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Sample records for royal ontario museum

  1. The response of the Government of Ontario to the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    In March 1980, after nearly five years of hearings and research, the Ontario Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning submitted the first volume of its final report. The remaining eight volumes were submitted in April 1980. The Commission made 88 recommendations on technical, operational, and policy issues. The present document sets out the Ontario government's response to the recommendations. The government accepts and is implementing 77 recommendations. Four recommendations require further study, and six have been rejected

  2. Conservation of the Sinclair Inn Museum, and the Painted Room Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaftel, A.; Ward, J.

    2017-08-01

    Conservation of the historic 18thC. Sinclair Inn Museum, and of the recently discovered late 18th/early 19thC. unique panoramic wall paintings located in an upstairs room, are co-dependent. This project was carried out with Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) staff, and Conservator in Private Practice Ann Shaftel. This paper will introduce the Sinclair Inn Museum, outline the CCI murals and building investigations of 2011-15, the mural investigation of 2015-16, which confirmed that the mural extended to all four walls of the function room, now referred to as the Painted Room, and to describe how it has been revealed and conserved to date.

  3. Authenticity and origin of prehispanic ceramic material, analysis of zapotecan urns of the Ontario Real Museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez L, A.; Schaaf, P.; Martinez, Y.; Ortiz D, E.; Lazos, L.; Ruvalcaba, J.L.; Sellen, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Zapotec culture flourished approximately in Oaxaca of the year 220 B.C. up to the 800 D.C., in their funeral acts the Zapotec often took to the tomb to their deads accompanied of rich offerings including a great variety of ceramic, one of these varieties of ceramics were those urns that are kind of an adorned vessels with a sphinx, that is to say, a cylinder that has incorporate a figure generally anthropomorphous, which represented ancestres or divinities, the size of these urns went from the 15 cm until but of a meter high. At the beginning of the XX century the urns got the attention of the collectors and a number important of replies (false) they were manufactured copying the original ones, in this time C. Rickards gathers one of those but important collections of urns zapotec, in 1919 the Real Museum of Ontario (ROM) acquired the collection Rickards, in the 70 s they were practiced test of authenticity for thermoluminescence indicating that 36 of these urns were false, comparing their iconography with the other urns of the collection suggests the possibility that at least 80 of these pieces are not you authenticate. In this work the results are presented by thermoluminescence carried out to 17 pieces of the collection Rickards property of the Real Museum of Ontario like part of a first one work stage, for they were perforated it the urns with a drill of tungsten carbide extracting 50 milligrams approximately, of which 25 were used for thermoluminescence and the rest for analysis for X ray Emission Spectroscopy. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and for X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The test of authenticity for thermoluminescence beginning with the determination of the rate of annual dose starting from the determination of the concentration of the natural radioisotopes of uranium ( 238 U) and torio ( 232 Th) by means of an accountant of particles alpha, the potassium ( 40 K) by means of X-ray diffraction, later on the sample was treated chemically with

  4. An Evil Hitherto Unchecked: Eugenics and the 1917 Ontario Royal Commission on the Care and Control of the Mentally Defective and Feeble-Minded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, C Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In 1917, the Ontario government appointed the Royal Commission on the Care and Control of the Mentally Defective and Feeble-Minded, headed by Justice Frank Hodgins. Its final report made wide-ranging recommendations regarding the segregation of feeble-minded individuals, restrictions on marriage, the improvement of psychiatric facilities, and the reform of the court system, all matters of great concern to the eugenics movement. At the same time, however, it refrained from using explicitly eugenic vocabulary and ignored the question of sterilization. This article explores the role the commission played in the trajectory of eugenics in Ontario (including the province's failure to pass sterilization legislation) and considers why its recommendations were disregarded.

  5. An investigation of roof runoff during rain events at the Royal Military College of Canada and potential discharge to Lake Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, David G; Weir, Ron D; White, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    The Royal Military College of Canada, located on the north eastern shore of Lake Ontario, possesses an abundance of copper roofs and lacks surface water treatment prior to discharge into Lake Ontario. Rainwater, roof runoff and soil samples were collected and analyzed for copper and other parameters. Copper was consistently detected in runoff samples with average concentrations of 3200 +/- 2100 microg/L. Multivariable linear regression analysis for a dependant copper runoff concentration yielded an adjusted R2 value of 0.611, based on an independent variable model using minimum temperature, maximum temperature, total precipitation, and wind speed. Lake water samples taken in the vicinity of storm water outfalls draining areas with copper roofs ranged from 2.0 to 40 microg/L copper. Such data exceed the 2.0 microg/L Canadian Water Quality Guidelines for the Protection of Aquatic Life as outlined by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME). Analysis of raw, filtered and digested forms suggested that the majority of copper present in runoff and lake water samples was in a dissolved form. The majority of soils taken in this study displayed copper concentrations below the 63 microg/g CCME residential/parkland land use limits. These findings suggested that ion exchange processes between runoff water and soil do not occur to a sufficient extent to elevate copper levels in soil. It may therefore be concluded that the eventual fate of copper, which is not discharged via storm water outfalls, is lost to the water table and Lake Ontario through the sub-soil.

  6. The flora and fauna of a proposed wind turbine site near Royal Road, Prince Edward County, Ontario : preliminary screening of the natural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, M.; Leggett, A. [Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd., Markham, ON (Canada)

    2002-07-15

    Calgary based Vision Quest Windelectric has been given zoning approval to install a 22 MW windfarm in Ontario's Prince Edward County. Following a preliminary screening to determine the effect of the windfarm on the natural environment, the Royal Road Windfarm will be developed in stages with up to 32 turbines. Jacques Whitford Environment Ltd. conducted an environmental study which showed that an exploratory wind turbine in the area is not likely to cause major adverse impacts on local fauna and flora. The proposed location of the wind turbine is not in an important bird area (IBA). An IBA is defined as a site providing essential habitat for one of more species of breeding or non-breeding birds. In 1999, Vision Quest initiated a program to examine bird interactions with wind turbines in southern Alberta. It was shown that most species choose flight paths to avoid turbines. The Royal Road site hosts rare alvars which are naturally open landscapes found in shallow soils on flat limestones. The alvars are subject to seasonal drought and flooding and have specific types of vegetation and animals. Since the exploratory wind turbine will be placed outside the IBA area, its impact on birds will be minimized, and it will have minimal effect on migrant, breeding and wintering birds. It was recommended that monitoring take place at the site during the first year of operation. It is also presumed that the wind turbine will not have any impact on mammals, reptiles and amphibians, or insects. However, it was recommended that more information be gathered on bat movement in the area. If placed appropriately, the wind turbine is not expected to impact on rare plants. It was emphasized that in the past, Vision Quest Windelectric has conducted environmental screening activities, and has acted on recommendations to place wind turbines in locations where environmental impact will be minimized. 26 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs., 2 appendices.

  7. Authenticity and origin of prehispanic ceramic material, analysis of zapotecan urns of the Ontario Real Museum; Autenticidad y origen de material ceramico prehispanico, analisis de urnas zapotecas del Museo Real de Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez L, A.; Schaaf, P. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, Y.; Ortiz D, E.; Lazos, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones Antropologicas, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruvalcaba, J.L. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Sellen, A. [Dep. de Antropologia, Museo Real de Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The Zapotec culture flourished approximately in Oaxaca of the year 220 B.C. up to the 800 D.C., in their funeral acts the Zapotec often took to the tomb to their deads accompanied of rich offerings including a great variety of ceramic, one of these varieties of ceramics were those urns that are kind of an adorned vessels with a sphinx, that is to say, a cylinder that has incorporate a figure generally anthropomorphous, which represented ancestres or divinities, the size of these urns went from the 15 cm until but of a meter high. At the beginning of the XX century the urns got the attention of the collectors and a number important of replies (false) they were manufactured copying the original ones, in this time C. Rickards gathers one of those but important collections of urns zapotec, in 1919 the Real Museum of Ontario (ROM) acquired the collection Rickards, in the 70 s they were practiced test of authenticity for thermoluminescence indicating that 36 of these urns were false, comparing their iconography with the other urns of the collection suggests the possibility that at least 80 of these pieces are not you authenticate. In this work the results are presented by thermoluminescence carried out to 17 pieces of the collection Rickards property of the Real Museum of Ontario like part of a first one work stage, for they were perforated it the urns with a drill of tungsten carbide extracting 50 milligrams approximately, of which 25 were used for thermoluminescence and the rest for analysis for X ray Emission Spectroscopy. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and for X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The test of authenticity for thermoluminescence beginning with the determination of the rate of annual dose starting from the determination of the concentration of the natural radioisotopes of uranium ({sup 238} U) and torio ({sup 232} Th) by means of an accountant of particles alpha, the potassium ({sup 40} K) by means of X-ray diffraction, later on the sample was treated

  8. State Authority and the Public Sphere: Ideas on the Changing Role of the Museum as a Canadian Social Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ashley

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums are important public sites for the authentication and presentation of heritage in Western cultures. The authority of museums is derived from their long history as repositories of material culture and as agents of identity formation, nationalism, and most recently, social inclusion. But in a country such as Canada where global economics and popular culture combine with an unprecedented influx of immigrants, how society imagines itself and how the nation articulates its community and its heritage is changing radically. Issues of power, meaning, authenticity and citizenship have threatened the museum’s representational authority. How are Canadian museums responding to these changes, and is their authority now up for debate? Or is the need to assert authority a problem in itself and can museums evolve a new type of discourse about heritage? This paper investigates museum authority inherent in its simultaneous roles as voice of the state and as a public space for opinion and meaning making. It focuses attention on Canadian museums and government policies that have influenced their authority, in particular, theoretical implications of the current drive for ‘social cohesion’. An exhibit on the Underground Railroad and African-Canadian history at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto is examined to consider how museums as instruments of the state can be re-tuned as sites of public identity discourse and social inclusion.

  9. Il tempo come materiale da costruzione. Il museo delle collezioni reali sulla Cornisa di Madrid / Time as a Construction Material. The Museum of the Royal Collections on Madrid's Cornisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Tuñón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available L’autore stesso dell’opera racconta nell’articolo il lungo percorso temporale che hanno attraversato per giungere alla realizzazione del Museo delle Collezioni Reali, che si estende sul bordo occidentale della città antica monumentale. Da un lato la scelta materico costruttiva, la ripetizione dei portali in cemento bianco, così influenzata dal contesto e dalle sue complesse stratificazioni storiche, e dall’altro la scelta tipologica, strettamente condizionata dalle necessità espositive della contemporaneità, sono declinazioni diverse di un tempo riletto come materiale del progetto. / In this article, the selfsame creator of the work tells of the long timeframe necessary to create the Museum of the Royal Collections, which stretches along the western edge of the ancient monumental city. On the one hand, the choice of construction materials, the repetition of portals in white concrete, so influenced by the context and its complex historical stratifications, and on the other the choice of the type, strictly conditioned by contemporary exhibition needs, are different variations of Time reinterpreted as design material.

  10. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  11. Museum Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Virtual museums focus on a specific curriculum theme and showcase electronic museum-type collections such as artifacts, paintings, photographs, numerous databases, and Web links to resources around the world. Museums of all types include vital teaching tools that help students make discoveries and form connections with the past, present, and…

  12. Technology Museums in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exhibit review of some of the major technology museums in Denmark. First comes an introduction to the Danish museum ”landscape”. Second a total of six museums and their technology focused exhibits are presented. Among the museums are the Fisheries and Maritime Museum...... in Esbjerg, housing one of the most impressive and representative exhibitions on the technology behind the strong Danish maritime sector. Another museum being mentioned is the Energy Museum, which covers the background for some of the major breakthroughs performed in Denmark within this area; particularly...... within wind power technology. Finally special attention is devoted to the Danish Technological Museum. A museum which is the oldest and most elaborate of all the technology museums. The museum covers virtually every technological breakthrough with any relevance in a Danish section, with a special focus...

  13. Museums and Their Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Harold

    1985-01-01

    Historical background concerning the nature and function of museums is provided, and the aesthetic functions of museums are discussed. The first major aesthetic function of museums is to preserve the artistic heritage of mankind and to make it widely available. The second major function is patronage. (RM)

  14. Museums and Their Enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Francis

    1985-01-01

    Since the eighteenth century, both artists and art historians have received educational benefits from public art museums. The main function of public museums, however, has usually been the improvement or refinement of public taste. But in addition to education and pleasure, another museum objective is that of moral improvement. (RM)

  15. A royal visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    King Harald V and Queen Sonja of Norway made a trip to CERN on Tuesday 4 April, taking a tour of part of the LHC and greeting the Norwegian students and scientists at the Laboratory. Norway's King Harald V and Queen Sonja take a tour of the ATLAS detector with CERN Director-General Robert Aymar.King Harald V and Queen Sonja are greeted warmly by members of the Norwegian community at the CERN Globe. CERN Director-General Robert Aymar welcomed the royal party, which included the Norwegian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Jonas Gahr Støre, and provided an overview of CERN's history and current and future research. ATLAS deputy spokesperson Steinar Stapnes then quickly explained the concept and inner workings of the LHC, some LHC physics goals and ATLAS, which is one of the main experiments receiving Norwegian contributions. 'I don't think I've ever had so many distinguished students before,' Stapnes said jokingly to the crowd.The royal delegation was then escorted underground for a look at the LHC tunnel and the...

  16. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCredie, J.

    1984-01-01

    This report briefly describes Ontario Hydro's nuclear program, examining the design and construction status, and the future from Ontario Hydro's perspective. Ontario Hydro relies heavily on nuclear power. Nuclear fuel was responsible for approximately 34% of Ontario Hydro's energy production in 1983. The nuclear proportion was supplied by twelve operating units located: NPD, Douglas Point, Pickering A and B. It is expected that by approximately 1992, 65% of the total energy needs will be generated through nuclear power

  17. Environmental monitoring in four European museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Dario; Van Grieken, Rene; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Sturaro, Giovanni; Valentino, Antonio; Bernardi, Adriana; Blades, Nigel; Shooter, David; Gysels, Kristin; Deutsch, Felix; Wieser, Monika; Kim, Oliver; Ulrych, Ursula

    In a European multidisciplinary research project concerning environmental diagnostics, museums have been selected, having different climate and pollution conditions, i.e.: Correr Museum, Venice (Italy); Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (Austria); Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp (Belgium); Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, Norwich (UK). Some field tests investigated the microclimate, the gaseous and particulate air pollution and the biological contamination to suggest mitigative techniques that may reduce the potential for damage in the long run. Potential risk factors are generated by imbalance in temperature and humidity, generated by heating, air conditioning or ventilating system (HVAC), or the building structures, exchange of outside air, or large visitor numbers. HVAC may also enhance indoor gaseous pollution. Plants and carpets represent potential niches for bacterial colonisation. Pollutants and particles have been recognised having partly external and partly internal origin. Tourism has a direct negative impact, i.e. transport of external particles, release of heat, vapour and CO 2, as well as generation of turbulence, which increases the deposition rate of particulate matter. However, the main problem is that the microclimate has been planned for the well being of visitors during only the visiting time, disregarding the needs of conservation that requires a constant climate by day and by night. In some of these cases, better environmental niches have been obtained with the help of showcases. In other cases, showcases worsened the situation, especially when incandescent lamps were put inside.

  18. Robots and Cultural Heritage: New Museum Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Germak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new technologies to enhance the visiting museum experience is not a novelty. A large variety of interactive systems are nowadays available, including virtual tours, which makes cultural heritage accessible remotely. The theme of increase in accessibility and attractiveness has lately been faced with the employment of the service robotics, covering various types of applications. Regrettably, many of robotics solutions appear less successful in terms of utility and usability. On the basis of this awareness, a design for a new robotic solution for cultural heritage has been proposed. The project, developed at the royal residence of Racconigi Castle, consists of a telepresence robot designed as a tool to explore inaccessible areas of the heritage. The employed robot, called Virgil, was expressly designed for the project. The control of the robot is entrusted to the museum guides in order to enhance their work and enrich the cultural storytelling.

  19. A brief history of the conchological collections at the Zoological Museum of Amsterdam, with some reflections on 18th century schell cabinets and their proprietors, on the occasion of the centenary of the Royal Zoological Society “Natura Artis Magistra”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benthem Jutting, van W.S.S.

    1939-01-01

    At the time when the Royal Zoological Society Natura Artis Magistra known in Holland as “Artis” was founded in 1838 the ground for the study of malacology lay already well prepared. For ever since the days when the early Dutch seafarers explored the commercial routes to East and to West, all kinds

  20. Corporate Training in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  1. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  2. Ontario Hydro's DSP update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Ontario Hydro's Demand/Supply Plan (DSP), the 25 year plan which was submitted in December 1989, is currently being reviewed by the Environmental Assessment Board (EAB). Since 1989 there have been several changes which have led Ontario Hydro to update the original Demand/Supply Plan. This information sheet gives a quick overview of what has changed and how Ontario Hydro is adapting to that change

  3. The Organization of Museums: Practical Advice. Museums and Monuments, IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Philip R.; And Others

    This manual deals with the organization of museums. The manual includes 10 chapters written by different people involved in museum work in various parts of the world. Chapter I, The Museum and Its Functions, deals with such topics as definition, collecting, identifying, and recording. Chapter II considers the administration of museums. Chapter…

  4. UK Royal Navy WWII Logbooks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006, the UK and NOAA's Climate Database Modernization Program (CDMP) funded the imaging of approximately 8,000 Royal Navy logbooks in the UK National Archives...

  5. A comparative sociological study of peace museums and military museums

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Toshifumi

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares peace museums and military museums in Japan and foreign countries. It analyses the features, social functions of both peace and military museums, and considers the social influence on both museums. A public relations facility of the Self Defense Forces is regarded as a military museum in Japan, so the development and contents of the exhibition of such public relations facilities are analyzed. A half of them were established in a period between 1964 and 1969. Three new larg...

  6. Virtual Museums as Educational Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Museums as Educational Tool On this web site you will find a collection of resources on virtual museums. The web site is meant to be a knowledge base for people with interest in museums, virtuality and education, and how virtual museums may contribute to adult education and lifelong...

  7. Another New Museum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michels, Christoph; Beyes, Timon; Steyaert, Chris

    2014-01-01

    city is at work in the planning of a new art museum in a medium-sized Swiss city. The analysis shows how the entrepreneurial rationale is contested and re-appropriated through the use of classic and situational modes to organize this cultural institution. The ways of imagining the museum are described...... as the effects of these three modes of ordering – entrepreneurial, classic, and situational – as well as their hybridization. The authors conclude that by attending to the multiple layers of urban life, which unfold in and around museums, we can imagine other ‘new museums’ than those of the entrepreneurial city....

  8. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  9. Ontario electricity industry restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of Ontario's electricity industry restructuring was described as an effort to enhance Ontario's competitiveness. It is believed that restructuring can be accomplished without an increase in electricity rates. In a series of charts, the report provides the timeline of restructuring from the time of the Macdonald report in 1995 to the beginning of open competition in Ontario electricity markets. It oulines the principles underlying the financial restructuring and the financial results of restructuring, including the size of the stranded debt ($ 7.8 billion). It lists the changes that have occurred since October 1998, explains some key factors in valuing the successor companies and profiles the Ontario Electricity Financial Corporation. Restructuring of the industry is expected to have a neutral to positive impact on Ontario's fiscal position. The residual stranded debt of $7.8 billion will be retired through revenues generated by the electricity sector, without recourse to the Provincial Treasury. 9 figs

  10. Market surveillance in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, H.

    2002-01-01

    On May 1, 2002 both wholesale and retail electricity markets in Ontario were opened to competition. Wholesale electricity market sales of 150 TWh were valued at over $11 billion with 27,500 MW in service installed capacity and 4,000 to 6,000 MW import/export capability with strong interconnections to the Quebec, the Midwest and the Northeast. The key players in Ontario's electricity market are the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO), Ontario Power Generation, and Hydro One. The OEB regulatory framework includes licensing and front line, daily monitoring of whole sale market. Serious capacity problems in Ontario have manifested themselves in tight supply and demand situations and highly volatile prices. The paper included graphs of available reserves for 1996 to 2002, HOEP trends and frequency, HOEP comparison, and a sensitivity to demand forecast. 1 tab., 6 figs

  11. Ontario energy review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This publication provides a review of the developments in Ontario in relation to the national and international energy scene. Ontario is the largest energy consumer in Canada and is highly dependent on external energy sources. Several developments have significantly altered the Ontario energy scene. Oil and gas markets have become deregulated and market forces increasingly determine prices. A free trade agreement with the United States makes Ontario even more affected by international markets. Oil and gas prices have fallen from the high levels of the 1980s, but energy efficiency and conservation continue to be extremely important because they affect economic performance and the environment. In the next few years the greatest challenges will be to continue improving energy efficiency, to reduce the impact of energy on the environment, and to ensure the availability of sufficient energy supplies for future needs. This review contains statistics on energy in Ontario and explains them for the non-specialist. (7 tabs., figs.)

  12. Det medialiserede museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, digital technologies have gained a greater and more important role in communication and dissemination of knowledge by museums. This article argues that the digitization of museum communication can be viewed as a result of a mediatization process that is connected...... to a cultural-political and museological focus on digital dissemination, in which user experience, interactivity, and participation are central concepts. The article argues that the different forms of communication, representation, and reception offered by digital media, together with the interactive and social...... of museum visiting has been transformed and somewhat adapted to new media-created forms of communication and action. From a more general perspective, the article may be regarded as a contribution to a continuous discussion of the role museums must play in a mediatized society....

  13. Climate Museum and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  14. Teaching science in museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lynn Uyen

    Museums are free-choice, non-threatening, non-evaluative learning and teaching environments. They enable learners to revisit contents, authentic objects, and experiences at their own leisure as they continually build an understanding and appreciation of the concepts. Schools in America have used museums as resources to supplement their curriculum since the 19 th century. Field trip research is predominantly from the teachers' and students' perspectives, and draws attention to the importance for classroom teachers and students to prepare prior to field trips, have tasks, goals, and objectives during their time at the museum, and follow up afterwards. Meanwhile, museum educators' contributions to field trip experiences have been scantily addressed. These educators develop and implement programs intended to help students' explore science concepts and make sense of their experiences, and despite their limited time with students, studies show they can be memorable. First, field trips are a break in the usual routine, and thus have curiosity and attention attracting power. Second, classroom science teaching literature suggests teachers' teaching knowledge and goals can affect their behaviors, and in turn influence student learning. Third, classroom teachers are novices at planning and implementing field trip planners, and museum educators can share this responsibility. But little is reported on how the educators teach, what guides their instruction, how classroom teachers use these lessons, and what is gained from these lessons. This study investigates two of these inquiries. The following research questions guided this investigation. (1) How do educators teaching one-hour, one-time lessons in museums adapt their instruction to the students that they teach? (2) How do time limitations affect instruction? (3) How does perceived variability in entering student knowledge affect instruction? Four educators from two museums took part in this participant observation study to

  15. Bathymetry of Lake Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Ontario has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  16. The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education. The Benaki Museum, Athens, 17 October 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Christidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of 'The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education 'conference, third in a series of conferences organised by the Benaki Museum in partnership with the American Embassy and the British Council in Greece, was the use of technology and social media as means of transforming museum education and, sometimes, funding museum exhibitions and educational programmes. Among others, the conference aimed to discuss the use of digital applications such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Kickstarter by museums in order to attract a wider audience, interpret their collections and even fund their programmes.

  17. Museums USA: Art, History, Science, and Other Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC.

    The results and analysis of an earlier museum survey, presented in "Museum U.S.A.: Highlights" (ED 093 777), are given in this document. The purpose is to present a comprehensive picture of museums in the United States--their numbers and locations, types and functions, facilities and finances, personnel and trustees, and activities and attendance.…

  18. SEMIOTIC MODELS IN MUSEUM COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plokhotnyuk Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a way of formalizing the description of various types of relations between the elements of museum communication based on the semiotic approach and the concepts introduced by F. de Saussure, C.S. Pierce and C.W. Morris. Semiotic models can be used to explain the specifics of museum communication for museum studies and as a methodological basis for developing various versions of databases or other software for museum affairs.

  19. "I love Skagen Museum"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Ditte; Hviid Mortensen, Christian; Olesen, Anne Rørbæk

    2017-01-01

    this gap by investigating empirically how one type of institution, namely museums, and their Facebook followers, actually communicate. Our approach is innovative in combining analytical tools from speech act theory and Conversation Analysis (CA) to a corpus of activities from the Facebook pages of nine...... Danish museums of different types and sizes collected during eight consecutive weeks in 2013. This approach enables us to both investigate communicative actions as isolated speech acts and the micromechanics of the interaction that potentially arise from these actions. Our findings indicate that certain...

  20. Is Museum Education "Rocket Science"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragotto, Erin; Minerva, Christine; Nichols, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The field of museum education has advanced and adapted over the years to meet the changing needs of audiences as determined by new research, national policy, and international events. Educators from Chicago's Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum provide insight into a (somewhat) typical museum education department, especially geared for readers…

  1. How to Visit a Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebetez, Pierre

    The primary aim of this study is to encourage schools and museums to unite their efforts to further the use of the museum for teaching purposes and to promote the full development of creative faculties. The educational function of the museum is explored in consideration of the thirteen to eighteen year old age group. A recurring theme throughout…

  2. Myths, Mummies and Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Greek mythology, Egyptian mummies, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City are the focus of a one-semester course given at the Sea Girt (New Jersey) Elementary School. It is an interdisciplinary program wherein students (grade 8) study ancient civilizations and do projects related to their studies. (KC)

  3. Museums, Environments, Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and

  4. Cogeneration markets in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poredos, S.

    1993-01-01

    Cogeneration offers a key strategy which supports global competitiveness for Ontario businesses, encourages energy efficiency and environmental protection, and offers natural gas utilities and producers stable long-term incremental markets. By supporting cogeneration projects, electric utilities will benefit from increased flexibility. Natural gas is the fuel of choice for cogeneration, which can in most cases be easily integrated into existing operations. In Ontario, electric demand grew along with the gross domestic product until 1990, but has decreased with the recent economic recession. The provincial utility Ontario Hydro is resizing itself to stabilize total rate increases of 30% over the last three years and supporting reduction of its high debt load. Rate increases are supposed to be limited but this may be difficult to achieve without further cost-cutting measures. Cogeneration opportunities exist with many institutional and industrial customers who are trying to remain globally competitive by cutting operating costs. In general, cogeneration can save 20% or more of total annual energy costs. Due to excess capacity, Ontario Hydro is not willing to purchase electric power, thus only electric load displacement projects are valid at this time. This will reduce overall savings due to economies of scale. In southwestern Ontario, Union Gas Ltd. has been successful in developing 40 MW of electric displacement projects, providing a total load of 5 billion ft 3 of natural gas (50% of which is incremental). Over 3,000 MW of technical cogeneration potential is estimated to exist in the Union Gas franchise area

  5. IBA in the museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menu, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Research Laboratory of the Museums of France (LRMF) has been a part of the Louvre Museum since 1931. At the beginning, paintings were only examined by means of optical microscopy, under UV or IR light, or by X-ray radiography. With the development of archaeometry in the early 1960s, different spectrometric techniques have been applied to the analysis of works of art and archaeological objects: UV spectrometry, XRF, and even SEM coupled to an X-ray Si(Li) detector. Crystalline objects were investigated with XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR); organic matter with gas chromatography, FTIR, UV and visible spectrophotometry. Thus the principal aim of the LRMF is to characterize the materials and the techniques involved in the creation of art and archaeological objects, for example, methods of production, provenance studies, authentication, and conservation. (The problem of dating is for the time being only a minor subject of research at the LRMF). Because of the valuable nature of such objects, nondestructive methods of analysis have been developed, and consequently the results have to be more and more accurate to answer the questions put to us by the art historian. Moreover, the works of art must stay inside the security area of the museum. Therefore, it was decided in 1982 to install within the Louvre an accelerator dedicated solely to museum problems. The installation of AGLAE, begun in 1984, has now been completed. The accelerator system, a Pelletron 6SDH2 from NEC, was rendered operational in June 1988. A general consensus with regard to the applications of the ion beam techniques in art and archaeology was arrived at during the International Workshop held in Pont-a-Mousson, France in 1985, which brought together museum scientists as well as IBA physicists who had applied these techniques to archaeology, geology and metallurgy. (orig./WL)

  6. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  7. The museum as information space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2016-01-01

    space to being outside the museum in the online information space of the Internet. This has fundamental implications for the institutional role of museums, our understanding of metadata and the methods of documentation. The onsite museum institution will, eventually, not be able to function...... as an institutional entity on the Internet, for in this new information space, objects, collections and museums, all function as independent components in a vast universe of data, side by side at everyone’s disposal at anytime. Potentially, users can access cultural heritage anytime, anywhere and anyhow. © The Author......Although museums vary in nature and may have been founded for all sorts of reasons, central to all museum institutions are the collected objects. These objects are information carriers organized in a catalogue system. In this chapter, the museum will be conceived as an information space, consisting...

  8. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable...... to their eligibility for funding and it is indeed an economic rather than a cultural issue. Though, modern art museums’ sustainability relies not only in developing economic and environmental strategies but mostly in creating cultural policies that favor art museums in accomplishing same tasks but from different...... curatorial and managerial perspectives. A long-term sustainable museum model steps beyond Foucault’s notion that art museums are “heterotopy”, i.e. spaces that present art as an alternative phenomenon outside reality. On the contrary, a sustainable model for museums acts as “archètopy”, i.e. a space (tòpos...

  9. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  10. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  11. Ontario Hydro statistical yearbook 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Ontario Hydro was created in 1906 by a special statute of the Province of Ontario. It is a financially self-sustaining corporation without share capital. The yearbook is a compilation of financial data detailed by financial statements and sales and revenue figures for the year 1990. It is broken down by municipalities served in Ontario

  12. Ontario Hydro statistical yearbook 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Ontario Hydro was created in 1906 by a special statute of the Province of Ontario. It is a financially self-sustaining corporation without share capital. The yearbook is a compilation of financial data detailed by financial statements and sales and revenue figures for the year 1990. It is broken down by municipalities served in Ontario.

  13. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    In a time with a heightened focus on how museum architecture and exhibition design shapes the museum visit, the entrance space of museums, the museum lobby, is remarkably absent from the museum literature and research. Still, the museum lobby is the first encounter visitors have with the museum...... and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions...

  14. British Museum paintings

    OpenAIRE

    Edmonds, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Frances Edmonds is one of a group of artists selected for the show ‘Territories’ taking place at Galerie Windkracht 13 in Den Helder, Holland this July 2012. This exhibition is curated by Sharon Beavan and Gethin Evans. The artists represented work across the boundaries of two and three-dimensional and time based form. The brief – to interrogate and explore the notion of territories. Frances will be showing several paintings from the British Museum series, based on imagery collected ...

  15. Ontario's energy action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    In the fall of 2002, the government of Ontario announced an action plan designed to ensure stable electricity prices while additional electricity generating capacity is built. The action plan included a strategy for encouraging major private sector investments in wind, solar and other renewable energy sources. The strategies for new renewable energy projects include: property tax incentives, business income tax incentives, and sales tax rebates. Initiatives to increase supply include: Toronto's Portland 550 megawatt, natural gas-fired generating station, Niagara Falls' Beck Tunnel Project, and Windsor's 580 megawatt natural gas-fired generating station. The government is promoting energy conservation by reducing its electricity consumption by 10 per cent, and setting a target where 20 per cent of electricity consumed in the province must be from renewable energy sources. The use of interval meters by Ontario residents is being encouraged. A provincial sales tax rebate is being offered to customers buying select energy efficient appliances. In its commitment to environmental protection, the Ontario government is phasing out coal, offering rebates for solar energy systems, implementing measures to reduce acid rain, and investing $3.25 billion over ten years to renew and expand public transit. In Chatham, Ontario, a plant producing ethanol from corn was built, and others are planned for other parts of the province. Tax incentives are also offered for alternative fuel users. 1 ref., 1 tab

  16. RESOURCE CENTRE AT THE SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ciunl ictlt.P cnnipc;. Material from other museums. Worksheets, activity books, guides, pamp~lets and other educational material from museums 1n Southern. Africa and overseas are kept in the museum education section of the Resource Centre. General infonnation on museums and museum technology are also collected.

  17. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws inspiration from Edward Said's orientalism, and examines how the three National Museums of Singapore - the Singapore History Museum, the Singapore Art Museum and the Asian Civilizations Museums - are orientalized. The process is mediated through the museums' close links to touris...

  18. Frames of References – Art Museums as Unique Visual Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Hristova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The age old activity of collecting arts is not intrinsically dependent on the art museum as separate architectural type. How was the art museum as an independent structure conceptualized and why? What was the idea behind that concept? Was it created as a medium consciously and what kind of messages was it supposed to deliver? What kind of unique “textual” overlaps the various disciplines of archaeology, art history, politics, literature, science and architecture created in order to produce what we today recognize as art museum space? This study focuses on the crucial historical moments of the late 17th century when such questions were posed for the first time within the classical discourse of the French architectural theory which followed the consolidation of French absolutism and the foundation of the Royal academies of arts and sciences, until the mid 19th century when the answers to those questions were finally exemplified in built architecture. The study gives a comprehensive overview of the cultural context art museums as public institutions emerged from and became new spatial models for collective cultivation.

  19. Retailers test Ontario market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishewitsch, S.

    2000-01-01

    In anticipation of the full opening of the Ontario electricity market in November 2000, some of the newly-licensed electricity retailers are reported to be ready to begin testing the market early, hoping that all the uncertainties that still exist about pricing will be worked out in time. Among those jumping in now is Direct Energy Marketing, a retailer which claims 800,000 households in Ontario as electricity supply customers, as well as a wholesale gas marketing business. Direct Energy began retail electrical marketing on April 3, 2000, starting cautiously with small commercial operations as the initial target. Greengrid Electric, another of the new marketers, planned to begin marketing in mid-April, offering 100 per cent renewable-sourced electricity. Provident Energy Management, one of the new marketers whose licence is still pending, hopes to begin direct marketing as soon as its licence is confirmed. Another marketer ready to go as soon its license is issued is the former Sault Ste. Marie Hydro, now reorganized as PUC Energies Inc. PUC has the advantage of having a firm contract with a NUG (non-utility generator), Great Lakes Power, signed while PUC was still a municipal electric utility. As far as the other potential marketers are concerned, caution overrides opportunity for the present. Principal concerns are uncertainty over the retail settlement code, the electronic business data transfer system, transmission and distribution tariffs, whether existing non-utility generator contracts will allow for supply to another party, and over how quickly Ontario Power Generation Inc's (successor to Ontario Hydro) market power will be ratcheted down. Many of the potential marketers feel that despite the Ontario government's desire to see more competition, the power mitigation agreement, as it now reads, leaves little room for the small retailer to compete

  20. Retailers test Ontario market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishewitsch, S.

    2000-04-01

    In anticipation of the full opening of the Ontario electricity market in November 2000, some of the newly-licensed electricity retailers are reported to be ready to begin testing the market early, hoping that all the uncertainties that still exist about pricing will be worked out in time. Among those jumping in now is Direct Energy Marketing, a retailer which claims 800,000 households in Ontario as electricity supply customers, as well as a wholesale gas marketing business. Direct Energy began retail electrical marketing on April 3, 2000, starting cautiously with small commercial operations as the initial target. Greengrid Electric, another of the new marketers, planned to begin marketing in mid-April, offering 100 per cent renewable-sourced electricity. Provident Energy Management, one of the new marketers whose licence is still pending, hopes to begin direct marketing as soon as its licence is confirmed. Another marketer ready to go as soon its license is issued is the former Sault Ste. Marie Hydro, now reorganized as PUC Energies Inc. PUC has the advantage of having a firm contract with a NUG (non-utility generator), Great Lakes Power, signed while PUC was still a municipal electric utility. As far as the other potential marketers are concerned, caution overrides opportunity for the present. Principal concerns are uncertainty over the retail settlement code, the electronic business data transfer system, transmission and distribution tariffs, whether existing non-utility generator contracts will allow for supply to another party, and over how quickly Ontario Power Generation Inc's (successor to Ontario Hydro) market power will be ratcheted down. Many of the potential marketers feel that despite the Ontario government's desire to see more competition, the power mitigation agreement, as it now reads, leaves little room for the small retailer to compete.

  1. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Medić; Nataša Pavlović

    2014-01-01

    In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of t...

  2. Can museums survive the postmodern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Keene

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although archaeologists regard museums as vital repositories of important research materials, museum professionals take a broader view of their role in not only preserving natural and cultural heritage but also of how they could or should be presented, or interpreted, to the public. In this personal view, issues of what museums should be, or seek to be, in a postmodern world are explored.

  3. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural...

  4. NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale | Art Museum in Fort Lauderdale

    Science.gov (United States)

    NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Visit Admissions Hours & Admission Policies & Accessibility Airports Shop & Dine About the Café & Store Store Café Menu Art Exhibitions Currently on View Thursday 2-for-1 specials on wine and craft beer in the Museum Café, and hands-on art projects for all

  5. Museums as Spaces for Cultural Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattrup, Lise; Lejsgaard Christensen, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums.......Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums....

  6. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  7. From research institution to astronomical museum: a history of the Stockholm Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaskell, Steven Haywood

    2008-07-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RSAS) (or Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien [KvA] in Swedish) founded 1739, opened its first permanent building, an astronomical and meteorological observatory, on 20 September 1753. This was situated at Brunkebergsåsen (formerly Observatorie Lunden, or Observatory Hill), on a high terrace in a northern quarter of Stockholm. This historic building is still sometimes called Gamla Observatoriet (the Old Observatory) and now is formally the Observatory Museum. This paper reviews the history of the Observatory from its function as a scientific astronomical institution to its relatively-recent relegation to museum status.

