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Sample records for root planing procedures

  1. In Vitro Study of Temperature Changes in Pulp Chamber During Root Planing Procedure Using Er:YAG Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, Blagovesta K; Zagorchev, Plamen I; Firkova, Elena I; Glavinkov, Ivan T

    2016-09-01

    To assess temperature changes at specified time intervals during Er:YAG laser scaling and root planing of surfaces with dental calculus. Fifteen single-rooted teeth with advanced periodontal disease were extracted and fixed in a cylinder thermostat filled with distilled water at constant temperature (35.5°C). A specially designed thermal probe (type K thermocouple) accurate to ±0.1°C over the range from 20°C to 80°C was fitted into the pulp chamber of tooth sample. Scaling and root planing of the mesial and distal root surfaces was performed using an Er:YAG laser (Lite Touch, Syneron Dental, Israel) with a wavelength of 2940 nm, provided with a chisel tip, and at the following settings: output energy 100 mJ and 50 Hz, duration of irradiation - 40 sec, the tip in contact mode oblique to the root surface at an angle of approximately 10-15 degrees and water spray level 5-6. The temperature inside the pulp chamber was measured every 10 sec. The temperature in the pulp chamber taken every 10 seconds and compared with the temperature of 35.5°C at baseline decreased by 1.6°C, 2.4°C, 2.5°C, and 2.5°C for the first, second, third and fourth measurement, respectively. These changes did not reach statistical significance. The Er:YAG laser does not increase the temperature inside the pulp chamber. The assessed changes do not depend on the duration of irradiation which was kept within 40 seconds. Therefore, this treatment modality causes no thermal damage to the pulp under the above defined conditions and can be considered safe.

  2. Periodontopathic microorganisms in peripheric blood after scaling and root planing.

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    Lafaurie, Gloria Inés; Mayorga-Fayad, Isabel; Torres, María Fernanda; Castillo, Diana Marcela; Aya, Maria Rosario; Barón, Alexandra; Hurtado, Paola Andrea

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of periodontopathic and other subgingival anaerobic and facultative bacteria in the bloodstream following scaling and root planing (SRP). Forty-two patients with severe generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) were included in the study. Four samples of peripheric blood were drawn from the cubital vein at different times: Pre-treatment: immediately before the SRP procedure (T1), immediately after treatment (T2), 15 min. post-treatment (T3) and 30 min. post-treatment (T4). In order to identify the presence of microorganisms in blood, subcultures were conducted under anaerobic conditions. 80.9% of the patients presented positive cultures after SRP and it occurred more frequently immediately after treatment; however, 19% of the patients still had microorganisms in the bloodstream 30 min. after the procedure. The periodontopathic microorganisms more frequently identified were Porphyromonas gingivalis and Micromonas micros. Campylobacter spp., Eikenella corrodens, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium spp. and Prevotella intermedia were isolated less often. Actinomyces spp. were also found frequently during bacteraemia after SRP. SRP induced bacteraemia associated with anaerobic bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease.

  3. Effectiveness of a sanguinarine regimen after scaling and root planing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, H; Dahan, M; Soell, M

    1999-03-01

    A variety of chemical agents have been evaluated relative to their abilities to inhibit dental plaque and to improve gingival health. Chlorhexidine gluconate is the best known and most widely used member of these agents, but its long-term use is compromised by different side effects, especially extrinsic tooth and tongue staining. Another agent, sanguinarine, which is currently used in both a mouthrinse and toothpaste, leads in some cases only to a transient burning sensation and could be used on a long-term basis. The purpose of this 14-week controlled clinical trial was to assess the effectiveness of a toothpaste and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract after scaling, root planing and a chlorhexidine regimen. Sixty patients diagnosed as having adult periodontitis received initial periodontal therapy including scaling and root planing, followed by a 2-week oral care regimen which included rinsing with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate oral rinse. Upon completion of this 2-week initial therapy phase, patients were randomly assigned to either sanguinarine toothpaste and oral rinse or to control toothpaste and oral rinse without sanguinarine. Plaque (modified Quigley-Hein index) and gingivitis (gingival index) were measured prior to periodontal therapy, at the end of the chlorhexidine phase (2 weeks), and after 8 and 14 weeks. Sanguinarine-containing toothpaste and oral rinse significantly inhibited the redevelopment of gingivitis through the 12 weeks following the chlorhexidine phase compared to the control toothpaste and rinse. Patients in the test group had 26% fewer bleeding sites at 8 weeks, and 32% fewer at 14 weeks, than the control group. Our results support the combined use of chlorhexidine mouthrinse for a short term (2 weeks) followed by sanguinaria mouthrinse and toothpaste up to 3 months in order to optimize the effectiveness of chlorhexidine without side effects. Further studies on the long-term effect of this combination should be established.

  4. Damage to root dentin during retreatment procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Roeleveld, A.C.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wu, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the influence of retreatment procedures on the appearance of defects on the root canal walls. Methods: Two hundred mandibular premolars were divided into 4 groups. One group was left unprepared. The rest of the teeth were prepared with ProTaper

  5. Effect of root planing on surface topography: an in-vivo randomized experimental trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Leal, J I; Flores, A B; Contreras, T; Bravo, M; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A; Mesa, F

    2015-04-01

    The root surface topography exerts a major influence on clinical attachment and bacterial recolonization after root planing. In-vitro topographic studies have yielded variable results, and clinical studies are necessary to compare root surface topography after planing with current ultrasonic devices and with traditional manual instrumentation. The aim of this study was to compare the topography of untreated single-rooted teeth planed in vivo with a curette, a piezoelectric ultrasonic (PU) scraper or a vertically oscillating ultrasonic (VOU) scraper. In a randomized experimental trial of 19 patients, 44 single-rooted teeth were randomly assigned to one of four groups for: no treatment; manual root planing with a curette; root planing with a PU scraper; or root planing with a VOU scraper. Post-treatment, the teeth were extracted and their topography was analyzed in 124 observations with white-light confocal microscopy, measuring the roughness parameters arithmetic average height, root-mean-square roughness, maximum height of peaks, maximum depth of valleys, absolute height, skewness and kurtosis. The roughness values arithmetic average height and root-mean-square roughness were similar after each treatment and lower than after no treatment ( p  0.05). Both ultrasonic devices reduce the roughness, producing a similar topography to that observed after manual instrumentation with a curette, to which they appear to represent a valid alternative. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A scanning electron microscopy study of diseased root surfaces conditioned with EDTA gel plus Cetavlon after scaling and root planing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins Júnior, Walter; De Rossi, Andiara; Samih Georges Abi Rached, Ricardo; Rossi, Marcos Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation, a scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of the topical application of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) gel associated with Cetavlon (EDTAC) in removing the smear layer and exposing collagen fibers following root surface instrumentation. Twenty-eight teeth from adult humans, single rooted and scheduled for extraction due to periodontal reasons, were selected. Each tooth was submitted to manual (scaling and root planing) instrumentation alone or combined with ultrasonic instruments, with or without etching using a 24% EDTAC gel. Following extraction, specimens were processed and examined under a scanning electron microscope. A comparative morphological semi-quantitative analysis was performed; the intensity of the smear layer and the decalcification of cementum and dentinal surfaces were graded in 12 sets using an arbitrary scale ranging from 1 (area covered by a smear layer) to 4 (no smear layer). Root debridement with hand instruments alone or combined with ultrasonic instruments resulted in a similar smear layer covering the root surfaces. The smear layer was successfully removed from the surfaces treated with EDTAC, which exhibited numerous exposed dentinal tubules and collagen fibers. This study supports the hypothesis that manual instrumentation alone or instrumentation combined with ultrasonic instrumentation is unable to remove the smear layer, whereas the subsequent topical application of EDTAC gel effectively removes the smear layer, uncovers dentinal openings and exposes collagen fibers.

  7. Subgingival bacterial recolonization after scaling and root planing in smokers with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feres, M; Bernal, Mac; Matarazzo, F; Faveri, M; Duarte, P M; Figueiredo, L C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare subgingival bacterial recolonization patterns after scaling and root planing in current smokers and non-smokers. 15 smokers and 15 non-smokers with chronic periodontitis received scaling and root planing in six visits lasting one hour each, over a period of 21 days. Clinical monitoring was performed at baseline and 180 days, and microbiological monitoring was performed at baseline, immediately after scaling and root planing (Day 0) and at 42, 63 and 180 days post-therapy. Subgingival plaque samples were analysed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. An improvement in clinical condition was observed for smokers and non-smokers; however, non-smokers showed a greater reduction in mean clinical attachment level in intermediate sites in comparison with smokers (p < 0.05). At Day 0, there was a significant reduction in the mean counts of the three pathogens from the red complex, Eubacterium nodatum and Parvimonas micra only in non-smokers (p < 0.05). There was a significant increase in the proportion of host-compatible species in non-smokers and smokers from baseline to 180 days post-therapy (p < 0.05). However, a significant decrease in the pathogenic species was observed only in non-smokers. Smokers were more susceptible to the re-establishment of a pathogenic subgingival biofilm than non-smokers. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Partical replacement of the rooting procedure of Chrysanthenum merifolium cuttings by pre-rooting storage in the dark.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Part of the rooting procedure of Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Pink Boston' and 'Refour' cuttings can be replaced by pre-rooting storage in the dark. Pre-rooting storage of 7 days at temperatures between 9° and 21°C was adequate. Longer periods of dark storage resulted in increase of root growth but

  9. Procedure proposed for performance of a probabilistic safety analysis for the event of ''Air plane crash''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    A procedures guide for a probabilistic safety analysis for the external event 'Air plane crash' has been prepared. The method is based on analysis done within the framework of PSA for German NPPs as well as on international documents. Both crashes of military air planes and commercial air planes contribute to the plant risk. For the determination of the plant related crash rate the air traffic will be divided into 3 different categories of air traffic: - The landing and takeoff phase, - the airlane traffic and waiting loop traffic, - the free air traffic, and the air planes into different types and weight classes. (orig./GL) [de

  10. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

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    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results: Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29. Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12, pseudoaneurysm (n=1, or dissection (n=6 of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%, native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%, structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%, and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%. There were 3 early deaths (4.5%. During follow- up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months, there were 14 late deaths (21.2%, and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients.

  11. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

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    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  12. Clinical results of a brindley procedure: sacral anterior root stimulation in combination with a rhizotomy of the dorsal roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Brindley procedure consists of a stimulator for sacral anterior-root stimulation and a rhizotomy of the dorsal sacral roots to abolish neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Stimulation of the sacral anterior roots enables micturition, defecation, and erections. This overview discusses the technique,

  13. Intraosseous anesthesia using a computer-controlled system during non-surgical periodontal therapy (root planing): Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keumah; Kim, Jongbin

    2018-02-01

    Local anesthesia is administered to control pain, but it may induce fear and anxiety. Root planing is a non-surgical periodontal therapy; however, when it is performed in an extensive manner, some tissue removal is inevitable. Notably, this removal may be so painful that local anesthesia is required to be administered to the area scheduled for the treatment. Although patients tend to accept root planing easily, they frequently express a fear of local anesthesia. Intraosseous anesthesia (IA) is an intraosseous injection technique, whereby local anesthetic is injected into the cancellous bone supporting the teeth. A computer-controlled IA system (CIAS) exhibits multiple benefits, such as less painful anesthesia, reduced soft tissue numbness, and the provision of palatal or lingual, as well as buccal, anesthesia via single needle penetration. In this report, we present two cases of root planing that were performed under local anesthesia, using a CIAS.

  14. Microbial contamination of contact lenses after scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers with and without protective eyewear: A clinical and microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzha, Rooh; Chatterjee, Anirban; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Pradeep, Avani Rangaraju

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic scaler is a preferential treatment modality among the clinicians. However, the aerosol/splatter generated is a concern for patients and practitioners. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate contamination of contact lenses of the dentist after scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers with and without protective eyewear. Thirty patients were randomly selected for scaling and root planing and divided into 2 groups of 15 each. Group A - dentist wearing contact lenses and protective eyewear. Group B - dentist wearing only contact lenses. After scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers, the lenses were subjected to culture and 16S rRNA (16S ribosomal RNA) gene sequencing. In Group A - 15 out of thirty samples were contaminated, in Group B - all the thirty samples were contaminated. Most of the samples showed Gram-positive bacteria and 5 samples were contaminated with fungi. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of forty contaminated samples showed that 31 were contaminated with Streptococcus mutans and 9 with Staphylococcus aureus. Keeping in mind the limitation of the study for the absence of negative control, we would like to conclude that dental practitioners should better avoid contact lenses in a dental setup because of the risk of contamination of the contact lenses from the various dental procedures which can produce aerosol/splatter and if worn, it is recommended to wear protective eyewear.

  15. Microbial contamination of contact lenses after scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers with and without protective eyewear: A clinical and microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooh Afzha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasonic scaler is a preferential treatment modality among the clinicians. However, the aerosol/splatter generated is a concern for patients and practitioners. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate contamination of contact lenses of the dentist after scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers with and without protective eyewear. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were randomly selected for scaling and root planing and divided into 2 groups of 15 each. Group A - dentist wearing contact lenses and protective eyewear. Group B - dentist wearing only contact lenses. After scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers, the lenses were subjected to culture and 16S rRNA (16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Results: In Group A – 15 out of thirty samples were contaminated, in Group B – all the thirty samples were contaminated. Most of the samples showed Gram-positive bacteria and 5 samples were contaminated with fungi. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of forty contaminated samples showed that 31 were contaminated with Streptococcus mutans and 9 with Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: Keeping in mind the limitation of the study for the absence of negative control, we would like to conclude that dental practitioners should better avoid contact lenses in a dental setup because of the risk of contamination of the contact lenses from the various dental procedures which can produce aerosol/splatter and if worn, it is recommended to wear protective eyewear.

  16. Effectiveness of a controlled release chlorhexidine chip (PerioColTM‑CG as an adjunctive to scaling and root planing when compared to scaling and root planing alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A comparative study

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    Kameswari Kondreddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a controlled-release chlorhexidine chip as an adjunctive therapy to scaling and root planing when compared with scaling and root planing alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with a total number of 40 posterior sites were selected. These sites were divided into two groups in a split mouth design,: Group A (control site had 20 sites treated with scaling and root planing alone and Group B (test site had 20 sites treated with scaling and root planing and PerioCol TM -CG. The clinical parameters (Plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline, 90 th and 180 th day for both the groups. Results: When both groups were compared the change in Plaque index was significantly higher in Group B when compared to Group A on the 90 th day and 180 th day. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean percentage of gingival bleeding sites between the two groups on the 90 th day, though Group B showed a statistically higher reduction in the mean percentage of gingival bleeding sites at the end of 180 th day. There was no statistically significant difference in probing pocket depth between the two groups on both 90 th and 180 th day. Gain in clinical attachment level was significantly higher in Group B when compared to Group A on the 90 th and 180 th day. Conclusion: From the results observed in this study, it can be concluded that the adjunctive use of PerioCol TM -CG was safe and provided significant improvement in both Plaque index and gingival bleeding index. It was also more favorable than scaling and root planing alone for gain in clinical attachment level.

  17. Root planing with Er:YAG laser X Gracey curette, a study in vitro in scanning electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Fabiano Augusto Sfier de

    2000-01-01

    The Er:YAG laser has been studied as a periodontal therapies, used to remove subgingival calculus and its bactericidal effects. The proposal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Er:YAG laser in root planing in comparison to the traditional method, not surgical. Six recently extracted due to the disease periodontal, were cut longitudinally, tends like this two half of the root. These half were separate in four groups. The first group is the natural tooth (group controls negative), the second group (group controls) was accomplished to root planing with Gracey curette. And in the third to Er:YAG laser with a contact tip, using a 45 deg angle in relation to the root; in the fourth group was scraped and planned with Er:YAG laser and complemented root planing with Gracey curette. The used energy was of 100 mJ (out put) and the frequency of 10 Hz accomplished with irrigation. The obtained results were similar in the groups 2 and 3 in comparison to the amount of smear-layer. In group 4 however, better result was obtained, because the image (SEM) was much more regular and with less amount of smear-layer. The conclusion of the work is that with the association of the laser technique and Gracey curette the results are superior to the conventional treatment. (author)

  18. Adjunctive use of essential oils following scaling and root planing -a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Mohammad Fallah; Schwiertz, Andreas; Jentsch, Holger F R

    2016-06-07

    Hitherto no study has been published on the effect of the adjunctive administration of essential oils following scaling and root planing (SRP). This study describes the effect of a mouthrinse consisting of essential oils (Cymbopogon flexuosus, Thymus zygis and Rosmarinus officinalis) following SRP by clinical and microbiological variables in patients with generalized moderate chronic periodontitis. Forty-six patients (aged 40-65 years) with moderate chronic periodontitis were randomized in a double-blind study and rinsed their oral cavity following SRP with an essential oil mouthrinse (n  =  23) or placebo (n  =  23) for 14 days. Probing depth (PD), attachment level (AL), bleeding on probing (BOP) and modified sulcus bleeding index (SBI) were recorded at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Subgingival plaque was taken for assessment of major bacteria associated with periodontitis. AL, PD, BOP and SBI were significantly improved in both groups after three (p   essential oils following SRP has a positive effect on clinical variables and on bacterial levels in the subgingival biofilm. 332-12-24092012, DRKS 00009387, German Clinical Trials Register, Freiburg i. Br., 16.09.2015.

  19. Local delivery of hyaluronan as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

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    Johannsen, Annsofi; Tellefsen, Monica; Wikesjö, Ulf; Johannsen, Gunnar

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adjunctive effect of the local application of a hyaluronan gel to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Twelve patients with chronic periodontitis were recruited to participate in a study with a split-mouth design and provided informed consent. Plaque formation and bleeding on probing were evaluated pretreatment (baseline) and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-treatment. Probing depths and attachment levels were evaluated at baseline and at 12 weeks. The patients received full-mouth scaling and root planing. A hyaluronan gel was administered subgingivally in the test sites at baseline and after 1 week. Significant differences between test and control were evaluated using the paired t test, repeated-measures analysis of variance (Wilks lambda), and a non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A significant reduction in bleeding on probing scores and probing depths was observed in both groups at 12 weeks (P scaling and root planing may have a beneficial effect on periodontal health in patients with chronic periodontitis.

  20. Comparison between scaling-root-planing (SRP and SRP/photodynamic therapy: six-month study

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    Berakdar Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The purpose of this long-term clinical study was to examine the additional efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT to scaling and root planing (SRP in patients with chronic periodontal disease. Methods A total of 22 patients (mean age: 59.3 ± 11.7 years with chronic periodontal disease and four teeth with probing depth ≥ 5 mm were enrolled in the study. Inclusion criteria were: no systemic disease, no smoking, no pregnancy and no long-term medication. Beside the anamnesis, the following clinical parameters were assessed at baseline (one week before therapy, and one, three and six months after the therapy: bleeding on probing (BOP, plaque index (PI probing depth (PD, and clinical attachment loss. All measurements were done by the same examiner with a fixed periodontal probe (PCP 12, Hu-Friedy at six measurements/tooth. In each patient, two teeth were treated with SRP alone and two teeth with SRP and PDT (Periowave, Ondine Biopharma, Vancouver, Canada. The nonparametric Wilcoxon test for paired samples was used for comparison of the effect of the two treatments (p ≤ 0.05. Results After both types of treatment, the number of teeth positive for BOP declined. At baseline, the CAL measured 7.2 ± 1.2 mm (SRP or 8.1 ± 1.3 mm (SRP/PDT; one, three and six months after both types of treatment an improvement was observed. At baseline, the probing depth was 5.9 ± 0.8 mm (SRP or 6.4 ± 0.8 mm (SRP/PDT; after six months, an improvement of 2.4 ± 0.6 mm (SRP or 2.9 ± 0.8 mm (SRP/PDT was found. The greater reduction of the PD, achieved by a combination of SRP/PDT, was statistically significant after six months (p = 0.007. Conclusion This clinical study demonstrates that SRP in combination with PDT seems to be effective and is therefore suitable as an adjuvant therapy to the mechanical conditioning of the periodontal pockets in patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

  1. Dentinal hypersensitivity following scaling and root planing: comparison of low-level laser and topical fluoride treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesevska, Snezana; Nakova, Marija; Ivanovski, Kiro; Angelov, Nikola; Kesic, Ljiljana; Obradovic, Radmila; Mindova, Sonja; Nares, Salvador

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of low-level laser irradiation to traditional topical fluoride treatment for treatment choices of dentinal hypersensitivity following scaling and root planing. The experimental group (15 patients) was treated with low-energy-level diode laser at each site of dentinal hypersensitivity following scaling and root planning. The control group (15 patients) received topical fluoride treatment (protective varnish for desensitization). All the patients were treated at baseline visit, and then at day 2 and 4 after the initial treatment; the pain was subjectively assessed by the patients as strong, medium, medium low, low, or no pain. Total absence of the dental hypersensitivity was reported in 26.66% of the examined group even after the second visit, compared to the control group where complete resolution of the hypersensitivity was not present after the second visit in any of the treated cases. Complete absence of pain was achieved in 86.6% of patients treated with laser and only in 26.6% in the fluoride treated group, after the third visit. Based on our findings, we conclude that low-energy biostimulative laser treatment can be successfully used for treatment of dental hypersensitivity following scaling and root planing.

  2. Microbial contamination of contact lenses after scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers with and without protective eyewear: A clinical and microbiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Afzha, Rooh; Chatterjee, Anirban; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Pradeep, Avani Rangaraju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic scaler is a preferential treatment modality among the clinicians. However, the aerosol/splatter generated is a concern for patients and practitioners. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate contamination of contact lenses of the dentist after scaling and root planing using ultrasonic scalers with and without protective eyewear. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were randomly selected for scaling and root planing and divided into 2 groups of 15 each. G...

  3. Novel scanning procedure enabling the vectorization of entire rhizotron-grown root systems

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    Lobet Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an original spit-and-combine imaging procedure that enables the complete vectorization of complex root systems grown in rhizotrons. The general principle of the method is to (1 separate the root system into a small number of large pieces to reduce root overlap, (2 scan these pieces one by one, (3 analyze separate images with a root tracing software and (4 combine all tracings into a single vectorized root system. This method generates a rich dataset containing morphological, topological and geometrical information of entire root systems grown in rhizotrons. The utility of the method is illustrated with a detailed architectural analysis of a 20-day old maize root system, coupled with a spatial analysis of water uptake patterns.

  4. Novel scanning procedure enabling the vectorization of entire rhizotron-grown root systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Guillaume; Draye, Xavier

    2013-01-04

    : This paper presents an original spit-and-combine imaging procedure that enables the complete vectorization of complex root systems grown in rhizotrons. The general principle of the method is to (1) separate the root system into a small number of large pieces to reduce root overlap, (2) scan these pieces one by one, (3) analyze separate images with a root tracing software and (4) combine all tracings into a single vectorized root system. This method generates a rich dataset containing morphological, topological and geometrical information of entire root systems grown in rhizotrons. The utility of the method is illustrated with a detailed architectural analysis of a 20-day old maize root system, coupled with a spatial analysis of water uptake patterns.

  5. Root finding in the complex plane for seismo-acoustic propagation scenarios with Green's function solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Brittany A; Collis, Jon M

    2014-09-01

    A normal mode solution to the ocean acoustic problem of the Pekeris waveguide with an elastic bottom using a Green's function formulation for a compressional wave point source is considered. Analytic solutions to these types of waveguide propagation problems are strongly dependent on the eigenvalues of the problem; these eigenvalues represent horizontal wavenumbers, corresponding to propagating modes of energy. The eigenvalues arise as singularities in the inverse Hankel transform integral and are specified by roots to a characteristic equation. These roots manifest themselves as poles in the inverse transform integral and can be both subtle and difficult to determine. Following methods previously developed [S. Ivansson et al., J. Sound Vib. 161 (1993)], a root finding routine has been implemented using the argument principle. Using the roots to the characteristic equation in the Green's function formulation, full-field solutions are calculated for scenarios where an acoustic source lies in either the water column or elastic half space. Solutions are benchmarked against laboratory data and existing numerical solutions.

  6. Effect of green tea catechin, a local drug delivery system as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis patients: A clinicomicrobiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Praveen; Tabasum, Syeda Tawkhira; Shekhawat, Nirmal Kanwar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evaluate the adjunctive use of locally delivered green tea catechin with scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone in the management of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with two sites in the contralateral quadrants with probing pocket depth of 5–8mm were selected. Each of the sites was assessed for the plaque index, gingival index, and probing pocket depth at baseline and 21 days and for microbiological analysis at baseline, 1 week and 21 days. Test sites received scaling and root planing along with green tea catechin strips and control sites received scaling and root planning alone. Results: The result showed intercomparison of the plaque index and gingival index for test and control groups at 21 days was not significant with P>0.05, whereas the probing depth at 21 days was significant with P<0.001. Intercomparison between microbial results demonstrated a considerable reduction of occurrence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium species and Capnocytophaga in test. Conclusion: Green tea catechin local delivery along with scaling and root planing is more effective than scaling and root planing alone. PMID:21772720

  7. Assessment of the effects of scaling and root planing on blood glucose levels in type II diabetes patients: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Rieyazulhuq Shaikh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of the scaling and root planing of some blood glucose levels in Type II Diabetes patients. Study Population and Methods: The clinical study was conducted in 15 Type II diabetic patients of Dr. D Y Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pimpri, Pune. All the participants underwent a baseline examination for periodontal status using the community periodontal index of treatment needs and also estimation of fasting and post-prandial blood sugar levels. The participants received the intervention of scaling and root planing, as also routine oral hygiene instructions, and were recalled after one month for a final periodontal examination and blood sugar level investigation. The significance of difference between the means of the baseline and the final examination was tested using the paired ′t′ test. Results and Conclusion: There was no significant change in the fasting and post-prandial blood glucose levels in patients treated with scaling and root planing.

  8. Valve-Sparing Root Replacement Compared With Composite Valve Graft Procedures in Patients With Aortic Root Dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Maral; Rao, Vivek; Manlhiot, Cedric; Abraham, Nachum; David, Carolyn; Feindel, Christopher M; David, Tirone E

    2016-10-25

    Although aortic valve-sparing (AVS) operations are established alternatives to composite valve graft (CVG) procedures for patients with aortic root aneurysms, comparative long-term outcomes are lacking. This study sought to compare the results of patients undergoing AVS procedures with those undergoing CVG operations. From 1990 to 2010, a total of 616 patients age Marfan syndrome and lower rates of bicuspid aortic valve than those undergoing bio-CVG or m-CVG procedures. In-hospital mortality (0.3%) and stroke rate (1.3%) were similar among groups. After adjusting for clinical covariates, both bio-CVG and m-CVG procedures were associated with increased long-term major adverse valve-related events compared with patients undergoing AVS (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.4, p = 0.005; and HR: 5.2, p valve-related complications when compared with bio-CVG and m-CVG. AVS is the treatment of choice for young patients with aortic root aneurysm and normal or near-normal aortic cusps. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of optimal ultrasound planes for the initialisation of image registration during endoscopic ultrasound-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati, Ester; Hu, Yipeng; Gibson, Eli; Uribarri, Laura; Keane, Geri; Gurusami, Kurinchi; Davidson, Brian; Pereira, Stephen P; Clarkson, Matthew J; Barratt, Dean C

    2018-06-01

    Navigation of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system can be technically challenging due to the small fields-of-view of ultrasound and optical devices, as well as the anatomical variability and limited number of orienting landmarks during navigation. Co-registration of an EUS device and a pre-procedure 3D image can enhance the ability to navigate. However, the fidelity of this contextual information depends on the accuracy of registration. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of a simulation-based planning method for pre-selecting patient-specific EUS-visible anatomical landmark locations to maximise the accuracy and robustness of a feature-based multimodality registration method. A registration approach was adopted in which landmarks are registered to anatomical structures segmented from the pre-procedure volume. The predicted target registration errors (TREs) of EUS-CT registration were estimated using simulated visible anatomical landmarks and a Monte Carlo simulation of landmark localisation error. The optimal planes were selected based on the 90th percentile of TREs, which provide a robust and more accurate EUS-CT registration initialisation. The method was evaluated by comparing the accuracy and robustness of registrations initialised using optimised planes versus non-optimised planes using manually segmented CT images and simulated ([Formula: see text]) or retrospective clinical ([Formula: see text]) EUS landmarks. The results show a lower 90th percentile TRE when registration is initialised using the optimised planes compared with a non-optimised initialisation approach (p value [Formula: see text]). The proposed simulation-based method to find optimised EUS planes and landmarks for EUS-guided procedures may have the potential to improve registration accuracy. Further work will investigate applying the technique in a clinical setting.

  10. Aortic root repair for thoracic aorta false aneurysm following Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jones, Steve; Sivananthan, U M; McGoldrick, J P

    2008-08-01

    The Bentall procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan's syndrome is safe and durable. We describe successful repair of periprosthetic valvular leak, 12 years following Bentall repair with composite graft. The aim of this report is to analyse and evaluate technical factors leading to this unusual occurrence.

  11. The efficacy of proanthocyanidins and secnidazole in the treatment of chronic periodontitis after scaling and root planing therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Li, R; Jin, Q; Pang, J; Xu, Z

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effect of the systemic antibiotic therapy of proanthocyanidins and secnidazole on periodontitis. Seventy-five subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomly divided into two treatment groups (secnidazole or proanthocyanidins) and one placebo control group (25 cases each). Plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (BI), probing pocket depth (PPD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were carried out at baseline, post-treatment and 3 months after treatment. Microbial analysis was performed at baseline and post-treatment. The results show that the two treatment groups had greater mean reduction in BI, GI, and PPD evaluated at both post-treatment and 3 months after treatment compared to the control group (p less than 0.05), but there were no significant differences in those of PI and CAL (except CAL evaluated at post-treatment, p 0.05). After treatment, culturable bacteria counts significantly decreased. In conclusion, the adjunctive use of proanthocyanidins or secnidazole in combination with scaling and root planing in adults with periodontitis is effective in reducing the pathogenic flora and achieves significantly better clinical results to a certain degree.

  12. Effects of 980 diode laser treatment combined with scaling and root planing on periodontal pockets in chronic periodontitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Alireza

    2010-02-01

    Objective: This study compared the effect of 980 Diode laser + scaling and root planing (SRP) versus SRP alone in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Method: 21 healthy patients with moderate periodontitis with a probing depth of at least 5mm were included in the study. A total of 42 sites were treated during 6weeks with a combination of 980 Diode laser and SRP (21 sites) or SRP alone (21 sites). The gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were examined at the baseline and after 6 weeks after the start of treatment. Results: Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in GI, BOP and PPD after treatment. The results also showed significant improvement from laser+ SRP group to SRP alone group. Conclusion: The present data suggest that treatment of chronic periodontitis with either 980 Diode laser + SRP or SRP alone results in statistically significant improvements in the clinical parameters. The combination of 980 Diode laser irradiation in the gingival sulcus and SRP, was significantly better as compared to SRP alone.

  13. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident-An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina; Cristache, Corina Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presented. Due to the existence of risk factors for dental strip perforation, experience of the clinician and the use of magnification and modern imagistic methods (CBCT) may avoid or reduce the frequency of this type of accidents. Under correct working circumstances, dental stripping should not be regarded as a malpractice but as a procedural accident. However, the patient must always be informed, before and during the endodontic procedure, about the event and the possible complications that may occur.

  14. Revascularization procedure in an open apex tooth with external root resorption: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Dastpak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available External inflammatory root resorption (EIR represents a challenge in endodontic practice. EIR commonly occurs after dental trauma that results in periodontal ligament injury, pulp necrosis and subsequent infection.  Treatment of EIR is based on disinfecting the root canal system through chemomechanical procedures and then filling it with calcium hydroxide or triple antibiotic paste. Dental trauma commonly occurs in young patients whose teeth are not fully formed and have thin dentinal walls and open apices. Revascularization therapy has proven to be suitable for treatment of root canals of teeth with pulp necrosis and open apices. This case report presents successful revascularization treatment of a permanent immature tooth with external root resorption and chronic apical periodontitis. The tooth was treated by the protocol suggested by the American Association of Endodontics (AAE, consisted of disinfecting the root canal system, filling it with blood clot and sealing the root canal with mineral trioxide aggregate followed by bonded resin restoration. The symptoms disappeared, the size of the periapical lesion reduced and the tooth was asymptomatic during the 12 month follow up period.

  15. Analytical solution to the 1D Lemaitre's isotropic damage model and plane stress projected implicit integration procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    obtaining an integral relationship between total strain and effective stress. By means of the generalized binomial theorem, an expression in terms of infinite series is subsequently derived. The solution is found to simplify considerably existing techniques for material parameters identification based...... on optimization, as all issues associated with classical numerical solution procedures of the constitutive equations are eliminated. In addition, an implicit implementation of the plane stress projected version of Lemaitre's model is discussed, showing that the resulting algebraic system can be reduced...

  16. Early and medium term results of the sleeve valve-sparing procedure for aortic root ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Amando; Tasca, Giordano; Giannico, Floriana; Lobiati, Elisabetta; Skouse, Douglas; Galanti, Andrea; Martino, Antonello Stefano; Triggiani, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate our experience of using a simplified aortic valve sleeve procedure to treat aortic root ectasia and aneurysms with or without aortic regurgitation. In experienced hands, 2 aortic valve-sparing procedures, ie, Yacoub and David, have yielded excellent long-term results in the treatment of aortic root aneurysms, with or without aortic regurgitation. However, these techniques are demanding and not widely used. Recently, a new and simplified valve-sparing technique, named "sleeve procedure," has been proposed, and has yielded encouraging early results. Ninety consecutive patients with aortic root aneurysms underwent sleeve procedures from October 2006 to October 2012. Follow-up data (clinical 100% complete and echocardiographic 93% complete) were acquired from our outpatient clinic or from the referring cardiologist. The mean age of the patients was 61.5 ± 12.5 years, 79% were male, 16 (18%) had a bicuspid valve, 3 had Marfan syndrome, and 2 had aortic dissection. Over a mean clinical follow-up of 34 ± 19 months, 2 patients died from noncardiac causes and 1 was reoperated on for the recurrence of aortic regurgitation. On follow-up echocardiography after a mean of 18 ± 9 months, aortic regurgitation was absent/negligible, mild or moderate in 62%, 37%, and 1% of patients, respectively, and the diameters of the annulus, Valsalva sinuses, and sinotubular junction were 27.3 + 2.2, 37.0 + 3.4, and 30.6 + 3.1 mm, respectively. Our encouraging early and medium term results suggest that the sleeve procedure is a safe and effective aortic valve-sparing technique for the treatment of aortic root ectasia and aneurysm. However, longer follow-up is needed in order to draw definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Valve-sparing root replacement for freestanding pulmonary autograft aneurysm after the Ross procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschiller, Thomas; Eva, Sames-Dolzer; Schimetta, Wolfgang; Paulus, Patrick; Müller, Hannes; Zierer, Andreas; Mair, Rudolf

    2018-02-20

    Autograft dilatation is the main long-term complication following the Ross procedure using the freestanding root replacement technique. We reviewed our 25-year experience with the Ross procedure with a special emphasis on valve-sparing reoperations. From 1991 to 2016, 153 patients (29.6 ± 16.6 years; 29.4% pediatric) underwent a Ross operation at our institution with implantation of the autograft as freestanding root replacement. The follow-up is 98.7% complete with a mean of 12.2 ± 5.5 years. Mortality at 30-days was 2.0%. Echocardiography documented no or trivial aortic regurgitation in 99.3% of the patients at discharge. Survival probability at 20 years was 85.4%. No case of autograft endocarditis occurred. Autograft deterioration rate was 2.01% per patient-year, and freedom from autograft reoperation was 75.3% at 15 years. A reoperation for autograft aneurysm was required in 35 patients (22.9%) at a mean interval of 11.1 ± 4.6 years after the Ross procedure. A valve-sparing root replacement was performed in 77% of patients, including 10 David and 17 Yacoub procedures with no early mortality. Three patients required prosthetic valve replacement within 2 years after a Yacoub operation. At latest follow-up, 92% of all surviving patients still carry the pulmonary autograft valve. Freedom from autograft valve replacement was 92.1% at 15 years. Using the David or Yacoub techniques, the autograft valve can be preserved in the majority of patients with root aneurysms after the Ross procedure. Reoperations can be performed with no early mortality, a good functional midterm result, and an acceptable reintervention rate. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of a horizontal root-fractured tooth with decoronation procedure: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Esin Yoldaş

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Early loss of permanent anterior teeth due to trauma can cause esthetic and functional problems for young patients. In such cases, replacement of the missing tooth with traditional approaches is possible; however such approaches will reduce the chance of the patient to receive an esthetic and consistent treatment in the future. CASE REPORT: A 12-year-old male patient referred to our clinic with a history of trauma. Complicated crown fracture in tooth no.11 and horizontal root fracture in tooth no. 21 was detected. Following root canal treatment, tooth no. 11 was restored with a fiber post and a strip crown. To avoid alveolar bone loss due to early tooth extraction, decoronation procedure, an alternative approach, was applied to tooth no. 21. This procedure consisted of leaving the root fragment inside the alveolar socket following the removal of the crown. For the rehabilitation of the missing crown, a partial removable prosthesis was implemented. The patient was recalled in 6., 12. and 18. months. Within the follow-up period, no reduction in the alveolar bone level was seen. No sign of infection was evident. The remaining root fragment kept on resorbing. Tooth no. 11 remained symptom-free as well. The patient is still being followed. CONCLUSION: Decoronation is essentially a treatment choice for preventing alveolar bone loss in ankylosed teeth considered for extraction. In this case report, decoronation was shown to be a suitable alternative also for a fractured, non-ankylosed tooth.

  19. Aortic root operations for Marfan syndrome: a comparison of the Bentall and valve-sparing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant D; Weiss, Eric S; Alejo, Diane E; Nwakanma, Lois U; Williams, Jason A; Dietz, Harry C; Spevak, Philip J; Gott, Vincent L; Vricella, Luca A; Cameron, Duke E

    2008-06-01

    We compared results of the Bentall procedure with valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR) for aortic root aneurysm in Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome patients who had the Bentall procedure or VSRR at our institution between April 1997 and September 2006 were identified. Follow-up information was obtained from hospital charts and contact with patients or their physicians. Kaplan-Meier survival and propensity score analyses were performed. One hundred forty Marfan syndrome patients had either the Bentall procedure (n = 56) or VSRR (n = 84; 40 remodeling and 44 reimplantation). Bentall patients were older than VSRR patients (38 versus 29 years; p = 0.0001) and had more aortic dissections (16% versus 1%; p = 0.0012); more urgent/emergent surgery (20% versus 2%; p = 0.0008); larger preoperative sinus diameter (5.7 versus 5.1 cm; p = 0.0004); and more preoperative 3+/4+ aortic insufficiency (59% versus 10%; p valve replacement was 90% for VSRR patients. Eight-year survival was 90% for Bentall and 100% for VSRR patients (p = 0.01). Propensity-adjusted regression showed that the Bentall procedure did not predict mortality (p = 1.00) and did not protect from reoperation (odds ratio = 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.01 to 4.33; p = 0.36). The Bentall procedure and VSRR have similar operative results in Marfan syndrome. The procedures are distinguished by higher rates of thromboembolism among Bentall patients and higher rates of reoperation among VSRR patients. Lower late survival among Bentall patients probably reflects the preferential use of the Bentall procedure for higher risk patients.

  20. Complicated Crown-Root Fracture Treated Using Reattachment Procedure: A Single Visit Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Rajput

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complicated crown-root fracture of maxillary central and lateral incisors is common in case of severe trauma or sports-related injury. It happens because of their anterior positioning in oral cavity and protrusive eruptive pattern. On their first dental visit, these patients are in pain and need emergency care. Because of impaired function, esthetics, and phonetics, such patients are quite apprehensive during their emergency visit. Successful pain management with immediate restoration of function, esthetics and phonetics should be the prime objective while handling such cases. This paper describes immediate treatment of oblique crown root fracture of maxillary right lateral incisor with reattachment procedure using light transmitting fiber post. After two and half years, the reattached fragment still has satisfying esthetics and excellent function.

  1. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

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    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  2. Postoperative visual loss following dorsal root entry zone rhizotomy: A dreaded complication after a benign procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative visual loss (POVL is a rare but grave postoperative complication. It has been mainly reported in patients undergoing cardiac and spinal surgeries. Dorsal root entry zone (DREZ is pain relieving procedure performed in patients with refractory neuropathic pain with minimal complication rate. We present a case of unilateral POVL following DREZ rhizotomy in prone position in a patient having brachial plexus neuropathy. Exact etiology of vision loss was though not clear; hypotension, use of vasopressors and hemodilution may have led to vision loss in this patient. This case report highlights the associated risk factors for development of this hazardous complication.

