru increased by approximately 30% by the addition of sodium nitrate. This may be partially explained by the existence of relatively highly concentrated nitrate ions in the liquid phase that oxidize the ruthenium species to RuO{sub 4} during the drying process. (authors)

  13. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition Over Ruthenium Nanoparticles Supported on Nano-Titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Nanosized Na2Ti3O7, K2Ti6O13 and Cs2Ti6O13 materials were prepared and used as supports of ruthenium nanoparticles for catalytic ammonia decomposition. It is shown that these catalysts exhibit higher catalytic activity than ruthenium supported on TiO2 nanoparticles promoted with cesium. The diffe...

  14. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E.; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel heteroleptic ruthenium sensitizer for nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivakumar, R.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Anandan, S.

    2009-01-01

    A novel heteroleptic ruthenium complex of the type [Ru(bpin)(dcbpyH2)Cl]Cl (where bpin is 2,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)isonicotinic acid and dcbpyH2 is 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine) was synthesized and characterized for tuning the LUMO level of the ruthenium sensitizer to achieve greater stabilization in

  16. Method of improving the decontaminating efficiency of ruthenium in evaporating treatment of nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kanya; Yamana, Hajime; Takeda, Seiichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the ruthenium removing efficiency in a nitric acid solution in an acid recovery system for the recovery of nitric acid from nitric acid liquid wastes through evaporating condensation. Method: Upon evaporating treatment of nitric acid solution containing ruthenium by supplying and heating the solution to a nitric acid evaporating device, hydrazine is previously added to the nitric acid solution. Hydrazine and intermediate reaction product of hydrazine such as azide causes a reduction reaction with intermediate reaction product of ruthenium tetraoxide to suppress the oxidation of ruthenium and thereby improve the decontaminating efficiency of ruthenium. The amount of hydrazine to be added is preferably between 20 - 500 mg/l and most suitably between 200 - 2000 mg/l per one liter of the liquid in the evaporating device. (Seki, T.)

  17. Ruthenium nanoparticles supported on CeO2 for catalytic permanganate oxidation of butylparaben.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Sun, Bo; Guan, Xiaohong; Wang, Hui; Bao, Hongliang; Huang, Yuying; Qiao, Junlian; Zhou, Gongming

    2013-11-19

    This study developed a heterogeneous catalytic permanganate oxidation system with ceria supported ruthenium, Ru/CeO2 (0.8‰ as Ru), as catalyst for the first time. The catalytic performance of Ru/CeO2 toward butylparaben (BP) oxidation by permanganate was strongly dependent on its dosage, pH, permanganate concentration and temperature. The presence of 1.0 g L(-1) Ru/CeO2 increased the oxidation rate of BP by permanganate at pH 4.0-8.0 by 3-96 times. The increase in Ru/CeO2 dosage led to a progressive enhancement in the oxidation rate of BP by permanganate at neutral pH. The XANES analysis revealed that (1) Ru was deposited on the surface of CeO2 as Ru(III); (2) Ru(III) was oxidized by permanganate to its higher oxidation state Ru(VI) and Ru(VII), which acted as the co-oxidants in BP oxidation; (3) Ru(VI) and Ru(VII) were reduced by BP to its initial state of Ru(III). Therefore, Ru/CeO2 acted as an electron shuttle in catalytic permanganate oxidation process. LC-MS/MS analysis implied that BP was initially attacked by permanganate or Ru(VI) and Ru(VII) at the aromatic ring, leading to the formation of various hydroxyl-substituted and ring-opening products. Ru/CeO2 could maintain its catalytic activity during the six successive runs. In conclusion, catalyzing permanganate oxidation with Ru/CeO2 is a promising technology for degrading phenolic pollutants in water treatment.

  18. Synthesis and spectral properties of Chromium(III) complex of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSCH) with chromium(III) chloride. The complex was characterized by molar conductance, magnetic moment, infrared, far-infrared and electronic spectra and elemental analysis. The ligand exists in keto tantomeric form and it coordinates through ...

  19. Some factors influencing the absorption, retention and elimination of ruthenium; Facteurs agissant sur l'absorption, la retention et l'elimination du ruthenium; Nekotorye faktory, vliyakshchie na vsasyvanie, zaderzhku i vydelenie ruteniya; Factores que influyen sobre la absorcion, retencion y eliminacion de rutenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, R. S. [Radiobiological Research Council, Medical Research Council, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1963-02-15

    The radioactive isotopes of ruthenium, Ru{sup 103} (t1/2 = 40 d) and Ru{sup 106}(t1/2 = 1 yr), are formed in relatively high yield as a result of nuclear fission of U{sup 235}. There is almost no information on the metabolism of ruthenium by man and the following considerations are based on investigations with rats and rabbits. The nature and extent of the hazard from radioruthenium will depend not only on the circumstances of contamination but also on the physical and chemical state of the ruthenium; Ru{sup 106} administered orally as the dioxide is absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract to a negligible extent when it is in a particulate form with carrier present but when given as a colloid in the absence of carrier, uptake is similar to that which follows administration of the chloride (3-5%). Nitrato-derivatives of nitrosyl ruthenium may be absorbed to an even greater extent (an average of 13% is absorbed by rabbits). Absorption by rats, which are not fasted, is complete within one hour of an intragastric dose. The limited period of absorption may be explained in terms of the rate of gastric emptying and combination of ruthenium with the contents of the gut. When rats are fasted overnight before the ruthenium is administered, absorption is increased threefold-and continues over a longer period. Nitrato derivatives of nitrosyl-ruthenium, in contrast to other compounds tested, react with the wall of the upper small intestine where up to 20% of an oral dose may be retained for several hours. Although the chemical state of ruthenium influences the degree of absorption, the subsequent distribution is not greatly affected. Approximately half of the absorbed ruthenium is excreted in the urine during the first 24 h. After one month, 5 to 20% of the absorbed fraction is retained with a long biological half-life. The ruthenium is distributed throughout the body with the concentrations in the various organs seldem differing by a factor of more than five, though the

  20. Synthesis, structure and photoluminescence of (PLAGH){sub 2}[ZnCl{sub 4}] and comparative analysis of photoluminescence properties with tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radanović, Mirjana M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Jelić, Miodrag G., E-mail: jelicmgm@uns.ac.rs [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Romčević, Nebojša Ž. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Boukos, Nikos [National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Institute of Materials Science, Athens (Greece); Vojinović-Ješić, Ljiljana S.; Leovac, Vukadin M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Hadžić, Branka B. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia); Bajac, Branimir M. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technology, Novi Sad (Serbia); Nađ, Laslo F. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Chandrinou, Chrysoula [National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Institute of Materials Science, Athens (Greece); Baloš, Sebastian S. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • New zinc(II) complex with pyridoxalaminoguanidine was synthesized. • The enhancement of the photoluminescence due to the compound formation was achieved. • Very high photoluminescence of Zn(II) compound was noticed. • Comparative analysis of photoluminescence with tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) was provided. - Abstract: The first compound of zinc(II) containing pyridoxalaminoguanidine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra, conductometric measurements and X-ray crystallography. Single crystals of the compound were obtained in the reaction of methanolic solution of zinc(II) chloride and pyridoxalaminoguanidine hydrochloride. In this compound the coordination of chelate ligand is absent and tetrachlorido complex of zinc(II) with pyridoxalaminuguanidinium cation as contraion is obtained. Photoluminescence spectra were measured. Lorentzian multipeak technique was used to determine peak wavelengths and their intensities. Photoluminescence spectroscopy upon 325, 488 and 514 nm laser excitation light was used to obtain results. This novel compound of zinc(II) was compared to the well-known organic light emitting diode material—ruthenium(II) complex with bypiridine i.e., tris(2,2′-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), under the same circumstances and the identical experimental setup. A scheme of energy levels and transitions is proposed to explain the obtained experimental results.

  1. Thermal behaviour of cesiumchloroferrates(III). 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, B.; Fest, M.; Hass, D.; Leibnitz, P.

    1989-01-01

    Tricesium aquapentachloroferrate(III) chloride crystallizes from acid aqueous solutions of FeCl 3 · 6 H 2 O and CsCl in the triclinic space group P-bar1 with a = 714.1 pm, b = 1070.9 pm, c = 950.4 pm, α = 105.65 0 , β = 109.51 0 , γ = 89.08 0 and Z = 2. The compound is formed also from dicesium aquapentachloroferrate(III) and cesium chloride in a solid state reaction. The orientational relationships between the educt and product phases are elucidated, and a topotactic reaction mechanism is discussed. (author)

  2. Complexes of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), samarium(III) and dysprosium(III) with substituted piperidines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manhas, B S; Trikha, A K; Singh, H; Chander, M

    1983-11-01

    Complexes of the general formulae M/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/(L)/sub 3/.C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH and M/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/(L)/sub 2/.CH/sub 3/OH have been synthesised by the reactions of chlorides and nitrates of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Dy(III) with 2-methylpiperidine, 3-methylpiperidine and 4-methylpiperidine. These complexes have been characterised on the basis of their elemental analysis, and IR and electronic reflectance spectra. IR spectral data indicate the presence of coordinated ethanol and methanol molecules and bidentate nitrate groups. Coordination numbers of the metal ions vary from 5 to 8. 19 refs.

  3. Cation exchange process for recovery of plutonium from laboratory solutions containing chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1978-10-01

    A cation exchange technique was developed for the separation of plutonium from laboratory solutions containing either Pu(III) or Pu(III)--Pu(IV) mixtures in acidic solutions containing chloride ions. The procedure consists of adjusting the acid concentration to less than one molar and adjusting the valence of the plutonium ion to the (III) state, if necessary. The adjusted solution is fed to a cation exchange column and washed with distilled water to remove residual chlorides from the column. Plutonium is then eluted from the column with 5M nitric acid containing 0.34M sulfamic acid. This procedure was used to separate plutonium from 1.2M chloride solution on a production-scale column. Typical plutonium recovery was 99.97%, while greater than 96% of the original chloride was rejected

  4. Late side effects of Ruthenium 106 therapy for uveal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, G.; Faulborn, J.; Poier, E.

    1994-01-01

    When effectiveness is evaluated in brachytherapy with Ruthenium 106 special emphasis has to be put on tumor destruction and late side effects responsible for the definite functional results. We evaluated the late side effects of 22 uveal melanomas, which had been treated with 106 Ruthenium plaques. The tumor prominences ranged from 3 to 10 mm, the diameter from 4 to 9 disc diameters. In 4 patients the tumor involved the posterior pole, 14 melanomas were located in the midperiphery of the fundus, 4 tumors were ciliary body melanomas. The total radiation dose of the apex ranged from 100 to 240 Gy with a corresponding dose to the sclera between 540 to 1000 Gy. Because of the short half life of the plaque we have been using different dose rates (1.6-11 Gy/h). In 17/22 eyes adequate regression could be achieved by Ruthenium therapy alone. In one case additional laser treatment of the macular part of the melanoma had to be performed, Gamma Knife therapy was necessary in another melanoma with 10 mm tumor prominence. 3 recurrences led to enucleation. The mean follow up was 4.8 years ranging from 1 to 7 years. In 2/22 patients opticopathy caused severe visual impairment, in another 2 patients radiation maculopathy and opticopathy was observed. 7/22 developed vasculopathy with neovascularization treated by photocoagulation. In one case of focal radiation maculopathy laser treatment could prevent further visual impairment. The following factors are responsible for a higher incidence of late side effects: 1. High dose rate of the plaques in combination with a high radiation dose to the sclera 2. Location of the tumor within a minimum distance of 2 disc diameters to the optic nerve or macula 3. Tumor location at the ciliary body Laser treatment in case of neovascularization and focal radiation maculopathy is the only effective treatment with regard to late side effects. Ischemic maculopathy and radiation opticopathy are responsible for late visual impairment. (authors)

  5. Radiation related complications after ruthenium plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summanen, P.; Immonen, I.; Kivela, T.; Tommila, P.; Tarkkanen, A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Meilahti Clinic; Heikkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1996-08-01

    The aims were to analyse radiation related complications and secondary enucleation after irradiation of malignant uveal melanoma with ruthenium-106 plaques. A series of 100 consecutive eyes irradiated in 1981-91 was analysed using the life table method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The 3 and 5 year probabilities of being without radiation cataract were 73% and 63%, without neovascular glaucoma 91% and 81%, without vitreous haemorrhage 83% and 74%, without radiation maculopathy 85% and 70%, and without radiation optic neuropathy 90% and 88%, respectively. (Author).

  6. Radiation related complications after ruthenium plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summanen, P.; Immonen, I.; Kivela, T.; Tommila, P.; Tarkkanen, A.; Heikkonen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The aims were to analyse radiation related complications and secondary enucleation after irradiation of malignant uveal melanoma with ruthenium-106 plaques. A series of 100 consecutive eyes irradiated in 1981-91 was analysed using the life table method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The 3 and 5 year probabilities of being without radiation cataract were 73% and 63%, without neovascular glaucoma 91% and 81%, without vitreous haemorrhage 83% and 74%, without radiation maculopathy 85% and 70%, and without radiation optic neuropathy 90% and 88%, respectively. (Author)

  7. Progress in doping of ruthenium silicide (Ru2Si3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vining, C.B.; Allevato, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that ruthenium silicide (Ru 2 Si 3 ) is currently under development as a promising thermoelectric material suitable for space power applications. Key to realizing the potentially high figure of merit values of this material is the development of appropriate doping techniques. In this study, manganese and iridium have been identified as useful p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Resistivity values have been reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Anomalous Hall effect results, however, complicate interpretation of some of the results and further effort is required to achieve optimum doping levels

  8. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Decarbonylation of Primary Alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazziotta, Andrea; Madsen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Dehydrogenative decarbonylation of a primary alcohol involves the release of both dihydrogen and carbon monoxide to afford the one-carbon shorter product. The transformation has now been achieved with a ruthenium-catalyzed protocol by using the complex Ru(COD)Cl2 and the hindered monodentate ligand...... P(o-tolyl)3 in refluxing p-cymene. The reaction can be applied to both benzylic and long chain linear aliphatic alcohols. The intermediate aldehyde can be observed during the transformation, which is therefore believed to proceed through two separate catalytic cycles involving first dehydrogenation...... of the alcohol and then decarbonylation of the resulting aldehyde....

  9. Mechanism of Water Oxidation Catalyzed by a Dinuclear Ruthenium Complex Bridged by Anthraquinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Wada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized 1,8-bis(2,2′:6′,2″-terpyrid-4′-ylanthraquinone (btpyaq as a new dimerizing ligand and determined its single crystal structure by X-ray analysis. The dinuclear Ruthenium complex [Ru2(µ-Cl(bpy2(btpyaq](BF43 ([3](BF43, bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine was used as a catalyst for water oxidation to oxygen with (NH42[Ce(NO36] as the oxidant (turnover numbers = 248. The initial reaction rate of oxygen evolution was directly proportional to the concentration of the catalyst and independent of the oxidant concentration. The cyclic voltammogram of [3](BF43 in water at pH 1.3 showed an irreversible catalytic current above +1.6 V (vs. SCE, with two quasi-reversible waves and one irreversible wave at E1/2 = +0.62, +0.82 V, and Epa = +1.13 V, respectively. UV-vis and Raman spectra of [3](BF43 with controlled-potential electrolysis at +1.40 V revealed that [Ru(IV=O O=Ru(IV]4+ is stable under electrolysis conditions. [Ru(III, Ru(II] species are recovered after dissociation of an oxygen molecule from the active species in the catalytic cycle. These results clearly indicate that an O–O bond is formed via [Ru(V=O O=Ru(IV]5+.

  10. Chloride Transport in Heterogeneous Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Holt, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) is a commonly-used method for estimating groundwater recharge. Observations of the vertical distribution of pore-water chloride are related to the groundwater infiltration rates (i.e. recharge rates). In CMB method, the chloride distribution is attributed mainly to the assumption of one dimensional piston flow. In many places, however, the vertical distribution of chloride will be influenced by heterogeneity, leading to horizontal movement of infiltrating waters. The impact of heterogeneity will be particularly important when recharge is locally focused. When recharge is focused in an area, horizontal movement of chloride-bearing waters, coupled with upward movement driven by evapotranspiration, may lead to chloride bulges that could be misinterpreted if the CMB method is used to estimate recharge. We numerically simulate chloride transport and evaluate the validity of the CMB method in highly heterogeneous systems. This simulation is conducted for the unsaturated zone of Ogallala, Antlers, and Gatuna (OAG) formations in Andrews County, Texas. A two dimensional finite element model will show the movement of chloride through heterogeneous systems. We expect to see chloride bulges not only close to the surface but also at depths characterized by horizontal or upward movement. A comparative study of focused recharge estimates in this study with available recharge data will be presented.

  11. Removal of fission product ruthenium from purex process solutions: thiourea as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floh, B.; Abrao, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for the treatment of spent uranium fuel is presented. It is based on the Purex Process using thiourea to increase the ruthenium decontamination factor. Thiourea exhibits a strong tendency for the formation of coordination compounds in acidic media. This tendency serves as a basis to transform nitrosyl-ruthenium species into Ru /SC(NH)(NH 2 )/ 2+ and Ru /SC(NH)(NH 2 )/ 3 complexes which are unextractable by TBP-varsol. The best conditions for the ruthenium-thiourea complex formation were found to be: thiourea-ruthenium ratio (mass/mass) close to 42, at 75 0 C, 30 minutes reaction time and aging period of 60 minutes. The ruthenium decontamination factor for a single uranium extraction are ca. 80-100, not interfering with extraction of actinides. These values are rather high in comparison to those obtained using the conventional Purex Process (e.g. F.D. sub(Ru)=10). By this reason the method developed here is suitable for the treatment of spent uranium fuels. Thiourea (100g/l) scrubbing experiments of ruthenium, partially co-extracted with actinides, confirmed the possibility of its removal from the extract. A decontamination greater than 83,5% for ruthenium as fission product is obtained in two stages with this procedure. (Author) [pt

  12. A thermodynamic/mass-transport model for the release of ruthenium from irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.; Iglesias, F.C.; Hunt, C.E.L.

    1990-01-01

    Some postulated nuclear reactor accidents lead to fuel failures and hence release of fission products into the primary heat transport system (PHTS). To determine the consequences of such accidents, it is important to understand the behavior of fission products both in the PHTS and in the reactor containment building. Ruthenium metal has a high boiling point and is nonvolatile under reducing conditions. However, under oxidizing conditions ruthenium can form volatile oxides at relatively low temperatures and, hence, could escape from failed fuel and enter the containment building. The ruthenium radioisotope Ru-106 presents a potentially significant health risk if it is released outside the reactor containment building. Consequently, it is important to understand the behavior of ruthenium during a nuclear reactor accident. The authors review the thermodynamic behavior of ruthenium at high temperatures. The qualitative behavior of ruthenium, predicted using thermodynamic calculations, is then compared with experimental results from the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). Finally, a simple thermodynamic/mass-transport model is proposed to explain the release behavior of ruthenium in a steam atmosphere

  13. Dynamics of the contact between a ruthenium surface with a single nanoasperity and a flat ruthenium surface: Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros de Oliveira, Alan; Fortini, Andrea; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Srolovitz, David

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the contact between a pair of surfaces (with properties designed to mimic ruthenium) via molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the contact between a ruthenium surface with a single nanoasperity and a flat ruthenium surface. The results of such simulations suggest that contact behavior is highly variable. The goal of this study is to investigate the source and degree of this variability. We find that during compression, the behavior of the contact force displacement curves is reproducible, while during contact separation, the behavior is highly variable. Examination of the contact surfaces suggests that two separation mechanisms are in operation and give rise to this variability. One mechanism corresponds to the formation of a bridge between the two surfaces that plastically stretches as the surfaces are drawn apart and eventually separate in shear. This leads to a morphology after separation in which there are opposing asperities on the two surfaces. This plastic separation/bridge formation mechanism leads to a large work of separation. The other mechanism is a more brittle-like mode in which a crack propagates across the base of the asperity (slightly below the asperity/substrate junction) leading to most of the asperity on one surface or the other after separation and a slight depression facing this asperity on the opposing surface. This failure mode corresponds to a smaller work of separation. This failure mode corresponds to a smaller work of separation. Furthermore, contacts made from materials that exhibit predominantly brittle-like behavior will tend to require lower work of separation than those made from ductile-like contact materials.