  8. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  9. National Museum of Military History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nicolaides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractions such as military history museums which exhibit a wide range of important historical artefacts are fundamental sub-elements in any tourism systems, and yet their study suffers from lack of theoretical depth. Military history is an integral element of the history of any nation and countless varieties of tourists both local and international, visit military museums whenever the opportunity presents itself because museums are generally stimulating places of interest. This article focuses predominantly on international tourists visiting the Ditsong National Museum of Military History. In addition to the interest that such museums generate, they play a key role as the organizational foundation stones of modernity. It is via their many interesting exhibits that museums enlighten us about the past that intrinsically highlights its distance from the present era. Museums also selectively reconstitute aspects of history and in so doing alienate many artefacts from their original context and yet manage to impart deep understanding of events that shaped the modern world. Museums of all types thus impart knowledge and have a wide range of tales to tell concerning the many and diverse assortments of objects they hold. National pride is an obvious reason for having a military museum where the comprehensive display of military equipment is exceptionally unique while exhibition halls also offer an educational narrative of a nation’s history. What is also of interest to many visitors is the type of research that is carried out in a multiplicity of ways. The huge global growth in tourism in recent years has contributed to many museums radically altering their exhibits in both content and manner of exhibition. This is significant given the reciprocal impact that museums and tourism have on one another. The attractions in museums are regarded by many to be central to the tourism process and these are very often the main reason for many tourists visiting

  10. Cultural mediation in museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherghina Boda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available If we perceive the museum not only as a place of storing and conserving the patrimony, but also of transmitting it, then we can also see it as a mediator through which cultures can become collective patrimony. Tightly connected to patrimonial appropriation, mediation appears from this perspective as a process and not an end, as it manifests itself in animation, communication and making knowledge popular in relation to a precise patrimony. That is why we can see cultural mediation as a transmission, as a transformation, as an action or social project which aims at creating social bonds, the museum thus being not only a place of meeting for the public with the objects exposed, but also as a place of meeting between different cultures. Thus, cultural mediation presents itself as the most efficient means for access to culture of all categories of the public, situated as the crossroads of culture, continuous education and entertainment and is inscribed in the field of informal education.

  11. Ontario Hydro annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    Ontario Hydro is a corporation without share capital created by a special statute of the Province of Ontario in 1906. It now operates under the authority of the Power Corporation Act, R.S.O. 1980, Chapter 384, as amended, with broad powers to generate, supply and deliver electric power throughout the province. It is also authorized to produce and sell steam and hot water as primary products. The Corporation's prime objective is to supply the people of Ontario with electricity at the lowest feasible cost consistent with high safety and quality of service standards. Ontario Hydro's main activity is wholesaling electric power to municipal utilities in urban areas who, in turn, retail it to customers in their service areas. In 1985, approximately 3,166,000 customers were served by Ontario Hydro and the municipal utilities in the province. Ontario Hydro operates 81 hydraulic, fossil and nuclear generating stations and an extensive power grid across Ontario to meet the province's demands for electric energy. Interconnections with other systems place the Corporation in an extensive electrical grid that covers a large segment of the North American continent. Ontario Hydro is a financially self-sustaining corporation. The Province of Ontario guarantees bonds and notes issued to the public by the Corporation

  12. Factors Influencing Museum Sustainability and Indicators for Museum Sustainability Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Luiza Pop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to identify the factors upon which museum sustainability depends and the way in which this can be measured. Methodologically, we applied a qualitative research approach, using semi-structured interviews with experts from the Romanian museum sector, complemented by an in-depth study of the literature in this field. Results indicated that any objective measuring of sustainability must take into account the size of a museum’s collections and its organizational structure. It was also found that museum type can affect sustainability via its competitive advantage. However, the sustainability of a museum is not strictly determined by these factors, but also by the management and marketing strategies applied. Based on analysis of literature- and respondent-based factors influencing sustainability, this article proposes a set of 33 indicators that can be used by museums to measure their sustainability, as well as a model that enables evaluation of the sustainability levels of various museums comparatively, regardless of their type, size or importance (e.g., national, regional and local. The results obtained are useful both from a theoretical point of view, given that there are few writings on this topic, and from a practical point of view, as they provide a basis for a clear, objective model of museum sustainability measurement.

  13. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...... on physical objects, but is unique in focusing on fusing the projection and the object in an engaging approach to communicating information at a cultural heritage museum. The Mejlby stone installation is now a permanent installation at a cultural and historical museum, and, based on observation as well...

  14. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  15. Ontario demand response scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.H.

    2005-09-01

    Strategies for demand management in Ontario were examined via 2 scenarios for a commercial/institutional building with a normal summertime peak load of 300 kW between 14:00 and 18:00 during a period of high electricity demand and high electricity prices. The first scenario involved the deployment of a 150 kW on-site generator fuelled by either diesel or natural gas. The second scenario involved curtailing load by 60 kW during the same periods. Costs and benefits of both scenarios were evaluated for 3 groups: consumers, system operators and society. Benefits included electricity cost savings, deferred transmission capacity development, lower system prices for electricity, as well as environmental changes, economic development, and a greater sense of corporate social responsibility. It was noted that while significant benefits were observed for all 3 groups, they were not substantial enough to encourage action, as the savings arising from deferred generation capacity development do not accrue to individual players. The largest potential benefit was identified as lower prices, spread across all users of electricity in Ontario. It was recommended that representative bodies cooperate so that the system-wide benefits can be reaped. It was noted that if 10 municipal utilities were able to have 250 commercial or institutional customers engaged in distributed response, then a total peak demand reduction of 375 MW could be achieved, representing more than 25 per cent of Ontario's target for energy conservation. It was concluded that demand response often involves the investment of capital and new on-site procedures, which may affect reactions to various incentives. 78 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs

  16. Pedagogy and Practice in Museum Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    How best might museums harness the interactive capabilities of online environments to provide active teaching and learning experiences for diverse learners and communities? How can museums engage learners in ways that encourage them to visit the museum in person and/or further explore online resources? What should be the role of the museum in…

  17. Does Royal jelly affect tumor cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirzad Maryam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Royal jelly is a substance that appears to be effective on immune system and it appears to be effective on both prevention and growth of cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to carry out a research to investigate the effect of royal jelly on the growth of WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cell in syngenic Balb/c mice. Methods: In an experimental study, 28 male Balb/c mice were designated into four equal groups. The mice were subcutaneously injected with 5x105 WEHI-164 tumor cells on the day zero in the chest area of the animal. Animals in groups 1 to 4 were orally given 100, 200, 300 mg/kg of royal jelly or vehicle, respectively. In every individual mouse, the tumour size was measured every 2 days from day 5 (days 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney-U tests. Result: Our results showed that the mean size of tumor in case group was significantly smaller than the control group in days 11, 13, 15 and 17 (P<0.05. No metastasis was seen in test and control groups. Conclusion: With emphasize on antitumor effect of royal jelly, it seems that royal jelly has important role in control and regression of fibrosarcoma cells. Since royal jelly showed a delayed effect in control of fibrosarcoma, we suggest that royal jelly be used at least 10 days before tumor inoculation.

  18. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.; Woodhead, L.W.; Fanjoy, G.R.

    1984-03-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on the operating performance and costs, reliability of system components and nuclear safety considerations for the workers and the public

  19. Ontario Hydro CANDU operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, R.W.; Woodhead, L.W.; Horton, E.P.; Nichols, M.J.; Daly, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water (CANDU-PHW) type of nuclear-electric generating station has been developed jointly by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. This report highlights Ontario Hydro's operating experience using the CANDU-PHW system, with a focus on worker and public safety, operating performance and costs, and reliability of system components

  20. Ontario Hydro annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A financial report and statistics on Ontario energy demand are presented. Efforts to secure a reliable supply of coal and uranium are described. Ontario Hydro's expansion is now controlled by capital availability and not power demand, and this has affected 11 construction projects, including heavy water plants and nuclear generating stations. (E.C.B.)

  1. Emerging opportunities: the internet, marketing and museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richani Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous impact of applying new technologies is obvious when it comes to museums. Internet forms an integral part of museums everyday life and decision making. Websites, online communities, social media, and mobile applications comprise elements of the modern museum’s digital self, which complements the real museum of permanent and temporary exhibitions, storage rooms, visitors’ facilities, laboratories and, most important, museum objects. This environment inevitably affects museum marketing strategies and creates relevant opportunities.

  2. Ontario regulatory update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent events which when combined add up to a gradual but unmistakable movement of the energy sector in Ontario towards a fully competitive market. Some of the events precipitating this movement towards competition include the passing of the Energy Competition Act of 1998 (Bill 35), electricity deregulation, regulatory reform of the natural gas sector, and changes to the consumer protection legislation. The role of the Ontario Energy Board was also updated to bring it in line with the demands of the competitive marketplace. Among the new roles that the Board will assume are to facilitate competition, to maintain fair and reasonable rates, and to facilitate rational expansion. Another objective is to provide opportunities for including energy efficiency in government policies. Implications of the changes in the OEB's mandate for market participants were also discussed, including (1) regulated gas sales and delivery mechanisms, (2) transactional services, (3) contract restructuring, (4) consumer protection, (5) supervision of competitive market participants, and (6) market surveillance

  3. Ontario electricity bill review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, G.

    2003-01-01

    Findings of an independent review of charges to electricity bills and recommendations to assist in the development of a standard, province-wide residential electricity bill for Ontario are discussed. The review was requested by the province's Minister of Energy in an effort to dispel growing confusion about the variations in customer billing practices used by the province's 90+ local distribution companies. Key recommendations and findings were as follows: (1)Consumer bill formats issued by local distribution companies should be more consumer-friendly, adhere to minimum design standards, adapt uniform terminology and common line charges; (2) charges on customer bills should be grouped into four standard line items, with full details available to customers: the four line items should be a basic service charge, a charge for delivering electricity to the customer, a charge for the electricity itself, and a separate charge for retiring the outstanding debt of the former Ontario Hydro; (3) bills should take advantage of opportunities for promoting province-wide energy conservation, such as encouraging the long-term use of interval meters, presenting historical consumption data on residential bills on a period-to-period basis, and education and communications initiatives. Details of the recommendations, including the calculation of the fixed and variable components of usage charges, an explanation of the concept of electricity system loss adjustments, a method for phasing in the recommendations, and the anticipated benefits to consumers are provided

  4. MUSEUMS AS CULTURAL TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN UBUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Kade Subhiksu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a shift in the attributes of several museums in Ubud in order to attract more tourists to visit museums as cultural tourism attractions. Some museums have expanded their collections and add other attributes to complement their main collections, which as the potential to alter the idealism, functions, and roles of museums. Another challenge faced by museum operators is the development of other tourist attractions, such as the addition of tourism destination attributes in Ubud, which was initially known as tourism destinations that offered art and culture such as dance performances and museums, and now have expanded into yoga destination, adventure destination, and so on. Based on these factors, the problem statements in this research are formulated as follows: (1 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of operators? (2 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of visitors? (3 How is the relationship between museums and other tourism components when examined from the role of museums as cultural tourism attractions in Ubud area?. This research on museums was conducted in the Ubud area because Ubud has made museums as the cultural tourism attractions in the area, which include the Blanco Museum, Museum Puri Lukisan, Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA, the Rudana Museum, and Neka Art Museum. This research is based on the theories of museum management, marketing, and theories on cultural tourism attraction. The research involved the participation of 82 foreign visitors and 79 domestic visitors as respondents, in addition to five museum owners and two museum professionals as informants. The conclusion of this research are as follows: (1 From the perspective of museum operators, museums function as cultural tourism attractions, as sources of historical information, as the media for cultural preservation, and the actualization of the noble objective of the museum

  5. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  6. Clinical Telemedicine Utilization in Ontario over the Ontario Telemedicine Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Laurel D; Hogenbirk, John C; Warry, Wayne

    2016-06-01

    Northern Ontario is a region in Canada with approximately 775,000 people in communities scattered across 803,000 km(2). The Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) facilitates access to medical care in areas that are often underserved. We assessed how OTN utilization differed throughout the province. We used OTN medical service utilization data collected through the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and provided by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Using census subdivisions grouped by Northern and Southern Ontario as well as urban and rural areas, we calculated utilization rates per fiscal year and total from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. We also used billing codes to calculate utilization by therapeutic area of care. There were 652,337 OTN patient visits in Ontario from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. Median annual utilization rates per 1,000 people were higher in northern areas (rural, 52.0; urban, 32.1) than in southern areas (rural, 6.1; urban, 3.1). The majority of usage in Ontario was in mental health and addictions (61.8%). Utilization in other areas of care such as surgery, oncology, and internal medicine was highest in the rural north, whereas primary care use was highest in the urban south. Utilization was higher and therapeutic areas of care were more diverse in rural Northern Ontario than in other parts of the province. Utilization was also higher in urban Northern Ontario than in Southern Ontario. This suggests that telemedicine is being used to improve access to medical care services, especially in sparsely populated regions of the province.

  7. Maximum Intervention: Renewal of a Maori Waka by George Nuku and National Museums Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Stable

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available National Museums Scotland (NMS has in its collections a Mäori war canoe (A.UC.767 or 'Waka Taua 'from New Zealand'.' The 'Waka' had been held in the Museum stores for many years and due to its incompleteness and poor state of repair had not been on public display. It was proposed that the 'Waka' be restored with the intention of it being a focal point of a new permanent gallery in the Royal Museum in Edinburgh dedicated to South Pacific cultures and communities. The gallery was being developed as one part of a £44 million redevelopment of Royal Museum building. Due to its poor condition assistance was sought to help in the restoration, reconstruction and visual interpretation of the 'Waka'. NMS commissioned George Nuku, a Mäori carver, to remake  missing parts. Nuku uses a variety of mediums to carve including Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA. This made a clear distinction between new and original material that could be easily read by the public and reflected Nuku’s conceptual vision of creating physical “ghosts” influenced by the original carvings. Due to the composite construction and condition of the canoe the  project became more complex and  involved. This paper describes how the renewal was done and relationships that developed between the artist, curator and conservator.

  8. The National Cryptologic Museum Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    telegrams. Modern communications and encryption methods have made them obsolete and mainly of historical interest. The library is also home to a...interpretations. Cross References The National Cryptologic Museum Library Eugene Becker Last year, a widely published German technical author, Klaus...Schmeh, e-mailed the library of the National Cryptologic Museum from his home in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. He needed information for an article on the

  9. Key Royale bridge five year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This report describes the design, construction, instrumentation, and five-year evaluation of the Key Royale Bridge substructure. The primary focus was the evaluation of the implementation of highly reactive supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) ...

  10. Biological Activities of Royal Jelly - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crenguţa I. Pavel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly is a secretion product of the cephalic glands of nurse bees that has been used for centuries for itsextraordinary properties and health effects. This bibliographic study aims to review many of the scientific findingsand research that prove many of the remarkable various actions, effects and some uses of royal jelly. There are takeninto consideration numerous biological properties and effects of royal jelly: antioxidant, neurotrophic, hipoglicemiant, hipocholesterolemiant and hepatoprotective, hypotensive and blood pressure regulatory, antitumor, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-allergic, general tonic and antiaging. Royal jelly is one ofthe most studied bee products, but there still remains much to reveal about its biochemistry and biological activity infuture research for our health and life benefit.

  11. New Designs in the Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Özer Erbay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Architectural structure of the museum shall be designed in an accessible way regarding safety. In these designs special needs of visitors shall be taken into consideration according to types thereof.  Architectural structure, topography and natural presence of the museum increase visitor accessibility.  Exhibition venue, showcases and platforms, staircases providing access to upstairs, stairs, slippery rugged surfaces and entrance and exit to the exhibition venue from the same door form inaccessible areas.   It mustn't be forgotten that special disabled visitors can create an unsafe environment for others. Existing designs in museums shall be redesigned to be made accessible by disabled persons.  Museum venues must be redesigned ad made accessible by disabled persons. All characteristics of visitors in museums should be taken into consideration and universal living spaces addressing integral attitude should be designed.  Museum environment designs with regard to visitor safety must be steady.  Ramps shouldn't be unnecessarily steep and slippery.  Floor tiles, carpets or other ground coatings must be attached each other in a safe way. Gaps in ground coating shouldn't exceed the radius of13 mm. Grounds with different colors should be used for highlighting the ground odds and drawing visitors' attention. A distinctive environment requirement should be provided for visitors especially who use walking sticks, crutches and wheelchairs and warning signs shouldn't be forgotten.

  12. DIGITALISATION IN FINNISH MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laine-Zamojska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available W artykule omówiono generalny obraz digitalizacji w fińskim sektorze muzealnym. Przedstawiono szacunkowe liczby dotyczące digitalizacji dziedzictwa kulturowego na podstawie przeprowadzonych statystycznych badań, oraz zaprezentowano wiele projektów związanych z ucyfrowieniem fińskich muzeów.\tFiński sektor muzealny jest niezwykle zróżnicowany, podobnie jak stopień skatalogowania i zdigitalizowania kolekcji. W projektach rozwojowych aktywnie uczestniczy cały sektor muzealny. W ostatnich latach, dzięki wielu inicjatywom i badaniom udało się uzyskać szczegółowy obraz fińskiego sektora muzealnego. Największą inicjatywą jest projekt utworzenia Narodowej Biblioteki Cyfrowej, podlegający Ministerstwu Edukacji i Kultury. Celem projektu jest połączenie i udostępnienie zasobów z instytucji pamięci (bibliotek, archiwów i muzeów. Towarzyszą mu rozległe projekty digitalizacji.\tW związku z ogromną różnorodnością systemów do zarządzania kolekcją i praktykami katalogowymi w muzeach, w 2011 r. Państwowy Urząd Muzealny (Museovirasto / National Board of Antiquities, Fiński Związek Muzeów (Suomen museoliitto / Finnish Museums Association i Państwowa Galeria Sztuki (Valtion taidemuseo / Finnish National Gallery zainicjowały projekt Muzeum2015 (Museo2015 / Museum2015. Jego głównymi celami są: unifikacja procesów związanych z zarządzaniem kolekcją, stworzenie architektury korporacyjnej dla zarządzania muzealną kolekcją, stworzenie modelu zarządzania dla architektury korporacyjnej, oraz określenie i stworzenie warunków do zakupu i implementacji ogólnofińskiego systemu zarządzania kolekcją.\tRozwój cyfrowych narzędzi dla najmniejszych, prowadzonych przez wolontariuszy, muzeów lokalnych jest jednym z celów projektu badawczego ViMuseo, prowadzonego na Uniwersytecie w Jyväskylä (Jyväskylän yliopisto / University of Jyväskylä.

  13. Ontario Hydro's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, H.A.

    1982-06-01

    In 1981 Ontario Hydro generated over 100 billion KWh of electrical energy. Approximately one third of this was from nuclear units. There are ten CANDU units (5 250 MW) currently in operation, and another twelve (8 600 MW) are under construction. The presently committed nuclear expansion program is estimated to involve expenditures of 16 billion dollars over the next 10 years. About 10 000 people are employed in the nuclear design and construction program. All projects are generally on schedule, with the stations coming into service during the following time periods: Pickering B, 1983-85; Bruce B, 1984-87; Darlington, 1988-90. The status of each project is reviewed. Planning is underway for some retubing projects, as early as 1985 for Pickering A

  14. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  15. Young people’s own museum views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drotner, Kirsten; Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Mortenesen, Christian Hviid

    2017-01-01

    Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning-making practi......Taking a mixed-methods, visitor-focused approach to views on museums, this article examines what views young Danes aged 13–23 years (n = 2,350) hold on museums and how these views can be categorized and articulated. Arguing that studying views of museums as socially situated meaning...

  16. Ontario perspective on interregional markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, A.

    2003-01-01

    On May 1, 2002, wholesale and retail electricity markets in Ontario were opened to competition. The industry structure has been completely unbundled into separate entities for power generation, distribution and transmission. There are currently 20 generators, 90 distributors and 4 transmitters in Ontario. Trade with neighbouring jurisdictions has increased and now accounts for 10 to 15 per cent of demand on summer peak days. Import/export capability with the United States (northeast and midwest) and other Canadian provinces (Quebec and Manitoba) is 4,000 to 6,000 MW. Ontario has not had new generation or transmission capacity in several years and the heat waves of summer 2002 resulted in a heavier power demand than forecasted. The province had to rely heavily on power imports resulting in high and volatile electricity prices. In response to customer complaints, the Ontario government froze retail rates and in a recent policy directive announced a public ownership policy for transmission with further consultation on improving supply competition in Ontario. FERC order 888 and the increased role of independent power producers has improved trading opportunities between Canada and the United States. The presentation highlighted recent trade trends and outlined the specific impact of the Standard Market Design on Canadian markets. It was noted that Ontario should work on ensuring power reliability, transmission planning, inter-regional coordination, and joint investments with neighbouring jurisdictions. 9 figs

  17. Maude Abbott and the Origin and Mysterious Disappearance of the Canadian Medical War Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Alberti, Samuel J M M; Lyons, Christopher; Fraser, Richard S

    2018-05-07

    - In the early 1900s, it was common practice to retain, prepare, and display instructive pathologic specimens to teach pathology to medical trainees and practitioners; these collections were called medical museums. Maude Abbott established her reputation by developing expertise in all aspects of medical museum work. She was a founder of the International Association of Medical Museums (later renamed the International Academy of Pathology) and became an internationally renowned expert on congenital heart disease. Her involvement in the Canadian Medical War Museum (CMWM) is less well known. - To explore Abbott's role in the development of the CMWM during and after World War I and to trace its history. - Available primary and secondary historical sources were reviewed. - Instructive pathologic specimens derived from Canadian soldiers dying during World War I were shipped to the Royal College of Surgeons in London, which served as a clearinghouse for museum specimens from Dominion forces. The Canadian specimens were repatriated to Canada, prepared by Abbott, and displayed at several medical meetings. Abbott, because she was a woman, could not enlist and so she reported to a series of enlisted physicians with no expertise in museology. Plans for a permanent CMWM building in Ottawa eventually failed and Abbott maintained the collection at McGill (Montreal, Quebec, Canada) until her death in 1940. We trace the CMWM after her death. - Sadly, after Abbott had meticulously prepared these precious teaching specimens so that their previous owners' ultimate sacrifice would continue to help their military brethren, the relics were bureaucratically lost.

  18. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    aspects this value brings in management. However, art museums have left beside the analysis of sustainability in regards to their cultural policies and internal managerial organization. Though European museums have proposed sustainability strategies in the collection management (brand franchising...

  19. Presidential Libraries Museum Collection Management Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — MCMD serves as a descriptive catalog for the Presidential Libraries museum collections, and also supports a full range of museum collections management processes...

  20. Portable technologies at the museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2011-01-01

    A topic of interest in contemporary museum studies is how digital technologies contribute to museum visitor experiences. Building on insights from media and technology studies that new media should be understood for how they overlap with old media, the article reports an ethnographic study...... of the intersections between the exhibition at a modern museum of natural history and three portable technologies – one of which is digital. Mobile phone cameras, exercise pamphlets and dress-up costumes link visitors with an exhibition, but they simultaneously shape this relation in their own specific directions....... This is shown by drawing on the concept of mediation as it is developed by philosopher Michel Serres and philosopher of technology Bruno Latour. The article is based on the Ph.D. thesis entitled “Portable Objects at the Museum”, defended at Roskilde University on 22 September 2010....

  1. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  2. MUSEUMS, MARKETING, TOURISM AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT. THE BRITISH MUSEUM – A SUCCESSFUL MODEL FOR ROMANIAN MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan-Andrei CORBOS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of cultural influence upon the modern societycombined with the increasing role of tourism in the economic life of cities, ledto the development of the “emblem museums”. The “emblem museum”usually becomes a touristic attraction objective that must be visited bytourists from a city, and by taking the decision of prolonging their staying inthat city, the tourists will increase the amount of money they spend in thatlocation. The “emblem museums” represent a way to develop urban tourism,gain competitive advantage and attract new sources of income for the city`seconomy. A recent study showed that 3 out of 10 tourists visited London forits museums. One of them is the British Museum, which, in 2010 was on the2nd place in the top10 world`s most visited museums. This study aims topresent the British Museum from the mix marketing perspective, from thevisitor’s point of view, and to present some of the good practices this giant isusing to attract more visitors and to maintain its competitive advantage,practices which may be used by Romanian museums in order to increase thevisitors number and to obtain a better position in the economy life ofRomanian cities.

  3. Quality Parameters for Commercial Royal Jelly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ioana Muresan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly has become a high-value commercial product and the standardization of this product is required to guarantee its quality on the market. The objective of the research activity was to pursue the chemical composition of commercial samples of Royal Jelly in Romania in order to propose standardization for this product. The physico-chemical composition of commercial Royal Jelly samples was analysed by determining quality parameters like: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA and mineral elements. Carbohydrates analysis showed values between 3.4 % and 5.87 % for fructose, 4.12 % and 7.05 % for glucose, while for sucrose the values ranged between 0.95 % and 2.56 % (determined by HPLC-RI. The lipids content ranged between 1.85 % and 6.32 % (determined by the Soxhlet method. The protein values extended from 13.10 % (RJ2 to 17.04 % (RJ10 (the total protein content was determined by the Kjeldahl method. The values for the major fatty acid in Royal Jelly, 10-HDA, ranged between 1.35 % (RJ8 and 2.03 % (RJ10 (determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The concentration of minerals varied between 3188.70 mg/kg and 4023.39 mg/kg (the concentration of minerals was measured using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Potassium, followed by magnesium, sodium and calcium, occurs in the highest concentrations. The commercial Royal Jelly samples analysed presented variable physico-chemical characteristics that correspond with the values given by international quality standard proposals for Royal Jelly.

  4. Contemporary collaborations between museums and universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Line Vestergaard; Simonsen, Celia Ekelund

    2017-01-01

    Numerous new types of cross-institutional collaborations have been conducted recently at the intersection between museums and universities. Museums of all subject areas have collaborated with university researchers, just as scholars from a broad range of disciplines including communications, media...... studies, IT and performance design and tourism increasingly collaborate with museums. Based on qualitative evaluation material and autobiographical experiences, this article analyzes a large Danish research project in which collaborations between several museums and universities took place. We investigate...

  5. Ontario freight movement study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-11-01

    The freight (cargo) transportation sector accounts for a major use of fossil fuels and contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. A study was conducted to estimate and forecast emissions from transportation in Ontario, by mode, over the next 15 years, and to examine ways in which those emissions could be reduced. Published data of freight transportation industries was used to examine the fuel consumption characteristics of each mode, followed by a review of emission rates. It was determined that truck transportation accounts for most CO 2 emissions (about 70%). Rail follows with 21% and the marine and air modes contribute relatively small shares (6% and 2%). New intermodal technologies being introduced by the railways were discussed. They have been designed to make intermodal transport more accessible to a wider segment of the freight market. A recommendation was made which would require all truck shipments over 500 km, accounting for fully one half of truck tonne-km, to have their line-haul component diverted to this new more fuel-efficient mode (i.e., from truck to rail). refs., tabs., figs

  6. A Museum for Palle Nielsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The present project attempts to articulate architecturally the psychic content in the danish graphic artist and draftsman Palle Nielsen's oeuvre. The museum inscribes itself within the city of Copenhagen as a part of it, but simultaneously establishes a taut vacuum between the city's buildings......, thereby setting these existing, surrounding monumental buildings in relief. The interior of the museum manifests itself as a dramatic, labyrinthine course of empty spaces, within which the visitor is deprived of contact with the city, and potentially loses his or her sense of place....

  7. Physics in the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Daniel A.; Bailey, Brenae L.

    2003-02-01

    Parisian artist Paul Signac met the impressionists Claude Monet and Georges Seurat in 1884. Their influence spurred his work in pointillism (or, where the juxtaposition of small dots of color in conjunction with the limited resolving power of the human eye lead to the impression of color coalescence).1-4 To stimulate a cross-disciplinary appreciation of science and art, we used the University of Wyoming Art Museum's Signac painting "Barques de Pêche à Marseilles" (see Fig. 1) to explore diffraction theory and the anatomical limitations to our vision during an optics exercise done in the museum.

  8. Royal Dutch Petroleum Company annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Petroleum Company has no operations of its own and virtually the whole of its income derives from its 60% interest in the companies known collectively as the Royal Dutch/Shell Group of Companies; the other 40% is owned by the Shell Transport and Trading Company, p.l.c. The company is engaged in the oil, natural gas, chemicals, coal and metals businesses throughout the world. The annual report summarises the year's results and analyses earnings in each industry segment. Financial statements for the year ended 31 December 1992 are presented. The Group companies' estimated net quantities of crude oil, natural gas and coal are given

  9. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection on...

  10. Adult Education in Museums and Public Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Harry G.

    Both museums and public libraries are available sources of education for adults. Besides their traditional functions of collecting and preserving items from human artistic or scientific history, museums have taken on a more active role in educating the public, particularly adults. Some educational services provided by museums are dioramas, period…

  11. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  12. Concept "Medical Museum" as a Sociocultural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, Nina V.; Slyshkin, Gennady G.; Zheltukhina, Marina R.; Privalova, Irina V.; Kravchenko, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the concept "medical museum" as a sociocultural phenomenon. The register of medical museums in Russia makes the material of research. The complex methods of analysis of the concept "medical museum" are used. The philosophical, historical, cultural, structural, communicative and semantic analysis is carried…

  13. Museums in Cultural Tourism in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Krakowiak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the museums, their potential and their significance for cultural tourism in Poland. Its aims are achieved through a presentation of registered national museums, ‘monuments of history’, museum buildings and the cultural activities undertaken by these institutions

  14. Royal Ahold: A Failure Of Corporate Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Jong (Abe); D.V. DeJong; G.M.H. Mertens (Gerard); P.G.J. Roosenboom (Peter)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRoyal Ahold (Koninklijke Ahold NV) was one of the major success stories in the 1990s and is one of the major failures in corporate governance, suffering a complete meltdown in 2003. This clinical study analyzes Ahold’s growth strategy through acquisitions and isolates the cause of the

  15. Isaac Newton and the Royal Mint

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 12. Isaac Newton and the Royal Mint. Biman Nath. Article-in-a-Box Volume 11 Issue 12 December 2006 pp 6-7. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/12/0006-0007 ...

  16. Royal Naval nursing: 'testing but worth it'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2014-08-19

    Inga Kennedy is the most senior nurse in the Royal Navy. She enjoys the commitment and discipline required by a career in the armed forces and says the work offers great opportunities for nurses. Her career highlights have included checking that injured personnel in Afghanistan were receiving the best care possible.

  17. A historical vignette (20). A royal otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tainmont, J

    2010-01-01

    A royal otitis. The young king of France, Francis II, the eldest son of Henry II and Catherine de Medici, died in Orleans from the effects of the complications of a chronic otitis on 6 December 1560. Based on texts of the time, the paper discusses the nature of the illness, the treatment, and the medical and political entourage of the king.

  18. Sociomateriality at the Royal Court of IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kautz, Karlheinz; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2013-01-01

    understanding of the notion of sociomateriality and its use in the IS discipline. We invite the reader to attend a prolonged monologue – characterized by honesty, frank observations and wit – at the royal court of IS. The monologue is delivered by the court jester and directed to the two sovereigns who, based...

  19. The Rose Art Museum Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    On January 26, 2009, the Brandeis University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to close the Rose Art Museum (Waltham, Massachusetts). The proceeds from the subsequent auction were to be reinvested in the university to ensure its long-term financial health. The reaction to the decision by campus constituencies provides a case study to show the…

  20. Air Pollution in Museum Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the main air pollutants relevant for preservation of cultural heritage objects. Air pollutants may originate from outdoor or indoor sources. Indoor sources include the emission of corrosive vapors from construction materials used for museum display settings. Air pollution may...

  1. A Day at the Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Field trips are not just for the school year. End the year right by encouraging parents and caregivers to continue working children's brains throughout the summer months. For example, the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) recommends taking children of all ages--preschoolers, children, tweens and teens--to museums. Whether it is a two-hour…

  2. Museums? Evidence from two Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah Kasim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides evidence on Young Adults’ motivations for visiting and not visiting museums. Using purposive sampling, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to respondents in Kedah, Malaysia and Eskisehir, Turkey. Both Kedah and Eskisehir share one similarity – they both have many museums. The findings revealed that in both study contexts, young people tended to visit museums for practical reasons such as to help them prepare homework or a project. They also visit for intrinsic reasons such as to satisfy their curiosity. Both samples also illustrate Davies (2001 contention that awareness is an important precursor to potential visits. On the other hand, both samples are different in reasons for not visiting. While young people in Eskisehir cite emotional reasons for deciding not to visit, young people in Kedah offered more practical ones such as lack of time and interest, or more interested in other activities. The study findings are useful for understanding reasons behind the generally low museum visits among youth. Several managerial implications of the study were also proposed.

  3. An Experiment in Museum Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Marguerite

    Various lesson plans for museum instruction were tested on fifth grade children of fair and high intelligence in an attempt to improve upon the "accepted method" of teaching, which was thought to be better suited to the child of low intelligence than to his abler classmates. The lesson plans tested were: (1) the accepted method…

  4. The Materiality of Museum Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter

    on the agency of objects that assert that ‘art objects' (in a wide definition of the concept) are not simply materialisation of culture or identity, but deliberate attempts to change the social world. Furthermore, empirical examples of community ownership, and reinterpretation of museum collections may cause...

  5. Queensland Museum Online Learning Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    This article evaluates three online educational resources on the Queensland Museum website in terms of their use of ICTs in science education; how they relate to the Queensland Middle School Science Curriculum and the Senior Biology, Marine Studies, Science 21 syllabuses; their visual appeal and level of student engagement; the appropriateness of…

  6. A Day at the Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, Joy Alter

    2009-01-01

    The school field trip, once a supporting player in a well-rounded education, is slowly becoming endangered. Widespread budget cuts have made happily anticipated class trips to museums, zoos, and other cultural destinations increasingly scarce. A librarian may be able to rescue the field trip from extinction by transforming the school building into…

  7. ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECTS OF FRESH AND PRESERVED ROYAL JELLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinka Maksimović

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial effects of the fresh royal jelly, royal jelly stored at 4 °C and -40 °C for a period of 12 months against reference and isolated bacterial strains from the different clinical samples, were tested and compared by the diffusion test. Royal jelly shows antibacterial effects against both tested gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Fresh royal jelly has the most effective antibacterial activity. Storage temperature at -40 oC slightly affects antibacterial activity of royal jelly, while storage temperature at 4 oC decreases its antibacterial activity.Key words: royal jelly, antibacterial effects, storage temperature, storage duration

  8. Analisa Minat Wisata Museum Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Solihat

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum is a collection of historical objects as evidence that should be known by the public, especially the new generation as a study of the history. In Bandung there are a number of museums including the Geology Museum, Asian-African Museum, Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Museum, Post Museum, Sri Baduga Museum, and Barli Museum. All six of the museum managed by the government and private parties. Until now the interest of tourists who come to the city of Bandung is just shopping, dining and tours of the city, it is not significant to the interests wisatawa education at the museum in the city of Bandung. Since 2014 Bandung many improvements done in various places, such as parks, Square Bandung, street like Braga as one of the attractions of the past, Dago, including the Asian-African region serve as a place Asian-African Conference ke- 50, it is one of the magnets increase the tourists to visit the city of Bandung. Increasing the tourists should have a great potential for the government of Bandung in increasing interest in the visit to the museum as a means of travel and history education. The purpose of this study was to identify how big tourist interest in visiting Bandung museums. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative method, while respondents in this study is that Bandung tourists, which is in the area of shopping area, culinary tours, and city tours. The results showed that the interest  Bandung tourists is very low in visiting the museum in the Bandung city.  Keyword : Tourism, Consumer Interest, Museum Tours

  9. Ontario Hydro looks at security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.J.; Kee, B.

    1995-01-01

    Ontario Hydro operates 20 CANDU reactors on three different sites. Since 1984, a review of security arrangements on all the sites has taken place on a five-yearly basis. The review process for 1995 is outlined. The three objectives were as follows: to assess current security threats and risks to the stations; to assess the adequacy of the existing programme to protect against current threats; by comparing the security programme against those of comparable entities to establish benchmarks for good practice as a basis for improvements at Ontario Hydro. Valuable insights gained through the review are listed. These could be useful to other utilities. (UK)

  10. Transmission system planning in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrie, D; Macedo, F X; Mcconnach, J S [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, new and modified approaches to planning the large transmission system that serves the province of Ontario, Canada, have been necessary to accommodate the rapidly changing planning environment including slower uncertain growth, ageing of facilities, integration of demand side management and non utility generation options, increased competitiveness, increased financial stresses and affordable constraints. This paper describes some of the new and modified approaches and tools that have been adopted or are being developed by Ontario Hydro to cope with this changing environment. (author) 9 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Inca Royal Estates in the Sacred Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim Malville, J.

    The royal estates lying between Cusco and Machu Picchu illustrate the remarkable variety by which the sun was honored and worshipped in the Inca Empire. The terraced basins of Moray combine the sun at both solstices and, perhaps, the zenith sun, with flowing water and offerings to Pachamama. The complex astronomy at Urubamba involves the palace of Quespiwanka, horizon pillars, solstices, and mountain worship. Ollantaytambo contains horizontal shadow-casting gnomons with a major water shrine.

  12. Creating the Royal Society's Sylvester Medal

    OpenAIRE

    Cantor, G.

    2004-01-01

    Following the death of James Joseph Sylvester in 1897, contributions were collected in order to mark his life and work by a suitable memorial. This initiative resulted in the Sylvester Medal, which is awarded triennially by the Royal Society for the encouragement of research into pure mathematics. Ironically the main advocate for initiating this medal was not a fellow mathematician but the chemist and naturalist Raphael Meldola. Religion, not mathematics, provided the link between Meldola and...