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Root Reimplantation and Bentall Procedure: Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heemoon; Cho, Yang Hyun; Sung, Kiick; Kim, Wook Sung; Park, Kay-Hyun; Jeong, Dong Seop; Park, Pyo Won; Lee, Young Tak

    2018-03-26

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of aortic root replacement(ARR) surgery:Root reimplantation as valve-sparing root replacement(VSR) and the Bentall procedure. We retrospectively reviewed 216 patients who underwent ARR between 1995 and 2013 at Samsung Medical Center. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on the procedure they underwent: Bentall(n=134) and VSR(n=82). The mean follow-up duration was 100.9±56.4 months. There were 2 early deaths in the Bentall group and none in the VSR group(p=0.53). Early morbidities were not different between the groups. Overall mortality was significantly lower in the VSR group (HR=0.12,p=0.04). Despite the higher reoperation rate in the VSR group(p=0.03), major adverse valve-related events(MAVRE) did not differ between the groups(p=0.28). Bleeding events were significantly higher in the Bentall group during follow-up(10 in Bentall group, 0 in VSR group, p=0.04). here were 6 thromboembolic events only in the Bentall group(p=0.11). We performed a propensity score matching analysis comparing the groups(134 Bentall vs 43 VSR). Matched analysis gave similar results, i.e. HR=0.17 and p=0.10 for overall mortality and HR=1.01 and p=0.99 for MAVRE. Although there was marginal significance in the propensity matched analysis, it is plausible to anticipate a survival benefit with VSR during long-term follow-up. Despite a higher reoperation for aortic valves, VSR can be a viable option in patients who decline life-long anticoagulation, especially the young or the patients in whom anticoagulation is contraindicated. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. David I reimplantation procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan patients: medium-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Fabian A; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Rylski, Bartosz; Stephens, Elizabeth H; Russe, Maximilian; Siepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Technical variations of the David reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) procedure have been proposed to be advantageous in patients with connective tissue disease, such as the Marfan syndrome (MFS). We report results of a Marfan cohort treated exclusively with the non-modified David I procedure. Forty-eight Marfan patients (25 males, mean age 33 ± 12 years, range 15-62 years) underwent the original variant of the David V-SARR (David I) between 1997 and 2013. Forty-two operations (88%) were performed as elective procedures for aortic root aneurysms and six for acute dissections (12%). Seventeen had aortic regurgitation (AR) grades ≥2+ preoperatively, and 3 had AR >2+. No patients with severe AR (4+) were selected for V-SARR. Three full or hemi-arch replacements were performed. Patients who were operated on using a variation of the David I or David II procedure were excluded. Mean prosthesis size was 28 ± 3 mm (18-30 mm). Mean clinical and echocardiographic follow-up (98% complete) was 3.8 ± 3.7 years with a cumulative follow-up of 178 patient-years. The early mortality rate was 2% (one hospital death). The survival rate was 98% (95% confidence 84-99%) at 4 years and 90% (57-98%) at 8 years with 5 patients at risk at 10 years. The rate of freedom from root or valve reoperation was 97% (79-99%) and 97% (79-99%) at 4 and 8 years, respectively. Only one patient required mechanical aortic valve replacement for progression of AR. Despite potential theoretical drawbacks of the David I V-SARR technique without neo-sinuses or a neo-sinotubular junction, it results in a favourable mid-term outcome in Marfan patients and compares well with reported results of different modifications of David V-SARR. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-; Maria Monea Adriana; Monica Monea; Mihai Pop; Angela Borda

    2016-01-01

    Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT) used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 i...

  6. Consecutive operative procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome up to 28 years after initial aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puluca, Nazan; Burri, Melchior; Cleuziou, Julie; Krane, Markus; Lange, Rüdiger

    2018-02-28

    Most patients (75%) with Marfan syndrome present with aortic root dilatation that may require surgical intervention. However, associated cardiovascular disorders are not limited to the aortic root. These patients frequently require consecutive operations on the remaining thoracic aorta or the heart valves. Our intent was to characterize the spectrum of such procedures. Data from all patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root surgery at our centre between 1988 and 2016 were analysed retrospectively. Overall, 73 patients (26 women) were selected for the study. The median age at 1st operation was 30 years (3-68 years). Indications for aortic root surgery were aneurysm (78%) and dissection (22%). Initially, 33 Bentall procedures and 40 valve-sparing root replacement procedures were performed, with a 97% rate of follow-up completion. The median follow up was 8 years (0-28 years). Survival at 1, 10 and 15 years was 100%, 85% and 82%, respectively. During follow-up monitoring, 48 subsequent procedures were performed in 33 patients (aorta, 23; aortic valve, 11; mitral valve, 7 and combined procedures, 7). The 30-day mortality rate after subsequent procedures was 4.2%. Freedom from subsequent operation and death (combined end-point) after 5, 10 and 15 years was 70%, 53% and 34%, respectively. After the initial surgery, subsequent procedures required in the setting of Marfan syndrome most often involve the remaining native aorta, followed by the aortic and mitral valves. The continued need for additional operative procedures remains high, even decades after the initial surgeries are undertaken. Therefore, long-term patient monitoring at specialized centres is imperative.

  7. Dilatation and Dysfunction of the Neo-aortic Root and in 76 Patients After the Ross Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Corina A; Weber, Roland; Greutmann, Matthias; Dave, Hitendu; Müller, Christoph; Prêtre, René; Seifert, Burkhardt; Buechel, Emanuela Valsangiacomo; Kretschmar, Oliver; Attenhofer Jost, Christine H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary autograft replacement (Ross procedure) is used as an alternative to prosthetic aortic valve replacement patients with aortic valve disease. There are limited data on incidence and risk factors for dilatation and dysfunction of the neo-aortic after the Ross procedure. Ross procedure was performed in 100 patients at our institution between 1993 and 2011. In 76 patients, complete follow-up data were available. Their median age at surgery was 16 (0.4-58) years (76 % males; 95 % with congenital aortic valve disease). Median follow-up duration was 5.2 years (0.3-16.0 years). We analyzed their clinical and echocardiographic follow-up to identify possible risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation and dysfunction. Ross procedure included reduction plasty of the native ascending aorta in 25 % of patients. During follow-up, 21 patients (28 %) developed neo-aortic root dilatation, 38 patients (50 %) dilatation oft the native ascending aorta and 7 patients (9 %) at least moderate neo-aortic regurgitation. Univariate risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation were preoperative aortic regurgitation (p = 0.04), concomitant reduction plasty of the ascending aorta (p = 0.009) and a longer duration of follow-up (p = 0.005). Younger age at surgery was associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta (p = 0.03). Reoperation on the neo-aortic root because of severe dilatation was necessary in 6 patients (8 %), where 2 patients had at least moderate neo-aortic root regurgitation. Neo-aortic root and aortic dilatation are common after the Ross procedure. This is often combined with neo-aortic valve dysfunction. Close follow-up of these patients is mandatory.

  8. Root coverage procedures improve patient aesthetics. A systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Francesco; Pagliaro, Umberto; Buti, Jacopo; Baccini, Michela; Graziani, Filippo; Tonelli, Paolo; Pagavino, Gabriella; Tonetti, Maurizio S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review (SR) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to explore if periodontal plastic surgery procedures for the treatment of single and multiple gingival recessions (Rec) may improve aesthetics at patient and professional levels. In order to combine evidence from direct and indirect comparisons by different trials a Bayesian network meta-analysis (BNM) was planned. A literature search on PubMed, Cochrane libraries, EMBASE, and hand-searched journals until January 2016 was conducted to identify RCTs presenting aesthetic outcomes after root coverage using standardized evaluations at patient and professional level. A total of 16 RCTs were selected in the SR; three RTCs presenting professional aesthetic evaluation with Root coverage Aesthetic Score (RES) and three showing final self-perception using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS Est) could be included in a BNM model. Coronally Advanced Flap plus Connective Tissue Graft (CAF + CTG) and CAF + Acellular Dermal Matrix (ADM) and Autologous Fibroblasts (AF) were associated with the best RES outcomes (best probability = 24% and 64%, respectively), while CAF + CTG and CAF + CTG + Enamel matrix Derivatives (EMD) obtained highest values of VAS Est score (best probability = 44% and 26%, respectively). Periodontal Plastic Surgery (PPS) techniques applying grafts underneath CAF with or without the adding of EMD are associated with improved aesthetics assessed by final patient perception and RES as professional evaluation system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Alpha-2-Macroglobulin Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid Pre- and Post-scaling and Root Planing with Adjunctive Tetracycline Fibers in Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhina, Shivjot; Rathore, Ajit Singh; Juneja, Saurabh

    2015-06-01

    This split-mouth clinical study aimed to investigate levels of alpha-2-macroglobulin (a2M) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of chronic periodontitis patients pre- and post-scaling and root planing (SRP) with or without adjunctive use of tetracycline fibers. In 30 patients of chronic periodontitis, samples of GCF were collected from the gingival sulcus before SRP. Recording of clinical parameters was conducted. This was followed by local drug delivery (LDD) of tetracycline fibers in test sites. In control sites, no LDD was done. Second samples of GCF were taken 90 days after treatment. Samples of crevicular fluid were analyzed to determine the levels of a2m. A gain of clinical attachment (CAL) of 3.30 mm for SRP and LDD and for SRP alone was 1.62 mm (p chronic periodontitis.

  10. Effect of scaling and root planing on serum interleukin-10 levels and glycemic control in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudh Balakrishna Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chronic periodontal disease (CPD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM share common pathogenic pathways involving the cytokine network resulting in increased susceptibility to both diseases, leading to increased inflammatory destruction, insulin resistance, and poor glycemic control. Periodontal treatment may improve glycemic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP of T2DM patients with CPD on hyperglycemia and the levels of serum interleukin-10 (IL-10. Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects were divided into three groups comprising 15 subjects each as Group 1 (healthy controls, Group 2 (CPD patients, and Group 3 (T2DM patients with CPD. Plaque index, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depths (PPD, clinical attachment loss (AL, bleeding on probing (BoP, random blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C, and serum IL-10 were measured at baseline; SRP was performed on Groups 2 and 3 and the selected parameters recorded again at 6 months. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05 differences were observed in the variables at baseline and 6 months after SRP between the three groups using one-way ANOVA. The paired samples t-test for PPD and AL in Group 3 was statistically significant. Group 3 revealed positive correlations between PPD and HbA1C, BoP and IL-10, respectively, at 6 months and a predictable association of HbA1C with PPD and GI, and IL-10 levels with BoP, respectively, at 6 months. Conclusion: Scaling and root planing is effective in reducing blood glucose levels in T2DM patient with pocket depths and effective in elevating systemic IL-10 levels in CPD patients and CPD patients with T2DM.

  11. Role of diode lasers (800-980 nm) as adjuncts to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Talat; Javed, Fawad; Johannsen, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review currently available evidence regarding the role of diode lasers (810-980 nm) as adjuncts to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis (CP). Mechanical instrumentation of periodontal tissues followed by diode laser application leads to complete removal of pocket epithelium compared with conventional SRP. To address the focused question "Is SRP with adjunct diode lasers (810-980 nm) therapy more effective in the treatment of CP than when CP is treated by SRP alone?" databases were searched using the following key words: chronic periodontitis, diode laser, surgical, AND scaling and root planing, periodontal diseases, periodontal therapy, AND periodontal treatment. Original studies were included. Letters to the editor, case reports, commentaries, and reviews were excluded. Ten clinical studies were included. In all studies, patients were systemically healthy, and cigarette smokers were included in two studies. In five studies, SRP plus diode laser application was more effective in the treatment of CP than SRP, and three studies showed no difference. In two studies, there was a moderate reduction in periodontal inflammation using SRP plus diode laser. The diameter of optic fiber, laser wavelengths, power, pulse repetition rate, and duration of laser exposure ranged between 300 μm and 2 mm, 810-980 nm, 0.8-2.5 W, 10-60 Hz, and 10-100 ms, respectively. In CP patients with probing depths ≤5 mm, diode lasers, SRP plus diode laser (800-980 nm) is more effective in the treatment of CP than when SRP is used alone.

  12. The Effect of Diode Laser With Different Parameters on Root Fracture During Irrigation Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Ertuğrul; Arslan, Hakan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Yılmaz, Cenk Burak; Yeter, Kübra Yesildal; Ayrancı, Leyla Benan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effect of a single diode laser application and agitation of EDTA with diode laser with different parameters at different time intervals on root fracture. Ninety mandibular incisors were instrumented except the negative control group. The specimens were divided randomly into 10 groups according to final irrigation procedure: (G1) non-instrumented; (G2) distilled water; (G3) 15% EDTA; (G4) ultrasonically agitated EDTA; (G5) single 1.5W/100 Hz Diode laser; (G6) single 3W/100 Hz Diode laser; (G7) 1.5W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 20 s; (G8) 1.5W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 40 s; (G9) 3W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 20 s; and (G10) 3W/100 Hz Diode laser agitation of EDTA for 40 s. The specimens were filled, mounted in acrylic resin, and compression strength test was performed on each specimen. Statistical analysis was carried out using one way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (P = 0.05). The statistical analysis revealed that there were statistically significant differences among the groups (P Laser-agitated irrigation with a 3W/100 Hz Diode laser for both 20 s and 40 s decreased the fracture resistance of teeth. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Root planing with Er:YAG laser X Gracey curette, a study in vitro in scanning electron microscopic study; Avaliacao em microscopia eletronica de varredura da superficie radicular, raspada e alisada com Er: YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Fabiano Augusto Sfier de

    2000-07-01

    The Er:YAG laser has been studied as a periodontal therapies, used to remove subgingival calculus and its bactericidal effects. The proposal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Er:YAG laser in root planing in comparison to the traditional method, not surgical. Six recently extracted due to the disease periodontal, were cut longitudinally, tends like this two half of the root. These half were separate in four groups. The first group is the natural tooth (group controls negative), the second group (group controls) was accomplished to root planing with Gracey curette. And in the third to Er:YAG laser with a contact tip, using a 45 deg angle in relation to the root; in the fourth group was scraped and planned with Er:YAG laser and complemented root planing with Gracey curette. The used energy was of 100 mJ (out put) and the frequency of 10 Hz accomplished with irrigation. The obtained results were similar in the groups 2 and 3 in comparison to the amount of smear-layer. In group 4 however, better result was obtained, because the image (SEM) was much more regular and with less amount of smear-layer. The conclusion of the work is that with the association of the laser technique and Gracey curette the results are superior to the conventional treatment. (author)

  14. Track-match procedure criteria in the reference mark plane for quality control of event measurements from the JINR measuring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    A new technique to preselect potential tracks of events in a reference plane is described. This technique allows to log bench marks used in track projections which connect two tops or a top and a break point in the TRACK-MATCH procedure. The above technique is implemented in a modular measurement quality control program. The results of measurement quality control obtained using a geometry restoration program are compared with those of the measurement quality control program

  15. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 instruments were fractured in the root canals. Digital intraoral periapical radiographs from two angles and CBCT scans were made with the teeth fixed in position. The images were evaluated and the number of detected accidents were stated in percentages. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi square-test. Results: On digital periapical radiographs the evaluators identified 12 (66.66% perforations, 10 (100 % separated instruments and 10 (76.9% created ledges. The CBCT scans made possible the recognition of 17 (94.66 % perforations, 9 (90 % separated instruments and 13 (100% ledges. The totally recognized accidental procedures showed significant differences between the two groups. (p<0.05 Conclusion: Digital periapical radiographs are the most common imaging modalities used during endodontic treatments. Though, the CBCT allows a better identification of the procedural accidents.

  16. Multilevel analysis of clinical parameters in chronic periodontitis after root planing/scaling, surgery, and systemic and local antibiotics: 2-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahimu Mdala

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Find the periodontal treatment that best maintained clinical results over time evaluated by changes in pocket depth (PD and clinical attachment level (CAL. Methods: 229 patients with chronic periodontitis from USA (n=134 and Sweden (n=95 were randomly assigned to eight groups receiving 1 scaling+root planing (SRP alone or combined with 2 surgery (SURG+systemic amoxicillin (AMOX+systemic metronidazole (MET; 3 SURG+local tetracycline (TET; 4 SURG; 5 AMOX+MET+TET; 6 AMOX+MET; 7 TET; and 8 SURG+AMOX+MET+TET. Antibiotics were given immediately after SRP. Plaque, gingival redness, bleeding on probing, suppuration, PD, and CAL were recorded at baseline and after 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Treatment effects were evaluated by linear multilevel regression and logistic multilevel regression models. We considered only data from sites with a baseline PD of at least 5 mm of 187 patients completing the study. Results: Surgically treated patients experienced most CAL loss. Adjunctive therapy including SURG was most effective in reducing PD. Combining SURG with AMOX, MET, and TET gave significant clinical benefits. Past and current smoking habits were significant predictors of deeper PD. Only current smoking was a significant predictor of CAL loss. Bleeding, accumulation of plaque, gingival redness, and suppuration were significant predictors of further CAL loss and deeper PD. Conclusions: Both surgical and non-surgical therapies can be used to arrest chronic periodontitis. SURG+AMOX+MET+TET gave best maintenance of clinical results.

  17. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  18. A randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate a novel noninjectable anesthetic gel with thermosetting agent during scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayakar, M M; Akbar, S M

    2016-01-01

    To study the efficacy of a noninjectable anesthetic gel with a thermosetting agent in the reduction of pain during scaling and root planing (SRP) in untreated chronic periodontitis patients. This study is a randomized, double-masked, split-mouth, placebo-controlled trial. Thirty patients were enrolled who underwent SRP in a split-mouth (right side/left side) manner. Before commencement of SRP, both quadrants on each side were isolated and had a randomized gel (either placebo or test gel) placed in the periodontal pockets for 30 s. The pain was measured using numerical rating scale (NRS) and verbal rating scale (VRS). The median NRS pain score for the patients treated with the anesthetic test gel was 1 (range: 0-4) as opposed to 5 (range: 3-7) in the placebo treated patients. The mean rank of pain score using NRS in test gel was 16.18 as compared to 44.82 in placebo treated sites. Hence, significant reduction in pain was found in test gel as compared to placebo using NRS (P < 0.001). The VRS showed that the majority of patients reported no pain or mild pain with a median of 1 as compared to placebo treated sites with a median of 2 suggestive of moderate pain. The NRS and VRS pain scores showed that the side treated with anesthetic gel was statistically more effective than the placebo in reducing pain during SRP.

  19. Comparative evaluation of efficacy of three treatment modalities – tetracycline fibers, scaling and root planing, and combination therapy: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashima Bajaj Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tetracycline is one of the primary antibiotics prescribed for antimicrobial therapy in periodontics. It has a broad spectrum of activity being effective against most bacteria as well as spirochetes. Due to limitations of systemic drug therapy, recent formulations of the drug for local administration in the subgingival area have been introduced, including collagen fibers impregnated with tetracycline. Aims and Objective: To compare the effectiveness of tetracycline fibers alone or in combination with scaling and root planing (SRP on clinical parameters in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: A total of twenty patients comprising of both sexes in the age group of 35-60 years with chronic periodontitis were selected. Split-mouth design was used, and three teeth from each patient with periodontal pocket measuring > 5 mm were selected which were treated with different treatment modality. They were randomly divided into site A (SRP, site B (tetracycline fibers only, and site C (combination therapy. Clinical parameters of plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, pocket probing depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL were recorded at 0, 30, and 45 days. The data obtained was compiled and put to statistical analysis. Results: All the three groups showed improvement in PI, GI, probing pocket depth, and CAL. Results of the study showed greater improvements in clinical parameters in Group C compared to Group A and Group B. Conclusion: The results indicate that the adjunctive use of tetracycline fibers with SRP is a clinically effective and simple nonsurgical treatment method to improve periodontal health.

  20. Is Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Effective as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to investigate whether antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT as either a primary mode of treatment or an adjunct to non-surgical treatment was more effective than scaling and root planing (SRP alone in treating chronic periodontitis in terms of clinical attachment level (CAL gain and probing depth (PD reduction. The focused question was developed using the Patient, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome (PICO format, and two authors independently searched the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases for relevant studies from January 2008 to December 2016. Twenty studies included in this systematic review were randomized clinical trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs of aPDT compared to placebo, no intervention, or non-surgical treatment in an adult population. Basic study characteristics, photosensitizing agents and wavelengths used in aPDT, frequency of aPDT application, effect of aPDT on clinical parameters, antimicrobial effect of aPDT in chronic periodontitis, effect of immunological parameters following aPDT and patient-based outcome measures were collected from the studies. Although there was a wide range of heterogeneity in the included studied, they all indicated that aPDT has the potential to be an effective adjunct in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Long-term, multicenter studies with larger sample sizes are needed before aPDT can be recommended as an effective treatment modality.

  1. Is adjunctive photodynamic therapy more effective than scaling and root planing alone in the treatment of periodontal disease in hyperglycemic patients? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Salehpoor, Danial; Al-Dhafeeri, Talal; Yousuf, Muhammad; Malmstrom, Hans; Khan, Junad; Akram, Zohaib

    2018-02-19

    To assess the impact of scaling and root planing (SRP) with and without adjunct photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease (PD) in hyperglycemic patients. Databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE; and CENTRAL) were searched up to December 2017. The addressed PICO question was: "What is the effectiveness of adjunctive PDT to non-surgical periodontal treatment by means of clinical periodontal and glycemic parameters in hyperglycemic patients?" Four clinical trials and 1 experimental study were included. Energy fluence, power output, power density and duration of irradiation were 2.79 joules per square centimeters (J cm -2 ), 150 milliwatts (mW), 428 milliwatts per square centimeters (mW cm -2 ) and 133 seconds (s) respectively. All studies reporting clinical periodontal and metabolic parameters, showed that aPDT was effective in the treatment of periodontal inflammation in hyperglycemic patients at follow-up. When compared with SRP alone, none of the studies showed additional benefits of PDT as compared to SRP alone at follow up. Three studies showed no influence of SRP with or without aPDT on HbA1c levels. One study showed a significant reduction of HbA1c levels in adjunctive aPDT as compared to SRP alone at follow-up. It remains debatable whether adjunctive PDT as compared to SRP is effective in the treatment of periodontal inflammation and reduction of HbA1c levels in hyperglycemic patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative evaluation of effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during scaling and root planing – A split-mouth clinical trial

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    Kalyan Chintala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pain control is an important outcome measure for successful periodontal therapy. Injected local anesthesia has been used to secure anesthesia for scaling and root planing (SRP and continues to be the anesthetic of choice for pain control. Alternatively, intra-pocket anesthetic gel has been used as an anesthetic during SRP. Hence, this clinical trial was done to compare the effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during SRP and also to assess the influence of intra-pocket anesthetic gel on treatment outcomes in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were recruited. The dental quadrants on right side received either intra-pocket 20% benzocaine gel (Gel group or infiltration/block by 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 adrenaline (injection group. Quadrants on the left side received the alternative. Pain perception and patients preference for the type of anesthesia was recorded. Clinical parameters: plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Results: No difference was observed in visual analog scale (P > 0.05 and verbal rating scale (P > 0.05 pain perception between gel group and injection group. A slightly increased preference to gel as anesthesia (53% vs. 47% was observed. The treatment outcome after SRP did not show a significant difference between gel and injection group (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Intra-pocket administration of 20% benzocaine gel may be effective for pain control during SRP and may offer an alternative to conventional injection anesthesia.

  3. Multilevel analysis of bacterial counts from chronic periodontitis after root planing/scaling, surgery, and systemic and local antibiotics: 2-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahimu Mdala

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To follow changes (over 2 years in subgingival bacterial counts of five microbial complexes including health-related Actinomyces spp. in deeper pockets (≥5 mm after periodontal treatments. Methods: Eight different treatments were studied: (1 scaling+root planing (SRP; (2 periodontal surgery (SURG+systemic amoxicillin (AMOX+systemic metronidazole (MET; (3 SURG+locally delivered tetracycline (TET; (4 SURG; (5 AMOX+MET+TET; (6 AMOX+MET; (7 TET; and (8 SURG+AMOX+MET+TET. Antibiotics were given immediately following SRP. Subgingival plaque was collected mesiobuccally from each tooth, except third molars, from 176 subjects, completing the study, at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post-treatment and analysed for 40 different bacteria using checkerboard hybridization. A negative binomial (NB generalized estimating equation (NB GEE model was used to analyze count data and a logistic GEE was used for proportions. Results: We observed short-term beneficial changes in the composition of the red complex of up to 3 months by treating subjects with AMOX+MET+TET. Similar short-term improvements with the same treatment were observed for Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola of the red complex. SURG had also short-term beneficial effect on Porphyromonas gingivalis. No periodontal treatments applied to severely affected sites promoted the growth of Actinomyces. Smoking elevated counts of both the red and orange complex while bleeding on probing (BOP and gingival redness were also predictors of more red complex counts. Comparatively similar findings were obtained by analyzing counts and by analyzing proportions. Conclusions: Although short-term reductions in the counts of the red complex were observed in sites that were treated with AMOX+MET+TET, long-term significant effects were not observed with any of the eight treatments. Poor oral hygiene in patients with severe chronic periodontitis diminished the beneficial effects of treatment.

  4. Clinical efficacy of photodynamic therapy adjunctive to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dong; Tang, Lu; Bai, Yuhao; Ding, Qian; Wang, Pengcheng; Zhao, Ying

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) adjunctive to scaling and root planing (SRP) in patients with untreated chronic periodontitis based on up-to-date evidence. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs), supplemented by a manual literature search. Mean differences (MD) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of probing depth (PD) reduction and clinical attachment level (CAL) gain were synthesized. The I 2 test and Q statistics were used to determine the inter-study heterogeneity. Subgroup analysis based on smoking status was performed. Eleven RCTs with a total of 243 subjects were included. Significant improvement in PD reduction (MD=0.13, CI:0.02-0.24, p=0.02) and marginal significant improvement in CAL gain (MD=0.18, CI:-0.005-0.363, p=0.056) were observed in favor of SRP+PDT at 3months. When evaluated at 6months after baseline, the association of PDT with SRP resulted in a significant benefit in PD reduction (MD=0.40, CI:0.05-0.74, p=0.03), but not in CAL gain (MD=0.37, CI:-0.18-0.93, p=0.18). Subgroup analysis revealed that the combined therapy produced no significant improvements in PD and CAL at neither 3months nor 6months for studies with smokers. No treatment-related adverse events or side effects had been reported by the included studies. Pooled analysis suggests a short-term benefit of PDT as an adjunct to SRP in clinical outcome variables. However, evidence regarding its long-term efficacy is still insufficient and no significant effect has been confirmed in terms of CAL gain at 6months. Future clinical trials of high methodological quality are needed to establish the optimal combination of photosensitizer and laser configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of local alendronate sodium gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing on smokers with chronic periodontitis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin Kiany

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical treatments for the modulation of host response are applied along with mechanical modalities as adjunctive to periodontal treatment. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of locally-delivered alendronate sodium gel in adjunction to scaling and root planning on periodontal indices and bone formation within vertical defects of smokers with chronic periodontitis. Methods and Materials: In this study vertical defects (n=8 with depth>5 mm have been investigated. After performing the phase I of periodontal treatment, alendronate sodium gel (1% was applied into the periodontal pockets. The whole procedure was repeated after 4 weeks. Periodontal indices (plaque and bleeding, probing depth, gingival recession, and radiographic parameter (depth of bony defect were measured at the beginning and following 6 months. Results: Compared to pre-treatment, the probing depth, radiographic depth of bony defect and bleeding and plaque indices were significantly reduced by local application of alendronate sodium gel (P=0.026; P=0.012 and P=0.007 respectively. Gingival recession showed significant increase (P=0.011. Conclusion: Local alendronate sodium gel (1% plays an important role in the improvement process of periodontal indices and bone formation within vertical bony defects of smoker patients with chronic periodontitis.

  6. Nearaffine planes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we develop a theory for nearaffine planes analogous to the theory of ordinary affine translation planes. In a subsequent paper we shall use this theory to give a characterization of a certain class of Minkowski planes.

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis on the nonsurgical treatment of chronic periodontitis by means of scaling and root planing with or without adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Christopher J; Tracy, Sharon L; Abt, Elliot; Michalowicz, Bryan S; John, Mike T; Gunsolley, John; Cobb, Charles M; Rossmann, Jeffrey; Harrel, Stephen K; Forrest, Jane L; Hujoel, Philippe P; Noraian, Kirk W; Greenwell, Henry; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Estrich, Cameron; Hanson, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    Conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on nonsurgical treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis by means of scaling and root planing (SRP) with or without adjuncts. A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs conducted a search of PubMed (MEDLINE) and Embase for randomized controlled trials of SRP with or without the use of adjuncts with clinical attachment level (CAL) outcomes in trials at least 6 months in duration and published in English through July 2014. The authors assessed individual study bias by using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool and conducted meta-analyses to obtain the summary effect estimates and their precision and to assess heterogeneity. The authors used funnel plots and Egger tests to assess publication bias when there were more than 10 studies. The authors used a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force methods to assess the overall level of certainty in the evidence. The panel included 72 articles on the effectiveness of SRP with or without the following: systemic antimicrobials, a systemic host modulator (subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline), locally delivered antimicrobials (chlorhexidine chips, doxycycline hyclate gel, and minocycline microspheres), and a variety of nonsurgical lasers (photodynamic therapy with a diode laser, a diode laser, neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers, and erbium lasers). With a moderate level of certainty, the panel found approximately a 0.5-millimeter average improvement in CAL with SRP. Combinations of SRP with assorted adjuncts resulted in a range of average CAL improvements between 0.2 and 0.6 mm over SRP alone. The panel judged the following 4 adjunctive therapies as beneficial with a moderate level of certainty: systemic subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline, systemic antimicrobials, chlorhexidine chips, and photodynamic therapy with a diode laser. There was a low level of certainty in the benefits of the other included adjunctive

  8. Comparative efficiency of final endodontic cleansing procedures in removing a radioactive albumin from root canal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecic, P.A.; Peters, D.D.; Grower, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-six teeth were initially instrumented, with the use of seven irrigants or irrigant combinations, and filled with radioactive albumin. The study then showed the relative ability of three final endodontic procedures (copious reirrigation with saline solution, drying with paper points, and reassuring patency of the canal with the final instrument) to remove the albumin. Even after copious irrigation, each additional procedure removed statistically significant amounts of albumin. Alternating an organic solvent and an inorganic solvent did appear to leave the canal system in the optimal condition for final cleansing procedures. The study then correlated the relative efficiency of irrigation alone versus instrumentation plus irrigation in removing the remaining albumin from the canal systems. Reinstrumentation plus copious irrigation removed significantly more albumin than copious irrigation alone

  9. The annual frequency of root fillings, tooth extractions and pulp-related procedures in Danish adults during 1977-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, L.; Reit, C.

    2004-01-01

    endodontic epidemiology, frequency of root fillings, pulp capping, stepwise excavation, tooth extractions......endodontic epidemiology, frequency of root fillings, pulp capping, stepwise excavation, tooth extractions...

  10. Procedure for the direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows in plane channels and annuli and its application in the development of turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, U

    1973-10-01

    Thesis. Submitted to Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe (West Germany). A numerical difference scheme is described to simulate threedimensional, time- dependent, turbulent flows of incompressible fluids at high Reynolds numbers in a plane channel and in concertric annuli. Starting from the results of Deardorff, the NavierStokes equations, averaged over grid volumes, are integrated. For description of the subgrid scale motion a novel model has been developed which takes into account strongly inhomogeneous turbulence and grid volumes of unequal side lengths. The premises used in the model are described and discussed. Stability criteria are established for this method and for similar difference schemes. For computation of the pressure field the appropriate Poisson's equation is solved accurately, except for rounding errors, by Fast Fourier Transform. The procedure implemented in the TURBIT-1 program is used to simulate turbulent flows in a plane channel and an annulus of 5: 1 ratio of radii. For both types of flow, different cases are realized with a maximum number of grid volumes of 65536. For rather small grid volume numbers the numerical results are in good agreement with experimental values. Especially the velocity profile and the mean velocity fluctuations are computed with significantly better accuracy than in earlier, direct simulations. The energy --length-scale model and the pressurestrain correlation are used as examples to show that the method may be used successfully to evaluate the parameters of turbulence models. Earlier results are reviewed and proposals for future research are made. (auth)

  11. Long-term outcomes of aortic root operations for Marfan syndrome: A comparison of Bentall versus aortic valve-sparing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Joel; Magruder, J Trent; Young, Allen; Grimm, Joshua C; Patel, Nishant D; Alejo, Diane; Dietz, Harry C; Vricella, Luca A; Cameron, Duke E

    2016-02-01

    Prophylactic aortic root replacement improves survival in patients with Marfan syndrome with aortic root aneurysms, but the optimal procedure remains undefined. Adult patients with Marfan syndrome who had Bentall or aortic valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) procedures between 1997 and 2013 were identified. Comprehensive follow-up information was obtained from hospital charts and telephone contact. One hundred sixty-five adult patients with Marfan syndrome (aged > 20 years) had either VSRR (n = 98; 69 reimplantation, 29 remodeling) or Bentall (n = 67) procedures. Patients undergoing Bentall procedure were older (median, 37 vs 36 years; P = .03), had larger median preoperative sinus diameter (5.5 cm vs 5.0 cm; P = .003), more aortic dissections (25.4% vs 4.1%; P Marfan syndrome, patients undergoing Bentall and valve-sparing procedures have similar late survival, freedom from root reoperation, and freedom from endocarditis. However, valve-sparing procedures result in significantly fewer thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of local drug-delivery system containing 2% whole turmeric gel used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis: A clinical and microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roobal Behal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effect of experimental local-drug delivery system containing 2% whole turmeric (gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP with the effect achieved using SRP alone by assessing their respective effects on plaque, gingival inflammation, bleeding on probing pocket depth, relative attachment levels and trypsin-like enzyme activity of "red complex " microorganisms, namely, Bacteroides forsythus, Porphvromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola. Material and Methods: Thirty subjects with chronic localized or generalized periodontitis with pocket depth of 5 to 7 mm were selected in a split-mouth study design. Control sites received SRP alone, while experimental sites received SRP plus experimental material (2% whole turmeric gel. Plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, sulcus bleeding index (SBI, probing pocket depth (PPD, relative attachment loss (RAL, microbiological study of collected plaque sample for trypsin-like activity of "red complex" by BAPNA assay were the parameters recorded on day 0, 30 days and 45 days. Results: Both groups demonstrated statistically significant reduction in PI, GI, SBI, PPD; and gain in RAL. Significant reduction in the trypsin-like enzyme activity of "red complex" (BAPNA values was observed for both the groups when compared to the baseline activity. Greater reduction was seen in all the parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control group. Conclusion: The experimental local drug-delivery system containing 2% whole turmeric gel can be effectively used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing and is more effective than scaling and root planing alone in the treatment of periodontal pockets.

  13. Involvement of YODA and mitogen activated protein kinase 6 in Arabidopsis post-embryogenic root development through auxin up-regulation and cell division plane orientation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smékalová, V.; Luptovčiak, I.; Komis, G.; Šamajová, O.; Ovečka, M.; Doskočilová, A.; Takáč, T.; Vadovič, P.; Novák, Ondřej; Pechan, T.; Ziemann, A.; Košútová, P.; Šamaj, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 4 (2014), s. 1175-1193 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis * cell division plane * MAP65-1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.672, year: 2014

  14. Effects of local alendronate sodium gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing on smokers with chronic periodontitis: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Farin Kiany; Hashem Montaseri; Sadaf Adibi; Masoud Golshah; Saba Golshah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chemical treatments for the modulation of host response are applied along with mechanical modalities as adjunctive to periodontal treatment. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of locally-delivered alendronate sodium gel in adjunction to scaling and root planning on periodontal indices and bone formation within vertical defects of smokers with chronic periodontitis. Methods and Materials: In this study vertical defects (n=8) with depth>5 mm have be...

  15. An estimate of pocket closure and avoided needs of surgery after scaling and root planing with systemic antibiotics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakovic, Mirela; Held, Ulrike; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Sahrmann, Philipp

    2014-12-22

    Relevant benefits of adjunctive medication of antibiotica after conventional root surface debridement in terms of enhanced pocket depth (PD) reduction have been shown. However, means and standard deviations of enhanced reductions are difficult to translate into clinical relevant treatment outcomes such as pocket resolution or avoidance of additional surgical interventions. Accordingly, the aim of this systematic review was to calculate odds ratios for relevant cut-off values of PD after mechanical periodontal treatment with and without antibiotics, specifically the combination of amoxicilline and metronidazol, from published studies. As clinical relevant cut-off values "pocket closure" for PD ≤ 3mm and "avoidance of surgical intervention" for PD ≤ 5 mm were determined. The databases PubMed, Embase and Central were searched for randomized clinical studies assessing the beneficial effect of the combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole after non-surgical mechanical debridement. Titles, abstracts and finally full texts were scrutinized for possible inclusion by two independent investigators. Quality and heterogeneity of the studies were assessed and the study designs were examined. From published means and standard deviations for PD after therapy, odds ratios for the clinically relevant cut-off values were calculated using a specific statistical approach. Meta-analyses were performed for the time points 3 and 6 month after mechanical therapy. Generally, a pronounced chance for pocket closure from 3 to 6 months of healing was shown. The administration of antibiotics resulted in a 3.55 and 4.43 fold higher probability of pocket closure after 3 and 6 months as compared to mechanical therapy alone. However, as the estimated risk for residual pockets > 5 mm was 0 for both groups, no odds ratio could be calculated for persistent needs for surgery. Generally, studies showed a moderate to high quality and large heterogeneity regarding treatment protocol, dose of

  16. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome: Bentall procedure with the composite mechanical valved conduit versus aortic valve reimplantation with Valsalva graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Paolo; Pellegrino, Antonio; Versaci, Francesco; Mantione, Ludmilla; Polisca, Patrizio; Iorio, Fiore S; Chiariello, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study is to compare mid-term results of Bentall aortic root replacement with composite mechanical valved conduit and aortic valve reimplantation procedure using the Valsalva graft for the treatment of aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome. We retrospectively compared data of 23 patients (mean age 38 + or - 14 years) who had undergone the Bentall procedure (group B) to those of 24 patients (mean age 36 + or - 12 years) who had undergone aortic valve reimplantation (group R) during a 14-year period. Follow-up (mean duration 65 + or - 44 months) was 100% complete. There were no operative deaths in either group. In group B, as compared with group R, preoperative aortic insufficiency (3.2 + or - 1.1/4 vs. 1.7 + or - 1.4/4, P Marfan patients, the Bentall procedure is associated with excellent mid-term outcome. The reimplantation technique, adopted for less dilated aortas, provides similarly satisfactory results. The Valsalva graft seems, with time, to allow a stable aortic valve function.

  17. Evaluation of the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells into the root canal space of necrotic immature teeth after clinical regenerative endodontic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Tyler W; Henry, Michael A; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Diogenes, Anibal

    2011-02-01

    Immature teeth with open apices treated with conventional nonsurgical root canal treatment often have a poor prognosis as a result of the increased risk of fracture and susceptibility to recontamination. Regenerative endodontics represents a new treatment modality that focuses on reestablishment of pulp vitality and continued root development. This clinical procedure relies on the intracanal delivery of a blood clot (scaffold), growth factors (possibly from platelets and dentin), and stem cells. However, to date, the clinical presence of stem cells in the canal space after this procedure has not been demonstrated. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate whether regenerative endodontic procedures are able to deliver stem cells into the canal space of immature teeth in young patients and to identify the possible tissue origin for these cells. After informed consent, the first appointment consisted of NaOCl irrigation and treatment with a triple antibiotic paste. One month later, the root canal space was irrigated with sterile saline, and bleeding was evoked with collection of samples on paper points. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry were conducted to compare the gene transcripts and proteins found in the root canal sample with levels found in the systemic circulation. Molecular analyses of blood collected from the canal system indicated the significant accumulation of transcripts for the stem cell markers CD73 and CD105 (up to 600-fold), compared with levels found in the systemic blood. Furthermore, this effect was selective because there was no change in expression of the differentiation markers ALK-P, DSPP, ZBTB16, and CD14. Histologic analyses demonstrated that the delivered cells expressed both CD105 and STRO-1, markers for a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the evoked-bleeding step in regenerative procedures triggers the significant accumulation of

  18. Effect of locally delivered tetracycline hydrochloride as an adjunct to scaling and root planing on Hba1c, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile in type 2 diabetes: A clinico-biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Dodwad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to assess the levels of HbA1c, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by treating the pockets using collagen impregnated sustained release resorbable tetracycline fiber (periodontal plus AB fiber following scaling and root planing (SRP. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly distributed into two groups receiving either SRP and tetracycline fiber or SRP alone. Patients were evaluated clinically with gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, and relative attachment level, and bio-chemically with HbA1c, C Reactive Protein, and lipid profile at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Results: Significant reduction in all the clinical parameters was seen in the tetracycline group compared to the control group. Bio-chemical analysis also revealed similar results except for cholesterol and High density lipoprotein who did not show any significant reduction. Conclusion: Locally delivered tetracycline as a better treatment modality compared to SRP alone.