  14. Photochromic ruthenium sulfoxide complexes: evidence for isomerization through a conical intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Beth Anne; Mockus, Nicholas V; Butcher, Dennis P; Lutterman, Daniel A; Turro, Claudia; Petersen, Jeffrey L; Rack, Jeffrey J

    2009-09-07

    The complexes [Ru(bpy)(2)(OS)](PF(6)) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](PF(6)), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, OS is 2-methylthiobenzoate, and OSO is 2-methylsulfinylbenzoate, have been studied. The electrochemical and photochemical reactivity of [Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) is consistent with an isomerization of the bound sulfoxide from S-bonded (S-) to O-bonded (O-) following irradiation or electrochemical oxidation. Charge transfer excitation of [Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) in MeOH results in the appearance of two new metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) maxima at 355 and 496 nm, while the peak at 396 nm diminishes in intensity. The isomerization is reversible at room temperature in alcohol or propylene carbonate solution. In the absence of light, solutions of O-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) revert to S-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+). Kinetic analysis reveals a biexponential decay with rate constants of 5.66(3) x 10(-4) s(-1) and 3.1(1) x 10(-5) s(-1). Cyclic voltammograms of S-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) are consistent with electron-transfer-triggered isomerization of the sulfoxide. Analysis of these voltammograms reveal E(S)(o)' = 0.86 V and E(O)(o)' = 0.49 V versus Ag/Ag(+) for the S- and O-bonded Ru(3+/2+) couples, respectively, in propylene carbonate. We found k(S-->O) = 0.090(15) s(-1) in propylene carbonate and k(S-->O) = 0.11(3) s(-1) in acetonitrile on Ru(III), which is considerably slower than has been reported for other sulfoxide isomerizations on ruthenium polypyridyl complexes following oxidation. The photoisomerization quantum yield (Phi(S-->O) = 0.45, methanol) is quite large, indicating a rapid excited state isomerization rate constant. The kinetic trace at 500 nm is monoexponential with tau = 150 ps, which is assigned to the excited S-->O isomerization rate. There is no spectroscopic or kinetic evidence for an O-bonded (3)MLCT excited state in the spectral evolution of S-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+) to O-[Ru(bpy)(2)(OSO)](+). Thus, isomerization occurs nonadiabatically from an S-bonded (or eta(2

  15. Quantum chemical studies on electronic structure and photodynamics of ruthenium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium complexes have found their way into many applications in the last decades. Among those, ruthenium polypyridyl compounds have been employed as light harvesting devices and photosensitisers in artificial photosynthesis and molecular photocatalysis. Ruthenium nitrosyl complexes are rapidly emerging as NO delivery agents to biological tissues with promising applications in anticancer photodynamic therapy, thanks to their ability to photorelease nitric oxide (NO). This thesis encompasses computational studies on reactivity, electronic structure, excited states and photodynamics of several ruthenium nitrosyl and polypyridyl complexes. The first part of the thesis deals with ruthenium nitrosyls. The cis-trans isomerisation mechanism of RuHIndNO, a ruthenium nitrosyl derivate of the prominent anti-cancer drug candidate KP1019, is investigated with density functional theory calculations. Next, the electronic structure of the ground and the first excited triplet state of RuHIndNO is studied with multiconfigurational methods including the density-matrix renormalisation group (DMRG). The obtained multiconfigurational wavefunctions and DMRG-based orbital entanglement analysis provides theoretical insight into the non-innocence of the NO ligand in nitrosyl complexes by describing the electron correlation in the Ru--NO bond and assigning oxidation states to the metal and the NO ligand. Another study is performed on excited states of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes with quantum chemical calculations and surface-hopping dynamics to obtain insights into the photodissociation mechanism of NO. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the excited states and photophysics of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes. Accurate excitation energies of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium (II), the prototype ruthenium polypyridyl are obtained with multiconfigurational calculations assisted by an orbital entanglement analysis. Subsequently, the effect of the ligand substitution on the photophysics

  16. Ruthenium determination by the method of inversion voltammetry on graphite electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominova, I G; Kolpakova, N A; Stromberg, A G [Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1978-12-01

    Optimal conditions for determining ruthenium by inversion voltammetry on a graphite electrode are 0.1 M KCl or KNO/sub 3/, pH 2-3, electrolysis potential - 1.0 V. A linear dependence of ruthenium electrodissolution current on its concentration in the solution makes it possible to use inversion voltammetry for determining 5x10/sup -7/ - 1x10/sup -4/ g-ion Ru/l. Ruthenium can be determined in the presence of a large excess of nickel and copper but commensurable amounts of mercury adn platinum metals interfere.

  17. Ruthenium behaviour in severe nuclear accident conditions - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backman, U.; Lipponen, M.; Zilliacus, R.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2004-03-01

    In order to prevent the radioactive ruthenium from spreading in gaseous form in case of an accident in a nuclear power plant it is of interest to know how it is formed and how it behaves. In the experiments the behaviour of ruthenium in oxidising atmosphere at high temperatures is studied. The methods for trapping and analysing RuO4 has been studied. It was found that 1M NaOH is capable of trapping RuO4 totally. The determination of Ru from the solution can be made using ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and from the reduced precipitates on filters by INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis). The results of the experiments carried out so far is reported. A significant difference in the decomposition rate of gaseous RuO4 depending on the tube material was found. In all experiments only a minor fraction of Ru remained in gaseous form until the bubbler. In order to achieve a better mass balance an experiment using radioactive tracer was carried out. In the decomposition of gaseous Ru needle-shaped RuO2 crystallites were formed. (au)

  18. Iron(III) Chloride mediated reduction of Bis(1-isoquinolylcarbonyl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    32. Ostendorf M, Romagnoli R, Cabeza Pereiro I C, Roos. E C, Moolenaar M J, Speckamp W N and Hiemstra H. 1997 Tetrahedron: Asymmetry 8 1773. 33. Wocadlo S, Massa W and Folgado J 1993 Inorg. Chim. Acta. 207 199. 34. Bedford R B, Bruce D W, Frost R M, Goodby J W and. Hird M 2004 Chem. Commun. 2822. 35.

  19. Titanium(III) chloride mediated synthesis of furan derivatives ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    a radical-induced synthesis of substituted furans from α-bromo-β-keto enoleth- ers using tributyl tinhydride (TBTH) as the radical initiator with 35–69% yield. But the use of tin com- pounds has certain limitations due to their toxicity and difficulties in isolation of pure products free of tin residues. To overcome these difficulties ...

  20. The vapour pressure of americium(III) chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, W.

    1983-01-01

    Based on the method described by Fischer, an ultramicro-size appratus was developed for static determination of the saturation vapour pressure of highly radioactive materials. The apparatus was tested with MgCl 2 , MnCl 2 , HoCl 3 and ScF 3 . The vapour pressure curves of MgCl 2 and MnCl 2 were in good agreement with other publications and thus proved the efficiency of the apparatus in spite of its difficulties of handling. The values measured for HoCl 3 and ScF 3 differed from those of earlier publications. However, these deviations have been observed before and may be the result of the different measuring principles of static and dynamic methods. For AmCl 3 , the following vapour pressure equation was established: log psub(Torr)=-(11826/T)+10.7. The thermodynamic parameters of the evaporation process were calculated on this basis, and the values for AmBr 3 and PnCl 3 were determined by extrapolation. (orig.) [de

  1. Valyl benzyl ester chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Dutkiewicz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound (systematic name: 1-benzyloxy-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-2-aminium chloride, C12H18NO2+·Cl−, the ester group is approximately planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.040 (2 Å from the least-squares plane, and makes a dihedral angle of 28.92 (16° with the phenyl ring. The crystal structure is organized by N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds which join the two components into a chain along the b axis. Pairs of chains arranged antiparallel are interconnected by further N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds, forming eight-membered rings. Similar packing modes have been observed in a number of amino acid ester halides with a short unit-cell parameter of ca 5.5 Å along the direction in which the chains run.

  2. Chloride on the Move

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo

    2017-01-09

    Chloride (Cl−) is an essential plant nutrient but under saline conditions it can accumulate to toxic levels in leaves; limiting this accumulation improves the salt tolerance of some crops. The rate-limiting step for this process – the transfer of Cl− from root symplast to xylem apoplast, which can antagonize delivery of the macronutrient nitrate (NO3−) to shoots – is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) and is multigenic. Until recently the molecular mechanisms underpinning this salt-tolerance trait were poorly defined. We discuss here how recent advances highlight the role of newly identified transport proteins, some that directly transfer Cl− into the xylem, and others that act on endomembranes in ‘gatekeeper’ cell types in the root stele to control root-to-shoot delivery of Cl−.

  3. Cobalt(III), nickel(II) and ruthenium(II) complexes of 1,10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Co(II) and Ru(II) complexes investigated in this study effect photocleavage of the supercoiled ... DNA is related to their utility in the design and development of synthetic restriction ..... ∗Quasi-reversible/irreversible (electrochemical behaviour of ...

  4. Long-Range Intramolecular Electronic Communication in a Trinuclear Ruthenium Tropolonate Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Jun; Kuwahara, Kyohei; Suzuki, Kota; Yuge, Hidetaka

    2017-02-20

    Dinuclear and trinuclear ruthenium complexes, [Ru(trop) 2 (C 2 trop)Ru(dppe)Cp] [2b; trop = tropolonato, C 2 trop = ethynyltropolonato, dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] and [Ru(trop){(C 2 trop)Ru(dppe)Cp} 2 ] (3), were synthesized, and their electronic and electrochemical properties were investigated in comparison with our previously reported complex [Ru(acac) 2 (C 2 trop)Ru(dppe)Cp] (2a). The electron-donating Ru II (dppe)Cp unit and electron-accepting Ru III O 6 unit are connected by C 2 trop in these complexes. 2a incorporates acetylacetonate as an ancillary ligand, while 2b and 3 incorporate tropolonate as an ancillary ligand. Every complex, 2a, 2b, and 3, exhibits similar UV-vis-near-IR (NIR) absorption spectra, demonstrating the lack of explicit intramolecular electronic communication between the units at least in the neutral state. The weak NIR absorption in 2a further diminished upon electrochemical oxidation, indicating almost no electronic communication between the units. In contrast, 2b and 3 exhibit broad NIR absorptions upon oxidation. Additionally, 3 exhibits four stepwise redox couples in the electrochemical study, which are formally attributed to [Ru II (trop) 3 ] - /[Ru III (trop) 3 ], two [Ru II (dppe)Cp]/[Ru III (dppe)Cp] + , and [Ru III (trop) 3 ]/[Ru IV (trop) 3 ] + couples. Clear separation of the redox couples attributed to the two terminal [Ru(dppe)Cp] units demonstrates the thermodynamic stability of the intermediate oxidation states with respect to disproportionation. Further electrochemical studies using an electrolyte including perfluorinated weakly coordinating anions and density functional theory/time-dependent density functional theory calculations confirmed the effect of ancillary ligands, acetylacetonate and tropolonate. In the case of 2a, electronic delocalization over the whole complex, especially over the [Ru(acac) 2 (trop)] unit, appears to be small. In contrast, the electronic communication between [Ru(dppe)Cp] and [Ru

  5. Ruthenium nitrosyl complexes in radioactive waste solutions in reprocessing plants. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Mueller, K.

    1984-01-01

    With capillary isotachophoresis and free-flow isotachophoresis it is possible to separate and isolate preparatively the mononuclear cationic ruthenium nitrosyl nitrato complexes. The behaviour of these complexes during storage, concentration and calcination is studied: The conversion of six ruthenium nitrosyl nitrato complexes as a function of time is studied at -36 0 C, 0 0 C, +3 0 C and 100 0 C. The percentage of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes with NO 3 - as ligand increased markedly during concentration experiments. Above 250 0 C NOsub(x) is liberated and the colour of the residue changes from brown to brownish-grey. At 400 0 C ruthenium complexes are no longer detected and the inner walls of the apparatus are covered with RuO 2 . (orig.)

  6. Synthesis and catalytic activity of ruthenium complexes modified with chiral racemic per- and polyfluorooxaalkanoates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lipovská, P.; Rathouská, L.; Šimůnek, O.; Hošek, J.; Kolaříková, V.; Rybáčková, M.; Cvačka, Josef; Svoboda, Martin; Kvíčala, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 191, Nov (2016), s. 14-22 ISSN 0022-1139 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : racemic * chiral * ruthenium complex * perfluorooxaalkanoate * polyfluorooxaalkanoate Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.101, year: 2016

  7. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Li, Shari; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-12-01

    Dendrimer-encapsulated ruthenium nanoparticles (DEN-Ru) have been used as catalysts in lithium-O2 batteries for the first time. Results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the nanoparticles synthesized by the dendrimer template method are ruthenium oxide instead of metallic ruthenium reported earlier by other groups. The DEN-Ru significantly improve the cycling stability of lithium (Li)-O2 batteries with carbon black electrodes and decrease the charging potential even at low catalyst loading. The monodispersity, porosity and large number of surface functionalities of the dendrimer template prevent the aggregation of the ruthenium nanoparticles making their entire surface area available for catalysis. The potential of using DEN-Ru as stand-alone cathode materials for Li-O2 batteries is also explored.

  8. Some thermophysical properties of ruthenium in the neighbourhood of the melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheindlin, A.E.; Kats, S.A.; Berezin, B.Ya.; Chekhovskoy, V.Ya.; Kenisarin, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    The technique of levitation calorimetry has been used to study for the first time thermophysical properties of ruthenium in the neighbourhood of the melting point. To measure enthalpy a copper block calorimeter with an istohermal jacket has been used. Basing on the values measured the equations for enthalpy of solid and liquid ruthenium within the temperature ranges of 2,270-2,607 K and 2,607-2,760 K respectively have been obtained by the least squares method. In addition the melting temperature of ruthenium and its brightness temperature at the melting point, the wavelength being 0.65 micron, have been measured. The results of the measurements have been used to calculate the heat and entropy of fusion, the specific heat of solid and that of liquid ruthenium and its normal spectral emissivity at the melting point

  9. Flameless atomic absorption determination of ruthenium using a ''Saturn-1'' spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichkov, V.N.; Sinitsyn, N.M.; Sadikova, F.G.; Govorova, M.I.; Yakshinskij, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    A flameless atomic absorption method is suggested for determining ruthenium in samples of complicated composition using a ''Saturn-1'' spectrophotometer with a L'vov graphite cuvette. The method was used for determining ruthenium in a copper-based sample (10 -3 % Ru) and in electrolyte slurries (10 -3 -10 -2 %). The limit of detection Csub(min, 0.95) = 3.0x10 -3 μg Ru/ml. Other platinum metals do not interfere [ru

  10. Identification of short-lived neutron-rich ruthenium and rhodium isotopes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.; Herrmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes ( 107 Ru, 108 Ru, 108 Rh, 109 Ru, 109 Rh, 110 Ru, 110 Rh, 111 Ru, 111 Rh, 112 Ru, 112 Rh, 113 Ru) have been separated from fission products by a rapid chemical procedure and identified by means of γ-ray spectroscopy. Nuclides with half-lives down to 3 sec were accessible. Ruthenium isotopes up to mass number 113 have been identified. (author)

  11. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Immobilized Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) Complex for Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Reductive Dehalogenation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Hao, Zhongkai; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hexing

    2016-05-18

    A sodium benzenesulfonate (PhSO3Na)-functionalized reduced graphene oxide was synthesized via a two-step aryl diazonium coupling and subsequent NaCl ion-exchange procedure, which was used as a support to immobilize tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex (Ru(bpy)3Cl2) by coordination reaction. This elaborated Ru(bpy)3-rGO catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic efficiency in visible-light-driven reductive dehalogenation reactions under mild conditions, even for ary chloride. Meanwhile, it showed the comparable reactivity with the corresponding homogeneous Ru(bpy)3Cl2 catalyst. This high catalytic performance could be attributed to the unique two-dimensional sheet-like structure of Ru(bpy)3-rGO, which efficiently diminished diffusion resistance of the reactants. Meanwhile, the nonconjugated PhSO3Na-linkage between Ru(II) complex and the support and the very low electrical conductivity of the catalyst inhibited energy/electron transfer from Ru(II) complex to rGO support, resulting in the decreased support-induced quenching effect. Furthermore, it could be easily recycled at least five times without significant loss of catalytic reactivity.

  12. Aquation Is a Crucial Activation Step for Anticancer Action of Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes to Trigger Cancer Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Lai, Lanhai; Zhao, Zhennan; Chen, Tianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Aquation has been proposed as crucial chemical action step for ruthenium (Ru) complexes, but its effects on the action mechanisms remain elusive. Herein, we have demonstrated the aquation process of a potent Ru polypyridyl complex (RuBmp=[Ru(II) (bmbp)(phen)Cl]ClO4 , bmbp=2,6-bis(6-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl) pyridine, phen=phenanthroline) with a chloride ligand, and revealed that aquation of RuBmp effectively enhanced its hydrophilicity and cellular uptake, thus significantly increasing its anticancer efficacy. The aquation products (H-RuBmp=[Ru(II) (bmbp)(phen)Cl]ClO4 , [Ru(II) (bmbp)(phen)(H2 O)]ClO4 , bmbp) exhibited a much higher apoptosis-inducing ability than the intact complex, with involvement of caspase activation, mitochondria dysfunction, and interaction with cell membrane death receptors. H-RuBmp demonstrated a higher interaction potency with the cell membrane and induced higher levels of ROS overproduction in cancer cells to regulate the AKT, MAPK, and p53 signaling pathways. Taken together, this study could provide useful information for fine-tuning the rational design of next-generation metal medicines. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cerium(terbium, erbium)chloride-choline chloride aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajfutdinova, R.K.; Zhuravlev, E.F.; Bikbaeva, G.G.; Domrachev, V.N.; Vanskova, G.I.

    1985-01-01

    To clarify the effect of rare earth nature on mutual solubility of rare earth salts and amines the solubility of solid phases in the systems, consisting of choline chloride, water and cerium, terbium, erbium chlorides, has been studied. It is established, that solubility isotherms of all the systems, testify to the formation of new solid phases of the composition: Ce(Tb, Er)xCl 3 x2C 5 H 14 ONClx3H 2 O. Individuality of new solid phases is proved by DTA method, the composition is confirmed by chemical analysis and data of PMR spectra, for choline chloride and its complexes with rare earth chlorides of the given composition PMR and IR spectra are studied

  14. Toxicological studies and antimicrobial properties of some Iron(III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two iron(III) complexes of Ciprofloxacin were synthesized by reaction of the ligand with iron(III) chloride hexahydrate in different solutions. The nature of bonding of the ligands and the structure of the isolated metal complexes were elucidated on the basis of their physical and spectroscopic studies. The infrared spectra ...

  15. The Biological Side of Water-Soluble Arene Ruthenium Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Therrien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article covers the synthetic strategies, structural aspects, and host-guest properties of ruthenium metalla-assemblies, with a special focus on their use as drug delivery vectors. The two-dimensional metalla-rectangles show interesting host-guest possibilities but seem less appropriate for being used as drug carriers. On the other hand, metalla-prisms allow encapsulation and possible targeted release of bioactive molecules and consequently show some potential as drug delivery vectors. The reactivity of these metalla-prisms can be fine-tuned to allow a fine control of the guest’s release. The larger metalla-cubes can be used to stabilize the formation of G-quadruplex DNA and can be used to encapsulate and release photoactive molecules such as porphins. These metalla-assemblies demonstrate great prospective in photodynamic therapy.

  16. Raman spectra of ruthenium and tantalum trimers in argon matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Shen, Xiaole; Chen, Xiaoyu; Lombardi, John R.

    2000-12-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of ruthenium trimers (Ru 3) in argon matrices have been obtained. Three resonance Raman transitions were observed between 570 and 590 nm. Two of them (303.4 and 603.7 cm -1) are assigned to the totally symmetric vibrational progression, giving k e=1.86 mdyne/ Å. The line at 581.5 cm-1 is assigned as the origin of a low-lying electronic state. We also report on the observation of a resonance Raman spectrum of tantalum trimers (Ta 3). Observed lines include 251.2 and 501.9 cm-1 which we assign to the fundamental and the first overtone of the symmetric stretch in Ta 3. This gives k e=2.25 mdyne/ Å.

  17. Evidence for Dynamic Chemical Kinetics at Individual Molecular Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2018-02-05

    Catalytic cycles are typically depicted as possessing time-invariant steps with fixed rates. Yet the true behavior of individual catalysts with respect to time is unknown, hidden by the ensemble averaging inherent to bulk measurements. Evidence is presented for variable chemical kinetics at individual catalysts, with a focus on ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by the second-generation Grubbs' ruthenium catalyst. Fluorescence microscopy is used to probe the chemical kinetics of the reaction because the technique possesses sufficient sensitivity for the detection of single chemical reactions. Insertion reactions in submicron regions likely occur at groups of many (not single) catalysts, yet not so many that their unique kinetic behavior is ensemble averaged. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Antagonizing STAT3 dimerization with a rhodium(III) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Liu, Li-Juan; Leung, Ka-Ho; Chen, Yen-Ting; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wang, Hui-Min David; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-08-25

    Kinetically inert metal complexes have arisen as promising alternatives to existing platinum and ruthenium chemotherapeutics. Reported herein, to our knowledge, is the first example of a substitutionally inert, Group 9 organometallic compound as a direct inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) dimerization. From a series of cyclometalated rhodium(III) and iridium(III) complexes, a rhodium(III) complex emerged as a potent inhibitor of STAT3 that targeted the SH2 domain and inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and dimerization. Significantly, the complex exhibited potent anti-tumor activities in an in vivo mouse xenograft model of melanoma. This study demonstrates that rhodium complexes may be developed as effective STAT3 inhibitors with potent anti-tumor activity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  20. Dynamic electrochemical measurement of chloride ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, Derk B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the dynamic measurement of chloride ions using the transition time of a silver silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrode. Silver silver chloride electrode is used extensively for potentiometric measurement of chloride ions concentration in electrolyte. In this measurement,

  1. Producing ammonium chloride from coal or shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, O L

    1921-02-25

    Process of producing ammonium chloride consists of mixing the substance to be treated with a chloride of an alkali or alkaline earth metal, free silica, water and free hydrochloric acid, heating the mixture until ammonium chloride distills off and collecting the ammonium chloride.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The...

  3. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375... CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No....1666 of this chapter, at a concentration of 1.5 times that of cetylpyridinium chloride. (c) The...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... hydrochloric acid solution and crystallizing out magnesium chloride hexahydrate. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-34 - Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). 151.50-34... chloride (vinyl chloride monomer). (a) Copper, aluminum, magnesium, mercury, silver, and their alloys shall... equipment that may come in contact with vinyl chloride liquid or vapor. (b) Valves, flanges, and pipe...

  7. 40 CFR 61.65 - Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants. 61.65 Section 61.65 Protection of Environment... AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.65 Emission standard for ethylene dichloride, vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of an ethylene dichloride...