  13. Furtive Museums and Digital Reciprocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Fernández Moreno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of museums has gone through many stages where, depending on the time, priority is given to education, collection, curation, conservation or leisure. Museums have played an essential role for several centuries, but it was in the middle decades of the 20th Century when they were developed as a new type of institution that belongs to their community. With the arrival of Information and Communication Technology (hereafter ICT, they will continue to evolve and adapt to their social and cultural context. The idea of common heritage of humankind begins to mature at a time when privatization is imposed in all areas. In this context, the commons civic potential makes it an ideal tool for revitalizing the only institution capable of providing theories for understanding human beings as social beings through their material and immaterial content.

  14. The Virtual Museum for Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Meteorites play a fundamental role in education and outreach, as these samples of extraterrestrial materials are very valuable tools to promote the public's interest in Astronomy and Planetary Sciences. Thus, for instance, meteorite exhibitions reveal the interest and fascination of students, educators and even researchers for these peculiar rocks and how these can provide information to explain many fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of our Solar System. However, despite the efforts of private collectors, museums and other institutions to organize meteorite exhibitions, the reach of these is usually limited. But this issue can be addressed thanks to new technologies related to the Internet. In fact we can take advantage of HTML and related technologies to overcome local boundaries and open the possibility of offering these exhibitions for a global audience. With this aim a Virtual Museum for Meteorites has been created and a description of this web-based tool is given here.

  15. Ontario Hydro annual report 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro`s annual report of the financial position and activities for the year 1986 consists of their financial highlights; corporate profile; customer service and satisfaction; message from Chairman; message from President; 1986 in review; financial section; management report; five-year summary of financial statistics; and comparative statistics.

  16. Ontario Hydro annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Ontario Hydro's annual report of the financial position and activities for the year 1986 consists of their financial highlights; corporate profile; customer service and satisfaction; message from Chairman; message from President; 1986 in review; financial section; management report; five-year summary of financial statistics; and comparative statistics

  17. [Ontario Hydro]. Corporate performance report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes Ontario Hydro's corporate performance for the year, with actual results being compared against planned values. Also includes additional indicators that illustrate noteworthy trends in corporate performance. Corporate results are reported under the new organizational structure implemented in 1993, beginning with overall results in such areas as customer service, environmental stewardship, human resources, and finance. This is followed by reports from the Generation Business Group, Customer Services Group, Corporate Business Group, General Counsel and Secretary, Ontario Hydro Audit, Strategic Planning, Environment and Communication Group, and Ontario Hydro enterprises (Ontario Hydro Technologies, Ontario Hydro International). The appendix includes summary financial statements

  18. Ontario Energy Corporation annual report 1981. [Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Corporation's mission of providing leadership and investment capital for selected energy ventures brought its total participation in projects from $16.4 million to $669 million, and its total assets increased from $44.4 million to $693 million during the year. The annual report review major operations with Ontario Energy Resources Ltd., Onexco Ltd., Ontario Alternate Energy Ltd., Ontario Power Share Ltd., and Ontario Energy in Transportation Ltd. The financial report includes a balance sheet, income and retained earnings statement, and a summary of financial changes during the reporting period. 1 figure, 4 tables. (DCK)

  19. Links between Libraries and Museums: a Case Study of Library-Museum Collaboration at the Hong Kong Maritime Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Lo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Established in 2005, the Hong Kong Maritime Museum (HKMM is a relatively new private museum that aims to collect all forms of materials related to the development of boats, ships, maritime exploration and trade, and naval warfare on the South China coast, as well as its adjacent seas.  The Museum not only serves as a unique platform for teaching and learning of the local heritage in Hong Kong, it also contributes greatly to the promotion of community engagement and social connections.  The HKMM is also equipped with its own museum library, and it is called the CSSC (China State Shipbuilding Corporation Maritime Heritage Resource Centre.  In addition to supporting various research activities carried out by the Museum, this Resource Centre also serves as a central, and yet comprehensive repository for publications, and other archival documents on maritime heritage and history related to Southeastern China.  This paper aims to compare the distinctive operational practices, and user needs between museums and libraries.  It also examines the benefits and challenges of museum-library collaborations in the new knowledge-driven society.  This paper features an interview with Kitty But (Librarian, CSSC Maritime Heritage Resource Centre, The Hong Kong Maritime Museum and Robert Trio (Project Officer for Technology, The Hong Kong Maritime Museum, and in which they discussed their professional experiences in the fields of audience education; the implementation of different new technologies associated with the museum and library services; and various collaborative initiatives carried out between the Museum and the Resource Centre.  Upcoming challenges and opportunities faced by both the Museum and Resource Centre are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Museum professionals meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, CERN organised a day of meetings attended by professionals from French and Swiss science museums. The poster for the Einstein exhibition that will open in Bern on 16 June 2005. Around thirty professionals from science museums, as well as representatives of France's Office de Coopération et d'Information Muséographiques (OCIM) and the Suisse Romande Réseau Science et Cité, congregated at CERN on 10th February with the purpose, among other things, of exchanging ideas and information on proposed exhibitions for the World Year of Physics. "We thought that it would be a good idea to start the World Year of Physics with a meeting at CERN that could provide inspiration for future exhibitions", explains Emma Sanders, Head of the Visits Service and Microcosm. Many scientific museums are trying to improve the way they cover contemporary science, and CERN is an ideal place to observe science in the making. Other goals of the meeting were to strengthen links between French and...

  1. Archaeology, museums and virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Pujol

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the idea that the virtual archaeological reconstructions seen in museums cannot be considered Virtual Reality (VR as they are based on an artistic conception of the discipline. The cause is to be found in the origins of Archaeology, which began in the 18th century and was closely linked to the History of Art. In the era of New Technologies, this concept has become both the cause and the consequence: determining the characteristics of VR from within the discipline, whilst simultaneously reinforcing the virtual reconstructions.To assess the relationship between VR and Archaeology, we must first establish a definition of Virtual Reality. Subsequently, we can take a brief look at the history so as to be able to understand the evolution of Archaeology and museums. This leads us to the analysis of some examples of VR in museums, from which we can gain conclusions on the current use of VR. Finally, we look at the possibilities for VR in terms of publicising Archaeology.

  2. Engaging Experiences in Interactive Museum Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Langballe, Line; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    and history museums. There is considerable potential in the development of experiences and in the communication of information customized to visitors in the museum apart from personally held information devices. The paper will present background research for developing solutions to a new media museum......The aim of the present paper is to outline possibilities for the development of combined IT and architectural concepts supported by joint engaging experiences for visitors to the room of the museum of the future. Focus is upon a joint experience, as many existing IT-systems designed for museums...... primarily appeal to a strong individualised experience where the visitor views a PDA or similar, rather than experience the atmosphere and interaction of the room. In this context, there are several examples from practice and in the research literature of IT-systems for science centres, art museums...

  3. The Bay of Pigs: Revisiting Two Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Playa Giron (the Bay of Pigs in the region of Cienega De Zapata, Cuba, celebrates the repulse of Brigade 2506 as the first reverse of US imperialism on the American continents. The equivalent Brigade 2506 Museum in Miami, dedicated to and maintained by the members of Brigade 2506, celebrates defeat at the Bay of Pigs as moral victory for the Cuban exiles. The forces were indeed implacable foes. Yet between the museums can be detected some curious similarities. Both present the common theme of the confrontation between forces of good and evil. Both celebrate the philosophy that dying for one’s country is the greatest good a citizen may achieve. Both museums fly the common Cuban flag. Both museums identify a common enemy: the United States of America. This article, by comparing the displays in the two museums, analyses some cultural elements of what, despite decades of separation, in some ways remains a common Cuban culture.

  4. Ontario electricity rates and industrial competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Industrial electricity prices in Ontario rose significantly after the opening of the competitive Ontario electricity market in 2002, thereby widening the gap between industrial electricity prices in Ontario and those in other Canadian provinces. Navigant Consulting Ltd. conducted this study at the request of the Association of Major Power Consumers in Ontario (AMPCO) to research and compare current and historical electricity prices in Ontario and other jurisdictions in North America. The study provided an independent analysis of how industrial electricity prices in Ontario compare to those in other jurisdiction in which AMPCO members operate. It also formed the basis for comparing the impacts of electricity policy on the economic competitiveness of major power consumers in Ontario. The relative electricity intensity in the United States, Ontario and other Canadian provinces was reviewed for specific industries, including forest products, steel manufacturing, petroleum refining, chemical manufacturing and cement manufacturing. Publicly available aggregate data from Statistics Canada and the United States Bureau of the Census was then used to compare average electricity prices for industrial customers in Ontario. The data confirmed that Ontario has experienced a decline in its competitive price advantage in industrial electricity. Delivered industrial electricity prices in Ontario have increased by more than 60 per cent since 2001. Industrial electricity prices in Ontario rose above those in Quebec, Manitoba, British Columbia and New Brunswick. In addition, industrial electricity prices in Ontario rose above those in competing states such as Ohio and Illinois, in part due to the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar. It was concluded that the price increase may lead to a greater decline in economic output in Ontario compared to competing jurisdictions. 2 tabs., 14 figs., 1 appendix

  5. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Rob

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American) knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and...

  6. The Women’s Museum in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Ipsen, Merete

    2010-01-01

    The Women’s Museum in Denmark isa nationally accredited museum which explores women’s cultural history by linking the historical to the contemporary. The museum started as a grass root movement in the 1980s. Today the museum welcomes you to 1200 square meters of exhibitions. The exhibitions comprise a general history about women’s lives from prehistoric to present time where women are subject in the history, and a general history about the change in childhood with focus on gender. Add to this...

  7. Museums and the Representation of War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Winter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Museums are the cathedrals of the twenty-first century, in that they have filled the void left by the conventional churches as a site in which mixed populations of different faiths or no faith at all, of different origins and beliefs, confront and meditate on sacred themes – sacrifice, death, mourning, evil, brotherhood, dignity, transcendence.1 War not only belongs in museums; war dominates museum space in much of the public representation of history and will continue to do so. That being so, it is the task of war museums to persuade visitors to pose the question: how can war be represented? While there is no adequate answer to this question, museum professionals must try to answer it anyway with a large dose of humility. By avoiding the didactic mode, that is, that they know the answer and will present it to the visitors, they can perform a major public service. By admitting the magnitude of the problems inherent in trying to represent war, and through it, trying to represent the pain of others, museum directors and designers fulfil a critical social task. Knowing about war is the business of an informed citizenship, and museums are those sites where moral questions are posed, questions inevitably raised about war, questions about sacrifice, suffering, brotherhood, courage, love, recovery, transcendence. Museums enable visitors to pose these enduring questions, by converting war time into museum space.

  8. A rationale for a museum of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Yousefi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The museum of health is a place that presents health science and human body and any other subjects that can affect human health. In this museum visitors can learn the mechanisms and functions of human body and learn how to protect and take care of their bodies. They can also learn several diseases and their consequences on human body and how to fight against them. This museum is a big step for improvement of general society health level by increasing society’s health knowledge. In this article structure, departments and also benefits of the health museum are evaluated.

  9. Mid-Victorian science museums and exhibitions: 'the industrial amusement and instruction of the people'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    The Royal Polytechnic Institution, Wyld's Globe and the Royal Panopticon were part of a family of institutions that existed in the post-Great Exhibition era that shared a common approach to popularizing science based on the blending of education and entertainment. Studying them helps us to understand the Victorian fascination with science, especially in the third quarter of the century. It draws our attention to the important role of popularizers of science who worked in these museums and exhibitions. Once their role is added to our account of the cult of science, a very different picture emerges that forces us to reconsider the standard story of the dominance of the scientific scene in the second half of the century by figures such as Darwin, Huxley and Tyndall. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Royal Jelly - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Ioana Bărnuţiu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the literature data regarding the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of RoyalJelly. Royal Jelly is a secretion from the hypofaringeal glands of worker bees which serves as a food for queen beeand to the growing up larvae. Having biological properties already proven, Royal Jelly has considerable commercialappeal and is today used in many sectors (pharmaceutical, food industries and cosmetic products. Thephysicochemical composition of pure royal jelly are analyzed by determining moisture, ash, lipids, proteins,vitamins,aminoacids, carbohydrates, 10-HDA; RJ is the key substance in the antimicrobial function of the system Apismellifera. The intact Royal Jelly exhibited the highest antibacterial activity.

  11. Rare royal families in honeybees, Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Robin F. A.; Lattorff, H. Michael G.; Neumann, Peter; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Radloff, Sarah E.; Hepburn, H. Randall

    2005-10-01

    The queen is the dominant female in the honeybee colony, Apis mellifera, and controls reproduction. Queen larvae are selected by the workers and are fed a special diet (royal jelly), which determines caste. Because queens mate with many males a large number of subfamilies coexist in the colony. As a consequence, there is a considerable potential for conflict among the subfamilies over queen rearing. Here we show that honeybee queens are not reared at random but are preferentially reared from rare “royal” subfamilies, which have extremely low frequencies in the colony's worker force but a high frequency in the queens reared.

  12. The nuclear engineering programmes at the Royal Military College of Canada. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-05-01

    The last years have been eventful for the staff and students in the nuclear engineering programmes at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) in Kingston, Ontario. Among the several changes is the accessibility of the graduate programmes to civilian (Canadian citizens) students, a fact that is little known outside RMC since, in the past, these graduate programmes were intended only for military personnel. Another major event is the accreditation of the graduate programmes offered by the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering(chemical, nuclear and environmental science and engineering) by the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies. The teaching and research staff share the following research areas: radiochemistry and neutron activation analysis, radiation effects on materials, radiation processing of polymers, neutron radiography, nuclear reactor simulation, analysis and design, CANDU fuel bundle optimal design, nuclear fuel cycles and management, nuclear fuel engineering and behaviour, including fission product release modelling, artificial intelligence applications to nuclear systems, nuclear accident response, nuclear radiation detection and measurement, health physics, dosimetry and radiation protection and nuclear reactor control.

  13. The nuclear engineering programmes at the Royal Military College of Canada. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    The last years have been eventful for the staff and students in the nuclear engineering programmes at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) in Kingston, Ontario. Among the several changes is the accessibility of the graduate programmes to civilian (Canadian citizens) students, a fact that is little known outside RMC since, in the past, these graduate programmes were intended only for military personnel. Another major event is the accreditation of the graduate programmes offered by the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering(chemical, nuclear and environmental science and engineering) by the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies. The teaching and research staff share the following research areas: radiochemistry and neutron activation analysis, radiation effects on materials, radiation processing of polymers, neutron radiography, nuclear reactor simulation, analysis and design, CANDU fuel bundle optimal design, nuclear fuel cycles and management, nuclear fuel engineering and behaviour, including fission product release modelling, artificial intelligence applications to nuclear systems, nuclear accident response, nuclear radiation detection and measurement, health physics, dosimetry and radiation protection and nuclear reactor control

  14. Ontario Hydro Research Division, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Research Division of Ontario Hydro provides technical and scientific support for the engineering and operation of a power system that includes hydraulic, fossil-fired, and nuclear generation. It also relates to the transmission and distribution of electricity and to the need to help customers use electricity with safety and economy. Among the examples of projects given are qualification of CANDU heat transport system components, pressure tube replacement, steam generator integrity, testing for earthquake resistance, and radioactive waste disposal

  15. Transforming Ontario's Power Generation Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, J.; Epp, J.; Godsoe, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    The OPG Review Committee was formed by the Ontario Ministry of Energy to provide recommendations and advice on the future role of Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPG) in the electricity sector. This report describes the future structure of OPG with reference to the appropriate corporate governance and senior management structure. It also discusses the potential refurbishing of the Pickering A nuclear generating Units 1, 2 and 3. The electricity system in Ontario is becoming increasingly fragile. The province relies heavily on electricity imports and the transmission system is being pushed to near capacity. Three nuclear generating units are out of service. The problems can be attributed to the fact that the electricity sector has been subjected to unpredictable policy changes for more than a decade, and that the largest electricity generator (OPG) has not been well governed. OPG has had frequent senior management change, accountability has been weak, and cost overruns have delayed the return to service of the Pickering nuclear power Unit 4. It was noted that the generating assets owned and operated by OPG are capable of providing more than 70 per cent of Ontario's electricity supply. Decisive action is needed now to avoid a potential supply shortage of about 5,000 to 7,000 megawatts by 2007. In its current state, OPG risks becoming a burden on ratepayers. Forty recommendations were presented, some of which suggest that OPG should become a rate-regulated commercial utility focused on running and maintaining its core generating assets. This would require that the government act as a shareholder, and the company operate like a commercial business. It was also emphasized that the market must be allowed to bring in new players. refs., tabs., figs

  16. Visitor Evaluation: An Exploratory Study for the USAF Museum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wosilius, William

    1997-01-01

    .... Constructs in the questionnaire included: motivation for visiting, evaluation of the museum experience, transportation issues, general awareness of museum services, and demographic information...

  17. The Museum of Solid Waste and Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Energy Education Development Project, Reston, VA.

    This activity geared for grades 5-9 involves students in creating museum stations on eight solid waste and energy topics. While working in groups, students present their station topic to other students who are conducting a "museum tour." In doing so participants are encouraged to enhance their reading, writing, public speaking, and artistic skills…

  18. Raising private investment funds for museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Tsjalle; Dolfsma, W.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors propose the notion of an "arts fund", a publicly traded investment fund for the purpose of acquiring increasingly costly art works to be displayed in museums. Public as well as private museums stand to benefit greatly from such an approach to financially supporting the arts. A

  19. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  20. environmental education and culture history museums

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zulu Cultural Museum has been built and where a large collection of indigenous regional cultural material is housed. Ondini today is a declared monument within the museum estate of 200 ha of thornvel d savannah, and is located 8 km outside the KwaZulu capital of. Ulundi on the through route to the Umfolozi Game.

  1. Multicultural University Education and Museum Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, G. F.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The specifics of the educational process in the museum are revealed. The experience of using the multicultural educational space of the museum for developing non-humanitarian directions of the university of general cultural competencies is expounded. The emphasis is on the formation of the ability to tolerate social, ethnic, confessional and cultural differences.

  2. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  3. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  4. [Ontario Hydro International Inc.]. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro International Inc. is the international representative of Ontario Hydro. OHII operates as a global utility that markets Ontario Hydro's services and products. Its mission is to be the leader in energy efficiency and sustainable development in the international marketplace. This report describes the year's activities in the following areas: Energy management and environment, hydroelectric generation, nuclear products and services, fossil generation, grid (transmission) business, utility management, Asia Power Group Inc. The document also includes financial highlights and international and customer contracts

  5. The safety of Ontario's nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. Extensive public hearings were held on several topics including the safety of nuclear power reactors operating in Ontario. The Committee found that these reactors are acceptably safe. Many of the 24 recommendations in this report deal with the licensing process and public access to information. (O.T.)

  6. Playful Learning Culture in the Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    not undergone much investigation. This study was conducted in cooperation with two historical museums, these being the Transport Museum in Coventry, England and The Viking Museum in Ribe, Denmark. A new learning platform called MicroCulture has been created, aimed at eliciting a sociocultural understanding......Museum learning culture is going through a paradigmatic change. Two main positions are dominant: the modernist, emphasizing the need for assessment and uniform learning outcomes, and the postmodern, encouraging dialogue and multiple learning outcomes. A critical factor is the potential contribution...... of history in young visitors. This study indicates that museum learning culture could be enriched by the introduction of mediated play as a resource for conceptual thinking and social interaction....

  7. A Social Media Framework of Cultural Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe ÖZDEMİR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums are regarded as cultural products and the core attractions of a destination that offer cultural, historical and artistic possessions for locals as well as tourists. Technological developments in communication have also contributed to the museum pre-, onsite and postexperience of visitors. Thereby, social media enables the museums to extend their networks also on an international basis with up-to-date and credible information about current researches, special events, new exhibitions, excavations in process, and promotional activities. In this sense, this study demonstrates how social media is used by the museums through a research about the Facebook accounts of 10 well-known international museums. Thus, a 32-category framework is created based on the performances of each social media account eventually, this research provides insights into creation of an effective social media account with the emphasis on certain categories’ role to draw and maintain the interest of followers.

  8. Litteraturen og forfatteren på museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels Dichov

    2016-01-01

    to the digital society and virtual representation. The role and strength of the author/writer and the importance of place and space in the mediation of literature are enhanced as distinctive for these kinds of museums. It is concluded that the ongoing growth of literary museums is both a result of and an answer......The article discusses the connection between literature and museum and the role of museums for the preservation and engagement with literary heritage. Based on an overview of research in the field and a discussion of definitions, distinctions, typology, and current forms of institutions, new...... developments in literary theory, i.e. new book history and the literary studies’ theories of geographic place, but also concepts of materiality, presence, performance and literary scenes, are brought in to explain different connections between literature and the museum and the supposedly dialectic relation...

  9. Alternative models for restructuring Ontario's electric sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, D.; Salaff, S.

    1996-01-01

    The future of Ontario Hydro and the provincial electrical sector was discussed. Various models proposed for restructuring Ontario's electric sector were described and views of some of the stake holders were presented, among them the views of AMPCO, MEA, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, IPPSO, Ontario Hydro Management, Energy Probe and the Power Workers' Union. In general, most stake holders were in favour of privatization to some degree except for the Power Workers' Union which was unalterably opposed to privatization, claiming that it would lead to quantum increases in electricity rates. 2 figs

  10. [Ontario Hydro]. Corporate performance report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Summarizes Ontario Hydro's corporate performance for the year, with actual results being compared against planned values established in the approved corporate financial plan and work program budget. Also includes additional indicators that illustrate noteworthy trends in corporate performance. Corporate results are reported under the new organizational structure implemented in mid-1993, beginning with overall results in such areas as customer satisfaction, electricity sales, human resources, and environmental protection. This is followed by reports from the Electricity Group (supply, generation, transmission), the Energy Services and Environment Group (load saved and shifted, non-utility generation, retail distribution), and Ontario Hydro enterprises (Ontario Hydro Technologies, Ontario Hydro International). The appendix contains summary financial statements

  11. The restructuring of the Ontario electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A summary of the current status of the deregulation of the electricity market in Ontario was presented. To follow global deregulation trends, the Ontario Government has embarked on a considerable restructuring of the Ontario electricity market. The monopoly position of Ontario Hydro has been removed by restructuring the provincial utility into two separate companies, GENCO and SERVCO, which will be responsible for the generation and transmission and distribution of electricity, respectively. Other mechanisms put in place to favour a free and competitive market for electricity in the province, such as the arrival on the market of other electricity producers, and the establishment of the independent market operator, are also discussed. 2 tabs

  12. The Education Act (Ontario) 1980: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ontario has provided special education legislation through the Education Amendment Act, 1980. Issues related to teacher preparation for special education and program planning and implementation are reviewed. (DF)

  13. Museum Ullen Sentalu dalam Perspektif Seni Budaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doro Daniwati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Museum merupakan tempat yang sering tidak bisa dilewatkan oleh wisatawan guna memuaskan rasa ingin tahu tentang keunikan dari sebuah kota tujuan wisata. Museum juga sering dikunjungi oleh baik para ilmuwan maupun para akademisi yang melakukan studi/riset/kajian tentang hal-hal yang memiliki nilai-nilai keunikan historis, arkeologis, estetis dan termasuk semua hal yang bernuansa memorabilia dan nostalgia. Ullen Sentalu merupakan museum yang agak unik karena di samping lokasinya yang agak jauh dari hingar bingar kesibukan kota, namun keberadaannya merupakan kebutuhan seni budaya perkotaan. Keunikan dari museum ini terletak pada nilai koleksi artefak-artefaknya yang menghadirkan khusus tentang benda-benda kewanitaan yang bernuansa warisan budaya monarki Mataram Lama yang berbeda dengan koleksi museum lainnya di tanah air.   Museum is a place where tourists are unable to easily neglect for satisfying their curiousity about the uniqueness found in the tourism destination cities.The museum is also commonly visited by artists, academicians, and scientists for their research and studies of variety subjects which discuss the values of historical, archeological, and aesthetic uniqueness, and any subjects that are concerned with those of memorabilia and nostalgic evidence. Ullen Sentalu museum is rather unique when we see the location in the ’remote’ area which is far from the frenetic bustle of the city yet its existence constitutes the needs of urban culture. The uniqueness of this museum lies on the value of artefacts collections which particularly bring the feminine objects nuenced the cultural heritage of the Old Mataram monarchy which are completely different from other museum collections in the country.

  14. The Evolving Role of Botanical Gardens and Natural Areas: A Floristic Case Study from Royal Botanical Gardens, Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A. GALBRAITH; Natalie E. IWANYCKI; Brechann V. McGOEY; Jamie McGREGOR; James S. PRINGLE; Carl J. ROTHFELS; Tyler W. SMITH

    2011-01-01

    As leaders calling for the conservation of the world's plants, botanical gardens protect plants within living collections. Many also study, manage and restore plants in natural habitats. Royal Botanical Gardens (Ontario,Canada) has integrated both horticultural and natural heritage in its mission for decades. Envisioned by municipal leaders in the 1920s as a combination of nature sanctuaries and civic gardens, RBG now includes forests, wetlands and other habitats, gardens and built spaces. Today RBG is Canada's largest botanical garden on the basis of area.In the 1950s RBG began to inventory plant diversity. The checklist of spontaneous vascular plants now exceeds 1 170 species, of which 752 are native. This is 37% of Ontario's native vascular plants and 19% of the native vascular flora of Canada. The RBG nature sanctuaries are among the richest locations in Canada for species-level diversity.We examine the history of fioristic exploration within RBG and compare plant species-area relationships among protected natural areas in Ontario. This comparison supports the contention that the nature sanctuaries, and in particular Cootes Paradise, could be considered an important area for plants in Canada, and relative to the nation's flora, a biodiversity hotspot. The fact that a candidate vascular plant hotspot for Canada lies within a major botanical garden presents opportunities for raising public awareness of the importance of plant diversity, as well as focusing attention on the scientific and conservation biology needs of communities and individual species in this area.

  15. Kastenhof - museum in Landau. Kastenhof - Museum in Landau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    1991-08-01

    When modifying the box-type court to a subsidiary museum of the prehistoric national compilation of Munich with multiple-purpose hall and a little restaurant, a considerable expenditure with regard to the preservation of monuments had to be done in order to uncover and keep the old built volumes. A low-temperature heating system as well as low-temperature oil/gas boiler were applied as heating system. The heating is realized via floor heating, plate heat exchanger for avoiding corrossions, hot-air heating, heating units and fan convectors. For energy saving an air-to-water heat pump was applied which can be used alternatively for heating or cooling. In addition, energy distribution and system control are treated by means of flowsheets. (BWI).

  16. iMuseumA: An Agent-Based Context-Aware Intelligent Museum System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ayala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, museums provide their visitors with interactive tour guide applications that can be installed in mobile devices and provide timely tailor-made multimedia information about exhibits on display. In this paper, we argue that mobile devices not only could provide help to visitors, but also to museum staff. Our goal is to integrate, within the same system, multimedia tour guides with the management facilities required by museums. In this paper, we present iMuseumA (intelligent museum with agents, a mobile-based solution to customize visits and perform context-aware management tasks. iMuseumA follows an agent-based approach, which makes it possible to interact easily with the museum environment and make decisions based on its current status. This system is currently deployed in the Museum of Informatics at the Informatics School of the University of Málaga, and its main contributions are: (i a mobile application that provides management facilities to museum staff by means of sensing and processing environmental data; (ii providing an integrated solution for visitors, tour guides and museum staff that allows coordination and communication enrichment among different groups of users; (iii using and benefiting from group communication for heterogeneous groups of users that can be created on demand.

  17. Musei parlanti. Corrado Ricci e la sfida di comunicare ad un ampio pubblico / Talking museums. Corrado Ricci and the challenge of communicating the museum to a wide audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cecchini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nel ruolo di direttore di musei Corrado Ricci sperimenta, tra il 1893 e il 1904, la possibilità di far comunicare il museo con un pubblico più ampio degli addetti ai lavori attraverso sale allestite secondo un impianto tipologico-iconografico.  Crea così le sale storico-topografiche e le sale dei ritratti. Il modello viene realizzato per la prima volta nella Galleria Reale di Parma, poi replicato nella Galleria Estense di Modena, nell’Accademia Carrara di Bergamo, ed anche nella mostra temporanea dedicata all’antica arte senese. Introduce uno spazio di mediazione tra gli spazi della città e le sale del museo, tra il tempo presente della vita e il passato ritratto nei quadri. Proposte che oggi ci possono sollecitare a riflettere sul ruolo della ricerca e su quello della traduzione, momenti essenziali del messaggio che il museo vorrebbe trasmettere.   As Museum Director Corrado Ricci experiences, between 1893 and 1904, the ability to communicate the Museum to a wider audience then the scholars through halls outfitted with a typological-iconographic system. He creates topographic-historic rooms and rooms of portraits. The model is realized for the first time in the Royal Gallery of Parma, then replicated in Galleria Estense in Modena, in the Accademia Carrara of Bergamo, and also in the temporary exhibition dedicated to ancient art of Siena. He introduces a mediation between the spaces of the city and the rooms of the Museum, between the present life and the past of the paintings. Proposals that today we shall seek to reflect on the role of research and translation, essential moments of the message that the Museum would like to transmit.

  18. Voice work at the Royal Shakespeare Company

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    En tant que responsable du département de la voix de la Royal Shakespeare Company, je me dois de démystifier la façon dont nous travaillons avec les acteurs. Il me semble également essentiel de mettre en lumière l’histoire et les objectifs du travail de la RSC sur la voix. Ceci devrait encore clarifier ce que nous entendons par « la voix de Shakespeare ». Depuis de nombreuses années les besoins d’un travail spécifique sur la voix n’ont cessé de grandir avec la compagnie. Cette pratique fait m...

  19. Oral Allergy Syndrome in a Child Provoked by Royal Jelly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantini Paola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly has been demonstrated to have several physiological activities. However, in the literature, different reactions induced by royal jelly are reported. We describe a case of seven-year-old child that was referred to our observation for two episodes of oral allergy syndrome (OAS that appeared ten minutes after ingestion of royal jelly. Skin prick test with standard panel of inhalant and food allergens, a prick-to-prick test using the royal jelly’s extract responsible for patient’s reactions, and royal jelly patch test with extemporaneous preparation were performed. The specific IgE by ImmunoCAP System method versus Hymenoptera venom, inhalant allergens, food allergens, and lipid transfer proteins was dosed. According to the positive reactions to royal jelly both by prick-by-prick test and by a first reading patch test, royal jelly immediate hypersensitivity was diagnosed. According to the positive response for almond in both in vivo and in vitro tests we can think of the royal jelly contamination with almond pollen as possible cause of patient’s reaction. Moreover, from the results of specific IgE titers versus Compositae pollens, we have argued the possibility that this case of royal jelly allergy could be explained also by the mechanism of cross-reaction with Compositae pollens.

  20. Museums and geographies of (national power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović Ljiljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper raises a discussion about the relation of museums and (national politics, primarily about the concept of 'apolitcism' of museum work, the idea that is spread among many museum workers as reality. I analyze the process of appearing of big museums in Europe and Serbia, as well as the aims of their work, in order to show that museums - from the very beginning of their appearing - function as means for consolidating national borders (outer and inner, teaching about patriotism. I also analyze the influence of German romanticism, that created the illusion of 'apoliticism' of the culture in general, as well as of museums. The change of attitude towards the state-as-nation in contemporary European community means also the change of museologic activities that should take part in the constitution of Europeism/European identity as meta-nation. That change has not still come to museums in Serbia, which points to the fact that society has not changed yet in the direction of appropriating of European values.

  1. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Baum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and the L.A. Riots of 1991, with references to other cultural catastrophes. While these projects are different, they are not opposed; both museums locate the American perspective of events and their meanings at the forefront. American holocaust museums seem to challenge spaces between memory and its direction, vision and revision. Within the gruesome context of holocaust portrayal, interrogate the valences of memory’s play and expose American holocaust museums as theatres of pornographic memory. The seduction of feeling does not invite change so much as purgation, what Aristotle identified as catharsis — an emotional and physical release, unfortunately replicating the seductive techniques used by Goebbels for the glorification of Hitler. Through manipulation of viewers as automatic audiences, these museums function as centres for pathos I question the policy and polity of presenting genocide as an entertainment leading to catharsis, recognizing that the final act of purgation is all too easily negation.

  2. Nuclear power at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapon, F.; Osborne, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    This case study shows that the diffusion of nuclear power in the electric public utility industry in Canada approximates the logistic growth curve, in agreement with previous results on technological innovation diffusion in the U.S. private sector. Many of the economic variables that affect this diffusion in the private sectors in the U.S. and Canada are also significant in the public sector in Canada. Too few utilities have adopted nuclear technology to permit using regression analysis to study the effect of environmental and regulatory factors on the growth of Ontario Hydro. Thus, cost-benefit analysis for each province might be more effective

  3. The Ontario Energy Marketers Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.F.C.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the role of the Ontario Energy Marketers Association (OEMA) and its future orientation was presented. Participants in the OEMA include agents, brokers, marketers, local distribution companies, public interest representatives, associations and government representatives. The role of the OEMA is to encourage open competition for the benefit and protection of all energy consumer and market participants. As well, the OEMA serves as a forum for key industry stakeholders to resolve market issues outside the regulatory arena, set standards and codes of practice, establish customer education programs, and develop industry input into public policy making

  4. Museum Studies: Connecting the Elementary and Secondary Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kachina; Yoder, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Museum studies will certainly reinforce students' appreciation of art history and art production. A student's understanding of a museum's function will deepen with each museum visit. Students will recognize that a museum can be organized around materials and kinds of art, periods of art history and cultures, and the works of an individual artist.…

  5. Museums And Young People: The Heritage Of Pride | Onyebinama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the origin of museum, its brief history in Nigeria , its meaning, types, need for museums and the relationship between museums and libraries. It specifically addresses the issue of young people and museum which is the heritage of their pride. The paper also discusses factors/problems which may ...

  6. Building Staff Capacity to Evaluate in Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubarek, Joy

    2015-01-01

    For years, museums of all varieties, including art museums, science centers, history museums, zoos, and aquariums, have conducted education evaluation. However, museums are all too often faced with the challenge of allocating staff time, expertise, and other resources toward conducting evaluation, particularly evaluation that moves beyond program…

  7. The Onomastic Octopus. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Robert G.

    Activities and information needs in museums and a project undertaken by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum to develop systematic solutions to problems in cataloging museum collections are described. Museum activities are grouped in three categories: (1) initial--acquisition, accession, registration, identification, and restoration; (2)…

  8. The Future of Museums and Libraries: A Discussion Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is committed to bringing together museums and libraries across the country for conversations dedicated to developing a better understanding of the roles of libraries and museums as providers of public service to communities. The Future of Libraries and Museums in the 21st Century Planning…

  9. Examining Competition in Ontario's Higher Education Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Bayan Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Financial challenges have forced many publicly funded academic institutions in Ontario to adopt a corporate model and to use market tools to compete in the higher education market and maintain their enrolment and revenue levels. This study has analyzed how competition affects publicly funded universities in Ontario. Competition was examined by…

  10. Ontario Hydro Research Division annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Research Division of Ontario Hydro conducts research in the fields of chemistry, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, and operations. Much of the research has a bearing on the safe, environmentally benign operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear power plants. Particular emphasis has been placed on nuclear plant component aging and plant life assurance

  11. The Hybrid Museum: Hybrid Economies of Meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2013-01-01

    Social media has created new ways of communicating and has brought about a new distinctive ethos. New literacies are not simply about new technology but also about this new ethos. Many museums are embracing this ethos by what is often called participatory practices. From a sociocultural perspective...... this article shows that there are two different museum mindsets where the second mindset leans towards participatory practices. It is shown how a museum can support a hybrid economy of meaning that builds on both a user generated economy of meaning and an institutional economy of meaning and adds value to both...

  12. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A....... Hein’s notion of a ‘constructivist museum’ the purpose of the article is to suggest and demonstrate a learning strategy that focuses on the learner’s consideration of his or her own learning but elaborates on Hein’s general view of the physical surroundings and deals with the question of how exhibition...

  13. [Overview of acupuncture development in Ontario Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Bin-jiang

    2012-04-01

    The history of acupuncture in Ontario, Canada was traced, and the current status as welI as the prospection were introduced in this paper. Statistics showed that the history of acupuncture in Ontario started in the 1880s, and it was only popular in China Town and Chinese community. In the 1970s, it gradually merged into the mainstream of the society, and entered into a growing period. With the tide of Chinese immigration in the 1980s and 1990s, acupuncture matured rapidly. In 2006, the "Traditional Chinese Medicine Act" was passed in Ontario, it was considered as a milestone in the history of acupuncture. At present, just like the other 23 health care professions, acupuncture has already be included into the legislation system, and become a component of Ontario's health care system. At the same time, the law and regulation may also promote the establishment of "pure Chinese Medicine" in Ontario.

  14. Ontario hydro radioactive material transportation field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, W.

    1987-01-01

    The recent introduction of both the AECB Transport Packaging of Radioactive Material Regulations and Transport Canada's Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations have significantly altered the requirements for transporting radioactive material in Canada. Extensive additional training as well as certification of several hundred Ontario Hydro employees has been necessary to ensure compliance with the additional and revised regulatory requirements. To assist in the training of personnel, an 'active' corporate Ontario Hydro Field Guide for Radioactive Material Transport document has been developed and published. The contents of this Field Guide identify current Ontario Hydro equipment and procedures as well as the updated relevant regulatory requirements within Canada. In addition, to satisfying Ontario Hydro requirements for this type of information over two thousand of these Field Guides have been provided to key emergency response personnel throughout the province of Ontario to assist in their transportation accident response training

  15. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts... Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a...