  19. Effect of Subgingivally Delivered 10% Emblica officinalis Gel as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis - A Randomized Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Shilpa; Tewari, Shikha; Sharma, Rajinder K; Singh, Gajendra; Yadav, Aparna; Naula, Satish C

    2016-06-01

    Emblica officinalis fruit possesses varied medicinal properties including cytoprotective antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiresorptive and antiinflammatory activity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of subgingival application of indigenously prepared E. officinalis (Amla) sustained-release gel adjunctive to scaling and root planing (SRP) on chronic periodontitis. Forty-six patients (528 sites) were randomly assigned to control group (23;264): SRP +placebo gel and test group (23;264): SRP + 10% E. officinalis gel application. Periodontal parameters: plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and modified sulcus bleeding index (mSBI) were assessed at baseline, 2 and 3-month post-therapy. Forty patients (470 sites) completed the trial. When test and control sites were compared, significantly more reduction in mean PPD, mSBI, number of sites with PPD = 5-6 mm, PPD ≥ 7 mm, CAL ≥ 6 mm and greater CAL gain were achieved in test sites at 2- and 3-month post-therapy (p periodontal destruction in patients with chronic periodontitis when compared with SRP alone. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of superoxide dismutase levels in local drug delivery system containing 0.2% curcumin strip as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis: A clinical and biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugumari Elavarasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Curcumin has proven properties such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and it also accelerates wound healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of superoxide dismutase (SOD enzyme, in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF, and the impact of nonsurgical treatment on the antioxidant profile using 0.2% curcumin strip as local drug delivery. Materials and Methods: A total of twenty subjects of age 35–55 years and 15 subjects with chronic periodontitis, each with bilateral 5–6 mm probing pocket depth, were selected for this study. Healthy group consists of 5 sites in which no bleeding on probing, no pocket depth. Group I – It consists of 15 sites with chronic periodontitis, in which scaling and root planing (SRP was done (control group. Group II – It consists of 15 sites, in which SRP followed by the placement of curcumin strip inside the pocket (SRP + curcumin strip (test group. GCF collection was done preoperatively and postoperatively after 21 days. The SOD activity was assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: In this study, all the clinical parameters were significantly reduced in test and control sites. Further, SOD levels were significantly improved in test sites when compared with control sites. Conclusion: Thus, the present study concluded that curcumin strip can be effectively used as an adjunct to SRP in treatment of chronic periodontitis and serves as antioxidant in subgingival environment.

  1. The Effects of One-Stage Full-Mouth Disinfection and Qua-drant-Wise Scaling and Root Planing on Serum Levels of IL-17 and IL-1β and Clinical Parameters (A randomized Controlled Trial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adileh Shirmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One-stage full-mouth disinfection technique (FMD has been introduced to avoid cross-contamination between the treated and untreated regions between treatment sessions. Considering the role of inflammatory mediators in periodontitis, the aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FMD with the quadrant-wise scaling and root planing (Q-SRP on serum levels of IL-17 and IL-1β in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis.Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis were selected randomly and based on inclusion criteria in each group. In order to evaluate the periodontal status, the clinical parameters of bleeding on probing (BOP, clinical attachment level (CAL, probing depth (PD and modified gingival index (MGI were measured and recorded before treatment and at 2- and 4-month intervals after treatment. Immunologic parameters of the study such as IL-17 and IL-1β serum levels were determined by special laboratory kits at the same intervals. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 statistical software. Statistical significance was defined at p0.05. In the evaluation of periodontal parameters, all parameters exhibited clinical improvements in both groups, with no statistically significant differences between the two study groups (p>0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that both FMD and Q-SRP techniques result in improvements in periodontal indexes and decreases in the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-1β inflammatory mediators.

  2. Effect of laser-assisted scaling and root planing on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid of patients with chronic periodontitis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Malignaggi, Vanessa Ros; Majoka, Hasham Abdullah; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Kellesarian, Tammy Varela; Romanos, Georgios E; Javed, Fawad

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to assess the efficacy of laser-assisted (low level laser therapy [LLLT], high intensity laser therapy [HILT], or antimicrobial photodynamic therapy [aPDT]) scaling and root planing (SRP) compared with SRP alone on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular (GCF) of patients with chronic periodontitis (CP). In order to address the focused question: "What is the efficacy of SRP with and without laser and/or aPDT on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the GCF of patients with CP?" an electronic search without time or language restrictions was conducted up to and including February 2017 in indexed databases using various key words. Twenty-two randomized control trials were included in the present systematic review. Nine studies and six studies assessed the efficacy of LLLT and HILT, as adjunct to SRP, respectively. Seven studies assessed the efficacy of aPDT as adjunct to SRP on down-regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the GCF among patients with CP. The outcomes of the studies included based upon the reduction in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were inconsistent. The role of laser-assisted SRP on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the GCF of patients with CP remains unclear. Further long term and well-designed randomized clinical trials are needed in this regard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient-reported outcomes and aesthetic evaluation of root coverage procedures: a 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanini, Martina; Jepsen, Karin; de Sanctis, Massimo; Baldini, Nicola; Greven, Björn; Heinz, Bernd; Wennström, Jan; Cassel, Björn; Vignoletti, Fabio; Sanz, Mariano; Jepsen, Søren; Zucchelli, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    To assess patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), aesthetics and stability of root coverage procedures from a previous 6-month RCT after 1 year. Forty-five patients (90 recessions) had received a coronally advanced flap (CAF = control) only or a xenogeneic collagen matrix in addition (CAF + CMX = test). Visual analogue scales (VAS) and questionnaires were used for PROMs and the root coverage aesthetic score (RES) for professional aesthetic evaluations. VAS scores (patient satisfaction) amounted to 8.58 ± 1.86 (test) versus 8.38 ± 2.46 (control). Six patients preferred CAF + CMX concerning surgical procedure and aesthetics, six preferred CAF and 29 were equally satisfied. RES was 7.85 ± 2.42 for the test group versus 7.34 ± 2.90 for the controls. Root coverage (RC) was 76.28% for test and 75.05% for control defects. The mean increase in keratinized tissue width was higher in test (from 1.97 to 3.02 mm) than in controls (from 2.00 to 2.64 mm) (p = 0.0413). Likewise, test sites showed more gain in gingival thickness (0.52 mm) than control sites (0.27 mm) (p = 0.0023). Compared to 6 months, clinical outcomes were stable. Results for PROMs, RES and RC did not significantly differ between treatment groups. Thickness and width of keratinized tissue were enhanced following CAF + CMX compared to CAF alone. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Procedural Errors during Preparation of Curved Root Canals with Hand and Rotary Instruments: A Randomized Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rajesh; Handa, Aashish; Virk, Rupam Kaur; Ghai, Deepika; Handa, Rajni Sharma; Goel, Asim

    2017-01-01

    Background: The process of cleaning and shaping the canal is not an easy goal to obtain, as canal curvature played a significant role during the instrumentation of the curved canals. Aim: The present in vivo study was conducted to evaluate procedural errors during the preparation of curved root canals using hand Nitiflex and rotary K3XF instruments. Materials and Methods: Procedural errors such as ledge formation, instrument separation, and perforation (apical, furcal, strip) were determined in sixty patients, divided into two groups. In Group I, thirty teeth in thirty patients were prepared using hand Nitiflex system, and in Group II, thirty teeth in thirty patients were prepared using K3XF rotary system. The evaluation was done clinically as well as radiographically. The results recorded from both groups were compiled and put to statistical analysis. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test was used to compare the procedural errors (instrument separation, ledge formation, and perforation). Results: In the present study, both hand Nitiflex and rotary K3XF showed ledge formation and instrument separation. Although ledge formation and instrument separation by rotary K3XF file system was less as compared to hand Nitiflex. No perforation was seen in both the instrument groups. Conclusion: Canal curvature played a significant role during the instrumentation of the curved canals. Procedural errors such as ledge formation and instrument separation by rotary K3XF file system were less as compared to hand Nitiflex. PMID:29042727

  5. Effect of scaling and root planing on gingival crevicular fluid level of YKL-40 acute phase protein in chronic periodontitis patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus: A clinico-biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Damodar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF levels of YKL-40 acute phase protein in chronic periodontitis (CP with and without type 2 diabetes and also to assess the effect of periodontal therapy (scaling and root planing [SRP] on this GCF biomarker and the clinical parameters. YKL-40 is derived from tyrosine (Y, lysine (K, and leucine (L with a molecular weight of 40 kDa. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 individuals (30–60 years were grouped as 35 individuals each in three groups (Group I – healthy; Group II – CP with diabetes mellitus [DM]; and Group III – CP. Clinical parameters including plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level followed by GCF sample collection from test sites were done at baseline and 6 weeks after SRP (among Group II and Group III patients. GCF YKL-40 level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The mean GCF YKL-40 level at baseline was significantly lower for Group I (309.81 ± 124.93 pg/ml as compared to Group II (924.88 ± 415.28 pg/ml and Group III (834.08 ± 270.42 pg/ml, respectively (P < 0.001. The level reduced significantly 6 weeks after SRP for Group II (507.6 ± 265.03 pg/ml and Group III (499.54 ± 293.38 pg/ml (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The level of GCF YKL-40 in CP patients with or without DM is higher than healthy individuals and the level reduced 6 weeks post-SRP among Group II and Group III. Hence, YKL-40 can be considered as an important biomarker in the diagnosis of CP.

  6. Why rooting fails

    OpenAIRE

    Creutz, Michael

    2007-01-01

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four "tastes." The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  7. Root rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  8. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  9. Null-plane quantization of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustaki, D.

    1990-01-01

    Massive Dirac fermions are canonically quantized on the null plane using the Dirac-Bergmann algorithm. The procedure is carried out in the framework of quantum electrodynamics as an illustration of a rigorous treatment of interacting fermion fields

  10. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debeljak, Marta [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Elteren, Johannes T. van, E-mail: elteren@ki.si [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg{sup 2+} does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm{sup −2}; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg{sup −1} DW HgCl{sub 2}. It was

  11. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debeljak, Marta; Elteren, Johannes T. van; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg 2+ does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm −2 ; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg −1 DW HgCl 2 . It was found that at given

  12. Better Rooting Procedure to Enhance Survival Rate of Field Grown Malaysian Eksotika Papaya Transformed with 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Oxidase Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets. PMID:25969786

  13. Better rooting procedure to enhance survival rate of field grown malaysian eksotika papaya transformed with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid oxidase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom

    2013-01-01

    A high survival rate for transformed papaya plants when transferred to the field is useful in the quest for improving the commercial quality traits. We report in this paper an improved rooting method for the production of transformed Malaysian Eksotika papaya with high survival rate when transferred to the field. Shoots were regenerated from embryogenic calli transformed with antisense and RNAi constructs of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) genes using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Regenerated transformed shoots, each measuring approximately 3-4 cm in height, were cultured in liquid half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or sterile distilled water, and with either perlite or vermiculite supplementation. All the culturing processes were conducted either under sterile or nonsterile condition. The results showed that rooting under sterile condition was better. Shoots cultured in half-strength MS medium supplemented with vermiculite exhibited a 92.5% rooting efficiency while perlite showed 77.5%. The survival rate of the vermiculite-grown transformed papaya plantlets after transfer into soil, contained in polybags, was 94%, and the rate after transfer into the ground was 92%. Morpho-histological analyses revealed that the tap roots were more compact, which might have contributed to the high survival rates of the plantlets.

  14. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals and their susceptibility to endodontic treatment procedures: A molecular study

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanović Nikola; Krunić Jelena; Popović Branka; Stojičić Sonja; Živković Slavoljub

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Because apical periodontitis is recognizably an infectious disease, elimination or reduction of intracanal bacteria is of utmost importance for optimum treatment outcome. Objective. The prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals was studied Also, the effect of endodontic therapy by using intracanal medicaments, calcium hydroxide paste (CH) or gutta-percha points containing calcium hydroxide (CH-GP)...

  15. Morphologic analysis, by means of scanning electron microscopy, of the effect of Er: YAG laser on root surfaces submitted to scaling and root planing Análise morfológica, através de microscopia eletrônica de varredura, da ação do laser de Er: YAG em superfícies radiculares submetidas à raspagem e aplainamento radicular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Helena Theodoro

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to morphologically evaluate, by means of scanning electron microscopy, the effects of Er:YAG laser on the treatment of root surfaces submitted to scaling and root planing with conventional periodontal instruments. Eighteen root surfaces (n = 18, which had been previously scaled and planed, were assigned to 3 groups (n = 6. The control Group (G1 received no further treatment; Group 2 (G2 was irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94 mum, with 47 mJ/10 Hz, in a focused mode with air/water spray during 15 s and with 0.57 J/cm² of fluency per pulse; Group 3 (G 3 was irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94 mum, with 83 mJ/10 Hz, in a focused mode with air/water spray during 15 s and with 1.03 J/cm² of fluency per pulse. We concluded that the parameters adopted for Group 3 removed the smear layer from the root surface, exposing the dentinal tubules. Although no fissures, cracks or carbonized areas were observed, an irregular surface was produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation. Thus, the biocompatibility of the irradiated root surface, within the periodontal healing process, must be assessed.O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar morfologicamente, através de microscopia eletrônica de varredura, os efeitos do laser de Er:YAG no tratamento de superfícies radiculares submetidas à raspagem e aplainamento radicular com instrumentos manuais. Foram utilizados 18 espécimes (n = 18 de superfícies radiculares que após ser submetidos à raspagem e aplainamento radicular foram divididos em 3 grupos (n = 6. O grupo controle (G1 não sofreu nenhum tratamento; Grupo 2 (G2 foi irradiado com laser de Er:YAG (2,94 mim 47 mJ/10 Hz, focalizado,com refrigeração à água durante 15 s e fluência de pulso de 0,57 J/cm²; Grupo 3 (G3 foi irradiado com laser de Er:YAG (2,94 mim, 83 mJ/10 Hz, focalizado, com refrigeração à agua durante 15 s e fluência de pulso de 1,03 J/cm². Através da análise dos resultados podemos concluir que o laser de

  16. Personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) in Marfan syndrome: analysis of 1-9 year outcomes by intention-to-treat in a cohort of the first 30 consecutive patients to receive a novel tissue and valve-conserving procedure, compared with the published results of aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Takkenberg, Johanna J M; Golesworthy, Tal; Rega, Filip; Petrou, Mario; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Mohiaddin, Raad; Rubens, Michael; Thornton, Warren; Lees, Belinda; Pepper, John

    2014-06-01

    Among people with Marfan syndrome who have a typical aortic root aneurysm, dissection is a characteristic cause of premature death. To pre-empt Type A dissection, composite root replacement with a mechanical valve became the standard of care in the 1980s and 1990s. This is being superseded by valve-sparing aortic root replacement to avoid lifelong anticoagulation. In 2004, a total root and valve-sparing procedure, personalised external aortic support, was introduced. We report here results among the first 30 recipients. From cross-sectional digital images, the patient's own aorta is modelled by computer aided design and a replica is made in thermoplastic by rapid prototyping. On this, a personalised support of a macroporous polymer mesh is manufactured. The mesh is positioned around the aorta, closely applied from the aortoventricular junction to beyond the brachiocephalic artery. The operation is performed with a beating heart and usually without cardiopulmonary bypass. Between 2004 and 2011, 30 patients, median age 28 years (IQR 20-44) had this operation and have been prospectively followed for 1.4-8.8 years by February 2013. During a total of 133 patient-years there were no deaths or cerebrovascular, aortic or valve-related events. These early outcomes are better than published results for the more radical extirpative root replacement operations. The aortic valve, the root architecture, and the blood/endothelia interface are conserved. The perioperative burden is less and there has been freedom from aortic and valvular events. A prospective comparative study is planned. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) in Marfan syndrome: analysis of 1–9 year outcomes by intention-to-treat in a cohort of the first 30 consecutive patients to receive a novel tissue and valve-conserving procedure, compared with the published results of aortic root replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Takkenberg, Johanna J M; Golesworthy, Tal; Rega, Filip; Petrou, Mario; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Mohiaddin, Raad; Rubens, Michael; Thornton, Warren; Lees, Belinda; Pepper, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Among people with Marfan syndrome who have a typical aortic root aneurysm, dissection is a characteristic cause of premature death. To pre-empt Type A dissection, composite root replacement with a mechanical valve became the standard of care in the 1980s and 1990s. This is being superseded by valve-sparing aortic root replacement to avoid lifelong anticoagulation. In 2004, a total root and valve-sparing procedure, personalised external aortic support, was introduced. We report here results among the first 30 recipients. Methods From cross-sectional digital images, the patient's own aorta is modelled by computer aided design and a replica is made in thermoplastic by rapid prototyping. On this, a personalised support of a macroporous polymer mesh is manufactured. The mesh is positioned around the aorta, closely applied from the aortoventricular junction to beyond the brachiocephalic artery. The operation is performed with a beating heart and usually without cardiopulmonary bypass. Results Between 2004 and 2011, 30 patients, median age 28 years (IQR 20–44) had this operation and have been prospectively followed for 1.4–8.8 years by February 2013. During a total of 133 patient-years there were no deaths or cerebrovascular, aortic or valve-related events. These early outcomes are better than published results for the more radical extirpative root replacement operations. Conclusions The aortic valve, the root architecture, and the blood/endothelia interface are conserved. The perioperative burden is less and there has been freedom from aortic and valvular events. A prospective comparative study is planned. PMID:24395977

  18. Existence of Projective Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Perrott, Xander

    2016-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the history of finite projective planes and their properties before going on to outline the proof that no projective plane of order 10 exists. The report also investigates the search carried out by MacWilliams, Sloane and Thompson in 1970 [12] and confirms their result by providing independent verification that there is no vector of weight 15 in the code generated by the projective plane of order 10.

  19. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  20. Cross plane scattering correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, L.; Karp, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Most previous scattering correction techniques for PET are based on assumptions made for a single transaxial plane and are independent of axial variations. These techniques will incorrectly estimate the scattering fraction for volumetric PET imaging systems since they do not take the cross-plane scattering into account. In this paper, the authors propose a new point source scattering deconvolution method (2-D). The cross-plane scattering is incorporated into the algorithm by modeling a scattering point source function. In the model, the scattering dependence both on axial and transaxial directions is reflected in the exponential fitting parameters and these parameters are directly estimated from a limited number of measured point response functions. The authors' results comparing the standard in-plane point source deconvolution to the authors' cross-plane source deconvolution show that for a small source, the former technique overestimates the scatter fraction in the plane of the source and underestimate the scatter fraction in adjacent planes. In addition, the authors also propose a simple approximation technique for deconvolution

  1. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dominguez@ttu.edu; Peralta, Luis Grave de [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Bernussi, Ayrton A. [Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  2. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals and their susceptibility to endodontic treatment procedures: a molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Nikola; Krunić, Jelena; Popović, Branka; Stojičić, Sonja; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2014-01-01

    Because apical periodontitis is recognizably an infectious disease, elimination or reduction of intracanal bacteria is of utmost importance for optimum treatment outcome. The prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals was studied Also, the effect of endodontic therapy by using intracanal medicaments, calcium hydroxide paste (CH) or gutta-percha points containing calcium hydroxide (CH-GP) or chlorhexidine (CHX-GP) on these microorganisms was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Fifty-one patients with chronic apical periodontitis were randomly allocated in one of the fol- lowing groups according to the intracanal medicament used: CH, CH-GP and CHX-GP group. Bacterial samples were taken upon access (S1), after chemomechanical instrumentation (S2) and after 15-day medication (S3). PCR assay was used to detect the presence of selected bacteria. E. faecalis was detected in 49% (25/51) and P. gingivalis in 17.6% (9/51) of the samples. Samples which showed no bacterial presence at S1 were excluded from further analysis. Overall analysis of all 29 samples revealed significant differences between S1 and S2 (p endodontic infection. Intracanal medication in conduction with instrumentation and irrigation efficiently eliminates E. faecalis and P. gingivalis from infected root canals.

  3. Instabilities of Kirkendall planes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dal, van M.J.H.; Gusak, A.M.; Cserhati, C.; Kodentsov, A.; Loo, van F.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Reconsideration of the Kirkendall effect is presented. It is demonstrated (experimentally as well as theoretically) that Kirkendall planes can be multiple, stable or unstable within a single-phase reaction zone. A general criterion of instabilty is given.

  4. Roots & Hollers

    OpenAIRE

    Kollman, Patrick L; Gorman, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Roots & Hollers, 2011 A documentary by Thomas Gorman & Patrick Kollman Master’s Project Abstract: Roots & Hollers uncovers the wild American ginseng trade, revealing a unique intersection between Asia and rural America. Legendary in Asia for its healing powers, ginseng helps sustain the livelihoods of thousands in Appalachia. A single root can sell for thousands of dollars at auction. Shot on-location in the mountains of Kentucky and West Virginia, this student doc...

  5. Algebraic Structures on MOD Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Kandasamy, Vasantha; Ilanthenral, K.; Smarandache, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    Study of MOD planes happens to a very recent one. In this book, systematically algebraic structures on MOD planes like, MOD semigroups, MOD groups and MOD rings of different types are defined and studied. Such study is innovative for a large four quadrant planes are made into a small MOD planes. Several distinct features enjoyed by these MOD planes are defined, developed and described.

  6. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals and their susceptibility to endodontic treatment procedures: A molecular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Because apical periodontitis is recognizably an infectious disease, elimination or reduction of intracanal bacteria is of utmost importance for optimum treatment outcome. Objective. The prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals was studied Also, the effect of endodontic therapy by using intracanal medicaments, calcium hydroxide paste (CH or gutta-percha points containing calcium hydroxide (CH-GP or chlorhexidine (CHX-GP on these microorganisms was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Methods. Fifty-one patients with chronic apical periodontitis were randomly allocated in one of the following groups according to the intracanal medicament used: CH, CH-GP and CHX-GP group. Bacterial samples were taken upon access (S1, after chemomechanical instrumentation (S2 and after 15-day medication (S3. PCR assay was used to detect the presence of selected bacteria. Results. E. faecalis was detected in 49% (25/51 and P. gingivalis in 17.6% (9/51 of the samples. Samples which showed no bacterial presence at S1 were excluded from further analysis. Overall analysis of all 29 samples revealed significant differences between S1 and S2 (p<0.001, S2 and S3 (p<0.05, and S1 and S3 (p<0.001. When distinction was made between the intracanal medications, there was a significant difference in the number of PCR positive samples between S1 and S2, S1 and S3, but not between S2 and S3 samples. Conclusion. E. faecalis is more prevalent than P. gingivalis in primary endodontic infection. Intracanal medication in conduction with instrumentation and irrigation efficiently eliminates E. faecalis and P. gingivalis from infected root canals.

  7. Root patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Laskowski, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that pattern lateral root primordial are essential for the elaboration of root system architecture, a trait of key importance for future crop breeding. But which are most important: periodic or local cues? In this issue of Journal of Experimental Botany (pages 1411-1420), Kircher

  8. Plane wave limits and T-duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guven, R.

    2000-04-01

    The Penrose limit is generalized to show that, any leading order solution of the low-energy field equations in any one of the five string theories has a plane wave solution as a limit. This limiting procedure takes into account all the massless fields that may arise and commutes with the T-duality so that any dual solution has again a plane wave limit. The scaling rules used in the limit are unique and stem from the scaling property of the D = 11 supergravity action. Although the leading order dual solutions need not be exact or supersymmetric, their plane wave limits always preserve some portion of the Poincare supersymmetry and solve the relevant field equations in all powers of the string tension parameter. Further properties of the limiting procedure are discussed. (author)

  9. Incidence and root causes of delays in emergency orthopaedic procedures: a single-centre experience of 36,017 consecutive cases over seven years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar, Ulla; Karlsson, Jon; Hansson, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Emergency surgery is unplanned by definition and patients are scheduled for surgery with minimal preparation. Some patients who have sustained emergency orthopaedic trauma or other conditions must be operated on immediately or within a few hours, while others can wait until the hospital's resources permit and/or the patients' health status has been optimised as needed. This may affect the prioritisation procedures for both emergency and elective surgery and might result in waiting lists, not only for planned procedures but also for emergencies. The main purpose of this retrospective, observational, single-centre study was to evaluate and describe for the number and reasons of delays, as well as waiting times in emergency orthopaedic surgery using data derived from the hospital's records and registers. All the emergency patients scheduled for emergency surgery whose procedures were rescheduled and delayed between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013 were studied. We found that 24% (8474) of the 36,017 patients scheduled for emergency surgeries were delayed and rescheduled at least once, some several times. Eighty per cent of these delays were due to organisational causes. Twenty-one per cent of all the delayed patients had surgery within 24 h, whilst 41% waited for more than 24 h, up to 3 days. A large number of the clinic's emergency orthopaedic procedures were rescheduled and delayed and the majority of the delays were related to organisational reasons. The results can be interpreted in two ways; first, organisational reasons are avoidable and the potential for improvement is great and, secondly and most importantly, the delays might negatively affect patient outcomes.

  10. Transformational plane geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Umble, Ronald N

    2014-01-01

    Axioms of Euclidean Plane Geometry The Existence and Incidence Postulates The Distance and Ruler Postulates The Plane Separation Postulate The Protractor Postulate The Side-Angle-Side Postulate and the Euclidean Parallel Postulate Theorems of Euclidean Plane Geometry The Exterior Angle Theorem Triangle Congruence Theorems The Alternate Interior Angles Theorem and the Angle Sum Theorem Similar Triangles Introduction to Transformations, Isometries, and Similarities Transformations Isometries and SimilaritiesAppendix: Proof of Surjectivity Translations, Rotations, and Reflections Translations Rotations Reflections Appendix: Geometer's Sketchpad Commands Required by Exploratory Activities Compositions of Translations, Rotations, and Reflections The Three Points Theorem Rotations as Compositions of Two Reflections Translations as Compositions of Two Halfturns or Two Reflections The Angle Addition Theorem Glide Reflections Classification of Isometries The Fundamental Theorem and Congruence Classification of Isometr...

  11. Fast Plane Wave Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas

    This PhD project investigates and further develops methods for ultrasound plane wave imaging and blood flow estimation with the objective of overcoming some of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems, which are related to low frame rates and only estimation of velocities along...... the ultrasound beam. The first part of the contribution investigates the compromise between frame rate and plane wave image quality including the influence of grating lobes from a λ-pitch transducer. A method for optimizing the image quality is suggested, and it is shown that the frame rate can be increased...... healthy volunteers. Complex flow patterns were measured in an anthropomorphic flow phantom and showed good agreement with the velocity field simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The last part of the contribution investigates two clinical applications. Plane wave imaging was used for slow velocity...

  12. Observation and simulation of root reinforcement on abandoned Mediterranean slopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, L.P.H.; Wint, J.; Cammeraat, L.H.; Edwards, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanics of root reinforcement have been described satisfactorily for a single root or several roots passing a potential slip plane and verified by field experiments. Yet, precious little attempts have been made to apply these models to the hillslope scale pertinent to landsliding at which

  13. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  14. The OBS control plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manolova, Anna Vasileva; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2010-01-01

    . The applicability analysis carried out here focuses on the actual feasibility of the integration and the potential trade-offs which appear when two contradicting principles are combined. Taking advantage of the flexibility of the GMPLS control plane does not seem to be as easy and as straightforward as expected...

  15. Root resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper summarizes the different conditions, which have a well-known influence on the resorption of tooth roots, exemplified by trauma and orthodontic treatment. The concept of the paper is to summarize and explain symptoms and signs of importance for avoiding resorption during...... orthodontic treatment. The Hypothesis: The hypothesis in this paper is that three different tissue layers covering the root in the so-called periroot sheet can explain signs and symptoms of importance for avoiding root resorption during orthodontic treatment. These different tissue layers are; outermost...... processes provoked by trauma and orthodontic pressure. Inflammatory reactions are followed by resorptive processes in the periroot sheet and along the root surface. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: Different morphologies in the dentition are signs of abnormal epithelium or an abnormal mesodermal layer. It has...

  16. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  17. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-01-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  18. Crack Propagation in Plane Strain under Variable Amplitude Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Luiz Carlos Hernandes

    2010-01-01

    . In this paper procedures to determine the crack opening and closure by finite elements analyses in plane strain will be presented. The objective of this paper is also provide a review of retardation models under variable spectrum loading considering plane strain constraint as well as their correlation...

  19. BKP plane partitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, Omar; Wheeler, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another

  20. BKP plane partitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, Omar; Wheeler, Michael [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    Using BKP neutral fermions, we derive a product expression for the generating function of volume-weighted plane partitions that satisfy two conditions. If we call a set of adjacent equal height-h columns, h > 0, an h-path, then 1. Every h-path can assume one of two possible colours. 2. There is a unique way to move along an h-path from any column to another.

  1. Carbon nanotube plane fastener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Hirahara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a feature of carbon nanotubes (CNTs that arises when the surfaces of two vertically-aligned CNT brushes are pressed together. Adhesion between the CNTs creates a plane fastener-like device. Observations from scanning electron microscopy and measurements of adhesion properties indicate a device-dependence on CNT density and shape near the tip region. Among other applications, such fasteners have the potential to attach small components onto micron-sized electronic devices.

  2. Conquest of the Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Colignatus, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    CONQUEST OF THE PLANE provides: an integrated course for geometry and analysis a didactic build-up that avoids traditional clutter use of only the essentials for good understanding proper place for vectors, complex numbers, linear algebra and trigonometry an original and elegant development of trigonometry an original and elegant foundation for calculus examples from physics, economics and statistics integration within the dynamic environment of Mathematica ...

  3. An Algorithm for constructing Hjelmslev planes

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Joanne L.; Rao, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Projective Hjelmslev planes and Affine Hjelmselv planes are generalisations of projective planes and affine planes. We present an algorithm for constructing a projective Hjelmslev planes and affine Hjelsmelv planes using projective planes, affine planes and orthogonal arrays. We show that all 2-uniform projective Hjelmslev planes, and all 2-uniform affine Hjelsmelv planes can be constructed in this way. As a corollary it is shown that all 2-uniform Affine Hjelmselv planes are sub-geometries o...

  4. Simultaneous orthogonal plane imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickevicius, Nikolai J; Paulson, Eric S

    2017-11-01

    Intrafraction motion can result in a smearing of planned external beam radiation therapy dose distributions, resulting in an uncertainty in dose actually deposited in tissue. The purpose of this paper is to present a pulse sequence that is capable of imaging a moving target at a high frame rate in two orthogonal planes simultaneously for MR-guided radiotherapy. By balancing the zero gradient moment on all axes, slices in two orthogonal planes may be spatially encoded simultaneously. The orthogonal slice groups may be acquired with equal or nonequal echo times. A Cartesian spoiled gradient echo simultaneous orthogonal plane imaging (SOPI) sequence was tested in phantom and in vivo. Multiplexed SOPI acquisitions were performed in which two parallel slices were imaged along two orthogonal axes simultaneously. An autocalibrating phase-constrained 2D-SENSE-GRAPPA (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition) algorithm was implemented to reconstruct the multiplexed data. SOPI images without intraslice motion artifacts were reconstructed at a maximum frame rate of 8.16 Hz. The 2D-SENSE-GRAPPA reconstruction separated the parallel slices aliased along each orthogonal axis. The high spatiotemporal resolution provided by SOPI has the potential to be beneficial for intrafraction motion management during MR-guided radiation therapy or other MRI-guided interventions. Magn Reson Med 78:1700-1710, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Scaling and root planing with enhanced root planing on healthcare for type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: This study suggests that SRP can be of benefit for the improvement of glycemic control and periodontal condition. In addition, ERP can further improve the periodontal condition of patients with T2DM.

  6. Locating a circle on the plane using the minimax criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Schoebel, Anita

    2006-01-01

    We consider the problem of locating a circle with respect to existing facilities on the plane, such that the largest weighted distance between the circle and the facilities is minimized. The problem properties are analyzed, and a solution procedure proposed.......We consider the problem of locating a circle with respect to existing facilities on the plane, such that the largest weighted distance between the circle and the facilities is minimized. The problem properties are analyzed, and a solution procedure proposed....

  7. Root coverage with bridge flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession in anterior teeth is a common concern due to esthetic reasons or root sensitivity. Gingival recession, especially in multiple anterior teeth, is of huge concern due to esthetic reasons. Various mucogingival surgeries are available for root coverage. This case report presents a new bridge flap technique, which allows the dentist not only to cover the previously denuded root surfaces but also to increase the zone of attached gingiva at a single step. In this case, a coronally advanced flap along with vestibular deepening technique was used as root coverage procedure for the treatment of multiple recession-type defect. Here, vestibular deepening technique is used to increase the width of the attached gingiva. The predictability of this procedure results in an esthetically healthy periodontium, along with gain in keratinized tissue and good patient′s acceptance.

  8. Factors affecting root curvature of mandibular first molar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Moon; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Kim, Jung Hwa; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won

    2006-01-01

    To find the cause of root curvature by use of panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiograph. Twenty six 1st graders whose mandibular 1st molars just emerged into the mouth were selected. Panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiograph were taken at grade 1 and 6, longitudinally. In cephalometric radio graph, mandibular plane angle, ramus-occlusal place angle, gonial angle, and gonion-gnathion distance(Go-Gn distance) were measured. In panoramic radiograph, elongated root length and root angle were measured by means of digital subtraction radiography. Occlusal plane-tooth axis angle was measured, too. Pearson correlations were used to evaluate the relationships between root curvature and elongated length and longitudinal variations of all variables. Multiple regression equation using related variables was computed. The pearson correlation coefficient between curved angle and longitudinal variations of occlusal plane-tooth axis angle and ramus-occlusal plane angle was 0.350 and 0.401, respectively (p 1 +0.745X 2 (Y: root angle, X 1 : variation of occlusal plane-tooth axis angle, X 2 : variation of ramus-occlusal plane angle). It was suspected that the reasons of root curvature were change of tooth axis caused by contact with 2nd deciduous tooth and amount of mesial and superior movement related to change of occlusal plane

  9. Root (Botany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  10. Plane partition vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rensburg, E J Janse van; Ma, J

    2006-01-01

    We examine partitions and their natural three-dimensional generalizations, plane partitions, as models of vesicles undergoing an inflation-deflation transition. The phase diagrams of these models include a critical point corresponding to an inflation-deflation transition, and exhibits multicritical scaling in the vicinity of a multicritical point located elsewhere on the critical curve. We determine the locations of the multicritical points by analysing the generating functions using analytic and numerical means. In addition, we determine the numerical values of the multicritical scaling exponents associated with the multicritical scaling regimes in these models

  11. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  12. Origin of the Local Group satellite planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indranil; O'Ryan, David; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2018-04-01

    We attempt to understand the planes of satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way (MW) and M31 in the context of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), which implies a close MW-M31 flyby occurred ≈8 Gyr ago. Using the timing argument, we obtain MW-M31 trajectories consistent with cosmological initial conditions and present observations. We adjust the present M31 proper motion within its uncertainty in order to simulate a range of orbital geometries and closest approach distances. Treating the MW and M31 as point masses, we follow the trajectories of surrounding test particle disks, thereby mapping out the tidal debris distribution. Around each galaxy, the resulting tidal debris tends to cluster around a particular orbital pole. We find some models in which these preferred spin vectors align fairly well with those of the corresponding observed satellite planes. The radial distributions of material in the simulated satellite planes are similar to what we observe. Around the MW, our best-fitting model yields a significant fraction (0.22) of counter-rotating material, perhaps explaining why Sculptor counter-rotates within the MW satellite plane. In contrast, our model yields no counter-rotating material around M31. This is testable with proper motions of M31 satellites. In our best model, the MW disk is thickened by the flyby 7.65 Gyr ago to a root mean square height of 0.75 kpc. This is similar to the observed age and thickness of the Galactic thick disk. Thus, the MW thick disk may have formed together with the MW and M31 satellite planes during a past MW-M31 flyby.

  13. Duality and noncommutative planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøndrup, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We study extensions of simple modules over an associative ring A   and we prove that for twosided ideals mm and nn with artinian factors the condition ExtA1(A/m,A/n)≠0 holds for the left A  -modules A/mA/m and A/nA/n if and only if it holds for the right modules A/nA/n and A/mA/m. The methods pro...... proving this are applied to show that noncommutative models of the plane, i.e. algebras of the form k〈x,y〉/(f)k〈x,y〉/(f), where f∈([x,y])f∈([x,y]) are noetherian only in case (f)=([x,y])...

  14. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  15. Semantic Versus Syntactic Cutting Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Filmus, Yuval; Hrubeš, Pavel; Lauria, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the strength of the semantic and syntactic version of the cutting planes proof system. First, we show that the lower bound technique of Pudlák applies also to semantic cutting planes: the proof system has feasible interpolation via monotone real circuits, which gives an exponential lower bound on lengths of semantic cutting planes refutations. Second, we show that semantic refutations are stronger than syntactic ones. In particular, we give a formula for whic...

  16. Sibling Curves 3: Imaginary Siblings and Tracing Complex Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ansie; Engelbrecht, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Visualizing complex roots of a quadratic equation has been a quest since the inception of the Argand plane in the 1800s. Many algebraic and numerical methods exist for calculating complex roots of an equation, but few visual methods exist. Following on from papers by Harding and Engelbrecht (A. Harding and J. Engelbrecht, "Sibling curves and…

  17. Geometric characteristics of aberrations of plane-symmetric optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Lijun; Deng Zhiyong

    2009-01-01

    The geometric characteristics of aberrations of plane-symmetric optical systems are studied in detail with a wave-aberration theory. It is dealt with as an extension of the Seidel aberrations to realize a consistent aberration theory from axially symmetric to plane-symmetric systems. The aberration distribution is analyzed with the spot diagram of a ray and an aberration curve. Moreover, the root-mean-square value and the centroid of aberration distribution are discussed. The numerical results are obtained with the focusing optics of a toroidal mirror at grazing incidence.

  18. Gravitational Couplings for Gop-Planes and y-Op-Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo, Juan Fernando Ospina

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino actions for generalized orientifold planes (GOp-planes) and y-deformed orientifold planes (yOp-planes) are presented and two series power expantions are realized from whiches processes that involves GOp-planes,yOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard GOp-planes and y-Op-planes are showed.

  19. Mining planing introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Basic concepts concerning mining parameters, plan establishment and typical procedure methods applied throughout the physical execution of mining operations are here determined, analyzed and discussed. Technological and economic aspects of the exploration phase are presented as well as general mathematical and statistical methods for estimating, analyzing and representing mineral deposits which are virtually essential for good mining project execution. The characterization of important mineral substances and the basic parameters of mining works are emphasized in conjunction with long, medium and short term mining planning. Finally, geological modelling, ore reserves calculations and final economic evaluations are considered using a hypothetical example in order to consolidate the main elaborated ideas. (D.J.M.) [pt

  20. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  1. Conceptual Design of Wave Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Trewers, Andrew; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    The Wave Plane is a patented Wave Energy device of the overtopping type, designed to capture potential as well as kinetic energy. This is as such different to other overtopping devices, who usually only focus on potential energy. If Wave Plane A/S can deliver the turbine technology to utilize both...