  8. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  9. Ruthenium(II) bipyridine complexes bearing quinoline-azoimine (NN'N″) tridentate ligands: synthesis, spectral characterization, electrochemical properties and single-crystal X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Noaimi, Mousa; Abdel-Rahman, Obadah S; Fasfous, Ismail I; El-khateeb, Mohammad; Awwadi, Firas F; Warad, Ismail

    2014-05-05

    Four octahedral ruthenium(II) azoimine-quinoline complexes having the general molecular formula [Ru(II)(L-Y)(bpy)Cl](PF6) {L-Y=YC6H4N=NC(COCH3)=NC9H6N, Y=H (1), CH3 (2), Br (3), NO2 (4) and bpy=2,2'-bipyrdine} were synthesized. The azoimine-quinoline based ligands behave as NN'N″ tridentate donors and coordinated to ruthenium via azo-N', imine-N' and quinolone-N″ nitrogen atoms. The composition of the complexes has been established by elemental analysis, spectral methods (FT-IR, electronic, (1)H NMR, UV/Vis and electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) techniques. The crystal structure of complex 1 is reported. The Ru(II) oxidation state is greatly stabilized by the novel tridentate ligands, showing Ru(III/II) couples ranging from 0.93-1.27 V vs. Cp2Fe/Cp2Fe(+). The absorption spectrum of 1 in dichloromethane was modeled by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of pure anhydrous rare earth chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kova, N.L.; Slastenova, N.M.; Batyaev, I.M.; Solov'ev, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been suggested for obtaining extra-pure anhydrous REE chlorides by chloridizing corresponding oxalates by chlorine in a fluid bed, the chloridizing agents being diluted by an inert gas in a ratio of 2-to-1. The method is applicable to the manufacture of quality chlorides not only of light, but also of heavy REE. Neodymium chloride has an excited life of tau=30 μs, this evidencing the absence of the damping impurities

  11. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  12. Behavior of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Mercier, J.P.; Gue, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30,000 MWday.t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: - ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation, - for a final temperature limited to 160 0 C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%, in the presence of H 2 0, HN0 3 , N0 x and 0 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source

  13. Behavior of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Mercier, J.P.; Gue, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30,000 MW day·t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small-volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation; for a final temperature limited to 160 degree C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%; in the presence of H 2 O, HNO 3 , NO x and O 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide (probably RuO 2 ) on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source

  14. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.F.; Zhou, F.Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10−6 cm3·g−1–1.29 × 10−6 cm3·g−1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10−6 cm3·g−1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10−6 cm3·g−1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10−6 cm3·g−1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. PMID:27090955

  15. Reaction of calcium chloride with alkali metal chlorides in melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, V.D.; Mikhajlova, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    Thermochemical characteristics of CaCl 2 reaction with sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium chlorides in melts at 890 deg C are determined. The values of formation enthalpies of infinitely diluted by CaCl 2 solutions (ΔH) in the chloride row increase from -22 in NaCl to -47 kJ/mol of CaCl 2 in CsCl. With increasing the concentration of calcium chloride in the solution the ΔH values decrease. The regularities of separation from the solution of the CaCl 2 -CsCl system at 890 deg C of the CaCl 2 x CsCl in solid are studied. Formation enthalpies under the given conditions constitutes -70+-3 kJ/mol

  16. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  17. The Role of Chloride Ions during the Formation of Akaganéite Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Scheck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron(III hydrolysis in the presence of chloride ions yields akaganéite, an iron oxyhydroxide mineral with a tunnel structure stabilized by the inclusion of chloride. Yet, the interactions of this anion with the iron oxyhydroxide precursors occurring during the hydrolysis process, as well as its mechanistic role during the formation of a solid phase are debated. Using a potentiometric titration assay in combination with a chloride ion-selective electrode, we have monitored the binding of chloride ions to nascent iron oxyhydroxides. Our results are consistent with earlier studies reporting that chloride ions bind to early occurring iron complexes. In addition, the data suggests that they are displaced with the onset of oxolation. Chloride ions in the akaganéite structure must be considered as remnants from the early stages of precipitation, as they do not influence the basic mechanism, or the kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions. The structure-directing role of chloride is based upon the early stages of the reaction. The presence of chloride in the tunnel-structure of akagenéite is due to a relatively strong binding to the earliest iron oxyhydroxide precursors, whereas it plays a rather passive role during the later stages of precipitation.

  18. Dehydrogenative Coupling of Primary Alcohols To Form Esters Catalyzed by a Ruthenium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølvhøj, Amanda Birgitte; Madsen, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The ruthenium complex [RuCl2(IiPr)(p-cymene)] catalyzes the direct condensation of primary alcohols into esters and lactones with the release of hydrogen gas. The reaction is most effective with linear aliphatic alcohols and 1,4-diols and is believed to proceed with a ruthenium dihydride...

  19. A facile one-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica: Aqueous hydration of nitriles to amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium hydroxide nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium hydroxide immobilization; the hydration of nitriles occurs in high yield and excellent selectivity using this...

  20. Activity and selectivity regulation of synthesis gas reaction over supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K; Nobusawa, T; Fukushima, T; Tominaga, H

    1985-01-01

    The catalytic activities of supported ruthenium for synthesis-gas conversion to hydrocarbons was found to be in the following order: TiOS > Nb2O3 > ZrO2 > SiO2 > Ta2O5 > Al2O3 > V2O5 > MoO3 > WO3 > MnO2 > ZnO. Turnover frequencies of the supported ruthenium increased with decrease in dispersion of the metal particles for every carrier material. Even the activities per unit weight of metals were higher for low-dispersion ruthenium of Al2O3, TiO2, and ZrO2. The chain-growth probability of a hydrocarbon product, which is characterized by the Schulz-Flory distribution, increased markedly with decrease in the metal dispersion irrespective of the carrier material. The catalytic activity of ruthenium particles with a dispersed ruthenium increased almost linearly with an increase in reaction pressure (up to at least 2.0 MPa). 23 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Mitigation of strontium and ruthenium release in the CANDU primary heat transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, J

    1998-03-01

    In certain severe accident scenarios, low-volatility fission products can appear to contribute significantly to dose, if treated with undue conservatism. Hence a survey was performed, to see if factors that may mitigate release of strontium and ruthenium could be incorporated into safety analyses, to cover parameters such as location in the fuel matrix under normal operating conditions, release from fuel, transport and deposition in the primary heat transport system and chemistry. In addition chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the volatility of strontium and ruthenium in the presence of uranium and important fission products. Strontium is very soluble in the U0{sub 2} fuel, up to 12 atom %, and hence release is improbable, particularly under oxidizing conditions until volatilization of the fuel matrix itself occurs. Ruthenium, however, can be released at low temperatures, but only under oxidizing conditions. These may occur during a fuel-handling accident or as a result of an end-fitting failure. Under these conditions, the primary heat transport system cannot be credited for retention. The volatile form of ruthenium, RuO{sub 4}(g), is thermally unstable above 381 K and decomposes to RuO{sub 2}(s) and O{sub 2}(g) upon contact with surfaces, a factor that is likely to minimize the release of ruthenium into the environment. (author)

  2. Mitigation of strontium and ruthenium release in the CANDU primary heat transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.

    1998-03-01

    In certain severe accident scenarios, low-volatility fission products can appear to contribute significantly to dose, if treated with undue conservatism. Hence a survey was performed, to see if factors that may mitigate release of strontium and ruthenium could be incorporated into safety analyses, to cover parameters such as location in the fuel matrix under normal operating conditions, release from fuel, transport and deposition in the primary heat transport system and chemistry. In addition chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the volatility of strontium and ruthenium in the presence of uranium and important fission products. Strontium is very soluble in the U0 2 fuel, up to 12 atom %, and hence release is improbable, particularly under oxidizing conditions until volatilization of the fuel matrix itself occurs. Ruthenium, however, can be released at low temperatures, but only under oxidizing conditions. These may occur during a fuel-handling accident or as a result of an end-fitting failure. Under these conditions, the primary heat transport system cannot be credited for retention. The volatile form of ruthenium, RuO 4 (g), is thermally unstable above 381 K and decomposes to RuO 2 (s) and O 2 (g) upon contact with surfaces, a factor that is likely to minimize the release of ruthenium into the environment. (author)

  3. Electrochemical Chloride extraction using external electrodes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical methods for the removal of chloride from concrete have been developed and the methods are primarily designed for situations where corrosion has started due to an increased chloride concentration in the vicinity of the reinforcement. In these methods the reinforcement is used...... as the cathode. However, some unwanted side effects can occur, including alkali-silica reaction and in some cases hydrogen embrittlement. It is also suggested also to use electrochemical chloride extraction in a preventive way in constructions where chloride induced corrosion is likely to be a problem after...... a period of time, i.e. remove the chlorides before the chloride front reaches the reinforcement. If the chlorides are removed from outer few centimetres from the surface, the chloride will not reach the reinforcement and cause damage. By using the electrochemical chloride removal in this preventive way...

  4. cyclic π-perimeter hydrocarbon ruthenium complexes bearing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on the basis of FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic data as well as by elemental analysis. Molecular structures of ... Experimental ... vent over dichloromethane solution of the cor- responding ... tion filtered to remove ammonium chloride and excess ammonium ...... UV-vis spectra of complexes were acquired in ace- tonitrile and ...

  5. Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzoxazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole in the presence of edta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Ignat'eva, T.I.; Lomakina, L.N.

    1975-01-01

    Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2MBI), 2-mercaptobenzoxazole (2MBO) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2MBT) in the presence of EDTA was studied. The interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with EDTA was constidered. Ruthenium complex is formed with constant output at 2-4.5 pH after 30 min.heating. In the lowacid solution (pH 2-4) osmium reacts with EDTA forming soluble compound. Characteristics of ruthenium (4) compound with 2MBI, 2MBO and 2MBT produced in the presence of EDTA are presented. Osmium (4) in the presence of EDTA and above mentioned organic reagents and when heating forms lowsoluble compounds. Possibility of joint determination of ruthenium and osmium with help of 2MBI in the presence of EDTA under conditions of minimum complexing osmium with EDTA was investigated

  6. Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, 2-mercaptobenzoxazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole in the presence of EDTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busev, A I; Ignat' eva, T I; Lomakina, L N [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Kafedra Analiticheskoj Khimii

    1975-05-01

    Interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2MBI), 2-mercaptobenzoxazole (2MBO) and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2MBT) in the presence of EDTA was studied. The interaction of ruthenium (4) and osmium (4) with EDTA was considered. Ruthenium complex is formed with constant output at 2-4.5 pH after 30 min. heating. In the low acid solution (pH 2-4) osmium reacts with EDTA forming soluble compound. Characteristics of ruthenium (4) compound with 2MBI, 2MBO and 2MBT produced in the presence of EDTA are presented. Osmium (4) in the presence of EDTA and above mentioned organic reagents and when heating forms low soluble compounds. Possibility of joint determination of ruthenium and osmium with help of 2MBI in the presence of EDTA under conditions of minimum complexing osmium with EDTA was investigated.

  7. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  8. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  9. Coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium complexes as efficient alkyneazide cycloaddition catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Lamberti, Marina; Fortman, George C.; Poater, Albert; Broggi, Julie; Slawin, Alexandra M. Z.; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 16-electron ruthenium complexes with the general formula Cp*Ru(L)X (in which L = phosphine or N-heterocyclic carbene ligand; X = Cl or OCH2CF3) was explored in azidealkyne cycloaddition reactions that afford the 1,2,3- triazole products. The scope of the Cp*Ru(PiPr 3)Cl precatalyst was investigated for terminal alkynes leading to new 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles in high yields. Mechanistic studies were conducted and revealed a number of proposed intermediates. Cp*Ru- (PiPr3)(2-HCCPh)Cl was observed and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR at temperatures between 273 and 213 K. A rare example of N,N-κ2-phosphazide complex, Cp*Ru(κ2- iPr3PN3Bn)Cl, was fully characterized, and a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure was obtained. DFT calculations describe a complete map of the catalytic reactivity with phenylacetylene and/or benzylazide. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Graphene Oxide/ Ruthenium Oxide Composites for Supercapacitors Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Fatima

    Supercapacitors are electrical energy storage devices with high power density, high rate capability, low maintenance cost, and long life cycle. They complement or replace batteries in harvesting applications when high power delivery is needed. An important improvement in performance of supercapacitors has been achieved through recent advances in the development of new nanostructured materials. Here we will discuss the fabrication of graphene oxide/ ruthenium oxide supercacitors electrodes including electrophoretic deposition. The morphology and structure of the fabricated electrodes were investigated and will be discussed. The electrochemical properties were determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge techniques and the experiments that demonstrate the excellent capacitive properties of the obtained supercapacitors will also be discussed. The fabrication and characterization of the samples were performed at the Center of Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Lab. The developed approaches in our study represent an exciting direction for designing the next generation of energy storage devices. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Visiting Faculty Program and the research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  11. Visual acuity after Ruthenium106 brachytherapy of choroidal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Bertil; Patel, Imran M.; Campbell, Ian R.; Mayles, Helen M.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To report on conservation of visual acuity after Ruthenium 106 (Ru-106) brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma. Methods and materials: This study was a noncomparative interventional case series of 458 patients with choroidal melanoma treated at a single center between January 1993 and December 2001. The intervention consisted of Ru-106 brachytherapy delivering minimum scleral and apex doses of 300 Gy and 80 Gy, respectively, using a 15-mm or 20-mm plaque. For discrete, posterior tumors, the plaque was positioned eccentrically with its posterior edge aligned with the posterior tumor margin. To ensure correct plaque positioning, any overlying extraocular muscles were dis-inserted, and the locations of both tumor and plaque edges were confirmed by transillumination and indentation. The main outcome measures were conservation of vision of 20/40 or better, 20/200 or better, and Counting Fingers or better, according to baseline variables. Results: The actuarial rate of conservation of 20/40 or better was 55% at 9 years, loss of such vision correlating with posterior tumor extension (p 106 brachytherapy of posterior choroidal melanoma achieves good conservation of vision if the tumor does not extend close to the optic nerve or fovea

  12. Coordinatively unsaturated ruthenium complexes as efficient alkyneazide cycloaddition catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Lamberti, Marina

    2012-01-23

    The performance of 16-electron ruthenium complexes with the general formula Cp*Ru(L)X (in which L = phosphine or N-heterocyclic carbene ligand; X = Cl or OCH2CF3) was explored in azidealkyne cycloaddition reactions that afford the 1,2,3- triazole products. The scope of the Cp*Ru(PiPr 3)Cl precatalyst was investigated for terminal alkynes leading to new 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles in high yields. Mechanistic studies were conducted and revealed a number of proposed intermediates. Cp*Ru- (PiPr3)(2-HCCPh)Cl was observed and characterized by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR at temperatures between 273 and 213 K. A rare example of N,N-κ2-phosphazide complex, Cp*Ru(κ2- iPr3PN3Bn)Cl, was fully characterized, and a single-crystal X-ray diffraction structure was obtained. DFT calculations describe a complete map of the catalytic reactivity with phenylacetylene and/or benzylazide. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Rapid visual and spectrophotometric nitrite detection by cyclometalated ruthenium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hoi-Shing; Lo, Ka-Wai; Yeung, Chi-Fung; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2017-10-16

    Quantitative determination of nitrite ion (NO 2 - ) is of great importance in environmental and clinical investigations. A rapid visual and spectrophotometric assay for NO 2 - detection was developed based on a newly designed ruthenium complex, [Ru(npy)([9]aneS3)(CO)](ClO 4 ) (denoted as RuNPY; npy = 2-(1-naphthyl)pyridine, [9]aneS3 = 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane). This complex traps NO + produced in acidified NO 2 - solution, and yields observable color change within 1 min at room temperature. The assay features excellent dynamic range (1-840 μmol L -1 ) and high selectivity, and its limit of detection (0.39 μmol L -1 ) is also well below the guideline values for drinking water recommended by WHO and U.S. EPA. Practical use of this assay in tap water and human urine was successfully demonstrated. Overall, the rapidity and selectivity of this assay overcome the problems suffered by the commonly used modified Griess assays for nitrite determination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ruthenium(V) oxides from low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiley, Craig I.; Walton, Richard I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Lees, Martin R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Fisher, Janet M.; Thompsett, David [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Reading (United Kingdom); Agrestini, Stefano [Max-Planck Institut, CPfS, Dresden (Germany); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-22

    Low-temperature (200 C) hydrothermal synthesis of the ruthenium oxides Ca{sub 1.5}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, SrRu{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and Ba{sub 2}Ru{sub 3}O{sub 9}(OH) is reported. Ca{sub 1.5}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7} is a defective pyrochlore containing Ru{sup V/VI}; SrRu{sub 2}O{sub 6} is a layered Ru{sup V} oxide with a PbSb{sub 2}O{sub 6} structure, whilst Ba{sub 2}Ru{sub 3}O{sub 9}(OH) has a previously unreported structure type with orthorhombic symmetry solved from synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. SrRu{sub 2}O{sub 6} exhibits unusually high-temperature magnetic order, with antiferromagnetism persisting to at least 500 K, and refinement using room temperature neutron powder diffraction data provides the magnetic structure. All three ruthenates are metastable and readily collapse to mixtures of other oxides upon heating in air at temperatures around 300-500 C, suggesting they would be difficult, if not impossible, to isolate under conventional high-temperature solid-state synthesis conditions. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Placental transfer of ruthenium in rat and guinea-pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levack, V.M.; Pottinger, H.; Harrison, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Ruthenium-106 in citrate solution was administered intravenously to rat at different stages of pregnancy and to guinea-pig either before conception or in late pregnancy. The results for rat showed that retention in the embryo/foetus measured at 3-5 days after administration increased from about 0.0002% of injected activity per embryo/foetus on day 12 of gestation to about 0.05% at birth. The relative concentrations of 106 Ru in embryo/foetus and mother (C f /C m ratio) were about 0.1 in each case. Concentrations in the yolk sac on day 12 were about 1% g -1 compared with 0.01% g -1 kin the foetus/ Retention in the guinea-pig foetus in late gestation at 7 days after administration (days 50-57) was about 0.2% injected activity per foetus, corresponding to a C f /C m = 0.2. Retention in each foetoplacental unit was 2% of injected 106 Ru with 50% in the yolk sac, 35% in the placenta and 10% in the foetus. For administration 4 weeks prior to conception, the level of 106 Ru retained in the foetus on day 57 of gestation was two orders of magnitude lower than after short-term administration, with a C f /C m about 0.004. (author)

  16. Sweetening ruthenium and osmium: organometallic arene complexes containing aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jennifer C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Winnig, Marcel; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Sadler, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    The novel organometallic sandwich complexes [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Ru(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (1) (OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate) and [(eta(6)-p-cymene)Os(eta(6)-aspartame)](OTf)(2) (2) incorporating the artificial sweetener aspartame have been synthesised and characterised. A number of properties of aspartame were found to be altered on binding to either metal. The pK(a) values of both the carboxyl and the amino groups of aspartame are lowered by between 0.35 and 0.57 pH units, causing partial deprotonation of the amino group at pH 7.4 (physiological pH). The rate of degradation of aspartame to 3,6-dioxo-5-phenylmethylpiperazine acetic acid (diketopiperazine) increased over threefold from 0.12 to 0.36 h(-1) for 1, and to 0.43 h(-1) for 2. Furthermore, the reduction potential of the ligand shifted from -1.133 to -0.619 V for 2. For the ruthenium complex 1 the process occurred in two steps, the first (at -0.38 V) within a biologically accessible range. This facilitates reactions with biological reductants such as ascorbate. Binding to and activation of the sweet taste receptor was not observed for these metal complexes up to concentrations of 1 mM. The factors which affect the ability of metal-bound aspartame to interact with the receptor site are discussed.

  17. Electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II) complexes with polyphenolic acids in micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Chemistry, Fatima College, Madurai 625 018 (India); Ramdass, Arumugam [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Research Department of Chemistry, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628 216 (India); Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Rajagopal, Seenivasan, E-mail: rajagopalseenivasan@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India)

    2016-02-15

    The electron transfer in a microhetrogeneous system is a perfect mimic of biological electron transfer. The electron transfer between biologically important phenolic acids and ruthenium (II) complexes is systematically studied in the presence of anionic and cationic micelles. The photophysical properties of these ruthenium (II) complexes with anionic and cationic micelles and their binding abilities with these two type of micelles are also studies using absorption, emission and excited state lifetime spectral techniques. Pseudophase Ion Exchange (PIE) Model is applied to derive mechanism of electron transfer in two types of micelles. - Highlights: • Effect of microhetrogeneous system is studied using ruthenium (II) complexes and gallic acid is studied. • Pseudophase Ion exchange model is applied to derive the mechanism. • Binding constants are in the range of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} M{sup −1}.

  18. Stable tracer investigations in humans for assessing the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Cantone, M.C.; Giussani, A.; Maggioni, T.; Birattari, C.; Bondardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Garlaschelli, I.; Werner, E.; Roth, P.; Hoellriegl, V.; Louvat, P.; Felgenhauer, N.; Zilker, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans is justified by the potential radiological risk represented by their radionuclides. Only a few data related to the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans are available and, accordingly, the biokinetic models currently recommended by the ICRP for these elements are mainly based on data from animal experiments. The use of stable isotopes as tracers, coupled with a proper analytical technique (nuclear activation analysis with protons) for their determination in biological samples, represents an ethically acceptable methodology for biokinetic investigations, being free from any radiation risk for the volunteer subjects. In this work, the results obtained in eight biokinetic investigations for ruthenium, conducted on a total of three healthy volunteers, and six for zirconium, performed on a total of three subjects, are presented and compared to the predictions of the ICRP models. (author)

  19. Amorphous carbon nanofibres inducing high specific capacitance of deposited hydrous ruthenium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, V.; Pico, F.; Ibanez, J.; Lillo-Rodenas, M.A.; Linares-Solano, A.; Kimura, M.; Oya, A.; Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M.; Rojo, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Composites consisting of ruthenium oxide particles deposited on amorphous carbon nanofibres are prepared by a repetitive impregnation procedure. The choice of amorphous carbon nanofibres as support of amorphous ruthenium oxide leads to composites in which the deposited oxide consists of aggregates of extremely small primary particles (1-1.5 nm-size) and showing high porosity (specific surface area of 450 m 2 g -1 ). This special deposition of the oxide seems to favour: (i) high oxide capacitance (1000 Fg -1 ) at high oxide loadings (up to 20 wt%) and (ii) high capacitance retention (ca. 80% from the initial oxide capacitance) at high current densities (200 mA cm -2 ). Amorphous carbon nanofibres are suitable supports for amorphous ruthenium oxide and perhaps for other amorphous oxides acting as active electrode materials.