  16. New initiatives in the Netherlands Open Air Museum: how an early open air museum keeps up with the times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands Open Air Museum in Arnhem is one of the oldest open air museums of Europe. From the 1990s the staff has been engaged in an intense process of fundamentally changing the museum. The major step was to redefine the museum’s institutional identity. We believed that a good museum not only

  17. 75 FR 8139 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... policies with respect to the duties, powers, and authorities related to Museum and Library Services. If you... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  18. The Behavior of Online Museum Visitors on Facebook Fan Page of the Museum in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Arta Moro Sundjaja; Ford Lumban Gaol; Sri Bramantoro Abdinagoro; Bahtiar S. Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to discover the behavior of museum visitors on Facebook fan page in Indonesia based on the user motivation, user expectation, online community involvement, and Facebook fan page of the museum. This research used a quantitative approach to descriptive analysis. The population was the Facebook users who had followed the Facebook fan page of the museum in Indonesia. The samples used were 270 respondents. The researchers distributed the questionnaire to a Facebo...

  19. Museum, exhibition, object : artefactual narratives and their dilemmas in the National Museum of Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Bucciantini, Alima Maria

    2009-01-01

    National museums are spaces where stories of the past are told through the display and interpretation of material culture. The narratives that are created in this way reflect the ways in which the nation wants to be seen at that particular moment, and are often embedded in the larger political and social contexts of that time. This thesis looks at the National Museum of Scotland as having three levels of narrative: that of the museum as a physical space and national institution...

  20. Green power opportunities for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwell, C.; Rotenberg, E.; Torrie, R.; Poch, D.; Allen, G.

    2002-02-01

    Green energy is defined as the energy generated from renewable and environmentally benign sources. In this document, the authors demonstrated that Ontario possesses the potential to reduce energy waste on an economic basis while generating sufficient green energy to enable the province to decommission its coal burning power plants. In turn, this would lead to a more sustainable energy economy and a lesser reliance on nuclear generation. It was determined that a three-fold policy would enable the province to achieve this goal. First, there is a need to remove hidden subsidies to polluting forms of generation. The second aspect of this policy is the implementation of a robust Demand Side Management Program, and the third aspect calls for the reform of the price of electricity that includes all costs. In this manner, all forms of generation would compete on an equal footing. The authors identified an alternative to immediate price reform in the form of a legislated Renewable Portfolio Standard. A growing percentage of new renewable electricity in the supply portfolio offered by electricity providers would be required by the Renewable Portfolio Standard. It was suggested that the Ontario government adopt this measure before the opening of the electricity market in May 2002, as strong support for the measure is present. 13 refs

  1. The uranium deposits of Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The principal types of uranium deposits in Ontario are carbonatites and fenites, alkalic volcanic rocks, pegiatites, calc-silicate rocks, pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerates, polymictic conglomerates and some pelitic rocks, and various 'pitchblende' deposits including late Precambrian unconformities, possibly late Precambrian diabase dikes, and other unconformities: carbonates, sandstones, lignites, and semi-pelitic rocks of middle and upper Precambrian age. Only red unzoned pegmatite and the pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerate have supported production. Ontario reasonably assured and estimated resources in the economic and subeconomic categories in 1977 amounted to 553 000 tonnes U, and 1977 production was 4000 tonnes U. Measured, indicated, and inferred resources in the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area are at least 400 000 tonnes U. The latter deposits are also a significant thorium resource. Geological features reflecting major changes in physics and chemistry are prime controls on distribution of uranium deposits. Geological province and subprovince boundaries, major faults, higher metamorphic grades, domain boundaries related to quartz monzonite batholiths, alkalic complexes, and the distribution of carbonate rocks are examples of such geological features

  2. Experiencing memory museums in Berlin. The Otto Weidt Workshop for the Blind Museum and the Jewish Museum Berlin

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Souto

    2018-01-01

    This article explores memory studies from the audience’s perspective, focusing on the perception of Holocaust narratives in two museums in Berlin. This research builds on and contributes to a number of emerging issues on memory studies, tourism perception and museum design: the debate on experiential authenticity, Dark Tourism, as well as the analysis of memory studies from the perspective of the user. The main data facilitating the analysis is based on responses shared on TripAdvisor; the ca...

  3. The Royal pilgrimage of the Goddess Nanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. Sax

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once every twelve years, when it is thought that some calamity has taken place because of the curse of the goddess Nanda Devi, a four-horned ram is born in the fields of the former king of Garhwal, an erstwhile Central Himalayan kingdom in north India (see map of Garhwal. This four-horned ram leads a procession of priests and pilgrims on the most dangerous and spectacular pilgrimage in all of India: a three-week, barefoot journey of one-hundred and sixty-four miles, during some of the worst weather of the year, at the end of the rainy season. The procession reaches Rupkund, a small pond located at an altitude of more than 5,000 metres, which is surrounded by human­ skeletons, and from there it goes yet further, to Homkund, the ‘Lake of the Fire Sacrifice’. According to the faithful, the four-horned ram leaves the procession at that point and finds its way, unaided, to the summit of Mount Trishul. As its name suggests, the Royal Procession is closely associated with the ruler of this erstwhile Himalayan kingdom: he attends its inaugural rituals, the bones that litter the shores of Rupkund are believed to be those of one of his ancestors, and the chief sponsor of the event is a local ‘Prince’ who is thought to be descended from the first kings of Garhwal. This Prince traverses the domain of his ancestors and thereby lays claim to it in the name of the goddess Nanda, who is not only his lineage goddess but was also the royal goddess of the neighbouring kingdom of Kumaon, in pre-colonial times. Although the Royal Procession ideally fosters social integration, it was disrupted in 1987 by a quarrel between two factions of priests. The goddess’s itinerary, the culminating date of the pilgrimage, the type of sacrifice to be performed, the order of procession, the participation of previously excluded persons, and the competency of certain ritual specialists—all were subjects of heated dispute between the rival groups. What was the reason for

  4. Experiencing memory museums in Berlin. The Otto Weidt Workshop for the Blind Museum and the Jewish Museum Berlin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Souto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores memory studies from the audience’s perspective, focusing on the perception of Holocaust narratives in two museums in Berlin. This research builds on and contributes to a number of emerging issues on memory studies, tourism perception and museum design: the debate on experiential authenticity, Dark Tourism, as well as the analysis of memory studies from the perspective of the user. The main data facilitating the analysis is based on responses shared on TripAdvisor; the case studies being the Otto Weidt Workshop for the Blind Museum and the Jewish Museum Berlin. The analysis of these museums, focusing on their narratives, design features and comments from visitors, will highlight a potential shift from the traditional object-focused museum, to a phenomenological subject-focused one. It will be argued, then, that the understanding and consumption of authenticity encompasses a very flexible definition, not only based on the nature of the objects exhibited, but on the production of authentic experiences.

  5. The Behavior of Online Museum Visitors on Facebook Fan Page of the Museum in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arta Moro Sundjaja

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to discover the behavior of museum visitors on Facebook fan page in Indonesia based on the user motivation, user expectation, online community involvement, and Facebook fan page of the museum. This research used a quantitative approach to descriptive analysis. The population was the Facebook users who had followed the Facebook fan page of the museum in Indonesia. The samples used were 270 respondents. The researchers distributed the questionnaire to a Facebook group managed by museums or communities. Based on the demographic profile of respondent, the researchers discover that the respondents are highly educated, work as employees or student, and allocate more than Rp500.000,00 per month for traveling expense. Based on social media behavior of the respondents, the respondents are active using Facebook and not aware of the presence of museum in social media. The respondents require museum information, social interaction, and entertainment on Facebook fan page of the museum. Therefore, museum managers must maintain the content quality and perceived usefulness in delivering the information through Facebook. The involvement of cultural community can help people to get honest information about museum through credible opinion from the respondents.

  6. New Mexico Museums and Cultural Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of museums and cultural centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using...

  7. A Checklist of Legal Considerations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Stephen E.

    1980-01-01

    A checklist for museum compliance with federal, state, and local laws covers administrative organization, general endowment and restricted funds, trustees, staffing and employment practices, volunteers, acquisition and disposition, exhibition programs, visitors and membership, auxiliary activities, building, and miscellaneous regulations. (MSE)

  8. 3D VISUALIZATION FOR VIRTUAL MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Skamantzari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  9. The Lenin Museum in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinenskii, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    New developments in the work practices of school Lenin halls and museums are observed. Emphasis is increasingly on the integration of these centers for ideological and political indoctrination and the educational process. (KM)

  10. Radiation preservation of cultural and museum objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibilities are summed up of using ionizing radiation for the treatment of museum collections, namely the biocidal effect of radiation on living organisms. An approximate assessment is made of the extent of damage to art and book collections by biological pests. Radiation preservation is compared with conventional methods which are unsatisfactory, because they do not affect deeper layers of materials. Experience is summed up with the use of radiation preservation in the Central Bohemian Museum in Roztoky. (J.C.)

  11. Instruction and Delight: Some Observations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret J.

    This paper assesses the work of artist-creator Walt Disney as a model for museum educators to draw the public into its work. Disney Land and Disney World are viewed as monuments of U.S. life and imagination, a living museum that attracts 40 million U.S. visitors per year. The paper describes what should be a partnership among the image-making,…

  12. Museums as a mirror of society

    OpenAIRE

    Clercq, Steven de

    2005-01-01

    Following the Darwinian approach, which describes a form in nature as the functional adaptation to its environment at a given time, I will explore the development of museums and collections of science as an expression of their function in historical and social context. This approach allows us to establish a classification of scientific museums where features like owner, user, role and use of the object and its social, cultural and intellectual environment act as discriminating factors. This a...

  13. University museums: problems, policy and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Merriman

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There are some 400 university museums and collections in the United Kingdom. During the 1990s their often neglected state came under close scrutiny and as a result their future role is now being re-assessed. A member of the Institute's staff has recently been appointed to the new position of Curator of UCL Museums and Collections, and he comments here on the national situation and describes some of the initiatives under way at UCL.

  14. The first royal appendix abscess drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2015-05-01

    On January 22nd 1901, at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, Queen Victoria, nearing her 82nd birthday and having ruled for 64 years, drew her last breath. Edward Prince of Wales, 59 years of age, was now King Edward VII. A year of mourning was proclaimed and his coronation scheduled for June 26th. It was unexpectedly delayed by an attack of royal appendicitis. On Saturday June 14th 1902, less than two weeks before the coronation, Edward travelled to Aldershot to attend a military review. It was a cold, rainy day and the King did not feel well. That night, his abdominal discomfort was getting worse and by five next morning the King's personal physician, Sir Francis Laking, was called to see him. Laking asked Sir Thomas Barlow, Physician-Extraordinary to the King, for a second opinion. By now there was fever, rigor and distinct tenderness in the right iliac fossa of the very obese abdomen. Under heavy sedation, the King was transferred to Windsor Castle, leaving his Queen, Alexandra, to review the parade of 30,000 soldiers gathered at Aldershot.

  15. Extremity dosimetry trial: Devonport royal dockyard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, R.; Collison, R.

    2008-01-01

    This trial was undertaken to assess extremity dosemeters, which were made available to Devonport Royal Dockyard and determine the most suitable to the site. The trial included operational and laboratory-based exposures. Operational exposures were within a submarine reactor compartment and a waste storage area. Laboratory exposures were undertaken using 241 Am, 137 Cs and 60 Co sources to compare and contrast the dosemeters energy response. In addition, the low dose response and the response if placed in the incorrect orientation were also assessed. Ten passive and two active dosemeters were tested, with three highlighted as the most technically suitable, DSTL Harshaw DXT-RAD, HPA Harshaw EXT-RAD and the AMEC Panasonic UD-807A. The most technically suitable dosemeter was the DSTL Harshaw DXT-RAD, due to good responses within all aspects of the trial and the user's preference for the ring type design. The John Caunt ED2 electronic dosemeter 2 (ED2) also performed well, but suffered radio frequency interference. (authors)

  16. Ethics. An approach to understanding museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Fernández del Amo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of modern museums emerged in the second half of the Eighteenth Century with a clear ideology and ways of seeing the world and a particular set of skills with which to go about curating. As happens with human beings, this genetic code strongly determined museums' future development. This is why many of our museums present themselves as the unquestionable heirs of the encyclopedic knowledge that the philosophers of the Enlightenment pursued. Since they were first established they have based their authority on the mastery of knowledge and have developed a story of the world through a scientific mode of interpreting reality. This paper has two objectives: firstly, to analyze the nature of the museum as a technology of modernity and how they are employed as instruments of legitimation of liberal states; secondly, to show how ethics can help museums to adopt a new role in the knowledge society, by questioning the ideological foundations of the Western paradigm. It does this through an interdisciplinary analysis, combining the voices of philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, and museum curators and concludes with a proposal on how to apply such thinking to the Latin American cultural environment.

  17. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  18. The first book museums in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Just before the advent of Fascism, in Turin, in the nearby town of Carmagnola and in Florence were born the first Italian examples of book museums. It was early and exceptional experiments of valorizing of book history and of the ancient techniques of manufacturing manuals in a time of great innovation. The first, called the National Museum of the book, was opened in 1913 as a result of the exhibition of the history of printing held during the Universal Exhibition of 1911; the second, created in 1921, was the result of collecting a notable family that took up the typographic tradition of Carmagnola old more than 4 centuries; the third, said Museum of books and illumination, was the result of the exploitation of the extraordinary collections of the Medici library and of the policy pursued by the Director Guido Biagi. Of such museums, outlining the events that led to their creation, only the museum in Carmagnola has come to this day, while the others for various reasons, were closed and never reconstituted. The contribution also provides an opportunity to reflect on the creation of a new museum of the book in Italy at a time when libraries lack visibility into the organization of the Ministry of cultural heritage, which could be distributed and polycentric in the offices of the State libraries in Rome, with its hub at the National Central Library.

  19. Royal Wine Corporation d/b/a/ Royal Kedem (Herzog Wine Cellars), Oxnard, CA; Consent Agreement and Final Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consent Agreement and Final Order (Proposed CA/FO), between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9 (EPA or Complainant), and Royal Wine Corporation, d/b/a Royal Kedem (Herzog Wine Cellars or Respondent). Docket Number CWA-09-2018-0004.

  20. Paradigma Baru Dalam Museum Seni dan Budaya Jawa Ullen Sentalu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarena Nediari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The existence of the museum building as  conservation collection of historic objects often give the impression that the museum is an ancient building, dark and disheveled. While the new paradigm in the management of the museum is a museum not only as a place to store historical objects, but need to present the collection in an attractive package so that visitors interested in coming back again to the museum. Museum of art and culture of Java Ullen Sentalu, in Kaliurang has provided a new insight to the culture, especially Javanese culture in the family palace of Yogyakarta and Solo Palace. The main attraction of this Sentalu Ullen is to deliver information about the historic collection from the family palace is presented as a whole, so that leaves a deep impression for visitors. This museum has given the world a new concept in museums in Indonesia, which certainly can be applied to other museums in Indonesia.  

  1. In Search of Museum Professional Knowledge Base: Mapping the Professional Knowledge Debate onto Museum Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Museum professionalism remains an unexplored area in museum studies, particularly with regard to what is arguably the core generic question of a "sui generis" professional knowledge base, and its necessary and sufficient conditions. The need to examine this question becomes all the more important with the increasing expansion of the…

  2. "In and against the Museum": The Contested Spaces of Museum Education for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grek, Sotiria

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on museum and gallery education for adults in Dundee, Scotland. Dundee has recently experienced a shift from being mainly working class to an educational, cultural and tourist centre. Hence, an interesting field for the examination of the educational policies and practices of the city museums/galleries and the different fashions…

  3. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  4. Meeting Ontario's electricity needs : a critical review of the Ontario Power Authority's supply mix advice report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.; Fracassi, J.

    2006-01-01

    In December, 2005 the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) outlined its proposed blueprint for meeting Ontario's electricity needs to 2025 in the document entitled Supply Mix Advice Report. As a result of the actions taken by the current government, the OPA believes that Ontario will have adequate electricity supplies to meet the province's needs until 2013. However, it stated that Ontario will require an additional 15,000 megawatts of new generation capacity between 2013 and 2025. The OPA also recommends that a significant proportion of this new generation capacity be nuclear. The Ontario Clean Air Alliance undertook a review of the OPA report and identified several discrepancies including an over-estimation of Ontario's rate of electricity load growth from 2005 to 2025; an under-estimation of the potential for electricity productivity improvements to reduce electricity demand and raise living standards; an under-estimation of renewable energy supply potential; an under-estimation of the potential for biomass and natural gas fired combined heat and power plants to meet electricity needs and increase the competitiveness of Ontario's industries; an under-estimation of the economic costs and risks of nuclear power; and a biased recommendation for a 70 million dollar resource acquisition budget against energy efficiency investments that would reduce demand and raise living standards. This report provides the Ontario Clean Air Alliances' analysis of the OPA report and presents it own recommendations for how Ontario can increase its electricity productivity and meet its electricity supply needs until 2025. The report concluded that the Government of Ontario should direct the OPA to develop a long-term strategy to raise the price of electricity up to its full cost without raising the electricity bills of low income consumers or impairing the competitiveness of Ontario's industries. It was suggested that Ontario's electricity productivity should be increased to the same level as

  5. [Harmful biological agents at museum workposts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skóra, Justyna; Zduniak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata; Rembisz, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of microbiological contamination of air and surfaces in museum premises with various collection specificities. In addition, the criteria for selecting indicators of contamination with harmful biological agents at museum workposts are proposed. The analysis of microbial contamination was carried out in 14 museum premises (storehouses, restoration workshops, exhibition hall). Microbiological air purity was measured with a MAS-100 Eco Air Sampler. Surface samples were collected using contact plates RODAC Envirocheck. Biochemical API tests were used to identify bacteria and yeasts. Fungi were diagnosed with taxonomic keys, based on macro- and microscopic mycelia assessment. The levels of microbiological contamination in museums varied and ranged from 2.1 x 10(2) to 7.0 x 10(3) cfu/m3 in the air and from 1.4 x 10(2) to 1.7 x 10(4) cfu/100 cm2 on surfaces. The dominant microorganisms were fungi, which accounted respectively for 18-98% and 23-100% of all isolates from tested sites and surfaces. It was found that the amount of fungi in the indoor air of the Museum of Archeology and Ethnography and the Museum of Independence Traditions equaled respectively 4.2 x 10(2) cfu/m3 and 1.4 x 10(4) cfu/m3, which means that they exceeded the recommended reference value of 2.0 x 10(2) cfu/m3. Having analyzed the frequency of strain isolation, the source of microorganisms and the hazard to human health, 10 fungal species were isolated, which may be regarded as indicators of contamination with harmful biological agents at museum workposts. They are: Aspergillus (A. niger, A. versicolor), Cladosporium (C. herbarum, C. macrocarpum), Penicillium (P. carneum, P. digitatum, P. italicum, P. paneum, P. polonicum), Rhizopus nigricans.

  6. Women's royal holiness as the church-historical phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimov Vladimir Fedorovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article under the topic of the Royal Holiness examines its specific subtype, the righteousness of the Royal women. Among the saint queens, empresses and princesses the authors distinguish the independent rulers, the widows, and wives of monarchs. The Holy Byzantine Empress and canonized European Queen, the Queen of the Georgian and the Russian Princess defended the Christian statehood brightened by feats of patience, mercy, by building the temples. In the conclusion of the article briefly tells about the Royal martyrs and Confessors of the 20th century.

  7. Ontario energy market review and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of the natural gas industry and the electric power industry in Ontario, in terms of deregulation, was described. Natural gas utilities will exit the regulated gas market over the next few years and transfer their existing residential and small commercial gas contracts to their unregulated affiliates. Nevertheless, a regulated gas supply option will remain until the regulator is assured that consumer protection issues have been properly addressed, and there is a truly competitive market. Ontario Hydro is a vertically integrated virtual monopoly. It lags behind B.C., Alberta, Quebec and Nova Scotia in terms of deregulation and restructuring, although the MacDonald Commission's recent report recommended sweeping changes to Ontario Hydro's monopoly over the electric power industry. A final response from the Ontario government is still pending. The convergence of the electric power and natural gas industries was also discussed

  8. Revitalizing the nuclear business at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, K.

    1994-01-01

    Ontario Hydro, North America's largest electric power utility, with an installed capacity of 34,000 MW, has under gone a major restructuring over the past year to better align itself with a changing electricity market and evolving customer needs. The single largest new business unit within the new Ontario Hydro is Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN), responsible for engineering, operation and maintenance of the Corporation's 20 large nuclear units at three generating sites, OHN faces a significant challenge in returning Ontario's nuclear units to the world-leading performance levels they enjoyed in the past, particularly the older Pickering A and Bruce A plants. However, steady progress is being made as evidenced by improving peer reviews and overall capacity and financial performance

  9. A xylarium for the sustainable management of biodiversity: the wood collection of the Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Beeckman, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: wood and the Neolithic revolutionSome scientific disciplines base their methodology on the analysis of documents. Others obtain their raw data mainly through experiments and observations, both in the laboratory and in the field. The study material for a third category of disciplines is being kept in big scientific collections. As such, collections exist with animal specimens for zoological research, mineral and stone collections for geology and herbaria for botany. Herbaria trad...

  10. X-ray safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    In July 1979 the Ontario Advisory Committee on Radiology was formed to develop a comprehensive strategy for x-ray safety in the province. At its hearings the committee recieved submissions from groups representing physicians, dentists, chiropractors, radiological technicians, physiotherapists, podiatrists, and consumers, among others; these briefs are included as appendices to the report. The report surveys the historical background and the current situation in Ontario, and makes recommendations for an organized safety program. (L.L.)

  11. Comments on nuclear reactor safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The Chalk River Technicians and Technologists Union representing 500 technical employees at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL submit comments on nuclear reactor safety to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Issues identified by the Review Commissioner are addressed from the perspective of both a labour organization and experience in the nuclear R and D field. In general, Local 1568 believes Ontario's CANDU nuclear reactors are not only safe but also essential to the continued economic prosperity of the province

  12. Market prices for solar electricity in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, I.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Ontario electricity supply is facing considerable challenges while demand is increasing due to a growing population and increased economic growth needs. In response to these challenges, the government of Ontario established the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) in 2004 to ensure adequate, reliable and secure electricity supply and resources in Ontario. The OPA has also engaged in activities to facilitate the diversification of sources of electricity supply by promoting the use of cleaner energy sources and technologies, including alternative energy sources and renewable energy. The purpose of this paper was to advance discussions regarding the contribution that solar PV can make to Ontario's supply mix. In particular, it determined the value of the electricity that would have been produced by a PV system located in Waterloo, Ontario under the following 4 pricing regimes: (1) the conventional small user tariff system currently in place in Ontario, (2) the time-of-use pricing system that is voluntarily available to those who have smart meters installed in their facilities, (3) the spot market, hourly prices, to which some of Ontario's largest electricity users are exposed, and (4) the recently-proposed rate for standard offer contracts for PV systems. The study showed that a solar PV system that produces 3,000 kWh of electricity over the course of a year would generate different revenue amounts, ranging from the smallest amount of approximately $174.00 to $1,260.00, depending on the pricing regime. The pricing regime that reflects real, time-of-day electricity prices appears to be most advantageous to solar PV systems. It was recommended that additional work is needed regarding the other benefits of solar PV, such as avoided capacity/generation needs, avoided transmission and distribution cost and losses, environmental benefits, and job creation. 3 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  13. Annual report 1993 (Ontario Hydro, Toronto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Ontario Hydro`s prime objective is to supply the people of Ontario with electricity at cost while maintaining high standards of safety and service. The annual report presents energy efficiency and competitiveness, operations in review, the environmental performance of the Corporation, the future, and choices for a sustainable future. A financial review and analysis is also provided, along with an auditor`s report and financial statements.

  14. Hun vil invitere kulturens frække lillesøster på museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackinney-Valentin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Interview with director of Denmark's Design Museum, Bodil Busk Laursen about the plans for opening a Danish fashion museum.......Interview with director of Denmark's Design Museum, Bodil Busk Laursen about the plans for opening a Danish fashion museum....

  15. Large catchment area recharges Titan's Ontario Lacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Rajani D.; Barnes, Jason W.; Yanites, Brian J.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    2018-01-01

    We seek to address the question of what processes are at work to fill Ontario Lacus while other, deeper south polar basins remain empty. Our hydrological analysis indicates that Ontario Lacus has a catchment area spanning 5.5% of Titan's surface and a large catchment area to lake surface area ratio. This large catchment area translates into large volumes of liquid making their way to Ontario Lacus after rainfall. The areal extent of the catchment extends to at least southern mid-latitudes (40°S). Mass conservation calculations indicate that runoff alone might completely fill Ontario Lacus within less than half a Titan year (1 Titan year = 29.5 Earth years) assuming no infiltration. Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations of clouds over the southern mid and high-latitudes are consistent with precipitation feeding Ontario's large catchment area. This far-flung rain may be keeping Ontario Lacus filled, making it a liquid hydrocarbon oasis in the relatively dry south polar region.

  16. Ontario's power market post November 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a review of Ontario's first year with an open electricity market. The year 2002 to 2003 had record energy demands with challenges on the supply side. In particular, generation availability was below expectations during the summer months. This demonstrated that price predictability and volatility needs to be addressed and investment in new power generation is needed in Ontario. Ontario demand forecasts outpace supply for the long term outlook. In addition, most of Ontario's generating plants are aging and will soon exceed their nominal service life, requiring major refurbishment or replacement. Decisions are needed now on the future of coal in Ontario's generation mix. It was also noted that transmission reinforcements are needed in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). In the short term, consumers can expect delays in return to service of nuclear units, forced extensions to planned outages, and reduced outlook for energy from hydroelectric resources. It was noted that Ontario will continue to rely on imports, although emergency generation is being installed. 5 figs

  17. Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investment in the building maintenance aspect is massive throughout the world. In most of the countries, it signifies approximately 50% of the entire revenue of the construction industry. The value of buildings depends on the eminence of the maintenance invested in them. Maintenance management engages obtaining utmost advantage from the investment made on the maintenance activities. At the moment, maintenance in buildings in Malaysia is on the increase in spite of size, category, location, and ownership. This study focuses on Building Maintenance Management System for Heritage Museum, which consists of two case studies in Penang State Museum and Art Gallery, Malaysia and Museum of Perak, Malaysia. The aim of this study is to propose methods to improve the maintenance management system for heritage museum. From the results, the common problem occurs during the implementation for the maintenance of each building is the budget for the maintenance and worker’s skill. The department of each museum must have their own maintenance unit to keep an eye on the maintenance activities for their buildings in order to improve the maintenance management system in their building.

  18. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-10-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish adaptations to deep sea, through the exploration of a fictional story, based on historical data and based on the work of the King that served as a guiding script for all the subsequent tasks. In both museums, students had access to: historical collections of organisms, oceanographic biological sampling instruments, fish gears and ships. They could also observe the characteristics and adaptations of diverse fish species characteristic of deep sea. The present study aimed to analyse the impact of these activities on students' scientific knowledge, on their understanding of the nature of science and on the development of transversal skills. All students considered the project very popular. The results obtained suggest that the activity promoted not only the understanding of scientific concepts, but also stimulated the development of knowledge about science itself and the construction of scientific knowledge, stressing the relevance of creating activities informed by the history of science. As a final remark we suggest that the partnership between elementary schools and museums should be seen as an educational project, in which the teacher has to assume a key mediating role between the school and the museums.

  19. From interventions to interactions: Science Museum Arts Projects’ history and the challenges of interpreting art in the Science Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Redler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah Redler’s paper examines the 13 year history of Science Museum, London’s contemporary art programme and explores how changing cultural conditions and the changing function of museums are making the questions raised by bringing art into the Science Museum context increasingly significant. It looks at how Science Museum Arts Projects started as a quirky, experimental sideline aimed at shaking up the Museum and its visitors’ assumptions, but has now become a fundamental means by which the Science Museum chooses to represent the impact of science, medicine, engineering and technology on peoples’ everyday lives.

  20. Nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, J.L.; Lowther, C.A.; Marsh, J.R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes some of the nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College and the way the facilities are used in the training of personnel for the Naval nuclear propulsion programme. (author)

  1. Physicochemical composition of pure and adulterated royal jelly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Garcia-Amoedo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical composition of pure royal jelly as well as of some adulterated samples was analyzed by determining moisture, ash, lipids, nitrogen/proteins, carbohydrates, starch and 10- HDA (10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid. The solubility in alkaline medium was used to detect the main frauds for adulterating royal jelly which comprise addition of yogurt, water, egg white, sweet condensed milk mixed with propolis, unripe banana and corn starch slurry.

  2. Kesejahteraan Karyawan PT. Royal Coconut Kabupaten Minahasa Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Londa, Very Y; Kaunang, Markus; Karim, Dian Fitriani

    2015-01-01

    Employee welfare is a form of welfare services provided by the company to the employees who have given power, mind and their services. Company Parties have an obligation to make efforts to motivate employees to provide benefits that can improve employee productivity. Welfare programs provided by the company to employees of PT. Royal Coconut North Minahasa yet either. Using qualitative methodology, research results show that the well-being of employees is not a good idea due to the PT. Royal C...

  3. Museum Institutions in Monuments - Positive and Negative Aspects of Adaptation: The New Amber Museum and Museum of Science in Gdansk, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowska, Ksenia

    2017-10-01

    The issue of the creation and location of new museums is a current topic. The decision of where and how to create new museum facilities will impact successful function in the future. Museums are either located in newly designed buildings or in existing buildings. In general, existing buildings adapted for museum use are either formally under conservational protection or not. With regard to museum location in preserved monuments, the author notes that the true impact on authentic monumental building structure still needs intense research. The adaptation of the Great Mill and St. Catherine’s Church - two preserved medieval objects located in the historical city center of Gdansk - provide case studies to investigate positive and negative aspects. In both cases, the author carried out architectural projects for the functional purposes of museums: The New Amber Museum and Museum of Science. The author concludes that mutual benefits of adaptation result from: the financial means of the museum institution to invest long-term; the institutional respect of the museum towards heritage, which translates into respect for conservational protection; and the competitive advantage created by the monumental features of the building and the privileged location in a well-established, branded space. Negative aspects result from: space limitations of monuments that disable the museum from extending its exposition and thus prevent institutional development; the overly restrictive requirements of restoration that take priority over the museum mission; and the lack of technically functional space required for contemporary museum technologies, which forces unconventional engineering solutions that are more expensive than the location of the museum in a newly constructed building.

  4. THE MUSEUM: A PARTNER IN ENVIRONMENTAL EDUC.ATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Museum resources are generally underutil ised by educational establishments, not least of all by environmental educators. Some museum activities are explained and ... What is their true mission in society? There are many descriptions of the ...

  5. Improving the Work of the School Lenin Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafannikova, G. P.

    1970-01-01

    A number of exemplary compositions and uses of School Lenin Museums are mentioned in this article which brings out the important function of these museums in the political-ideological education of youth. (JB)

  6. Poaching Museum Collections using Digital 3D Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Younan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creative engagement with digital 3D models of museum artefacts and gives insight into new uses of museum collections enabled by digital scanning, editing and 3D printing technologies. Digital 3D models of museum artefacts are malleable and increasingly easy to use. Additionally, freely available 3D software has made 3D scanning, editing and manufacturing possible for non-specialists. These technologies allow users to create new artworks through the creation and transformation of digital replicas of museum artefacts. Examples of creative works, taken from two case studies that involve the creative use of digital reproductions of museum artefacts are presented in this paper. These projects are illustrative of a larger trend: the digital ‘poaching’ of heritage artefacts. This paper examines how digital 3D technologies can foster creative forms of museum engagement, democratise access to museum collections and engage users with personal forms of museum experience.

  7. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  8. DIORAMA ART – A POTENTIAL MEDIUM FOR MUSEUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The study recognizes the traditional role diorama plays as an effective medium for museum edu- cation and employed both ... Keywords: Diorama, Museum, Education, Aperture, Assemblage. ... velopment of the modern world. Aside the open ...

  9. Virtual museum of manuscripts in teaching humanitarian subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нина Леонидовна Панина

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The author examines existing forms of representation of the book in museum's online resources and proposes a new approach for virtual museum of the manuscript, specifically focused on the educational purposes.

  10. The Museum Library in the United States: A Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David; Fearnley, Henry D.

    1976-01-01

    A statistical survey was made of the general condition and problems of the museum library, using a questionnaire sent to a random sample of 856 historical, art, science, and other museum libraries. (Author)

  11. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  12. Towards an Integrative Approach to Interactive Museum Installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray, C.A.; van der Vaart, M.; Addison, A.C.; Guidi, G.; De Luca, L.; Pescarin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Museum visits are quickly becoming more personalized and interactive with the help of technology. However, the introduction of technology could also result in drawing attention away from museum collections towards (technological) interpretation devices. How does the introduction of technology into

  13. Portable Tablets in Science Museum Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of portable tablets in learning, their impact has received little attention in research. In five different projects, this media-ethnographic and design-based analysis of the use of portable tablets as a learning resource in science museums investigates how young people...... is identified. It is argued that, paradoxically, museums’ decisions to innovate by introducing new technologies, such as portable tablets, and new pedagogies to support them conflict with many young people’s traditional ideas of museums and learning. The assessment of the implications of museums’ integration...... of portable tablets indicates that in making pedagogical transformations to accommodate new technologies, museums risk opposing didactic intention if pedagogies do not sufficiently attend to young learners’ systemic expectations to learning and to their expectations to the digital experience influenced...

  14. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  15. Introducing Physician Assistants to Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Vanstone

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC introduced Physician Assistants (PAs through the announcement of demonstration projects, education and training programs, and subsequent funding. PAs are directly supervised by physicians and act as physician extenders by performing acts as delegated to them by their supervising physicians. PAs were proposed as a potential solution to help improve access to health care and reduce wait times throughout the province. Prior to the 2006 Ministry announcement, there was little public discussion regarding the acceptance of the PA role or its sustainability. Opposition from nursing and other groups emerged in response to the 2006 announcement and flared again when stakeholder comments were solicited in 2012 as part of the PA application for status as regulated health professionals. As a health reform, the introduction of PAs has neither succeeded nor failed. In 2013, the majority of PA funding continues to be provided by the MOHLTC, and it is unknown whether the PA role will be sustainable when the MOHTLC withdraws salary funding and health system employers must decide whether or not to continue employing PAs at their own expense.

  16. Ontario Hydro annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    Ontario continues a strong growth in electricity consumption; over the past five years consumption has risen an average of 5 percent a year. In 1988 consumption rose by 6.5 percent to 133.1 billion kilowatt-hours. Peak demand was 23 million kilowatts. The top priority for the 1990s will be improving the energy efficiency of customers and the operating efficiency of the Corporation, with a target saving of 4500 megawatts through demand management and energy efficiency by the year 2000. A new environmental division has been formed, as well as a division for non-utility generation. Safety is of particular importance to the Nuclear Generating Division; in all nuclear operations, after 143 million hours worked from 1955 to 1988, there has never been a work-related fatality or a detectable injury due to radiation. The average radiation dose per worker continues to decline and is now under 10 percent of the legal dose limit. Retubing of Pickering Nuclear Generating Station unit 2 has been completed. Retubing of unit 1 is under way, and work on units 3 and 4 has been approved. Construction continues on the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, where the first unit is expected to go into service in 1989. The Darlington Tritium Removal Facility was completed

  17. Royal College surgical objectives of urologic training: A survey of faculty members from Canadian training programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Ahmed S.; Haddad, Richard; Dragomir, Alice; Kassouf, Wassim; Andonian, Sero; Aprikian, Armen G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: According to the Royal College objectives of training in urology, urologic surgical procedures are divided as category A, B and C. We wanted to determine the level of proficiency required and achieved by urology training faculty for Royal College accreditation. Methods: We conducted a survey that was sent electronically to all Canadian urology training faculty. Questions focused on demographics (i.e., years of practice, geographic location, subspecialty, access to robotic surgery), operating room contact with residents, opinion on the level of proficiency required from a list of 54 surgical procedures, and whether their most recent graduates attained category A proficiency in these procedures. Results: The response rate was 43.7% (95/217). Among respondents, 92.6% were full timers, 21.1% practiced urology for less than 5 years and 3.2% for more than 30 years. Responses from Quebec and Ontario formed 69.4% (34.7% each). Of the respondents, 37.9% were uro-oncologists and 75.7% reported having access to robotic surgery. Sixty percent of faculty members operate with R5 residents between 2 to 5 days per month. When respondents were asked which categories should be listed as category A, only 8 procedures received 100% agreement. Also, results varied significantly when analyzed by sub-specialty. For example, almost 50% or more of uro-oncologists believed that radical cystectomy, anterior pelvic exenteration and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy should not be category A. The following procedures had significant disagreement suggesting the need for re-classification: glanular hypospadias repair, boari flap, entero-vesical and vesicovaginal fistulae repair. Overall, more than 80% of faculty reported that their recent graduating residents had achieved category A proficiency, in a subset of procedures. However, more than 50% of all faculty either disagreed or were ambivalent that all of their graduating residents were Category A proficient in several procedures

  18. SMART SfM: SALINAS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Inzerillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  19. Smart SfM: Salinas Archaeological Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzerillo, L.

    2017-08-01

    In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions) offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  20. Department of Defense Operation and Financial Support for Military Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    and gives substance to tradition and enhances esprit de corps. The museum consists of a trailer complex and a warehouse which provide...and DV receptions . The museum provides safe, professional archival storage and exhibition of rare military cultural artifacts. The museum’s Spanish...built in the 1960s as a movie theater, classroom and auditorium used for basic training during the Vietnam War. Don F. Pratt Memorial Museum The

  1. The British Museum: An Imperial Museum in a Post-Imperial World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Duthie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the British Museum’s imperialist attitudes towards classical heritage. Despite considerable pressure from foreign governments, the museum has consistently refused to return art and antiquities that it acquired under the aegis of empire. It is the contention of this article that the British Museum remains an imperialist institution. The current debates over the British Museum’s collections raise profound questions about the relationship between museums and modern nation states and their nationalist claims to ancient heritage. The museum’s inflexible response to repatriation claims also encapsulates the challenges inherent in presenting empire and its legacy to contemporary, post-imperial audiences.