  2. Controlled short-circuiting MIG-MAG welding process and procedures applied to the root pass in pipeline construction; Processo de soldagem MIG/MAG em curto-circuito controlado e procedimentos aplicados ao passe de raiz na construcao de linhas dutoviarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Regis H.G. e; Gohr Junior, Raul; Weck, Leonardo W.A. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Soldagem e Mecatronica (LABSOLDA)

    2005-07-01

    The work deals with the study and development of the Controlled Short-Circuiting MIG/MAG Welding Process (CCC) and procedures for the root pass on pipes, in pipelines construction. The developed process (CCC) consists in an semi-automatic slag free operation, yielding higher productivity than the Coated Electrode and TIG processes, with satisfactory properties on the root weld. The significant influence of the welding over the time schedule and construction cost makes the development of this technology attractive, in order to become available at low cost, enhancing the companies' competitiveness in the globalized oil sector. The developed system, a MIG/MAG variant, features the advantages of short-circuiting metal transfer and avoids its inconveniences (mainly with high CO{sub 2} content gases), enabling its use on pipes root welding. This is possible through current waveform control, providing process and weld pool stability. Procedures for the root pass were determined for each of the welding positions reached in thick walled pipes welding, with the CCC. Also, the low welder training time was notable. (author)

  3. Basic examination of in-plane spatial resolution in multi-slice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takanori; Kato, Hideki; Akiyama, Mitsutoshi; Murata, Katsutoshi

    2002-01-01

    In computed tomography (single-slice spiral CT, conventional CT), in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution is consistently identified as depending on the detector density of the in-plane (x-y plane). However, we considered that the in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution of multi-slice CT (MSCT) was influenced by an error in the detector's sensitivity to the Z-axis and by the frequency of use of direct row data and complementary row data when the image of spiral pitches (SP) was reconstructed. Our goal in this experiment was to analyze the relationship of the in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution of an asymmetric-type detector in MSCT to SP, tube current, and rotation time. By employing a tungsten wire phantom of 0.2 mm in diameter, we examined modulation transfer functions (MTF) by point-spread functions (PSF) of CT-images. Next, using the mean-square-root bandwidth theory, we analyzed the MTF of wire phantoms. The analysis of in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution revealed that various tube currents had no effect on the value of the mean-square-root bandwidth. However, rotation time and high spiral pitch did have an effect on mean-square-root bandwidth. Considering the results mentioned above, spiral pitch (z-axis reconstruction algorithm) had a slight effect on in-plane (x-y plane) spatial resolution of asymmetric-type detectors in MSCT. Accordingly, we proposed a new general view of VDDz (view/mm) in MSCT that considered view data density on the Z-axis according to spiral pitch (mm/rotation), rotation time (view/rotation), and slice collimation. (author)

  4. A comparative scanning electron microscopy study between hand instrument, ultrasonic scaling and erbium doped:Yttirum aluminum garnet laser on root surface: A morphological and thermal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitul Kumar Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Scaling and root planing is one of the most commonly used procedures for the treatment of periodontal diseases. Removal of calculus using conventional hand instruments is incomplete and rather time consuming. In search of more efficient and less difficult instrumentation, investigators have proposed lasers as an alternative or as adjuncts to scaling and root planing. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of erbium doped: Yttirum aluminum garnet (Er:YAG laser scaling and root planing alone or as an adjunct to hand and ultrasonic instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: A total of 75 freshly extracted periodontally involved single rooted teeth were collected. Teeth were randomly divided into five treatment groups having 15 teeth each: Hand scaling only, ultrasonic scaling only, Er:YAG laser scaling only, hand scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling and ultrasonic scaling + Er:YAG laser scaling. Specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and photographs were evaluated by three examiners who were blinded to the study. Parameters included were remaining calculus index, loss of tooth substance index, roughness loss of tooth substance index, presence or absence of smear layer, thermal damage and any other morphological damage. Results: Er:YAG laser treated specimens showed similar effectiveness in calculus removal to the other test groups whereas tooth substance loss and tooth surface roughness was more on comparison with other groups. Ultrasonic treated specimens showed better results as compared to other groups with different parameters. However, smear layer presence was seen more with hand and ultrasonic groups. Very few laser treated specimens showed thermal damage and morphological change. Interpretation and Conclusion: In our study, ultrasonic scaling specimen have shown root surface clean and practically unaltered. On the other hand, hand instrument have produced a plane surface

  5. Standardization of 32P activity determination method in soil-root cores for root distribution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.B.; Ghildyal, B.P.

    1976-01-01

    The root distribution of wheat variety UP 301 was obtained by determining the 32 P activity in soil-root cores by two methods, viz., ignition and triacid digestion. Root distribution obtained by these two methods was compared with that by standard root core washing procedure. The percent error in root distribution as determined by triacid digestion method was within +- 2.1 to +- 9.0 as against +- 5.5 to +- 21.2 by ignition method. Thus triacid digestion method proved better over the ignition method. (author)

  6. Personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) in Marfan syndrome: Analysis of 1-9 year outcomes by intention-to-treat in a cohort of the first 30 consecutive patients to receive a novel tissue and valve-conserving procedure, compared with the published results of aortic root replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); T. Golesworthy (Tal); F. Rega (Filip); M. Petrou (Mario); U. Rosendahl (Ulrich); R. Mohiaddin (Raad); M. Rubens (Michael); W. Thornton (Warren); B. Lees (Belinda); J. Pepper (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Among people with Marfan syndrome who have a typical aortic root aneurysm, dissection is a characteristic cause of premature death. To pre-empt Type A dissection, composite root replacement with a mechanical valve became the standard of care in the 1980s and 1990s. This is

  7. On Helmholtz Problem for Plane Periodical Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishin, P.G.; Vinitskij, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    The plane Helmholtz problem of the periodical disc structures with the phase shifts conditions of the solutions along the basis lattice vectors and the Dirichlet conditions on the basic boundaries is considered. The Green function satisfying the quasi periodical conditions on the lattice is constructed. The Helmholtz problem is reduced to the boundary integral equations for the simple layer potentials of this Green function. The methods of the discretization of the arising integral equations are proposed. The procedures of calculation of the matrix elements are discussed. The reality of the spectral parameter of the nonlinear continuous and discretized problems is shown. 8 refs., 2 figs

  8. Seedling root targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Out-of-Plane vs. In-Plane Interscalene Catheters: A Randomized, Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Eric S; Gandhi, Kishor; Baratta, Jaime L; Torjman, Marc; Epstein, Richard H; Chung, Jaeyoon; Vaghari, Benjamin A; Beausang, David; Bojaxhi, Elird; Grady, Bernadette

    2015-12-01

    Continuous interscalene blocks provide excellent analgesia after shoulder surgery. Although the safety of the ultrasound-guided in-plane approach has been touted, technical and patient factors can limit this approach. We developed a caudad-to-cephalad out-of-plane approach and hypothesized that it would decrease pain ratings due to better catheter alignment with the brachial plexus compared to the in-plane technique in a randomized, controlled study. To compare an out-of-plane interscalene catheter technique to the in-plane technique in a randomized clinical trial. Eighty-four patients undergoing open shoulder surgery were randomized to either the in-plane or out-of-plane ultrasound-guided continuous interscalene technique. The primary outcome was VAS pain rating at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included pain ratings in the recovery room and at 48 hours, morphine consumption, the incidence of catheter dislodgments, procedure time, and block difficulty. Procedural data and all pain ratings were collected by blinded observers. There were no differences in the primary outcome of median VAS pain rating at 24 hours between the out-of-plane and in-plane groups (1.50; IQR, [0 - 4.38] vs. 1.25; IQR, [0 - 3.75]; P = 0.57). There were also no differences, respectively, between out-of-plane and in-plane median PACU pain ratings (1.0; IQR, [0 - 3.5] vs. 0.25; IQR, [0 - 2.5]; P = 0.08) and median 48-hour pain ratings (1.25; IQR, [1.25 - 2.63] vs. 0.50; IQR, [0 - 1.88]; P = 0.30). There were no differences in any other secondary endpoint. Our out-of-plane technique did not provide superior analgesia to the in-plane technique. It did not increase the number of complications. Our technique is an acceptable alternative in situations where the in-plane technique is difficult to perform.

  10. Locating a circle on the plane using the minimax criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Schöbel, Anita

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of locating a circle with respect to existing facilities on the plane, such that the largest weighted distance between the circumference of the circle and the facilities is minimized. The problem properties are analyzed, and a solution procedure proposed......We consider the problem of locating a circle with respect to existing facilities on the plane, such that the largest weighted distance between the circumference of the circle and the facilities is minimized. The problem properties are analyzed, and a solution procedure proposed...

  11. Soil moisture causes dynamic adjustments to root reinforcement that reduce slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristram C. Hales; Chelcy F. Miniat

    2017-01-01

    In steep soil-mantled landscapes, the initiation of shallow landslides is strongly controlled by the distribution of vegetation, whose roots reinforce the soil. The magnitude of root reinforcement depends on the number, diameter distribution, orientation and the mechanical properties of roots that cross potential failure planes. Understanding how these...

  12. Generating asymptotically plane wave spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2003-01-01

    In an attempt to study asymptotically plane wave spacetimes which admit an event horizon, we find solutions to vacuum Einstein's equations in arbitrary dimension which have a globally null Killing field and rotational symmetry. We show that while such solutions can be deformed to include ones which are asymptotically plane wave, they do not posses a regular event horizon. If we allow for additional matter, such as in supergravity theories, we show that it is possible to have extremal solutions with globally null Killing field, a regular horizon, and which, in addition, are asymptotically plane wave. In particular, we deform the extremal M2-brane solution in 11-dimensional supergravity so that it behaves asymptotically as a 10-dimensional vacuum plane wave times a real line. (author)

  13. Two-transitive MInkowski planes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we determine all finite Minkowski planes with an automorphism group which satisfies the following transitivity property: any ordered pair of nonparallel points can be mapped onto any other ordered pair of nonparallel points.

  14. A conceptual approach to approximate tree root architecture in infinite slope models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaltz, Elmar; Glade, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation-related properties - particularly tree root distribution and coherent hydrologic and mechanical effects on the underlying soil mantle - are commonly not considered in infinite slope models. Indeed, from a geotechnical point of view, these effects appear to be difficult to be reproduced reliably in a physically-based modelling approach. The growth of a tree and the expansion of its root architecture are directly connected with both intrinsic properties such as species and age, and extrinsic factors like topography, availability of nutrients, climate and soil type. These parameters control four main issues of the tree root architecture: 1) Type of rooting; 2) maximum growing distance to the tree stem (radius r); 3) maximum growing depth (height h); and 4) potential deformation of the root system. Geometric solids are able to approximate the distribution of a tree root system. The objective of this paper is to investigate whether it is possible to implement root systems and the connected hydrological and mechanical attributes sufficiently in a 3-dimensional slope stability model. Hereby, a spatio-dynamic vegetation module should cope with the demands of performance, computation time and significance. However, in this presentation, we focus only on the distribution of roots. The assumption is that the horizontal root distribution around a tree stem on a 2-dimensional plane can be described by a circle with the stem located at the centroid and a distinct radius r that is dependent on age and species. We classified three main types of tree root systems and reproduced the species-age-related root distribution with three respective mathematical solids in a synthetic 3-dimensional hillslope ambience. Thus, two solids in an Euclidian space were distinguished to represent the three root systems: i) cylinders with radius r and height h, whilst the dimension of latter defines the shape of a taproot-system or a shallow-root-system respectively; ii) elliptic

  15. Emergency procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Emergency Procedures: emergency equipment, emergency procedures; emergency procedure involving X-Ray equipment; emergency procedure involving radioactive sources

  16. DLCQ and plane wave matrix Big Bang models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-09-01

    We study the generalisations of the Craps-Sethi-Verlinde matrix big bang model to curved, in particular plane wave, space-times, beginning with a careful discussion of the DLCQ procedure. Singular homogeneous plane waves are ideal toy-models of realistic space-time singularities since they have been shown to arise universally as their Penrose limits, and we emphasise the role played by the symmetries of these plane waves in implementing the flat space Seiberg-Sen DLCQ prescription for these curved backgrounds. We then analyse various aspects of the resulting matrix string Yang-Mills theories, such as the relation between strong coupling space-time singularities and world-sheet tachyonic mass terms. In order to have concrete examples at hand, in an appendix we determine and analyse the IIA singular homogeneous plane wave - null dilaton backgrounds.

  17. DLCQ and plane wave matrix Big Bang models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We study the generalisations of the Craps-Sethi-Verlinde matrix big bang model to curved, in particular plane wave, space-times, beginning with a careful discussion of the DLCQ procedure. Singular homogeneous plane waves are ideal toy-models of realistic space-time singularities since they have been shown to arise universally as their Penrose limits, and we emphasise the role played by the symmetries of these plane waves in implementing the flat space Seiberg-Sen DLCQ prescription for these curved backgrounds. We then analyse various aspects of the resulting matrix string Yang-Mills theories, such as the relation between strong coupling space-time singularities and world-sheet tachyonic mass terms. In order to have concrete examples at hand, in an appendix we determine and analyse the IIA singular homogeneous plane wave - null dilaton backgrounds.

  18. Some pitfalls in unit root testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.B.; Koning, Ruud H.

    1991-01-01

    Testing for unit roots is now common practice for economists. The most popular procedure is the approach developed by Dickey and Fuller (1979, 1981), which only requires running appropriately specified regressions. However, application of the Dickey-Fuller procedure requires that the disturbance

  19. V-notch tip subjected to in-plane mixed mode loading: overview of recent results and possible future outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Berto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available . The fictitious notch rounding concept is applied for the first time to V-notches with root hole subjected to in-plane mixed mode loading. Outof-bisector crack propagation is taken into account. The fictitious notch radius is determined as a function of the real notch radius, the microstructural support length and the notch opening angle. Due to the complexity of the problem, a method based on the simple normal stress failure criterion has been used. It is combined with the maximum tangential stress criterion to determine the crack propagation angle. An analytical method based on Neuber's procedure has been developed. The method provides the values of the microstructural support factor as a function of the mode ratio and the notch opening angle. The support factor is considered to be independent of the microstructural support length. Finally, for comparison, the support factor is determined on a purely numerical basis by iterative analysis of FE models.

  20. ROOT Reference Documentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fuakye, Eric Gyabeng

    2017-01-01

    A ROOT Reference Documentation has been implemented to generate all the lists of libraries needed for each ROOT class. Doxygen has no option to generate or add the lists of libraries for each ROOT class. Therefore shell scripting and a basic C++ program was employed to import the lists of libraries needed by each ROOT class.

  1. Radiopacity of root filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Olsen, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method for measuring the radiopacity of root filling materials is described. Direct measurements were made of the optic density values of the materials in comparison with a standard curve relating optic density to the thickness of an aluminium step wedge exposed simultaneously. By proper selection of film and conditions for exposure and development, it was possible to obtain a near-linear standard curve which added to the safety and reproducibility of the method. The technique of radiographic assessment was modified from clinical procedures in evaluating the obturation in radiographs, and it was aimed at detecting slits or voids between the dental wall and the filling material. This radiographic assessment of potensial leakage was compared with actual in vitro lekage of dye (basic fuchsin) into the roots of filled teeth. The result of the investigation show that root filling materials display a very wide range of radiopacity, from less than 3 mm to more than 12 mm of aluminium. It also seem that tooth roots that appear to be well obturated by radiographic evaluation, stand a good chance of beeing resistant to leakage in vitro, and that the type of filling material rather than its radiographic appearance, determines the susceptibility of the filled tooth to leakage in vitro. As an appendix the report contains a survey of radiopaque additives in root filling materials

  2. A statistical approach to root system classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot eBodner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant root systems have a key role in ecology and agronomy. In spite of fast increase in root studies, still there is no classification that allows distinguishing among distinctive characteristics within the diversity of rooting strategies. Our hypothesis is that a multivariate approach for plant functional type identification in ecology can be applied to the classification of root systems. We demonstrate that combining principal component and cluster analysis yields a meaningful classification of rooting types based on morphological traits. The classification method presented is based on a data-defined statistical procedure without a priori decision on the classifiers. Biplot inspection is used to determine key traits and to ensure stability in cluster based grouping. The classification method is exemplified with simulated root architectures and morphological field data. Simulated root architectures showed that morphological attributes with spatial distribution parameters capture most distinctive features within root system diversity. While developmental type (tap vs. shoot-borne systems is a strong, but coarse classifier, topological traits provide the most detailed differentiation among distinctive groups. Adequacy of commonly available morphologic traits for classification is supported by field data. Three rooting types emerged from measured data, distinguished by diameter/weight, density and spatial distribution respectively. Similarity of root systems within distinctive groups was the joint result of phylogenetic relation and environmental as well as human selection pressure. We concluded that the data-define classification is appropriate for integration of knowledge obtained with different root measurement methods and at various scales. Currently root morphology is the most promising basis for classification due to widely used common measurement protocols. To capture details of root diversity efforts in architectural measurement

  3. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  4. Pretreatment procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    It is frequently in the patient's best interest that radiation treatments are initiated soon after the decision to treat is made. However, it is essential to good radiation therapy that the patient's treatment course be planned and beam-modifying devices be fabricated with utmost care prior to treatment. The objectives of the treatment, along with the treatment parameters and techniques necessary to achieve these objectives, must be discussed prior to initiating planning procedures. Determination of the target volume is made by the radiation oncologist; this is based on knowledge of the history of the tumor, the patterns of spread of the disease, and on diagnostic findings during the work-up of each patient. It is then necessary to obtain several measurements of the patient and also to identify the position of the target volume and of adjacent normal organs with respect to known external skin marks before the actual treatment planning is begun. Such localization can be done through several methods. The two most commonly used methods are radiographic and computed tomography (CT), both of which are discussed in this chapter. The measurements often include contours of the patient's external surface, usually in the axial plane of the central axis of the beam, and often in multiple levels within the region to be treated. Three dimensional localization and treatment planning requires thorough understanding of geometry as well as of patient positioning and immobilization. This chapter attempts to clarify some of these complicated but essential preparations for treatment

  5. Root canal irrigants

    OpenAIRE

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are...

  6. Error Analysis on Plane-to-Plane Linear Approximate Coordinate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the error analysis has been done for the linear approximate transformation between two tangent planes in celestial sphere in a simple case. The results demonstrate that the error from the linear transformation does not meet the requirement of high-precision astrometry under some conditions, so the ...

  7. Unleashing the potential of the root hair cell as a single plant cell type model in root systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen eQiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant root is an organ composed of multiple cell types with different functions. This multicellular complexity limits our understanding of root biology because –omics studies performed at the level of the entire root reflect the average responses of all cells composing the organ. To overcome this difficulty and allow a more comprehensive understanding of root cell biology, an approach is needed that would focus on one single cell type in the plant root. Because of its biological functions (i.e. uptake of water and various nutrients; primary site of infection by nitrogen-fixing bacteria in legumes, the root hair cell is an attractive single cell model to study root cell response to various stresses and treatments. To fully study their biology, we have recently optimized procedures in obtaining root hair cell samples. We culture the plants using an ultrasound aeroponic system maximizing root hair cell density on the entire root systems and allowing the homogeneous treatment of the root system. We then isolate the root hair cells in liquid nitrogen. Isolated root hair yields could be up to 800 to 1000 mg of plant cells from 60 root systems. Using soybean as a model, the purity of the root hair was assessed by comparing the expression level of genes previously identified as soybean root hair specific between preparations of isolated root hair cells and stripped roots, roots devoid in root hairs. Enlarging our tests to include other plant species, our results support the isolation of large quantities of highly purified root hair cells which is compatible with a systems biology approach.

  8. NCC-RANSAC: a fast plane extraction method for 3-D range data segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiangfei; Ye, Cang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a new plane extraction (PE) method based on the random sample consensus (RANSAC) approach. The generic RANSAC-based PE algorithm may over-extract a plane, and it may fail in case of a multistep scene where the RANSAC procedure results in multiple inlier patches that form a slant plane straddling the steps. The CC-RANSAC PE algorithm successfully overcomes the latter limitation if the inlier patches are separate. However, it fails if the inlier patches are connected. A typical scenario is a stairway with a stair wall where the RANSAC plane-fitting procedure results in inliers patches in the tread, riser, and stair wall planes. They connect together and form a plane. The proposed method, called normal-coherence CC-RANSAC (NCC-RANSAC), performs a normal coherence check to all data points of the inlier patches and removes the data points whose normal directions are contradictory to that of the fitted plane. This process results in separate inlier patches, each of which is treated as a candidate plane. A recursive plane clustering process is then executed to grow each of the candidate planes until all planes are extracted in their entireties. The RANSAC plane-fitting and the recursive plane clustering processes are repeated until no more planes are found. A probabilistic model is introduced to predict the success probability of the NCC-RANSAC algorithm and validated with real data of a 3-D time-of-flight camera-SwissRanger SR4000. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method extracts more accurate planes with less computational time than the existing RANSAC-based methods.

  9. Dynamic article: surgical anatomical planes for complete mesocolic excision and applied vascular anatomy of the right colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açar, Halil İbrahim; Cömert, Ayhan; Avşar, Abdullah; Çelik, Safa; Kuzu, Mehmet Ayhan

    2014-10-01

    Lower local recurrence rates and better overall survival are associated with complete mesocolic excision with central vascular ligation for treatment of colon cancer. To accomplish this, surgeons need to pay special attention to the surgical anatomical planes and vascular anatomy of the colon. However, surgical education in this area has been neglected. The aim of this study is to define the correct surgical anatomical planes for complete mesocolic excision with central vascular ligation and to demonstrate the correct dissection technique for protecting anatomical structures. Macroscopic and microscopic surgical dissections were performed on 12 cadavers in the anatomy laboratory and on autopsy specimens. The dissections were recorded as video clips. Dissections were performed in accordance with the complete mesocolic excision technique on 10 male and 2 female cadavers. Vascular structures, autonomic nerves, and related fascias were shown. Within each step of the surgical procedure, important anatomical structures were displayed on still images captured from videos by animations. Three crucial steps for complete mesocolic excision with central vascular ligation are demonstrated on the cadavers: 1) full mobilization of the superior mesenteric root following the embryological planes between the visceral and the parietal fascias; 2) mobilization of the mesocolon from the duodenum and the pancreas and identification of vascular structures, especially the veins around the pancreas; and 3) central vascular ligation of the colonic vessels at their origin, taking into account the vascular variations within the mesocolonic vessels and the autonomic nerves around the superior mesenteric artery. The limitation of this study was the number of the cadavers used. Successful complete mesocolic excision with central vascular ligation depends on an accurate knowledge of the surgical anatomical planes and the vascular anatomy of the colon.

  10. Interaction of gravitational plane waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, V.

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical theory of colliding, infinite-fronted, plane gravitational waves is presented. The process of focusing, the creation of singularities and horizons, due to the interaction, and the lens effect due to a beam-like gravitational wave are discussed

  11. Force Lines in Plane Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathkjen, Arne

    A state of plane stress is illustrated by means of two families of curves, each family representing constant values of a derivative of Airy's stress function. The two families of curves form a map giving in the first place an overall picture of regions of high and low stress, and in the second...

  12. Blocking sets in Desarguesian planes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokhuis, A.; Miklós, D.; Sós, V.T.; Szönyi, T.

    1996-01-01

    We survey recent results concerning the size of blocking sets in desarguesian projective and affine planes, and implications of these results and the technique to prove them, to related problemis, such as the size of maximal partial spreads, small complete arcs, small strong representative systems

  13. Gravitational Couplings for y-Gop-Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo, Juan Fernando Ospina

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino action for y deformed and generalized orientifold planes (yGOp-planes) is presented and one power expantion is realized from which processes that involves yGOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard yGOp-planes are showed.

  14. Gravitational Couplings for Generalized Orientifold Planes

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo, Juan Fernando Ospina

    2000-01-01

    The Wess-Zumino action for generalized orientifold planes (GOp-planes) is presented and a series power expantion is realized from which processes that involves GOp-planes, RR-forms, gravitons and gaugeons, are obtained. Finally non-standard GOp-planes are showed.

  15. Seasonal unit roots in trade variables

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Alexander; Manuel Cantavella Jordá

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we examine the presence of seasonal unit roots in trade variables for Germany, France, the United Kingdom, and Italy, using the procedure developed by Hylleberg, Engle, Granger, and Yoo (1990) [HEGY]. Both quarterly and monthly data reject the presence of unit roots at most seasonal frequencies, more frequently in quarterly than in monthly data. This has important implications for econometric modeling of trade balance, exchange rates and income in European Union (EU) countries. ...

  16. Plane waves and structures in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirovich, L.; Ball, K. S.; Keefe, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A direct simulation of turbulent flow in a channel is analyzed by the method of empirical eigenfunctions (Karhunen-Loeve procedure, proper orthogonal decomposition). This analysis reveals the presence of propagating plane waves in the turbulent flow. The velocity of propagation is determined by the flow velocity at the location of maximal Reynolds stress. The analysis further suggests that the interaction of these waves appears to be essential to the local production of turbulence via bursting or sweeping events in the turbulent boundary layer, with the additional suggestion that the fast acting plane waves act as triggers.

  17. A method for the isolation of root hairs from the model legume Medicago truncatula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos Escribano, J.; Bisseling, T.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the isolation of root hairs from the model legume, Medicago truncatula, was developed. The procedure involves the propagation of detached roots on agar plates and the collection of root hairs by immersion in liquid nitrogen. Yields of up to 40 µg of root hair protein were obtained

  18. Diffraction of love waves by two parallel perfectly weak half planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghar, S.; Zaman, F.D.; Ayub, M.

    1986-04-01

    We consider the diffraction of Love waves by two parallel perfectly weak half planes in a layer overlying a half space. The problem is formulated in terms of the Wiener-Hopf equations in the transformed plane. The transmitted waves are then calculated using the Wiener-Hopf procedure and inverse transforms. (author)

  19. Hydrodynamics of planing monohull watercraft

    CERN Document Server

    Vorus, William S

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the principles involved in the design and engineering of planing monohull power boats, with an emphasis on the theoretical fundamentals that readers need in order to be fully functional in marine design and engineering. Author William Vorus focuses on three topics: boat resistance, seaway response, and propulsion and explains the physical principles, mathematical details, and theoretical details that support physical understanding. In particular, he explains the approximations and simplifications in mathematics that lead to success in the applications of planing craft design engineering, and begins with the simplest configuration that embodies the basic physics. He leads readers, step-by-step, through the physical complications that occur, leading to a useful working knowledge of marine design and engineering. Included in the book are a wealth of examples that exemplify some of the most important naval architecture and marine engineering problems that challenge many of today’s engineers.

  20. Plane waves with weak singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Justin R.

    2003-03-01

    We study a class of time dependent solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations which are plane waves with weak null singularities. This singularity is weak in the sense that though the tidal forces diverge at the singularity, the rate of divergence is such that the distortion suffered by a freely falling observer remains finite. Among such weak singular plane waves there is a sub-class which does not exhibit large back reaction in the presence of test scalar probes. String propagation in these backgrounds is smooth and there is a natural way to continue the metric beyond the singularity. This continued metric admits string propagation without the string becoming infinitely excited. We construct a one parameter family of smooth metrics which are at a finite distance in the space of metrics from the extended metric and a well defined operator in the string sigma model which resolves the singularity. (author)

  1. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP)

    OpenAIRE

    Câmara, Carlos Alexandre; Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP), which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors...

  2. Plane waves and spacelike infinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marolf, Donald; Ross, Simon F

    2003-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we showed that the causal boundary of any homogeneous plane wave satisfying the null convergence condition consists of a single null curve. In Einstein-Hilbert gravity, this would include any homogeneous plane wave satisfying the weak null energy condition. For conformally flat plane waves such as the Penrose limit of AdS 5 x S 5 , all spacelike curves that reach infinity also end on this boundary and the completion is Hausdorff. However, the more generic case (including, e.g., the Penrose limits of AdS 4 x S 7 and AdS 7 x S 4 ) is more complicated. In one natural topology, not all spacelike curves have limit points in the causal completion, indicating the need to introduce additional points at 'spacelike infinity' - the endpoints of spacelike curves. We classify the distinct ways in which spacelike curves can approach infinity, finding a two-dimensional set of distinct limits. The dimensionality of the set of points at spacelike infinity is not, however, fixed from this argument. In an alternative topology, the causal completion is already compact, but the completion is non-Hausdorff

  3. Rooting gene trees without outgroups: EP rooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Janet S; Little, Roderick J A; Lake, James A

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167-181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301-316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60-76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489-493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763-766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255-260).

  4. Palatal approach of anterior superior alveolar injection technique may not be potentially useful in periodontal procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pragathi Raghavendra; Acharya, Anirudh Balakrishna; Thakur, Srinath Lakshman

    2016-01-01

    The palatal approach of anterior superior alveolar (P-ASA) using WAND injection was reported to effectively provide a profound bilateral maxillary anesthesia of the soft tissue of anterior one-third of the palate and facial gingivae extending from canine to canine which lasted for more than an hour thus making it ideal for scaling root planing and minor periodontal procedures in the anterior maxilla. Our study suggests that the conventional P-ASA injection is of very short duration and the extent of anesthesia was not profound and consistent. This has not been reported earlier in the literature. Thirty-five cases (20 males and 15 females), who underwent scaling, root planing and minor periodontal surgical procedures such as abscess drainage, gingivectomy, and frenectomy in the maxillary anterior region in the age range of 19-45 years was assessed for the efficacy of the P-ASA injection. After the administration of the P-ASA injection, the subjective and the objective symptoms were used to evaluate the extent and duration of the anesthesia at 10, 15, and 20 min. This study suggests that the conventional P-ASA injection technique does not provide anesthesia for more than 20 min. Wilcoxon matched pairs test was used to compare the effect of anesthesia at the different time intervals and the results were found to be statistically significant ( P periodontal surgery of the anterior maxilla.

  5. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  6. Functional traits and root morphology of alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Mandy; Stroude, Raphaël; Buttler, Alexandre; Rixen, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Vegetation has long been recognized to protect the soil from erosion. Understanding species differences in root morphology and functional traits is an important step to assess which species and species mixtures may provide erosion control. Furthermore, extending classification of plant functional types towards root traits may be a useful procedure in understanding important root functions. In this study, pioneer data on traits of alpine plant species, i.e. plant height and shoot biomass, root depth, horizontal root spreading, root length, diameter, tensile strength, plant age and root biomass, from a disturbed site in the Swiss Alps are presented. The applicability of three classifications of plant functional types (PFTs), i.e. life form, growth form and root type, was examined for above- and below-ground plant traits. Plant traits differed considerably among species even of the same life form, e.g. in the case of total root length by more than two orders of magnitude. Within the same root diameter, species differed significantly in tensile strength: some species (Geum reptans and Luzula spicata) had roots more than twice as strong as those of other species. Species of different life forms provided different root functions (e.g. root depth and horizontal root spreading) that may be important for soil physical processes. All classifications of PFTs were helpful to categorize plant traits; however, the PFTs according to root type explained total root length far better than the other PFTs. The results of the study illustrate the remarkable differences between root traits of alpine plants, some of which cannot be assessed from simple morphological inspection, e.g. tensile strength. PFT classification based on root traits seems useful to categorize plant traits, even though some patterns are better explained at the individual species level.

  7. n=3 differential calculus and gauge theory on a reduced quantum plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Baz, M.; El Hassouni, A.; Hassouni, Y.; Zakkari, E.H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the algebra of NxN matrices as a reduced quantum plane. A n=3-nilpotent deformed differential calculus involving a complex parameter q is constructed. The two cases, q 3rd and Nth root of unity are completely treated. As an application, we establish a gauge field theory for the particular cases n=2 and n=3

  8. On the theory of type-I superconductor surface tension and twinning-plane-superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishonov, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    A correction is found to the surface tension in type-I superconductors which is proportional to the square root of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter. This correction is essential for obtaining the phase diagram and other thermodynamical variables of the narrow superconducting layer arising near the twinning plane in some metals

  9. Degeneracy of the lowest Landau level and suq(2) on the Poincare half plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellal, A.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the presence of the quantum group symmetry su q (2) in the quantum Hall effect on the Poincare upper half plane the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level. It is also shown that the relation between the degeneracy and the cyclic representation of su q (2) appears in accordance with q being a kth root of unity. (Authors)

  10. Some Considerations Regarding Plane to Plane Parallelism Error Effects in Robotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Alaci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that by imposing the parallelism constraint between the measured plane and the reference plane, the position of the current plane is not univocal specified and is impossible to specify the way to attain the parallelism errors imposed by accuracy constrains. The parameters involved in the calculus of plane to plane parallelism error can be used to set univocal the relative position between the two planes.

  11. Design and characterization of AlN-based in-plane microplate resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Díez, V; Manzaneque, T; Hernando-García, J; Sánchez-Rojas, J L; Ababneh, A; Kucera, M; Schmid, U; Seidel, H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a design procedure to perform an efficient actuation of in-plane modes in piezoelectric resonators is presented. This procedure is applied to different microplate structures, paying attention to two in-plane mode families: contour modes and flexure-actuated modes. A representative set of devices from both families were used as illustrative examples. These devices were characterized electrically by measuring the impedance and their in-plane modal shapes were measured with a novel technique based on speckle-pattern interferometry. Figures of merit such as the quality factor or the motional resistance were obtained and used to evaluate the different design approaches. (paper)

  12. Work Planing Automation at Mechanical Subdivision

    OpenAIRE

    Dzindzelėta, Vytautas

    2005-01-01

    Work planing automation, installation possibilities and future outlook at mechanical subdivision. To study how the work planing has changed before and after automation process and to analyse automation process methodology.

  13. Combinatorial geometry in the plane

    CERN Document Server

    Hadwiger, Hugo; Klee, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduates familiar with analysis and college geometry, this concise book discusses theorems on topics restricted to the plane such as convexity, coverings, and graphs. In addition to helping students cultivate rigorous thought, the text encourages the development of mathematical intuition and clarifies the nature of mathematical research.The two-part treatment begins with specific topics including integral distances, covering problems, point set geometry and convexity, simple paradoxes involving point sets, and pure combinatorics, among other subjects. The second pa

  14. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez, D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R and D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics

  15. A study of parallelism of the occlusal plane and ala-tragus line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Katayoun; Sadr, Makan

    2009-01-01

    Orientation of the occlusal plane is one of the most important clinical procedures in prostho-dontic rehabilitation of edentulous patients. The aim of this study was to define the best posterior reference point of ala-tragus line for orientation of occlusal plane for complete denture fabrication. Fifty-three dental students (27 females and 26 males) with complete natural dentition and Angel's Class I occlusal relationship were selected. The subjects were photographed in natural head position while clenching on a Fox plane. After tracing the photographs, the angles between the following lines were measured: the occlusal plane (Fox plane) and the superior border of ala-tragus, the occlusal plane (Fox plane) and the middle of ala-tragus as well as the occlusal plane (Fox plane) and the inferior border of ala-tragus. Descriptive statistics, one sample t-test and independent t-test were used. P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. There was no parallelism between the occlusal plane and ala-tragus line with three different posterior ends and one sample t-test showed that the angles between them were significantly different from zero (pplane. The superior border of the tragus is suggested as the posterior reference for ala-tragus line.

  16. Genetic association among root morphology, root quality and root yield in ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Ramesh R.; Reddy Anjaneya Prasanna L.; Subbaiah Chinna J.; Kumar Niranjana A.; Prasad Nagendra H.N.; Bhukya Balakishan

    2011-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a dryland medicinal crop and roots are used as valuable drug in traditional systems of medicine. Morphological variants (morphotypes) and the parental populations were evaluated for root - morphometric, quality and yield traits to study genetic association among them. Root morphometric traits (root length, root diameter, number of secondary roots/ plant) and crude fiber content exhibited strong association among them and ...

  17. Synergy between root hydrotropic response and root biomass in maize (Zea mays L.) enhances drought avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Delfeena; Martínez-Guadarrama, Jesús; Hernández-Bruno, Oralia; Flores, Leonardo; Nieto-Sotelo, Jorge; Cassab, Gladys I

    2017-12-01

    Roots of higher plants change their growth direction in response to moisture, avoiding drought and gaining maximum advantage for development. This response is termed hydrotropism. There have been few studies of root hydrotropism in grasses, particularly in maize. Our goal was to test whether an enhanced hydrotropic response of maize roots correlates with a better adaptation to drought and partial/lateral irrigation in field studies. We developed a laboratory bioassay for testing hydrotropic response in primary roots of 47 maize elite DTMA (Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa) hybrids. After phenotyping these hybrids in the laboratory, selected lines were tested in the field. Three robust and three weak hybrids were evaluated employing three irrigation procedures: normal irrigation, partial lateral irrigation and drought. Hybrids with a robust hydrotropic response showed growth and developmental patterns, under drought and partial lateral irrigation, that differed from weak hydrotropic responders. A correlation between root crown biomass and grain yield in hybrids with robust hydrotropic response was detected. Hybrids with robust hydrotropic response showed earlier female flowering whereas several root system traits, such as projected root area, median width, maximum width, skeleton width, skeleton nodes, average tip diameter, rooting depth skeleton, thinner aboveground crown roots, as well as stem diameter, were considerably higher than in weak hydrotropic responders in the three irrigation procedures utilized. These results demonstrate the benefit of intensive phenotyping of hydrotropism in primary roots since maize plants that display a robust hydrotropic response grew better under drought and partial lateral irrigation, indicating that a selection for robust hydrotropism might be a promising breeding strategy to improve drought avoidance in maize. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An introduction to finite projective planes

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Abraham Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Geared toward both beginning and advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this self-contained treatment offers an elementary approach to finite projective planes. Following a review of the basics of projective geometry, the text examines finite planes, field planes, and coordinates in an arbitrary plane. Additional topics include central collineations and the little Desargues' property, the fundamental theorem, and examples of finite non-Desarguesian planes.Virtually no knowledge or sophistication on the part of the student is assumed, and every algebraic system that arises is defined and

  19. Systems considerations in mosaic focal planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. P., III

    1983-08-01

    Two key reasons for pursuing the development of mosaic focal planes are reviewed and it is shown that rapid frame repetition rate is the only requirement that can be solved no other way than through mosaic focal planes. With the view that spaceborne mosaic focal plane sensors are necessarily 'smart sensors' requiring a lot of onboard processing just to function, it is pointed out that various artificial intelligence techniques may be the most appropriate to incorporate in the data processing. Finally, a novel mosaic focal plane design is proposed, termed a virtual mosaic focal plane, in response to other system constraints.

  20. Halogenated auxins affect microtubules and root elongation in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effect of 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-(indole-3-)butyric acid (TFIBA), a recently described root growth stimulator, and 5,6-dichloro-indole-3-acetic acid (DCIAA) on growth and microtubule (MT) organization in roots of Lactuca sativa L. DCIAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) inhibited root elongation and depolymerized MTs in the cortex of the elongation zone, inhibited the elongation of stele cells, and promoted xylem maturation. Both auxins caused the plane of cell division to shift from anticlinal to periclinal. In contrast, TFIBA (100 micromolar) promoted elongation of primary roots by 40% and stimulated the elongation of lateral roots, even in the presence of IBA, the microtubular inhibitors oryzalin and taxol, or the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. However, TFIBA inhibited the formation of lateral root primordia. Immunostaining showed that TFIBA stabilized MTs orientation perpendicular to the root axis, doubled the cortical cell length, but delayed xylem maturation. The data indicate that the auxin-induced inhibition of elongation and swelling of roots results from reoriented phragmoplasts, the destabilization of MTs in elongating cells, and promotion of vessel formation. In contrast, TFIBA induced promotion of root elongation by enhancing cell length, prolonging transverse MT orientation, delaying cell and xylem maturation.

  1. Endoscopic root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, Joshua; Michaeli, Eli; Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-10-01

    To describe an innovative endoscopic technique for root canal treatment. Root canal treatment was performed on 12 patients (15 teeth), using a newly developed endoscope (Sialotechnology), which combines an endoscope, irrigation, and a surgical microinstrument channel. Endoscopic root canal treatment of all 15 teeth was successful with complete resolution of all symptoms (6-month follow-up). The novel endoscope used in this study accurately identified all microstructures and simplified root canal treatment. The endoscope may be considered for use not only for preoperative observation and diagnosis but also for active endodontic treatment.

  2. RUNTIME DICTIONARIES FOR ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wind, David Kofoed

    2013-01-01

    ROOT is the LHC physicists' common tool for data analysis; almost all data is stored using ROOT's I/O system. This system benefits from a custom description of types (a so-called dictionary) that is optimised for the I/O. Until now, the dictionary cannot be provided at run-time; it needs to be prepared in a separate prerequisite step. This project will move the generation of the dictionary to run-time, making use of ROOT 6's new just-in-time compiler. It allows a more dynamic and natural access to ROOT's I/O features especially for user code.

  3. Medical Terminology: Root Words. Health Occupations Education Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on medical terminology (root words) is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module consists of an introduction to root words, a list of resources needed, procedures for using the module, a list of terminology used in the…

  4. The plane strain tests in the PROMETRA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazalis, B.; Desquines, J.; Carassou, S.; Le Jolu, T.; Bernaudat, C.

    2016-01-01

    A fuel cladding mechanical test, performed under conditions of plane strain deformation in the transverse direction of tube axis, was originally developed at Pennsylvania State University. It was decided to implement this original test within the PROMETRA program using the same experimental procedure and its optimization for a ring mechanical testing on plane strain conditions (PST tests) in hot cells laboratory. This paper presents a detailed description and an interpretation of the Plane Strain Tensile (PST) tests performed in the framework of the PROMETRA program on fresh and irradiated claddings. At first, the context of the PST tests is situated and the specificities of these tests implemented at CEA are justified. Indeed, a significant adjustment of the original experimental procedure is carried out in order to test the irradiated fuel cladding in the best possible conditions. Then, the tests results on fresh Zircaloy-4 and on irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5™ and ZIRLO ® specimens are gathered. The main analyses in support of these tests, such as metallographies, fractographic examinations and finite element simulations are detailed. Finally, a synthesis of the interpretation of the tests is proposed. The PST test seems only representative of plane strain fracture conditions when the test material is very ductile (fresh or high temperature or low hydride material like M5TM). However, it provides a relevant representation of the RIA rupture initiation which is observed in irradiated cladding resulting from hydride rim damage due to the strong irradiation of a fuel rod. - Highlights: • A plane strain mechanical test performed on fuel rod claddings is described. • The tests are performed in the framework of the French PROMETRA program. • Fresh Zircaloy-4 and irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5 and ZIRLO specimens are tested. • The main analyses in support of these tests are detailed. • A synthesis of the interpretation of the PST tests is proposed.