  20. Estimation of very low concentrations of Ruthenium by spectrophotometric method using barbituric acid as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna Reddy, S.; Srinivasan, R.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrophotometric method employing numerous chromogenic reagents like thiourea, 1,10-phenanthroline, thiocyanate and tropolone is reported in the literature for the estimation of very low concentrations of Ru. A sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of ruthenium in the concentration range 1.5 to 6.5 ppm in the present work. This method is based on the reaction of ruthenium with barbituric acid to produce ruthenium(ll)tris-violurate, (Ru(H 2 Va) 3 ) -1 complex which gives a stable deep-red coloured solution. The maximum absorption of the complex is at 491 nm due to the inverted t 2g → Π(L-L ligand) electron - transfer transition. The molar absorptivity of the coloured species is 9,851 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1

  1. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  2. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    : On the basis of five included studies, the ED10 values of aqueous cobalt chloride ranged between 0.0663 and 1.95 µg cobalt/cm(2), corresponding to 30.8-259 ppm. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis provides an overview of the doses of cobalt that are required to elicit allergic cobalt contactdermatitis in sensitized...

  3. Extraction of actinides from chloride medium using pentaalkylpropanediamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.

    1991-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical processes for the purification of plutonium create waste solutions containing actinides, mainly americium, in chloride medium. Studies have been undertaken to study the extraction of actinides in chloride medium (hydrochloric acid mixed with concentrated salts such as LiCl, CaCl 2 , MgCl 2 , KCl) using pentaalkylpropanediamides as extractants. Plutonium (IV) is very easily extracted, Am (III) needs a salting out agent such as LiCl. Back extraction of trivalent cations is easy in HCl <5M. Plutonium(IV) and (VI) can be stripped by reduction either with ascorbic acid or hydroxylammonium salts in weak acid medium. Several diluents can be used (aromatic, chlorinated or even aliphatic) with addition of decanol to prevent third phase formation. In conclusion diamides can be used for various wastes declassification, they are potentially completely incinerable, and, as the synthesis has been optimized, they appear to be promising extractants

  4. Surface chloride salt formation on Space Shuttle exhaust alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Wakelyn, N. T.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum oxide samples from the exhaust of Space Shuttle launches STS-1, STS-4, STS-5, and STS-6 were collected from surfaces on or around the launch pad complex and chemically analyzed. The results indicate that the particulate solid-propellant rocket motor (SRM) alumina was heavily chlorided. Concentrations of water-soluble aluminum (III) ion were large, suggesting that the surface of the SRM alumina particles was rendered soluble by prior reactions with HCl and H2O in the SRM exhaust cloud. These results suggest that Space Shuttle exhaust alumina particles are good sites for nucleation and condensation of atmospheric water. Laboratory experiments conducted at 220 C suggest that partial surface chloriding of alumina may occur in hot Space Shuttle exhaust plumes.

  5. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Rao, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, WA (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University, Florida (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Pu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(III) species are lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other trivalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is mainly used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  6. Surface Chloride Levels in Colorado Structural Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This project focused on the chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in structural concrete. The primary goal of this project is to analyze the surface chloride concentration level of the concrete bridge decks throughout Colorado. The study in...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of vinyl chloride in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.M.; Laib, R.J.; Kappus, H.; Buchter, A.

    1977-01-01

    When rats are exposed to [ 14 C]vinyl chloride in a closed system, the vinyl chloride present in the atmosphere equilibrates with the animals' organism within 15 min. The course of equilibration could be determined using rats which had been given 6-nitro-1,2,3-benzothiadiazole. This compound completely blocks metabolism of vinyl chloride. The enzymes responsible for metabolism of vinyl chloride are saturated at an atmospheric concentration of vinyl chloride of 250 ppm. Pharmacokinetic analysis shows that no significant cumulation of vinyl chloride or its major metabolites is to be expected on repeated administration of vinyl chlorides. This may be consistent with the theory that a reactive, shortly living metabolite which occurs in low concentration only, may be responsible for the toxic effects of vinyl chloride

  8. Dye sensitized photovoltaic cells: Attaching conjugated polymers to zwitterionic ruthenium dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Biancardo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of a zwitterionic ruthenium dye that binds to anatase surfaces and has a built-in functionality that allows for the attachment of a conjugated polymer chain is presented. The system was found to adsorb on the surface of anatase anchored by the ruthenium dye. Two types of devices were...... prepared: standard photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar cells and polymer solar cells. The PEC solar cells employed a sandwich geometry between TiO2 nanoporous photoanodes and Pt counter electrodes using LiI/I-2 in CH3CN as an electrolyte. The polymer solar cells employed planar anatase electrodes...

  9. Ruthenium phosphine complexes as catalysts for alternating co-polymerization of ethylene and CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, O.V.; Kal'sin, A.M.; Peganov, T.A.; Petrovskij, P.V.; Belov, G.P.; Novikova, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    Ruthenium (2) complexes, [Ru(dppe) 2 (OTs) 2 ] and [Ru(PhP(CH 2 CH 2 CH 2 PPh 2 ) 2 )(OTs) 2 ], where dppe (diphenylphosphino)ethane; OTs = tosylate, were synthesized with the yield of 67 and 76%, respectively, and characterized by 31 P NMR. The properties of the above complexes as catalysts of alternating co-polymerization of ethylene and carbon monoxide were studied. A considerable increase in catalytic activity of the complexes was established in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid and 1,4-benzoquinone. These compounds are the first example of ruthenium complexes that catalyse co-polymerization of ethylene and CO [ru

  10. Behaviour of ruthenium in the case of shutdown of the cooling system of HLLW storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, M.; Gue, J.P.; Mercier, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    The consequences of the failure of the cooling system of fission product storage tanks over a variable period were investigated as part of the safety analysis of the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plant. Due to the considerable heat release, induced by the fission products, a prolonged shutdown of the tank cooling system could cause the progressive evaporation of the solutions to dryness, and culminate in the formation of volatile species of ruthenium and their release in the tank venting circuit. To determine the fraction of ruthenium likely to be transferred from the storage tanks in volatile or aerosol form during the failure, evaporation tests were conducted by evaporating samples of actual nitric acid solutions of fission products, obtained on the laboratory scale after the reprocessing of several kilograms of MOX fuels irradiated to 30.000 MW day ·t -1 . A distillation apparatus was designed to operate with small-volume solution samples, reproducing the heating conditions existing in the reprocessing plant within a storage tank for fission products. The main conclusions drawn from these experiments are as follows: - ruthenium is only volatilized in the final phase of evaporation, just before desiccation, - for a final temperature limited to 160 deg. C, the total fraction of volatilized ruthenium reaches 12%, - in the presence of H 2 O, HNO 3 , NO x and O 2 , the volatilized ruthenium recombines mainly in the form of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrates, or decomposes into ruthenium oxide (probably RuO 2 ) on the walls of the apparatus. Assuming a heating power density of 10 W/liter of concentrate, and a perfectly adiabatic storage system, the minimum time required to reach dryness can be estimated at 90 h, allowing substantial time to take action to restore a cooling source. It is probable that, in an industrial storage tank, the heat losses from the tank and the offgas discharge ducts will cause recondensation and internal reflux, which will commensurately delay

  11. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  12. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Nannhein, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Altos, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  13. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food... Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following conditions: (a) In spice oleoresins as a residue from...

  14. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is generally...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  1. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color...

  2. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must be...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the Food...

  7. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a...

  8. Adsorption properties of cationic rhodamine B dye onto metals chloride-activated castor bean residue carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Lee Lin; Zaini, Muhammad Abbas Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    This work was aimed to evaluate the feasibility of castor bean residue based activated carbons prepared through metals chloride activation. The activated carbons were characterized for textural properties and surface chemistry, and the adsorption data of rhodamine B were established to investigate the removal performance. Zinc chloride-activated carbon with specific surface area of 395 m 2 /g displayed a higher adsorption capacity of 175 mg/g. Magnesium chloride and iron(III) chloride are less toxic and promising agents for composite chemical activation. The adsorption data obeyed Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The rate-limiting step in the adsorption of rhodamine B is film diffusion. The positive values of enthalpy and entropy indicate that the adsorption is endothermic and spontaneous at high temperature.

  9. Electrochemical reduction of lanthanum trichloride in a molten equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolevskaya, A.L.; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Polyakov, E.G.; Stangrit, P.T.

    1987-09-20

    The authors used linear voltamperometry for the investigation of the mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum. The mechanism for the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride in molten equimolar NaCl-KCl may be seen as consisting of a slow irreversible electrode reaction with a subsequent rapid irreversible chemical reaction. Lanthanum ions in a lower oxidation state were not found upon the prolonged maintenance of metallic lanthanum in molten NaCl-KCl-LaCl/sub 3/. Only an increase in the concentration of lanthanum(III) chloride in the melt was noted. The appearance of oxygen anions in the melt does not lead to a change in the mechanism of the cathodic reduction of lanthanum chloride but reduces the concentration of this chloride due to the formation of lanthanum oxochloride which is insoluble in the melt.

  10. Iron chloride catalysed PCDD/F-formation: Experiments and PCDD/F-signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Ma, Siyuan; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Iron chloride is often cited as catalyst of PCDD/F-formation, together with copper chloride. Conversely, iron chloride catalysis has been less studied during de novo tests. This paper presents such de novo test data, derived from model fly ash incorporating iron (III) chloride and established over a vast range of temperature and oxygen concentration in the gas phase. Both PCDD/F-output and its signature are extensively characterised, including homologue and congener profiles. For the first time, a complete isomer-specific analysis is systematically established, for all samples. Special attention is paid to the chlorophenols route PCDD/F, to the 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners, and to their relationship and antagonism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of supplemental cementitious materials for optimum resistance of concrete to chloride penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether significant improvements could be achieved in the resistance to the penetration by chloride ions of concretes with fly ash or slag by the addition of silica fume with either Type II or Type III cement and...

  12. Use of gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging spruce knots by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Amy H. Herlihy; Po-Wah So

    2006-01-01

    Treatments of knot-containing spruce wood blocks with a paramagnetic salt, gadolinium (III) chloride, in combination with solvent pretreatments, were evaluated as strategies to enhance the visualization of wood features by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Initial experiments with clear wood and excised knot samples showed differences in moisture uptake after...

  13. A ruthenium anticancer compound interacts with histones and impacts differently on epigenetic and death pathways compared to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona, Cynthia; Spaety, Marie-Elodie; Capuozzo, Antonelle; Ali, Moussa; Santamaria, Rita; Armant, Olivier; Delalande, Francois; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cianferani, Sarah; Spencer, John; Pfeffer, Michel; Mellitzer, Georg; Gaiddon, Christian

    2017-01-10

    Ruthenium complexes are considered as potential replacements for platinum compounds in oncotherapy. Their clinical development is handicapped by a lack of consensus on their mode of action. In this study, we identify three histones (H3.1, H2A, H2B) as possible targets for an anticancer redox organoruthenium compound (RDC11). Using purified histones, we confirmed an interaction between the ruthenium complex and histones that impacted on histone complex formation. A comparative study of the ruthenium complex versus cisplatin showed differential epigenetic modifications on histone H3 that correlated with differential expression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes. We then characterized the impact of these epigenetic modifications on signaling pathways employing a transcriptomic approach. Clustering analyses showed gene expression signatures specific for cisplatin (42%) and for the ruthenium complex (30%). Signaling pathway analyses pointed to specificities distinguishing the ruthenium complex from cisplatin. For instance, cisplatin triggered preferentially p53 and folate biosynthesis while the ruthenium complex induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and trans-sulfuration pathways. To further understand the role of HDACs in these regulations, we used suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and showed that it synergized with cisplatin cytotoxicity while antagonizing the ruthenium complex activity. This study provides critical information for the characterization of signaling pathways differentiating both compounds, in particular, by the identification of a non-DNA direct target for an organoruthenium complex.

  14. In vitro evaluation of ruthenium complexes for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenna; Xie, Qiang; Lai, Linglin; Mo, Zhentao; Peng, Xiaofang; Leng, Ennian; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Hongxia; Li, Yiqi; Mei, Wenjie; Gao, Shuying

    2017-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising anti-tumor treatment strategy. Photosensitizer is one of the most important components of PDT. In this work, the anticancer activities of PDT mediated by six new ruthenium porphyrin complexes were screened. The mechanisms of the most efficacious candidate were investigated. Photocytotoxicity of the six porphyrins was tested. The most promising complex, Rup-03, was further investigated using Geimsa staining, which indirectly detects reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subcellular localization. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, c-Myc gene expression, and telomerase activities were also assayed. Rup-03 and Rup-04 had the lowest IC 50 values. Rup-03 had an IC 50 value of 29.5±2.3μM in HepG2 cells and 59.0±6.1μM in RAW264.7 cells, while Rup-04 had an IC 50 value of 40.0±3.8μM in SGC-7901 cells. The complexes also induced cellular morphological changes and impaired cellular ability to scavenge ROS, and accumulated preferentially in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Rup-03 reduced MMP levels, induced apoptosis, and repressed both c-Myc mRNA expression and telomerase activity in HepG2 cells. Among six candidates, Rup-03-mediated PDT is most effective against HepG2 and RAW264.7, with a similar efficacy as that of Rup-04-mediated PDT against SGC-7901 cells. Repression of ROS scavenging activities and c-Myc expression, which mediated DNA damage-induced cell apoptosis and repression of telomerase activity, respectively, were found to be involved in the anticancer mechanisms of Rup-03. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dealloyed Ruthenium Film Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Chemical Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis B. Serin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin-film ruthenium (Ru and copper (Cu binary alloys have been prepared on a Teflon™ backing layer by cosputtering of the precious and nonprecious metals, respectively. Alloys were then selectively dealloyed by sulfuric acid as an etchant, and their hydrogen generation catalysts performances were evaluated. Sputtering time and power of Cu atoms have been varied in order to tailor the hydrogen generation performances. Similarly, dealloying time and the sulfuric acid concentration have also been altered to tune the morphologies of the resulted films. A maximum hydrogen generation rate of 35 mL min−1 was achieved when Cu sputtering power and time were 200 W and 60 min and while acid concentration and dealloying time were 18 M and 90 min, respectively. It has also been demonstrated that the Ru content in the alloy after dealloying gradually increased with the increasing the sputtering power of Cu. After 90 min dealloying, the Ru to Cu ratio increased to about 190 times that of bare alloy. This is the key issue for observing higher catalytic activity. Interestingly, we have also presented template-free nanoforest-like structure formation within the context of one-step alloying and dealloying used in this study. Last but not least, the long-time hydrogen generation performances of the catalysts system have also been evaluated along 3600 min. During the first 600 min, the catalytic activity was quite stable, while about 24% of the catalytic activity decayed after 3000 min, which still makes these systems available for the development of robust catalyst systems in the area of hydrogen generation.

  16. {sup 106}Ruthenium Plaque Therapy (RPT) for Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Naoya, E-mail: namuraka@ncc.go.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Shigenobu [Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshimura, Ryoichi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology, Head and Neck Reconstruction Division, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, Koji; Kuroda, Yuki; Morota, Madoka; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sakudo, Mototake; Wakita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni [Department of Radiology, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of episcleral {sup 106}ruthenium plaque therapy (RPT) in the management of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred one RPTs were retrospectively analyzed that were performed in 90 eyes of 85 patients with retinoblastoma at National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2008. Each RPT had a corresponding tumor and 101 tumors were considered in the analysis of local control. Median follow-up length was 72.8 months. Median patient age at the RPT was 28 months. Median prescribed doses at reference depth and outer surface of the sclera were 47.4 Gy and 162.3 Gy, respectively. Results: Local control rate (LCR) and ocular retention rate (ORR) at 2 years were 33.7% and 58.7%, respectively. Unilateral disease, International Classification of Retinoblastoma group C or more advanced at the first presentation or at the time of RPT, vitreous and/or subretinal seeding, tumor size greater than 5 disc diameter (DD), reference depth greater than 5 mm, dose rate at reference depth lower than 0.7 Gy/hour, dose at the reference depth lower than 35 Gy, and (biologically effective dose with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 10 Gy) at the reference depth lower than 40 Gy{sub 10} were associated with unfavorable LCR. Two patients died of metastatic disease. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 12 eyes (13.3%), proliferative retinopathy in 6 (6.7%), rubeosis iris in 2 (2.2%), and posterior subcapsular cataract in 23 (25.6%). Conclusion: RPT is an effective eye-preserving treatment for retinoblastoma.

  17. Behavior of ruthenium, cesium and antimony during simulated HLLW vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of ruthenium, cesium, and antimony during the vitrification of simulated high-level radioactive liquid wastes (HLLW) in a liquid fed melter was studied on a laboratory scale and on a semi-pilot scale. In the laboratory melter of a 2.5 kg capacity, a series of tests with the simulate traced with 103 Ru, 134 Cs and 124 Sb, has shown that the Ru and Cs losses to the melter effluent are generally higher than 10% whereas the antimony losses remain lower than 0.4%. A wet purification system comprising in series, a dust scrubber, a condenser, an ejector venturi and an NOx washing column retains most of the activity present in the off-gas so that the release fractions for Ru at the absolute filter inlet ranges between 5.10 -3 to 5.10 -5 % of the Ru fed, for Cs the corresponding release fraction ranges between 3.10 -3 to 10 -4 % and for Sb the release fraction ranges between 1.7 10 -4 to 1.7 10 -5 %. The same experiments were performed at a throughput of 1 to 2 1 h -1 of simulated solution in the semi-pilot scale unit RUFUS. The RUFUS unit comprises a glass melter with a 50 kg molten glass capacity and the wet purification train comprises in series a dust scrubber, a condenser, an ejector venturi and an NOx washing column. The tracer tests were restricted to 103 Ru and 134 Cs since the laboratory tests had shown that the antimony losses were very low. The results of the tests are presented

  18. Reaction mechanisms of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehaug, Astrid Elisabeth

    1995-12-31

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of ruthenium tetroxide mediated oxidations of saturated hydrocarbons, ethers, alkenes and alcohols. Several methods were used. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidations of adamantane and cis-decalin were studied in CCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 3}CN-H{sub 2}O and in acetone-water. The rate of reaction was found to be moderately influenced by the polarity of the solvent. Solvent properties other than the polarity were also found to influence the reaction rates. From the oxidations of adamantane and adamantane-1,3,5,7-d{sub 4} two primary kinetic deuterium isotope effects were found. These were comparable with the deuterium isotope effects found for the analogous oxidations of cis-decalin and cis-decalin-d{sub 18}. The results seem to exclude both a one step hydride abstraction reaction mechanism and a one step concerted mechanism, as well as a scheme where two such mechanisms compete. The observations may be explained by a two step reaction mechanism consisting of a pre-equilibrium with formation of a substrate-RuO{sub 4} complex followed by a concerted rate determining reaction. The RuO{sub 4}-mediated oxidation of ethers was of kinetic second order with a small enthalpy of activation and a large negative entropy of activation. Oxidation of cyclopropylmethyl methyl ether gave methyl cyclopropanecarboxylate, no rearranged products were observed. On RuO{sub 4} oxidations in CCl{sub 4} with NaIO{sub 4} as stoichiometric oxidant, no chlorinated products were observed. Several observations not in agreement with a hydride or a hydrogen abstraction mechanism may be explained by assuming that the reaction proceeds by either a concerted reaction or by a reversible oxidative addition of the ether to RuO{sub 4} followed by a slow concerted step. 228 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Ruthenium porphyrin-induced photodamage in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoeva, Vanya; Siksjø, Monica; Sæterbø, Kristin G; Melø, Thor Bernt; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Lindgren, Mikael; Gederaas, Odrun A

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment for solid malignant and flat tumors. Light activated sensitizers catalyze photochemical reactions that produce reactive oxygen species which can cause cancer cell death. In this work we investigated the photophysical properties of the photosensitizer ruthenium(II) porphyrin (RuP), along with its PDT efficiency onto rat bladder cancer cells (AY27). Optical spectroscopy verified that RuP is capable to activate singlet oxygen via blue and red absorption bands and inter system crossing (ISC) to the triplet state. In vitro experiments on AY27 indicated increased photo-toxicity of RuP (20μM, 18h incubation) after cell illumination (at 435nm), as a function of blue light exposure. Cell survival fraction was significantly reduced to 14% after illumination of 20μM RuP with 15.6J/cm(2), whereas the "dark toxicity" of 20μM RuP was 17%. Structural and morphological changes of cells were observed, due to RuP accumulation, as well as light-dependent cell death was recorded by confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry verified that PDT-RuP (50μM) triggered significant photo-induced cellular destruction with a photoxicity of (93%±0.9%). Interestingly, the present investigation of RuP-PDT showed that the dominating mode of cell death is necrosis. RuP "dark toxicity" compared to the conventional chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin was higher, both evaluated by the MTT assay (24h). In conclusion, the present investigation shows that RuP with or without photoactivation induces cell death of bladder cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ruthenium chalcogenonitrosyl and bridged nitrido complexes containing chelating sulfur and oxygen ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ho-Yuen; Cheung, Wai-Man; Kwan Huang, Enrique; Wong, Kang-Long; Sung, Herman H-Y; Williams, Ian D; Leung, Wa-Hung

    2015-11-14

    Ruthenium thio- and seleno-nitrosyl complexes containing chelating sulfur and oxygen ligands have been synthesised and their de-chalcogenation reactions have been studied. The reaction of mer-[Ru(N)Cl3(AsPh3)2] with elemental sulfur and selenium in tetrahydrofuran at reflux afforded the chalcogenonitrosyl complexes mer-[Ru(NX)Cl3(AsPh3)2] [X = S (1), Se (2)]. Treatment of 1 with KN(R2PS)2 afforded trans-[Ru(NS)Cl{N(R2PS)2}2] [R = Ph (3), Pr(i) (4), Bu(t) (5)]. Alternatively, the thionitrosyl complex 5 was obtained from [Bu(n)4N][Ru(N)Cl4] and KN(Bu(t)2PS)2, presumably via sulfur atom transfer from [N(Bu(t)2PS)2](-) to the nitride. Reactions of 1 and 2 with NaLOEt (LOEt(-) = [Co(η(5)-C5H5){P(O)(LOEt)2}3](-)) gave [Ru(NX)LOEtCl2] (X = S (8), Se (9)). Treatment of [Bu(n)4N][Ru(N)Cl4] with KN(R2PS)2 produced Ru(IV)-Ru(IV)μ-nitrido complexes [Ru2(μ-N){N(R2PS)2}4Cl] [R = Ph (6), Pr(i) (7)]. Reactions of 3 and 9 with PPh3 afforded 6 and [Ru(NPPh3)LOEtCl2], respectively. The desulfurisation of 5 with [Ni(cod)2] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) gave the mixed valance Ru(III)-Ru(IV)μ-nitrido complex [Ru2(μ-N){N(Bu(t)2PS)2}4] (10) that was oxidised by [Cp2Fe](PF6) to give the Ru(IV)-Ru(IV) complex [Ru2(μ-N){N(Bu(t)2PS)2}4](PF6) ([10]PF6). The crystal structures of 1, 2, 3, 7, 9 and 10 have been determined.