  2. Perancangan Interior Museum Film Indonesia Di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Limantoro, Lim Renawati

    2013-01-01

    Surabaya is a city with a thriving cultural variety with a pluralistic society where people in Surabaya is more modern that easy to accept new things that developed in the community. Museum is a public place so that the necessary interior educative and informative and can be used as a sports-themed Indonesian films. The purpose of designing the interior of the film museum in Surabaya this is a venue to preserve Indonesian films and give knowledge to the people of Surabaya on the world of cine...

  3. Implications of the Ontario government's white paper and competition strategies for Ontario's municipal electric utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The strategies that Municipal Electric Utilities (MEU) should follow to deal with competition were discussed. North Bay Hydro is the 34th largest MEU out of 300 in Ontario but it serves only 23,000 out of 4 million electrical customers in Ontario. Therefore, the main strategy for municipal utilities to ensure their future would be to become part of an alliance and association like the MEA and the SAC - the Strategic Alliance for Competition and Customer Choice. Strong criticism was voiced regarding the contents of the recent Ontario Government White Paper for being vague with regard to electrical distribution and the role of MEUs in Ontario. It was suggested that it is vitally important that MEUs ally themselves with other stakeholders, to resist an Ontario Hydro monopoly, to make sure that prices stay low, to avoid excessive debt and bureaucratic inefficiency, be innovative, and consumer oriented and be prepared to anticipate events and conditions. 3 figs

  4. Ontario's new electricity market and the future of OPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, H.

    2002-01-01

    The recent measures taken by Ontario Power Generation since 1998 to deregulate the electricity market in the province of Ontario are reviewed. The opening of Ontario's power market in May 2002 will oblige Ontario Power Generation to reduce its market share. The author reviewed the current status of the energy market in Ontario and noted a modest growth in demand. A significant portion of the energy supply is being provided by nuclear, fossil fuels and hydro energy. The challenge facing Ontario Power Generation is to stay competitive in the new deregulated market and to participate in the energy market in the United States. 6 figs

  5. Teaching History with Museums: Strategies for K-12 Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan; Stoddard, Jeremy; Woodward, Walter W.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History with Museums" provides an introduction and overview of the rich pedagogical power of museums. In this comprehensive textbook, the authors show how museums offer a sophisticated understanding of the past and develop habits of mind in ways that are not easily duplicated in the classroom. Using engaging cases to illustrate…

  6. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... devoted to museum functions as described in paragraph (a) of this section. (ii) The period of time that such museum functions have been carried out by the institution over the course of the institution's... devoted to such museum functions. (v) Such other information as the Director requests. (3) The Director...

  7. The Educational Use of Museums: An English Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Hazel

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the establishment and function of the Museums Committee of Her Majesty's Inspectorate, a committee which was formed to encourage the effective use of England's museums. Describes the various programs initiated by the committee, focusing on the best practices of the schools using museum resources. (GEA)

  8. Finding a New Voice: Lifelong Learning Experiences in Museum Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Mette Irene

    2018-01-01

    'Working with you all and finding my voice as an educator has changed my life', one of the retirees said as we were discussing their experiences as museum volunteers. When I was given a two-year contract as a museum educator to contribute to the renewal of a maritime museum in Norway by designing and developing a broad ranging outreach programme,…

  9. How a Museum Discovered the Transforming Power of Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 the Strong Museum in Rochester, New York reopened as the Strong National Museum of Play. Devising a new interpretive plan proved crucial to transforming the institution's mission and decisive in leading toward a $37 million expansion that drove strong gains in attendance. Still, the new interpretive direction, articulated in the museum's…

  10. Inspiring Leaders: Unique Museum Programs Reinforce Professional Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardelli, Jennifer; Wasserman, JoAnna

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has developed educational programs targeting adult audiences. Engaging public service professionals--those charged with serving and protecting our nation's democratic principles--has become a core outreach strategy to achieve the Museum's mission. This article describes the Museum's process…

  11. Designerly Learning: Workshops for Schools at the Design Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents qualitative research recently undertaken by the Head of Learning at the Design Museum. The research explores how learning in the museum's workshop programme for schools is conceptualised by the museum educators who devise and teach on the programme. The study is framed by an epistemological stance of social constructionism, in…

  12. Make Your Museum Talk: Natural Language Interfaces for Cultural Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, Stefania; Gaia, Giuliano; Caldarini, Morgana

    A museum can talk to its audience through a variety of channels, such as Web sites, help desks, human guides, brochures. A considerable effort is being made by museums to integrate these different means. The Web site can be designed to be reachable or even updateable from visitors inside the museum via touchscreen and wireless devices. But these…

  13. Performing Witnessing: Dramatic Engagement, Trauma and Museum Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Erika

    2018-01-01

    This article offers a discussion of two interactive museum installations, 'Remembering the Children: Daniel's Story' at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC, and the main exhibit at the Humanity House Museum in the Hague, Netherlands. Both are examples of what I term "self-guided dramas," taking the…

  14. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  15. Understanding the Exhibitionary Characteristics of Popular Music Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fairchild

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature on the popular music museum has primarily focused on the study of heritage and cultural memory with a secondary focus on tourism. Given the unprecedented expansion of the museum sector worldwide in recent decades, which has produced an increasing number of major museums dedicated to popular music, it is an opportune time to expand this range of analytical concerns. Specifically, the development of popular music museums has not yet been closely examined within the broader historical trajectory of the so-called ‘new museum.’ This article seeks to outline the range of exhibitionary types commonly used in a range of high-profile popular music museums in pursuit of this line of inquiry. The goal is not simply to produce a generic survey or typology of displays, but to place the use of different forms of museum display within the specific historical trajectory that has produced steadily larger numbers of these kinds of museums in recent years. I organize these exhibitionary types into two broad streams of museum exhibition practice implied in the historical survey presented here: a populist-vernacular stream of museum display and an institutional-educational one. I seek to place the exhibitionary practices of contemporary popular music museums in a broader and longer trajectory of similar practices in order to get a more grounded sense of the more important characteristics of these kinds of museums.

  16. SSL Adoption by Museums: Survey Results, Analysis, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, T. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Druzik, J. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY report that summarizes the results of a survey of the museum community regarding conversions to SSL in museums. Responses provided real-world insight into how LEDs are being incorporated into museums, and what successes and hurdles have been encountered in the process.

  17. Slovene Ethnographic Museum Web Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Špiček

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:Are you interested in the night view of Ljubljana or in the view on the Ljubljana skyscraper in the 30- ies of the 20th century? What did Cerknica look like in that time? What did a typical alpine house look like? What beds were used fifty years ago? Are you a sports fan interested in the training of Yugoslav athletic team in 1953? Is it true that Anton Codelli and his colleague Leo Poljanec set up the first wireless telegraph station for the company Telefunken in the West African German colony of Togo? What is a Palm Sunday bundle? Is a duel between a woman of Carinthia and Carniola really painted on a wooden bee hive panel? What on earth is an object called »roš«? What chimneys were built on the roofs of the Artiže village? The answers to these unusual questions can be found on the SEM (Slovene Ethnographic Museum website. The SEM documentation comprises numerous collections of photographs which are of interest to ethnologists as well as to the general public. To facilitate the access to them SEM bought the first scanner and started to scan individual photos in 1997. In 2007 SEM continued with systematic digitisation of the most frequently used collections of photos. In 2009 the activities were continued (partly in cooperation with external partners and we joined the Athena EU project. In order to be promoted the entire collections were published on the SEM website and made accessible to a broad audience. The MINOK software enabling the creation of html catalogues was used. As static catalogues were unsuitable for inclusion on the website, a new application using dynamic html was designed to create the gallery view of museum objects and photos, photo slide show, keyword filter, geolocation filter, display of geolocation on a map, and to offer the possibility of advanced searching. The Galerist software was designed by an external partner. It enables html catalogue import, sorting and editing XML files; it is possible to

  18. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  19. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  20. The Conference in the Moscow Kremlin State Museums “Historical Weapons in Museums and Private Collections”

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey P. Orlenko

    2017-01-01

    In November 2016 in the Moscow Kremlin State Historical and Cultural Museum and Heritage Site in the framework of events dedicated to the 210th anniversary of the Armoury Chamber museum, an international conference “Historical weapons in museums and private collections”. This scientific forum continued the tradition of conferences held in the Moscow Kremlin Museums in 1999-2007. The participants of this forum discussed a number of priority topics for the studies of the weapon collection h...

  1. Marine chronometers at Greenwich a catalogue of marine chronometers at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

    CERN Document Server

    Betts, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    This is a comprehensive, illustrated catalogue of the 200+ marine chronometers in the collections of Royal Museums Greenwich. Every chronometer has been completely dismantled, studied and recorded, and illustrations include especially commissioned line drawings as well as photographs. The collection is also used to illustrate a newly researched and up-to-date chapter describing the history of the marine chronometer, so the book is much more than simply a catalogue. The history chapter naturally includes the story of John Harrison’s pioneering work in creating the first practical marine timekeepers, all four of which are included in the catalogue, newly photographed and described in minute detail for the first time. In fact full technical and historical data are provided for all of the marine chronometers in the collection, to an extent never before attempted, including biographical details of every maker represented. A chapter describes how the 19th century English chronometer was manufactured, and another ...

  2. Cultural property, museums and Tourism: analysis of the public factor in the Museum of Caceres (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Marcos Arévalo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work exposes the interim analysis of the results obtained so far on the ongoing research carried on over the Social Anthropology final Master´s degree project at the University of Extremadura entitled "Analysis of public factor at the Cáceres’ Museum". The research aims to establish a profile of each one of the Caceres Museum Visitors and also to aknowledge the perceptions, representation and the connection the Museum neighborhood residents have towards the institution with the idea of using this previously mentioned gathered information in order to contribute to the planification of activities and to generate links between the Museum and its public. In order to accomplish this objective, Anthropology own data recollection techniques such as the participant observation and surveys have been used at the first instance and in-depth interviews at the later stage.

  3. Meeting Ontario's electricity supply challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between nuclear generation and other existing power generation, with particular reference to the natural gas industry. The aim of the paper was to present a rationale for an extensive nuclear restart in the near future in Ontario. An energy forecast was provided, generating capacity requirements were examined, with particular reference to requirements beyond conservation and renewable energy supplies. The cost effectiveness of nuclear rehabilitation was compared to combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT) in terms of capital and non-fuel costs. Future prospects of gas prices were discussed, as well as the possibilities of demand outstripping supply. CCGT costs were compared to nuclear rehabilitation in terms of overall electricity prices, including capital, non-fuel operating costs and fuel costs. Steps towards making the nuclear option a reality included a sustainable market environment; clear policy framework; a balanced energy mix; long term price certainty; and clear regulatory requirements. In was concluded that in order to regenerate its potential, the nuclear industry must demonstrate world class project management; fixed scope; fixed supplier prices; program commitment; guarantees; and realistic future production estimates. It was also concluded that nuclear restart and life extension was an extremely attractive option for consumers, offering long term stable competitive power, with fuel diversity and future reserves as well as zero greenhouse gas emissions and an optimization and use of existing facilities. Challenges in creating the right climate for nuclear rehabilitation were the difficulties in making the nuclear option attractive to investors as well as developing correct estimation of project times, costs, and scopes and allocation of project risks. tabs., figs

  4. Ontario Hydro 1982 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    Due to the economic recession, primary electrical energy demand for the year failed to exceed that of the previous year for the first time since 1944. Actual demand was 100.8 billion kWh, 0.8 per cent below 1981. However, annual peak demand reached 18.1 million kW on January 18, an all-time high, and 5.4 per cent over January 1981. There were 104.1 billion kWh of electricity generated during the year, nearly equally from nuclear, coal, and water power. Nuclear generating units continued their outstanding performance. Bruce-3 completed a 494-day run at continuous power. NPD Generating Station celebrated 20 years of operation. Pickering B unit 5 started up and produced its first power. At Bruce A, a remote-controlled vehicle was used to remove damaged fuel to a shielded flask, completing the job in a short time with low staff radiation exposure. Bruce B construction progressed on schedule; while at Darlington, design and construction continued at a high level, with 1700 workers on site at year-end. Actual net income was $348 million, $38 million below forecast. Coal deliveries were 13.4 million Mg (23 per cent over 1981). Nuclear fuel deliveries to generating stations were 996 Mg (3 per cent over 1981). Agreements were negotiated for the supply of 5200 Mg of uranium concentrates during 1985-93. Nuclear fuel manufacturing contracts were awarded at lower prices than previously attained. Income totalling $163 million from electricity exports to the U.S.A. reduced overall cost of providing electricity to Ontario customers by 5.1 per cent. The Residential Energy Advisory Program surveyed 16,000 homeowners wishing to improve home energy efficiency. There were 20,000 residential customers who received grants to convert from oil to electric heating. Additional consumption resulting from these conversions is estimated at 280 million kWh

  5. Restructuring in Ontario : electricity sector reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, S.

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's electricity reform strategy was outlined along with challenge facing Ontario's electricity supply and demand with particular focus on the issue of replacing coal-fired generation. According to reports by the Independent Electricity Market Operator, short-term reserve margins were higher in 2004 than they were in 2003 due to the return to service of some nuclear generating units and planned capacity additions. Ontario's long-term supply and demand situation was also examined. It was noted that lenders hesitate to finance the expansion of generation companies selling into the spot market. Many lenders are requiring that half of the project's output be sold in advance on contract. Other challenges include Ontario's aging generation infrastructure and rising energy prices. The presentation included graphs that compared electricity costs for residential and small business customers across various provinces and states. The main supply and conservation challenges revolve around the large investments required by 2020 to replace coal plants, retire nuclear plants and projected load growth. Ontario's current generation capacity is 154 TWh and the mix is represented by 40 per cent nuclear, 25 per cent coal, 25 per cent hydro, 8 per cent natural gas, 1 per cent oil, and 1 per cent biomass and other renewable energy sources. This paper also addressed the issue of coal generation and air pollution and emphasized the importance of looking at the broad externalities associated with air emissions. tabs., figs

  6. Marketing program for R2000 in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killins, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    In the Ontario new housing market, Ontario Hydro's goal is to reduce the demand for electricity, increase the utility's visibility in this market, and increase customer satisfaction. Analyses have demonstrated that it costs less to construct new houses according to R-2000 insulation standards than to install new power production and transmission facilities. Research has also shown that R-2000 houses have better air quality and energy efficiency than ordinary houses. Nevertheless, most home builders have little enthusiasm for R-2000 houses; the strictness of airtightness standards, the slowness of certification, excessive paperwork, and a lack of promised marketing support are cited as the reasons for this. Ontario Hydro and builders' associations have signed a cooperative agreement for certifying new houses with the object of self-financing the program. The program intends to see construction of 1,000 R-2000 houses in 1990. To carry out this objective, some elements have been added to Ontario Hydro's marketing program in order to make potential customers aware of the advantages of the R-2000 house. Field staff will receive rigorous training in order to prepare them for helping the diverse types of builders. A mail campaign, focusing on areas not served by natural gas where significant numbers of new houses are being built, intends to bring home builders and buyers together. In February 1990, Ontario Hydro signed agreements with four major housing manufacturers to construct a significant proportion of the R-2000 housing stock

  7. 75 FR 63516 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ...: Elizabeth Lyons, Director of Special Events and Board Liaison, Institute of Museum and Library Services... and Library Services, related to museum and library services. If you need special accommodations due... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services...

  8. Science Engagement at the Museum School: Teacher Perspectives on the Contribution of Museum Pedagogy to Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the accounts of science teachers working within the UK's only "museum school" and what they perceive as the benefits and shortcomings of "museum pedagogy" as a process of object-based teaching (and learning). Museum pedagogy is in this context considered for its potential in harmonising informal and formal…

  9. 75 FR 32818 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the agenda of...

  10. Museum promotion and cultural salience: the agenda of the Athenian Acropolis museum

    OpenAIRE

    Zakakis, Nikos; Bantimaroudis, Philemon; Zyglidopoulos, Stylianos

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines a process of agenda building in the context of cultural organizations. We chose the Acropolis Museum, as a new, emerging cultural organization in the European periphery which engages in public actions, in the form of symbolic initiatives, in order to set a specific cultural agenda for Greek and international media. We scrutinize seven symbolic initiatives publicized by the museum, as attributes that influence media content. We conclude that development of cultural/edu...

  11. Science literacy and natural history museums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-10-15

    Oct 15, 2010 ... Paradoxically, this is probably the period in the history of advanced countries in which increasing public and personal efforts have been directed toward the dissemination of scientific knowledge to increase public understanding of science. This article vindicates the role of natural history museums in ...

  12. Audiences, museums and the English middle class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Longhurst

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly accepted way to analyse any media product is to consider production, text and audience processes. In a deceptively simple way, a television programme, for example, can be examined in the institutional, social and political context in which it is produced and with respect to the organizational framework that provides its immediate production environment. Second, its textual structures and strategies can be analysed using different approaches, such as structuralism or (in certain respects content analysis. Third, the way in which the audience understands (or decodes the text can be considered, as can the makeup of the audience, in terms of standard factors such as class, gender, age, ethnicity and so on. There are many variations on this sort of approach. This paper starts from such a premise. It suggests that in addition to the well formulated approaches to the study of the museum that focus generally on the institutional and wider social context for museums, or on specific museums and the processes that occur within them, or on the much studied strategies for display and narration of texts, the audiences for museums are also important.

  13. Beyond regress: museum records management in Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the needs of the public and researchers who look up to ... The vision for NMMZ as stated in the ... For instance, the Natural History. Museum ... locate objects and make them available to us- ers when ... enduring value are provided. Overall ...

  14. appropriate strategies for designing contemporary art museums

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-16

    Jul 16, 2016 ... such as (aesthetic style designed for the set, easy access to the collections and availability of educational .... Thus, any decisions to encounter different cultures can help the ... effect of museum attraction on cultural tourism status in the ..... Making the space dynamic and attractive by providing adequate ...

  15. Publication List - New York State Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Museum, Albany.

    Presented is a list of publications in six areas: (1) Anthropology and Archeology, (2) Botany, (3) Entomology, (4) Zoology, (5) Geology and Paleontology, and (6) Miscellaneous. This list was produced by the New York State Department of Education in cooperation with the New York State Museum. The list includes the publication number, author(s),…

  16. Preservation management for libraries, archives and museums

    CERN Document Server

    Gorman, G E

    2006-01-01

    Memory institutions such as libraries, archives, galleries and museums all share pressing concerns about preserving heritage. This book charts the diversity of preservation management in the contemporary information landscape, and offers guidance on preservation methods for the sustainability of collections from a range of international experts.

  17. Transmedial Museum Experiences: the case of Moesgaard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajares Tosca, Susana

    2016-01-01

    This article’s aim is to elucidate the uncertain ontological status of the transmedial museum experience, which I define as the aesthetic encounter of a user with the complex object that is the conjunction of historical artefact, informative label and fictional stories on different media platform...

  18. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.M.; Gorgels, P.; Rutledge, L.W.; Schreiber, G.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how Semantic Web

  19. The Ethics of Evaluation in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    2015-01-01

    Ethics in research and evaluation has a long standing history, one steeped with legal and moral implications. This article addresses the technicalities of ethics in evaluation as well as highlights the importance for museum educators to prioritize adopting such practices. While understanding the myriad of ethical concerns and best practices can be…

  20. The Art of Playful Mobility in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel Cristina G.; Walker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Many of us interact with other people in online games and social networks, through multiple digital devices. But harnessing playful and mobile activities for museum learning is mostly undeveloped. In this chapter we explore play as a structure to support visitor learning, drawing from internation...

  1. Museums and Adults Learning: Perspectives from Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Alan, Ed.; Stannett, Annette, Ed.

    This book contains 28 papers presenting perspectives from Europe on museums and adult learning. The papers, each of which is devoted to a specific country, examine topics such as the following: further education and inservice training; programs for unemployed individuals; lectures and open days; elderly visitors; immigrants; refugees; disabled…

  2. Art, the Natural Sciences and a Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterberg, Adele Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    Described is a school-museum program which linked art and science through the study of small mammals and birds in relation to color, form, and communication. Art, audiovisual aids, research, readings, language, and communication were combined in this interdisciplinary program. (KC)

  3. The Museum and the Gifted Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karen B.

    1985-01-01

    The article presents questioning strategies that can be used when introducing gifted children to the art museum. The strategies utilize eight creative processes and seventeen content, process, and product modifications, based on the differentiation models of Frank Williams and June Maker. A single work of art is used and examples of questions…

  4. Information seeking behaviour of online museum visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette

    visitors pursuing a long-standing interest or hobby. The second part of the talk will present preliminary findings from a study of user motivation in the context of Europeana.eu. The talk will invite to reflections and a discussion of how we can explore and evaluate motivation of virtual museum visitors....

  5. Prague: The City Is the Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2001-01-01

    States that Prague, the capital of the Czech-Republic, is a virtual art museum because of the number of architectural styles and other artworks throughout the city. Explores the various architectural styles that are present in the city from the Gothic monasteries and churches to examples of contemporary styles. (CMK)

  6. The Development of a Virtual Dinosaur Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Wernhuar; Liou, Hsin-Hun

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study the network and virtual reality technologies for developing a virtual dinosaur museum, which provides a Web-learning environment for students of all ages and the general public to know more about dinosaurs. We first investigate the method for building the 3D dynamic models of dinosaurs, and then describe…

  7. Review of The Museum of the World [website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Lash

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The British Museum, in partnership with the Google Cultural Institute, has developed a digital interface featuring selected objects from their collections: The Museum of the World. The mission of the project is to make knowledge and culture of the 'whole of humanity' available to all as a Museum of and for the World (MacGregor 2015. This impressive effort pushes the bounds of what digital heritage can be, but also raises important questions about the role of the museum, public interaction, and the presentation of world history. This article is a review of the digital interface: The Museum of the World.

  8. Recovering the royal cuisine in Chosun Dynasty and its esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Kyung Chung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We believe that researching the cuisine consumed by the royal family, in particular the king, during the 500-year long Chosun Dynasty is an interesting and meaningful endeavor. This task is an important part of unraveling the cultural significance of Korean cuisine in the 21st century, a new age of gastronomy. Until now, research has largely focused on recreating Chosun royal cuisine based on oral statements from staff in the last royal kitchen or the Uikwe (儀軌, the Royal Protocols which recorded food consumed at banquets. However, little research has been conducted on ordinary royal cuisine consumed by the king, mainly because of a lack of materials to study. This article aims to shed light on this topic and recreate what every day royal cuisine looked like in the late stages of the Chosun Dynasty by examining joseoksangsikbalgi (朝夕上食撥記, memos of morning and evening ancestral rites table and judaryebalgi (晝茶禮撥記, memos of daytime tea ceremonies. The memos are similar to the chanpumdanja (饌品單子, literally meaning “a list of dishes served on the table” that recorded national banquets and therefore do not contain records of ordinary royal cuisine. However, the memos of morning and evening ancestral rites table still remain. These documents describe food offered to the deceased, which was the same as the meals they regularly ate while alive. Accordingly, we attempted to reproduce the traditional table setting for ordinary royal cuisine served to King Kojong (高宗 by analyzing these memos. King Kojong (1852–1919 was the 26th king of the Chosun Dynasty, and a detailed description of the sangsik (上食, ancestral rites table prepared following his death in January 1919 is present in the morning and evening sangsik memos and daytime tea ceremony memos from October 11, 1919. After analyzing the memos from after King Kojong's death in 1919, we were able to determine that the cuisine consisted of rice as bap (a

  9. Lessons learned from Ontario wind energy disputes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Stewart; Mabee, Warren; Baxter, Jamie; Christidis, Tanya; Driver, Liz; Hill, Stephen; McMurtry, J. J.; Tomkow, Melody

    2016-02-01

    Issues concerning the social acceptance of wind energy are major challenges for policy-makers, communities and wind developers. They also impact the legitimacy of societal decisions to pursue wind energy. Here we set out to identify and assess the factors that lead to wind energy disputes in Ontario, Canada, a region of the world that has experienced a rapid increase in the development of wind energy. Based on our expertise as a group comprising social scientists, a community representative and a wind industry advocate engaged in the Ontario wind energy situation, we explore and suggest recommendations based on four key factors: socially mediated health concerns, the distribution of financial benefits, lack of meaningful engagement and failure to treat landscape concerns seriously. Ontario's recent change from a feed-in-tariff-based renewable electricity procurement process to a competitive bid process, albeit with more attention to community engagement, will only partially address these concerns.

  10. Assessing Ontario's Personal Support Worker Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Laporte

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to the growing role of personal support workers (PSWs in the delivery of health care services to Ontarians, the Ontario government has moved forward with the creation of a PSW registry. This registry will be mandatory for all PSWs employed by publicly funded health care employers, and has the stated objectives of better highlighting the work that PSWs do in Ontario, providing a platform for PSWs and employers to more easily access the labour market, and to provide government with information for human resources planning. In this paper we consider the factors that brought the creation of a PSW registry onto the Ontario government’s policy agenda, discuss how the registry is being implemented, and provide an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of this policy change.

  11. Uranium and thorium deposits of Northern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This, the second edition of the uranium-thorium deposit inventory, describes briefly the deposits of uranium and/or thorium in northern Ontario, which for the purposes of this circular is defined as that part of Ontario lying north and west of the Grenville Front. The most significant of the deposits described are fossil placers lying at or near the base of the Middle Precambrian Huronian Supergroup. These include the producing and past-producing mines of the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area. Also included are the pitchblende veins spatially associated with Late Precambrian (Keweenawan) diabase dikes of the Theano Point - Montreal River area. Miscellaneous Early Precambrian pegmatite, pitchblende-coffinite-sulphide occurrences near the Middle-Early Precambrian unconformity fringing the Lake Superior basin, and disseminations in diabase, granitic rocks, alkalic complexes and breccias scattered throughout northern Ontario make up the rest of the occurrences

  12. Effect of different levels of royal jelly on biochemical parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... treatment of cancer, atherosclerosis, hypertension, infertility, asthma, depression and ... and body composition was determined by Tanita BC 418 MA. Royal jelly. Royal jelly used in the study was ... acids content of royal jelly. The composition of the royal jelly used in the study was determined. Saritaş et al.

  13. Increasing the Sustainability of Museums through International Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Luiza POP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums use resources in order to provide public goods and services. The most important sources of income for many museums are budgetary subsidies. Unfortunately, these grants are limited and shrinking. In this context, during the last years the need for sustainable development of museums was stressed. In order to continue to operate, museums were forced to find ways of increasing their own income and keeping their costs under control. Thus museums have begun to use management and marketing strategies similar to those used by private companies. This paper examines the positive effects of international strategy implementation on museums’ sustainability. The first part of the paper explains why it is necessary to reform the traditional management of museums, which its main development directions are, what the sustainable development of museums is and why they should become sustainable. In the second part our research conducted on three museums (Guggenheim, Louvre, Hermitage shows that international expansion helps museums to increase their sustainability. The international strategy enables museums to increase their revenue, through licensing agreements, reduce their storage costs, highlight their heritage, improve their market image and be closer to consumers. Thus, through a strategy applied until recently only in the private sector, museums can improve their sustainability, but also better fulfill their purpose of serving the society.

  14. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF TOURIST POTENTIAL OF MUSEUMS OF KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Kirilicheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The article describes the tourist potential of two large museums of the Krasnodar Territory, the Krasnodar State Historical and Archaeological Museum-Reserve named after E.D. Felitsyn and Krasnodar Regional Art Museum named after F.A. Kovalenko. Much attention is paid to the classification of museums in the Krasnodar Territory. Methods. In the study were used a comparative-geographical method, a systematic approach, an analysis of statistical-mathematical materials and an analysis of the leisure profile of citizens. Findings. A comparative assessment of the potential of two large museums of the region is given. We also conducted an analysis of the survey data of the leisure profile among the townspeople in the city of Krasnodar in order to identify which of the museums is more popular. The main indicators such as the number of storage units, the total exposition and exhibition area, the number of sightseeing visits and mass events, the number of educational programs and exhibitions, the number of employees were examined and analyzed. Distinctions between museums are also noted. Conclusions. An analysis of these data showed that both museums have sufficient tourist potential to represent the city and get acquainted with the city through museums. The results of an analysis of events held in museums to attract visitors are presented. The sufficient tourist potential of two large museums for representation of the city and region is defined. The directions for their development as objects of tourism are proposed.

  15. Authentication at a small museum: the kindness of strangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Douglas K. S.

    2000-03-01

    Over the last twenty years, I have served as curator and director of several small and medium size museums including the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, Tennessee; the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Alabama; the San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, Texas, and most recently, the Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, Massachusetts. The largest budget approached three million dollars, minute in comparison with the Metropolitan Museum of Art of the National Gallery. Our resources were limited and the demands of building maintenance, programs, acquisitions and conservation far outstripped the amount of money available to be spent. Each museum housed between five and thirty thousand art works and generally speaking the collections were eclectic. It is not unusual at these city museums to find extraordinary oddities ranging from the finest Wedgwood collection in the world in Birmingham to the most extensive group of Latin American folk art objects to be found anywhere in San Antonio. Each year museums of comparable size are offered thousands of art works on all shapes and sizes form all periods and cultures. Only rarely does the staff have the expertise to evaluate and determine the authenticity of the eclectic group of objects both in the collection and being offered. With few curators and in many cases even fewer local experts to call upon, the museum professional must be both bold and creative.

  16. Ontario feed-in-tariff programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatchew, Adonis; Baziliauskas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Recent feed-in-tariff (FIT) programs in Ontario, Canada have elicited a very strong supply response. Within the first year of their inception, the Ontario Power Authority received applications totaling over 15,000 MW, equivalent to about 43% of current Ontario electricity generating capacity. The overwhelming share of applications is for wind-power (69%) and solar photovoltaic (28%) generating facilities. Wind generation is being remunerated at 14-19 cents /kWh. Solar facilities receive from 40 to 80 cents /kWh. The initiative, which responds to Provincial legislation is administratively divided into applications for facilities exceeding 10 kW (the FIT program) and those less than or equal to 10 kW (the microFIT program). This paper describes the programs and their features, compares them to their predecessors in Ontario as well as to programs elsewhere, analyses the reasons for the very strong response, and assesses their efficacy and sustainability. - Research highlights: → Recent feed-in-tariff (FIT) programs in Ontario, Canada have elicited a very strong supply response. Within the first year, applications totaled over 15,000 MW, equivalent to about 43% of current Ontario electricity generating capacity. → Most projects are either solar or wind. → Likely causes of strong supply response-preferred system access and favorable, secure tariffs. (Wind generation is being remunerated at 14-19 cents /kWh. Solar facilities receive from 40 to 80 cents /kWh.) → Long term political sustainability of present program is in question.

  17. The potential of solar PV in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMonagle, R.

    2005-01-01

    Canada has lagged behind other industrialized nations in the growth of solar energy markets. Currently, over 78 per cent of the global market for solar energy is for grid-connected applications where power is fed into the electrical distribution network. Less than 3.5 per cent of the Canadian solar market is grid-connected. This report investigated the potential size of the photovoltaic (PV) market in Ontario given adequate support from both governments and utilities. The forecast was based on sustainable growth levels that the solar industry as a whole might maintain over an extended period of time. It was suggested that it is technically feasible to install over 3000 MW of PV in single, detached homes in the province, which could generate over 3200 GWh each year. If the right policy conditions were put in place, the technical potential for PV on all buildings in Ontario is over 14,000 MW by 2025, which would generate over 13,000 GWh annually. Support mechanisms such as the Advanced Renewable Tariff (ART) or Standard Offer Contracts (SOC) will enable the PV industry to build capacity. Future markets for PV include new homes, commercial buildings and the existing housing stock. With a properly designed system, it is forecasted that the deployment of PV by 2025 could result in the involvement of 400,000 homes with over 1200 MW of installed capacity and over 290 MW installed annually by 2025. Recommendations to Ontario Power Authority's (OPA) report supply mix report focused on the use of SOCs as the appropriate support mechanism to start building solar capacity in Ontario, as projections using SOCs would see Ontario following the growth patterns of other nations. It was concluded that the OPA report does not acknowledge the current growth rates of PV globally, nor does it fully consider the potential of PV in Ontario. 9 refs., 8 figs

  18. Museum nuclear science programs during the past 30 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsee, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The American Museum of Atomic Energy was opened as a program of the Atomic Energy Commission. The name was changed in 1977 to the American Museum of Science and Energy to reflect an expanded roll of the Department of Energy. From 1954 until 1980 the museum was the base for a Traveling Exhibit Program that visited schools, state fairs, shopping centers and malls, libraries, summer camps, and science museums throughout the United States. Today the museum transfers information on the research and development of all the energy sources, the environmental impact of these sources and possible solutions to these impacts. The museum also manages an Outreach Program to area schools and coordinates several special events for student visits to the museum

  19. Royal Wine Corporation d/b/a/ Royal Kedem (Herzog Wine Cellars), Oxnard, CA; Proposed Settlement of Clean Water Act Class II Administrative Penalty and Opportunity to Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Notice of Proposed Settlement of Clean Water Act Class II Administrative Penalty and Opportunity to Comment In the Matter of Royal Wine Corporation d/b/a/ Royal Kedem (Herzog Wine Cellars), Oxnard, California.

  20. The Science Museum and the Leonardo da Vinci Quincentenary Exhibition of 1952

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Professor Jim Bennett

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A large and successful exhibition to mark the 500th anniversary of the birth of Leonardo da Vinci was held at the Royal Academy, Burlington House, London, in 1952. It was an important event for the public appreciation of Leonardo’s genius. The proposal for the exhibition had come from the Science Museum, whose staff arranged a ‘scientific section’ of the exhibition, providing and displaying photographs and models. The story of these early models is particularly interesting in the light of the subsequent expansion in the use of mechanical models and animations to interpret and present Leonardo’s work. Questions that surrounded their introduction are accentuated by the ubiquity of models today. Some of the 1952 models will be displayed at the Science Museum in 2016, alongside an exhibition of a large group of ‘historical models’ first displayed in Milan in 1953. The occasion should provoke some thoughtful consideration of the current influence of this tool for research and display.

  1. Application of reliability methods in Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppesen, R.; Ravishankar, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Ontario Hydro have established a reliability program in support of its substantial nuclear program. Application of the reliability program to achieve both production and safety goals is described. The value of such a reliability program is evident in the record of Ontario Hydro's operating nuclear stations. The factors which have contributed to the success of the reliability program are identified as line management's commitment to reliability; selective and judicious application of reliability methods; establishing performance goals and monitoring the in-service performance; and collection, distribution, review and utilization of performance information to facilitate cost-effective achievement of goals and improvements. (orig.)

  2. Sparking investment in Ontario's power generation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the business strategy needed to spark investment in Ontario's power generation industry. It examines the process of decision making and investing in an uncertain environment. The paper suggests that any strategy based on one view of the future courts trouble and that strategic flexibility can prepare for what cannot be predicted. Finally the paper suggests that Ontario needs to create a stable policy and regulatory environment that allows investors to fulfill reasonable expectations and investors need to place bets that provide the flexibility to respond quickly to changing market conditions

  3. The Accounting Register of a Royal Secretary in Aragonese Naples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Russo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the crucial years of the succession war that involved the Kingdom of Naples after Alfonso the Magnanimous’death (1459-1464, a secretary of the new king Ferrante I of Aragon, Antonello Petrucci, was entrusted with royal financial charges. He therefore compiled an account book, where receipts and payments of the royal finances were carefully recorded. It has been recently discovered: this paper aims at examining its actual framework as well as the relative volume of the state budget. Because of its new and comprehensive body of evidence, Petrucci’s account book is a very useful source, which may provide additional informations not only on the bulk of the state funds and expenditure but also on the structure of the king’s household and on the system of the royal financial administration, which appears now as characterized by a more complex organization than it was supposed to be in the past.

  4. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite.

  5. Ontario's standard offer programs: moving toward a cleaner energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shervill, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Ontario Standard Offer Program is designed to ensure reliable, long-term electricity supply for Ontario. The functional areas of the program are planning, conservation and supply sector development. The long-term plan is to create a self-sustaining electricity market in Ontario with 2700 MW renewable sources by 2010 including wind, waterpower, solar photovoltaic (PV) and biomass

  6. "Strengthening" Ontario Universities: A Neoliberal Reconstruction of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Bob; Kuchapski, Renée

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews neoliberalism as an ideology that has influenced higher education generally and Ontario higher education in particular. It includes a discourse analysis of "Strengthening Ontario's Centres of Creativity, Innovation and Knowledge" (Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities, 2012), a government discussion…

  7. Opening Doors to Nursing Degrees: A Proposal from Ontario's Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleges Ontario, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Ontario needs to expand nursing education options to improve access to the nursing profession, create better pathways amongst all nursing occupations, and build Ontario's capacity to meet the province's long-term nursing needs. Ontario's colleges are capable of playing a larger role within a long-term provincial strategy for sustaining and…

  8. Royal Order of 5 December 1975 amending the Royal Order of 11 May 1971 embodying the general Military Regulations for Protection Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Royal Order amends the Royal Order on general Military Regulations for Protection against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations to bring it into line with the Royal Order of 23 December 1970, amending the general Regulations for Protection of the Population and Workers against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations of 28 February 1963, subject to certain adaptations specific to military activities. (NEA) [fr

  9. Ontario Hydro's plan for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens-Guille, P.D.; Howes, H.A.; Freire-Canosa, J.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive plan for the management of used nuclear fuel has been published by Ontario Hydro. In this paper current practices are discussed and actions leading to disposal in a repository are outlined. Extended storage options are discussed should disposal be delayed

  10. Wind power and bats : Ontario guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuiness, F. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Peterborough, ON (Canada). Renewable Energy Resources; Stewart, J. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Toronto, ON (Canada). Wildlife Section

    2008-07-01

    None of the 8 species of bats in Ontario are considered as species at risk. However, all bats in Ontario are protected under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) is responsible for identifying significant wildlife habitat for bats, including hibernacula and maternity roosts. The MNR's role in wind development includes environmental assessments (EA) and surveys. The MNR bat guideline includes a summary of Ontario species, a literature review of research related to wind turbines and bats, and a review of methods for assessing and monitoring bats. Guideline development includes a bat working group responsible for obtaining data on risk factors and monitoring requirements. The MNR has determined that site selection is critical for minimizing potential impacts. Wind farm proponents can use MNR data, information, and maps for their site selection process. Information requirements include bat species data; habitat data; and meteorological data. The presence of risk factors results in a sensitivity rating. The MNR is also developing a site sensitivity mapping project in order to assist proponents in making siting decisions. All proposed sites are required to conduct pre-construction site surveys. Acoustic detectors and radar are used to determine bat activity at the site. Monitoring and mitigation strategies include selective wind turbine shutdown during key periods or weather conditions. tabs., figs.