  5. The plane strain tests in the PROMETRA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazalis, B., E-mail: bernard.cazalis@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES, F-13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance BP3 (France); Desquines, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES, F-13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance BP3 (France); Carassou, S.; Le Jolu, T. [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/DMN, F- 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bernaudat, C. [Electricité de France, EDF/SEPTEN, F-69628 Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-04-15

    A fuel cladding mechanical test, performed under conditions of plane strain deformation in the transverse direction of tube axis, was originally developed at Pennsylvania State University. It was decided to implement this original test within the PROMETRA program using the same experimental procedure and its optimization for a ring mechanical testing on plane strain conditions (PST tests) in hot cells laboratory. This paper presents a detailed description and an interpretation of the Plane Strain Tensile (PST) tests performed in the framework of the PROMETRA program on fresh and irradiated claddings. At first, the context of the PST tests is situated and the specificities of these tests implemented at CEA are justified. Indeed, a significant adjustment of the original experimental procedure is carried out in order to test the irradiated fuel cladding in the best possible conditions. Then, the tests results on fresh Zircaloy-4 and on irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5™ and ZIRLO{sup ®} specimens are gathered. The main analyses in support of these tests, such as metallographies, fractographic examinations and finite element simulations are detailed. Finally, a synthesis of the interpretation of the tests is proposed. The PST test seems only representative of plane strain fracture conditions when the test material is very ductile (fresh or high temperature or low hydride material like M5TM). However, it provides a relevant representation of the RIA rupture initiation which is observed in irradiated cladding resulting from hydride rim damage due to the strong irradiation of a fuel rod. - Highlights: • A plane strain mechanical test performed on fuel rod claddings is described. • The tests are performed in the framework of the French PROMETRA program. • Fresh Zircaloy-4 and irradiated Zircaloy-4, M5 and ZIRLO specimens are tested. • The main analyses in support of these tests are detailed. • A synthesis of the interpretation of the PST tests is proposed.

  6. A New Nonlinear Unit Root Test with Fourier Function

    OpenAIRE

    Güriş, Burak

    2017-01-01

    Traditional unit root tests display a tendency to be nonstationary in the case of structural breaks and nonlinearity. To eliminate this problem this paper proposes a new flexible Fourier form nonlinear unit root test. This test eliminates this problem to add structural breaks and nonlinearity together to the test procedure. In this test procedure, structural breaks are modeled by means of a Fourier function and nonlinear adjustment is modeled by means of an Exponential Smooth Threshold Autore...

  7. Irrational Square Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  8. Quantifying root-reinforcement of river bank soils by four Australian tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docker, B. B.; Hubble, T. C. T.

    2008-08-01

    The increased shear resistance of soil due to root-reinforcement by four common Australian riparian trees, Casuarina glauca, Eucalyptus amplifolia, Eucalyptus elata and Acacia floribunda, was determined in-situ with a field shear-box. Root pull-out strengths and root tensile-strengths were also measured and used to evaluate the utility of the root-reinforcement estimation models that assume simultaneous failure of all roots at the shear plane. Field shear-box results indicate that tree roots fail progressively rather than simultaneously. Shear-strengths calculated for root-reinforced soil assuming simultaneous root failure, yielded values between 50% and 215% higher than directly measured shear-strengths. The magnitude of the overestimate varies among species and probably results from differences in both the geometry of the root-system and tensile strengths of the root material. Soil blocks under A. floribunda which presents many, well-spread, highly-branched fine roots with relatively higher tensile strength, conformed most closely with root model estimates; whereas E. amplifolia, which presents a few, large, unbranched vertical roots, concentrated directly beneath the tree stem and of relatively low tensile strength, deviated furthest from model-estimated shear-strengths. These results suggest that considerable caution be exercised when applying estimates of increased shear-strength due to root-reinforcement in riverbank stability modelling. Nevertheless, increased soil shear strength provided by tree roots can be calculated by knowledge of the Root Area Ratio ( RAR) at the shear plane. At equivalent RAR values, A. floribunda demonstrated the greatest earth reinforcement potential of the four species studied.

  9. Roof planes detection via a second-order variational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benciolini, Battista; Ruggiero, Valeria; Vitti, Alfonso; Zanetti, Massimo

    2018-04-01

    The paper describes a unified automatic procedure for the detection of roof planes in gridded height data. The procedure exploits the Blake-Zisserman (BZ) model for segmentation in both 2D and 1D, and aims to detect, to model and to label roof planes. The BZ model relies on the minimization of a functional that depends on first- and second-order derivatives, free discontinuities and free gradient discontinuities. During the minimization, the relative strength of each competitor is controlled by a set of weight parameters. By finding the minimum of the approximated BZ functional, one obtains: (1) an approximation of the data that is smoothed solely within regions of homogeneous gradient, and (2) an explicit detection of the discontinuities and gradient discontinuities of the approximation. Firstly, input data is segmented using the 2D BZ. The maps of data and gradient discontinuities are used to isolate building candidates and planar patches (i.e. regions with homogeneous gradient) that correspond to roof planes. Connected regions that can not be considered as buildings are filtered according to both patch dimension and distribution of the directions of the normals to the boundary. The 1D BZ model is applied to the curvilinear coordinates of boundary points of building candidates in order to reduce the effect of data granularity when the normals are evaluated. In particular, corners are preserved and can be detected by means of gradient discontinuity. Lastly, a total least squares model is applied to estimate the parameters of the plane that best fits the points of each planar patch (orthogonal regression with planar model). Refinement of planar patches is performed by assigning those points that are close to the boundaries to the planar patch for which a given proximity measure assumes the smallest value. The proximity measure is defined to account for the variance of a fitting plane and a weighted distance of a point from the plane. The effectiveness of the

  10. Chromatic roots and hamiltonian paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    We present a new connection between colorings and hamiltonian paths: If the chromatic polynomial of a graph has a noninteger root less than or equal to t(n) = 2/3 + 1/3 (3)root (26 + 6 root (33)) + 1/3 (3)root (26 - 6 root (33)) = 1.29559.... then the graph has no hamiltonian path. This result...

  11. How far is the root apex of a unilateral impacted canine from the root apices' arch form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, You-Min; Oh, Sewoong; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Soo-Byung; Son, Woo-Sung; Kim, Yong-Il

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the arch form of the root apices of normally erupting teeth and then determine the differences in the location of the apex of impacted canines relative to normally erupting canines. In addition, we sought to determine whether the labiopalatal position of the impacted canines influences the position of the apices. The study included 21 patients with unerupted canines that subsequently had a normal eruption, 21 patients with palatally impacted canines, 27 patients with labially impacted canines, and 17 patients with midalveolus impacted canines. Images were obtained using cone beam computed tomography, and the x, y, and z coordinates of the root apices were determined using Ondemand3D software (Cybermed Co., Seoul, Korea). Two-dimensional coordinates were converted from acquired 3-dimensional coordinates via projection on a palatal plane, and the Procrustes method was used to process the converted 2-dimensional coordinates and to draw the arch forms of the root apices. Finally, we measured the extent of root apex deviation from the arch forms of the root apices. Normally erupting canines showed that even though calcifications may be immature, their positions were aligned with a normal arch form. The root apices of the impacted canines were an average of 6.572 mm away from the root apices' arch form, whereas those of the contralateral nonimpacted canines were an average distance of 2.221 mm away, a statistically significant difference. The palatally impacted canines' root apices distribution tended toward the first premolar root apices. Incompletely calcified, unerupted teeth with a subsequent normal eruption showed a normal arch form of the root apices. The root apices of impacted canines were farther from the arch forms than were the nonimpacted canines. Also, the root apices of impacted canines in the palatal area showed distributions different from those of the other impacted canine groups. Copyright © 2017 American

  12. Nearly Efficient Likelihood Ratio Tests for Seasonal Unit Roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Michael; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    In an important generalization of zero frequency autore- gressive unit root tests, Hylleberg, Engle, Granger, and Yoo (1990) developed regression-based tests for unit roots at the seasonal frequencies in quarterly time series. We develop likelihood ratio tests for seasonal unit roots and show...... that these tests are "nearly efficient" in the sense of Elliott, Rothenberg, and Stock (1996), i.e. that their local asymptotic power functions are indistinguishable from the Gaussian power envelope. Currently available nearly efficient testing procedures for seasonal unit roots are regression-based and require...... the choice of a GLS detrending parameter, which our likelihood ratio tests do not....

  13. A Collaborative Knowledge Plane for Autonomic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Maïssa; Krief, Francine

    Autonomic networking aims to give network components self-managing capabilities. Several autonomic architectures have been proposed. Each of these architectures includes sort of a knowledge plane which is very important to mimic an autonomic behavior. Knowledge plane has a central role for self-functions by providing suitable knowledge to equipment and needs to learn new strategies for more accuracy.However, defining knowledge plane's architecture is still a challenge for researchers. Specially, defining the way cognitive supports interact each other in knowledge plane and implementing them. Decision making process depends on these interactions between reasoning and learning parts of knowledge plane. In this paper we propose a knowledge plane's architecture based on machine learning (inductive logic programming) paradigm and situated view to deal with distributed environment. This architecture is focused on two self-functions that include all other self-functions: self-adaptation and self-organization. Study cases are given and implemented.

  14. Quantization Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, J. A.; Martin, R.

    1976-01-01

    We present in this work a review of the conventional quantization procedure, the proposed by I.E. Segal and a new quantization procedure similar to this one for use in non linear problems. We apply this quantization procedures to different potentials and we obtain the appropriate equations of motion. It is shown that for the linear case the three procedures exposed are equivalent but for the non linear cases we obtain different equations of motion and different energy spectra. (Author) 16 refs

  15. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  16. Compact planes, mostly 8-dimensional. A retrospect

    OpenAIRE

    Salzmann, Helmut R.

    2014-01-01

    Results on $8$-dimensional topological planes are scattered in the literature. It is the aim of the present paper to give a survey of these geometries, in particular of information obtained after the appearance of the treatise Compact Projective Planes or not included in this book. For some theorems new proofs are given and a few related results concerning planes of other dimensions are presented.

  17. Biocompatibility of Er:YSGG laser radiated root surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthin, Hartmut; Ertl, Thomas P.; Schmidt, Dirk; Purucker, Peter; Bernimoulin, J.-P.; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed Er:YAG and Er:YSGG lasers are well known to be effective instruments for the ablation of dental hard tissues. Developments in the last years made it possible to transmit the laser radiation at these wavelengths with flexible fibers. Therefore the application in the periodontal pocket may be possible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro conditions to generate a bioacceptable root surface. Twenty extracted human teeth, stored in an antibiotic solution, were conventionally scaled, root planed and axially separated into two halves. Two main groups were determined. With the first group laser radiation was carried out without and in the second group with spray cooling. The laser beam was scanned about root surface areas. Laser parameters were varied in a selected range. The biocompatibility was measured with the attachment of human gingival fibroblasts and directly compared to conventionally treated areas of the root surfaces. The fibroblasts were qualified and counted in SEM investigations. On conventionally treated areas gingival fibroblasts show the typical uniform cover. In dependance on the root roughness after laser treatment the fibroblasts loose the typical parallel alignment to the root surface. With spray cooling a better in-vitro attachment could be obtained. Without spray cooling the higher increase in temperature conducted to less bioacceptance by the human gingival fibroblasts to the root surface. These results show the possibility of producing bioacceptable root surfaces with pulsed laser radiation in the range of very high water absorption near 3 micrometer.

  18. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  19. Lower incisor inclination regarding different reference planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zataráin, Brenda; Avila, Josué; Moyaho, Angeles; Carrasco, Rosendo; Velasco, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of lower incisor inclination with respect to different reference planes. It was an observational, analytical, longitudinal, prospective study conducted on 100 lateral cephalograms which were corrected according to the photograph in natural head position in order to draw the true vertical plane (TVP). The incisor mandibular plane angle (IMPA) was compensated to eliminate the variation of the mandibular plane growth type with the formula "FMApx.- 25 (FMA) + IMPApx. = compensated IMPA (IMPACOM)". As the data followed normal distribution determined by the KolmogorovSmirnov test, parametric tests were used for the statistical analysis, Ttest, ANOVA and Pearson coefficient correlation test. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical significance of p planes. There were statistically significant differences among the means of the planes measured, except for IMPACOM, FMIA and TVP. The IMPA differed significantly from the IMPACOM. The compensated IMPA and the FMIA did not differ significantly from the TVP. The true horizontal plane was mismatched with Frankfort plane in 84% of the sample with a range of 19°. The true vertical plane is adequate for measuring lower incisor inclination. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  20. Flux dynamics in ultrasensitive superconducting focal planes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The performance of superconducting focal planes will drive the achievable specifications of ultrasensitive instruments for NASA astrophysics missions, yet they have...

  1. Colliding almost-plane gravitational waves: Colliding plane waves and general properties of almost-plane-wave spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurtsever, U.

    1988-01-01

    It is well known that when two precisely plane-symmetric gravitational waves propagating in an otherwise flat background collide, they focus each other so strongly as to produce a curvature singularity. This paper is the first of several devoted to almost-plane gravitational waves and their collisions. Such waves are more realistic than plane waves in having a finite but very large transverse size. In this paper we review some crucial features of the well-known exact solutions for colliding plane waves and we argue that one of these features, the breakdown of ''local inextendibility'' can be regarded as nongeneric. We then introduce a new framework for analyzing general colliding plane-wave spacetimes; we give an alternative proof of a theorem due to Tipler implying the existence of singularities in all generic colliding plane-wave solutions; and we discuss the fact that the recently constructed Chandrasekhar-Xanthopoulos colliding plane-wave solutions are not strictly plane symmetric and thus do not satisfy the conditions and the conclusion of Tipler's theorem

  2. The retroperitoneal interfascial planes: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuo; Nakao, Shota; Nakamuro, Makoto; Huang, Tai-Ping; Nakano, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the concept of interfascial planes has become the prevalent theory among radiologists for understanding the retroperitoneal anatomy, having replaced the classic tricompartmental theory. However, it is a little known fact that the concept remains incomplete and includes embryological errors, which have been revised on the basis of our microscopic study. We believe that the concept not only provides a much clearer understanding of the retroperitoneal anatomy, but it also allows further development for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal injuries and diseases, should it become an accomplished theory. We explain the history and outline of the concept of interfascial planes, correct common misunderstandings about the concept, explain the unconsciously applied therapeutic procedures based on the concept, and present future perspectives of the concept using our published and unpublished data. This knowledge could be essential to acute care physicians and surgeons sometime soon.

  3. Where are the roots of the Bethe Ansatz equations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, R.S., E-mail: rsvieira@df.ufscar.br; Lima-Santos, A., E-mail: dals@df.ufscar.br

    2015-10-02

    Changing the variables in the Bethe Ansatz Equations (BAE) for the XXZ six-vertex model we had obtained a coupled system of polynomial equations. This provided a direct link between the BAE deduced from the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz (ABA) and the BAE arising from the Coordinate Bethe Ansatz (CBA). For two magnon states this polynomial system could be decoupled and the solutions given in terms of the roots of some self-inversive polynomials. From theorems concerning the distribution of the roots of self-inversive polynomials we made a thorough analysis of the two magnon states, which allowed us to find the location and multiplicity of the Bethe roots in the complex plane, to discuss the completeness and singularities of Bethe's equations, the ill-founded string-hypothesis concerning the location of their roots, as well as to find an interesting connection between the BAE with Salem’s polynomials.

  4. Decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in root-canal exudates during root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamapun, Kassara; Handagoon, Sira; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Gutmann, James L; Pavasant, Prasit; Krisanaprakornkit, Suttichai

    2017-10-01

    To determine the matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) levels in root-canal exudates from teeth undergoing root-canal treatment. The root-canal exudates from six teeth with normal pulp and periradicular tissues that required intentional root canal treatment for prosthodontic reasons and from twelve teeth with pulp necrosis and asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP) were sampled with paper points for bacterial culture and aspirated for the detection of proMMP-2 and active MMP-2 by gelatin zymography and the quantification of MMP-2 levels by ELISA. By gelatin zymography, both proMMP-2 and active MMP-2 were detected in the first collection of root-canal exudates from teeth with pulp necrosis and AAP, but not from teeth with normal pulp, and their levels gradually decreased and disappeared at the last collection. Consistently, ELISA demonstrated a significant decrease in MMP-2 levels in the root-canal exudates of teeth with pulp necrosis and AAP following root canal procedures (papical lesions, similar to the clinical application of MMP-8 as a biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Grass Rooting the System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Janice E.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a taxonomy of the grass roots movement and gives a general descriptive over view of the 60 groups studied with respect to origin, constituency, size, funding, issues, and ideology. (Author/AM)

  6. Rooting an Android Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    1. Overview The purpose of this document is to demonstrate how to gain administrative privileges on an Android device. The term “rooting” is...is applicable for the Samsung Galaxy S3 as well as many other Android devices, but there are several steps involved in rooting an Android device (as...root access has been granted. 4. Conclusion This document serves as a tutorial on how to grant user administrative privilege to an Android device by

  7. Discretization of superintegrable systems on a plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabát, Z.

    2012-02-01

    We construct difference analogues of so called Smorodinsky-Winternitz superintegrable systems in the Euclidean plane. Using methods of umbral calculus, we obtain difference equations for generalized isotropic harmonic oscillator on the uniform lattice, and also its solution in terms of power series. In the case of gauge-rotated Hamiltonian, the solution is a polynomial, well-defined in the whole plane.

  8. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  9. Moving vertices to make drawings plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goaoc, X.; Kratochvil, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Shin, C.S.; Wolff, A.; Hong, S.K.; Nishizeki, T.; Quan, W.

    2008-01-01

    In John Tantalo’s on-line game Planarity the player is given a non-plane straight-line drawing of a planar graph. The aim is to make the drawing plane as quickly as possible by moving vertices. In this paper we investigate the related problem MinMovedVertices which asks for the minimum number of

  10. Open Cluster Dynamics via Fundamental Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Cheng; Pang, Xiao-Ying

    2018-04-01

    Open clusters (OCs) are important objects for stellar dynamics studies. The short survival timescale of OCs makes them closely related to the formation of Galactic field stars. We motivate to investigate the dynamical evolution of OCs on the aspect of internal effect and the external influence. Firstly, we make use of the known OC catalog to obtain OCs masses, effective radii. Additionally, we estimate OCs kinematics properties by OC members cross-matched with radial velocity and metallicity from SDSSIV/APOGEE2. We then establish the fundamental plane of OCs based on the radial velocity dispersion, the effective radius, and average surface brightness. The deviation of the fundamental plane from the Virial Plane, so called the tilt, and the r.m.s. dispersion of OCs around the average plane are used to indicate the dynamical status of OCs. Parameters of the fitted plane will vary with cluster age and distance.

  11. Slipping and rolling on an inclined plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient (μ). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is studied. It is shown that the evolution equation for the contact point of a sliding sphere is similar to that of a point particle sliding on an inclined plane whose friction coefficient is 7/2 μ. If μ > 2/7 tan θ, for any arbitrary initial velocity and angular velocity, the sphere will roll on the inclined plane after some finite time. In other cases, it will slip on the inclined plane. In the case of rolling, the centre of the sphere moves on a parabola. Finally the velocity and angular velocity of the sphere are exactly computed.

  12. Coherent field propagation between tilted planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Johannes; Worku, Norman Girma; Gross, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    Propagating electromagnetic light fields between nonparallel planes is of special importance, e.g., within the design of novel computer-generated holograms or the simulation of optical systems. In contrast to the extensively discussed evaluation between parallel planes, the diffraction-based propagation of light onto a tilted plane is more burdensome, since discrete fast Fourier transforms cannot be applied directly. In this work, we propose a quasi-fast algorithm (O(N 3  log N)) that deals with this problem. Based on a proper decomposition into three rotations, the vectorial field distribution is calculated on a tilted plane using the spectrum of plane waves. The algorithm works on equidistant grids, so neither nonuniform Fourier transforms nor an explicit complex interpolation is necessary. The proposed algorithm is discussed in detail and applied to several examples of practical interest.

  13. Fluctuation diamagnetism near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    Fluctuations of the magnetic moment and of the specific heat near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors are studied. Fluctuations near a surface yield an additional contribution to the effect of the usual bulk fluctuations on the diamagnetic moment. Such an additional contribution has a singularity near a temperature T/sub c/3(H), which is higher than the bulk superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field T/sub c/2(H). Depending on the strength of the magnetic field, the singularity of the additional contribution to the magnetic moment can be either logarithmic (strong fields) or of square-root type (weak fields). Experiments which could reveal the aforementioned anomalous behavior are discussed in detail

  14. effects of different concentrations of auxins on rooting and root

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: The effect of auxins and their different concentrations on rooting and root ... primary root length and the longest primary root was recorded with the ... ceuticals, lubricants, foods, electrical insulators, .... stem cuttings of jojoba treated with IBA and NAA, .... increasing cell division and enlargement at each.

  15. Analysis of Relative Parallelism Between Hamular-Incisive-Papilla Plane and Campers Plane in Edentulous Subjects: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambake, Deepti; Shetty, Shilpa; Satish Babu, C L; Fulari, Sangamesh G

    2014-12-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the parallelism between hamular-incisive-papilla plane (HIP) and the Campers plane. And to determine which part of the posterior reference of the tragus i.e., the superior, middle or the inferior of the Camper's plane is parallel to HIP using digital lateral cephalograms. Fifty edentulous subjects with well formed ridges were selected for the study. The master casts were obtained using the standard selective pressure impression procedure. On the deepest point of the hamular notches and the centre of the incisive papilla stainless steel spherical bearings were glued to the cast at the marked points. The study templates were fabricated with autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The subjects were prepared for the lateral cephalograms. Stainless steel spherical bearings were adhered to the superior, middle, inferior points of the tragus of the ear and inferior border of the ala of the nose using surgical adhesive tape. The subjects with study templates were subjected to lateral cephalograms. Cephalometric tracings were done using Autocad 2010 software. Lines were drawn connecting the incisive papilla and hamular notch and the stainless steel spherical bearings placed on the superior, middle and inferior points on the tragus and the ala of the nose i.e., the Campers line S, Campers line M, Campers line I. The angles between the three Camper's line and the HIP were measured and recorded. Higher mean angulation was recorded in Campers line S -HIP (8.03) followed by Campers line M-HIP (4.60). Campers line I-HIP recorded the least angulation (3.80). The HIP is parallel to the Camper's plane. The Camper's plane formed with the posterior reference point as inferior point of the tragus is relatively parallel to the HIP.

  16. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.

    2005-01-01

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate (φ coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m 2 ) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints

  17. Three surgical planes identified in laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision for right-sided colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Da-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Wu; OuYang, Man-Zhao; Lu, Yan

    2016-01-12

    Complete mesocolic excision provides a correct anatomical plane for colon cancer surgery. However, manifestation of the surgical plane during laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision versus in computed tomography images remains to be examined. Patients who underwent laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision for right-sided colon cancer underwent an abdominal computed tomography scan. The spatial relationship of the intraoperative surgical planes were examined, and then computed tomography reconstruction methods were applied. The resulting images were analyzed. In 44 right-sided colon cancer patients, the surgical plane for laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision was found to be composed of three surgical planes that were identified by computed tomography imaging with cross-sectional multiplanar reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and volume reconstruction. For the operations performed, the mean bleeding volume was 73±32.3 ml and the mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 22±9.7. The follow-up period ranged from 6-40 months (mean 21.2), and only two patients had distant metastases. The laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision surgical plane for right-sided colon cancer is composed of three surgical planes. When these surgical planes were identified, laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision was a safe and effective procedure for the resection of colon cancer.

  18. A general digital computer procedure for synthesizing linear automatic control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.D.

    1961-10-01

    The fundamental concepts required for synthesizing a linear automatic control system are considered. A generalized procedure for synthesizing automatic control systems is demonstrated. This procedure has been programmed for the Ferranti Mercury and the IBM 7090 computers. Details of the programmes are given. The procedure uses the linearized set of equations which describe the plant to be controlled as the starting point. Subsequent computations determine the transfer functions between any desired variables. The programmes also compute the root and phase loci for any linear (and some non-linear) configurations in the complex plane, the open loop and closed loop frequency responses of a system, the residues of a function of the complex variable 's' and the time response corresponding to these residues. With these general programmes available the design of 'one point' automatic control systems becomes a routine scientific procedure. Also dynamic assessments of plant may be carried out. Certain classes of multipoint automatic control problems may also be solved with these procedures. Autonomous systems, invariant systems and orthogonal systems may also be studied. (author)

  19. Optimal imaging parameters to visualize lumbar spinal nerve roots in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamato, Hidetada; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Funata, Tomonari; Nitta, Masaru; Nakazawa, Yasuo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2001-05-01

    Radiculopathy due to lumber spine disorders is diagnosed mainly by radiculography. Recent advances in MRI have enabled non-invasive visualization of the lumbar nerve roots. Fifty normal volunteers were evaluated for optimal imaging angle to visualize the lumbar nerve roots and optimal imaging sequences. Results showed that in the coronal oblique plane, angles that visualized the nerve roots best were L4 17, L5 29.6, and S1 36.8. In the left sagittal oblique plane, the angles were L4 17.9, L5 21.4, and S1 12.6, and in the right sagittal oblique plane, L4 16.3, L5 19.4 and S1 12.6. SPGR showed the best results both in CNR values and visually. In summary, the optimal angle by which to visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots increased as the roots became more caudal, except for S1 of the sagittal oblique plane, where individual variations were pronounced. SPGR was the best sequence for visualizing the nerve roots. (author)

  20. A conformal mapping approach to a root-clustering problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, Gennady I; Dudarenko, Nataly A; Melnikov, Vitaly G

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for matrix root-clustering in sophisticated and multiply-connected regions of the complex plane. The parametric sweeping method and a concept of the closed forbidden region covered by a set of modified three-parametrical Cassini regions are used. A conformal mapping approach was applied to formulate the main results of the paper. An application of the developed method to the problem of matrix root-clustering in a multiply connected region is shown for illustration

  1. Molecular cloning of plane pollen allergen Pla a 3 and its utility as diagnostic marker for peach associated plane pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangorsch, A; Larsson, H; Messmer, M; García-Moral, A; Lauer, I; Wolfheimer, S; Schülke, S; Bartra, J; Vieths, S; Lidholm, J; Scheurer, S

    2016-05-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) are considered to provoke allergic symptoms to plane tree pollen, which are frequently associated with peach allergy. The objective was to clone the cDNA of plane pollen nsLTP Pla a 3, to characterize IgE-binding and allergenic potency of recombinant Pla a 3 in comparison to its natural counterpart and peach nsLTP Pru p 3. Natural Pla a 3 was purified from plane pollen and analysed by mass spectrometry (MS). Recombinant Pla a 3 was characterized by SDS-PAGE and CD spectroscopy. Specific IgE to extract, components of plane pollen and Pru p 3 was measured by ImmunoCAP in sera of patients allergic to either plane pollen (n = 10), peach (n = 15) or both (n = 15). Biological potency of the proteins was investigated by in vitro mediator release assays and IgE cross-reactivity by competitive ELISA. Two Pla a 3 isoforms were identified. Recombinant Pla a 3 showed high purity, structural integrity, IgE-binding capacity comparable to nPla a 3 and biological potency. Sensitization to plane pollen extract was confirmed in 24/25 plane pollen allergics. The frequency of sensitization to Pla a 3 was 53% among patients allergic to both plane pollen and peach and 10% among plane pollen allergics tolerating peach where most patients were sensitized to Pla a 1. Pla a 3 and Pru p 3 showed strong bi-directional IgE cross-reactivity in patients allergic to peach and plane pollen, but not in peach allergics tolerating plane pollen. Levels of IgE-binding were generally higher to Pru p 3 than to Pla a 3. Sensitization to Pla a 3 is relevant in a subgroup of plane pollen allergics with concomitant peach allergy. IgE testing with Pla a 3 may serve as a marker to identify plane pollen allergic patients at risk of LTP-mediated food reactions and thereby improve in vitro diagnostic procedures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. n=3 differential calculus on a given reduced quantum plane and gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbaz, M.; El Hassouni, A.; Hassouni, Y.; Zakkari, E.H.

    2002-08-01

    We discuss the algebra of NxN matrices that seems to be as a reduced quantum plane. A new deformed differential calculus involving a complex parameter q is introduced. The two cases, q generic and q N-th root of unity are completely treated. As an application, we give connection with gauge field theory for the particular cases n=2 and n=3. (author)

  3. Preventative Valve-Sparing Aortic Root Replacement and Pregnancy Outcome in Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopaša, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with ...

  4. Tailoring distributed modal sensors for in-plane modal filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoso, A; Bellido, J C

    2009-01-01

    In this note we deal with finding the shape of distributed piezoelectric modal sensors for isolating the in-plane mode shapes of plates. The problem is treated by an optimization approach, in which a binary function is used to model the design variable: the polarization profile of the piezoelectric layer. The numerical procedure proposed here allows us to find polarization profiles which take on two values only, i.e. either positive or negative polarization, that make it possible to isolate particular vibration modes in the frequency domain. (technical note)

  5. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  6. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  7. Pre- and Postoperative Imaging of the Aortic Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Frandics P.; Mitchell, R. Scott; Miller, D. Craig; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional datasets acquired using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideally suited for characterization of the aortic root. These modalities offer different advantages and limitations, which must be weighed according to the clinical context. This article provides an overview of current aortic root imaging, highlighting normal anatomy, pathologic conditions, imaging techniques, measurement thresholds, relevant surgical procedures, postoperative complications and potential imaging pitfalls. Patients with a range of clinical conditions are predisposed to aortic root disease, including Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Various surgical techniques may be used to repair the aortic root, including placement of a composite valve graft, such as the Bentall and Cabrol procedures; placement of an aortic root graft with preservation of the native valve, such as the Yacoub and David techniques; and implantation of a biologic graft, such as a homograft, autograft, or xenograft. Potential imaging pitfalls in the postoperative period include mimickers of pathologic processes such as felt pledgets, graft folds, and nonabsorbable hemostatic agents. Postoperative complications that may be encountered include pseudoaneurysms, infection, and dehiscence. Radiologists should be familiar with normal aortic root anatomy, surgical procedures, and postoperative complications, to accurately interpret pre- and postoperative imaging performed for evaluation of the aortic root. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26761529

  8. [Anatomical key points and operative principle of "two planes and four landmarks" in extralevator abdominoperineal excision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yingjiang; Shen, Zhanlong; Wang, Shan

    2014-11-01

    Abominoperineal resection (APR) is the main approach of lower rectal cancer treatment. Recently, it was found that conventional APR had higher incidence rate of positive circumferential resection margin(CRM) and intraoperative perforation (IOP), which was the crucial reason of local recurrence and worse prognosis. Extralevator abdominoperineal excision(ELAPE) procedure was proposed by European panels including surgeons, radiologist and pathologists, and considered to lower the positive rates of CRM and IOP. Definitive surgical planes and anatomic landmarks are the cores of this procedure, which are the prerequisite for the guarantee of safety and smoothness of surgery. To realize the anatomy of muscles, fascias, blood vessels and nervous of perineal region is the base of carrying out ELAPE procedure. In this paper, we introduce the key anatomy related to ELAPE procedure and summarize the principle of ELAPE procedure as "two planes and four landmarks", which will be beneficial to the popularization and application.

  9. Finite Thin Cover on an Orthotropic Elastic Half Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Oyedeji Falope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the mechanical behaviour of thin films bonded to a homogeneous elastic orthotropic half plane under plain strain condition and infinitesimal strain. Both the film and semi-infinite substrate display linear elastic orthotropic behaviour. By assuming perfect adhesion between film and half plane together with membrane behaviour of the film, the compatibility condition between the coating and substrate leads to a singular integral equation with Cauchy kernel. Such an equation is straightforwardly solved by expanding the unknown interfacial stress in series of Chebyshev polynomials displaying square-root singularity at the film edges. This approach allows handling the singular behaviour of the shear stress and, in turn, reducing the problem to a linear algebraic system of infinite terms. Results are found for two loading cases, with particular reference to concentrated axial forces acting at the edges of the film. The corresponding mode II stress intensity factor has been assessed, thus providing the stress concentrations at both ends of the covering. Possible applications of the results here obtained range from MEMS, NEMS, and solar Silicon cell for energy harvesting to welded joint and building foundation.

  10. Slip patterns and preferred dislocation boundary planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    2003-01-01

    The planes of deformation induced extended planar dislocation boundaries are analysed in two different co-ordinate systems, namely the macroscopic system defined by the deformation axes and the crystallographic system given by the crystallographic lattice. The analysis covers single and polycryst......The planes of deformation induced extended planar dislocation boundaries are analysed in two different co-ordinate systems, namely the macroscopic system defined by the deformation axes and the crystallographic system given by the crystallographic lattice. The analysis covers single...... and polycrystals of fcc metals in three deformation modes (rolling, tension and torsion). In the macroscopic system, boundaries lie close to the macroscopically most stressed planes. In the crystallographic system, the boundary plane depends on the grain/crystal orientation. The boundary planes in both co......-ordinate systems are rationalised based on the slip. The more the slip is concentrated on a slip plane, the closer the boundaries lie to this. The macroscopic preference arises from the macroscopic directionality of the slip. The established relations are applied to (a) prediction of boundary planes from slip...

  11. In-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of molybdenum disulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhiwei; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the in-plane thermal conductivity of monolayer MoS 2 is about 19.76 W mK −1 . Interestingly, the in-plane thermal conductivity of multilayer MoS 2 is insensitive to the number of layers, which is in strong contrast to the in-plane thermal conductivity of graphene where the interlayer interaction strongly affects the in-plane thermal conductivity. This layer number insensitivity is attributable to the finite energy gap in the phonon spectrum of MoS 2 , which makes the phonon–phonon scattering channel almost unchanged with increasing layer number. For the cross-plane thermal transport, we find that the cross-plane thermal conductivity of multilayer MoS 2 can be effectively tuned by applying cross-plane strain. More specifically, a 10% cross-plane compressive strain can enhance the thermal conductivity by a factor of 10, while a 5% cross-plane tensile strain can reduce the thermal conductivity by 90%. Our findings are important for thermal management in MoS 2 based nanodevices and for thermoelectric applications of MoS 2 . (paper)

  12. Influence of mandibular fixation method on stability of the maxillary occlusal plane after occlusal plane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosano, Akira; Katakura, Akira; Takaki, Takashi; Shibahara, Takahiko

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we investigated how method of mandibular fixation influenced longterm postoperative stability of the maxilla in Class III cases. In particular, we investigated change in the maxillary occlusal plane after Occlusal Plane Alteration. Therefore, we focused on change in the palatal plane to evaluate stability of the maxillary occlusal plane, as the position of the palatal plane affects the maxillary occlusal plane. This study included 16 patients diagnosed with mandibular protrusion. Alteration of the occlusal plane was achieved by clockwise rotation of the maxilla by Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular setback was performed by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy. We analyzed and examined lateral cephalometric radiographs taken at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Stability achieved by two methods of mandibular fixation was compared. In one group of patients (group S) titanium screws were used, and in the other group (group P) titanium-locking mini-plates were used. No significant displacement was recognized in group S, whereas an approximately 0.7mm upward vertical displacement was recognized in the anterior nasal spine in group P. As a result, not only the angle of the palatal plane and S-N plane, but also occlusal plane angle in group P showed a greater decrease than that in group S. The results suggest that fixing the mandible with screws yielded greater stability of the maxilla and maxillary occlusal plane than fixing the mandible with titanium plates.

  13. Streptococcus anginosus infections: crossing tissue planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Bernie Y; Miller, Wallace T

    2014-10-01

    Streptococcus anginosus has long been recognized to cause invasive pyogenic infections. This holds true for thoracic infections where S. anginosus has a propensity for abscess and empyema formation. Early diagnosis is important given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with thoracic S. anginosus infections. Yet, distinguishing thoracic S. anginosus clinically is difficult. We present three cases of thoracic S. anginosus that demonstrated radiographic extension across tissue planes, including the interlobar fissure, diaphragm, and chest wall. Few infectious etiologies are known to cross tissue planes. Accordingly, we propose S. anginosus be considered among the differential diagnosis of potential infectious etiologies causing radiographic extension across tissue planes.

  14. Optically sectioned imaging by oblique plane microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Lin, Ziduo; Lyon, Alex R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. The first OPM results obtained using a high NA water immersion lens on a commercially available inverted microscope frame are presented, together with a measurement of the achievable optical resolution.

  15. Causal inheritance in plane wave quotients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality

  16. Lieb's correlation inequality for plane rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivasseau, V.

    1980-01-01

    We prove a conjecture by E. Lieb, which leads to the Lieb inequality for plane rotors. As in the Ising model case, this inequality implies the existence of an algorithm to compute the transition temperature of this model. (orig.)

  17. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II program is to complete the development of the titanium heat pipe thermal plane and establish all necessary steps for production of this...

  18. Some Features of the Plane Couette Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skovorodko, Petr

    2000-01-01

    In the previous paper 1 it was found, in particular, that in the transition regime of the plane Couette flow the values of total energy flux and shear stress may exceed the corresponding free molecular values...

  19. Causal inheritance in plane wave quotients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general space-time to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave space-times. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

  20. Proof of Polyakov conjecture on supercomplex plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachkachi, M.; Kouadik, S.

    1994-10-01

    Using Neumann series, we solve iteratively SBE to arbitrary order. Then applying this, we compute the energy momentum tensor and n points functions for generic n starting from WZP action on the supercomplex plane. We solve the superconformal Ward identity and we show that the iterative solution to arbitrary order is resumed by WZP action. This proves the Polyakov conjecture on supercomplex plane. (author). 8 refs

  1. Constructive curves in non-Euclidean planes

    OpenAIRE

    Horváth, Ákos G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we overview the theory of conics and roulettes in four non-Euclidean planes. We collect the literature about these classical concepts, from the eighteenth century to the present, including papers available only on arXiv. The comparison of the four non-Euclidean planes, in terms of the known results on conics and roulettes, reflects only the very subjective view of the author.

  2. Heteroepitaxial growth of basal plane stacking fault free a-plane GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieneke, Matthias; Hempel, Thomas; Noltemeyer, Martin; Witte, Hartmut; Dadgar, Armin; Blaesing, Juergen; Christen, Juergen; Krost, Alois [Otto-von-Guericke Universitaet Magdeburg, FNW/IEP, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Growth of light emitting quantum-wells based on a-plane GaN is a possibility to reduce or even to avoid polarization correlated luminescence red shift and reduction of radiative recombination efficiency. But until now heteroepitaxially grown a-plane GaN films are characterized by a poor crystalline quality expressed by a high density of basal plane stacking faults (BSF) and partial dislocations. We present Si doped a-plane GaN films grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy using high temperature AlGaN nucleation layers. FE-SEM images revealed three dimensionally grown GaN crystallites sized up to tenth micrometer in the basal plane and a few tenth micrometers along the c-axes. Though, the full width at half maxima of the X-ray diffraction {omega}-scans of the in-plane GaN(1 anti 100) and GaN(0002) Bragg reflections exhibited a very high crystal quality. Furthermore, luminescence spectra were dominated by near band gap emission, while there was no separated peak of the basal plane stacking fault. In summary we present heteroepitaxially grown a-plane GaN without an evidence of basal plane stacking faults in X-ray diffraction measurements and luminescence spectra.