  1. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  2. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.; Bü chel, Gabriel E.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Jakupec, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  4. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of ruthenium thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coloma Ribera, R.; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Zoethout, E.; Yakshin, Andrey; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    For next generation Extreme UV photolithography, multilayer coatings may require protective capping layers against surface contamination. Ruthenium, as a low-oxidation metal, is often used as a reference material. The oxidation behaviour of Ru thin films has been studied using X-ray reflectometry

  5. Fabrication of ruthenium metal nanosheets via topotactic metallization of exfoliated ruthenate nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Sato, Jun; Saida, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Wataru; Ebina, Yasuo; Shibata, Tatsuo; Osada, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2013-03-04

    The metallization behavior of molecularly thin RuO2 nanosheets obtained from complete delamination of layered ruthenates was studied. Interestingly, the RuO2 nanosheets in a monolayer state topotactically transformed into a single layer of Ru atoms, i.e., ruthenium metal nanosheets, which can be regarded as a new family of nanosized metals.

  6. Acetic Acid Formation by Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol over Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Hanning, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst systems comprising ruthenium hydroxide supported on different carrier materials, titania, alumina, ceria, and spinel (MgAl2O4), were applied in selective aerobic oxidation ethanol to form acetic acid, an important bulk chemical and food ingredient. The catalysts were...

  7. Activity of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovich, I A; Mikhaylov, V A; Migulina, N N [Yaroslavskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1976-06-01

    Experimental data for the activities of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide are considered and the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. It is concluded that surface structures (complexes) may be formed and that micro-electronic feaures play a role in heterogeneous catalysis.

  8. Elimination of ionic interference effects in the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Defrawy, M.M.M.; Posta, J.; Beck, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with work on the catalytic effect of ruthenium complexes, new compounds were prepared. Atomic absorption spectrometry (a.a.s.) was to be used for their analysis. The standard methods could not be applied to the complexes studied, therefore the effect of cyanide ions for elimination of interfering effects has been studied, because of the great stability of cyanide complexes. (Auth.)

  9. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Sample Analysis of Zirconium and Ruthenium in Metal Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    linear regression fits for the calibration curves. The goodness of the linear fits are summarized in Table 3 and Figure 1. Table 3. Concentration...and ruthenium at each calibration level. 11 REFERENCES 1. General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories

  10. Hydrogenation of esters catalyzed by ruthenium PN3-Pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2014-08-11

    Hydrogenation of esters under mild conditions was achieved using air-stable ruthenium PN3-pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm. High efficiency was achieved even in the presence of water. DFT studies suggest a bimolecular proton shuttle mechanism which allows H2 to be activated by the relatively stable catalyst with a reasonably low transition state barrier. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. Biological properties of novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles

    KAUST Repository

    Novak, Maria S.

    2016-03-09

    Since the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) is a physiologically relevant molecule, there has been great interest in the use of metal nitrosyl compounds as antitumor pharmaceuticals. Particularly interesting are those complexes which can deliver NO to biological targets. Ruthenium- and osmium-based compounds offer lower toxicity compared to other metals and show different mechanisms of action as well as different spectra of activity compared to platinum-based drugs. Novel ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with azole heterocycles were studied to elucidate their cytotoxicity and possible interactions with DNA. Apoptosis induction, changes of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and possible formation of reactive oxygen species were investigated as indicators of NO-mediated damage by flow cytometry. Results suggest that ruthenium- and osmium-nitrosyl complexes with the general formula (indazolium)[cis/trans-MCl4(NO)(1H-indazole)] have pronounced cytotoxic potency in cancer cell lines. Especially the more potent ruthenium complexes strongly induce apoptosis associated with depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, and elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Furthermore, a slight yet not unequivocal trend to accumulation of intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate attributable to NO-mediated effects was observed.

  12. Design and synthesis of ruthenium(II) OCO pincer type NHC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tridentate nature of the tBu(OCO)2− ligand as well as some level of steric protection ... our previous results of ruthenium(II) o-hydroxyaryl sub- stituted bidentate NHC ...... (a) Ribelin T, Katz C E, English D G, Smith S,. Manukyan A K, Day ...

  13. Preliminary assessment of modified borosilicate glasses for chromium and ruthenium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Osama M. [Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt); Centre of Nuclear Engineering (CNE), Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Abdel Rahman, R.O., E-mail: alaarehab@yahoo.com [Hot Laboratory Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The feasibility of using modified alkali borosilicate glasses for ruthenium and chromium immobilization is preliminary assessed by investigating the immobilization system structure under normal conditions. Within this context, reference alkali borosilicate, and simulated Magnox-modified glasses were prepared and studied. The results indicate that ruthenium is immobilized in the vitreous structure as encapsulated RuO{sub 2} crystallites that act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of other crystalline phases. The presence of Zn, as modifier, has contributed to chromium immobilization in zincochromite spinel structure, whereas Ca is accommodated in the vitreous structure. Immobilization performance was evaluated by conducting conservative static leach test and studying the leached glass. Leached glass morphology was altered, where near surface reference glass is leached over 400 nm and simulated Magnox-modified sample is altered over 300 nm. Normalized release rates are within normal range for borosilicate material. For simulated Magnox-modified sample, Ca and alkali structural element, i.e. Na and Li, are leached via ion-exchange reaction. The ion-exchanged fraction equals 1.06 × 10{sup −8} mol/m{sup 2} s and chromium has slightly lower normalized release rate value than ruthenium. - Highlights: • The presence of modifiers and waste oxides led to localized de-vitrification. • Ruthenium is encapsulated within the vitreous glass network as RuO{sub 2} crystals. • Chromium is immobilized within the zincochromite spinel structure. • Pitting and cracks induced by leaching did not affect the immobilization performance.

  14. Dinuclear ruthenium sawhorse-type complexes containing carboxylato bridges and ferrocenyl substituents: Synthesis and electrochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Auzias, M.; Süss-Fink, G.; Štěpnička, P.; Ludvík, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 360, č. 6 (2007), s. 2023-2028 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : carboxylato bridges * dinuclear complexes * ruthenium * electrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2007

  15. Contribution to the study of the fluorination of ruthenium and its dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, Charles.

    1977-12-01

    Compounds formed during fluorination of ruthenium and its dioxide are studied. By chemical analysis the constitution of these compounds is cleared up. RuF 5 is the main compound formed, but a secondary product is obtained which is RuF 8 . The vapor pressure of this product is given between 178 and 221 0 K, and its infrared spectrum is drawn [fr

  16. Highly dispersed supported ruthenium oxide as an aerobic catalyst for acetic acid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders Bo; Gorbanev, Yury; Cavalca, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    The increasing need for shifting to renewable feedstocks in the chemical industry has driven research toward using green aerobic, selective oxidation reactions to produce bulk chemicals. Here, we report the use of a ruthenium mixed oxide/hydroxide (RuOx) on different support materials for the sel...

  17. Structural, spectral, DFT and biological studies on macrocyclic mononuclear ruthenium (II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukkumar, M.; Kamal, C.; Venkatesh, G.; Kaya, C.; Kaya, S.; Enoch, Israel V. M. V.; Vennila, P.; Rajavel, R.

    2017-11-01

    Macrocyclic mononuclear ruthenium (II) complexes have been synthesized by condensation method [Ru (L1, L2, L3) Cl2] L1 = (C36 H31 N9), L2= (C42H36N8), L3= (C32H32 N8)]. These ruthenium complexes have been established by elemental analyses and spectroscopic techniques (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1H- nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C- NMR and Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)). The coordination mode of the ligand has been confirmed and the octahedral geometry around the ruthenium ion has been revealed. Binding affinity and binding mode of ruthenium (II) complexes with Bovine serum Albumin (BSA) have been characterized by Emission spectra analysis. UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have also been utilized to examine the interaction between ligand and its complexes L1, L2, & L3 with BSA. Chemical parameters and molecular structure of Ru (II) complexes L1H, L2H, & L3H have been determined by DFT coupled with B3LYP/6-311G** functional in both the gaseous and aqueous phases.

  18. Ion implantation to improve mechanical and electrical properties of resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeli, A.V.; Shykh, S.K.; Beresina, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of ion implantation, using different chemical species, on the surface micromorphology, wear resistance, coefficient of friction and electrical resistivity, and its variation during friction for resistive materials based on ruthenium dioxide. It is demonstrated that nitrogen and hydrogen ions are the most effective for modifying surface properties. (Author)

  19. A study of ruthenium complexes of some biologically relevant a-N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 112; Issue 3. A study of ruthenium complexes of some biologically relevant ∙ -N-heterocyclic ... Author Affiliations. P Sengupta1 S Ghosh1. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Calcutta 700 032, India ...

  20. New soluble functional polymers by free-radical copolymerization of methacrylates and bipyridine ruthenium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holder, E.; Meier, M.A.R.; Marin, V.N.; Schubert, U.S.

    2003-01-01

    The luminescent complex [4-(3-hydroxypropyl)-4-methyl-2,2-bipyridine]-bis(2,2-bipyridine)-ruthenium(II)-bis(hexafluoroantimonate) and its methacrylate derivative were successfully synthesized and fully characterized by two-dimensional 1H and 13C{1H} NMR techniques [correlation spectroscopy (COSY)

  1. Electronic Interplay between TTF and Extended-TCNQ Electrophores along a Ruthenium Bis(acetylide) Linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Antoine; Auffray, Morgan; Barrière, Frédéric; Roisnel, Thierry; Lorcy, Dominique

    2017-11-17

    A bis(TTF-butadiynyl) ruthenium D-D'-D complex, with intramolecular electronic interplay between the three electron-donating electrophores, was easily converted through a cycloaddition-retroelectrocyclization with TCNQ into a D-A-D'-A-D pentad complex, which exhibits an intense intramolecular charge transfer together with an electronic interplay between the two acceptors along the conjugated organometallic bridge.

  2. Reactions of ruthenium and osmium cluster carbonyls with heteroatom-substituted and functionalized alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koridze, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies of the reactions of ruthenium and osmium cluster carbonyls with metal (M = Re, Mn, Fe) alkynes, silylalkynes, propargyl alcohols and their derivatives, diynes, enynes, and ferrocenylacetylene are summarized. Intramolecular rearrangements in the cluster complexes including migrations of carbonyl, hydride, and hydrocarbon ligands and the metal core reorganization are considered [ru

  3. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  4. Ruthenium-catalyzed cyclization of N-carbamoyl indolines with alkynes: an efficient route to pyrroloquinolinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Ramasamy; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-09-21

    A regioselective synthesis of substituted pyrroloquinolinones via a ruthenium-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of substituted N-carbamoyl indolines with alkynes is described. The cyclization reaction was compatible with various symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes including substituted propiolates. Later, we performed the aromatization of pyrroloquinolinones into indole derivatives in the presence of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ).

  5. Photo-induced DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity of a ruthenium(II) arene anticancer complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor; Prachařová, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Sadler, P. J.; Kašpárková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 160, JUL2016 (2016), s. 149-155 ISSN 0162-0134 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21053S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14019 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Ruthenium anticancer complex * DNA cleavage * Phototoxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.348, year: 2016

  6. Mixed-ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) incorporating a diazo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Dedicated to the memory of the late Professor Bhaskar G Maiya. *For correspondence. Mixed-ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) incorporating a diazo ligand: Synthesis .... water (1 : 1) for 5 h to give a dark red solution. The solution was cooled to room temperature. After eva- poration of the solvent, the solid was collected,.

  7. Correlations between electrochemical and spectrochemical parameters of ruthenium sulfoxides series with N-heterocyclic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D. de; Toma, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study of Ru Cl sub(2) (DMSO) sub(2) L sub(2) derivates, where L = N-heterocyclic base is described, contributing for a best understanding of chemical behaviour and electronic structure of the ruthenium sulfoxides. The correlations between the electrochemical and the spectroscopical parameters of the serie are presented with more emphasis. (author)

  8. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    Dissolution of ruthenium was observed in the 80-cell stack. Duration testing was performed in single cell MEAs to determine the pathway of cell degradation. EDAX analysis on each of the single cell MEAs has shown that the Johnson Matthey commercial catalyst is stable in DMFC operation for 250 hours, no ruthenium dissolution was observed. Changes in the hydrophobicity of the cathode backing papers was minimum. Electrode polarization analysis revealed that the MEA performance loss is attributed to changes in the cathode catalyst layer. Ruthenium migration does not seem to occur during cell operation but can occur when methanol is absent from the anode compartment, the cathode compartment has access to air, and the cells in the stack are electrically connected to a load (Shunt Currents). The open-to-air cathode stack design allowed for: a) The MEAs to have continual access to oxygen; and b) The stack to sustain shunt currents. Ruthenium dissolution in a DMFC stack can be prevented by: a) Developing an internally manifolded stacks that seal reactant compartments when not in operation; b) Bringing the cell voltages to zero quickly when not in operation; and c) Limiting the total number of cells to 25 in an effort to limit shunt currents.

  9. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  10. Aerobic Oxidation of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural in Ionic Liquids with Solid Ruthenium Hydroxide Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Tim Johannes Bjarki; Eyjolfsdottir, Ester; Gorbanev, Yury

    2012-01-01

    The aerobic oxidation of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural was investigated over solid ruthenium hydroxide catalysts in ionic liquids at elevated temperatures and pressures. Several different catalyst supports were tested in combination with various ionic liquids. The best result was obtained in [EMIm...

  11. Ruthenium(II)- bipyridyl with extended π-system: Improved thermo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aInorganic and Physical Chemistry Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Uppal Road, Tarnaka, ... A new extended thermo-stable high molar extinction coefficient bipyridyl ruthenium(II) complex ... cyanines and metal free organic sensitizers have been ..... Iodide-based ionic liquids are more viscous than.

  12. Tailoring the Selectivity for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution on Ruthenium Oxides by Zinc Substitution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrykin, Valery; Macounová, Kateřina; Shlyakhtin, O. A.; Krtil, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 28 (2010), s. 4813-4815 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrocatalysis * ruthenium oxides * zinc substitution Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 12.730, year: 2010

  13. Efficient oxygen reduction reaction using ruthenium tetrakis(diaquaplatinum)octacarboxyphthalocyanine catalyst supported on MWCNT platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maxakato, NW

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available -1 Electroanalysis 2011, 23, No. 2, 325 ? 329 Efficient Oxygen Reduction Reaction Using Ruthenium Tetrakis(diaquaplatinum)Octacarboxyphthalocyanine Catalyst Supported on MWCNT Platform Nobanathi W. Maxakato,a Solomon A. Mamuru,a Kenneth I. Ozoemena*a, b a...

  14. Room temperature aerobic oxidation of amines by a nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide pyrochlore nafion composite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Shanmuganathan; Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Chan, Ting-Shan; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2012-05-14

    The aerobic oxidation of primary amines to their respective nitriles has been carried out at room temperature using a highly reusable nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide pyrochlore Nafion composite catalyst (see figure). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Study of the emission oxidative reactions of ruthenium (II) complex by cationic compounds in anionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonilha, J.B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative quenching of the emission of the tetraanionic complex tris (4,4' dicarboxylate - 2,2' - bipyridine ruthenium (II) in aqueous solution, by both organic and inorganic compounds in presence of anionic detergents, above and below the critical micelle concentration is studied. The organic cations, the inorganic ion and detergents used are shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  16. Removal of chloride from MSWI fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Fang-Chih; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Tsai, Min-Shing; Ko, Chun-Han

    2012-10-30

    The high levels of alkali chloride and soluble metal salts present in MSWI fly ash is worth noting for their impact on the environment. In addition, the recycling or reuse of fly ash has become an issue because of limited landfill space. The chloride content in fly ash limits its application as basis for construction materials. Water-soluble chlorides such as potassium chloride (KCl), sodium chloride (NaCl), and calcium chloride hydrate (CaCl(2) · 2H(2)O) in fly ash are easily washed away. However, calcium chloride hydroxide (Ca(OH)Cl) might not be easy to leach away at room temperature. The roasting and washing-flushing processes were applied to remove chloride content in this study. Additionally, air and CO(2) were introduced into the washing process to neutralize the hazardous nature of chlorides. In comparison with the water flushing process, the roasting process is more efficient in reducing the process of solid-liquid separation and drying for the reuse of Cl-removed fly ash particles. In several roasting experiments, the removal of chloride content from fly ash at 1050°C for 3h showed the best results (83% chloride removal efficiency). At a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10 the water-flushing process can almost totally remove water-soluble chloride (97% chloride removal efficiency). Analyses of mineralogical change also prove the efficiency of the fly ash roasting and washing mechanisms for chloride removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemistry of vanadium(II and the electrodeposition of aluminum-vanadium alloys in the aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of vanadium(II was examined in the 66.7-33.3 mole percent aluminum chloride-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride molten salt containing dissolved VCl2 at 353 K. Voltammetry experiments revealed that V(II could be electrochemically oxidized to V(III and V(IV. However at slow scan rates the V(II/V(III electrode reaction is complicated by the rapid precipitation of V(III as VCl3. The reduction of V(II occurs at potentials considerably negative of the Al(III/Al electrode reaction, and Al-V alloys cannot be electrodeposited from this melt. However electrodeposition experiments conducted in VCl2-saturated melt containing the additive, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, resulted in Al-V alloys. The vanadium content of these alloys increased with increasing cathodic current density or more negative applied potentials. X-ray analysis of Al-V alloys that were electrodeposited on a rotating copper wire substrate indicated that these alloys did not form or contain an intermetallic compound, but were non-equilibrium or metastable solid solutions. The chloride-pitting corrosion properties of these alloys were examined in aqueous NaCl by using potentiodynamic polarization techniques. Alloys containing ~10 a/o vanadium exhibited a pitting potential that was 0.3 V positive of that for pure aluminum.