  11. Measuring Social Capital in Hamilton, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Peter; Williams, Allison; Simone, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Social capital has been studied by academics for more than 20 years and within the past decade there has been an explosion of growth in research linking social capital to health. This paper investigates social capital in Hamilton, Ontario by way of a telephone survey of 1,002 households in three neighbourhood groups representing high, mixed and…

  12. Poster - 27: Incident Learning Practices in Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angers, Crystal; Medlam, Gaylene; Liszewski, Brian; Simniceanu, Carina [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Mississauga Halton/Central West Regional Cancer Center, Odette Cancer Centre, Cancer Care Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The Radiation Incident and Safety Committee (RISC), established and supported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), is responsible for advising the Provincial Head of the Radiation Treatment program on matters relating to provincial reporting of radiation incidents with the goal of improved risk mitigation. Methods: The committee is made up of Radiation Incident Leads (RILs) with representation from each of the 14 radiation medicine programs in the province. RISC routinely meets to review recent critical incidents and to discuss provincial reporting processes and future directions of the committee. Regular face to face meetings have provided an excellent venue for sharing incident learning practices. A summary of the incident learning practices across Ontario has been compiled. Results: Almost all programs in Ontario employ an incident learning committee to review incidents and identify corrective actions or process improvements. Tools used for incident reporting include: paper based reporting, a number of different commercial products and software solutions developed in-house. A wide range of classification schema (data taxonomies) are employed, although most have been influenced by national guidance documents. The majority of clinics perform root cause analyses but utilized methodologies vary significantly. Conclusions: Most programs in Ontario employ a committee approach to incident learning. However, the reporting tools and taxonomies in use vary greatly which represents a significant challenge to provincial reporting. RISC is preparing to adopt the National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Therapy (NSIR-RT) which will standardize incident reporting and facilitate data analyses aimed at identifying targeted improvement initiatives.

  13. Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework: A Critical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, James

    2013-01-01

    Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) is reviewed and found not to meet all five criteria proposed for a strong quality assurance system focused on student learning. The QAF requires a statement of student learning outcomes and a method and means of assessing those outcomes, but it does not require that data on achievement of intended…

  14. The Status of Benthos in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benthic community of Lake Ontario was dominated by an amphipod (Diporeia spp.) prior to the 1990’s. Two dreissenid mussel species D. polymorpha (zebra) and D. bugensis (quagga) were introduced in 1989 and 1991 via ballast water exchange. D. bugensis was observed as deep as 85...

  15. Global warming: Towards a strategy for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A discussion paper is provided as background to a proposed public review of a strategy for Ontario's response to global warming. Global warming arises from the generation of greenhouse gases, which come from the use of fossil fuels, the use of chlorofluorocarbons, and deforestation. Energy policy is the backbone of achieving climate stability since the burning of fossil fuels releases most of the greenhouse gases, mainly carbon dioxide. Canada is, by international standards, a very energy-intensive country and is among the world's largest emitters of carbon dioxide on a per capita basis. Ontario is the largest energy-using province in Canada, and fossil fuels represent over 80% of provincial energy use. A proposed goal for Ontario is to provide leadership in stabilizing atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases, while minimizing the social, economic, and environmental costs in Ontario of adapting to global warming. A proposed first step to address global warming is to achieve reductions in expected emissions of the greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, so that levels by the year 2000 are lower than in 1989. Current policies and regulations helping to reduce the greenhouse effect include some of the current controls on automotive emissions and the adoption by the provincial electric utility of targets to reduce electricity demand. New initiatives include establishment of minimum energy efficiency standards and reduction of peak-day electricity use. Action steps for future consideration are detailed in the categories of greenhouse gas emissions reductions, carbon dioxide absorption, and research and analysis into global warming

  16. Seven steps to an energy efficient Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The future of the electricity market in Ontario is examined in light of the recent debate concerning deregulation. This report focuses on measures that would have to be taken to ensure that there will be sufficient electricity available to serve the needs of Ontario. Increasing supply, or decreasing demand are discussed as the obvious answers to the problem at hand. The report concludes that: (1) mechanisms to encourage Demand Side Management and Demand Response have all but disappeared since the opening of the competitive electricity market in Ontario, (2) the current market structure does nothing to stimulate increased supply, nor does it encourage measures to reduce demand; as such, the result is an unsustainable situation. The report further concludes that Demand Side Management and Demand Response programs are essential components of the success of Ontario's evolving electricity market, and recommends programs that are designed and implemented in a manner that dovetail with parallel policies dealing with supply challenges. Seven essential elements of such a policy are discussed. These are: (1) vision and a clear set of goals for demand side management; (2) appropriate market drivers, principles and pricing incentives; (3) a central co-ordinating authority for managing demand side management; (4) appropriate implementation agents to manage programs and processes; (5) incentives to motivate change; (6) widespread education of the market; and (7) appropriate tactics to enable demand side management in sectors

  17. Poster - 27: Incident Learning Practices in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angers, Crystal; Medlam, Gaylene; Liszewski, Brian; Simniceanu, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Incident and Safety Committee (RISC), established and supported by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), is responsible for advising the Provincial Head of the Radiation Treatment program on matters relating to provincial reporting of radiation incidents with the goal of improved risk mitigation. Methods: The committee is made up of Radiation Incident Leads (RILs) with representation from each of the 14 radiation medicine programs in the province. RISC routinely meets to review recent critical incidents and to discuss provincial reporting processes and future directions of the committee. Regular face to face meetings have provided an excellent venue for sharing incident learning practices. A summary of the incident learning practices across Ontario has been compiled. Results: Almost all programs in Ontario employ an incident learning committee to review incidents and identify corrective actions or process improvements. Tools used for incident reporting include: paper based reporting, a number of different commercial products and software solutions developed in-house. A wide range of classification schema (data taxonomies) are employed, although most have been influenced by national guidance documents. The majority of clinics perform root cause analyses but utilized methodologies vary significantly. Conclusions: Most programs in Ontario employ a committee approach to incident learning. However, the reporting tools and taxonomies in use vary greatly which represents a significant challenge to provincial reporting. RISC is preparing to adopt the National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Therapy (NSIR-RT) which will standardize incident reporting and facilitate data analyses aimed at identifying targeted improvement initiatives.

  18. Implementasi Sapta Pesona Pada Museum Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Hamzah

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum refers to the building that keeping the treasures of ancient history or past. Museum is important for our place deepen the knowledge of past history. Many of them are less interested to come to the museum. Travelers make the museum as an alternative tourist spot. Visitors who visit the museum itself mostly for their tour schedule or from institutions or schools of the visitors which was scheduled to visit the museum. Establishing a tourist must pay attention to things that are important in the world of tourism, one  of Sapta Pesona. Sapta pesona is a condition that must be realized in order to attract more tourists to visit an area or region in our country. Meanwhile the condition seen at this time there are 7 (seven elements of Sapta Pesona have not been realized to the maximize at the Museum Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi, still there are some elements in Sapta Pesona are not realized by the museum management that influence the tourist attraction until this time. Some elements are not maximized application that is beautiful and memorable. It is necessary to change the management, promotion, and restoration spatial Mandala Museum Wangsit by 7 (seven elements of Sapta Pesona. Implementation of Sapta Pesona is done in order to attract tourists and increase the level of tourist traffic. Keywords: Museum, Implementation, Sapta Pesona.

  19. Anniversary celebrations at the National Museum of History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ploşniţa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available December 21, 2013 we celebrated 30 years since the founding of the National Museum of History of Moldova. On this occasion the museum has organized several events. Program of the day began with a Round Table “Policies for conservation and restoration of the museum heritage in the Republic of Moldova”. Then, the general director of the museum Eugen Sava opened a solemn assembly in the museum’s Blue Room. During the meeting there were presented congratulatory words addressed to the participants, public figures, university professors, researchers, and museum professionals. Among the activities celebrating the establishment of this prestigious museum on December 21, 1983, there was held the presentation of the second volume of “Studies on Museology” published in Chisinau in 2013. This volume on different aspects of museum work brings knowledge and encourages activities, and practical use of its publication is undeniable. Written in a clear and sober style, it will take an important place among the works devoted to this field of science. The proceedings were inspired by respect for the museum and museology and are a continuation of the tradition of museological research in the National Museum of History of Moldova. In honor of the anniversary there was organized a temporary exhibition “National Museum of History of Moldova: A Brief Illustrated History” aimed to reflect the history of the museum and some parts of its activities during the 30 years by means of photos and documents. The exhibition was divided into several compartments: “Establishment of the Museum”, “The Museum Building” “Exhibition Activities”, “Educational Activities”, “Promotion of the Museum”, “Scientific Development of Cultural and Historical Heritage”, “The Museum’s Publications”. All the events organized on the occasion of the anniversary were attended by a large audience that through its presence and laudatory responses recognized and

  20. Renewables without limits : moving Ontario to advanced renewable tariffs by updating Ontario's groundbreaking standard offer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    2007-11-01

    The Ontario Sustainable Energy Association (OSEA) promotes the development of community-owned renewable energy generation. It was emphasized that in order to achieve OSEA's original objectives of developing as much renewable energy as quickly as possible through community participation, changes are needed to Ontario's groundbreaking standard offer contract (SOC) program. This report examined the status of Ontario's SOC program and proposed changes to the program as part of the program's first two-year review. The report provided a summary of the program and discussed each of the program's goals, notably to encourage broad participation; eliminate barriers to distributed renewable generation; provide a stable market for renewable generation; stimulate new investment in renewable generation; provide a rigorous pricing model for setting the tariffs; create a program applicable to all renewable technologies; provide a simple, streamlined, and cost-effective application process; and provide a dispute resolution process. The program goals as developed by the Ontario Power Authority and Ontario Energy Board were discussed with reference to mixed results to date; simplicity; removing barriers; balancing targets with value to ratepayers; and building on the efforts of OSEA. Advanced renewable tariffs (ART) and tariff determination was also discussed along with ART's in Germany, France, Spain and Ontario. Inflation indexing; tariff degression; proposed new tariffs by technology; and other costs and factors affecting profitability were also reviewed. ref., tabs

  1. Ontario's Clean Air Action Plan : protecting environmental and human health in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's Clean Air Action Plan was launched in June 2000 in an effort to improve air quality and comply with the Canada-Wide Standards for Particulate Matter and Ozone. This paper describes Ontario's approach to reducing smog. Smog-related air pollution is linked to health problems such as premature death, respiratory and heart problems. Smog also contributes to environmental problems such as damage to forests, agricultural crops and natural vegetation. The two main ingredients of smog are ground level ozone and particulate matter. In order to reduce the incidence of smog, the following four key smog-causing pollutants must be reduced: nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, sulphur dioxide and particular matter. This paper includes the 2001 estimates for Ontario's emissions inventory along with Ontario's smog reduction targets. It was noted that approximately half of all smog in Ontario comes from sources in the midwestern United States. The province of Ontario is committed to replacing coal-fired power plants with cleaner sources of energy. It is also considering emission caps for key industrial sectors. The key players in reducing smog include municipalities, industry, individuals, the federal government and programs that reduce emissions in the United States. 3 figs., 8 tabs., 1 appendix

  2. Assessing the financial positions of Ontario`s new electricity companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, T. [Standard and Poor`s, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes the methodology, including the criteria factors, comparable ratings and key credit issues used in assessing the financial positions of Ontario Power Generation Inc., and the Ontario Hydro Services Company. The rating criteria factors include both business factors (such as ownership structure, regulation, service area, operations, management, etc.,) and financial factors (e.g. financial policies and guidelines, recent financial performance, margin analysis, capital structure and borrowing plans, financial projections and sensitivities). Key credit issues include considerations of competitive dynamics, nuclear portfolio performance (for Genco), regulatory changes, cost control, capital spending program, retail business exposure, future financial performance. Comparisons are made with corresponding positions of comparable entities in Australia, Finland, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA. In the case of Ontario Power Generation Inc., the company is assessed to have significant advantages initially, but various uncertainties over the medium term warrant a more cautious view of the credit profile. For the Ontario Hydro Services Company the business risks appear to be low and moderate leverage entails a strong, stable credit profile. The overall assessment of the two companies is that while certain questions such as the workability and credibility of the new industry structure, the problem of stranded debt and questions about the liquidity of market participants remain unsolved, Ontario Power Generation Inc., and the Ontario Hydro Services Company ratings compare favorably with ratings of global industry peers.

  3. Hygrothermal optimisation of museum storage spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2013-01-01

    Despite the large economic and ecologic costs, museum storage spaces are often equipped with extensive air conditioning, to provide the desired stable interior climate. The new “passive conditioning” paradigm aims at resolving these costs: a high-hygrothermal-inertia building with a high-hygrothe......Despite the large economic and ecologic costs, museum storage spaces are often equipped with extensive air conditioning, to provide the desired stable interior climate. The new “passive conditioning” paradigm aims at resolving these costs: a high-hygrothermal-inertia building with a high...... and ecologic cost of conditioning, the paper finally assesses “concentrated dehumidification”: dehumidification during a part of the day only, while leaving the humidity free-running during the rest of the day. It is established that the hygric inertia of the interior air, building walls and stored objects...

  4. Deregulation experiences in Alberta and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction of Nexen Chemicals, one of the largest producers of sodium chlorate in the world, was offered, and a map displaying its locations throughout the world was displayed. Nexen is one of Canada's largest independent oil and gas producers, while Nexen Marketing is involved in the marketing of natural gas in North America. In January 2001, the deregulated market opened in Alberta. High natural gas prices, generation shortages, high prices in California and an upcoming provincial election all combined to complicate the situation. A high degree of volatility characterized the market. A chart displaying weekly average Alberta power and gas prices from Jan 2002 to 13 Oct 2002 was shown. In Ontario, the market opened in May 2002, and the demand growth rate was in the 1 to 2 per cent range. The author indicated that approximately 20 per cent of homeowners in Ontario have signed deals with retailers, contrary to Alberta where very few have done so. A similar chart displaying weekly average Ontario power prices was presented. The issues in Ontario are: consistency in policy, increase market transparency, transmission / distribution price flexibility, overall transmission / distribution to industrial consumers high, and increasing costs of the system operator. In Alberta, the issues are: government intent, congestion management issues, and billing settlement errors that continue. The opportunities offered by a deregulated market include process responsiveness which is rewarded, the ability to look in forward prices when prices fit margin requirement, and gives companies the opportunity to participate in the development of the market. Various charts were also displayed to further illustrate the market in both Alberta and Ontario. figs

  5. New methods of museum objects preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justa, P.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contains 22 papers of which four discuss the use of ionizing radiation in the preservation and restoration of cultural objects, this namely: radiation methods used for the impregnation of wooden cultural objects, a mobile irradiation robot and its uses for the preservation of museum objects, X-ray fluorescence analysis as an auxiliary scientific discipline for restorers, and the use of neutron activation analysis for expertise of paintings. Some 230 participants attended the seminar. (J.B.)

  6. The British Royal Family’s Circumcision Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Darby

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The birth of Prince William’s son in July 2013 was the occasion for an outpouring of media speculation about the fate of the royal baby’s foreskin. The possibility that he might be circumcised was connected to a purported tradition of circumcision within the British royal family, said to be have been initiated either by Queen Victoria or by George I. In this article, we trace the origins and evolution of these stories and assess their validity. Our conclusion is that belief in a royal circumcision tradition derives from the reported circumcision of Prince Charles by the mohel Jacob Snowman in 1948, and the efforts of the British Israelite movement to concoct a “lost tribes of Israel” origin for the British race. These elements merged into a fully developed narrative that was widely disseminated from the late 1990s. The initially separate claim that the tradition was imported from Hanover by George I can be sourced precisely to 2012. We further show that these stories are inventions, and that the royal family circumcision tradition should be regarded as a classic instance of a contemporary legend or urban myth.

  7. Re-engineering production systems: the Royal Netherlands Naval Dockyard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijm, Willem H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Reengineering production systems in an attempt to meet tight cost, quality and leadtime standards has received considerable attention in the last decade. In this paper, we discuss the reengineering process at the Royal Netherlands Naval Dockyard. The process starts with a characterisation and a

  8. Royal Numico N.V. : Resurrecting shareholder value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachotzki, F.; Olson, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    This case presents the extraordinary turn-around engineered at Royal Numico (a specialized nutrition company, previously covered in another Nyenrode case under its old name Nutricia) by a team of managers formed and led by Jan Bennink. Company fortunes were at a low ebb by the beginning of 2002, as

  9. Efficacy of royal jelly on methotrexate-induced systemic oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this present study is to investigate the mucositis caused by methotrexate (MTX), as well as whether the application of royal jelly (RJ) has a protective effect on oxidative stress. This present study included six groups each consisted of 12 Wistar rats. Distilled water (po: peroral) was given to the 1st group as placebo ...

  10. Evaluation of the antioxidant potential of royal jelly during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Galhardo Borguini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly is a creamy substance produced by young nurse worker bees, which has a color that ranges from white to slightly yellow, and is secreted by the hypopharingeal and mandibular glands of the bees. The objective of this work was to assess the in vitro antioxidant potential of royal jelly while in storage. The physical-chemical parameters analyzed were moisture, ascorbic acid and total phenolic content. Alcohol extracts were made and used to evaluate the 1.1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity. The ascorbic acid (to 0.75 from 1.31mg.100g-1wet base and total phenolic content (to 14.26 from 28.30mg GAE.100g-1 wet base of the royal jelly were low. The percentages of DPPH discoloration of the samples were above 50%, except for the samples stored for 90 days. Considering the reduced ascorbic acid and total phenolic content, and the low alcohol DPPH scavenging activity of the samples, it can be concluded that royal jelly presents relatively low antioxidant potential. The storage time did not determine the changes found.

  11. Musei del migration heritage / Migration heritage museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Dragoni

    2015-01-01

    Since the second half of the 1960s of the 20th century, a profound cultural innovation was accompanied to the radical change in the social, political and economic climate. The anthropological notion of culture as opposed to idealistic vision, the unusual and strong interest in material culture, the enunciation of the concept of cultural property by the Franceschini Commission, the luck of the Public History bring a change of the disciplinary statutes of historical sciences, which begin to attend to social history, focusing on the spontaneous sources of information and initiating experiences of oral history. To all this a remarkable transformation of the themes and of the social function of museums is added. This paper illustrates, in relation to this more general context, the foundation and the dissemination of museums dedicated to the history of migration in Italy and in the world, enunciates their possible social utility for the integration of present migrants in Italy and illustrates, by way of example, the museum recently opened in Recanati.

  12. Virtual Museums for Landscape Valorization and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroni, E.

    2017-08-01

    Research in the domain of landscape virtual reconstructions has been mainly focused on digitization and recording inside GIS systems, or real time visualization, paying a minor attention to the development of a methodological approach for the landscape narration, combing different registers, conceptual, emotional incitements and, thus, able to arouse in the public a feeling of emotional "sensing" and self- identification. The landscape reflects also the human activities in the territory and the communities' cultural patterns, their sense of "belonging". In a virtual museum of landscapes, the multidisciplinary approach, the multiplication of perspectives and voices, storytelling, acquire primary importance. A Virtual Museum of landscapes should integrate both holistic and delimited visions. The holistic vision requires a diachronic approach, including both present and past phases of life. On the other side, delimited, or "monographic", representations are useful to go deeper into specific and exemplar stories, regarding specific groups of people. Beside, the emergence of new social media enhancing cultural interactions among people induce the creation of specific social platforms for Cultural Heritage for the active participation of a large number of stakeholders. Co-creation scenarios and tools can be particularly promising. Aton is an example of front-end VR social platform in the web end, for the efficient streaming of medium/large landscape, their exploration and characterization. The Tiber Valley Virtual Museum is an example of sensorial cultural landscape. Starting from the acquisition of topographical data through integrated technologies, several multi-sensory scenarios have been created, inside which visitors can feel embodied and involved.

  13. 76 FR 73663 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of... ethnographic collection from the Conner Museum to the Museum of Anthropology. In June of 2011, the curator of collections at the Conner Museum found four unassociated funerary items in the museum storage area and...

  14. How to meet the climate requirements? Evaluating the indoor climate in three types of Dutch museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.H.J.; Schellen, H.L.; Schijndel, van A.W.M.; Aarle, van M.A.P.; Meinhold, U.; Petzold, H.

    2007-01-01

    In a lot of Dutch museums climate-related problems occur, especially in museums in which the ‘Delta plan’ is implied. Three different types of museums were chosen and thoroughly investigated. The problems in each type of museum are different. Therefore museum climate standards should be customized

  15. Building the image of modern art : the rhetoric of two museums and the representation and canonization of modern art (1935-1975) : the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leigh, Nana

    2008-01-01

    The Rhetoric of Two Museums and the Representation and Canonization of Modern Art (1935-1975): The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York Museums of modern art have determined the course of modern art history. Their contributions to the representation and

  16. Mobile media, mobility and mobilisation in the current museum field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2017-01-01

    Introducing the concept of a 'mobile museology' to describe how museums are currently set in motion by a confluence of cultural, technological and museological developments, this chapter traces the connections between mobile media and notions of mobility and mobilisation in the museum field....... As illustrated by current examples in the chapter, mobile phones have thus provided an opportunity for both augmenting and transcending the museum space, blurring former boundaries between institutions and their environments. At the same time, technological advances and digitial culture developments have also...... required and inspired museums to become organisationally mobile, and to mobilise collections, audiences and institutions in order to fulfill museum missions. In this perspective, mobile media are thus seen as both catalysts and instruments for current museum developments....

  17. Evaluation of visitor profiles and motivations at Ankara museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Gürel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums all over the world appear to be targeting their visitors for resources, thanks to diminishing state support. The purpose of this study is to recognize the profiles and motivations of visitors to museums in Ankara, in order to provide for the development of strategies that will help translate these visits to regular active participation. The results of the study conducted at Ankara’s five principal museums show that these museums play a significant part in education for the visitors. Certain internal and external factors – such as advertising and promotion – are essential to boost museum visits. Study results call attention to external factors in particular, as driving forces for recurrent museum visitors.

  18. The Bibliometric Analysis Of Literature On Museum Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. W.; Yang, Y. H.

    2015-08-01

    Museum studies, is the study of museums, museum curation, and how and why museums developed into their institutional role in education and culture through scientific, social, political and other related forces. The purpose of this study is to shed light on the application trends of the international literature related to museum studies on the SCIE, SSCI, and AHCI databases between 1995 and 2014 using a bibliometric technique and citation analysis. The results of this study reveal that influences of the literature related to museum studies on other subject areas continue to expand. Considering the publication of major countries, subject areas, journal and institutions, the results also discussed that the future trend through analysing most cited articles. Moreover, 12 core journal lists are identified by Bradford's law.

  19. The Role of Large Enterprises in Museum Digitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By actively promoting museum digitalization, Japan finds an idiosyncratic way to museum digitalization. The mode of collaboration, in which the government plays a leading role while large enterprises’ R&D capabilities and museum’s cultural dynamics are both allowed to give full play, turns these powerful enterprises into the solid backing of museum digitalization, provides a concrete solution to the common financial and technical challenges museums face in the process. In the course of such collaboration, large enterprises succeed in cultivating a number of talents who understand both business world and museum operation. Thanks to their experiences in the business world, compared with museum professionals, they play a more vital role in marketing the potential commercial exploitation of related digital technologies. The benefits large enterprises could possibly gain from such mode of collaboration - realizing social values, enhancing corporate image, for instance - help to motivate their active involvement, thereby forming a positive cycle of sustainable development.

  20. "Scientific peep show": the human body in contemporary science museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadelli, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The essay focuses on the discourse about the human body developed by contemporary science museums with educational and instructive purposes directed at the general public. These museums aim mostly at mediating concepts such as health and prevention. The current scenario is linked with two examples of past museums: the popular anatomical museums which emerged during the 19th century and the health museums thrived between 1910 and 1940. On the museological path about the human body self-care we went from the emotionally involving anatomical Venuses to the inexpressive Transparent Man, from anatomical specimens of ill organs and deformed subjects to the mechanical and electronic models of the healthy body. Today the body is made transparent by the new medical diagnostics and by the latest discoveries of endoscopy. The way museums and science centers presently display the human body involves computers, 3D animation, digital technologies, hands-on models of large size human parts.

  1. Royal Order of 23 November 1977 amending the Royal order of 12 December 1975 setting up a National Energy Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Royal Order of 23 November 1977 modified the composition of the National Energy Committee. Members of delegations are appointed by the Minister for Economic Affairs for a 5-year period which is renewable. The Secretariat includes members recognised for their technical, economic or social competence in the energy field. (NEA) [fr

  2. Use of twitter and Facebook by top European museums

    OpenAIRE

    Kostas Zafiropoulos; Vasiliki Vrana; Konstantinos Antoniadis

    2015-01-01

    With social media becoming so pervasive, museums strive to adopt them for their own use. Effective use of social media especially Facebook and Twitter seems to be promising. Social media offer museums the possibility to engage audiences, potential and active visitors with their collections and ideas. Facebook and Twitter are the market leaders of social media. This paper records the top European museums and their Facebook and Twitter accounts. It records the use of the two media, and by apply...

  3. Issue 7: Museum Attendance, Population Shifts, and Changing Tastes

    OpenAIRE

    Haselhoff, Kim; Ong, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    SCS Fact Sheet no. 7 looks at the extent to which Southern California residents attend art and cultural museums. The findings are consistent with other studies, which have found differences in museum attendance based on ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics. We also found similarities in the general rate of museum attendance in the region over the past twenty years, as well as some changes in attendance rates among groups over the past two decades.

  4. Benthic prey fish assessment, Lake Ontario 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidel, Brian C.; Walsh, Maureen; Connerton, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 benthic fish assessment was delayed and shortened as a result of the U.S. Government shutdown, however the assessment collected 51 of the 62 planned bottom trawls. Over the past 34 years, Slimy Sculpin abundance in Lake Ontario has fluctuated, but ultimately decreased by two orders of magnitude, with a substantial decline occurring in the past 10 years. The 2013 Slimy Sculpin mean bottom trawl catch density (0.001 ind.·m-2, s.d.= 0.0017, n = 52) and mean biomass density (0.015 g·m-2 , s.d.= 0.038, n = 52) were the lowest recorded in the 27 years of sampling using the original bottom trawl design. From 2011-2013, the Slimy Sculpin density and biomass density has decreased by approximately 50% each year. Spring bottom trawl catches illustrate Slimy Sculpin and Round Goby Neogobius melanostoma winter habitat overlaps for as much as 7 months out of a year, providing opportunities for competition and predation. Invasive species, salmonid piscivory, and declines in native benthic invertebrates are likely all important drivers of Slimy Sculpin population dynamics in Lake Ontario. Deepwater Sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsonii, considered rare or absent from Lake Ontario for 30 years, have generally increased over the past eight years. For the first time since they were caught in this assessment, Deepwater Sculpin density and biomass density estimates declined from the previous year. The 2013 abundance and density estimates for trawls covering the standard depths from 60m to 150m was 0.0001 fish per square meter and 0.0028 grams per square meter. In 2013, very few small (recruitment. Nonnative Round Gobies were first detected in the USGS/NYSDEC Lake Ontario spring Alewife assessment in 2002. Since that assessment, observations indicate their population has expanded and they are now found along the entire south shore of Lake Ontario, with the highest densities in U.S. waters just east of the Niagara River confluence. In the 2013 spring-based assessment, both the

  5. Adoption of Social Media for Public Relations by Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Suzić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual evolution of the Internet and Web, substantiated through Web 2.0 and the emergence of online social networks, reinvented the way that enterprises interact with their customers. Museums, as cultural institutions with an important mission, are not unaffected by that change, however. In order to fulfil their duties and societal purpose successfully, they have to attract visitors’ attention and engage the public effectively in a highly competitive and saturated environment. The goal of this paper is to analyze and compare the social media presence of museums in two European capitals. It focuses on museums in Prague and Berlin, and considers their general Web presence and the dynamics of activities on Facebook. In order to understand the integrative social media approach of museums in both regions, we investigated additionally Twitter and Youtube presence among museums with a Facebook account. The study reveals a lower presence of Prague museums both on the Web and in the identified social media networks, in comparison to Berlin museums. Moreover, we conclude that the presence of both regional museums on social media networks is low, while the integration and simultaneous application of more networks at the same time are negligible, both for Prague and Berlin museums.

  6. Anniversary celebrations at the National Museum of History

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Ploşniţa

    2014-01-01

    December 21, 2013 we celebrated 30 years since the founding of the National Museum of History of Moldova. On this occasion the museum has organized several events. Program of the day began with a Round Table “Policies for conservation and restoration of the museum heritage in the Republic of Moldova”. Then, the general director of the museum Eugen Sava opened a solemn assembly in the museum’s Blue Room. During the meeting there were presented congratulatory words addressed to the participants...

  7. A conceptual framework for audio-visual museum media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkedahl Lysholm Nielsen, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    In today's history museums, the past is communicated through many other means than original artefacts. This interdisciplinary and theoretical article suggests a new approach to studying the use of audio-visual media, such as film, video and related media types, in a museum context. The centre...... and museum studies, existing case studies, and real life observations, the suggested framework instead stress particular characteristics of contextual use of audio-visual media in history museums, such as authenticity, virtuality, interativity, social context and spatial attributes of the communication...

  8. The role of the imagination in museum visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The imagination plays an important role in museums, today more than ever. Visitors use their repositories of imagination or repertoires to make sense of their encounters with objects and exhibits. In this article, I argue that this initial meaning making, rather than being the end goal of museum...... that becoming familiar with commonly occurring repertoires is necessary for exhibition designers in order for museums to continue to take their interpretive responsibility seriously, and I discuss how such a familiarisation may affect museum practice. I conclude with some perspectives on the implications...

  9. Scaffolding the Next Wave of Digital Visitor Interaction in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the last ten years the possibilities for engaging in dialogue and participation with museum visitors have been greatly improved by developments in digital technologies. Throughout the world museums are experimenting with inclusive and participatory digital projects that can enhance the museum...... visitor experience. Many of these projects are unique and creative in their use of cutting edge technology, and in their search for finding new ways to reach differentiated groups of users. However, building on insights from user studies at a Danish digital museum installation, this paper also suggests...

  10. Museums – A Catalyst for Sustainable Economic Development in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Christer; Ijla, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Museums have a great impact on the cultural economy of every country and museums have a very significant meaning for social integration within socio-cultural and socio-economic contexts. Studies have shown that the impact of museums may vary from one city to another, and from one country to another, at local, regional or national level. The role of museums in the cultural economy is very important, because they sustain cities in promoting themselves as cultural center‟s in the domestic and re...

  11. The Kaleidoscope of Culture: expanding the museum experience and the museum narrative by inviting visitors into the curatorial process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Jensen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional art museum exhibitions are planned according to art-historical elements. At Trapholt – a museum of modern Danish art, design and applied art in Denmark, we are interested in exploring what happens when ordinary visitors are invited to curate personal exhibitions in the museum space. This paper analyses the project The Kaleidoscope of Culture, where people with no art historical background were invited to curate exhibitions based on the Trapholt collection of art and their own cultural backgrounds and experiences. The main argument is that, by allowing these personal voices in the museum space, new museum narratives are established. But to make the museum a truly transformative space the art- historical knowledge and methods must also be activate.

  12. Migration, Socially Engaged Museum Theme, and Why Slovenian Museums Successfully Avoid it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Perko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last year, the refugee crisis has turned into a human tragedy, in many ways resembling that of World War Two. The Mediterranean Sea, the highly praised Mare Nostrum, has become a horrifying collective tomb for countless people. Another consequence of war is also the destruction of historical urban centres, monuments, and other cultural heritage in so-called crisis areas – a destruction which has reached unfathomable proportions. Museums all across the world have actively responded to society’s needs. Their goal has been to encourage an open dialogue in our society, as well as alleviate fear of the unknown, and reduce the tide of hatred before it reaches world-shattering proportions. During the refugee crisis, it has become apparent that an intersocietal dialogue is both a necessity and a definitive imperative; without it, the society of the future cannot possibly be assured. Modern society has given museums the role of being a credible medium with a mission to communicate heritage contents. By using a metaphorical and metonymic language museums have an extraordinary social power and represent a bridge between science and modern society, between societies of the past and present, between the elites and marginal groups. The museum reformers of the second half of the 20th century were of the opinion that, despite many reorganizations, museums cannot serve the needs of modern society. This was the reason a new museology emerged that substantiates museums as a socially responsible institution. It equips that institution with specific theoretical knowledge that enables the conversion of heritage into a socially relevant communication of a nonverbal nature. The article theoretically argues for modern museum concepts and, using them, contemplates social responsibility in the inner workings of Slovenian museums. Contemporary museums or post-museums are institutions that carry out active social tasks. An engaged manner brings along social

  13. Case Studies of Three Midwestern Art Museums as They Function as Adult Education Institutions, with an Introductory History of Adult Education in American Art Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furstenberg, James Henry

    The study describes current art museum adult education programs and objectives in three art museums. Data were gathered through interviews with museum staffs, from current publications and records, and from clipping files and historical documents. Each museum sponsors training for volunteer guides and a yearly show for collectors, and provides…

  14. 77 FR 34987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of... of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in..., University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, 3260 South...

  15. 76 FR 28072 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ...: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: National Park... in the possession of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology... remains was made by University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology professional staff...

  16. 77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA... Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated..., Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue...

  17. 76 FR 62842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ...: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... the human remains may contact the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

  18. 75 FR 52023 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington...

  19. 75 FR 36672 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service... of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington...

  20. Electricity market readiness plan : Ontario Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This document informs electric power market participants of the Ontario Energy Board's newly developed market readiness plan and target timelines that local distribution companies (LDCs) must meet for retail marketing. The Ontario Energy Board's plan incorporates relevant independent market operator (IMO)-administered market milestones with retail market readiness targeted for September 2001. The market readiness framework involves a self-certification process for LDCs by August 10, 2001, through which the Board will be able to monitor progress and assess the feasibility of meeting the target timelines. For retail market readiness, all LDCs will have to calculate settlement costs, produce unbundled bills, provide standard supply service, change suppliers and accommodate retail transactions. LDCs must be either authorized participants in the IMO-administered market or become retail customers of their host LDC. Unbundled bills will include itemized charges for energy price, transmission, distribution and debt retirement charge. 1 tab., 1 fig

  1. An Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona R Loutfy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare paralytic illness resulting from a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Botulism in Canada is predominately due to C botulinum type E and affects mainly the First Nations and Inuit populations. The most recent outbreak of botulism in Ontario was in Ottawa in 1991 and was caused by C botulinum type A. We report an outbreak of foodborne type B botulism in Ontario, which implicated home-canned tomatoes. The outbreak was characterized by mild symptoms in two cases and moderately severe illness in one case. The investigation shows the importance of considering the diagnosis of botulism in patients presenting with cranial nerve and autonomic dysfunction, especially when combined with gastrointestinal complaints; it also highlights the importance of proper home canning technique.

  2. Life cycle management at Ontario Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper outlines the Life Cycle Management (LCM) program at Ontario Power Generation. LCM is carried out at different levels that includes components, systems, unit and fleet. A system involves cumulative effect of individual component aging. These components include steam generators, pressure tubes and feeders. A unit involves an overall unit aging strategy integrating all systems. At the fleet level, there is an optimal strategy for plant-level investments including end-of-life of a unit

  3. Interim report on nuclear power in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    An exhaustive report is presented on the implications of nuclear electric generation for Ontario's energy future. Such aspects as electrical demand and power planning, the CANDU fuel cycle, the nuclear debate, health, environmental and safety concerns, economics, social impacts and the status of the nuclear industry, uranium resources, ethical and political issues, nuclear weapons proliferation and plant security, and the regulation of nuclear power are dealt with in detail. (E.C.B.)

  4. [In the era of the Royal Society of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramain, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    In the May 2013 issue of medecine/sciences, the Rob Laffecteur complained about the constraints imposed by the Société Royale de Médecine in 1779, bearing on the labelling of remedies. Though, he did take advantage of the evaluation from an advertising point of view; though in this prospect he diverted his evaluation's report, in order to present it in a flattering manner. The Société Royale de Médecine was founded in 1778; its mission was to cover everything that had to do with public healthcare. Active, age-old and competent, it was submitted to many of contemporary issues that we are facing nowadays in the matter of medicines' evaluation, which is based on a rigorous scientific evaluation, itself based on knowledge's state-of-the-art. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  5. The Royal College of Psychiatrists and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, John

    2004-01-01

    The Royal College of Psychiatrists recently issued a revised statement on its position concerning capital punishment. The College proposes to support psychiatrists who refuse to be involved in the capital process, but accepts that some may take up limited involvement in the manner set out in the document. The Royal College is the professional body for psychiatric practitioners in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Almost no public statements are issued from the College without first being deliberated on within at least two of its three major committees. The new document on capital punishment remains in the spirit of the previous ones. The topic of capital punishment is noncontroversial within the British medical profession. In all European countries, capital punishment is against the law, because there is an overarching directive from the Council of Europe (a wide group of nations, wider than the European Union) insisting that it be abolished.