  3. The minimal access deep plane extended vertical facelift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacono, Andrew A; Parikh, Sachin S

    2011-11-01

    Modern facelift techniques have benefited from a "repopularization" of shorter incisions, limited skin elevation, and more limited dissection of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and platysma in order to shorten postoperative recovery times and reduce surgical risks for patients. The authors describe their minimal access deep plane extended (MADE) vertical vector facelift, which is a hybrid technique combining the optimal features of the deep plane facelift and the short scar, minimal access cranial suspension (MACS) lift. The authors retrospectively reviewed the case records of 181 patients who underwent facelift procedures performed by the senior author (AAJ) during a two year period between March 2008 and March 2010. Of those patients, 153 underwent facelifting with the MADE vertical technique. With this technique, deep plane dissection releases the zygomatico-cutaneous ligaments, allowing for more significant vertical motion of the midface and jawline during suspension. Extended platysmal dissection was utilized with a lateral platysmal myotomy, which is not traditionally included in a deep plane facelift. The lateral platysmal myotomy allowed for separation of the vertical vector of suspension in the midface and jawline from the superolateral vector of suspension that is required for neck rejuvenation, obviating the need for additional anterior platysmal surgery. The average age of the patients was 57.8 years. The average length of follow-up was 12.7 months. In 69 consecutive patients from this series, average vertical skin excision measured 3.02 cm on each side of the face at the junction of the pre auricular and temporal hair tuft incision (resulting in a total excision of 6.04 cm of skin). Data from the entire series revealed a revision rate of 3.9%, a hematoma rate of 1.9%, and a temporary facial nerve injury rate of 1.3%. The common goal of all facelifting procedures is to provide a long-lasting, natural, balanced, rejuvenated aesthetic

  4. "Roots": Medium and Message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnamon, Keneth

    A national telephone survey indicated that audiences rated the television production of "Roots" positively in terms of the following: realistic portrayal of the people and the times; relevance for contemporary race relations; perceived emotional effect; and increased understanding of the psychology of black people. However, a comparison…

  5. Armillaria Root Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.E. Williams; C.G. III Shaw; P.M. Wargo; W.H. Sites

    1986-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is found throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world. In the continental United States, the disease has been reported in nearly every State. Hosts include hundreds of species of trees, shrubs, vines, and forbs growing in forests, along roadsides, and in cultivated areas. The disease is caused by fungi, which live as parasites on...

  6. computer-aided root aided root aided root aided root-locus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    m, stability, transient response, root-locus, iteration he means by which any a machine, mechanism or d or altered in accordance. Introduction of feedback has the advantages of f system performance to in system parameters, ponse and minimizing the ignals. However, feedback of components, increases ain and introduces ...

  7. (Lamiaceae) root extracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the larvicidal, nematicidal, antifeedant, and antifungal effects of 10 solvent extracts of Mentha spicata root. Methods: Ten solvent extracts were investigated for their total flavonoid and phenolic content and screened for larvicidal, nematicidal, antifeedant, and antifungal activities. The total phenolic ...

  8. Palatal approach of anterior superior alveolar injection technique may not be potentially useful in periodontal procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragathi Raghavendra Bhat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The palatal approach of anterior superior alveolar (P-ASA using WAND injection was reported to effectively provide a profound bilateral maxillary anesthesia of the soft tissue of anterior one-third of the palate and facial gingivae extending from canine to canine which lasted for more than an hour thus making it ideal for scaling root planing and minor periodontal procedures in the anterior maxilla. Our study suggests that the conventional P-ASA injection is of very short duration and the extent of anesthesia was not profound and consistent. This has not been reported earlier in the literature. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five cases (20 males and 15 females, who underwent scaling, root planing and minor periodontal surgical procedures such as abscess drainage, gingivectomy, and frenectomy in the maxillary anterior region in the age range of 19–45 years was assessed for the efficacy of the P-ASA injection. After the administration of the P-ASA injection, the subjective and the objective symptoms were used to evaluate the extent and duration of the anesthesia at 10, 15, and 20 min. Results: This study suggests that the conventional P-ASA injection technique does not provide anesthesia for more than 20 min. Wilcoxon matched pairs test was used to compare the effect of anesthesia at the different time intervals and the results were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusions: The conventional P-ASA injection technique is of very short duration and does not demonstrate effectiveness in periodontal surgery of the anterior maxilla.

  9. Cultural analysis: The missing factor in root-cause evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a model that can focus attention on appropriate cultural targets of inquiry, provide a completion criterion for root-cause completeness, and illustrate results. The illustration provided is as follows: Discover the root causes(s) related to issues of a nuclear reactor operator sleeping, inattention to duties, failure to adhere to procedures, and management inaction or adequate action

  10. Endoscopic facelift of the frontal and temporal areas in multiple planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaogen; Ma, Haihuan; Xue, Zhiqiang; Qi, Huijie; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-01

    The detachment planes used in endoscopic facelifts play an important role in determining the results of facial rejuvenation. In this study, we introduced the use of multiple detachment planes for endoscopic facelifts of the frontal and temporal areas, and examined its outcome. This study included 47 patients (38 female, 9 male) who requested frontal and temporal facelifts from January 2009 to January 2014. The technique of dissection in multiple planes was used for all 47 patients. In this technique, the frontal dissection was first carried out in the subgaleal plane, before being changed to the subperiosteal plane about 2 cm above the eyebrow line. Temporal dissection was carried out in both the subcutaneous and subgaleal planes. After detachment, frontal and temporal fixations were achieved using nonabsorbable sutures, and the incisions were closed. During follow-up (ranging from 6-24 months after surgery), the patients were shown their pre- and postoperative images, and asked to rate their satisfaction with the procedure. Complications encountered were documented. All 47 patients had complete recovery without any serious complications. The patient satisfaction rate was 93.6%. Minor complications included dimpling at the suture site, asymmetry, overcorrection, transitory paralysis, late oedema, haematoma, infection, scarring and hair loss. These complications resolved spontaneously and were negligible after complete recovery. Dissection in multiple planes is valuable in frontal and temporal endoscopic facelifts. It may be worthwhile to introduce the use of this technique in frontal and temporal facelifts, as it may lead to improved outcomes. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  11. "A Tale of Two Planes": Deep Versus Superficial Serratus Plane Block for Postmastectomy Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piracha, Mohammad M; Thorp, Stephen L; Puttanniah, Vinay; Gulati, Amitabh

    Postmastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS) is a significant burden for breast cancer survivors. Although multiple therapies have been described, an evolving field of serratus anterior plane blocks has been described in this population. We describe the addition of the deep serratus anterior plane block (DSPB) for PMPS. Four patients with history of PMPS underwent DSPB for anterior chest wall pain. A retrospective review of these patients' outcomes was obtained through postprocedure interviews. Three of the patients previously had a superficial serratus anterior plane block, which was not as efficacious as the DSPB. The fourth patient had a superficial serratus anterior plane that was difficult to separate with hydrodissection but had improved pain control with a DSPB. We illustrate 4 patients who have benefitted from a DSPB and describe indications that this block may be more efficacious than a superficial serratus plane block. Further study is recommended to understand the intercostal nerve branches within the lateral and anterior muscular chest wall planes.

  12. Heterogeneous upper-bound finite element limit analysis of masonry walls out-of-plane loaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, G.; Zuccarello, F. A.; Olivito, R. S.; Tralli, A.

    2007-11-01

    A heterogeneous approach for FE upper bound limit analyses of out-of-plane loaded masonry panels is presented. Under the assumption of associated plasticity for the constituent materials, mortar joints are reduced to interfaces with a Mohr Coulomb failure criterion with tension cut-off and cap in compression, whereas for bricks both limited and unlimited strength are taken into account. At each interface, plastic dissipation can occur as a combination of out-of-plane shear, bending and torsion. In order to test the reliability of the model proposed, several examples of dry-joint panels out-of-plane loaded tested at the University of Calabria (Italy) are discussed. Numerical results are compared with experimental data for three different series of walls at different values of the in-plane compressive vertical loads applied. The comparisons show that reliable predictions of both collapse loads and failure mechanisms can be obtained by means of the numerical procedure employed.

  13. Affine planes, ternary rings, and examples of non-Desarguesian planes

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a detailed self-contained exposition of a part of the theory of affine planes leading to a construction of affine (or, equivalently, projective) planes not satisfying the Desarques axiom. It is intended to complement the introductory expositions of the theory of affine and projective planes. A novelty of our exposition is a new notation for the ternary operation in a ternary ring, much more suggestive than the standard one.

  14. The effect of ovalbumin on orthodontic induced root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghili, Hosseinagha; Ardekani, Mohammad Danesh; Meybodi, Seyed Amir Reza Fatahi; Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Modaresi, Jalil; Mansouri, Reza; Momeni, Ehsan

    2013-09-01

    This randomized trial was undertaken to investigate the effect of experimentally induced allergy on orthodontic induced root resorption. A total of 30 Wistar rats were divided randomly into test and control groups. Starting from the first 3 days, the rats in the test group were injected intra-peritoneally by 2 mg ovalbumin as allergen and 0.5 mg Alume as adjuvant. Afterward only allergen was injected once a week. The control group was injected by normal saline. After 21 days, Wistar immunoglobulin E was measured and peripheral matured eosinophil was counted. A total of 50 g nickel-titanium closed coil spring was ligated between right incisor and first molar. All animals were sacrificed after 14 days. The mesial root of the right and left first molar was dissected in a horizontal plane. The specimens were divided into four groups considering whether force and/or ovalbumin was applied or not. Root resorption was measured and compared among these groups. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Bonferoni tests were used to analyze the data. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. In general, the differences were insignificant (P root resorption than the group in which neither force nor ovalbumin was applied (P > 0.001). Allergy may increase the susceptibility to root resorption. Application of light force, periodical monitoring of root resorption and control of allergy are advisable.

  15. Effect of scaling and root planing on blood counts in patients with chronic generalized periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinder Singh Kalsi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many systemic diseases have been implicated as risk factors in periodontal disease. Studies suggest that periodontal infection can adversely affect systemic health; by inference periodontal disease will also have an effect on blood values, but the data available is not conclusive. Aim: This clinical study was designed to evaluate the effect of treatment of plaque induced periodontitis on commonly assessed blood parameters. Materials and Method: 37 males and 31 females aged between 20 and 50 years in good general health but suffering from plaque induced chronic periodontitis were selected for the study. The selected patients were assessed for ESR, TLC, PMN count, lymphocyte count from DLC, HB, BT and their periodontal condition before the start of the study. SCRP was carried out and patients were reassessed for the same clinical and hematological parameters 21 days after the periodontal therapy (SCRP. Results: A highly significant reduction in the counts of PMNs and the values of ESI was seen after SCRP. Furthermore a significant reduction in TLC, lymphocytes count, and BT and a non significant decrease in Hb were also observed. Conclusion: SCRP done in patients of chronic periodontitis has a considerable affect on the assessed blood parameters.

  16. Introduction to the ROOT System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Introduction to the ROOT data handling system. ROOT is used in some for or another by all LHC experiments and will be used by all for final data analysis. The introduction gives an overview of the system. Prerequisite knowledge: C++

  17. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  18. Deflection of electron beams by ground planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernsler, R.F.; Lampe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods are used to determine the effect of a nearby ground plane on the trajectory of a relativistic electron beam passing through dense gas. The beam is shown to respond to the ground plane in one of two distinct modes, determined by beam current and energy. Low-power beams deflect from the ground plane and tear longitudinally. High-power beams do not deflect or tear but tilt, i.e., the beam axis is no longer parallel to the direction of propagation. This conclusion is reached by computing the net beam force as a superposition of the ''bare'' ground-plane forces, the shielding forces from the beam-generated plasma, the body coupling forces induced by beam tilt, and the force that arises as the beam separates from the plasma. Effects from electromagnetic retardation and ground resistivity are shown to be negligible in typical cases of interest, and the interaction between ground planes and other external forces is discussed as well

  19. The horizontal plane appearances of scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illés, Tamás S.; Burkus, Máté; Somoskeőy, Szabolcs

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: A posterior-anterior vertebral vector is proposed to facilitate visualization and understanding of scoliosis. The aim of this study was to highlight the interest of using vertebral vectors, especially in the horizontal plane, in clinical practice. Methods: We used an EOS two-/three-dimen......Purpose: A posterior-anterior vertebral vector is proposed to facilitate visualization and understanding of scoliosis. The aim of this study was to highlight the interest of using vertebral vectors, especially in the horizontal plane, in clinical practice. Methods: We used an EOS two...... cases of a normal spine and a thoracic scoliosis are presented. Results: For a normal spine, vector projections in the transverse plane are aligned with the posterior-anterior anatomical axis. For a scoliotic spine, vector projections in the horizontal plane provide information on the lateral...... decompensation of the spine and the lateral displacement of vertebrae. In the horizontal plane view, vertebral rotation and projections of the sagittal curves can also be analyzed simultaneously. Conclusions: The use of posterior-anterior vertebral vector facilitates the understanding of the 3D nature...

  20. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  1. Computed tomography of peripancreatic fat planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittich, G.R.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Willson, S.A.; Tobin, R.S.; Cubberley, D.A.; Marx, M.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Obliteration of peripancreatic fat planes usually is considered an indicator of peripancreatic tumour infiltration in the presence of a malignant mass, or of inflammation of peripancreatic tissues in patients with pancreatitis. However, absence of peripancreatic fat planes also may be found in patients without evidence of pancreatic disease. Hence, CT scans of 125 patients without clinical or computed tomographic evidence of pancreatic disease were evaluated to assess normal variations in the anatomy of the pancreas and its relation to surrounding vessels and bowel loops. The fat plane separating the superior mesenteric artery from the pancreas was preserved in 100% of patients. Conversely, fat planes between the pancreas and the superior mesenteric vein, inferior vena cava, and adjacent bowel loops were partially or totally obliterated in 13% to 50% of patients. It is concluded that the absence of fat around the superior mesenteric artery is highly suggestive of pathologic changes of the pancreas, while the lack of fat planes between the pancreas and other splanchnic vessels or bowel loops frequently is normal, and therefore, is an unreliable sign of pancreatic disease. The applications of these findings to the assessment of tumour resectability by CT, and to CT scanning techniques, are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Transversus abdominis plane block for analgesia in renal transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Freir, Noelle M

    2012-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has proven effective in reducing opioid requirements and pain scores for some procedures involving the lower abdominal wall. In this study we assessed its efficacy in patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation.

  3. Environmental procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The European Bank has pledged in its Agreement to place environmental management at the forefront of its operations to promote sustainable economic development in central and eastern Europe. The Bank's environmental policy is set out in the document titled, Environmental Management: The Bank's Policy Approach. This document, Environmental Procedures, presents the procedures which the European Bank has adopted to implement this policy approach with respect to its operations. The environmental procedures aim to: ensure that throughout the project approval process, those in positions of responsibility for approving projects are aware of the environmental implications of the project, and can take these into account when making decisions; avoid potential liabilities that could undermine the success of a project for its sponsors and the Bank; ensure that environmental costs are estimated along with other costs and liabilities; and identify opportunities for environmental enhancement associated with projects. The review of environmental aspects of projects is conducted by many Bank staff members throughout the project's life. This document defines the responsibilities of the people and groups involved in implementing the environmental procedures. Annexes contain Environmental Management: The Bank's Policy Approach, examples of environmental documentation for the project file and other ancillary information

  4. Reaction plane angle dependence of dihadron azimuthal correlations from a multiphase transport model calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.; Zhang, S.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Chen, J. H.; Ma, G. L.; Zhong, C.; Huang, H. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Dihadron azimuthal angle correlations relative to the reaction plane have been investigated in Au+Au collisions at √(s NN )=200 GeV using a multiphase transport model (AMPT). Such reaction plane azimuthal-angle-dependent correlations can shed light on the path-length effect of energy loss of high-transverse-momentum particles propagating through a hot dense medium. The correlations vary with the trigger particle azimuthal angle with respect to the reaction plane direction, φ s =φ T -Ψ EP , which is consistent with the experimental observation by the STAR Collaboration. The dihadron azimuthal angle correlation functions on the away side of the trigger particle present a distinct evolution from a single-peak to a broad, possibly double-peak structure when the trigger particle direction goes from in-plane to out-of-plane with the reaction plane. The away-side angular correlation functions are asymmetric with respect to the back-to-back direction in some regions of φ s , which could provide insight into the testing v 1 method for reconstructing the reaction plane. In addition, both the root-mean-square width (W rms ) of the away-side correlation distribution and the splitting parameter (D) between the away-side double peaks increase slightly with φ s , and the average transverse momentum of away-side-associated hadrons shows a strong φ s dependence. Our results indicate that a strong parton cascade and resultant energy loss could play an important role in the appearance of a double-peak structure in the dihadron azimuthal angular correlation function on the away side of the trigger particle.

  5. Rooted in Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The result of the synergy between four doctoral projects and an advanced MA-level course on Bronze Age Europe, this integrated assemblage of articles represents a variety of different subjects united by a single theme: movement. Ranging from theoretical discussion of the various responses to and ...... period of European prehistory. In so doing, the text not only addresses transmission and reception, but also the conceptualization of mobility within a world which was literally Rooted in Movement....

  6. Aquaporins and root water uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water is one of the most critical resources limiting plant growth and crop productivity, and root water uptake is an important aspect of plant physiology governing plant water use and stress tolerance. Pathways of root water uptake are complex and are affected by root structure and physiological res...

  7. On the theory of twinning plane superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishonov, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The thermodynamic potential of the superconducting layer in the twinning plane (TP) vicinity for the type I superconductors is found. The corrections to the surface tension in powers of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter κ are obtained. The corresponding states law for the supercooling field for the type I twinning plane superconductivity (TPS) is obtained, as well as the critical field law for the type II TPS. A review of experimental and theoretical works on TPS and some similar systems is given. The conditions for the Berezinski-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition for the proximity effect are discussed, as well as the possible mechanisms for the conducting phase transition TPS in Nb and the pinning forces close to the twinning plane. The obtained order parameter distribution can be used for description of the superlattices from normal and superconducting metals as well. 6 figs., 44 refs

  8. Expressing Parallelism with ROOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piparo, D. [CERN; Tejedor, E. [CERN; Guiraud, E. [CERN; Ganis, G. [CERN; Mato, P. [CERN; Moneta, L. [CERN; Valls Pla, X. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab

    2017-11-22

    The need for processing the ever-increasing amount of data generated by the LHC experiments in a more efficient way has motivated ROOT to further develop its support for parallelism. Such support is being tackled both for shared-memory and distributed-memory environments. The incarnations of the aforementioned parallelism are multi-threading, multi-processing and cluster-wide executions. In the area of multi-threading, we discuss the new implicit parallelism and related interfaces, as well as the new building blocks to safely operate with ROOT objects in a multi-threaded environment. Regarding multi-processing, we review the new MultiProc framework, comparing it with similar tools (e.g. multiprocessing module in Python). Finally, as an alternative to PROOF for cluster-wide executions, we introduce the efforts on integrating ROOT with state-of-the-art distributed data processing technologies like Spark, both in terms of programming model and runtime design (with EOS as one of the main components). For all the levels of parallelism, we discuss, based on real-life examples and measurements, how our proposals can increase the productivity of scientists.

  9. Expressing Parallelism with ROOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piparo, D.; Tejedor, E.; Guiraud, E.; Ganis, G.; Mato, P.; Moneta, L.; Valls Pla, X.; Canal, P.

    2017-10-01

    The need for processing the ever-increasing amount of data generated by the LHC experiments in a more efficient way has motivated ROOT to further develop its support for parallelism. Such support is being tackled both for shared-memory and distributed-memory environments. The incarnations of the aforementioned parallelism are multi-threading, multi-processing and cluster-wide executions. In the area of multi-threading, we discuss the new implicit parallelism and related interfaces, as well as the new building blocks to safely operate with ROOT objects in a multi-threaded environment. Regarding multi-processing, we review the new MultiProc framework, comparing it with similar tools (e.g. multiprocessing module in Python). Finally, as an alternative to PROOF for cluster-wide executions, we introduce the efforts on integrating ROOT with state-of-the-art distributed data processing technologies like Spark, both in terms of programming model and runtime design (with EOS as one of the main components). For all the levels of parallelism, we discuss, based on real-life examples and measurements, how our proposals can increase the productivity of scientists.

  10. High-quality nonpolar a-plane GaN epitaxial films grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by the combination of pulsed laser deposition and metal–organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weijia; Zhang, Zichen; Wang, Wenliang; Zheng, Yulin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Guoqiang

    2018-05-01

    High-quality a-plane GaN epitaxial films have been grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by the combination of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). PLD is employed to epitaxial growth of a-plane GaN templates on r-plane sapphire substrates, and then MOCVD is used. The nonpolar a-plane GaN epitaxial films with relatively small thickness (2.9 µm) show high quality, with the full-width at half-maximum values of GaN(11\\bar{2}0) along [1\\bar{1}00] direction and GaN(10\\bar{1}1) of 0.11 and 0.30°, and a root-mean-square surface roughness of 1.7 nm. This result is equivalent to the quality of the films grown by MOCVD with a thickness of 10 µm. This work provides a new and effective approach for achieving high-quality nonpolar a-plane GaN epitaxial films on r-plane sapphire substrates.

  11. Topologically protected edge states for out-of-plane and in-plane bulk elastic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shao-Yong; Chen, Jiu-Jiu; Huang, Hong-Bo

    2018-04-01

    Topological phononic insulators (TPnIs) show promise for application in the manipulation of acoustic waves for the design of low-loss transmission and perfectly integrated communication devices. Since solid phononic crystals exist as a transverse polarization mode and a mixed longitudinal-transverse polarization mode, the realization of topological edge states for both out-of-plane and in-plane bulk elastic waves is desirable to enhance the controllability of the edge waves in solid systems. In this paper, a two-dimensional (2D) solid/solid hexagonal-latticed phononic system that simultaneously supports the topologically protected edge states for out-of-plane and in-plane bulk elastic waves is investigated. Firstly, two pairs of two-fold Dirac cones, respectively corresponding to the out-of-plane and in-plane waves, are obtained at the same frequency by tuning the crystal parameters. Then, a strategy of zone folding is invoked to form double Dirac cones. By shrinking and expanding the steel scatterer, the lattice symmetry is broken, and band inversions induced, giving rise to an intriguing topological phase transition. Finally, the topologically protected edge states for both out-of-plane and in-plane bulk elastic waves, which can be simultaneously located at the frequency range from 1.223 to 1.251 MHz, are numerically observed. Robust pseudospin-dependent elastic edge wave propagation along arbitrary paths is further demonstrated. Our results will significantly broaden its practical application in the engineering field.

  12. Clinical considerations for regenerative endodontic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Todd M

    2012-07-01

    The management of a tooth with incomplete root maturation and a necrotic pulp is an endodontic and a restorative challenge. Apexification procedures alone leave the tooth in a weakened state and at risk for reinfection. Regenerative endodontic procedures potentially offer advantages, including the possibility of hard tissue deposition and continued root development. Case studies have reported regeneration of human pulplike tissues in vivo, but there is no protocol that reliably regenerates pulplike tissue. This article summarizes historical, current, and future regenerative treatment approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Staining human lymphocytes and onion root cell nuclei with madder root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cücer, N; Guler, N; Demirtas, H; Imamoğlu, N

    2005-01-01

    We performed staining experiments on cells using natural dyes and different mordants using techniques that are used for wool and silk dyeing. The natural dye sources were madder root, daisy, corn cockle and yellow weed. Ferrous sulfate, copper sulfate, potassium tartrate, urea, potassium aluminum sulfate and potassium dichromate were used as mordants. Distilled water, distilled water plus ethanol, heptane, and distilled water plus methanol were used as solvents. All dye-mordant-solvent combinations were studied at pH 2.4, 3.2 and 4.2. The generic staining procedure was to boil 5-10 onion roots or stimulated human lymphocyte (SHL) preparations in a dye bath on a hot plate. Cells were examined at every half hour. For multicolor staining, madder-dyed lymphocytes were decolorized, then stained with Giemsa. The AgNOR technique was performed following the decolorization of Giemsa stained lymphocytes. Good results were obtained for both onion root cells and lymphocytes that were boiled for 3 h in a dye bath that included 4 g madder root, 4 g ferrous sulfate as mordant in 50 ml of 1:1 (v/v) methanol:distilled water. The pH was adjusted to 4.2 with 6 ml acetic acid. We conclude that madder root has potential as an alternative dye for staining biological materials.

  14. Effect of topical alendronate on root resorption of dried replanted dog teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, L; Bryson, E C; Caplan, D; Trope, M

    2001-06-01

    Alendronate (ALN) is a third generation bisphosphonate with demonstrated osteoclast inhibitory activity that may slow down the resorptive process after severe traumatic injuries. Eighty-two premolar roots of five mongrel dogs were endodontically treated and restored, extracted and treated as follows: 70 roots were bench dried for either 40 or 60 min. Thirty-eight of these roots were then soaked for 5 min in a 1 mM solution of ALN in Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) and replanted. Thirty-two roots were soaked for 5 min in HBSS and replanted. In the remaining 12 roots which were not exposed to the bench drying procedure, a 0.5 mM deep lingual mid-root cemental defect was made. Six of these roots were soaked in a 1 mM solution of ALN in HBSS for 5 min and replanted. The other six roots were soaked for 5 min in HBSS and replanted. Historical negative and positive controls were used from similarly treated teeth in our previous studies. After 4 months the dogs were killed and the roots prepared for histological evaluation. Five-microm-thick cross-sections of the root and surrounding tissue taken every 70 microm were evaluated for healing according to the criteria of Andreasen. In the 12 roots with cemental defects, healing with cementum of the damaged root surface was evaluated. In addition, residual root mass was also measured to determine the extent of root structure loss for each soaking method. Cemental healing took place in all 12 artificially damaged roots, indicating that these soaking media did not inhibit cementogenesis. The alendronate-soaked roots had statistically significantly more healing than the roots soaked in HBSS without alendronate. This improvement in healing was seen in all dogs except one and in all teeth except the first premolar. Soaking in alendronate also resulted in significantly less loss in root mass due to resorption compared to those teeth soaked in HBSS without alendronate.

  15. Radiochemical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    The modern counting instrumentation has largely obviated the need for separation processes in the radiochemical analysis but problems in low-level radioactivity measurement, environmental-type analyses, and special situations caused in the last years a renaissance of the need for separation techniques. Most of the radiochemical procedures, based on the classic works of the Manhattan Project chemists of the 1940's, were published in the National Nuclear Energy Series (NNES). Improvements such as new solvent extraction and ion exchange separations have been added to these methods throughout the years. Recently the Los Alamos Group have reissued their collected Radiochemical Procedures containing a short summary and review of basic inorganic chemistry - 'Chemistry of the Elements on the Basis of Electronic Configuration'. (A.L.)

  16. 16 CFR 1510.4 - Test procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedure. 1510.4 Section 1510.4 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... plane surface. Under its own weight and in a non-compressed state apply any portion of the test sample...

  17. Root tips moving through soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    Root elongation occurs by the generation of new cells from meristematic tissue within the apical 1–2 mm region of root tips. Therefore penetration of the soil environment is carried out by newly synthesized plant tissue, whose cells are inherently vulnerable to invasion by pathogens. This conundrum, on its face, would seem to reflect an intolerable risk to the successful establishment of root systems needed for plant life. Yet root tip regions housing the meristematic tissues repeatedly have been found to be free of microbial infection and colonization. Even when spore germination, chemotaxis, and/or growth of pathogens are stimulated by signals from the root tip, the underlying root tissue can escape invasion. Recent insights into the functions of root border cells, and the regulation of their production by transient exposure to external signals, may shed light on long-standing observations. PMID:21455030

  18. Multiple fracture planes in deuteron irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.R.; Johnson, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence has been found of multiple fracture planes in the blistering and flaking of metals observed at room temperature following irradiation at 120 K with 200 keV deuterons. In particular, two fracture planes are identified in copper, gold and stainless steel and three in aluminium. In nickel only one fracture plane is found. Qualitative models are proposed which explain the different fracture planes that are observed. In these models it is proposed that several mechanisms are important. (i) High levels of compressional stress in the implanted layer inhibits bubble nucleation and bubble growth in the depth region near the maxima in the damage and gas deposition profiles. (ii) The lateral stress varies from compression in the implant region to tension in the material below. In the region of tension bubble growth is enhanced. The vertical gradient in the lateral stress may also assist gas to move deeper into the target to further enhance bubble growth in this region. (iii) Shear resulting from differential expansion due to a combination of radiation induced swelling and localised heating is an important mechanism leading to fracture. (orig.)

  19. Copernican Revolution in the Complex Plane

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 11. Copernican Revolution in the Complex Plane - An Algebraic Way to Show the "Chief Point" of Copernican Innovation. Giorgio Goldoni. General Article Volume 17 Issue 11 November 2012 pp 1065-1084 ...

  20. Infrared MUSIC from Z technology focal planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, C.R.; Sommese, A.; Johnston, D.; Landau, H.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm which uses the high frequency differences in sensed time signals to discriminate, count, and accurately locate closely spaced targets. Z technology focal planes allow the implementation of this algorithm and the trade-off between finer spatial resolution systems and systems with coarser resolution but higher sampling rates

  1. Construction of the STAR Event Plane Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    The Event Plane Detector (EPD) is an upgrade to the STAR experiment at RHIC, providing high granularity and acceptance in the forward (2.2 run for commissioning. In this talk I will discuss the construction of the EPD, the installation of the quarter wheel, and plans for full installation in 2018.

  2. Ruler of the plane - Games of geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuis, S.; Buchin, K.; Castermans, T.; Hurks, T.; Sonke, W.; Aronov, B.; Katz, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ruler of the Plane is a set of games illustrating concepts from combinatorial and computational geometry. The games are based on the art gallery problem, ham-sandwich cuts, the Voronoi game, and geometric network connectivity problems like the Euclidean minimum spanning tree and traveling

  3. Trigonometric Characterization of Some Plane Curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    (Figure 1). A relation between tan θ and tanψ gives the trigonometric equation of the family of curves. In this article, trigonometric equations of some known plane curves are deduced and it is shown that these equations reveal some geometric characteristics of the families of the curves under consideration. In Section 2,.

  4. On Generalisation of Polynomials in Complex Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslina Darus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalised Bell and Laguerre polynomials of fractional-order in complex z-plane are defined. Some properties are studied. Moreover, we proved that these polynomials are univalent solutions for second order differential equations. Also, the Laguerre-type of some special functions are introduced.

  5. Covariant quantum mechanics on a null plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutwyler, H.; Stern, J.

    1977-03-01

    Lorentz invariance implies that the null plane wave functions factorize into a kinematical part describing the motion of the system as a whole and an inner wave function that involves the specific dynamical properties of the system - in complete correspondence with the non-relativistic situation. Covariance is equivalent to an angular condition which admits non-trivial solutions

  6. Does monocular visual space contain planes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.; Albertazzi, Liliana; van Doorn, Andrea J.; van Ee, Raymond; van de Grind, Wim A.; Kappers, Astrid M L; Lappin, Joe S.; Farley Norman, J.; (Stijn) Oomes, A. H J; te Pas, Susan P.; Phillips, Flip; Pont, Sylvia C.; Richards, Whitman A.; Todd, James T.; Verstraten, Frans A J; de Vries, Sjoerd

    The issue of the existence of planes-understood as the carriers of a nexus of straight lines-in the monocular visual space of a stationary human observer has never been addressed. The most recent empirical data apply to binocular visual space and date from the 1960s (Foley, 1964). This appears to be

  7. In-plane user positioning indoors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jovanovic, N.; Özçelebi, T.; Lukkien, J.J.; Skoric, B.; Ignatenko, T.

    2014-01-01

    Indoor positioning is a service required by many smart environment applications for various purposes, such as activity classification, indoor navigation and context awareness. In this paper, we present a novel approach to the user positioning problem based on in-plane detection enabled by a set of

  8. Techniques to measure complex-plane fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2014-09-25

    Full Text Available In this work we construct coherent superpositions of Gaussian and vortex modes which can be described to occupy the complex-plane. We demonstrate how these fields can be experimentally constructed in a digital, controllable manner with a spatial...

  9. Personnel thermoluminescent dosimetry of plane pilots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin V, J.C.; Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the research realized in the pilots of commercial planes of the different flight equipment existing. The results obtained show that the pilots receive during their work, doses of ionizing radiation greater than the limit recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection. (Author)

  10. Elastic Constants of Plane Orthotropic Elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The four independent material parameters of plane orthotropic elasti city are introduced as the effective stiffness, the effective Poisson ratio, the stiffness ratio and the shear parameter. It is proved that stress boundary value problems with zero resulting force on internal contours lead...

  11. Cues for localization in the horizontal plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jakob; Møller, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    manipulated in HRTFs used for binaural synthesis of sound in the horizontal plane. The manipulation of cues resulted in HRTFs with cues ranging from correct combinations of spectral information and ITDs to combinations with severely conflicting cues. Both the ITD and the spectral information seem...

  12. Locating a minisum circle in the plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimberg, Jack; Juel, Henrik; Schöbel, Anita

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of locating a circle with respect to existing facilities in the plane such that the sum of weighted distances between the circle and the facilities is minimized, i.e., we approximate a set of given points by a circle regarding the sum of weighted distances. If the radius...

  13. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. Error analysis of marker-based object localization using a single-plane XRII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habets, Damiaan F.; Pollmann, Steven I.; Yuan, Xunhua; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The role of imaging and image guidance is increasing in surgery and therapy, including treatment planning and follow-up. Fluoroscopy is used for two-dimensional (2D) guidance or localization; however, many procedures would benefit from three-dimensional (3D) guidance or localization. Three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) using a C-arm mounted x-ray image intensifier (XRII) can provide high-quality 3D images; however, patient dose and the required acquisition time restrict the number of 3D images that can be obtained. C-arm based 3D CT is therefore limited in applications for x-ray based image guidance or dynamic evaluations. 2D-3D model-based registration, using a single-plane 2D digital radiographic system, does allow for rapid 3D localization. It is our goal to investigate - over a clinically practical range - the impact of x-ray exposure on the resulting range of 3D localization precision. In this paper it is assumed that the tracked instrument incorporates a rigidly attached 3D object with a known configuration of markers. A 2D image is obtained by a digital fluoroscopic x-ray system and corrected for XRII distortions (±0.035 mm) and mechanical C-arm shift (±0.080 mm). A least-square projection-Procrustes analysis is then used to calculate the 3D position using the measured 2D marker locations. The effect of x-ray exposure on the precision of 2D marker localization and on 3D object localization was investigated using numerical simulations and x-ray experiments. The results show a nearly linear relationship between 2D marker localization precision and the 3D localization precision. However, a significant amplification of error, nonuniformly distributed among the three major axes, occurs, and that is demonstrated. To obtain a 3D localization error of less than ±1.0 mm for an object with 20 mm marker spacing, the 2D localization precision must be better than ±0.07 mm. This requirement was met for all investigated nominal x-ray exposures at 28 cm FOV, and

  15. Investigations on the necessity of dose calculations for several planes of the target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.

    1987-01-01

    In radiotherapy planning, the shape of a target volume can at present be exactly delimited by means of computed tomography. A method often applied is to project the largest target volume scan on the plane of the central ray and to calculate the dose in this plane. This method does not allow to take into account any change of the target volume scan which will be mainly due to the body contours of the patient. The results of dose calculations made in several planes for pharyngeal and laryngeal tumors are presented. With this procedure, 33 out of 60 irradiation techniques for nine tumor sites meet the requirements with regard to the central ray plane. If several planes are regarded, this is only true for ten irradiation plans. If is therefore absolutely necessary to calculate the doses of several planes if the target volume has an irregular shape or if the body contours vary considerably. This is the only way to prevent a false treatment caused by possibly severe dose excesses or dose insufficiencies in radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  16. The tangential breast match plane: Practical problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, M.

    1989-01-01

    The three-field breast set-up, in which tangential oblique opposed fields are joined to an anterior supraclavicular field, has been the method of choice for treatment of breast cancer for many years. In the last several years many authors have suggested refinements to the technique that improve the accuracy with which fields join at a match plane. The three-field breast set-up, using a rotatable half-beam block is the technique used at our institution. In instituting this procedure, several practical problems were encountered. Due to the small collimator rotation angles used it is possible to clinically reverse the collimator angle without observing an error noticeable on fluoroscopy. A second error can occur when the table base angle is used to compensate for the incorrect collimator rotation. These potential sources of error can be avoided if a programmable calculator or computer program is used to assist the dosimetrist during the simulation. Utilization of fluoroscopy, digital table position displays and a caliper provide accurate input for the computer program. This paper will present a hybrid procedure that combines practical set-up procedures with the mathematical calculation of ideal angles to result in an accurate and practical approach to breast simulation

  17. Instability of in-plane vortices in two-dimensional easy-plane ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysin, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of the core region of an in-plane vortex in the two-dimensional Heisenberg model with easy-plane anisotropy λ=J z /J xy leads to a clear understanding of the instability towards transformation into an out-of-plane vortex as a function of anisotropy. The anisotropy parameter λ c at which the in-plane vortex becomes unstable and develops into an out-of-plane vortex is determined with an accuracy comparable to computer simulations for square, hexagonal, and triangular lattices. For λ c , the in-plane vortex is stable but exhibits a normal mode whose frequency goes to zero as ω∝(λ c -λ) 1/2 as λ approaches λ c . For λ>λ c , the static nonzero out-of-plane spin components grow as (λ-λ c ) 1/2 . The lattice dependence of λ c is determined strongly by the number of spins in the core plaquette, is fundamentally a discreteness effect, and cannot be obtained in a continuum theory

  18. Determining the ice-binding planes of antifreeze proteins by fluorescence-based ice plane affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms.

  19. Philosophical Roots of Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, M.

    2008-10-01

    We shall consider the philosophical roots of cosmology in the earlier Greek philosophy. Our goal is to answer the question: Are earlier Greek theories of pure philosophical-mythological character, as often philosophers cited it, or they have scientific character. On the bases of methodological criteria, we shall contend that the latter is the case. In order to answer the question about contemporary situation of the relation philosophy-cosmology, we shall consider the next question: Is contemporary cosmology completely independent of philosophical conjectures? The answer demands consideration of methodological character about scientific status of contemporary cosmology. We also consider some aspects of the relation contemporary philosophy-cosmology.

  20. The Roots of Beowulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The first Beowulf Linux commodity cluster was constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1994 and its origins are a part of the folklore of high-end computing. In fact, the conditions within Goddard that brought the idea into being were shaped by rich historical roots, strategic pressures brought on by the ramp up of the Federal High-Performance Computing and Communications Program, growth of the open software movement, microprocessor performance trends, and the vision of key technologists. This multifaceted story is told here for the first time from the point of view of NASA project management.

  1. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A.; Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    This guide provides information and recommendations to the following groups: insulation contractors; general contractors; builders; home remodelers; mechanical contractors; and homeowners, as a guide to the work that needs to be done. The order of work completed during home construction and retrofit improvements is important. Health and safety issues must be addressed first and are more important than durability issues. And durability issues are more important than saving energy. Not all techniques can apply to all houses. Special conditions will require special action. Some builders or homeowners will wish to do more than the important but basic retrofit strategies outlined by this guide. The following are best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant items were discussed with the group which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane: 1. Horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; 2. Where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; 3. Frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation. Section 5 of this measure guideline contains the detailed construction procedure for the three recommended methods to effectively seal the joints in exterior insulating sheathing to create a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane.

  2. Focal plane based wavefront sensing with random DM probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluzhnik, Eugene; Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo; Dudinov, Vladimir N.

    2017-09-01

    An internal coronagraph with an adaptive optical system for wavefront control is being considered for direct imaging of exoplanets with upcoming space missions and concepts, including WFIRST, HabEx, LUVOIR, EXCEDE and ACESat. The main technical challenge associated with direct imaging of exoplanets is to control of both diffracted and scattered light from the star so that even a dim planetary companion can be imaged. For a deformable mirror (DM) to create a dark hole with 10-10 contrast in the image plane, wavefront errors must be accurately measured on the science focal plane detector to ensure a common optical path. We present here a method that uses a set of random phase probes applied to the DM to obtain a high accuracy wavefront estimate even for a dynamically changing optical system. The presented numerical simulations and experimental results show low noise sensitivity, high reliability, and robustness of the proposed approach. The method does not use any additional optics or complex calibration procedures and can be used during the calibration stage of any direct imaging mission. It can also be used in any optical experiment that uses a DM as an active optical element in the layout.

  3. Spatial noise in staring IR focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scribner, D.A.; Kruer, M.R.; Sarkady, K.; Gridley, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Problems with nonuniformity correction algorithms due to nonlinear pixel response and 1/f noise have been shown previously to cause spatial noise which can be significantly greater than temporal noise. The residual spatial noise after correction cannot be reduced with time averaging. Because of spatial noise the sensitivity of staring FPA sensors is often less than predicted on the basis of the temporal noise of the individual elements. A review is given of methods for measuring and analyzing spatial noise (after nonuniformity correction) in staring infrared focal plane arrays. Automated measurement techniques are described briefly, including necessary equipment and data reduction procedures. An example of spatial noise measurements is given using a staring InSb Charge Injection Device (CID) array

  4. Plane strain problem in microstretch elastic solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    College, Patti 143 416, India. 3Department of Mathematics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143 005, ... lem in microstretch elastic solid by employing the eigenvalue approach. 975. Page 2. 976. Rajneesh Kumar et al. 2. Basic equations ..... of the matrix A are characteristic roots of (29) assuming that real parts of qs.