  18. Analysis of flow fields, temperatures and ruthenium transport in the test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Pyykoenen, J.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2008-03-01

    Ruthenium transport experiments were conducted at VTT during years 2002- 2006. Experiments gave information about ruthenium behaviour in air ingress accident conditions. This study complements those experiments with an analysis of the flows and thermal fields in the test system. Temperature profiles were measured at the walls of the experimental facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations used the measured profiles and provided predictions of flows and temperatures inside the furnace. Ruthenium transport was also modelled with CFD. Thermal characterisation of the reactor demonstrated that buoyancy has a significant role during the cooling after the furnace. A hypothesis of the dominant role of RuO2 and RuO3 condensation on reactor walls gave simulation results that are in accordance with radiotracer measurements of deposition in experiments conducted with furnace at 1500K. Actually, RuO3 does not condensate, but it thermal decomposes to RuO2. This does not seem to have effect on result. Particle formation around the furnace exit could be detected from the comparison of modelling results with the measured profiles. In several other experiments ruthenium behaviour is dominated by other issues. These are related to the complex ruthenium chemistry that includes various surface reactions. Thermal equilibrium indicates significant gaseous RuO4 concentration around 1300 K. It seems that seed particles decreased the catalytic decomposition activity of RuO4 to RuO2 around this temperature pushing the gas concentration towards the equilibrium, and further give rise to gaseous RuO4 transport to low temperatures. At higher temperature increasing mass flow rate of RuO2 particles is likely to catalyse (decomposition) reaction of RuO4 to RuO2. (au)

  19. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM) 2 Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(Ph) 2 leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(η 2 -C 6 H 4 ) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO 2 and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs

  20. Analysis of flow fields, temperatures and ruthenium transport in the test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerkelae, T.; Pyykoenen, J.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J. [Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT (Finland)

    2008-03-15

    Ruthenium transport experiments were conducted at VTT during years 2002- 2006. Experiments gave information about ruthenium behaviour in air ingress accident conditions. This study complements those experiments with an analysis of the flows and thermal fields in the test system. Temperature profiles were measured at the walls of the experimental facility. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations used the measured profiles and provided predictions of flows and temperatures inside the furnace. Ruthenium transport was also modelled with CFD. Thermal characterisation of the reactor demonstrated that buoyancy has a significant role during the cooling after the furnace. A hypothesis of the dominant role of RuO2 and RuO3 condensation on reactor walls gave simulation results that are in accordance with radiotracer measurements of deposition in experiments conducted with furnace at 1500K. Actually, RuO3 does not condensate, but it thermal decomposes to RuO2. This does not seem to have effect on result. Particle formation around the furnace exit could be detected from the comparison of modelling results with the measured profiles. In several other experiments ruthenium behaviour is dominated by other issues. These are related to the complex ruthenium chemistry that includes various surface reactions. Thermal equilibrium indicates significant gaseous RuO4 concentration around 1300 K. It seems that seed particles decreased the catalytic decomposition activity of RuO4 to RuO2 around this temperature pushing the gas concentration towards the equilibrium, and further give rise to gaseous RuO4 transport to low temperatures. At higher temperature increasing mass flow rate of RuO2 particles is likely to catalyse (decomposition) reaction of RuO4 to RuO2. (au)

  1. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  2. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of neptunium in the aluminum chloride-1-n-butylpyridinium chloride melt at 400C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoebrechts, J.P.; Gilbert, B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry of neptunium in acidic and basic AlCl 3 -1-n-butylpyridinium chloride melts at 40 0 C has been investigated by means of electrochemical and spectral techniques. In acidic as well as in basic melts, the reduction of Np(IV) to Np(III) at glassy-carbon electrodes is quasi-reversible. Indirect measurements of the formal potential and spectroscopic results on the Np(IV)-Np(III) system as a function of the acidity indicate that Np(III) and Np(IV) exist as NpCl 6 3- and NpCl 6 2- and solvated Np 3+ and NpCl/sub x//sup (4-x)+/ (with 3 greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to 1), respectively, in basic and acidic melts. The apparent rate constant K 0 ' has been measured on the basic and acidic sites. It depends on the melt acidity only in the latter melts. The Nugent linearization method has been applied to the standard potentials of Np(IV)-Np(III) and U(IV)-U(III) in 2:1 melts. A comparison with the results obtained from other room-temperature solvents shows, as already found with lanthanides, that the acidic melt is a very weak solvating medium

  3. Elimination of chloride ions in the analytical method for the precise determination of plutonium or uranium using titanous ions as reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol-Rostaing, C.; Wagner, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The Corpel and Regnaud's procedure for the precise determination of uranium and plutonium, using titanous (III) chloride as reductant has been modified in order to be compatible with the throwing out standards in nuclear plants. The removal of chloride reagents has been studied. On the original method, there are two: titanous chloride and ferric chloride. We propose titanous sulphate and ferric nitrate as substitution reagents. As commercial titanous sulphate can't be found, an easy procedure has been set and described with storage conditions: experimental conditions have been optimized and adapted for manufacturing on a laboratory scale [fr

  4. Hydrolysis of cupric chloride in aqueous ammoniacal ammonium chloride solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limpo, J. L.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Cupric solubility in the CuCl2-NH4Cl-NH3-H2O system for chloride concentrations lower than 4 molal in the temperature range 25-60 °C was studied. The experimental results show that for chloride concentration between 3.0 and 1.0 molal the cupric solubility is determined by the solubility of the cupric hydroxychloride Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5. For a chloride concentration value of 4.0 molal, there are two cupric compounds, the hydroxychloride Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5 or the diammine chloride Cu(NH32Cl2, on which the solubility of Cu(II depends, according to the temperature and the value of the ratio [NH3]Total/[Cu]Total.

    Se estudia la solubilidad del Cu(II en el sistema CuCl2-NH4Cl-NH3-H2O para concentraciones de cloruro inferiores a 4 molal en el intervalo de temperaturas 25-60 °C. Los resultados experimentales muestran que, para concentraciones de cloruros comprendidas entre 3,0 y 1,0 molal, la solubilidad cúprica viene determinada por la solubilidad del hidroxicloruro cúprico, Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5. Para concentraciones de cloruro 4,0 molal, existen dos compuestos cúpricos, el hidroxicloruro, Cu(OH1.5Cl0.5 o el cloruro de diamina, Cu(NH32Cl2, de los que, de acuerdo con la temperatura y con el valor de la relación [NH3]Total/[Cu]Total depende la solubilidad del Cu(II.

  5. Spectroscopic and electrochemical study of polynuclear clusters from ruthenium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriano, C.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of the trinuclear clusters [Ru sub(3) O (CH sub(3) CO sub(2)) sub(4) L sub(3)] where L = imidazole, pyridine or pyrazine type of ligands, was investigated based on spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. These complexes are of great interest from the point of view of their electronic and redox properties, providing multisite species for electron transfer processes. They were isolated in solid state, and characterized by means of elementary analyses and infrared spectra. The electrochemical behaviour in acetonitrile solution was typically reversible; the cyclic voltammograms exhibited a series of four or five mono electronic waves ascribed to the sucessive Ru sup(IV) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) / Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III)/ --- Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) redox couples. The differences between the successive redox potentials were about 1 V, indicating strong metal-metal interaction in the trinuclear Ru sub(3) centre. The E values were strongly sensitive to the nature of the N-heterocyclic ligand, increasing with the pi-acceptor properties of the pyridine and pyrazine derivatives, but in a much less pronounced way in the case of the imidazole derivatives. Resonance Raman studies for the pyrazine cluster showed selective intensification of the vibrational modes of the Ru-pyrazine chromophore, and the trinuclear centre, using excitation wavelengths coinciding with the metal-to-pyrazine and metal-metal bands, respectively. (author)

  6. Oxidation of Bromide to Bromine by Ruthenium(II) Bipyridine-Type Complexes Using the Flash-Quench Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kelvin Yun-Da; Chang, I-Jy

    2017-07-17

    Six ruthenium complexes, [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ (1), [Ru(bpy) 2 (deeb)] 2+ (2), [Ru(deeb) 2 (dmbpy)] 2+ (3), [Ru(deeb) 2 (bpy)] 2+ (4), [Ru(deeb) 3 ] 2+ (5), and [Ru(deeb) 2 (bpz)] 2+ (6) (bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine; deeb: 4,4'-diethylester-2,2'-bipyridine; dmbpy: 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, bpz: 2,2'-bipyrazine), have been employed to sensitize photochemical oxidation of bromide to bromine. The oxidation potential for complexes 1-6 are 1.26, 1.36, 1.42, 1.46, 1.56, and 1.66 V vs SCE, respectively. The bimolecular rate constants for the quenching of complexes 1-6 by ArN 2 + (bromobenzenediazonium) are determined as 1.1 × 10 9 , 1.6 × 10 8 , 1.4 × 10 8 , 1.2 × 10 8 , 6.4 × 10 7 , and 8.9 × 10 6 M -1 s -1 , respectively. Transient kinetics indicated that Br - reacted with photogenerated Ru(III) species at different rates. Bimolecular rate constants for the oxidation of Br - by the Ru(III) species derived from complexes 1-5 are observed as 1.2 × 10 8 , 1.3 × 10 9 , 4.0 × 10 9 , 4.8 × 10 9 , and 1.1 × 10 10 , M -1 s -1 , respectively. The last reaction kinetics observed in the three-component system consisting of a Ru sensitizer, quencher, and bromide is shown to be independent of the Ru sensitizer. The final product was identified as bromine by its reaction with hexene. The last reaction kinetics is assigned to the disproportionation reaction of Br 2 -• ions, for which the rate constant is determined as 5 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 . Though complex 6 has the highest oxidation potential in the Ru(II)/Ru(III) couple, its excited state fails to react with ArN 2 + sufficiently for subsequent reactions. The Ru(III) species derived from complex 1 reacts with Br - at the slowest rate. Complexes 2-5 are excellent photosensitizers to drive photooxidation of bromide to bromine.

  7. Selective deposition of nanostructured ruthenium oxide using Tobacco mosaic virus for micro-supercapacitors in solid Nafion electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnerlich, Markus; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Culver, James N.; Ketchum, Douglas R.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional micro-supercapacitor has been developed using a novel bottom-up assembly method combining genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-1Cys), photolithographically defined micropillars and selective deposition of ruthenium oxide on multi-metallic microelectrodes. The three-dimensional microelectrodes consist of a titanium nitride current collector with two functionalized areas: (1) gold coating on the active electrode area promotes TMV-1Cys adhesion, and (2) sacrificial nickel pads dissolve in ruthenium tetroxide plating solution to produce ruthenium oxide on all electrically connected areas. The microfabricated electrodes are arranged in an interdigitated pattern, and the capacitance per electrode has been measured as high as 203 mF cm-2 with solid Nafion electrolyte. The process integration of bio-templated ruthenium oxide with microfabricated electrodes and solid electrolyte is an important advance towards the energy storage needs of mass produced self-sufficient micro-devices.

  8. Nanoengineering of Ruthenium and Platinum-based Nanocatalysts by Continuous-Flow Chemistry for Renewable Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents an integrated study of nanocatalysts for heterogenous catalytic and electrochemical processes using pure ruthenium (Ru) with mixed-phase and platinum-based nanomaterials synthesized by continuous-flow chemistry. There are three

  9. Synthesis of Zirconium Lower Chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaviria, Juan P.

    2002-01-01

    This research is accurately related to the Halox concept of research reactor spent fuel element treatment.The aim of this project is to work the conditioning through selected chlorination of the element that make the spent fuel element. This research studied the physical chemistry conditions which produce formation of the lower zirconium chlorides through the reaction between metallic Zr and gaseous ZrCl 4 in a silica reactor.This work focused special attention in the analysis and confrontation of the published results among the different authors in order to reveal coincidences and contradictions.Experimental section consisted in a set of synthesis with different reaction conditions and reactor design. After reaction were analyzed the products on Zr shavings and the deposit growth on wall reactor.The products were strongly dependent of reactor design. It was observed that as the distance between Zr and wall reactor increased greater was tendency to lower chlorides formation.In reactors with small distance the reaction follows other way without formation of lower chlorides.Analysis on deposit growth on reactor showed that may be formed to a mixture of Si x Zr y intermetallics and zirconium oxides.Presence of oxygen in Zr and Zr-Si compounds on wall reactor reveals that there is an interaction between quartz and reactants.This interaction is in gaseous phase because contamination is observed in experiences where Zr was not in contact with reactor.Finally, it was made a global analysis of all experiences and a possible mechanism that interprets reaction ways is proposed

  10. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly [Orlando, FL; Rossin, Joseph A [Columbus, OH; Knapke, Michael J [Columbus, OH

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  11. Study of some properties of the ruthenium (II) trans-tetra-ammines with nitrogened aromatic heterocyclic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The ruthenium (II) complexes trans [Ru(NH 3 ) 4 LL'] (BF 4 ) 2 , where L and L' are 4-picoline, pyridine, isonicatinamide, pyrazine or 4-acetylpyridine are studied. The U.V-visible range spectra, bands in the U.V. and in the visible range is analysed. The spectra and the bands by comparison with other ruthenium (II) ammines are discussed, and a qualitative molecular orbital model is used. (M.J.C.) [pt

  12. Melting in trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; Scamehorn, C.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-11-01

    We report a neutron diffraction study of the liquid structure of YCl 3 and combine the structural data with macroscopic melting and transport data to contrast the behaviour of this molten salt with those of SrCl 2 , ZnCl 2 and AlCl 3 as prototypes of different melting mechanisms for ionic materials. A novel melting mechanism for trivalent metal chlorides, leading to a loose disordered network of edge-sharing octahedral units in the liquid phase, is thereby established. The various melting behaviours are related to bonding character with the help of Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale. (author). 25 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Condensation mechanisms of tetravalent technetium in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, F.

    2004-10-01

    In deep storage technetium can exist in degree IV or III. Recent studies on Tc(IV) have shown that Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ , Tc IV (μ-O) 2 Tc IV structure, is a precursor for precipitation of TcO 2 . Few data are available on Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ Subject of this thesis is the mechanism of condensation of Tc(IV) leading to this form. Kinetic studies have shown that the condensation of Tc IV Cl 5 (H 2 O) - in chloride media leads to a dimer. XAS studies resulted in a linear structure Tc IV -O-Tc IV . This compound, formulated as Tc 2 OCl 10 4- , is stable at pH = 0.3, it undergoes cyclization to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH =1.5 and is oxidized to TcO 4 - under α radiation. In 3 M chloride media, TcO 2 lead to formation Tc 2 OCl 10 4- at pH = 0.3 and to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH = 1.5. An electrochemical cell permitting 'in situ' XAS measurement was developed. XANES studies have shown that the reduction of Tc(VII) lead to a Tc(IV)/Tc(III) mixture. (author)

  14. Ruthenium complexing during sorption by graft copolymer of polyacrylonitrile fibre with poly-2-methyl-5-vnylpyridine (PAN-MVP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanova, S.A.; Kolmakova, A.I.; Konovalov, L.V.; Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Lysenko, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The sorption of ruthenium chlorocomplexes is studied on graft copolymer of polyacrylonitrile fibre with poly-2-methyl-5-vinylpyridine (PAN-MVP). The sorption has been performed under static conditions in the course of mixing at 20 and 98 deg from 0.1-2 OM HCl, 0.1-1 m NaCl solutions. The volume of the investigated solutions constituted 25 ml, fibre weight -0.1-0.3 g. Ruthenium concentration in solutions has been changed in the limits of 5x10 3 -2x10 -2 mol/l. The fibre has been preliminarily moistened by a solution containing no ruthenium. In all cases fresh-prepared ruthenium chlorocomplex solutions have been used. It has been found that with temperature increase the PAN-MVP sorption capacitance relative to ruthenium increases (at 20 deg-1.15 mmol/g, at 98 deg-1.70 mmol/g. The ruthenium chlorocomplex sorption by pyridine fibrous sorbent from salt-acid solutions occurs by anionoexchange mechanism and is related to the formation in the sorbent phase of onium chlorocomplexes - (RPyH) 2 [RuCl 6 ]. In the course of sorbents heating pyridine compounds are subject to Anderson regroupping with formation of compounds of diamine type-[Ru(RPy) 2 Cl 4

  15. Renal abnormalities in congenital chloride diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamad, Nadia M.; Al-Eisa, Amal A.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea CLD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the chloride/ bicarbonate exchange in the ileum and colon. It is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal distension, hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with high fecal content of chloride >90 mmol/l. We report 3 patients with CLD associated with various renal abnormalities including chronic renal failure secondary to renal hypoplasia, nephrocalcinosis and congenital nephrotic syndrome. (author)

  16. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled ethyl chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanski, R.

    1976-01-01

    A new efficient method of synthesis of ethyl chloride (1,2- 14 C), based on the Ba 14 CO 3 and dry hydrogen chloride as starting materials has been developed and described. Addition of the hydrogen chloride to ethylene (1,2- 14 C), obtained from Ba 14 CO 3 , has been carried out in the presence of the AlCl 3 as catalyst. The outlined method leads to ethyl chloride (1,2- 14 C) of high specific activity. The radiochemical yield of the reaction based on the activity of barium carbonate used was 72%. (author)

  17. Method of processing chloride waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Tsunashima, Mikiyasu; Horie, Masaaki; Koyama, Masafumi; Sudo, Minoru; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Ogasawara, Tadashi.

    1991-01-01

    In a method of applying molten salt electrolysis to chloride wastes discharged from a electrolytic refining step of a dry reprocessing step for spent fuels, and removed with transuranium elements of long half-decaying time, metals capable of alloying with alkali and alkaline earth metals under melting by electrolysis are used as a cathode material, and an electrolytic temperature is made higher than the melting point of salts in a molten salt electrolysis bath, to recover Li, Ca and Na as alloys with the cathode material in a first electrolysis step. Then, the electrolytic temperature is made higher than the melting point of the chloride salts remained in the bath after the electrolysis step described above by using the cathode material, to recover Ba, Rb, Sr and Cs of nuclear fission products also as alloys with the cathode material in a second electrolysis step. Accordingly, the amount of wastes formed can be reduced, and the wastes contain no heat generating nuclear fission elements. (T.M.)

  18. Study of the effect of anions and mixed solvents on the kinetics of reduction of Eu(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, V.R.; Sundaram, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of reduction of Eu(III) to Eu(II) in aqueous solutions of perchlorate, chloride, sulphate, acetate and lactate anions and water-methanol and water-acetone mixtures containing potassium chloride as the inert electrolyte is reported and the effect of anions and solvent on the kinetics is studied. (author)

  19. Kinetic method of ruthenium ion traces determination, basing on the reaction of oxidation of direct blue 6B, by means of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwinska, T.; Gregorowicz, A.; Matysek-Majewska, D.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method of determination of ruthenium ion traces (1.10 - 3 μg/cm 3 ) has been worked out. The method is based on oxidation of direct blue 6B by hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions at pH = 0,8 - 1,2 in the presence of ruthenium ions as catalyst. The method has been applied for determination of ruthenium traces in Pt, PdCl 2 , PtCl 4 and RhCl 3 .n H 2 O. In these materials ruthenium has been determined within the range of 1,10 - 2 % - 5,10 - 4 %. (author)

  20. Electrochemical chloride extraction of a beam polluted by chlorides after 40 years in the sea

    OpenAIRE

    BOUTEILLER, Véronique; LAPLAUD, André; MALOULA, Aurélie; MORELLE, René Stéphane; DUCHESNE, Béatrice; MORIN, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    A beam element, naturally polluted by chlorides after 40 years of a marine tidal exposure, has been treated by electrochemical chloride extraction. The chloride profiles, before and after treatment, show that free chlorides are extrated with an efficiency of 70 % close to the steel, 50 % in the intermediate cover and only 5 % at the concrete surface. From the electrochemical characterizations (before, after, 1, 2 and 17 months after treatment), the steel potential values can, semehow, indicat...

  1. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Ruthenium, Cobalt, and Black Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peethala, Brown Cornelius

    Ta/TaN bilayer serves as the diffusion barrier as well as the adhesion promoter between Cu and the dielectric in 32 nm technology devices. A key concern of future technology devices (layer (vs. a bilayer of Ta/TaN) to act as a barrier. During patterning, they need to be planarized using conventional chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to achieve a planar surface. However, CMP of these new barrier materials requires novel slurry compositions that provide adequate selectivity towards Cu and dielectric films, and minimize galvanic corrosion. Apart from the application as a barrier, Ru also has been proposed as a lower electrode material in metal-insulator-metal capacitors where high (> 50 nm/min) Ru removal rates (RRs) are required and as a stop layer in magnetic recording head fabrication where low (hydroxide (KOH). It was also determined that increased the ionic strength is not responsible for the observed increase in Ru removal rate. Benzotirazole (BTA) and ascorbic acid were added to the slurry to reduce the open circuit potential (Eoc) difference between Cu and Ru to ˜20 mV from about 550 mV in the absence of additives. A removal mechanism with KIO4 as the oxidizing agent is proposed based on the formation of several ruthenium oxides, some of which formed residues on the polishing pad below a pH of ˜7. Next, a colloidal silica-based slurry with hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) as the oxidizer (1 wt%), and arginine (0.5 wt%) as the complexing agent was developed to polish Co at pH 10. The Eoc between Cu and Co at the above conditions was reduced to ˜20 mV compared to ˜250 mV in the absence of additives, suggestive of reduced galvanic corrosion during the Co polishing. The slurry also has the advantages of good post-polish surface quality at pH 10, and no dissolution rate. BTA at a concentration of 5mM in this slurry inhibited Cu dissolution rates and yielded a Cu/Co RR ratio of ˜0.8:1 while the open potential difference between Cu and Co was further reduced to ˜10

  2. Mechanistic studies of the oxidation of soluble species of ruthenium in nitric acid solutions. Application to the removal of ruthenium from nuclear fuel dissolution solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the most troublesome fission products during nuclear fuel reprocessing. His removal from nitric acid fuel dissolution solutions, above the PUREX process, is under consideration. Electro-volatilization could be a possible way to eliminate this element. It consists in the oxidation of soluble ruthenium species coupled with the volatilization of formed RuO 4 . Soluble species are nitrate and nitro complexes of nitrosyl ruthenium RuNO 3+ . The first part of this work deals with the direct oxidation of RuNO 3+ at a golden or a platinum anode. It has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and infrared and UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy. The oxidation of RuNO 3+ begins with an adsorption step, which precedes the formation of RuO 4 . Then a reaction between RuO 4 and RuNO 3+ occurs to produce a Ru IV compound, which is also electro-oxidized to RuO 4 . The second part concerns potentiostatic electro-volatilization experiences. The rate of electro-volatilization decreases with increasing HNO 3 concentration. At low concentrations, kinetic is controlled by the volatilization of RuO 4 . The rate-determining step is the oxidation of RuNO 3+ at concentrations higher than 1 M. In HNO 3 4 M, the addition of AgNO 3 is required to accelerate the oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The last part is devoted to the study of the indirect oxidation of RuNO 3+ . The electrocatalytic power of electro-generated Ag II is illustrated by voltammetric techniques and potentiostatic electrolysis. The existence of a limit concentration of AgNO 3 is shown (which value depends on experimental conditions) beyond which kinetic is controlled by the RuO 4 volatilization step. These results indicate that the electro-volatilization kinetic could be increased by optimizing the volatilization conditions. (author)