  6. Interconnection issues in Ontario : a status check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbronner, V.

    2010-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed wind and renewable energy interconnection issues in Ontario. The province's Green Energy Act established a feed-in tariff (FIT) program and provided priority connection access to the electricity system for renewable energy generation facilities that meet regulatory requirements. As a result of the province's initiatives, Hydro One has identified 20 priority transmission expansion projects and is focusing on servicing renewable resource clusters. As of October 2010, the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) has received 1469 MW of FIT contracts executed for wind projects. A further 5953 MW of wind projects are awaiting approval. A Korean consortium is now planning to develop 2500 MW of renewable energy projects in the province. The OPA has also been asked to develop an updated transmission expansion plan. Transmission/distribution availability tests (TAT/DAT) have been established to determine if there is sufficient connection availability for FIT application projects. Economic connection tests (ECTs) are conducted to assess whether grid upgrade costs to enable additional FIT capacity are justifiable. When projects pass the ECT, grid upgrades needed for the connection included in grid expansion plans. Ontario's long term energy plan was also reviewed. tabs., figs.

  7. Gas marketing strategies for Ontario producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, P.R. [Energy Objective Ltd., London, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Activity in natural gas exploration and production in the province of Ontario has recently increased due to higher natural gas prices. This paper discussed the issue of how the gas from the new reserves should be marketed. A review of historical pricing and consumption patterns was also presented to better identify how prices of natural gas are determined in Ontario and to forecast the future demand for natural gas. The first trend of interest is the increased use of natural gas in generating electricity to meet cooling needs in the summer months. The second trend is the increase in gas consumption by the industrial sector resulting from increases in process load. Several marketing options are available to Ontario natural gas producers. They can market their gas to third parties at various trading points in the province or they can market it directly to Union Gas Limited, the local gas utility. This paper briefly described how a gas supply contract works with the union, how gas marketing agreement is conducted with a gas marketer, and how a gas marketing arrangement works with a consultant. Some of the pitfalls of marketing natural gas were also described and some recommended some strategies for selling natural gas in the future were presented. 7 figs.

  8. A fluvial mercury budget for Lake Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkenberger, Joseph S; Driscoll, Charles T; Mason, Edward; Branfireun, Brian; Warnock, Ashley

    2014-06-03

    Watershed mercury (Hg) flux was calculated for ten inflowing rivers and the outlet for Lake Ontario using empirical measurements from two independent field-sampling programs. Total Hg (THg) flux for nine study watersheds that directly drain into the lake ranged from 0.2 kg/yr to 13 kg/yr, with the dominant fluvial THg load from the Niagara River at 154 kg/yr. THg loss at the outlet (St. Lawrence River) was 68 kg/yr and has declined approximately 40% over the past decade. Fluvial Hg inputs largely (62%) occur in the dissolved fraction and are similar to estimates of atmospheric Hg inputs. Fluvial mass balances suggest strong in-lake retention of particulate Hg inputs (99%), compared to dissolved total Hg (45%) and methyl Hg (22%) fractions. Wetland land cover is a good predictor of methyl Hg yield for Lake Ontario watersheds. Sediment deposition studies, coupled atmospheric and fluvial Hg fluxes, and a comparison of this work with previous measurements indicate that Lake Ontario is a net sink of Hg inputs and not at steady state likely because of recent decreases in point source inputs and atmospheric Hg deposition.

  9. Ontario's energy crisis brings out conflicting visions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishewitsch, S.

    2004-01-01

    Ontario's medium-term energy supply situation is discussed in light of the Ontario provincial government's insistence on phasing out coal-fired generation by 2007, and the somewhat longer term uncertainty about the aging nuclear fleet and the price tag associated with their overhauling or replacement. Centre to the discussion is the replacement of coal-fired plants by natural gas-fired generating plants, complicated by the fact is that there is already a surfeit of gas-fired plants sitting idle for lack of fuel available at an economically acceptable price. Recent statistics show that conventional gas supplies have already levelled off and unconventional sources, such as coalbed methane, and imports like LNG, are more abundant, but also significantly more expensive. The nuclear option is considered by knowledgeable insiders as a viable option for increased generation, although it is generally acknowledged as a serious public relations problem. The contributions of green power and cogeneration are also explored; the most optimistic estimates put the supply from this source at 50,000 GWh a year; less than the amount needed even in the absence of growth in demand. The overall conclusion is that Ontario's energy future can only be assured by aggressive pursuit of productivity improvements, financial and policy innovations, extensive use of cogeneration, strong development of renewables, energy conservation, efficiency, and demand management

  10. Gas marketing strategies for Ontario producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    Activity in natural gas exploration and production in the province of Ontario has recently increased due to higher natural gas prices. This paper discussed the issue of how the gas from the new reserves should be marketed. A review of historical pricing and consumption patterns was also presented to better identify how prices of natural gas are determined in Ontario and to forecast the future demand for natural gas. The first trend of interest is the increased use of natural gas in generating electricity to meet cooling needs in the summer months. The second trend is the increase in gas consumption by the industrial sector resulting from increases in process load. Several marketing options are available to Ontario natural gas producers. They can market their gas to third parties at various trading points in the province or they can market it directly to Union Gas Limited, the local gas utility. This paper briefly described how a gas supply contract works with the union, how gas marketing agreement is conducted with a gas marketer, and how a gas marketing arrangement works with a consultant. Some of the pitfalls of marketing natural gas were also described and some recommended some strategies for selling natural gas in the future were presented. 7 figs

  11. Ontario hydro waste storage concepts and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, T.J.; Mentes, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Ontario Hydro presently operates 2,200 MWe of CANDU heavy water reactors with a further 11,000 MWe under design or construction. The annual quantities of low and medium level solid wastes expected to be produced at these stations are tabulated. In order to manage these wastes, Ontario Hydro established a Radioactive Waste Operations Site within the Bruce Nuclear Power Development located on Lake Huron about 250 km northwest of Toronto. The Waste Operations Site includes a 19-acre Storage Site plus a Radioactive Waste Volume Reduction Facility consisting of an incinerator and waste compactor. Ontario has in use or under construction both in-ground and above-ground storage facilities. In-ground facilities have been used for a number of years while the above-ground facilities are a more recent approach. Water, either in the form of precipitation, surface or subsurface water, presents the greatest concern with respect to confinement integrity and safe waste handling and storage operations

  12. Reappraisal of the seismotectonics of southern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajer, A.A.

    1987-11-01

    The fundamental objectives of this study were to review and improve the seismological data base as an aid in more realistic evaluation of seismic hazard in southern Ontario. For this purpose, the following procedures have been undertaken: In the first stage, the types of errors in earthquake location files are identified, sources of uncertainties are discussed and a sensitivity analysis of the errors to different parameters is presented. In the second stage, a group location technique, Joint Hypocenter Determination (JHD), has been utilized to improve the locations of a group of 67 well-recorded events, mostly from the more active region near the Ottawa River and in western Quebec. The third stage, to relocate smaller and less reliably detected events in southern Ontario, utilized a nw algorithm, 'HYPOCENTER', which proved very efficient and flexible in the test runs for handling local explosion and natural events. A preliminary interpretation of the seismicity patterns in the study regions shows that earthquakes of magnitude 3 and larger tend to align along preferred seismic trends which may, in turn, be controlled by weakness planes in the Earth's crust. These inferred trends coincide with dominant northwesterly and northeasterly striking structural directions. For earthquakes smaller than magnitude 4 prior to 1970 and for microearthquakes (M<3) which occurred near the Lake Ontario shoreline, the detection coverage was not sufficient to conclusively discuss accurate locations and causative mechanisms

  13. Climate change impacts: an Ontario perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortsch, L.

    1995-11-01

    Significant changes in the climate system which are likely to affect biophysical, social and economic systems in various ways, were discussed. Trends in greenhouse gas levels show that during the 20. century, human activity has changed the make-up of the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect properties. A pilot study on the impacts of climate change identified changes in the water regime such as declines in net basin supply, lake levels and outflows, as important concerns. These changes would have impacts on water quality, wetlands, municipal water supply, hydroelectric power generation, commercial shipping, tourism and recreation, and to a lesser extent, on food productions. Climate impact assessments suggest that world conditions will change significantly as a result. Those with less resources are likely to be most affected by climate change, and the impacts on other regions of the world will be more significant to Ontario than the direct impacts on Ontario itself. In an effort to keep pace with global changes, Ontario will have to limit emissions, conduct research in innovative technology and develop greater awareness of the risk of climate change. refs., tabs., figs

  14. Nuclear cluster strategy Carolinas - Ontario - Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberth, R.

    2012-01-01

    Organization of Candu Industries (OCI) is an industry association representing the interests of 170 private sector suppliers of products and services to the Canadian and offshore nuclear industries. OCI member companies, mainly in Ontario, employ over 30,000 highly specialized workers with over 12,000 working in nuclear area. OCI's objectives are to sustain the domestic nuclear program by building support among political leaders, the public and local communities, assist OCI member companies in becoming the preferred suppliers for domestic nuclear projects (competitive), assist OCI member companies in international nuclear markets - trade missions and vendor workshops. OCI is at the heart of an 'Ontario nuclear cluster'. The Carolinas have shown what can be achieved when industry, academia, S&T centers and governments collaborate with a shared vision to achieve a common goals. Ontario has the assets to become a stronger center for nuclear excellence. OCI is working to bring the pieces together. Saskatchewan has the assets to become a center of excellence in Small Modular Reactors (SMR) by licensing and constructing the first SMR in Canada.

  15. Museums of Poland: ways of exploiting the National Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Tipa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the fellowship Thesaurus Poloniae provided by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage of Poland and the International Cultural Centre Krakow I was able to visit a number of museums in the cities of Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Poznan. The innovative method of using audiovisual media has especially attracted my attention. Visiting Polish museums, I concluded that the country's history, its past hasn't remained in archives, in documents hidden from the public eye and accessible only to specialists in the field. By possibilities of museums upgraded the past comes alive as a page in the life of Poles. The national heritage, studied and carefully preserved, is passed on to the younger generation through the most advanced methods. Today, digital techniques increasingly penetrate into all spheres of art and culture. Museums also look for non-trivial ways to demonstrate the most valuable objects from their collections through the latest information methods. The use of audiovisual media in various forms is an ideal opportunity to immerse visitors in the distant past, help them survive dramatic historical events in a dynamic, penetrate the spirit of patriotism. The screen (monitor has become a traditional element in Polish museums and exhibition halls equipped with touch screens allowing guests to browse and receive a variety of available information in international communication languages (English, French, German and, of course, Polish. On the screens placed in the exhibition halls, documents are displayed non-stop either completely or in fragments, a visual picture sends visitors to real museum exhibits. Museums opened after 2000 are equipped with cinema halls (National Museum, The Warsaw Rising Museum and POLIN Museum, Rynek Underground Museum and Oscar Schindler’s Enamel Factory in Krakowб etc., some of them are equipped for films in 3D, with panoramic projection. Expressive audiovisual entourage is created by playing light and shadow

  16. Museum 2.0: A study into the culture of expertise within the museum blogosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Verboom (Jessica); P.A. Arora (Payal)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWhile studies on popular culture have a more vast understanding of the impact of the participatory culture on experts and expertise, there is a dearth of literature on the impact of Web 2.0 on museums, which are established authorities within the cultural field. We aim to answer the

  17. Museum 2.0: A study into the culture of expertise within the museum blogosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Verboom (Jessica); P.A. Arora (Payal)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWhile studies on popular culture have a vast understanding of the impact of the participatory culture on experts and expertise, there is a dearth of literature on the impact of Web 2.0 on museums, which are established authorities within the cultural field. We aim to answer the following

  18. A Management Information System Design for a General Museum. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Sandra

    A management information system (MIS) is applied to a medium sized general museum to reflect the actual curatorial/registration functions. The recordkeeping functions of loan and conservation activities are examined since they too can be effectively handled by computer and constitute a complementary data base to the accession/catalog information.…

  19. Presenting Cultural Artifacts in the Art Museum: A University-Museum Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on multicultural art education and integrative pedagogy, educators have incorporated community resources, such as cultural artifacts exhibited in art museums, to enrich their programs. Cultural artifacts are human-made objects which generally reveal historic information about cultural values, beliefs, and traditions.…

  20. The role of museums in sustainable tourism development the Black Heritage Museum, Badagry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Adeniji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the roles of museum to sustainable tourism development of the black heritage museum with special focus on the development of Badagry. Most scholars have been writing and are still writing on the need for cultural resource management laying emphasis on the role they play towards national development and tourism economic growth. These cultural resources are not properly managed. However, this mismanagement of cultural resources is becoming directly affecting the conservation and preservation of our cultural resources. The purpose of this study, among others, is to examine how the black heritage museum holding could be effectively utilized for sustainable tourism and to make suggestions for better utilization of the slave relics for tourism promotion. One hundred structured questionnaires were administered to both visitors and residents in Badagry. The chi-square correlation and paired sample test methods of analysis were used to analyze the data collected. The findings of the study reveal that the black heritage museum has played a role to the development of Tourism in Badagry. There are also some unrealized developments such as the physical development. This research concludes by recommending the way forward and suggests that general infrastructure development should be ensured for better sustainable tourism development.

  1. The Magnetic Observatory Buildings at the Royal Observatory, Cape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    During the 1830s there arose a strong international movement, promoted by Carl Friedrich Gauss and Alexander von Humboldt, to characterise the earth's magnetic field. By 1839 the Royal Society in London, driven by Edward Sabine, had organised a "Magnetic Crusade" - the establishment of a series of magnetic and meteorological observatories around the British Empire, including New Zealand, Australia, St Helena and the Cape. This article outlines the history of the latter installation, its buildings and what became of them.

  2. The Ursula Faince Dinnerware Series by Royal Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    This working paper is a case study about the development of a faience product line in Royal Copenhagen and illustrates several aspects of how, at what stages of development, and by whom, cultural products in general are evaluated. Three theoretical issues emerge. One concerns the constraints impo...... of a particular cultural product had to be negotiated within a particular organizational world embracing both management and workers, with differentiated skills. These issues lead to a more general discussion of craftsmanship and storytelling....

  3. Je Maintiendrai: The Royal Netherlands Army Within the Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    CHAPTER I Combat History of the Dutch Army The Kir.ngdom of the Netherlands has tended to favor neutrality or abstentionism over involvement in...a small power and the Dutch increasingly favored abstentionism from European conflicts. Subsequently, the wartime organization of the Royal Army was...Netherlands abandoned its traditional policy of abstentionism and became a founding member of the Brussels Treaty (1948) and the North Atlantic

  4. VIRTUAL MUSEUMS FOR LANDSCAPE VALORIZATION AND COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pietroni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Research in the domain of landscape virtual reconstructions has been mainly focused on digitization and recording inside GIS systems, or real time visualization, paying a minor attention to the development of a methodological approach for the landscape narration, combing different registers, conceptual, emotional incitements and, thus, able to arouse in the public a feeling of emotional “sensing” and self- identification. The landscape reflects also the human activities in the territory and the communities’ cultural patterns, their sense of “belonging”. In a virtual museum of landscapes, the multidisciplinary approach, the multiplication of perspectives and voices, storytelling, acquire primary importance. A Virtual Museum of landscapes should integrate both holistic and delimited visions. The holistic vision requires a diachronic approach, including both present and past phases of life. On the other side, delimited, or “monographic”, representations are useful to go deeper into specific and exemplar stories, regarding specific groups of people. Beside, the emergence of new social media enhancing cultural interactions among people induce the creation of specific social platforms for Cultural Heritage for the active participation of a large number of stakeholders. Co-creation scenarios and tools can be particularly promising. Aton is an example of front-end VR social platform in the web end, for the efficient streaming of medium/large landscape, their exploration and characterization. The Tiber Valley Virtual Museum is an example of sensorial cultural landscape. Starting from the acquisition of topographical data through integrated technologies, several multi-sensory scenarios have been created, inside which visitors can feel embodied and involved.

  5. Monitoring Of Pollutants In Museum Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Budu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Art works are affected by environmental factors as light, temperature, humidity. Air pollutants are also implicated in their degradation. The pollution in museums has two sources: the air from outside, which brings usually dust and inorganic particles, and the inside sources – the materials used for casings (sealants, textiles placed on the display cases, varnishes, wood that emanate organic compounds. The dust is composed of particles with a diameter of approximately 2µm or higher, which come from soil (silica or animal and vegetal residues (skin cells, pollen. They facilitate water condensation on objects surface and biologic attack. The inorganic compounds are a result of materials combustion (SO2, NO2, NO and in presence of water they form acidic compounds which affect the museum objects. The organic compounds are usually peroxides, acids, phthalates, formaldehyde. The effects of these pollutants are: soiling, surface discolouration, embrittlement, corrosion. Therefore, conservators are interested in monitoring the pollution degree in the display cases or in the museum air and in analyzing the effects of pollutants on the exhibited objects. They use different methods for pollutants identification, like direct reading devices based on colorimetry, that can be read after few minutes and hours (they interact with the pollutants in atmosphere, or indirect reading samples that require a laboratory. The information gathered is used for the identification of pollution source and to analyze the concentration of pollutants needed to provoke damages on the surfaces of art objects. This paper is a review of pollutants that affect the art objects and of the monitoring systems used for their identification and measuring.

  6. Gambling in revolutionary Paris - The Palais Royal: 1789-1838.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, R T

    1992-06-01

    By the revolution of 1789, the four-story, quadrangular Palais Royal in Paris had become the most glittering tourist center of Europe, with 180 shops and cafes in its ground floor arcades. By 1791, its basement and secondary story contained over 100 separate, illicit gambling operations featuring the most popular dice and card games. The mania for gambling had been transferred from defunct, monarchical Versailles to the thriving, bourgeois Palais Royal, where the five main gaming clubs throbbed from noon till midnight. During the Revolution, Prince Talleyrand won 30,000 francs at one club, and after Waterloo in 1815, Marshal Blucher lost 1,500,000 francs in one night at another. To bring the situation under control and raise taxes for the state, in 1806 Napoleon legalized the main clubs, which from 1819 to 1837 grossed an enormous 137 million francs. When the anti-gambling forces triumphed in 1837 and the clubs were closed down, the National Guard had to be called out to evict the mobs of gamblers who refused to leave the tables. Dramatic reports from Revolutionary police raids, and quotations from the memoirs of humorous French gamblers and shocked foreign visitors, provide anecdotal illustrations of the 49 years during which the Palais Royal was the most intriguing and picturesque gambling mecca of Europe-and probably of the world.

  7. Affordances and distributed cognition in museum exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; May, Michael; Marandino, Martha

    2014-01-01

    consistent framework. Here, we invoke the notions of affordance and distributed cognition to explain in a coherent way how visitors interact with exhibits and exhibit spaces and make meaning from those interactions, and we exemplify our points using observations of twelve visitors to exhibits at a natural...... history museum. We show how differences in exhibit characteristics give rise to differences in the interpretive strategies used by visitors in their meaning-making process, and conclude by discussing how the notions of affordance and distributed cognition can be used in an exhibit design perspective....

  8. Mental Health Consultation Among Ontario's Immigrant Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farah; Khanlou, Nazilla; Macpherson, Alison; Tamim, Hala

    2017-11-16

    To determine the prevalence rates and characteristics of past-year mental health consultation for Ontario's adult (18 + years old) immigrant populations. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2012 was used to calculate the prevalence rates of past-year mental health consultation by service provider type. Characteristics associated with mental health consultation were determined by carrying out multivariable logistic regression analysis on merged CCHS 2008-2012 data. Adult immigrant populations in Ontario (n = 3995) had lower estimated prevalence rates of past-year mental health consultation across all service provider types compared to Canadian-born populations (n = 14,644). Amongst those who reported past-year mental health consultation, 57.89% of Ontario immigrants contacted their primary care physician, which was significantly higher than the proportion who consulted their family doctor from Canadian-born populations (45.31%). The factors of gender, age, racial/ethnic background, education level, working status, food insecurity status, self-perceived health status, smoking status, alcohol drinking status, years since immigration, and age at time of immigration were significantly associated with past-year mental health consultation for immigrant populations. Ontario's adult immigrant populations most commonly consult their family doctor for mental health care. Potential exists for expanding the mental health care role of primary care physicians as well as efforts to increase accessibility of specialized mental health services. Integrated, coordinated care where primary care physicians, specialized mental health professionals, social workers, and community educators, etc. working together in a sort of "one-stop-shop" may be the most effective way to mitigate gaps in the mental health care system. In order to effectively tailor mental health policy, programming, and promotion to suit the needs of immigrant populations initiatives that focus on

  9. Lake Ontario benthic prey fish assessment, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidel, Brian C.; Walsh, Maureen; Holden, Jeremy P.; Connerton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic prey fishes are a critical component of the Lake Ontario food web, serving as energy vectors from benthic invertebrates to native and introduced piscivores. Since the late 1970’s, Lake Ontario benthic prey fish status was primarily assessed using bottom trawl observations confined to the lake’s south shore, in waters from 8 – 150 m (26 – 492 ft). In 2015, the Benthic Prey Fish Survey was cooperatively adjusted and expanded to address resource management information needs including lake-wide benthic prey fish population dynamics. Effort increased from 55 bottom trawl sites to 135 trawl sites collected in depths from 8 - 225m (26 – 738 ft). The spatial coverage of sampling was also expanded and occurred in all major lake basins. The resulting distribution of tow depths more closely matched the available lake depth distribution. The additional effort illustrated how previous surveys were underestimating lake-wide Deepwater Sculpin, Myoxocephalus thompsonii, abundance by not sampling in areas of highest density. We also found species richness was greater in the new sampling sites relative to the historic sites with 11 new fish species caught in the new sites including juvenile Round Whitefish, Prosopium cylindraceum, and Mottled sculpin, Cottus bairdii. Species-specific assessments found Slimy Sculpin, Cottus cognatus abundance increased slightly in 2015 relative to 2014, while Deepwater Sculpin and Round Goby, Neogobius melanostomus, dramatically increased in 2015, relative to 2014. The cooperative, lake-wide Benthic Prey Fish Survey expanded our understanding of benthic fish population dynamics and habitat use in Lake Ontario. This survey’s data and interpretations influence international resource management decision making, such as informing the Deepwater Sculpin conservation status and assessing the balance between sport fish consumption and prey fish populations. Additionally a significant Lake Ontario event occurred in May 2015 when a single

  10. Proceedings of the Ontario Energy Association's 2004 annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Association (OEA) is a unique trade association that represents key participants in Ontario's converging natural gas and electricity industries. Its members include energy producers, transmitters, distributors, marketers, and retailers. This conference provided a forum to discuss the role of energy policy and energy conservation in promoting competitive and efficient gas and electricity markets in Ontario. The conference featured 15 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database

  11. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 1: Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Werner; Branch, William R; Watson, Gillian

    2015-03-18

    The Port Elizabeth Museum houses the consolidated herpetological collections of three provincial museums of the Eastern Cape, South Africa: the Port Elizabeth Museum (Port Elizabeth), the Amatole (previously Kaffarian) Museum (King Williams Town), and the Albany Museum (Grahamstown). Under John Hewitt, Albany Museum was the main centre of herpetological research in South Africa from 1910-1940, and he described numerous new species, many based on material in the museum collection. The types and other material from the Albany Museum are now incorporated into the Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology collection (PEM). Due to the vague typification of much of Hewitt's material, the loss of the original catalogues in a fire and the subsequent deterioration of specimen labels, the identification of this type material is often troublesome. Significant herpetological research has been undertaken at the PEM in the last 35 years, and the collection has grown to be the third largest in Africa. During this period, numerous additional types have been deposited in the PEM collection, generated by active taxonomic research in the museum. As a consequence, 43 different amphibian taxa are represented by 37 primary and 151 secondary type specimens in the collection. This catalogue provides the first documentation of these types. It provides the original name, the original publication date, journal number and pagination, reference to illustrations, current name, museum collection number, type locality, notes on the type status, and photographs of all holotypes and lectotypes. Where necessary to maintain nomenclatural stability, and where confused type series are housed in the PEM collection, lectotypes and paralectotypes are nominated.

  12. TYPES OF OPEN-AIR MUSEUM (SKANSEN IN UKRAINIAN CARPATHIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Chervinskyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The problems of preservation of wooden architecture of Ukraine are discussed. The museums under opened air are organized for better preservation of the wooden architecture. The Ukrainian Museums under opened air are described and their use for tourism purposes is analyzed.

  13. Eco-Visualization: Promoting Environmental Stewardship in the Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Eco-visualizations are artworks that reinterpret environmental data with custom software to promote stewardship. Eco-visualization technology offers a new way to dynamically picture environmental data and make it meaningful to a museum population. The questions are: How might museums create new projects and programs around place-based information?…

  14. Museum Signage as Distributed Mediation to Encourage Family Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungyoun

    2009-01-01

    Many prior studies conducted in museums have focused primarily on exhibits as the main objects for learning. Less progress has been made in studying signage as another meaning-making tool in museums. The present study was designed to understand the role of signage in family learning by answering the following research questions, "How does signage…

  15. Visualizing, clustering, and predicting the behavior of museum visitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martella, Claudio; Miraglia, Armando; Frost, Jeana; Cattani, Marco; van Steen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Fine-arts museums design exhibitions to educate, inform and entertain visitors. Existing work leverages technology to engage, guide and interact with the visitors, neglecting the need of museum staff to understand the response of the visitors. Surveys and expensive observational studies are

  16. The Development of a Virtual Marine Museum for Educational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Wermhuar; Change, Mei-Yu; Ou, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Ya-Wen; Liou, Hsin-Hun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the computer animation and virtual reality technologies for developing a virtual marine museum. The museum consists of three exhibition areas. The first area displays fishes in freshwater, including creeks, rivers, and dams in Taiwan. The second area exhibits marine ecology and creatures of different…

  17. Tradition and Technology. A Magnet School-Museum Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Michael; Judd, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Presents a case study of an educational partnership between an Albuquerque magnet elementary school and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Descriptions of the school and museum are provided as well as the program's goals, current activities and products, outcomes, and future directions. The Proyecto Futuro program, a multiyear…

  18. Providing Personal Assistance in the SAGRES Virtual Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoletti, Ana Carolina; Moraes, Marcia Cristina; da Rocha Costa, Antonio Carlos

    The SAGRES system is an educational environment built on the Web that facilitates the organization of visits to museums, presenting museum information bases in a way adapted to the user's characteristics (capacities and preferences). The system determines the group of links appropriate to the user(s) and shows them in a resultant HTML page. In…

  19. A Study of Early Learning Services in Museums and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirinides, P.; Fink, R.; DuBois, T.

    2017-01-01

    Museums and libraries can play a role in providing opportunities for early learning, and there is clear momentum and infrastructure already in place to help make this happen. Researchers conducted a mixed-methods descriptive study to generate new evidence about the availability of services for young children in museums and libraries, and the…

  20. Image as Interface : Consequences for Users of Museum Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rijcke, Sarah; Beaulieu, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Photographs of objects are ubiquitous in the work and presentation of museums, whether in collection-management infrastructure or in Web-based communication. This article examines the use of images in these settings and traces how they function as interfaces and tools in the production of museum

  1. The Laboratory of Museum Studies: Museality in the Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Kiersten F.

    2017-01-01

    As makerspaces and hackerspaces pop up in libraries and museums, one little lab sits in the middle of an Information School, but it is not a maker-space, a gallery, or a museum. The MuseLab, at the Kent State School of Information, is something else, something new--or perhaps something familiar, but situated in a different context, making it less…

  2. Geology Museum-Based Learning in Soil Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, E. A.; Tennant, C. H.; Post, C. J.; Cicimurri, C.; Cicimurri, D.

    2013-01-01

    Museums provide unique learning opportunities in soil science. The Bob Campbell Geology Museum in Clemson, SC, features an exhibit of minerals and rocks common in the state and in its geologic history. We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise utilizing an exhibit that gives college students an opportunity to visualize regional minerals and…

  3. Mediated co-construction of museums and audiences on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle; Kristiansen, Erik; Drotner, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This article asks how we should research museum communication with audiences through social media. We argue that museums and audiences co-construct one another on social media, and we explore how particular modes of communication and discursive genres serve to generate mutual online positionings...

  4. The democratic horizons of the museum: Citizenship and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlgren, P.; Hermes, J.; Witcomb, A.; Message, K.

    2015-01-01

    Change is sweeping through the world of museums, technologically, financially, and ideologically, impacting on the sociocultural evolution of their roles and status. We seek to contribute to ongoing reflections by offering a conceptual framework that links museums with democratic theory, to

  5. Re-Presenting Slavery: Underserved Questions in Museum Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Cyra

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the notion of what, not who, is underserved in museum education. The importance of looking through, in, and from objects in order to uncover underserved questions and themes is vital. A willingness to consider new ways to approach collections and display is necessary to have a dialogue with our audiences about how museums can…

  6. Museums for Peace: Agents and Instruments of Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamashiro, Roy; Furnari, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Although museums for peace claim peace education to be a primary mission, their definitions of "peace" and their aims and practices for peace education vary widely. In this article, we draw from the field of critical museology and the knowledge construction perspective to understand the role of museums for peace in the service of peace…

  7. Modern Masters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    A new traveling exhibition and catalogue produced by the Smithsonian's American Art Museum features works by 31 artists from the United States who came to maturity in the mid-20th century. These artists have become the most significant and influential artists over the past 50 years as their works adorn the modern galleries of hundreds of museums.…

  8. Art Museum Education in Transition: Moderna Galerija in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, Adela

    2012-01-01

    This essay examines the educational practices at the Moderna galerija, a national museum of modern and contemporary art in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in the last twenty years. Its aim is to reflect on the museum education in relation to broader historical context, of the former Yugoslavia (the country Slovenia was a part of until 1991) and discuss how…

  9. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  10. Building and Sustaining Digital Collections: Models for Libraries and Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Library and Information Resources, Washington, DC.

    In February 2001, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage (NINCH) convened a meeting to discuss how museums and libraries are building digital collections and what business models are available to sustain them. A group of museum and library senior executives met with…

  11. The Rural Open Air Museums: Visitors, Community and Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlikowska-Piechotka Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rural museums perform not only the traditional tasks but are also the places where both the visitors and the local community members have chances for entertainment and attractive leisure time. Consequently one can find in museums numerous catering offers such as cafes, bistros, snack bars, restaurants, pubs and wine bars. The material presented is the result of theoretical and field studies carried out in the selected open air museums in Poland and focused on newly introduced commercial activities (as catering. Our research results show that the development of sustainable cultural tourism as a generator of income in the open air rural museums is important in the challenging economic time. Museums having catering services of different character could easier overcome financial struggle. Moreover there is no doubt that the introduction of an interesting and ambitious cuisine in the restaurants located in the rural open air museum is of great importance also in other terms: popularization of the food culture, rural tradition of region, healthy diet and lifestyle, chance to increase the museum attractiveness, important economic support to the museum and the local community and the improvement of living quality.

  12. Conservation heating for a museum environment in a monumental building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuhaus, E.; Schellen, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    For the conservation of an important museum collection in a historic building a better controlled indoor climate may be necessary. One of the most important factors is controlling relative humidity. Museum collections often are part of the interior of a historic building. In most cases the

  13. Museums of Gdansk - Tourism Products or Signs of Remembrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz-Jankowska, Dorota

    2017-10-01

    Museum buildings constitute a significant element in the composition and functionality of contemporary cities. They are both their attractions and landmarks. The article presents a case study illustrating the relation between museum buildings and their location, as well as the showcased exhibition. The article aims at demonstrating the way in which those elements form a harmonious whole - a cultural tourism product affecting the economics of the region. In the context of perceiving a museum as an element shaping the dynamics of tourism development, the location planned for the museum is not without significance. Enhancing the popularity of a city on the basis of the existing museums has become a common phenomenon and is viewed as a driving force of museum tourism development. Sometimes, the museum building itself is considered as one of the elements adding to the attractiveness of the city. The relationship between the exhibition as such and the location - the city - is not the most important factor. Gdańsk is an example of a city which contradicts that approach. Four new museum seats built in the 21st century serve to demonstrate how interesting it may be to seek the right architectural form of museums for the places where they are erected. Furthermore, the thematic scope of exhibitions is strictly related to the history of the place. Particularly worthy of attention are the National Maritime Museum, the European Solidarity Centre and the Museum of the Second World War. The examples discussed in the article prove that the value of a place as such in displaying the building and the museum collections is significant. It is impossible to disregard that connection, if the city aims at promoting not only the architectural form of the museum building, but also the exhibits, especially if they are related to its history. Gdańsk is an example of a place with museum buildings of interesting architectural forms which are not only style icons, but also unique symbols

  14. Nation Building at the Museum of Welsh Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon Mason

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the representational problems inherent in one museum’s attempt to tell a ‘national story’. The museum in question started life as the ‘Welsh Folk Museum’ but in 1995 became the much broader ‘Museum of Welsh Life’. This article examines how and why this change occurred and the challenges produced by this shift in remit. The article also illustrates the processes of selection and revision which occur within museum representations and considers how these relate to competing versions of ‘the national story’ present within Wales. I argue that such revisions are inevitable in national museums which, by their very nature, aim to tell a universal story and that, as a consequence, these museums function both as a catalyst for discussion and a public forum within which debates over the accepted nature of national identity and history will occur.

  15. Perceived Authenticity of the Visitor Experience in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Anne-Marie; Garma, Romana; Josiassen, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    of perceived authenticity, resonating with Bal's (1996) research in this area. Findings also confirm that consumer scepticism and expectations are antecedents to perceived authenticity of the visitor experience in museums, and that perceived authenticity in turn affects visitor satisfaction and perceived...... corporate hypocrisy. Practical implications -This research provides a framework for museums to manage visitors' perceptions of authenticity, and to plan and design exhibits accordingly. Originality/value - Our research, set in the museum context, articulates the basis of perceived authenticity, its....... To investigate authenticity in a model with two antecedents and two outcomes, an additional data set was collected. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling. Findings -The results show that perceived authenticity of the museum, the visitor and the materials in the museum are dimensions...

  16. From Patrimonial Relics to Materialized Memories in the National Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Carolina Pulido Chaparro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The following paper comes from an ethnographic work in the National Museum of Colombia, and it aims to analyze the objects exhibited in its halls and the store in order to understand the connection between patrimony and consumption. In this sense, the representation of the National Museum consolidates in the creation of a national identity based on the official history of the national heroes and their descendants, which is expressed in most of the objects displayed in the exhibit halls. On the other hand, another narrative guided by the neoliberal economy is constructed in the museum store. It takes afro, indigenous and rural representations that have been marginalized in most of the museum halls, strenghtened by the ethnic economy and promoted by tourism and advertising. This duality leads the museum visitors to consume both representations: the ones built by the State as well as the ones positioned by companies and multinationals.

  17. The virtual museum of education. Identity, perspectives, attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Baldassarri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The museums conceived as spaces for communication are places where a prospective of lifelong learning is supported and facilitated. Hence, it is necessary to adopt didactic ways of communication that develop projects concerning innovations in the field of education through the application of new technologies in the museums themselves, in order to make those museums "virtual" by creating a complementary reality. The Scienze dell’Educazione department's research regarding the institution of a Museo dell’Educazione is working in this direction, trying to build a network that exploits the relationship among schools, institutions and museums. In dept, the aim of the analysis was individuate some guidelines for the creation of the Museo dell’Educazione website, beginning from a study of the main European virtual educational museums.

  18. Learning Museum genbesøgt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zipsane, Henrik; Fristrup, Tine; Lundborg, Maria Domeij

    Hvordan kan LM-modellens fokus på det tværinstitutionelle samarbejde mellem skole, læreruddannelse og museum anskues som en kapacitetsopbyggende strategi i forbindelse med implementeringen af folkeskolereformen? Dette undersøgelsesspørgsmål udgør det centrale omdrejningspunkt i nærværende...... forskere tilknyttet NCK: Henrik Zipsane (projektleder), Tine Fristrup (gæsteforsker fra DPU, Aarhus Universitet), Maria Domeij Lundborg og Sara Grut. Undersøgelsens baggrund skal først og fremmest findes i projektet ’Learning Museum’ som i perioden 2011-2013 etablerede et samarbejde mellem læreruddannelser...... og museer i hele Danmark. Det var resultaterne fra dette projekt, som igangsatte nærværende undersøgelse eftersom ændringer af læreruddannelsen (fra LU07 til LU13) i forbindelse med folkeskolereformen i 2013 faldt sammen med afslutningen på Learning Museum projektet. Folkeskolereformen og dermed...