  5. [Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, H; Sasaki, H; Hanafusa, Y; Hirata, M; Numata, S; Ando, M; Yagihara, T; Kitamura, S

    2002-07-01

    The outcome of aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction in Marfan syndrome was reviewed. Thirteen patients with Marfan syndrome underwent aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction for annuloaortic ectasia or aortic root dissection between 1994 and 1999. The grade of preoperative aortic regurgitation was I in 4, II in 2, III in 5, IV in 2 patients. The procedures of aortic valve-sparing were reimplantation in 7 and remodeling in 5 patients. There was no hospital and late death. Recurrence of aortic regurgitation greater than moderate grade developed in 1 patient immediately after the surgery and in the other 4 patients in the late stage. One patient of them required aortic valve replacement for it. Aortic valve-sparing root reconstruction is applicable in Marfan patients, although the indication should be cautious. Close observation is needed for recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  6. Maxillary second molar with four roots and five canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjia Sha

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we present a maxillary second molar variant, which had two palatal roots with two canals and two buccal roots with three canals, including a second mesiobuccal canal. A 44-year-old female patient complained about a tooth crown fracture and severe pain in her right maxillary second molar. A clinical intraoral inspection and radiography were carried out on the tooth, and a diagnosis of chronic apical periodontitis was made. Four roots (two buccal and two palatal and five canals (three buccal and two palatal were found. The anatomical variation of the tooth was further confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography, a cone-fit procedure, and a radiograph with a shifted projection angle. Root-canal treatment was performed under an endodontic microscope.

  7. Is pulmonary function affected by bilateral dual transversus abdominis plane block? A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover pilot study in healthy male volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Maria; Elers, Jimmi; Børglum, Jens

    2011-01-01

    : Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been shown to reduce postoperative pain after various abdominal surgical procedures in several studies. The motor nerves of the abdominal wall are located in the same plane as the sensory nerves affected by the TAP block. The aim of this study...

  8. Modelling of the UV Index on vertical and 40° tilted planes for different orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, D; Marín, M J; Utrillas, M P; Tena, F; Martínez-Lozano, J A

    2012-02-01

    In this study, estimated data of the UV Index on vertical planes are presented for the latitude of Valencia, Spain. For that purpose, the UVER values have been generated on vertical planes by means of four different geometrical models a) isotropic, b) Perez, c) Gueymard, d) Muneer, based on values of the global horizontal UVER and the diffuse horizontal UVER, measured experimentally. The UVER values, obtained by any model, overestimate the experimental values for all orientations, with the exception of the Perez model for the East plane. The results show statistical values of the MAD parameter (Mean Absolute Deviation) between 10% and 25%, the Perez model being the one that obtained a lower MAD for all levels. As for the statistic RMSD parameter (Root Mean Square Deviation), the results show values between 17% and 32%, and again the Perez model provides the best results in all vertical planes. The difference between the estimated UV Index and the experimental UV Index, for vertical and 40° tilted planes, was also calculated. 40° is an angle close to the latitude of Burjassot, Valencia, (39.5°), which, according to various studies, is the optimum angle to capture maximum radiation on tilted planes. We conclude that the models provide a good estimate of the UV Index, as they coincide or differ in one unit compared to the experimental values in 99% of cases, and this is valid for all orientations. Finally, we examined the relation between the UV Index on vertical and 40° tilted planes, both the experimental and estimated by the Perez model, and the experimental UV Index on a horizontal plane at 12 GMT. Based on the results, we can conclude that it is possible to estimate with a good approximation the UV Index on vertical and 40° tilted planes in different directions on the basis of the experimental horizontal UVI value, thus justifying the interest of this study. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  9. The H.E.S.S. Galactic plane survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Benkhali, F. Ait; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Tjus, J. Becker; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carrigan, S.; Caroff, S.; Carosi, A.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Emery, G.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Gaté, F.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glawion, D.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holch, T. L.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Malyshev, D.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Ndiyavala, H.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poireau, V.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Rauth, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rinchiuso, L.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Safi-Harb, S.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schandri, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Shiningayamwe, K.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spir-Jacob, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steppa, C.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsirou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Zorn, J.; Żywucka, N.

    2018-04-01

    We present the results of the most comprehensive survey of the Galactic plane in very high-energy (VHE) γ-rays, including a public release of Galactic sky maps, a catalog of VHE sources, and the discovery of 16 new sources of VHE γ-rays. The High Energy Spectroscopic System (H.E.S.S.) Galactic plane survey (HGPS) was a decade-long observation program carried out by the H.E.S.S. I array of Cherenkov telescopes in Namibia from 2004 to 2013. The observations amount to nearly 2700 h of quality-selected data, covering the Galactic plane at longitudes from ℓ = 250° to 65° and latitudes |b|≤ 3°. In addition to the unprecedented spatial coverage, the HGPS also features a relatively high angular resolution (0.08° ≈ 5 arcmin mean point spread function 68% containment radius), sensitivity (≲1.5% Crab flux for point-like sources), and energy range (0.2-100 TeV). We constructed a catalog of VHE γ-ray sources from the HGPS data set with a systematic procedure for both source detection and characterization of morphology and spectrum. We present this likelihood-based method in detail, including the introduction of a model component to account for unresolved, large-scale emission along the Galactic plane. In total, the resulting HGPS catalog contains 78 VHE sources, of which 14 are not reanalyzed here, for example, due to their complex morphology, namely shell-like sources and the Galactic center region. Where possible, we provide a firm identification of the VHE source or plausible associations with sources in other astronomical catalogs. We also studied the characteristics of the VHE sources with source parameter distributions. 16 new sources were previously unknown or unpublished, and we individually discuss their identifications or possible associations. We firmly identified 31 sources as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), supernova remnants (SNRs), composite SNRs, or gamma-ray binaries. Among the 47 sources not yet identified, most of them (36) have possible

  10. ROOT Tutorial for Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Piparo, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    ROOT is a "batteries-included" tool kit for data analysis, storage and visualization. It is widely used in High Energy Physics and other disciplines such as Biology, Finance and Astrophysics. This event is an introductory tutorial to ROOT and comprises a front lecture and hands on exercises. IMPORTANT NOTE: The tutorial is based on ROOT 6.04 and NOT on the ROOT5 series.  IMPORTANT NOTE: if you have ROOT 6.04 installed on your laptop, you will not need to install any virtual machine. The instructions showing how to install the virtual machine on which you can find ROOT 6.04 can be found under "Material" on this page.

  11. Critical values for unit root tests in seasonal time series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); B. Hobijn (Bart)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we present tables with critical values for a variety of tests for seasonal and non-seasonal unit roots in seasonal time series. We consider (extensions of) the Hylleberg et al. and Osborn et al. test procedures. These extensions concern time series with increasing seasonal

  12. Table of nuclear root mean square charge radii. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paviotti-Corcuera, R.; McLaughlin, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes a table of nuclear root-mean-square (rms) charge radii evaluated by two different procedures. The data are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section via INTERNET or on PC diskettes upon request. This document supersedes the previous IAEA-NDS-163, 1990, 'Nuclear Charge Radii'. (author)

  13. Properties of estimated characteristic roots

    OpenAIRE

    Bent Nielsen; Heino Bohn Nielsen

    2008-01-01

    Estimated characteristic roots in stationary autoregressions are shown to give rather noisy information about their population equivalents. This is remarkable given the central role of the characteristic roots in the theory of autoregressive processes. In the asymptotic analysis the problems appear when multiple roots are present as this implies a non-differentiablity so the δ-method does not apply, convergence rates are slow, and the asymptotic distribution is non-normal. In finite samples ...

  14. Multi-planed unified switching topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2017-07-04

    An apparatus and method for extending the scalability and improving the partitionability of networks that contain all-to-all links for transporting packet traffic from a source endpoint to a destination endpoint with low per-endpoint (per-server) cost and a small number of hops. An all-to-all wiring in the baseline topology is decomposed into smaller all-to-all components in which each smaller all-to-all connection is replaced with star topology by using global switches. Stacking multiple copies of the star topology baseline network creates a multi-planed switching topology for transporting packet traffic. Point-to-point unified stacking method using global switch wiring methods connects multiple planes of a baseline topology by using the global switches to create a large network size with a low number of hops, i.e., low network latency. Grouped unified stacking method increases the scalability (network size) of a stacked topology.

  15. Suicide plane crash against nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, A.

    2002-01-01

    Cea (French atomic energy commission) and EDF (Electricity of France) are reassessing their safety standards concerning suicide plane attacks against nuclear facilities. The general idea is to study the non-linear behaviour of reinforced concrete in case of mechanical impact. American studies carried out in 1988 show that a F-14 phantom crashing into a 3,6 meter thick wall at a speed of 774 km/h penetrates only the first 5 cm of the wall. More recent studies performed in Germany and based on computerized simulations show that the reactor containment can sustain impacts from a F15 plane or even from a 747-Boeing but contiguous buildings like the one which houses spent fuels might be more easily damaged because of their metal roofing. (A.C.)

  16. Endodontic Management of Maxillary Second Molar with Two Palatal Roots: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatment may sometimes fail because morphological features of the tooth adversely affect the treatment protocol. Maxillary second molars are recognized as usually having a single palatal root with a single palatal canal. The incidence of second palatal root in the maxillary second molar is very rare. Two cases are presented in this paper describing the endodontic management of a four-rooted maxillary second molar with two distinct palatal roots and canals and two distinct buccal roots and canals. Clinical examination and radiographs showed the presence of two palatal roots during the root canal procedure. The canals were biomechanically prepared with crown-down technique and obturated using lateral condensation technique with AH-Plus sealer.

  17. A multiplicity jump trigger using silicon planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Erwin, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    Since silicon tracking planes are already present in a B decay experiment, it is an attractive idea to use these as part of a multiplicity jump detector. Two average B decays would produce a multiplicity jump of around 10 in the final state. Such a trigger has been tried for a fixed target Charm experiment with disappointing success. The failure was attributed to the difficulty in adequately controlling the gains of a large number of microstrip amplifies

  18. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  19. Cues for localization in the horizontal plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jakob; Møller, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Spatial localization of sound is often described as unconscious evaluation of cues given by the interaural time difference (ITD) and the spectral information of the sound that reaches the two ears. Our present knowledge suggests the hypothesis that the ITD roughly determines the cone of the perce...... independently in HRTFs used for binaural synthesis. The ITD seems to be dominant for localization in the horizontal plane even when the spectral information is severely degraded....

  20. Resonant power processors. I - State plane analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, R.; Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    State-plane techniques in conjunction with piecewise-linear analysis is employed to study the steady-state and transient characteristics of a series resonant converter. With the direct viewing of the resonant tank energy and the device switching instants, the state portrayal provides unique insights into the complex behavior of the converter. Operation of the converter under both continuous and discontinuous current modes and at frequencies both below and above resonant frequency are discussed.

  1. Push-out bond strength of different tricalcium silicate-based filling materials to root dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Henrique Stefaneli Marques

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different triccalcium silicate cements to retrograde cavity using a push out test. Thirty maxillary central incisors were shaped using #80 hand files and sectioned transversally. Root slices were obtained from the apical 4 mm after eliminating the apical extremity. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and positioned at 45° to the horizontal plane for preparation of root-end cavities with a diamond ultrasonic retrotip. The samples were divided into three groups according to the root-end filling material (n = 10: MTA Angelus, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine. A gutta-percha cone (#80 was tugged-back at the limit between the canal and the root-end cavity. The root-end cavity was filled and the gutta-percha cone was removed after complete setting of the materials. The specimens were placed in an Instron machine with the root-end filling turned downwards. The push-out shaft was inserted in the space previously occupied by the gutta-percha cone and push out testing was performed at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. There was no statistically significant difference in resistance to push out by the materials tested (p > 0.01. MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA showed predominantly mixed failure while Biodentine exhibited mixed and cohesive failures. The tricalcium silicate-based root-end filling materials showed similar bond strength retrograde cavity.

  2. Push-out bond strength of different tricalcium silicate-based filling materials to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaneli Marques, Jorge Henrique; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues de; Mazzi-Chaves, Jardel Francisco; Camilleri, Josette; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2018-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different triccalcium silicate cements to retrograde cavity using a push out test. Thirty maxillary central incisors were shaped using #80 hand files and sectioned transversally. Root slices were obtained from the apical 4 mm after eliminating the apical extremity. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and positioned at 45° to the horizontal plane for preparation of root-end cavities with a diamond ultrasonic retrotip. The samples were divided into three groups according to the root-end filling material (n = 10): MTA Angelus, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine. A gutta-percha cone (#80) was tugged-back at the limit between the canal and the root-end cavity. The root-end cavity was filled and the gutta-percha cone was removed after complete setting of the materials. The specimens were placed in an Instron machine with the root-end filling turned downwards. The push-out shaft was inserted in the space previously occupied by the gutta-percha cone and push out testing was performed at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. There was no statistically significant difference in resistance to push out by the materials tested (p > 0.01). MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA showed predominantly mixed failure while Biodentine exhibited mixed and cohesive failures. The tricalcium silicate-based root-end filling materials showed similar bond strength retrograde cavity.

  3. Proteomics of Maize Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochholdinger, Frank; Marcon, Caroline; Baldauf, Jutta A; Yu, Peng; Frey, Felix P

    2018-01-01

    Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  4. Proteomics of Maize Root Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hochholdinger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize forms a complex root system with structurally and functionally diverse root types that are formed at different developmental stages to extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. In recent years proteomics has been intensively applied to identify proteins involved in shaping the three-dimensional architecture and regulating the function of the maize root system. With the help of developmental mutants, proteomic changes during the initiation and emergence of shoot-borne, lateral and seminal roots have been examined. Furthermore, root hairs were surveyed to understand the proteomic changes during the elongation of these single cell type structures. In addition, primary roots have been used to study developmental changes of the proteome but also to investigate the proteomes of distinct tissues such as the meristematic zone, the elongation zone as well as stele and cortex of the differentiation zone. Moreover, subcellular fractions of the primary root including cell walls, plasma membranes and secreted mucilage have been analyzed. Finally, the superior vigor of hybrid seedling roots compared to their parental inbred lines was studied on the proteome level. In summary, these studies provide novel insights into the complex proteomic interactions of the elaborate maize root system during development.

  5. The Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The next generation of X-ray spectrometers necessitate significant increases in both resolution and effective area to achieve the science goals set forth in the 2010 Decadal Survey and the 2013 Astrophysics Roadmap. The Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment (OGRE), an X-ray spectroscopy suborbital rocket payload currently scheduled for launch in Q3 2020, will serve as a testbed for several key technologies which can help achieve the desired performance increases of future spectrometers. OGRE will be the first instrument to fly mono-crystalline silicon X-ray mirrors developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The payload will also utilize an array of off-plane gratings manufactured at The Pennsylvania State University. Additionally, the focal plane will be populated with an array of four electron-multiplying CCDs developed by the Open University and XCAM Ltd. With these key technologies, OGRE hopes to achieve the highest resolution on-sky soft X-ray spectrum to date. We discuss the optical design, expected performance, and the current status of the payload.

  6. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas, Jay [Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB-Campus Plaine CP231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Blau, Matthias [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-07-29

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  7. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  8. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  9. Linearized motion estimation for articulated planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Ankur; Sheikh, Yaser; Kanade, Takeo

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the explicit application of articulation constraints for estimating the motion of a system of articulated planes. We relate articulations to the relative homography between planes and show that these articulations translate into linearized equality constraints on a linear least-squares system, which can be solved efficiently using a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker system. The articulation constraints can be applied for both gradient-based and feature-based motion estimation algorithms and to illustrate this, we describe a gradient-based motion estimation algorithm for an affine camera and a feature-based motion estimation algorithm for a projective camera that explicitly enforces articulation constraints. We show that explicit application of articulation constraints leads to numerically stable estimates of motion. The simultaneous computation of motion estimates for all of the articulated planes in a scene allows us to handle scene areas where there is limited texture information and areas that leave the field of view. Our results demonstrate the wide applicability of the algorithm in a variety of challenging real-world cases such as human body tracking, motion estimation of rigid, piecewise planar scenes, and motion estimation of triangulated meshes.

  10. Alignment in the transverse plane, but not sagittal or coronal plane, affects the risk of recurrent patella dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeru; Sato, Takashi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tanifuji, Osamu; Mochizuki, Tomoharu; Omori, Go; Endo, Naoto

    2017-11-17

    Abnormalities of lower extremity alignment (LEA) in recurrent patella dislocation (RPD) have been studied mostly by two-dimensional (2D) procedures leaving three-dimensional (3D) factors unknown. This study aimed to three-dimensionally examine risk factors for RPD in lower extremity alignment under the weight-bearing conditions. The alignment of 21 limbs in 15 RPD subjects was compared to the alignment of 24 limbs of 12 healthy young control subjects by an our previously reported 2D-3D image-matching technique. The sagittal, coronal, and transverse alignment in full extension as well as the torsional position of the femur (anteversion) and tibia (tibial torsion) under weight-bearing standing conditions were assessed by our previously reported 3D technique. The correlations between lower extremity alignment and RPD were assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. The difference of lower extremity alignment in RPD between under the weight-bearing conditions and under the non-weight-bearing conditions was assessed. In the sagittal and coronal planes, there was no relationship (statistically or by clinically important difference) between lower extremity alignment angle and RPD. However, in the transverse plane, increased external tibial rotation [odds ratio (OR) 1.819; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.282-2.581], increased femoral anteversion (OR 1.183; 95% CI 1.029-1.360), and increased external tibial torsion (OR 0.880; 95% CI 0.782-0.991) were all correlated with RPD. The tibia was more rotated relative to femur at the knee joint in the RPD group under the weight-bearing conditions compared to under the non-weight-bearing conditions (p alignment parameters in the transverse plane related to the risk of RPD, while in the sagittal and coronal plane alignment parameters did not correlate with RPD. The clinical importance of this study is that the 3D measurements more directly, precisely, and sensitively detect rotational parameters associated with RPD and

  11. Back to the roots!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woermann, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    This article argues that one can revive the critical edge that postmodernist theory has brought to marketing, thinking without subscribing to any particular school of (critical) theory by following the principle of methodological situationalism. The roots of postmodernist critique lie in careful...... empirical observation of how social reality is being constructed in local contexts. Because knowledge, subjects, power, and value are social accomplishments, they are neither fixed nor without alternative. Many key developments in marketing theory such as assemblage theory, practice and consumer tribes...... of social order into account, hence fail to provide sensible insight. I propose the principle of methodological situationalism as a litmus test to the analytical strength of a theory or piece of research. The principle states that theoretically adequate accounts of social phenomena must be grounded...

  12. Radiographing roots and shoots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariffah Noor Khamseah Al Idid

    1985-01-01

    The effect of seed orientation on germination time and on shoot and root growth patterns is studied. Neutron radiography is used to observe the development of 4 types of plants, maize, greenpea, soya bean and padi. These plants were grown in varying orientations; sand sizes, sand thicknesses, and level of water content. Radiography of the seeds and plants were obtained for time exposure ranging from 3-12 hours and at reactor thermal power level, ranging from 500-750 kilowatts. Results obtained showed that seeds planted in varying orientations need different length of time for shoot emergence. Neutron radiography is now developed to other areas of non-industrial applications in Malaysia. (A.J.)

  13. Type III apical transportation of root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv P Mantri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural accidents leading to complications such as canal transportation have been ascribed to inapt cleaning and shaping concepts. Canal transportation is an undesirable deviation from the natural canal path. Herewith a case of apical transportation of root canal resulting in endodontic retreatment failure and its management is presented. A healthy 21-year-old young male presented discomfort and swelling associated with painful endodontically retreated maxillary incisor. Radiograph revealed periradicular radiolucency involving underfilled 11 and overfilled 12. Insufficiently obturated 11 exhibited apical transportation of canal. This type III transportation was treated by periradicular surgery and repair using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Comfortable asymptomatic patient presented uneventful healing at third and fourth month recall visits. A decrease in the size of radiolucency in radiograph supported the clinical finding. In the present case, MTA is useful in repairing the transportation defect. The result of these procedures is predictable and successful.

  14. Radiation dosimetry with plane-parallel ionization chambers: An international (IAEA) code of practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    1996-01-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA Code of Practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has expanded our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber dosimeter, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different national organizations have published, or are in the process of publishing, recommendations on detailed procedures for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspices of the IAEA, first to assess the status and validity of IAEA TRS-277, and second to develop an international Code of Practice for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers in high-energy electron and photon beams. The purpose of this work is to describe the forthcoming Code of Practice. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Radiation dosimetry with plane-parallel ionization chambers: An international (IAEA) code of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreo, P [Lunds Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Radiophysics Dept.; Almond, P R [J.G. Brown Cancer Center, Univ. of Lousville, Lousville, KY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mattsson, O [Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Nahum, A E [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; Roos, M [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA Code of Practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has expanded our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber dosimeter, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different national organizations have published, or are in the process of publishing, recommendations on detailed procedures for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspices of the IAEA, first to assess the status and validity of IAEA TRS-277, and second to develop an international Code of Practice for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers in high-energy electron and photon beams. The purpose of this work is to describe the forthcoming Code of Practice. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  16. Fabrication of Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeters for X-Ray Focal Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Audley, Heather; Bandler, Simon R.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lee, Sang Jun; hide

    2015-01-01

    Requirements for focal planes for x-ray astrophysics vary widely depending on the needs of the science application such as photon count rate, energy band, resolving power, and angular resolution. Transition edge sensor x-ray calorimeters can encounter limitations when optimized for these specific applications. Balancing specifications leads to choices in, for example, pixel size, thermal sinking arrangement, and absorber thickness and material. For the broadest specifications, instruments can benefit from multiple pixel types in the same array or focal plane. Here we describe a variety of focal plane architectures that anticipate science requirements of x-ray instruments for heliophysics and astrophysics. We describe the fabrication procedures that enable each array and explore limitations for the specifications of such arrays, including arrays with multiple pixel types on the same array.

  17. Osmolarity and root canal antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, G; Guastalli, A R

    2014-04-01

    Antiseptics used in endodontics for disinfection purposes include root canal dressings and irrigants. Osmotic shock is known to cause the alteration of microbial cell viability and might have a role in the mechanism of action of root canal antiseptics. The aim of this review was to determine the role of osmolarity on the performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment. A literature search using the Medline electronic database was conducted up to 30 May 2013 using the following search terms and combinations: 'osmolarity AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmolality AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmotic AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmosis AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; sodium chloride AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm'. Publications were included if the effects of osmolarity on the clinical performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment were stated, if preparations with different osmolarities values were compared and if they were published in English. A hand search of articles published online, 'in press' and 'early view', and in the reference list of the included papers was carried out following the same criteria. A total of 3274 publications were identified using the database, and three were included in the review. The evidence available in endodontics suggests a possible role for hyperosmotic root canal medicaments as disinfectants, and that there is no influence of osmolarity on the tissue dissolution capacity of sodium hypochlorite. There are insufficient data to obtain a sound conclusion regarding the role of hypo-osmosis in root canal disinfection, or osmosis in any further desirable

  18. Root systems of chaparral shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerow, Jochen; Krause, David; Jow, William

    1977-06-01

    Root systems of chaparral shrubs were excavated from a 70 m 2 plot of a mixed chaparral stand located on a north-facing slope in San Diego County (32°54' N; 900 m above sea level). The main shrub species present were Adenostoma fasciculatum, Arctostaphylos pungens, Ceanothus greggii, Erigonum fasciculatum, and Haplopappus pinifolius. Shrubs were wired into their positions, and the soil was washed out beneath them down to a depth of approximately 60 cm, where impenetrable granite impeded further washing and root growth was severely restricted. Spacing and interweaving of root systems were recorded by an in-scale drawing. The roots were harvested in accordance to their depths, separated into diameter size classes for each species, and their dry weights measured. Roots of shrubs were largely confined to the upper soil levels. The roots of Eriogonum fasciculatum were concentrated in the upper soil layer. Roots of Adenostoma fasciculatum tended to be more superficial than those from Ceanothus greggii. It is hypothesized that the shallow soil at the excavation site impeded a clear depth zonation of the different root systems. The average dry weight root:shoot ratio was 0.6, ranging for the individual shrubs from 0.8 to 0.4. The root area always exceeded the shoot area, with the corresponding ratios ranging from 6 for Arctostaphylos pungens to 40 for Haplopappus pinifolius. The fine root density of 64 g dry weight per m 2 under the canopy was significantly higher than in the unshaded area. However, the corresponding value of 45 g dry weight per m 2 for the open ground is still high enough to make the establishment of other shrubs difficult.

  19. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Page McAdams, H.; Dobbins, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20° and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS planes must be

  20. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, Devon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Page McAdams, H. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Dobbins, James T. III [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Physics, and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20 Degree-Sign and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS

  1. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Devon J; McAdams, H Page; Dobbins, James T

    2013-02-01

    Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. For scan angles of 20° and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS planes must be averaged to sufficiently

  2. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Page McAdams, H.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20° and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS planes must be

  3. [Root resorption and orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbar, M; Bourzgui, F

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of root resorption during and at the end of orthodontic treatment and to assess its relationship with age, sex and treatment with or without extractions. Our study included 82 patients (51 women and 31 men) aged between 6 and 38 years, who received orthodontic treatment. Evaluation of root resorption was performed on panoramics at the beginning and at the end of orthodontic treatment. All the teeth were observed. The degree of root resorption was increased respectively by the standards in four ordinal levels (4). Data analysis was performed by Epi Info 6.0. Root resorption was present in all the teeth and maxillary incisors are the most affected. The correlation between age and root resorption was significant (p = 0.008). Women were more affected by resorption (P = 0.002). Patients treated with extraction showed more root resorption (p = 0.12). Our results suggest that orthodontic treatment is involved in the development of root resorption. The most often teeth resorbed are maxillary incisors. Age, sex and orthodontic extractions can be considered as risk factors for root resorption.

  4. Searching for Roots / Pierre Gervasoni

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gervasoni, Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Searching for Roots. Eduard Tubin: Symphonie no 11; Arvo Pärt: Nekrolog-Symphonie no 1; Erkki-Sven Tüür: Searching for Roots - Insula deserta - Zeitraum; Orchestre philharmonique royal de Stockholm, Paavo Järvi (direction)" Virgin Classics 5 45212 2 (distribue par EMI)

  5. The contribution of riparian vegetation to the stability of agricultural channels banks in the Lombardy plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelta, E.; Chiaradia, E. A.; Bischetti, G. B.

    2009-04-01

    limitations, we have modified the model to account for the distribution of root cohesion (cR) within the soil and the non-simultaneous root breaking: ‘N cR = k′k′′ (Trar)i i=1 where Tr is the tensile strength and ar is the Root Area Ratio (RAR) for roots belonging to diameter class i, N is the number of classes considered, k′ is the factor accounting for the decomposition of root tensile strength and k′′ is a factor accounting for the non-simultaneous breaking of roots. In the present work the modified W&W model has been adopted to estimate the root cohesion due to the riparian vegetation, and the bank stability, for six study sites belonging to two small agricultural channel of the Lombardy plane. The study sites consist of very steep banks (45-50˚ ) with the following riparian vegetation, typical of the considered landscape: Sambucus nigra, Acer campestre, Rubus spp., Populus Canadensis. Several samples of roots have been taken at each site, in order to carry out laboratory tensile strength tests and to develop the strength-diameter relationships, which are requested to estimate the tensile strength of the roots of the different size according to their species. Trenches have been excavated into the bank at each site in order to identify all the roots of different size present at each depth, and to estimate RAR distribution with depth. Estimated root cohesion values for each site have been then used into a bank stability model to evaluate the current Factor of Safety values, that have been compared with those resulting from banks without vegetation. Results show that in the selected cases, riparian vegetation is crucial in determining the stability of the banks. Neglecting the estimated values of cohesion, in fact, banks result extremely unstable, according to their soil properties and their steepness.

  6. Cytokinin signaling during root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishopp, Anthony; Help, Hanna; Helariutta, Ykä

    2009-01-01

    The cytokinin class of phytohormones regulates division and differentiation of plant cells. They are perceived and signaled by a phosphorelay mechanism similar to those observed in prokaryotes. Research into the components of phosphorelay had previously been marred by genetic redundancy. However, recent studies have addressed this with the creation of high-order mutants. In addition, several new elements regulating cytokinin signaling have been identified. This has uncovered many roles in diverse developmental and physiological processes. In this review, we look at these processes specifically in the context of root development. We focus on the formation and maintenance of the root apical meristem, primary and secondary vascular development, lateral root emergence and development, and root nodulation. We believe that the root is an ideal organ with which to investigate cytokinin signaling in a wider context.

  7. Fungi in neotropical epiphyte roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D; Benzing, D H

    1989-01-01

    Roots of thirty-eight Ecuadoran vascular epiphytes, representing eleven angiosperm families, were examined for the presence of symbiotic microorganisms. Most orchid roots contained fungal endophytes like those that regularly infect terrestrial counterparts. Hyphae were also common in and on nonorchid roots, but assignments of these relationships to known mycorrhizal morphologies was not possible in all cases. Evidence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) existed in a number of subjects while in Ericaceae and Campanulaceae a fungal association similar to the demateaceous surface fungi (DSF) described for alpine and prarie plants was usually present. Some associations were characterized by multicellular propagules on root surfaces. The significance of these findings and the factors likely to influence occurrence and consequences of root-fungus mutualisms in tropical forest canopies are discussed. Facts and considerations that could aid future inquiry on these systems are provided.

  8. Physical root-soil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Legué, Valérie; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice

    2017-12-01

    Plant root system development is highly modulated by the physical properties of the soil and especially by its mechanical resistance to penetration. The interplay between the mechanical stresses exerted by the soil and root growth is of particular interest for many communities, in agronomy and soil science as well as in biomechanics and plant morphogenesis. In contrast to aerial organs, roots apices must exert a growth pressure to penetrate strong soils and reorient their growth trajectory to cope with obstacles like stones or hardpans or to follow the tortuous paths of the soil porosity. In this review, we present the main macroscopic investigations of soil-root physical interactions in the field and combine them with simple mechanistic modeling derived from model experiments at the scale of the individual root apex.

  9. Investigation of reconstruction conditions in sagittal-plane multiplanar reconstruction of the temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Miyako; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Ichikawa, Ginichiro; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Ando, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, it has become possible to quickly obtain a large amount of 3D data with high continuity by helical CT scanning, in which the body is scanned continuously in a helical fashion. MPR (multiplanar reconstruction) can be performed using this data to generate images in arbitrary sectional planes, making it possible to obtain sagittal-plane images of the highest quality, which is useful for surgical planning. However, the procedures involved are rather complicated. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate conditions for standardization of sagittal-plane MPR examinations performed using Xvigor CT scanners and Xtension. The results showed that a slice interval of 1 mm, no imaging filter, a zooming factor of 1.5, a window level of 350, and a window width of 3500 are the optimal imaging conditions. The stapes can be visualized in 70% of cases with sagittal-plane MPR based on axial images, and can be recognized at surgery in 75% or more of cases. Images of consistent quality can be obtained by standardizing the conditions for sagittal-plane MPR, which should prove advantageous in the clinical setting. (author)

  10. Root damage induced by intraosseous anesthesia. An in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Christian; Fawzy-El-Sayed, Karim-Mohamed; Graetz, Nicole; Dörfer, Christof-Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The principle of the intraosseous anesthesia (IOA) relies on the perforation of the cortical plate of the bone for direct application of the local anesthetic solution into the underlying cancellous structures. During this procedure, IOA needles might accidentally come in contact with the tooth roots. The aim of the current in vitro study was to examine the consequences of this 'worst case scenario' comparing five commercially available IOA systems. Extracted human roots were randomly perforated using five different IOA systems with a drilling time ≤5s. To simulate normal in vivo conditions, the roots were kept humid during the drilling procedure. Data was statistically evaluated using F-test (SPSS16, SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA) and the significance level was set at p ≤ 0.05. All examined systems resulted in root perforation. Drill fractures occurred in either none 0% (Quicksleeper, Anesto, Intraflow, Stabident) or 100% (X-Tip) of the applications. Excessive heat generation, as evident by combustion odor as well as metal and tooth discoloration, appeared in 30% (Quicksleeper), 40% (Anesto), 60% (Intraflow), 90% (Stabident) and 100% (X-Tip) of all perforations. Within the limits of in-vitro studies, the results show a potential for irreversible root damage that might be inflicted by an improper use of IOA systems.

  11. Strategy to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch: aortic root enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dharmendra Kumar; Sanki, Prokash; Bhattacharya, Subhankar; Siddique, Javed Veqar

    2014-02-01

    The choice of a valve with an effective orifice area matching the body surface area and providing efficient hemodynamics is an important factor affecting mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. Our preventative strategy was to implant a larger prosthetic valve by aortic root enlargement using the Nunez procedure in 17 patients between February 2010 and January 2011. The decision to enlarge the aortic root was taken when the 19-mm sizer could not be negotiated easily through the aortic root, or on the basis of body surface area of the patient or type of prosthesis available. Postoperative reductions in peak and mean pressure gradients across aortic valve of 12.8-16.5 and 10.2-12.6 mm Hg, respectively, were observed. Postoperative effective orifice areas of the aortic valves were 1.1-1.5 cm(2). By upsizing the aortic valve, we were able to eliminate patient-prosthesis mismatch in 5 patients, and reduce severe patient-prosthesis mismatch to moderate in 11. Aortic root enlargement is a safe procedure. Therefore, cardiac surgeons should not be reluctant to enlarge the aortic root with an autologous pericardial patch to permit implantation of an adequate size of aortic valve prosthesis, with minimal additional aortic crossclamp time and no added cost.

  12. RootJS: Node.js Bindings for ROOT 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffart, Theo; Früh, Maximilian; Haas, Christoph; Rajgopal, Sachin; Schwabe, Jonas; Wolff, Christoph; Szuba, Marek

    2017-10-01

    We present rootJS, an interface making it possible to seamlessly integrate ROOT 6 into applications written for Node.js, the JavaScript runtime platform increasingly commonly used to create high-performance Web applications. ROOT features can be called both directly from Node.js code and by JIT-compiling C++ macros. All rootJS methods are invoked asynchronously and support callback functions, allowing non-blocking operation of Node.js applications using them. Last but not least, our bindings have been designed to platform-independent and should therefore work on all systems supporting both ROOT 6 and Node.js. Thanks to rootJS it is now possible to create ROOT-aware Web applications taking full advantage of the high performance and extensive capabilities of Node.js. Examples include platforms for the quality assurance of acquired, reconstructed or simulated data, book-keeping and e-log systems, and even Web browser-based data visualisation and analysis.

  13. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account for the fact that root systems are comprised of multiple types of roots. We assessed whether the relationship between CSD and Vd varies as a function of root type. Additionally, we sought to identify a more accurate and time-efficient method for estimating missing root volume than is currently available. We used a database that described the 3D root architecture of Pinus pinaster root systems (5, 12, or 19 years) from a stand in southwest France. We determined the relationship between CSD and Vd for 10,000 root segments from intact root branches. Models were specified that did and did not account for root type. The relationships were then applied to the diameters of 11,000 broken root ends to estimate the volume of missing roots. CSD was nearly linearly related to the square root of Vd, but the slope of the curve varied greatly as a function of root type. Sinkers and deep roots tapered rapidly, as they were limited by available soil depth. Distal shallow roots tapered gradually, as they were less limited spatially. We estimated that younger trees lost an average of 17% of root volume when excavated, while older trees lost 4%. Missing volumes were smallest in the central parts of root systems and largest in distal shallow roots. The slopes of the curves for each root type are synthetic parameters that account for differentiation due to genetics, soil properties, or mechanical stimuli. Accounting for this differentiation is critical to estimating root loss accurately.

  14. Simulation Exploration through Immersive Parallel Planes: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Bush, Brian W.; Gruchalla, Kenny; Smith, Steve

    2016-03-01

    We present a visualization-driven simulation system that tightly couples systems dynamics simulations with an immersive virtual environment to allow analysts to rapidly develop and test hypotheses in a high-dimensional parameter space. To accomplish this, we generalize the two-dimensional parallel-coordinates statistical graphic as an immersive 'parallel-planes' visualization for multivariate time series emitted by simulations running in parallel with the visualization. In contrast to traditional parallel coordinate's mapping the multivariate dimensions onto coordinate axes represented by a series of parallel lines, we map pairs of the multivariate dimensions onto a series of parallel rectangles. As in the case of parallel coordinates, each individual observation in the dataset is mapped to a polyline whose vertices coincide with its coordinate values. Regions of the rectangles can be 'brushed' to highlight and select observations of interest: a 'slider' control allows the user to filter the observations by their time coordinate. In an immersive virtual environment, users interact with the parallel planes using a joystick that can select regions on the planes, manipulate selection, and filter time. The brushing and selection actions are used to both explore existing data as well as to launch additional simulations corresponding to the visually selected portions of the input parameter space. As soon as the new simulations complete, their resulting observations are displayed in the virtual environment. This tight feedback loop between simulation and immersive analytics accelerates users' realization of insights about the simulation and its output.

  15. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  16. Simulation Exploration through Immersive Parallel Planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Steve [Los Alamos Visualization Associates

    2017-05-25

    We present a visualization-driven simulation system that tightly couples systems dynamics simulations with an immersive virtual environment to allow analysts to rapidly develop and test hypotheses in a high-dimensional parameter space. To accomplish this, we generalize the two-dimensional parallel-coordinates statistical graphic as an immersive 'parallel-planes' visualization for multivariate time series emitted by simulations running in parallel with the visualization. In contrast to traditional parallel coordinate's mapping the multivariate dimensions onto coordinate axes represented by a series of parallel lines, we map pairs of the multivariate dimensions onto a series of parallel rectangles. As in the case of parallel coordinates, each individual observation in the dataset is mapped to a polyline whose vertices coincide with its coordinate values. Regions of the rectangles can be 'brushed' to highlight and select observations of interest: a 'slider' control allows the user to filter the observations by their time coordinate. In an immersive virtual environment, users interact with the parallel planes using a joystick that can select regions on the planes, manipulate selection, and filter time. The brushing and selection actions are used to both explore existing data as well as to launch additional simulations corresponding to the visually selected portions of the input parameter space. As soon as the new simulations complete, their resulting observations are displayed in the virtual environment. This tight feedback loop between simulation and immersive analytics accelerates users' realization of insights about the simulation and its output.

  17. Modified dorsal root entry zone lesioning for intractable pain relief in patients with root avulsion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) lesioning has been the most effective surgical treatment for the relief of intractable pain due to root avulsion injury, but residual pain and a decrease in pain relief in the follow-up period have been reported in 23%-70% of patients. Based on pain topography in the most recent studies on neuropathic pain, the authors modified the conventional DREZ lesioning procedure to improve clinical outcomes. The presumed rationale for this procedure is to eliminate the spontaneous discharges of neurons in the superficial spinal dorsal horn as well as wide dynamic range neurons in the deep spinal dorsal horn. METHODS Ten patients with avulsion-related pain underwent surgery between 2011 and 2015. The surgical procedure was described and postoperative pain relief was assessed as follows: excellent (residual pain never exceeded 3 on the visual analog scale [VAS] without medication), good (residual pain never exceeded 5 on the VAS with medication), and poor (residual pain was greater than 5 with medication). Specific perioperative complications were assessed. RESULTS The aim of this surgical procedure was to destroy the deeper layers of the posterior horn of spinal gray matter, which was in contrast to the procedures of Nashold and Sindou, which were to destroy the superficial layers. All patients achieved excellent (n = 7, pain relief without medication) or good (n = 3, pain relief with medication) pain relief postoperatively, and the recurrence of pain was not reported in any patients (median 29 months after surgery, range 12-64 months). Nine patients (90%) achieved complete pain relief (a score of 0 or 1 on the VAS) with or without medication. No surgical site complications such as infection or CSF leakage were noted. No motor deficit was observed in any patient. A sensory deficit was observed in 2 patients and disappeared within 1 month in 1 patient. New pain at the adjacent level of DREZ lesioning was observed in 3 patients and

  18. ARC Code TI: X-Plane Communications Toolbox (XPC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The X-Plane Communications Toolbox (XPC) is an open source research tool used to interact with the commercial flight simulator software X-Plane. XPC allows users to...

  19. Dose distributions of pendulum fields in the field border plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, R.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations (program SIDOS-U2) and LiF measurements taken in a cylindric water phantom are used to investigate the isodose distributions of different pendulum irradiation methods (Co-60) in a plane which is parallel to the central ray plane and crosses the field borders at the depth of the axis. The dose values compared to the maximum values of the central ray plane are completely different for each pendulum method. In case of monoaxial pendulum methods around small angles, the maximum dose value found in the border plane is less than 50% of the dose in the central ray plane. The relative maximum of the border plane moves to tissues laying in a greater depth. In case of bi-axial methods, the maximum value of the border plane can be much more than 50% of the maximum dose measured in the central ray plane. (orig.) [de

  20. Vacuum Predisperser For A Large Plane-Grating Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleman, R.; Palmer, B. A.; Steinhaus, D. W.