  3. Inner-sphere and outer-sphere complexes of yttrium(III), lanthanum (III), neodymium(III), terbium(III) and thulium(III) with halide ions in N,N-dimethylformamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryouta; Ishiguro, Shin-ichi

    1991-01-01

    The formation of chloro, bromo and iodo complexes of yttrium(III), and bromo and iodo complexes of lanthanum(III), neodymium(III), terbium(III) and thulium(III) has been studied by precise titration calorimetry in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) at 25 o C. The formation of [YCl] 2+ , [YCl 2 ] + , [YCl 3 ] and [YCl 4 ] - , and [MBr] 2+ and [MBr 2 ] + (M = Y, La, Nd, Tb, Tm) was revealed, and their formation constants, enthalpies and entropies were determined. It is found that the formation enthalpies change in the sequence ΔH o (Cl) > ΔH o (l), which is unusual for hard metal (III) ions. This implies that, unlike the chloride ion, the bromide ion forms outer-sphere complexes with the lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) ions in DMF. Evidence for either an inner- or outer-sphere complex was obtained from 89 Y NMR spectra for Y(ClO 4 ) 3 , YCl 3 and YBr 3 DMF solutions at room temperature. (author)

  4. Electrooxidative Ruthenium-Catalyzed C-H/O-H Annulation by Weak O-Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Youai; Tian, Cong; Massignan, Leonardo; Rogge, Torben; Ackermann, Lutz

    2018-05-14

    Electrocatalysis has been identified as a powerful strategy for organometallic catalysis, and yet electrocatalytic C-H activation is restricted to strongly N-coordinating directing groups. The first example of electrocatalytic C-H activation by weak O-coordination is presented, in which a versatile ruthenium(II) carboxylate catalyst enables electrooxidative C-H/O-H functionalization for alkyne annulations in the absence of metal oxidants; thereby exploiting sustainable electricity as the sole oxidant. Mechanistic insights provide strong support for a facile organometallic C-H ruthenation and an effective electrochemical reoxidation of the key ruthenium(0) intermediate. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Study of methods for removing strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from Savannah River Plant waste supernate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1976-06-01

    As a part of long-term waste management studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, tests were made to study removal of strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from simulated and actual waste supernates. Plutonium was sorbed by Duolite ARC-359 ion exchange resin, the same resin that is used to remove cesium from waste supernate. Strontium was removed from supernate by sorption on a chelating resin Chelex 100, or by precipitation as Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . Activities of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 238-241 Pu remaining in processed waste supernate should be 1-10 nanocuries of each element per gram of salt. Of the methods that were tested, none was adequate for plant-scale removal of ruthenium

  6. In Situ FTIR and NMR Spectroscopic Investigations on Ruthenium-Based Catalysts for Alkene Hydroformylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Christoph; Profir, Irina; Fleischer, Ivana; Baumann, Wolfgang; Selent, Detlef; Fischer, Christine; Spannenberg, Anke; Ludwig, Ralf; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin

    2016-02-18

    Homogeneous ruthenium complexes modified by imidazole-substituted monophosphines as catalysts for various highly efficient hydroformylation reactions were characterized by in situ IR spectroscopy under reaction conditions and NMR spectroscopy. A proper protocol for the preformation reaction from [Ru3 (CO)12] is decisive to prevent the formation of inactive ligand-modified polynuclear complexes. During catalysis, ligand-modified mononuclear ruthenium(0) carbonyls were detected as resting states. Changes in the ligand structure have a crucial impact on the coordination behavior of the ligand and consequently on the catalytic performance. The substitution of CO by a nitrogen atom of the imidazolyl moiety in the ligand is not a general feature, but it takes place when structural prerequisites of the ligand are fulfilled. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Large-scale ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of (rac-1-phenylethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäckvall Jan-E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scale-up of the ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR of (rac-1-phenylethanol (2 is addressed. The immobilized lipase Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB was employed for the resolution, which shows high enantioselectivity in the transesterification. The ruthenium catalyst used, (η 5-C5Ph5RuCl(CO2 1, was shown to possess very high reactivity in the "in situ" redox racemization of 1-phenylethanol (2 in the presence of the immobilized enzyme, and could be used in 0.05 mol% with high efficiency. Commercially available isopropenyl acetate was employed as acylating agent in the lipase-catalyzed transesterifications, which makes the purification of the product very easy. In a successful large-scale DKR of 2, with 0.05 mol% of 1, (R-1-phenylethanol acetate (3 was obtained in 159 g (97% yield in excellent enantiomeric excess (99.8% ee.

  8. Recent advances in the ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with aromatics: synthesis of trisubstituted alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Rajendran; Jeganmohan, Masilamani

    2015-11-14

    The hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics in the presence of a metal catalyst via chelation-assisted C-H bond activation is a powerful method to synthesize trisubstituted alkenes. Chelation-assisted C-H bond activation can be done by two ways: (a) an oxidative addition pathway and (b) a deprotonation pathway. Generally, a mixture of cis and trans stereoisomeric as well as regioisomeric trisubstituted alkenes was observed in an oxidative addition pathway. In the deprotonation pathway, the hydroarylation reaction can be done in a highly regio- and stereoselective manner, and enables preparation of the expected trisubstituted alkenes in a highly selective manner. Generally, ruthenium, rhodium and cobalt complexes are used as catalysts in the reaction. In this review, a ruthenium-catalyzed hydroarylation of alkynes with substituted aromatics is covered completely. The hydroarylation reaction of alkynes with amide, azole, carbamate, phosphine oxide, amine, acetyl, sulfoxide and sulphur directed aromatics is discussed.

  9. Electro-volatilization of ruthenium in nitric medium: influences of ruthenium species nature and models solutions composition; Electro-volatilisation du ruthenium en milieu nitrique: influence de la nature des formes chimiques du ruthenium et de la composition des solutions modeles de dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousset, F

    2004-12-15

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products in the reprocessing of irradiated fuels that requires a specific processing management. Its elimination, upstream by the PUREX process, has been considered. A process, called electro-volatilization, which take advantage of the RuO{sub 4} volatility, has been optimised in the present study. It consists in a continuous electrolysis of ruthenium solutions in order to generate RuO{sub 4} species that is volatilized and easily trapped. This process goes to satisfying ruthenium elimination yields with RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} synthetic solutions but not with fuel dissolution solutions. Consequently, this work consisted in the speciation studies of dissolved ruthenium species were carried out by simulating fuel solutions produced by hot acid attack of several ruthenium compounds (Ru(0), RuO{sub 2},xH{sub 2}O, polymetallic alloy). In parallel with dissolution kinetic studies, the determination of dissolved species was performed using voltammetry, spectrometry and spectro-electrochemistry. The results showed the co-existence of Ru(IV) and RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}. Although these species are different from synthetic RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, their electro-oxidation behaviour are similar. The electro-volatilization tests of these dissolution solutions yielded to comparable results as the synthetic RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} solutions. Then, complexity increase of models solutions was performed by in-situ generation of nitrous acid during ruthenium dissolution. Nitrous acid showed a catalytic effect on ruthenium dissolution. Its presence goes to quasi exclusively RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} species. It is also responsible of the strong n-bond formation between Ru{sup 2+} and NO{sup +}. In addition, it has been shown that its reducing action on RuO{sub 4} hinders the electro-volatilization process. Mn{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} cations also reveal, but to a lesser

  10. Investigation of the process for ruthenium fixation on stainless steel in concentrated nitric environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massit, Hubert

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a process and the determination of the conditions for the fixation of insoluble ruthenium compounds on a Z2CN180 stainless steel in a concentrated nitric environment. The original characteristics and results of this research work are the use of a rotating disk to control the hydrodynamic conditions of suspension particle transport towards the collector surface, and the application of X ray spectrometry of solid deposits of ruthenium compounds fixed on this surface. Characterization techniques (granulometry, Auger electron spectroscopy or AES, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis or ESCA) allowed the assessment of the influence of various parameters (size, surface chemical composition) on the studied process. Electrochemical techniques are used to show the role of particle-substrate Coulomb interactions, on the quantity of fixed particles and on fixation kinetics. The author evokes possible developments and applications, notably decontamination processes [fr

  11. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F.

    2004-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high βγ activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO 4 in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO 3+ solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO 2 ,xH 2 O and Ru 0 in nitric acid media. (authors)

  12. Effect of solvent on Se-modified ruthenium/carbon catalyst for oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanxiang Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Se-modified ruthenium supporting on carbon (Sex–Ru/C electrocatalyst was prepared by solvothermal one-step synthesis method. The reaction mechanism was revealed after discussing impact of different solvents (i-propanol and EG in solvotermal reaction. The result showed that the grain size of Se-modified ruthenium electrocatalyst was as small as 1 to 3 nm and highly dispersed on carbon surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS presented that selenium mainly existed in the catalyst in the form of elemental selenium and selenium oxides when the solvent was EG and i-propanol, respectively. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR performance was improved by appearance of selenium oxides.

  13. Forefront of PUREX system engineering. Chemistry and engineering of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reports the activity of the research committee organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan on 'Ruthenium and Technetium Chemistry in the PUREX System', with focusing on basic behaviors of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium in the PUREX process, the principles of plant design, and behaviors during the final waste treatment. The scope of the work includes the following major topics: (1) basic solution and solid-state chemistry; (2) basic solution and solid-state chemistry of minor actinides in particular, Np; (3) partitioning chemistry in the PUREX system and environmental behavior of the components; (4) processes of recovery, purification, and utilization of rare metal fission products; (5) field data on plant design, operation, decontamination, and decommissioning; (6) numerical process simulations and process control technologies; (7) compilation of a data base for process chemistry and plant engineering. (S. Ohno)

  14. A mixed ruthenium polypyridyl complex containing a PEG-bipyridine macroligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Veronica; Holder, Elisabeth; Meier, Michael A.R.; Hoogenboom, Richard; Schubert, Ulrich S. [Laboratory of Macromolecular Chemistry and Nanoscience, Eindhoven University of Technology and Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2004-04-06

    An amino-functionalized bipyridine ligand was prepared in order to serve as a bridging unit to an activated low-molecular-weight monomethyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Coordination of a ruthenium(II) phenantroline precursor onto the formed PEG-containing bipyridine ligand yielded a metal-containing polymer which shows interesting properties for solar cell applications. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparation and characterization of nickel-caffeine and ruthenium-arborine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusmidah Ali

    1998-01-01

    In this study, two types of complexes were synthesised, namely, nickel-cafeine and ruthenium-arborine by using NiCl 2 6H 2 O and RuCl 3 3H 2 O as starting materials. The complexes were characterised using far- and near infrared and CHN analysis. The proposed complexes were (Ni(kaf)Cl 2 ) 4 and (RuCl 3 Ab)EtOH

  17. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo

    2017-08-08

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  18. Synergistic Interaction within Bifunctional Ruthenium Nanoparticle/SILP Catalysts for the Selective Hydrodeoxygenation of Phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luska, Kylie L; Migowski, Pedro; El Sayed, Sami; Leitner, Walter

    2015-12-21

    Ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized on acid-functionalized supported ionic liquid phases (Ru NPs@SILPs) act as efficient bifunctional catalysts in the hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic substrates under batch and continuous flow conditions. A synergistic interaction between the metal sites and acid groups within the bifunctional catalyst leads to enhanced catalytic activities for the overall transformation as compared to the individual steps catalyzed by the separate catalytic functionalities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai-Shuai; Lin, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Dong, Lin

    2015-01-28

    In this paper, a simple and highly efficient ruthenium-catalyzed direct C3 alkylation of indoles with various α,β-unsaturated ketones without chelation assistance has been developed. This novel C-H activation methodology exhibits a broad substrate scope such as different substituted indoles, pyrroles, and other azoles. Further synthetic applications of the alkylation products can lead to more attractive 3,4-fused tricyclic indoles.

  20. Modification of Ammonia Decomposition Activity of Ruthenium Nanoparticles by N-Doping of CNT Supports

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Tamsin; Zhan, G; Wu, Kejun; Torrente Murciano, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of ammonia as a hydrogen vector has the potential to unlock the hydrogen economy. In this context, this paper presents novel insights into improving the ammonia decomposition activity of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNT) by nitrogen doping. Our results can be applied to develop more active systems capable of delivering hydrogen on demand, with a view to move towards the low temperature target of less than 150 °C. Herein we demonstrate that nitrogen doping of ...

  1. Ruthenium(II)-catalyzed direct addition of indole/pyrrole C2-H bonds to alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Libo; Fu, Shaomin; Lin, Dongen; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Deng, Yuanfu; Jiang, Huanfeng; Zeng, Wei

    2014-10-17

    A ruthenium-catalyzed C2-hydroindolation of alkynes has been achieved. This protocol provides a rapid and concise access to kinds of 2-alkenyl-substituted N-(2-pyridyl)indoles in which the pyridyl moiety can be easily removed to afford free (N-H) indoles under mild conditions. Various arenes and alkynes, including electron-deficient and electron-rich internal alkynes and terminal alkynes, allow for this transformation.

  2. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo; Ferná ndez-Salas, José A.; Nahra, Fady; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  3. Improvements in iodine and ruthenium removal from advanced liquid processing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    SRNL has considerable experience in designing, engineering, and operating systems for removing iodine-129 (I-129) and ruthenium-106 (Ru-106) from waste streams that are directly analogous to the Advanced Liquid Processing System (ALPS) waste streams. SRNL proposes to provide the technical background and design and engineering support for an improved I-129 and Ru-106 removal system for application to ALPS on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS).

  4. Ammonia synthesis in the presence of rhodium-ruthenium-iridium carbonyl clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.V.

    2007-01-01

    Researches in the field of platinum metal coordination compounds, where nitrogen enters as a ligand in coordination sphere of metal, are discussed. Results of experiments on the ammonia synthesis during the CO+N 2 mixture passing through alkali solution containing mixture of carbonyl clusters of rhodium, ruthenium and iridium at atmospheric pressure are given. Technique of the experiment and steps of assumed reactions of nitrogen fixation by Rh, Ir and Ru carbonyl clusters are demonstrated [ru

  5. Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Coats, Alison M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature), The measurements...

  6. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  7. Synthesis of 14C-dehydrocorydaline chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rui; Wang Ding

    1988-01-01

    A method for synthesis of 14 C-dehydrocorydaline chloride is described. In the presence of sodium hydroxide, acetonylpalmatine is reacted with 14 C-methyl iodide in sealed glass ampoule to give 14 C-13-methylpalmatine iodide which is then converted to chloride. The radiochemical purity of 14 C-dehydrocorydaline determined by TLC is over 98% and the labelling efficiency is 54%

  8. Chronopotentiometric chloride sensing using transition time measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, D.B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Detection of chloride ions is crucial to accurately access the concrete structure durability[1]. The existing electrochemical method of chloride ions detection in concrete, potentiometry[1], is not suitable for in-situ measurement due to the long term stability issue of conventional reference

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction employment under this section are...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those...

  13. Properties of silver chloride track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, V.D.; Kocherov, N.P.; Novikova, N.R.; Perfilov, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    The experiments on preparation of silver chloride track detectors and their properties are described. The results of X-ray structural analysis and data on sensitivity to charged particles and actinic light of silver chloride crystals, doped with several elements, are presented. (orig.) [de

  14. Dechlorinating reaction of organic chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahata, Taneaki; Kihara, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ohuchi, Misao

    1996-06-01

    Dechlorination has been examined by the reaction between iron, aluminum powder or CaO and organic chlorides such as C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Progress of the reaction was analyzed with mass spectrometer. The reaction between iron and organic chloride was rapidly occurred at the temperature between 350 and 440degC in an atmosphere of argon. Above 380degC, more than 99.5% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, approximately 60% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed by the reaction with aluminium powder within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, reaction between C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CaO powder were occurred rapidly in an atmosphere of argon to form CaCl{sub 2} and free carbon. Also in an atmosphere of air, nearly the same result was obtained. In this reaction, CaCl{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} were formed. CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was also decomposed by the reaction with iron at the temperature between 380 and 440degC. In the reaction, FeCl{sub 2}, carbon and hydrogen were formed. CH{sub 3}{sup +} and CH{sub 4} were observed during the dechlorinating reaction of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Variation in particle size of iron powder such as 100, 150 and 250 mesh did not affect the reaction rate. (author)

  15. Covalent attachment of pyridine-type molecules to glassy carbon surfaces by electrochemical reduction of in situ generated diazonium salts. Formation of ruthenium complexes on ligand-modified surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesildag, Ali; Ekinci, Duygu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, pyridine, quinoline and phenanthroline molecules were covalently bonded to glassy carbon (GC) electrode surfaces for the first time using the diazonium modification method. Then, the complexation ability of the modified films with ruthenium metal cations was investigated. The derivatization of GC surfaces with heteroaromatic molecules was achieved by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding in situ generated diazonium salts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to confirm the attachment of heteroaromatic molecules to the GC surfaces and to determine the surface concentration of the films. The barrier properties of the modified GC electrodes were studied in the presence of redox probes such as Fe(CN) 6 3- and Ru(NH 3 ) 6 3+ by cyclic voltammetry. Additionally, the presence of the resulting organometallic films on the surfaces was verified by XPS after the chemical transformation of the characterized ligand films to the ruthenium complex films. The electrochemical behavior of these films in acetonitrile solution was investigated using voltammetric methods, and the surface coverage of the organometallic films was determined from the reversible metal-based Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation waves.

  16. Covalent attachment of pyridine-type molecules to glassy carbon surfaces by electrochemical reduction of in situ generated diazonium salts. Formation of ruthenium complexes on ligand-modified surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesildag, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ekinci, Duygu, E-mail: dekin@atauni.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2010-09-30

    In this study, pyridine, quinoline and phenanthroline molecules were covalently bonded to glassy carbon (GC) electrode surfaces for the first time using the diazonium modification method. Then, the complexation ability of the modified films with ruthenium metal cations was investigated. The derivatization of GC surfaces with heteroaromatic molecules was achieved by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding in situ generated diazonium salts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to confirm the attachment of heteroaromatic molecules to the GC surfaces and to determine the surface concentration of the films. The barrier properties of the modified GC electrodes were studied in the presence of redox probes such as Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-} and Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} by cyclic voltammetry. Additionally, the presence of the resulting organometallic films on the surfaces was verified by XPS after the chemical transformation of the characterized ligand films to the ruthenium complex films. The electrochemical behavior of these films in acetonitrile solution was investigated using voltammetric methods, and the surface coverage of the organometallic films was determined from the reversible metal-based Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation waves.

  17. Sequential Electrodeposition of Platinum-Ruthenium at Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for Methanol Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana González-González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequential electrodeposition of Pt and Ru on boron-doped diamond (BDD films, in 0.5 M H2SO4 by cyclic voltammetry, has been prepared. The potential cycling, in the aqueous solutions of the respective metals, was between 0.00 and 1.00 V versus Ag/AgCl. The catalyst composites, Pt and PtRu, deposited on BDD film substrates, were tested for methanol oxidation. The modified diamond surfaces were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy-X-ray fluorescence-energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The scanning Auger electron spectroscopy mapping showed the ruthenium signal only in areas where platinum was electrodeposited. Ruthenium does not deposit on the oxidized diamond surface of the boron-doped diamond. Particles with 5–10% of ruthenium with respect to platinum exhibited better performance for methanol oxidation in terms of methanol oxidation peak current and chronoamperometric current stability. The electrogenerated •OH radicals on BDD may interact with Pt surface, participating in the methanol oxidation as shown in oxidation current and the shift in the peak position. The conductive diamond surface is a good candidate as the support for the platinum electrocatalyst, because it ensures catalytic activity, which compares with the used carbon, and higher stability under severe anodic and cathodic conditions.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-10-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), CIO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well identified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  19. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), ClO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well idendified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  20. Tracking the Oxygen Status in the Cell Nucleus with a Hoechst-Tagged Phosphorescent Ruthenium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daiki; Umehara, Yui; Son, Aoi; Asahi, Wataru; Misu, Sotaro; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Kondo, Teruyuki; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2018-05-04

    Molecular oxygen in living cells is distributed and consumed inhomogeneously, depending on the activity of each organelle. Therefore, tractable methods that can be used to monitor the oxygen status in each organelle are needed to understand cellular function. Here we report the design of a new oxygen-sensing probe for use in the cell nucleus. We prepared "Ru-Hoechsts", each consisting of a phosphorescent ruthenium complex linked to a Hoechst 33258 moiety, and characterized their properties as oxygen sensors. The Hoechst unit shows strong DNA-binding properties in the nucleus, and the ruthenium complex shows oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. Thus, Ru-Hoechsts accumulated in the cell nucleus and showed oxygen-dependent signals that could be monitored. Of the Ru-Hoechsts prepared in this study, Ru-Hoechst b, in which the ruthenium complex and the Hoechst unit were linked through a hexyl chain, showed the most suitable properties for monitoring the oxygen status. Ru-Hoechsts are probes with high potential for visualizing oxygen fluctuations in the nucleus. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Antipyrilquinoneimine dye formation by coupling aniline derivatives with 4-aminoantipyrine in the presence of ruthenium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasthuri, J.; Santhanalakshmi, J.; Rajendiran, N.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of 4-aminoantipyrine with aniline derivatives catalyzed by ruthenium nanoparticles has been studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy in aqueous medium. The rate constant for antipyrilquinoneimine dye formation depends on the nature of the aniline substituent and the p H, ionic strength and temperature of the reaction medium. The maximum rate constant of the dye formation reaction is observed at p H 3.6. Aniline derivatives with electron donating substituents show higher rate constant values than those with electron withdrawing substituents, with increasing rate constant values in the order: N,N-dimethyl aniline> a-toluidine> o-chloroaniline > m-chloroaniline. With pseudo first order kinetics, the total order is 1.0 + 1.0 + 1.0 = 3.0, which includes the orders with respect to amine, 4-aminoantipyrine and ruthenium nanoparticles. Studies on these effects help to complete the kinetic analysis as well as propose the reaction pathway. Furthermore, TEM measurement confirms that the nano scalar size of the ruthenium nanoparticles is 7 nm

  2. About the value of Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy in the treatment of uveal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, G.; Mosboeck, G.; Stuecklschwaiger, G.; Muellner, K.; Lechner, H.; Faulborn, J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: to investigate the clinical course, sequelae and visual function of uveal melanomas treated with Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy. Patients and method: 47 patients who underwent Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy between 1985 and 2000 were evaluated using Kaplan Meier statistical method. Mean follow up interval was 22 month (range 8 - 152 months). Results: Local tumor control rate was 85 %, 5 years possibility to avoid enucleation was 75 %. The most important sequelae were radiation optic neuropathy (29 %), maculopathy (37 %) and radiation retinopathy (32 %). After terminating the study the 34 % of the patients achieved a visual acuity of 20/40 and more, another 34 % had a visual function of 20/200 and lower. Conclusion: Ruthenium 106 brachytherapy is our method of choice in small medium sized uveal melanomas and a maximum tumor prominence of 6 mm. Tumors have to be located in the midperiphery and outer periphery of the fundus including the ciliary body. In addition to the indications introduced by Lommatzsch we treated ciliary body melanomas with a tumor base more than 3 clock hours (by shifting the plaque) as an alternative therapy to enucleation. (author)

  3. High-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition of ferromagnetic ruthenium-containing carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav O., E-mail: V.Khavrus@ifw-dresden.de; Ibrahim, E. M. M.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht [IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    We report on the high-pressure catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of ruthenium nanoparticles (NPs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of gas-phase decomposition of acetonitrile and ruthenocene in a tubular quartz flow reactor at 950 Degree-Sign C and at elevated pressures (between 2 and 8 bar). The deposited material consists of Ru metal cores with sizes ranging between 1 and 3 nm surrounded by a carbon matrix. The high-pressure CCVD seems to be an effective route to obtain composite materials containing metallic NPs, Ru in this work, inside a nanostructured carbon matrix protecting them from oxidation in ambient air. We find that in contradiction to the weak paramagnetic properties characterizing bulk ruthenium, the synthesized samples are ferromagnetic as predicted for nanosized particles of nonmagnetic materials. At low pressure, the very small ruthenium catalyst particles are able to catalyze growth of SWCNTs. Their yield decreases with increasing reaction pressure. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements were used to analyze and confirm properties of the synthesized NPs and nanotubes. A discussion on the growth mechanism of the Ru-containing nanostructures is presented.