  19. The Museum Wearable: Real-Time Sensor-Driven Understanding of Visitors' Interests for Personalized Visually-Augmented Museum Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparacino, Flavia

    This paper describes the museum wearable: a wearable computer that orchestrates an audiovisual narration as a function of the visitors' interests gathered from their physical path in the museum and length of stops. The wearable consists of a lightweight and small computer that people carry inside a shoulder pack. It offers an audiovisual…

  20. Public Participation and Scientific Citizenship in the Science Museum in London: Visitors’ Perceptions of the Museum as a Broker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandelli, A.; Konijn, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Science museums in Europe play an emerging and important role as brokers between the public and policy-making institutions and are becoming platforms that enable scientific citizenship. To do so, museums rely on the participation of their visitors. However, little is known about the relation between

  1. Energy impact of ASHRAE’s museum climate classes : a simulation study on four museums with different quality of envelopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, R.P.; Schellen, H.L.; van Schijndel, A.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    ASHRAE's indoor climate design classes for general museums, galleries, archives and libraries are well known: AA (most strict), A, B, C and D (least strict). Museum staff often select class AA, presuming to gain the best overall preservation result that is possible. However, the exact consequences

  2. Pilgrimages to the museums of the new age: appropriating European industrial museums in New York City (1927–1937

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Jaume Sastre-Juan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available How did industrial museums cross the Atlantic? When the first American museums of science and industry were created in the 1920s, they looked to Europe in order to import what was seen at that time as a burgeoning cultural institution. In this article, I look at this process of appropriation through an analysis of the changing perceptions of European industrial museums as expressed in the reports, surveys and books written by the curators, directors and trustees of the New York Museum of Science and Industry. I will pay particular attention to the 1927 film Museums of the New Age, documenting the main national industrial museums in Europe, and to a 1937 report on the techniques of display at the Palais de la Découverte. I will argue that their contrasting assessment of European industrial museums, which in only ten years ceased to be seen as cathedrals of a new age to become old-fashioned storehouses, is symptomatic of the significant transformation of museums of science and industry as cultural institutions during the 1930s in the United States.

  3. Museums for all: evaluation of an audio descriptive guide for visually impaired visitors at the science museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Soler Gallego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Translation and interpreting are valuable tools to improve accessibility at museums. Theese tools permit the museum communicate with visitors with different capabilities. The aim of this article is to show the results of a study carried out within the TACTO project, aimed at creating and evaluating an audio descriptive guide for visually impaired visitors at the Science Museum of Granada. The project focused on the linguistic aspects of the guide’s contents and its evaluation, which combined the participatory observation with a survey and interview. The results from this study allow us to conclude that the proposed design improves visually impaired visitors’ access to the museum. However, the expectations and specific needs of each visitor change considerably depending on individual factors such as their level of disability and museum visiting habits.

  4. Museums as brokers of participation: how visitors view the emerging role of European science centres and museums in policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bandelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Science centres and museums in Europe traditionally offer opportunities for public participation, such as dialogues, debates and workshops. In recent years, starting with the support of grants from the European Commission, the purpose of these initiatives is increasingly more connected with the policy making processes where science centres play a role as brokers between the public and other stakeholders. This article begins an investigation on how these two levels of participation – the participation of museums in policy, and the participation of visitors in museums – are related in seven European science centres and museums. The results suggest that science centres and museums are regarded by their visitors as potential platforms to facilitate public participation in policy, especially in countries where the general infrastructure for public participation in science is weak.

  5. The geologic story of Isle Royale National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, N. King

    1975-01-01

    Isle Royale is an outstanding example of relatively undisturbed northwoods lake wilderness. But more than simple preservation of such an environment is involved in its inclusion in our National Park System. Its isolation from the mainland provides an almost untouched laboratory for research in the natural sciences, especially those studies whose very nature depends upon such isolation. One excellent example of such research is the intensive study of the predator-prey relationship of the timber wolf and moose, long sponsored by the National Park Service and Purdue University. In probably no other place in North America are the necessary ecological conditions for such a study so admirably fulfilled as on Isle Royale. The development of a natural laboratory with such conditions is ultimately dependent upon geologic processes and events that although not unique in themselves, produced in their interplay a unique result, the island archipelago as we know it today, with its hills and valleys, swamps and bogs the ecological framework of the plant and animal world. Even the most casual visitor can hardly fail to be struck by the fiordlike nature of many of the bays, the chains of fringing islands, the ridge-and-valley topography, and the linear nature of all these features. The distinctive topography of the archipelago is, of course, only the latest manifestation of geologic processes in operation since time immemorial. Fragments of geologic history going back over a billion years can be read from the rocks of the island, and with additional data from other parts of the Lake Superior region, we can fill in some of the story of Isle Royale. After more than a hundred years of study by man, the story is still incomplete. But then, geologic stories are seldom complete, and what we do know allows a deeper appreciation of one of our most naturally preserved parks and whets our curiosity about the missing fragments.

  6. 34. annual conference Ontario Petroleum Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A total of 18 papers, dealing with a variety of issues relevant to the petroleum industry, such as marketing strategies, feasibility studies and exploration technologies, were combined in this volume of proceedings of the 34th annual conference of the Ontario Petroleum Institute. Some of the papers presented case studies of hydrocarbon reserves in North America, along with their depositional histories. Oil yields and resource potential of fractured reservoirs was the subject of some presentations. Studies of cores from drilling sites and complete stratigraphic columns of some oil fields were also presented. (Papers are paged individually). refs., tabs., figs

  7. The Ontario Energy Board's proposed new mandate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughren, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Board's proposed new mandate was reviewed. The role of the Board will be to regulate the monopoly delivery components of the electricity and natural gas industry and to smooth the transition to competition. The Board will monitor market performance and will encourage electricity and natural gas monopoly services to be compatible where possible. The Board will also assist local restructuring efforts when called upon do so and ensure that the marketplace operates efficiently and effectively. Gas marketers' licensing is scheduled to begin in early 1999. Licenses will also apply to the electric industry. The objectives of the proposed licensing, the regulatory requirements and the proposed regulatory approach are described

  8. Main coolant pump testing at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartlen, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes Ontario Hydro Research Division's experience with a computerized data acquisition and analysis system for monitoring mechanical vibration in reactor coolant pumps. The topics covered include bench-marking of the computer system and the coolant pumps, signatures of normal and malfunctioning pumps, analysis of data collected by the monitoring system, simulation of faults, and concerns that have been expressed about data interpretation, sensor types and locations, alarm/shutdown limits and confirmation of nondestructive examination testing. This presentation consists of overheads only

  9. Ontario Power Generation Nuclear: results and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermarkar, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the accomplishments of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Nuclear and outlines future opportunities. OPG's mandate is to cost effectively produce electricity, while operating in a safe, open and environmentally responsible manner. OPG's nuclear production has been increasing over the past three years - partly from the addition of newly refurbished Pickering A Units 1 and 4, and partly from the increased production from Darlington and Pickering B. OPG will demonstrate its proficiency and capability in nuclear by continuing to enhance the performance and cost effectiveness of its existing operations. Its priorities are to focus on performance excellence, commercial success, openness, accountability and transparency

  10. The Ontario Hydro mortality surveillance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Ontario Hydro mortality surveillance programme was the first such study established in any group of radiation workers. Copies of annual reports are available to senior officials of both management and union and to members of the general public. Apart from an elevated Standardized Mortality Ratio in the 15.0 - 19.9 cSv range, there is no suggestion of any rising cancer death rate with increased lifetime radiation dose. It should be noted that employees who had left before pensionable age were not included in the study. Results of the study are presented in tabular form

  11. Visit of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, Thailand

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2000-01-01

    Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand (left) visiting DELPHI with Spokesman, Tiziano Camporesi, and Prapol Assavavirulhakarn, Pattaratorn Chirapravati, Claude Détraz, CERN Director for Fixed Target andFuture Programmes and Richard Breedon, University of California. No. 05: Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn and Daniel Treille, former spokesman of Delphi. No. 31: in Delphi experiment. No. 35: H.E. Mr. Virasakdi Futrakul, Ambassador, Permanent Representative ofThailand, Geneva with H.E. Dr. Ronarong Nopakun, Ambassador of the Thai Embassy in Bern

  12. Mycelium characterization of the Amauroderma sp collected from Royal Belum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan Hamdani Mutaat; Mat Rasol Awang; Fauzi Daud; Rosnani Rashid; Meswan Maskom; Arfah Sumeri

    2010-01-01

    Etnobotanical study carried on the native community in the Royal Belum Forest areas had identified many potentially valuable spices that could be further explored for its medicinal and health purposes. The mushrooms, Amauroderma sp. was one of the resources that had been screened and collected for further investigation. In this works, the mycelium characterization of the mushroom was carried out in order to develop suitable seed or spawn for cultivation. The Amauroderma sp. mycelium, cultured from the fruit body tissue was found to grow well on the PDA plate. While on the potato extract liquid medium the mushroom could grow and produce stalk like fruit body. (author)

  13. Background submission to the Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Royal Commission on Nuclear Power Generation in New Zealand is required to inquire into and report upon the likely consequences of a nuclear power programme. The New Zealand Electricity Department would have prime responsibilty for implementing the construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants should the need be established and should this be acceptable to the Government. In this submission the Department has attempted to present the issues raised by the introduction of nuclear power in relatively simple terms on the assumption that elaboration can be provided later if necessary

  14. Royal Ageing: The Queen Mother and Queen Victoria

    OpenAIRE

    Mike Hepworth

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a reflection on the contribution of the image of the Queen Mother to the cultural construction of role models of positive ageing. The interest lies in the Queen Mother's performance in public of her roles as woman and royal personage particularly as she grew older. It is suggested that cultural analysis of the icon of the Queen Mother as a blend of gender and power suggests certain significant parallels with the imagery cultivated around the career of Queen Victoria in the later...

  15. Museum networks and sustainable tourism management : the case study of marche region's museums (Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Cerquetti, Mara; Montella, Marta Maria

    2015-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, research on cultural tourism has sought to find a balance between tourism development and cultural heritage conservation. However scholars have not focused on the enhancement of local cultural heritage as an asset to raise awareness of new cultural destinations and to prevent overcrowding in just a few cultural cities. After a discussion of literature on heritage tourism management, this paper presents the results of a survey on museum networks in...

  16. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Kõiva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  17. (ReShaping History in Bosnian and Herzegovinian Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lozic

    2015-06-01

    The article illustrates that during the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, which established the National Museum in 1888, the museum played an important part in the representation of Bosnian identity (bosnjastvo. After World War II, in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, all three analysed museums were summoned to interpret the past in accordance with the guidelines of the communist regime. Since the 1990s, a highly ethnicized process of identity building and of the musealization of heritage, and history permeates all three museums analysed here. When it comes to the central exhibition-themes following the 1990s war, one could conclude that whereas the National Museum and the History Museum highlight the recent creation of an independent BiH and ostracize BIH-Serbs, the Museum of the Republic of Srpska asserts the ostensible distinctiveness of the Republic of Srpska and excludes the narratives about BiH as a unified and independent nation-state. If an agreement about the future of BiH and its history is to be reached, a step towards multi-vocal historical narratives has to be made from both sides.

  18. Portable Tablets in Science Museum Learning: Options and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    2017-06-01

    Despite the increasing use of portable tablets in learning, their impact has received little attention in research. In five different projects, this media-ethnographic and design-based analysis of the use of portable tablets as a learning resource in science museums investigates how young people's learning with portable tablets matches the intentions of the museums. By applying media and information literacy (MIL) components as analytical dimensions, a pattern of discrepancies between young people's expectations, their actual learning and the museums' approaches to framing such learning is identified. It is argued that, paradoxically, museums' decisions to innovate by introducing new technologies, such as portable tablets, and new pedagogies to support them conflict with many young people's traditional ideas of museums and learning. The assessment of the implications of museums' integration of portable tablets indicates that in making pedagogical transformations to accommodate new technologies, museums risk opposing didactic intention if pedagogies do not sufficiently attend to young learners' systemic expectations to learning and to their expectations to the digital experience influenced by their leisure use.

  19. The Contemporary Museum as a Site for Displaying Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Kõiva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Museums constitute an important cultural and social resource. The main objective of museums is making certain objects in the collection visible or, on the contrary, leaving them invisible. In contemporary society the institution serves many important roles, being a place for displaying historical and contemporary values, an institution for preserving and displaying personal and collective memory, cultural values, for collecting tangible and intangible values, an institution for creating identity and ethnic kudos, a work place, an educational environment, a framework for promoting ethnic handicraft and art, a place for integrating different folklore festivals, exhibitions, shows; they are connected to tourism patterns and museum business. The article reflects the changes in the development of museums in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, focusing on the main key words being multifunctional museum, the museum as an open classroom, presentation of tangible and intangible history, the relation and mergence of permanent and temporary exhibitions. The issues of digitalization and preservation and the role of the exhibition curator and the person represented on displays have increased in the museology of the past few decades. The museums’ tradition of self-replication and an increased interest in museological anthropology indicate that museums fulfil an important role in society.

  20. Innovative application of virtual display technique in virtual museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-09-01

    Virtual museum refers to display and simulate the functions of real museum on the Internet in the form of 3 Dimensions virtual reality by applying interactive programs. Based on Virtual Reality Modeling Language, virtual museum building and its effective interaction with the offline museum lie in making full use of 3 Dimensions panorama technique, virtual reality technique and augmented reality technique, and innovatively taking advantages of dynamic environment modeling technique, real-time 3 Dimensions graphics generating technique, system integration technique and other key virtual reality techniques to make sure the overall design of virtual museum.3 Dimensions panorama technique, also known as panoramic photography or virtual reality, is a technique based on static images of the reality. Virtual reality technique is a kind of computer simulation system which can create and experience the interactive 3 Dimensions dynamic visual world. Augmented reality, also known as mixed reality, is a technique which simulates and mixes the information (visual, sound, taste, touch, etc.) that is difficult for human to experience in reality. These technologies make virtual museum come true. It will not only bring better experience and convenience to the public, but also be conducive to improve the influence and cultural functions of the real museum.

  1. Managing an oak decline crisis in Oakville, Ontario: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter A. Williams; John W. McNeil; Kurt W. Gottschalk; Robert A. Haack

    2013-01-01

    The town of Oakville, Ontario, is located along the north shore of Lake Ontario between Toronto and Hamilton. In the fall of 2002, significant oak (Quercus spp.) mortality was observed at Oakville's Iroquois Shoreline Woods Park, an environmentally significant forest remnant noted for its oak-dominated forests. Investigations suggested that oak...

  2. Cooperatives and the State: The Case of Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Laforest

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early 2000s, the cooperative movement in Ontario came together in order to lobby its provincial government for active cooperative development support programs. Momentum was building for these types of programs. Already, many provincial governments had implemented active support programs in their jurisdiction. Despite having one of the largest cooperative sectors in Canada, Ontario was lagging behind. This article assesses the progress of the efforts of the Ontario cooperative movement to date. It details how the Ontario cooperative movement developed a sectoral identity for itself and framed its objectives in an effort to strengthen its relationship with the Ontario government. / Le mouvement coopératif en Ontario s'est rassemblé au début des années 2000 afin de faire pression sur le gouvernement provincial pour qu'il développe des programmes de soutient actif pour coopératives. Déjà plusieurs gouvernements provinciaux avaient mis en place de telles politiques. L'Ontario tardait malgré le fait qu'il avait un des plus grands secteurs coopératifs au Canada. Cet article examine le progrès qu'a connu le mouvement coopératif en Ontario dans ses efforts. Il décrit comment le mouvement coopératif a construit une identité sectorielle autour de laquelle il a pu ancrer ses demandes auprès du gouvernement ontarien.

  3. Colonoscopy resource availability and colonoscopy utilization in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Webber

    2017-04-01

    The availability of colonoscopy resources improved in Ontario between 2007 and 2013. However, the geographic variation in resource availability and findings that higher colonoscopy resource availability is associated with higher colonoscopy utilization suggest that certain areas of the province may be under-resourced. These areas may be appropriate targets for efforts to improve colonoscopy capacity in Ontario.

  4. Education Governance Reform in Ontario: Neoliberalism in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between neoliberal ideology and the discourse and practice of education governance reform in Ontario over the last two decades. It focuses on changes in education governance introduced by successive Ontario governments: the NDP government from 1990 to 1995, the Progressive Conservative government from 1995 to…

  5. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The Province of Ontario Nuclear Emergency Plan has been developed pursuant to Section 8 of the Emergency Plans Act, 1983. This plan replaces the Province of Ontario Nuclear Contingency Off-Site Plan (June 1980) which is no longer applicable. The wastes plan includes planning, preparation, emergency organization and operational responsibilities and policy

  6. Informal adult education and museum andragogics in the context of the history of modern museums in Ukraine (review historiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Kutsaeva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article set the goal to analyse the published academic/ scientific, popular scientific publications and the published results of Ukrainian museums’ practical developments for 1990-2010s, which in total can be described as a museum andragogics or informal adult education by museum means. Initially, it was found that despite the growing interest in these kinds of museum activities, the available research body is not systematized. It was found that brief reviews of the problem’s historiography are present mostly in preambles of museology, pedagogy, museums history articles. They are often related to the topic indirectly. Attempts to study purposefully the subject are now rare, although their aim is to summarize the existing Ukrainian experience. It was determined that, although it is impossible now to determine the museum andragogics as a separate sphere of knowledge on the basis of a small number of published investigations of Ukrainian specialists. These investigations are reflecting the national museums and available foreign publications’ experience in this sphere (translated into Ukrainian or published in Russian. But the formation of the andragogics in Ukraine is actual and necessary on the way towards the integration into the global cultural space. Summarizing the material the conclusion was made that the museum andragogics and non-formal adult education in museums are promising areas of scientific knowledge. A contribution of the museum’s and other Ukrainian connected sectors professionals in the process by years 2012-13 is notable both at the level of the foreign experience’s study and the reflection in practice, research, scientific and popular publications. However, until now there was no such activity surge, as it happened in the spheres of museum marketing or sociology. Such forms of activity as «Workshop», «Summer school», public lecture are not known and used enough by domestic museums, and therefore by

  7. New Designs in Circulation Areas And Museums the Case of the Quai Branly Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihan CANBAKAL ATAOĞLU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the Pre-Modern Era of 1970s; new buildings questioning general typologies and offering advances in terms of design and function are started to be built. Architects not only looked for unattempted block structures but also their quest for unattempted block structures were continued for internal places, too and internal implicit setups were designed using ortographic tools like plans and sections. In today’s museums; new and multiple circulation routes are designed; in which visitors do not read books from beginning to end but choose their own paths and walk through the exhibition as if in a labyrinth on their own. These radical perceptional, spatial changes and spatial scenarios are particularly emphasized in museum buildings. These new spatial arrangements in circulation areas are offering new spatial experiences with irregular gaps in sections, regular but non-geometric floor plans, vagueness of the borders, striking colors, patterns and materials, differentiated circulation parts (stairs, moving stairways, elevators, platforms, bridges. In the study; Jean Nouvel’s Quai Branly Museum (2006 which is a recent example of this striking change will be analyzed thorough spatial experiences, observations, syntactic analysis technique and semantic examinations.   

  8. 77 FR 68851 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Coordinator for Special Events and Board Liaison, Institute of Museum and Library Services, 1800 M Street NW... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  9. 77 FR 39269 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ..., Proposed Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database: MuseumsCount.gov AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library... request. SUMMARY: The Institute of Museum and Library Services announces that the following information... proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency...

  10. 78 FR 64006 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum. The human remains were removed from Island....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of...

  11. 78 FR 59955 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Burke Museum, Seattle, WA. The human....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of... Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an inventory of...

  12. Motivational Factors in Career Decisions Made by Chinese Science Museum Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jiao; Anderson, David; Wu, Xinchun

    2016-01-01

    Conceptualized by the self-determination theory, this interpretive study examined 23 museum educators' perspectives from five Chinese science museums to understand their work motivation in relation to their professional practice of working in museums. Research outcomes showed that, Chinese science museum educators' work motivation followed a…

  13. Governing Difficult Knowledge: The Canadian Museum for Human Rights and Its Publics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) comes to invoke, realize, and mediate museum publics. The author writes that she is interested in how the museum's architecture, rhetoric, and governance framings imagine, and engage with the public. As Canada's newest national museum and the first to be built outside of the…

  14. Making Difficult History Public: The Pedagogy of Remembering and Forgetting in Two Washington DC Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Avner

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Avner Segall explores some pedagogical processes in the context of two museums in Washington, DC, that focus on difficult knowledge, the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. In doing so, Segall's aim is not to explore the museums as a whole or provide a comprehensive…

  15. From Clouds of Chemical Warfare to Blue Skies of Peace: The Tehran Peace Museum, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Khateri, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the limited number of peace museums around the world, there exists an essential role for existing peace museums to promote a culture of peace and peace education. The purpose of this article was to introduce the origins, rationale, scope and work of the Tehran Peace Museum in Iran. The concept of the museum is to facilitate peace education…

  16. 78 FR 23311 - Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... policies with respect to the duties, powers, and authority of the Institute relating to museum, library and... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and...

  17. A Mobile Music Museum Experience for Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Helleberg; Knudsen, Aske Sønderby; Wilmot, Thomas Michael

    2015-01-01

    An interactive music instrument museum experience for children of 10-12 years is presented. Equipped with tablet devices, the children are sent on a treasure hunt where participants have to identify musical instruments by listening to samples; when the right instrument is located, a challenge...... of playing an application on the tablet is initiated. This application is an interactive digital representation of the found instrument, mimicking some of its key playing techniques, using a simplified scrolling-on-screen musical notation. A qualitative evaluation of the application using observations while...... interacting with the application and a focus group interview with school children revealed that the children were more engaged when playing with the interactive application than when only watching a music video....

  18. The Whipple Museum and Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippard, Brian

    The Whipple Museum is part of the History and Philosophy of Science Department in the University of Cambridge. It is on your right as soon as you enter Free School Lane from Pembroke Street, and is normally open between 1:30 and 4:30 P.M. on weekdays. The main room, a hall with hammer-beam roof, is a relic of Stephen Perse’s school (1624) now flourishing elsewhere in the city. It houses a large collection of mathematical, physical and astronomical instruments — abaci, Napier’s bones, slide rules; sextants and other surveying instruments; telescopes, compasses and pocket sundials (especially of ivory from Nuremberg 1500-1700); and a Grand Orrery by George Adams (1750). The gallery of a second room is used for special exhibitions, often of items from the well-stocked store. Some specialist catalogues have been compiled and are on sale.

  19. Independent power and cogeneration in Ontario's new competitive electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnstable, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    The factors influencing the initial market pricing in the early years of Ontario's new electricity market were discussed with particular insight on the potential for near term development of independent power and cogeneration. The major factors influencing prices include: (1) no increase in retail prices, (2) financial restructuring of Ontario Hydro, (3) the Market Power Mitigation Agreement, (4) tighter power plant emissions standards, and (5) an electricity supply and demand balance. Generation competition is not expected to influence market pricing in the early years of the new electricity market. Prices will instead reflect the restructuring decisions of the Ontario government. The decision to have Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPGI) as a single generator for Ontario Hydro's generation assets will ensure that average spot market pricing in the early market years will be close to a 3.8 c/kWh revenue cap

  20. Art expertise and attribution of museum porcelain and faience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revenok N.N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available the article considers problems of research of museum art porcelain and faience of the XIX – the beginning of the XX century in the process of carrying out fine art expertise and also reveals the main criteria of Museum attribution. An important part of the examination methodology of thin-ceramic products is the development of special methods for their study in the conditions of modern laboratories on the latest-generation devices. The results presented in the article can contribute to the practical application of the proposed methods in conducting art criticism of art porcelain and faience in the museum research and restoration work.

  1. The Museum as a platform for tobacco promotion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Sun, Shaojing; Yao, Xinyi; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The China Tobacco Museum in Shanghai is the largest in China, consisting of seven pavilions of tobacco-related exhibits. A focus group and previous survey data revealed that the museum conveys messages that make tobacco use appealing. Of the pavilions, three were found to contain blatant misinformation about tobacco and tobacco consumption. We argue that the China Tobacco Museum is a platform for tobacco promotion, a form of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, and thus contravenes the FCTC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Nine meta-functions for science museums and science centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; Sølberg, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Science centres and science museums face challenges such as increased accountability, increased demands for accessibility, and growing competition from leisure experiences. On their own, the traditional museum practices of preservation, communication, and research are insufficient to address...... Ecsite conference, to map out how these institutions address modern-day challenges. This analysis generates a new framework of nine meta-functions for science centres and science museums that can guide and help qualify discussions about their present and future activities. We discuss the new meta...

  3. Mining the Museum in an Age of Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2014-01-01

    with the aim of ‘mining’ and thereby undermining colonial perceptions of the world. If so, it is of particular relevance to museums: decolonial institutional interventions as a means to turn museums into sites of contamination capable of including formerly repressed histories and migrating memories. Second......, to which degree Mignolo’s equation of an artist’s intervention with the politics of decoloniality really captures the transformative potential of artists’ interventions in museums in an age of migration, when the much desired diversity of audiences should also be mirrored in the chosen exhibits and modes...

  4. Deregulation, privatization and the Ontario power failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) has examined the history of deregulation of the electricity industry in the United States and presents lessons that could be learned from the California electricity crisis, the collapse of Enron, and the massive blackout that occurred in August 2003 across Ontario and northeastern United States. Unlike the United States, Canada's electricity system is mostly publicly owned and operated. This report emphasized that the need for public investment in the electricity system is greater than ever, and offers suggestions on how to strengthen the Canadian electricity system. It examines the attempts made to deregulate and privatize the electricity system in Ontario, Alberta, New Brunswick and British Columbia and exposes the reality of price caps and the debt of public utilities. It demonstrates that privatization has failed to provide a safe, reliable, affordable and adequate supply of electricity. The report claims that profit-seeking power producers want to keep supply and demand in their favour to sell electricity at the highest possible price. In addition to emphasizing the need for public investment in the electricity system, this report emphasizes the need for Canadian electricity cooperation, with particular mention of the large energy supplies in Manitoba and Quebec. 37 refs

  5. Public perceptions of energy issues in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    In October 2004, the Environics Research Group conducted a telephone survey of 608 adult Ontarians to collect information on matters regarding energy; consumer confidence and protection; responsibilities of the Ontario Energy Board; and consumer information preferences. This report summarizes the key findings of the survey. According to the survey, the most important electricity and natural gas issue was identified as being price and cost issues, followed by reliability of supply, conservation, keeping utilities publicly owned, finding renewable sources of energy, and over-consumption. The survey revealed that Ontarians show much interest in conserving energy to save money, to protect the environment and ensure future energy supply, but they are generally sceptical that their interests are being protected on electricity and natural gas price issues. At least 9 in 10 Ontarians consider the tasks of the Ontario Energy Board to be important. The majority of Ontarians prefer to receive energy conservation information through the mail and from public regulators over a government department or a company. 10 tabs

  6. Ontario Energy Board 2005 survey of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted among members of the Ontario Energy Board's (OEB) various stakeholder groups in order to measure the Board's performance and to help the Board identify areas for improvement in the way it operates. The survey included telephone interviews with consumer groups, advocacy groups, the energy sector, electricity and gas distributors, financial organizations as well as other stakeholders. The topics addressed in the survey were key energy issues and priority issues; the perceived role of the OEB; the OEB strengths and weaknesses; the importance of various OEB functions; the overall performance of the OEB; an evaluation of OEB communication with industry and consumers; an evaluation of service quality; and, awareness and participation in regulatory policy initiatives. Respondents used a 10-point scale in their evaluation. This report presented the main findings and their interpretations. Major stakeholders identified electricity supply issues and the price of electricity as being the most important energy issues facing Ontario. This report also presented the detailed findings for questions regarding the lack of generator capacity, policy stability, the coal phase out program, electricity blackouts, conservation, electricity restructuring and investment. The major finding of the survey was an overall increase in satisfaction with the OEB's performance. It was suggested that the OEB can improve in timeliness and providing consumer information. The major areas of strength were found to be its professionalism in conducting hearings and the fairness of the Board's decisions and regulations. tabs

  7. Coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This report examines coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario and recommends actions to be taken by the provincial government to protect the environment. The recommendations are also designed to assist in making decisions about the environmental safeguards needed for a competitive electricity industry. The report examines air emissions from coal-fired generating plants in the larger context of air pollution in the province; summarizes background information on key air pollutants; provides an individual profile of all coal-fired power stations in the province; and benchmarks Ontario's emissions performance by comparing it with 19 nearby U.S. jurisdictions. Current and proposed environmental controls for fossil fuel power generation in the province are elaborated. Options for maximizing environmental performance and the framework for strengthening environmental protection are reviewed. The report also contains a series of findings and recommendations which are deemed necessary before the moratorium imposed on the sale of coal-fired electricity plants imposed in May 2000, can be lifted. tabs., figs

  8. Occupational stress and strain in the Royal Navy 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, R S; Brasher, K; Dew, A; Kilminster, S

    2008-12-01

    Previous surveys of psychological strain in the Naval Service (NS) have shown higher than expected levels of strain when compared to the general population. To repeat the survey last carried out in 2004 and to obtain further information on the nature of the occupational stressors associated with strain. General Health Questionnaire-12 strain rates and job/life stressors were measured using a Work and Well-Being Questionnaire. Models of strain were developed for male and female personnel in the Royal Navy (RN) and males in the Royal Marines (RM). The response rate was 57%. The psychological strain rate was 31.5% overall. Personnel suffering from strain tended to be 'overcommitted' to work, had low levels of commitment to the NS and had suffered stressful life events (SLEs) in the previous 12 months. Strain rates declined with age and rank in males, but not in females. Strain was significantly positively correlated with levels of overcommitment, effort-reward imbalance (ERI), role conflict, work-family conflict, organizational commitment and exposure to SLEs. Models of strain in the males and females in the RN and in the RM accounted for between 37 and 44% of the variance in strain. The survey provides evidence for both the demand control and ERI models-components of these models contribute independently to strain. High levels of commitment to the organization were associated with lower strain and exposure to SLEs to higher strain.

  9. Royal Society Scientific Meeting: Extracellular vesicles in the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Ryan Charles; Elmusrati, Areeg A; Lambert, Daniel; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2018-01-05

    Cancer cells do not grow as an isolated homogeneous mass; tumours are, in fact, complex and heterogeneous collections of cancer and surrounding stromal cells, collectively termed the tumour microenvironment. The interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment has emerged as a key concept in the regulation of cancer progression. Understanding the intercellular dialogue in the tumour microenvironment is therefore an important goal. One aspect of this dialogue that has not been appreciated until recently is the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are small vesicles released by cells under both normal and pathological conditions; they can transfer biological molecules between cells leading to changes in phenotype. EVs have emerged as important regulators of biological processes and can be dysregulated in diseases such as cancer; rapidly growing interest in their biology and therapeutic potential led to the Royal Society hosting a Scientific Meeting to explore the roles of EVs in the tumour microenvironment. This cross-disciplinary meeting explored examples of how aberrant crosstalk between tumour and stromal cells can promote cancer progression, and how such signalling can be targeted for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic benefit. In this review, and the special edition of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that follows, we will provide an overview of the content and outcomes of this exciting meeting.This article is part of the discussion meeting issue 'Extracellular vesicles and the tumour microenvironment'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Design and erection of the MUSEUM BRIDGE; Bijutsu no sekai eno yume no kakehashi. MUSEUM BRIDGE no sekkei seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, S.; Tsunekawa, M.; Umda, A.; Kishimoto, Y.; Yotsukura, Y.; Miitsu, K.; Okada, S.; Furukawa, M. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1998-12-20

    MUSEUM Projects for the religious corporation of Shinji-Shumeikai, at Shigaraki, Shiga prefecture. Fundamental design was by a project team led by the world-famous architect I.M. Pei. The museum is located in a prefectural park surrounded by forests. The design concept of the bridge aimed to connect Shangri-La (museum) to the real world. In order to satisfy this purpose, a cable-stayed bridge with external tendon was adopted as an original structure style, and details such as handrails, gratings, and gloss painting taken into consideration. The authors report the characteristics of the bridge and the sequence of erection. (author)

  11. Kudos to the volunteers of Qingdao Marine ProductMuseum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the organization structure, personnel management and dis -tinctive services of the volunteers of Qingdao Marine Product Museum, and shows the effect of their work onscientific popularization and social responsibility.

  12. the medal publications of the south african national museum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Second, the project exemplifies the Museum's educative ... War. The association of the Citizen Force long service and good conduct medals with the Brit- ... period was characterised by ...... into a series of three monographs, each devoted.

  13. Curating Performance on the Edge of the Art Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Schwarzbart, Judith

    two-day festival offers a format that vary considerable from the exhibition series the museum puts on most of the time. The performance program includes artists such as composers usually working with contemporary music, electronic music composers, as well as performance artists working from......Since the Intermedia and Fluxus movements a variety of timebased artforms have been contained within visual art contexts. The performative works draw often as much on the tradition of theatre, music, dance, and poetry reading as fine art. Although the institutional context plays a role...... art institution. Our research relates specifically to a festival for performative art, ACTS 2014, which we co-curate for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde. Having grown out of a Fluxus spirit, the museum is not foreign to time-based practices like many museums are. Nevertheless, the intensive...

  14. The museum foyer as a transformative space of communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Ditte; Kristiansen, Erik; Drotner, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    has four transformative functions, and we ask the following question: How do people entering the museum practise these transformative functions so as to become visitors – and become non-visitors again on leaving? Answers are provided through an empirical analysis of the foyer as a transformative...... communicative space. Based on qualitative studies of four divergent Danish museums and a science centre, we demonstrate that the foyer’s communicative space supports transformative functions consisting of multiple phases before and after the visit itself, namely arrival–orientation–service–preparation (before......This article explores how we may study physical museum foyers as multilayered spaces of communication. Based on a critical examination of ways in which the museum foyer is conceptualised in the research literature, we define the foyer as a transformative space of communication for visitors which...

  15. Use of twitter and Facebook by top European museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Zafiropoulos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With social media becoming so pervasive, museums strive to adopt them for their own use. Effective use of social media especially Facebook and Twitter seems to be promising. Social media offer museums the possibility to engage audiences, potential and active visitors with their collections and ideas. Facebook and Twitter are the market leaders of social media. This paper records the top European museums and their Facebook and Twitter accounts. It records the use of the two media, and by applying statistical analysis it investigates whether Twitter use is in accordance to Facebook use. Findings reveal that this is not the case. By using Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis the paper finds that there is, however, a district group of top museums which manage to excel in both media mainly by adopting carefully planned strategies and paying attention to the potential and benefits that social media offer.

  16. Popping the museum: the cases of Sheffield and Preston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Brabazon

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This article excavates the ‘problem’ of popular culture in museums, with particular attention to Sheffield’s National Centre for Popular Music and Preston’s National Football Museum. In both cases, profound issues are raised for information and knowledge experts who must manage and negotiate the contradictions of the popular. These two case studies are contextualized through both urban regeneration policies and sports tourism strategies. Both institutions were situated in the North of England, and both faced extraordinary obstacles. What is interesting is that Sheffield’s Centre was termed – derisively – a Museum. It failed. Preston embraced the label of a National Museum, and after profound threats to the institution, has survived. Part of the explanation for these distinct trajectories is found in understanding the specific challenges that popular culture presents for the presentation of history, narrative, identity and space.

  17. Proceedings of the Ontario Petroleum Institute's 48. annual conference : Ontario oil, gas and storage conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference discussed issues related to Ontario's petroleum industry and evaluated the province's potential hydrocarbon plays. Geological studies of interest to oil and gas operators were presented along with storage opportunities for hydrocarbons in underground formations. Regulatory issues related to the environmental impacts of oil and gas operations on soil and groundwater were reviewed, and various mitigation options for treating soils impacted by hydrocarbons were discussed. New technologies currently being used in Ontario's petroleum industry were presented together with various investment and exploration opportunities. An economic update of recent oil and gas activities in the region was also presented. The conference was divided into 7 sessions, and featured 17 presentations, of which 11 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  18. Waste management practices in Ontario`s workplaces: An emerging industrial ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Describes a study commissioned to evaluate employee attitudes and behaviours with respect to participation in workplace initiatives in waste diversion/reduction, to examine management initiatives related to waste diversion and reduction/recycling/reuse, and to report on Ontario Ministry of Environment & Energy activities related to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) waste diversion activities. Linkages between management and employees, management and government, and ICI activities and government were also studied. The study methodology included a literature review, a series of interviews with key stakeholders, industry associations, and waste management companies, and a series of 12 case studies spanning major industrial sectors in Ontario. Issues addressed in the study include the factors that trigger waste diversion activities by ICI establishments, barriers to the initiation of waste diversion practices, and the social aspects of waste reduction/recycling/reuse practices.

  19. Decolonising the Aceh Museum Objects, Histories and their Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeng Arainikasih

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The Aceh Museum, one of the oldest museums in Indonesia, was established during Dutch colonial rule. In this article the discussion of three objects of the colonial collections at the Aceh Museum (an ancient metal bell, colonial photographs and an old wooden weaving tool illustrate the complexities of decolonising museums in a previously colonised country. As this practice varies, depending on whether the country was colonised or was a coloniser, this case study shows that in the Indonesian context, decolonising museums means featuring narratives from the local perspective, challenging colonial legacies (such as social segregation and deconstruction of Indonesian postcolonial postcolonial official nationalist history.This article is part of the forum 'Decolonisation and colonial collections: An unresolved conflict'Het Aceh Museum, een van de oudste musea in Indonesië, werd opgericht tijdens het Nederlands koloniaal bewind. In dit artikel wordt aan de hand van verschillende voorwerpen uit de collectie van het Aceh Museum (een oude metalen klok, koloniale foto’s en een oud weefgereedschap ingegaan op de dekolonisatie van musea in vroegere gekoloniseerde landen. Aangezien de dekolonisatie van musea afhankelijk is van het gegeven of een museum in een gekoloniseerd land staat of juist in een land dat koloniseerde, laat deze case study zien hoe het dekoloniseren van musea in Indonesië zou moeten plaatsvinden door middel van narratieven vanuit lokaal perspectief, het ter discussie stellen van koloniale erfenissen (zoals sociale segregatie en het deconstrueren van de Indonesische, postkoloniale en officiële nationalistische geschiedschrijving.Dit artikel is onderdeel van het forum 'Decolonisation and colonial collections: An unresolved conflict'

  20. Education and science museums. Reflections in Italy and on Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rodari

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The educational function of science museums was born with the first naturalistic collections ever, flourished in 16th-century Italy. The pedagogic thought and the educational experimentations carried out in approximately five century of history have allowed the educational mission of museums to acquire many different facets, drawing a task having an increasingly higher and complex social value. Recent publications explore these new meanings of an old role.