  4. Ruthenium(II) carbonyl compounds with the 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Haukka, Matti

    2017-04-01

    Two ruthenium carbonyl complexes with the 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine ligand (tpy-Cl, C 15 H 10 ClN 3 ), i.e. [RuCl(tpy-Cl)(CO) 2 ][RuCl 3 (CO) 3 ] (I) [systematic name: cis -di-carbonyl-chlorido(4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ 3 N )ruthenium(II) fac -tricarbonyltri-chlorido-ruthenate(II)], and [RuCl 2 (tpy-Cl)(CO) 2 ] (II) [ cis -dicarbonyl- trans -di-chlorido(4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-κ 2 N 1 , N 1' )ruthenium(II)], were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Ru II atoms in both centrosymmetric structures (I) and (II) display similar, slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination spheres. The coordination sphere in the complex cation in compound (I) is defined by three N atoms of the tridentate tpy-Cl ligand, two carbonyl carbon atoms and one chlorido ligand; the charge is balanced by an octa-hedral [Ru(CO) 3 Cl 3 ] - counter-anion. In the neutral compound (II), the tpy-Cl ligand coordinates to the metal only through two of its N atoms. The coordination sphere of the Ru II atom is completed by two carbonyl and two chlorido ligands. In the crystal structures of both (I) and (II), weak C-H⋯Cl inter-actions are observed.

  5. Oxidative dissolution of ruthenium deposits onto stainless steel by permanganate ions in alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floquet, S.; Eysseric, C.; Maurel, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/Valrho), Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    During spent nuclear fuel reprocessing ruthenium is liable to form black ruthenium deposits on the stainless steel walls of process equipments. These deposits promote corrosion and can eventually obstruct the off-gas lines. The results of decontamination of 304L stainless steel test specimens covered with RuO(OH){sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O deposits by permanganate ions in alkaline medium are described. The ruthenium deposits were dissolved by oxidation of RuO(OH){sub 2} to RuO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions, while the permanganate ions were reduced to MnO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions and then to manganese dioxide MnO{sub 2}. The parameters affecting the kinetics of oxidative dissolution of these deposits were examined. The results indicate that the oxidative dissolution kinetics depends on the instantaneous surface area of the deposit, and that the dissolution rate increases with the concentrations of MnO{sub 4}{sup -} and OH{sup -} ions. (orig.)

  6. Surface heterogeneity and ionization of Cs promoter in carbon-based ruthenium catalyst for ammonia synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotarba, Andrzej; Dmytrzyk, Jaromir; Rarog-Pilecka, Wioletta; Kowalczyk, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    Second-generation ammonia synthesis cesium-doped ruthenium catalyst supported on turbostratic carbon was investigated by the species resolved thermal alkali desorption method (SR-TAD). Energetic barriers for cesium ions (2.86 eV), ground state (1.96 eV) and electronically excited atoms (5.76 eV) desorbing from the Cs-Ru/C catalyst were determined. In the case of ruthenium-free Cs/C system, cesium desorbs as ground state atoms only, with an energy barrier of 2.87 eV. The work functions determined by the thermionic emission of electrons from Cs/C and Cs-Ru/C were of the same value (2.9 eV). It was concluded that ruthenium induces heterogeneous distribution of cesium on the catalyst surface. The promoter stability is reduced on low work function areas and its surface ionization on high work function areas opens the ionic desorption channel. The Cs desorption from the catalyst is discussed in terms of the literature data for the cesium/graphite system

  7. COMPARISON OF ROCURONIUM BROMIDE AND SUCCINYLCHOLINE CHLORIDE FOR USE DURING RAPID SEQUENCE INTUBATION IN ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Penchalaiah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE : The goal of rapid sequence intubation is to secure the patients airway smoothly and quickly, minimizing the chances of regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents. Traditionally succinylcholine chloride has been the neuromuscular blocking drug of choi ce for use in rapid sequence intubation because of its rapid onset of action and profound relaxation. Succinylcholine chloride remains unsurpassed in providing ideal intubating conditions. However the use of succinylcholine chloride is associated with many side effects like muscle pain, bradycardia, hyperkalaemia and rise in intragastric and intraocular pressure. Rocuronium bromide is the only drug currently available which has the rapidity of onset of action like succinylcholine chloride. Hence the present study was undertaken to compare rocuronium bromide with succinylcholine chloride for use during rapid sequence intubation in adult patients. METHODOLOGY : The study population consisted of 90 patients aged between 18 - 60 years posted for various elective su rgeries requiring general anaesthesia . S tudy population was randomly divided into 3 groups with 30 patients in each sub group. 1. Group I : Intubated with 1 mg kg - 1 of succinylcholine chloride (n=30 . 2. Grou p II : Intubated with rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg kg - 1 (n=30 . 3. Group III : Intubated with rocuronium bromide 0.9 mg kg - 1 (n=30 . Intubating conditions were assessed at 60 seconds based on the scale adopted by Toni Magorian et al. 1993. The haemodynamic para meters in the present study were compared using p - value obtained from student t - test . RESULTS : It was noted that succinylcholine chloride 1 mg kg - 1 body weight produced excellent intubating conditions in all patients. Rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg kg - 1 body we ight produced excellent intubating conditions in 53.33% of patients but produced good to excellent intubating conditions in 96.67% of patients. Rocuronium bromide 0.9 mg kg - 1

  8. Application of the ruthenium and technetium thermodynamic data bases used in the EQ3/6 geochemical codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1985-04-01

    Based on a critical review of the available thermodynamic data, computerized data bases for technetium and ruthenium were created for use with the EQ3/6 geochemical computer codes. The technetium data base contains thermodynamic data for 8 aqueous species and 15 solids; 26 aqueous species and 9 solids were included in the ruthenium data base. The EQ3NR code was used to calculate solubility limits for ruthenium (8 x 10 -16 M) in ground water from Yucca Mountain, a potential nuclear waste repository site near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The code confirmed the essentially unlimited solubility of technetium in oxidizing conditions, such as those that are believed to exist in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain and the Cambric Nuclear event site at the NTS. Ruthenium migration observed from the Cambric site was evaluated. The solubility limit for ruthenium (as the aqueous species RuO 4 - ) when constrained by RuO 2 is approximately equal to the concentration of ruthenium found in the cavity ground water (i.e., 2.1 x 10 -11 vs 4.5 x 10 -11 M). Differences in ruthenium solubility limits between Yucca Mountain and Cambric are primarily due to differences in ground-water pH. Technetium solubility (3 x 10 -8 M) for moderately reducing conditions (Eh = -0.1 V) using the metastable oxide, TcO 2 .2H 2 O, as the solubility constraint is within the range of experimental values recently published in a study of technetium sorption on basalt. Previously published technetium solubilities of 10 -12 to 10 -16 M were apparently based on a technetium data base that did not include aqueous species other than TcO 4 - . When TcO(OH) 2 0 is included in the data base, the calculated values are much closer to the experimental results. Eh-pH diagrams were also generated for a variety of conditions using the SOLUPLOT code

  9. Chloride Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/chloridebloodtest.html Chloride Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Chloride Blood Test? A chloride blood test measures the ...

  10. Application of sorption method on hydroxides for purification of some reactive from iron(III) markings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhmonberdiev, A.D.; Khamidov, B.O.

    1986-01-01

    The method of purification of solutions of citric acid, tartaric acid and their salts, potassium hydroxide, potassium nitrate and chloride, sodium perchlorate from iron (III) impurities by means of sorption method on zirconium hydroxide is elaborated. The control of iron(III) content in solutions is conducted by inversion voltammetry method with mercury-graphite electrode. It is defined that complete sorption of iron (III) ions achieves at ph =4÷14.

  11. Tailoring Ruthenium Exposure to Enhance the Performance of fcc Platinum@Ruthenium Core-Shell Electrocatalysts in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan

    2016-05-17

    The catalytic properties of noble metal nanocrystals are a function of their size, structure, and surface composition. In particular, achieving high activity without sacrificing stability is essential for designing commercially viable catalysts. A major challenge in designing state-of-the-art Ru-based catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is a key step in water splitting, is the poor stability and surface tailorability of these catalysts. In this study, we designed rapidly synthesizable size-controlled, morphology-selective, and surface-tailored platinum-ruthenium core-shell (Pt@Ru) and alloy (PtRu) nanocatalysts in a scalable continuous-flow reactor. These core-shell nanoparticles with atomically precise shells were produced in a single synthetic step with carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. By varying the metal precursor concentration, a dendritic or layer-by-layer ruthenium shell can be grown. The catalytic activities of the synthesized Pt@Ru and PtRu nanoparticles exhibit noticeably higher electrocatalytic activity in the OER compared to that of pure Pt and Ru nanoparticles. Promisingly, Pt@Ru nanocrystals with a ~2-3 atomic layer Ru cuboctahedral shell surpass conventional Ru nanoparticles in terms of both durability and activity.

  12. Tailoring Ruthenium Exposure to Enhance the Performance of fcc Platinum@Ruthenium Core-Shell Electrocatalysts in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan; LaGrow, Alec P.; Joya, khurram; Hwang, Jinyeon; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Sinatra, Lutfan; Kim, Jin Young; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic properties of noble metal nanocrystals are a function of their size, structure, and surface composition. In particular, achieving high activity without sacrificing stability is essential for designing commercially viable catalysts. A major challenge in designing state-of-the-art Ru-based catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which is a key step in water splitting, is the poor stability and surface tailorability of these catalysts. In this study, we designed rapidly synthesizable size-controlled, morphology-selective, and surface-tailored platinum-ruthenium core-shell (Pt@Ru) and alloy (PtRu) nanocatalysts in a scalable continuous-flow reactor. These core-shell nanoparticles with atomically precise shells were produced in a single synthetic step with carbon monoxide as the reducing agent. By varying the metal precursor concentration, a dendritic or layer-by-layer ruthenium shell can be grown. The catalytic activities of the synthesized Pt@Ru and PtRu nanoparticles exhibit noticeably higher electrocatalytic activity in the OER compared to that of pure Pt and Ru nanoparticles. Promisingly, Pt@Ru nanocrystals with a ~2-3 atomic layer Ru cuboctahedral shell surpass conventional Ru nanoparticles in terms of both durability and activity.

  13. Deposition and properties of cobalt- and ruthenium-based ultra-thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lucas Benjamin

    Future copper interconnect systems will require replacement of the materials that currently comprise both the liner layer(s) and the capping layer. Ruthenium has previously been considered as a material that could function as a single material liner, however its poor ability to prevent copper diffusion makes it incompatible with liner requirements. A recently described chemical vapor deposition route to amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films could correct this problem by eliminating the grain boundaries found in pure ruthenium films. Bias-temperature stressing of capacitor structures using 5 nm ruthenium-phosphorus film as a barrier to copper diffusion and analysis of the times-to-failure at accelerated temperature and field conditions implies that ruthenium-phosphorus performs acceptably as a diffusion barrier for temperatures above 165°C. The future problems associated with the copper capping layer are primarily due to the poor adhesion between copper and the current Si-based capping layers. Cobalt, which adheres well to copper, has been widely proposed to replace the Si-based materials, but its ability to prevent copper diffusion must be improved if it is to be successfully implemented in the interconnect. Using a dual-source chemistry of dicobaltoctacarbonyl and trimethylphosphine at temperatures from 250-350°C, amorphous cobalt-phosphorus can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The films contain elemental cobalt and phosphorus, plus some carbon impurity, which is incorporated in the film as both graphitic and carbidic (bonded to cobalt) carbon. When deposited on copper, the adhesion between the two materials remains strong despite the presence of phosphorus and carbon at the interface, but the selectivity for growth on copper compared to silicon dioxide is poor and must be improved prior to consideration for application in interconnect systems. A single molecule precursor containing both cobalt and phosphorus atoms, tetrakis

  14. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Fernandez, P.; Medina, J.; Hernandez, P.; Barrado, E.

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) ↔ Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al 3 Sm and Al 2 Sm.

  15. Electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides in pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillejo, Y., E-mail: ycastril@qa.uva.es [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Fernandez, P. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Medina, J. [Dept Fisica Materia Condensada Cristalografia y Mineralogia, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Hernandez, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carr. Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, C.P. 42076 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Barrado, E. [QUIANE/Dept Quimica Analitica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    This work concerns the electrochemical extraction of samarium from molten chlorides. In this way, the electrochemical behaviour of samarium ions has been investigated in the eutectic LiCl-KCl at the surface of tungsten, aluminium and aluminium coated tungsten electrodes. On a W inert electrode the electro-reduction of Sm(III) takes place in only one soluble-soluble electrochemical step Sm(III)/Sm(II). The electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) has not been observed within the electrochemical window, because of the prior reduction of Li(I) ions from the solvent, which inhibits the electro-extraction of Sm species from the salt on such a substrate. Sm metal in contact with the melt react to give Li(0) according to the reaction: Sm(0) + 2Li(I) {r_reversible} Sm(II) + 2Li(0). On the contrary, on reactive Al electrodes the electrochemical system Sm(II)/Sm(0) was observed within the electroactive range. The potential shift of the redox couple is caused by the decrease of Sm activity in the metal phase due to the formation of Sm-Al alloys at the interface. The formation mechanism of the intermetallic compounds was studied in a melt containing: (i) both Sm(III) and Al(III) ions, using W and Al coated tungsten electrodes, and (ii) Sm(III) ions using an Al electrode. Analysis of the samples after potentiostatic electrolysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), allowed the identification of Al{sub 3}Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm.

  16. Effects of platinic chloride on Tetrahymena pyrifromis GL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jytte R.

    1992-01-01

    Cellebiologi, platinum(IV)chloride, endocytosis, detoxification, cell proliferation, fine structure, cisplatin......Cellebiologi, platinum(IV)chloride, endocytosis, detoxification, cell proliferation, fine structure, cisplatin...

  17. Bone marrow scintigraphy using 111Indium chloride in patients with aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Kumano, Machiko; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Arita, Shigehiro; Nakagawa, Kenichi; Fujii, Koichi; Yoshioka, Hiroyasu; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1987-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy using 111 Indium chloride ( 111 In-chloride) was performed in 18 patients with aplastic anemia. The scintigrams were taken 48 hours after an intravenous injection of 111 In-chloride 3 mCi. The distribution patterns on scintigram were classified into 5 types: Type I (4 cases) showed no accumulation, Type II (6 cases) showed low accumulation in usual bone marrow sites. Type III (7 cases) showed island-like distribution in bone marrow sites. Type IV, although no case was included in the 18 patients, shows uneven distribution between pelvis and sternum or vertebrae. Type V (one case) showed almost normal accumulation in usual bone marrow sites. Bone marrow uptake of 111 In-chloride correlated well with the cellularity of bone marrow. There was a tendency for the cases of markedly increased saturated iron-binding capacity to show increased renal activity. In type III, both the percentage of cases who had been treated and the count of reticulocytes were higher than those in the other types, which suggested that island-like distribution on scintigram showed the regeneration responded to the therapy, and related to the erythropoietic function. (author)

  18. Bone marrow scintigraphy using /sup 111/Indium chloride in patients with aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabuchi, Nobuhisa; Kumano, Machiko; Matsumoto, Fumiko; Arita, Shigehiro; Nakagawa, Kenichi; Fujii, Koichi; Yoshioka, Hiroyasu; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1987-12-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy using /sup 111/Indium chloride (/sup 111/In-chloride) was performed in 18 patients with aplastic anemia. The scintigrams were taken 48 hours after an intravenous injection of /sup 111/In-chloride 3 mCi. The distribution patterns on scintigram were classified into 5 types: Type I (4 cases) showed no accumulation, Type II (6 cases) showed low accumulation in usual bone marrow sites. Type III (7 cases) showed island-like distribution in bone marrow sites. Type IV, although no case was included in the 18 patients, shows uneven distribution between pelvis and sternum or vertebrae. Type V (one case) showed almost normal accumulation in usual bone marrow sites. Bone marrow uptake of /sup 111/In-chloride correlated well with the cellularity of bone marrow. There was a tendency for the cases of markedly increased saturated iron-binding capacity to show increased renal activity. In type III, both the percentage of cases who had been treated and the count of reticulocytes were higher than those in the other types, which suggested that island-like distribution on scintigram showed the regeneration responded to the therapy, and related to the erythropoietic function.

  19. Mathematical modelling of brittle phase precipitation in complex ruthenium containing nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    A new model has been developed in this work which is capable of simulating the precipitation kinetics of brittle phases, especially TCP-phases (topologically close packed phases) in ruthenium containing superalloys. The model simultaneously simulates the nucleation and the growth stage of precipitation for any number of precipitating phases. The CALPHAD method (Calculation of Phase Diagrams) is employed to calculate thermodynamic properties, such as the driving force or phase compositions in equilibrium. For calculation of diffusion coefficients, kinetic mobility databases which are also based on the CALPHAD-method are used. The model is fully capable of handling multicomponent effects, which are common in complex superalloys. Metastable phases can be treated and will automatically be dissolved if they get unstable. As the model is based on the general CALPHAD method, it can be applied to a broad range of precipitation processes in different alloys as long as the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic databases are available. The developed model proves that the TCP-phases precipitate in a sequence of phases. The first phase that is often formed is the metastable σ-phase because it has the lowest interface energy due to low-energy planes at the interface between matrix and precipitate. After several hundred hours the stable μ- and P-phases start to precipitate by nucleating at the σ-phase which is energetically favourable. During the growth of these stable phases the sigma-phase is continuously dissolved. It can be shown by thermodynamic CALPHAD calculations that the sigma-phase has a lower Gibbs free enthalpy than the μ- and P-phase. All required parameters of the model, such as interface energy and nucleate densities, have been estimated. The mechanisms of suppression of TCP-phase precipitation in the presence of ruthenium in superalloys were investigated with the newly developed model. It is shown by the simulations that ruthenium mostly affects the nucleation

  20. Consequences of tributyltin chloride induced stress in Leydig cells: an ex-vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Srivastava, Ankit; Khanna, Smita; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2014-03-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a member of the organotin family, is a known endocrine disruptor. It persists long in the environment and is widely used in various industrial applications. This study was planned to understand its toxic influence on Leydig cells isolated from 28 day old wistar rats. In-vitro exposure to TBT-Chloride (TBTC) (300-3000 nM) reduced cell viability (DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation and MTT assay) and affected testosterone production. TBTC induced both apoptotic and necrotic cell death (AnnexinV/PI binding assay). Involvement of calcium (Ca(2+)), redox imbalance (ROS, GSH and TBARS) and mitochondria in TBTC toxicity was evaluated by using Ca(2+) inhibitors (BAPTA-AM, EGTA, Ruthenium Red), free radical scavengers (NAC, C-Phycocyanin) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor (Cyclosporine A). Protein expression analysis of phosphorylated MAPKinases (ERK1/2, JNK1/2, & p38), steroidogenic proteins (3β-HSD, StAR & TSPO) and apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bcl2) illustrates the cytotoxic and anti-steroidogenic activity of TBTC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.