    1980-11-01

    A plane grating predisperser has been constructed which acts as an "order-sorter" for a large plane-grating spectrograph. This combination can photograph relatively wide regions of spectra in a single exposure with no loss of resolution.

  1. Plane wave fast color flow mode imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolic, Ibrahim; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2006-01-01

    A new Plane wave fast color flow imaging method (PWM) has been investigated, and performance evaluation of the PWM based on experimental measurements has been made. The results show that it is possible to obtain a CFM image using only 8 echo-pulse emissions for beam to flow angles between 45...... degrees and 75 degrees. Compared to the conventional ultrasound imaging the frame rate is similar to 30 - 60 times higher. The bias, B-est of the velocity profile estimate, based on 8 pulse-echo emissions, is between 3.3% and 6.1% for beam to flow angles between 45 degrees and 75 degrees, and the standard...

  2. Synchrotron-radiation plane-wave topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riglet, P.; Sauvage, M.; Petroff, J.F.; Epelboin, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program based on the Takagi-Taupin differential equations for X-ray propagation in distorted crystals has been developed in order to simulate dislocation images in the Bragg case. The program is valid both for thin and thick crystals. Simulated images of misfit dislocations formed either in a thin epilayer or in a thick substrate are compared with experimental images obtained by synchrotron-radiation plane-wave topography. The influence of the various strain components on the image features is discussed. (author)

  3. PSB Chromaticity Correction in both Planes

    CERN Document Server

    Bartosik, Hannes; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    In view of the LHC injector upgrade program (LIU[1]), all LHC pre-accelerators and in particular the CERN Booster (PSB) are being reviewed for potential lattice optics and equipment optimizations. The option to correct the chromaticity in both planes would be very helpful for a better control of the beam in the presence of both non-linearities and space charge. Moreover, one could reduce decoherence phenomena that otherwise limit the usefulness of resonance measurement techniques based on a turn-by-turn BPM system.

  4. The effect of ovalbumin on orthodontic induced root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseinagha Aghili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This randomized trial was undertaken to investigate the effect of experimentally induced allergy on orthodontic induced root resorption. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 Wistar rats were divided randomly into test and control groups. Starting from the first 3 days, the rats in the test group were injected intra-peritoneally by 2 mg ovalbumin as allergen and 0.5 mg Alume as adjuvant. Afterward only allergen was injected once a week. The control group was injected by normal saline. After 21 days, Wistar immunoglobulin E was measured and peripheral matured eosinophil was counted. A total of 50 g nickel-titanium closed coil spring was ligated between right incisor and first molar. All animals were sacrificed after 14 days. The mesial root of the right and left first molar was dissected in a horizontal plane. The specimens were divided into four groups considering whether force and/or ovalbumin was applied or not. Root resorption was measured and compared among these groups. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA, and Bonferoni tests were used to analyze the data. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: In general, the differences were insignificant (P > 0.05. As the only exception, the group in which both ovalbumin and force were applied had significantly more root resorption than the group in which neither force nor ovalbumin was applied (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Allergy may increase the susceptibility to root resorption. Application of light force, periodical monitoring of root resorption and control of allergy are advisable.

  5. New plastic plane stress model for concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnicki, A.; Cichon, Cz.

    1993-01-01

    In the paper a description of concrete behaviour in the plane stress case is given on the basis of the modified bounding surface plasticity theory. Three independent plastic mechanisms have been introduced describing axiatoric and deviatoric plastic strains and their coupling. All the new analytical formulae for material functions being in agreement with experiments and loading/unloading criteria have been proposed. In addition, for the proper description of concrete behaviour in tension a new, separate function of bounding surface shrinkage has been introduced. (author)

  6. The Simbol-X Focal Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, P.

    2009-05-01

    The Simbol-X focal plane is designed to detect photons focused by the mirror in the 0.5 to 100 keV energy band. Composed of two detectors, it will measure the position, energy, and arrival time of each incoming X-ray. On top of it will be a collimator to shield all photons not coming from the mirror field of view. The whole system is surrounded by an active and passive shielding in order to ensure the required very low background.

  7. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  8. The memory effect for plane gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.-M.; Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2017-09-01

    We give an account of the gravitational memory effect in the presence of the exact plane wave solution of Einstein's vacuum equations. This allows an elementary but exact description of the soft gravitons and how their presence may be detected by observing the motion of freely falling particles. The theorem of Bondi and Pirani on caustics (for which we present a new proof) implies that the asymptotic relative velocity is constant but not zero, in contradiction with the permanent displacement claimed by Zel'dovich and Polnarev. A non-vanishing asymptotic relative velocity might be used to detect gravitational waves through the "velocity memory effect", considered by Braginsky, Thorne, Grishchuk, and Polnarev.

  9. Standard test method for linear-elastic plane-strain fracture toughness KIc of metallic materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of fracture toughness (KIc) of metallic materials under predominantly linear-elastic, plane-strain conditions using fatigue precracked specimens having a thickness of 1.6 mm (0.063 in.) or greater subjected to slowly, or in special (elective) cases rapidly, increasing crack-displacement force. Details of test apparatus, specimen configuration, and experimental procedure are given in the Annexes. Note 1—Plane-strain fracture toughness tests of thinner materials that are sufficiently brittle (see 7.1) can be made using other types of specimens (1). There is no standard test method for such thin materials. 1.2 This test method is divided into two parts. The first part gives general recommendations and requirements for KIc testing. The second part consists of Annexes that give specific information on displacement gage and loading fixture design, special requirements for individual specimen configurations, and detailed procedures for fatigue precracking. Additional a...

  10. Gravisensing in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, G.

    1999-01-01

    The mode of gravisensing in higher plants is not yet elucidated. Although, it is generally accepted that the amyloplasts (statoliths) in the root cap cells (statocytes) are responsible for susception of gravity. However, the hypothesis that the whole protoplast acts as gravisusceptor cannot be dismissed. The nature of the sensor that is able to transduce and amplify the mechanical energy into a biochemical factor is even more controversial. Several cell structures could potentially serve as gravireceptors: the endoplasmic reticulum, the actin network, the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton associated with this membrane. The nature of the gravisusceptors and gravisensors is discussed by taking into account the characteristics of the gravitropic reaction with respect to the presentation time, the threshold acceleration, the reciprocity rule, the deviation from the sine rule, the movement of the amyloplasts, the pre-inversion effect, the response of starch free and intermediate mutants and the effects of cytochalasin treatment. From this analysis, it can be concluded that both the amyloplasts and the protoplast could be the gravisusceptors, the former being more efficient than the latter since they can focus pressure on limited areas. The receptor should be located in the plasma membrane and could be a stretch-activated ion channel.

  11. Preventative valve-sparing aortic root replacement and pregnancy outcome in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopasa, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-06-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with prosthetic valve/tube graft. It provides excellent survival with low rates of aortic - valve related complications.

  12. In-plane and out-of-plane nonlinear dynamics of an axially moving beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the nonlinear forced dynamics of an axially moving beam is investigated numerically taking into account the in-plane and out-of-plane motions. The nonlinear partial differential equations governing the motion of the system are derived via Hamilton’s principle. The Galerkin scheme is then introduced to these partial differential equations yielding a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations with coupled terms. This set is transformed into a new set of first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of a change of variables. A direct time integration technique is conducted upon the new set of equations resulting in the bifurcation diagrams of Poincaré maps of the system. The dynamical characteristics of the system are investigated for different system parameters and presented through use of time histories, phase-plane portraits, Poincaré sections, and fast Fourier transforms

  13. Root cause of failure analysis and the system engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppock, M.S.; Hartwig, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    In an industry where ever-increasing emphasis is being placed on root cause of failure determination, it is imperative that a successful nuclear utility have an effective means of identifying failures and performing the necessary analyses. The current Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) good practice, OE-907, root-cause analysis, gives references to methodology that will help determine breakdowns in procedures, programs, or design but gives very little guidance on how or when to perform component root cause of failure analyses. The system engineers of nuclear utilities are considered the focal point for their respective systems and are required by most programs to investigate component failures. The problem that the system engineer faces in determining a component root cause of failures lies in acquisition of the necessary data to identify the need to perform the analysis and in having the techniques and equipment available to perform it. The system engineers at the Palo Verde nuclear generating station routinely perform detailed component root cause of failure analyses. The Palo Verde program provides the system engineers with the information necessary to identify when a component root cause of failure is required. Palo Verde also has the necessary equipment on-site to perform the analyses

  14. 16-dimensional smooth projective planes with large collineation groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bödi, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Erworben im Rahmen der Schweizer Nationallizenzen (http://www.nationallizenzen.ch) Smooth projective planes are projective planes defined on smooth manifolds (i.e. the set of points and the set of lines are smooth manifolds) such that the geometric operations of join and intersection are smooth. A systematic study of such planes and of their collineation groups can be found in previous works of the author. We prove in this paper that a 16-dimensional smooth projective plane which admits a ...

  15. Medico-legal aspects of vertical root fractures in root filled teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I; Tamse, A

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT).......To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT)....

  16. Plane wave diffraction by a finite plate with impedance boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Javaid, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in.

  17. Plane wave diffraction by a finite plate with impedance boundary conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rab Nawaz

    Full Text Available In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in.

  18. Determination of the critical plane and durability estimation for a multiaxial cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burago, N. G.; Nikitin, A. D.; Nikitin, I. S.; Yakushev, V. L.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical procedure is proposed to determine the critical plane orientation according to the Findley criterion for the multiaxial cyclic loading. The cases of in-phase and anti-phase cyclic loading are considered. Calculations of the stress state are carried out for the system of the gas turbine engine compressor disk and blades for flight loading cycles. The formulas obtained are used for estimations of the fatigue durability of this essential element of structure.

  19. Maximizing mandibular prosthesis stability utilizing linear occlusion, occlusal plane selection, and centric recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Richard A; Williamson, Anne E; Bowley, John; Toothaker, Randy

    2004-03-01

    The stability of mandibular complete dentures may be improved by reducing the transverse forces on the denture base through linear (noninterceptive) occlusion, selecting an occlusal plane that reduces horizontal vectors of force at occlusal contact, and utilizing a central bearing intraoral gothic arch tracing to record jaw relations. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with one technique for providing stable complete denture prostheses using the aforementioned materials, devices, and procedures.

  20. Effect of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces: A SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurparkash Singh Chahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A surface smear layer consisting of organic and inorganic material is formed on the root surface following mechanical instrumentation and may inhibit the formation of new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. Modification of the tooth surface by root conditioning has resulted in improved connective tissue attachment and has advanced the goal of reconstructive periodontal treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on the instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces in vitro using a scanning electron microscope. Settings and Design: A total of 45 dentin samples obtained from 15 extracted, scaled, and root planed teeth were divided into three groups. Materials and Methods: The root conditioning agents were applied with cotton pellets using the "Passive burnishing technique" for 5 minutes. The samples were then examined by the scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, version 15.0 for Windows. For all quantitative variables means and standard deviations were calculated and compared. For more than two groups ANOVA was applied. For multiple comparisons post hoc tests with Bonferroni correction was used. Results: Upon statistical analysis the root conditioning agents used in this study were found to be effective in removing the smear layer, uncovering and widening the dentin tubules and unmasking the dentin collagen matrix. Conclusion: Tetracycline HCl was found to be the best root conditioner among the three agents used.

  1. On Finite Hjelmslev Planes of Parameters (pk−1, p)

    OpenAIRE

    Atilla Akpinar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study on finite projective Hjelmslev planes M(Zq) coordinatized by Hjelmslev ring Zq (where prime power q = pk). We obtain finite hyperbolic Klingenberg planes from these planes under certain conditions. Also, we give a combinatorical result on M(Zq), related by deleting a line from lines in same neighbour.

  2. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  3. The Curious Out-of-Plane Conductivity of PEDOT : PSS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ruit, Kevin; Katsouras, Ilias; Bollen, Dirk; van Mol, Ton; Janssen, Rene A. J.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Kemerink, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    For its application as transparent conductor in light-emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, both the in-plane and out-of-plane conductivity of PEDOT:PSS are important. However, studies into the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS rarely address the out-of-plane conductivity and those that do, report widely

  4. Nearly Efficient Likelihood Ratio Tests of the Unit Root Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Michael; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    Seemingly absent from the arsenal of currently available "nearly efficient" testing procedures for the unit root hypothesis, i.e. tests whose local asymptotic power functions are indistinguishable from the Gaussian power envelope, is a test admitting a (quasi-)likelihood ratio interpretation. We...... show that the likelihood ratio unit root test derived in a Gaussian AR(1) model with standard normal innovations is nearly efficient in that model. Moreover, these desirable properties carry over to more complicated models allowing for serially correlated and/or non-Gaussian innovations....

  5. Fermi system with planes and charge reservoir: Anisotropic in-plane resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.A.; Quader, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    The authors explore the normal state in-plane resistivity of a model Fermi system with two planes and a charge reservoir. When the Fermi energy lies near the top of one of the resulting sub-bands, the system can be described by two types of quasiparticle excitations with different energy spectra and relaxation times. They show that for certain stoichiometry, ρ ab is linear in temperature with positive or negative intercepts. A relation between the slopes and intercepts of resistivities in the a and b directions in untwinned crystals is derived. The results are in good agreement with experimental data on YBCO. 7 refs., 1 tab

  6. The study of practices in planed diagnostic medical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Irina-Anca; Perju, Nicoleta Ana-Maria; Cobzeanu, Camelia

    2011-01-01

    The exposure of population to ionizing radiations in medical diagnostic purposes represents a planed exposure procedure, medically justified, having a direct impact on patient health state. A justification of exposure, with a result that can confirm a clinical diagnostic, implies further important steps in treatment decisions. Optimization in patients radiological protection is the result of observing the reference levels recommendations, which maintains a reasonable individual exposure to ionizing radiation in medical purpose. In this paper we investigated the justification of 4189 exposures of patients who underwent planed diagnostic medical investigation over 36 months in a radiological unit. The most frequent investigation concerned the spinal column in 38.3% of total exposures-mainly at lumbar level (63.0% and 24.1%, respectively of total number of exposures), followed by limb bones (20.6%) and thorax (26.9%). Justification of practices included: rheumatic pains in 45.8% of exposures followed by traumatic injuries (20.6%), pleural and pulmonary pathology (19.3%), malignant processes (12.3%), ear-nose-throat investigations (1.1%) and car accidents (0.9%). The females over 40 years old were the group with the highest number of medical exposures, with 54.5% of total practices. This study revealed that the number of medical exposures justification is almost equal with non-justified examinations, confirming a not so good correlation between clinical diagnostic and the required radiological investigation. The percentages of justified versus non-justified practices indicated by specialist physicians and general practitioners were slightly equal - 59.3% vs. 40.7%, 56.9% vs. 43.1%, respectively. The analysis of data concluded that either specialist/general physicians must evaluate more rigorously the patients and all clinical signs in order to reduce as reasonable as possible the non-justified medical exposures to ionizing radiations, and thus to avoid financial and

  7. Root anatomical phenes predict root penetration ability and biomechanical properties in maize (Zea Mays)

    OpenAIRE

    Chimungu, Joseph G.; Loades, Kenneth W.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of roots to penetrate hard soil is important for crop productivity but specific root phenes contributing to this ability are poorly understood. Root penetrability and biomechanical properties are likely to vary in the root system dependent on anatomical structure. No information is available to date on the influence of root anatomical phenes on root penetrability and biomechanics. Root penetration ability was evaluated using a wax layer system. Root tensile and bending strength we...

  8. Traces of chiral symmetry on light planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazdjian, Hagop.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of a description of the hadronic world by field theories defined on light planes and formulated in terms of three interacting quark field variables has been investigated. The framework of models where the chiral symmetry breaking is produced by the only mechanical masses of quarks has been considered. The hypothesis that the light plane charges generate in the real world approximate symmetries of one particle states has also been emitted. The projection of the algebraic structure of the observables in the space of physical states have yielded various relations in terms of the masses and couplings of the low lying mesons. They seem to be in agreement with experimental data, and suggest the consistency of the adopted model to describe symmetry breaking phenomena. The quark mechanical masses m(u) approximately 30MeV and m(s) approximately 200MeV have also been estimated. The smallness of these masses in respect to those of hadrons seems to indicate that they do not constitute the only mass scale of the hadronic world, but that there should exist another scale parameter, independent of the quark mechanical masses, and symmetric of SU(3) [fr

  9. The plane motion control of the quadrocopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kanatnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among a large number of modern flying vehicles, the quadrocopter relates to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV which are relatively cheap and easy to design. Quadrocopters are able to fly in bad weather, hang in the air for quite a long time, observe the objects and perform many other tasks. They have been applied in rescue operations, in agriculture, in the military and many other fields.For quadrocopters, the problems of path planning and control are relevant. These problems have many variants in which limited resources of modern UAV, possible obstacles, for instance, for flying in a cross-country terrain or in a city environment and weather conditions (particularly, wind conditions are taken into account. Many research studies are concerned with these problems and reflected in series of publications (note the interesting survey [1] and references therein. Various methods were used for the control synthesis for these vehicles: linear approximations [2], sliding mode control [3], the covering method [4] and so on.In the paper, a quadrocopter is considered as a rigid body. The kinematic and dynamic equations of the motion are analyzed. Two cases of motion are emphasized: a motion in a vertical plane and in a horizontal plane. The control is based on transferring of the affine system to the canonical form [5] and the nonlinear stabilization method [6].

  10. The Sentinel-4 UVN focal plane assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinger, Jürgen; Hohn, Rüdiger; Gebhardt, Eyk; Reichardt, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    The Sentinel-4 UVN Instrument is a dispersive imaging spectrometer covering the UV-VIS and the NIR wavelength. It is developed and built under an ESA contract by an industrial consortium led by Airbus Defence and Space. It will be accommodated on board of the MTG-S (Meteosat Third Generation - Sounder) satellite that will be placed in a geostationary orbit over Europe sampling data for generating two-dimensional maps of a number of atmospheric trace gases. The incoming light is dispersed by reflective gratings and detected by the two (UVVIS and NIR) CCDs mounted inside the focal plane assemblies. Both CCD detectors acquire spectral channels and spatial sampling in two orthogonal directions and will be operated at about 215 K mainly to minimize random telegraph signal effects and to reduce dark current. Stringent detector temperature as well as alignment stability requirements of less than +/-0.1 K per day respectively of less than 2 micrometers/2 arcseconds from ground to orbit are driving the FPA thermo-mechanical design. A specific FPA design feature is the redundant LED-calibration system for bad pixel detection as well as pixel gain and linearity monitoring. This paper reports on the design and qualification of the Focal Plane Assemblies with emphasis on thermo-mechanical as well as alignment stability verification.

  11. The Sentinel 4 focal plane subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Rüdiger; Skegg, Michael P.; Hermsen, Markus; Hinger, Jürgen; Williges, Christian; Reulke, Ralf

    2017-09-01

    The Sentinel 4 instrument is an imaging spectrometer, developed by Airbus under ESA contract in the frame of the joint European Union (EU)/ESA COPERNICUS program with the objective of monitoring trace gas concentrations. Sentinel 4 will provide accurate measurements of key atmospheric constituents such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, as well as aerosol and cloud properties. Sentinel 4 is unique in being the first geostationary UVN mission. The SENTINEL 4 space segment will be integrated on EUMETSAT's Meteosat Third Generation Sounder satellite (MTG-S). Sentinel 4 will provide coverage of Europe and adjacent regions. The Sentinel 4 instrument comprises as a major element two Focal Plane Subsystems (FPS) covering the wavelength ranges 305 nm to 500 nm (UVVIS) and 750 nm to 775 nm (NIR) respectively. The paper describes the Focal Plane Subsystems, comprising the detectors, the optical bench and the control electronics. Further the design and development approach will be presented as well as first measurement results of FPS Qualification Model.

  12. Mathematical Foundation for Plane Covering Using Hexagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gordon G.

    1999-01-01

    This work is to indicate the development and mathematical underpinnings of the algorithms previously developed for covering the plane and the addressing of the elements of the covering. The algorithms are of interest in that they provides a simple systematic way of increasing or decreasing resolution, in the sense that if we have the covering in place and there is an image superimposed upon the covering, then we may view the image in a rough form or in a very detailed form with minimal effort. Such ability allows for quick searches of crude forms to determine a class in which to make a detailed search. In addition, the addressing algorithms provide an efficient way to process large data sets that have related subsets. The algorithms produced were based in part upon the work of D. Lucas "A Multiplication in N Space" which suggested a set of three vectors, any two of which would serve as a bases for the plane and also that the hexagon is the natural geometric object to be used in a covering with a suggested bases. The second portion is a refinement of the eyeball vision system, the globular viewer.

  13. Plasma drift towards a plane equipotential surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1984-03-01

    Recently Alfven has qualitatively described how a collisionless plasma drifts in crossed electric and magnetic fields towards an infinite conducting plate of constant potential. In the present note we quantitatively study three models which are closely related to Alfven's model. It is found that when the plasma comes sufficiently close to a plane equipotential surface (conducting plate) it is deflected approximately along the surface. The deflection is not caused by pressure effects but rather by the electric and magnetic fields. Small fluxes of ions and electrons also cross the plane equipotential surface. These fluxes account for an electric current in the plasma which induces a magnetic field in the same direction as the total magnetic field assumed to be homogeneous. It is shown that if the Alfven number, M(sub)A, is much smaller than unity in the volume considered the magnetic field induced by plasma currents is small compared to the total magnetic field. However, if M(sub)A is of the order of unity or larger the total magnetic field is to a substantial degree generated by plasma currents. (Author)

  14. A Single-Element Plane Grating Monochromator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Hettrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concerted rotations of a self-focused varied line-space diffraction grating about its groove axis and surface normal define a new geometric class of monochromator. Defocusing is canceled, while the scanned wavelength is reinforced at fixed conjugate distances and horizontal deviation angle. This enables high spectral resolution over a wide band, and is of particular advantage at grazing reflection angles. A new, rigorous light-path formulation employs non-paraxial reference points to isolate the lateral ray aberrations, with those of power-sum ≤ 3 explicitly expanded for a plane grating. Each of these 14 Fermat equations agrees precisely with the value extracted from numerical raytrace simulations. An example soft X-ray design (6° deviation angle and 2 × 4 mrad aperture attains a resolving power > 25 , 000 over a three octave scan range. The proposed rotation scheme is not limited to plane surfaces or monochromators, providing a new degree of freedom in optical design.

  15. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  16. Technical Quality of Root Canal Treatment Performed by Undergraduate Clinical Students of Isfahan Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Masoud; Mohammadi, Golshan; Vali Sichani, Armita; Moshkforoush, Saba

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiographic quality of RCTs performed by undergraduate clinical students of Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. In this cross sectional study, records and periapical radiographs of 1200 root filled teeth were randomly selected from the records of patients who had received RCTs in Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from 2013 to 2015. After excluding 416 records, the final sample consisted of 784 root-treated teeth (1674 root canals). Two variables including the length and the density of the root fillings were examined. Moreover, the presence of ledge, foramen perforation, root perforation and fractured instruments were also evaluated as procedural errors. Descriptive statistics were used for expressing the frequencies of criteria and chi square test was used for comparing tooth types, tooth locations and academic level of students ( P students was not satisfactory and incidence of procedural errors was considerable.

  17. Effect of piezocision on root resorption associated with orthodontic force: A microcomputed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Braydon M; Dalci, Oyku; Papadopoulou, Alexandra K; Madukuri, Suman; Mahon, Jonathan; Petocz, Peter; Spahr, Axel; Darendeliler, M Ali

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of piezocision on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption. Fourteen patients were included in this split-mouth study; 1 side was assigned to piezocision, and the other side served as the control. Vertical corticotomy cuts of 4 to 5 mm in length were performed on either side of each piezocision premolar, and 150-g buccal tipping forces were applied to the premolars. After 4 weeks, the maxillary first premolars were extracted and scanned with microcomputed tomography. There was a significantly greater total amount of root resorption seen on the piezocision sides when compared with the control sides (P = 0.029). The piezocision procedure resulted in a 44% average increase in root resorption. In 5 patients, there was noticeable piezocision-related iatrogenic root damage. When that was combined with the orthodontic root resorption found on the piezocision-treated teeth, there was a statistically significant 110% average increase in volumetric root loss when compared with the control side (P = 0.005). The piezocision procedure that initiates the regional acceleratory phenomenon may increase the iatrogenic root resorption when used in conjunction with orthodontic forces. Piezocision applied close to the roots may cause iatrogenic damage to the neighboring roots and should be used carefully. Copyright © 2017.

  18. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Inge; Schotte, Sébastien; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Wound-induced adventitious root (AR) formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR) and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LRs). In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid, and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in A. thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are distinct from LR

  19. Hypocotyl adventitious root organogenesis differs from lateral root development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge eVerstraeten

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound-induced adventitious root (AR formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LR. In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are

  20. Efficient Closed Form Cut-Off Planes and Propagation Planes Characteristics for Dielectric Slab Loaded Boundary Value Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar, Junaid

    2012-01-01

    The geometrical relationship between the cut-off and propagating planes of any waveguide system is a prerequisite for any design process. The characterization of cut-off planes and optimisation are challenging for numerical methods, closed-form solutions are always preferred. In this paper Maxwells coupled field equations are used to characterise twin E-plane and H-plane slab loaded boundary value problems. The single mode bandwidths and dispersion characteristics of these structures are pres...

  1. Software-defined networking control plane for seamless integration of multiple silicon photonic switches in Datacom networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yiwen; Hattink, Maarten H N; Samadi, Payman; Cheng, Qixiang; Hu, Ziyiz; Gazman, Alexander; Bergman, Keren

    2018-04-16

    Silicon photonics based switches offer an effective option for the delivery of dynamic bandwidth for future large-scale Datacom systems while maintaining scalable energy efficiency. The integration of a silicon photonics-based optical switching fabric within electronic Datacom architectures requires novel network topologies and arbitration strategies to effectively manage the active elements in the network. We present a scalable software-defined networking control plane to integrate silicon photonic based switches with conventional Ethernet or InfiniBand networks. Our software-defined control plane manages both electronic packet switches and multiple silicon photonic switches for simultaneous packet and circuit switching. We built an experimental Dragonfly network testbed with 16 electronic packet switches and 2 silicon photonic switches to evaluate our control plane. Observed latencies occupied by each step of the switching procedure demonstrate a total of 344 µs control plane latency for data-center and high performance computing platforms.

  2. IAA transport in corn roots includes the root cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenstein, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    In earlier reports we concluded that auxin is the growth regulator that controls gravicurvature in roots and that the redistribution of auxin occurs within the root cap. Since other reports did not detect auxin in the root cap, we attempted to confirm the IAA does move through the cap. Agar blocks containing 3 H-IAA were applied to the cut surface of 5 mm long apical segments of primary roots of corn (mo17xB73). After 30 to 120 min radioactivity (RA) of the cap and root tissue was determined. While segments suspended in water-saturated air accumulated very little RA in the cap, application of 0.5 μ1 of dist. water to the cap (=controls) increased RA of the cap dramatically. Application to the cap of 0.5 μ1 of sorbitol or the Ca 2+ chelator EGTA reduced cap RA to 46% and 70% respectively compared to water, without affecting uptake. Control root segments gravireacted faster than non-treated or osmoticum or EGTA treated segments. The data indicate that both the degree of hydration and calcium control the amount of auxin moving through the cap

  3. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. On the necessity of connection between plane and curve space metrics in gravity theory on a plane background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The necessity of covariant connection of plane space metrics in the gravity theory ''on a plane background'' is underlined. It is shown that this connection in the relativistic gravity theory results in its difference from the general relativity theory ''on a plane background''

  5. (Allium cepa) root tip mitosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    their chemical composition and genotoxic effects on cell reproduction. Two petrochemicals, air ... the chromosomes of the individual cells of the root tip could be a pointer to their ..... Chromosome technique: Theory and. Practice. Butterworths ...

  6. aqueous root extract on spermatogenesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four groups were gavaged with the whole plant or root aqueous extract in low or high doses. The male ... motility and morphology as well as chromatin integrity were evaluated. Results: Serum ... Treatment of disease began long ago with the.

  7. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and climate....

  8. ISLSCP II Ecosystem Rooting Depths

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to predict the global distribution of plant rooting depths based on data about global aboveground vegetation structure and...

  9. The in-focus variable line spacing plane grating monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reininger, R.

    2011-01-01

    The in-focus variable line spacing plane grating monochromator is based on only two plane optical elements, a variable line spacing plane grating and a plane pre-mirror that illuminates the grating at the angle of incidence that will focus the required photon energy. A high throughput beamline requires only a third optical element after the exit slit, an aberration corrected elliptical toroid. Since plane elements can be manufactured with the smallest figure errors, this monochromator design can achieve very high resolving power. Furthermore, this optical design can correct the deformations induced by the heat load on the optics along the dispersion plane. This should allow obtaining a resolution of 10 meV at 1 keV with currently achievable figure errors on plane optics. The position of the photon source when an insertion device center is not located at the center of the straight section, a common occurrence in new insertion device beamlines, is investigated.

  10. Guide-Plane Retention in Designing Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothopi-Peri, Matshediso; Owen, C Peter

    To compare the influence of abutment teeth guide planes and guiding surfaces on retention of a removable partial denture (RPD). Extracted teeth embedded into a maxillary cast in the first premolar and second molar positions simulated two bounded saddles. Acrylic resin RPDs were made with no guide planes, then with guide planes, then with guiding surfaces added to directly contact the guide planes. The maximum loads on removal from the cast were recorded. There was a significant increase in retention force of 1.6 times when only guide planes were present and of 10.2 times when guiding surfaces intimately contacted the guide planes. The retention of acrylic resin RPDs can be substantially increased by making their guiding surfaces intimately contact the guide planes of the teeth.

  11. The graphics editor in ROOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antcheva, Ilka; Brun, Rene; Hof, Carsten; Rademakers, Fons

    2006-01-01

    A well-designed Graphical User Interface (GUI) has critical importance in any computer application. The user interface is where the end users and the complex system intersect. An effective interface design can make a powerful and complex system, such as ROOT, easy and intuitive to learn and operate. This paper describes the main goals we defined and the design solution we found developing the graphics editor in ROOT

  12. Plane grating monochromators for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The general background and theoretical basis of plane grating monochromators (PGM's) is reviewed and the particular case of grazing incidence PGM's suitable for use with synchrotron radiation is considered in detail. The theory of reflection filtering is described and the problem of the finite source distance is shown to be of special importance with high brightness storage rings. The design philosophy of previous instruments is discussed and a new scheme proposed, aimed at dealing with the problem of the finite source distance. This scheme, involving a parabolic collimating mirror fabricated by diamond turning, is considered in the context of Wolter-type telescopes and microscopes. Some practical details concerning an instrument presently under construction using the new design are presented

  13. Drawing Contour Trees in the Plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, C; Schneider, D; Carr, Hamish; Scheuermann, G

    2011-11-01

    The contour tree compactly describes scalar field topology. From the viewpoint of graph drawing, it is a tree with attributes at vertices and optionally on edges. Standard tree drawing algorithms emphasize structural properties of the tree and neglect the attributes. Applying known techniques to convey this information proves hard and sometimes even impossible. We present several adaptions of popular graph drawing approaches to the problem of contour tree drawing and evaluate them. We identify five esthetic criteria for drawing contour trees and present a novel algorithm for drawing contour trees in the plane that satisfies four of these criteria. Our implementation is fast and effective for contour tree sizes usually used in interactive systems (around 100 branches) and also produces readable pictures for larger trees, as is shown for an 800 branch example.

  14. Landau levels on the hyperbolic plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhri, H; Shariati, M

    2004-01-01

    The quantum states of a spinless charged particle on a hyperbolic plane in the presence of a uniform magnetic field with a generalized quantization condition are proved to be the bases of the irreducible Hilbert representation spaces of the Lie algebra u(1, 1). The dynamical symmetry group U(1, 1) with the explicit form of the Lie algebra generators is extracted. It is also shown that the energy has an infinite-fold degeneracy in each of the representation spaces which are allocated to the different values of the magnetic field strength. Based on the simultaneous shift of two parameters, it is also noted that the quantum states realize the representations of Lie algebra u(2) by shifting the magnetic field strength. (letter to the editor)

  15. Landau levels on the hyperbolic plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, H [Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran 19395-5531 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariati, M [Department of Physics, Khajeh Nassir-Al-Deen Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 15418 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2004-11-05

    The quantum states of a spinless charged particle on a hyperbolic plane in the presence of a uniform magnetic field with a generalized quantization condition are proved to be the bases of the irreducible Hilbert representation spaces of the Lie algebra u(1, 1). The dynamical symmetry group U(1, 1) with the explicit form of the Lie algebra generators is extracted. It is also shown that the energy has an infinite-fold degeneracy in each of the representation spaces which are allocated to the different values of the magnetic field strength. Based on the simultaneous shift of two parameters, it is also noted that the quantum states realize the representations of Lie algebra u(2) by shifting the magnetic field strength. (letter to the editor)

  16. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  17. Plane shock wave studies of geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.D.; Larson, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    Plane shock wave experiments have been conducted on eight geologic materials in an effort to determine the importance of time-dependent mechanical behavior. Of the eight rocks studied, only Westerly granite and nugget sandstone appear to show time independence. In the slightly porous materials (1-5 percent), Blair dolomite and sodium chloride, and in the highly porous (15 to 40 percent) rock, Mt. Helen tuff and Indiana limestone, time-dependent behavior is associated with the time required to close the available porosity. In water-saturated rocks the time dependence arises because the water that is present shows no indication of transformation to the higher pressure ice phases, thus suggesting the possibility that a metastable form of water exists under dynamic conditions

  18. A ''quadratized'' augmented plane wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrcka, L.

    1982-02-01

    The exact radial solution inside the muffin-tin sphere is replaced by its Taylor expansion with respect to the energy, truncated after the quadratic term. Making use of it the energy independent augmented plane waves are formed which lead to the secular equations linear in energy. The method resembles the currently used linearized APW method but yields higher accuracy. The analysis of solution inside one muffin-tin sphere shows that the eigenvalue error is proportional to (E-E 0 ) 6 as compared with (E-E 0 ) 4 for LAPW. The error of eigenfunctions is (E-E 0 ) 3 ((E-E 0 ) 2 for LAPW). These conclusions are confirmed by direct numerical calculation of band structure of Cu and Al. (author)

  19. Root hair mutants of barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engvild, K.C.; Rasmussen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Barley mutants without root hairs or with short or reduced root hairs were isolated among M 2 seeds of 'Lux' barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) after acidified sodium azide mutagenesis. Root hair mutants are investigated intensively in Arabidopsis where about 40 genes are known. A few root hair mutants are known in maize, rice, barley and tomato. Many plants without root hairs grow quite well with good plant nutrition, and mutants have been used for investigations of uptake of strongly bound nutrients like phosphorus, iron, zinc and silicon. Seed of 'Lux' barley (Sejet Plant Breeding, Denmark) were soaked overnight, and then treated with 1.5-millimolarsodium azide in 0.1 molar sodium phosphate buffer, pH 3, for 2.5 hours according to the IAEA Manual on Mutation Breeding (2nd Ed.). After rinsing in tap water and air-drying, the M 2 seeds were sown in the field the same day. Spikes, 4-6 per M 1 plant, were harvested. The mutation frequency was similar to that obtained with other barley cultivars from which low-phytate mutants were isolated [5]. Seeds were germinated on black filter paper in tap water for 3 or 4 days before scoring for root hair mutants

  20. NUMERICAL DERIVATIONS OF A MACROSCOPIC MODEL FOR REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLS CONSIDERING IN-PLANE AND OUT-OF-PLANE BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    LATCHAROTE; Panon KAI, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    A macroscopic model, macro plate model, was proposed to represent a wall member of RC walls. Both in-plane and out-of-plane behavior were considered for numerical derivations of macro plate model. For out-of-plane behavior, bending deformation was incorporated with shear deformation to consider out-of-plane deformation as same as in-plane behavior. The hysteretic behavior of macro plate model can be directly expressed by stress-strain relationships in any conventional hysteretic rules, which ...

  1. Aortic root surgery in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheick-Yousif, Basheer; Sheinfield, Ami; Tager, Salis; Ghosh, Probal; Priesman, Sergey; Smolinsky, Aram K; Raanani, Ehud

    2008-03-01

    As the shortcomings of the Bentall operation and its variants in the Marfan syndrome have become apparent, the recent cusp-sparing techniques (remodeling or reimplantation) bear promise of better mid-term and long-term outcomes. To examine the results of aortic root surgery in patients with Marfan syndrome. During the period March 1994 to September 2007, 220 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery; 20 were Marfan patients (group 1) who were compared with another 20 Marfan patients undergoing composite aortic root replacement (group 2). Fourteen patients had aortic dissection and 26 had thoracic aortic aneurysm. There were 31 males and 9 females with a mean age of 37.9 +/- 13.8 years. In group 1, reimplantation was used in 13 patients, remodeling in 4, and aortic valve repair with sinotubular junction replacement in 3. In group 2, a mechanical valve conduit was used. Mean logistic Euroscore was 12.27 +/- 14.6% for the whole group, five of whom were emergent cases Group 2 had more previous cardiac procedures compared to group 1 (9 vs. 2, P = 0.03) and shorter cross-clamp time (122 +/- 27.1 vs. 153.9 +/- 23.7 minutes, P = 0.0004). Overall mortality was 10%. Early mortality was 10% in group 2 and 5% in group 1 (NS). Mean follow-up time was 25 months for group 2 and 53 months for group 1. Three patients were reoperated; all had undergone the remodeling. Five year freedom from reoperation and death was 86% and 90% in group 2 and 70% and 95% in group 1 (P = 0.6, P = 0.6), respectively. Late survival of patients with Marfan syndrome was similar in both groups. Root reconstruction tends towards a higher incidence of late reoperations if the remodeling technique is used. We now prefer to use the reimplantation technique.

  2. Root Conditioning and Agents Effect in Regeneration of Periodontal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadkhoda Z

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis affected root surfaces are hypermineralized and contaminated with cytotoxic and"nother biologically active substances."nThe instrumented surface will inervitably be coverd by a smear layer following root planing with or without flap."nSmear layer is resistant to saline rinsing, but may be removed with agents such as acids (e.g.citric acid, tetracyclines, EDTA, and laser."nLow pH aqueous solutions such as citric acid have been used in surgical periodontal therapy mainly for two reasons, It dissolves smear layer after a relatively short exposure time and it has been claimed to selectively remove root surface associated mineral exposing collagen to varying degrees. A root surface coated with collagen appears to be a preferred surface for fibroblast attachment, a cellular event fundamental to successful periodontal wound healing."nSeveral studies indicate the potential of tetracycline (TTE-HCL in periodontal regeneration. Its acidic pH suggest that it can be used as a demineralization agent and removing the smear layer and exposing collagen matrix of the dentin."nChalating agent (EDTA working at neutral pH appears preferable with respect to preserving the integrity of exposed collagen fibers, early colonization, and wound healing. In addition, etching at neutral pH has been reported preserve adjacent tissue- vitality, while etching at low pH necrotizes the fiap and adjacent periodontium."nClinical and subclinical studies have demonstrated laser waves can remove calculus and bacterial plaque and pocket epithelium and strile the root surface and can expose the dentin collagen and dentinal tublules, and leads to pronounce reducing of probing depth around teeth diseased with periodontitis.

  3. Reoperative aortic root replacement: Outcome in a contemporary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Thourani, Vinod H; Chen, Edward P

    2017-09-01

    Reoperative aortic root replacement is a challenging procedure associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the outcomes of reoperative aortic root replacement when performed in a number of complex clinical settings and to identify risk factors for operative mortality and long-term survival. From 2006 to 2015, 280 consecutive patients at an academic center underwent reoperative aortic root replacement after a variety of previous aortic or cardiac operations. Logistic regression and extended Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to determine risk factors for operative mortality and long-term survival, respectively. The mean age of patients was 52.5 ± 14.1 years. Prior operations included proximal aortic replacement in 113 patients, valve surgery in 162 patients, and coronary artery bypass grafting in 46 patients. Concomitant procedures included arch replacement in 135 patients, coronary artery bypass grafting in 68 patients, and mitral valve repair/replacement in 18 patients. Operative mortality was 14.3%. Five-year survival was 74.0%. Univariable analysis did not find previous root replacement, prior proximal aortic surgery, and concomitant arch replacement to be risk factors for operative mortality. In the multivariable analysis, chronic lung disease, prior myocardial infarction, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for operative mortality. Age, peripheral artery disease, emergency, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for mortality in the late phase. Reoperative aortic root replacement represents complex procedures carrying significant morbidity and mortality. Chronic lung disease, prior myocardial infarction, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for operative mortality. Age, peripheral artery disease, emergency, and concomitant mitral valve surgery were risk factors for long-term mortality. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for

  4. A New Anatomically Based Nomenclature for the Roots and Root Canals—Part 1: Maxillary Molars

    OpenAIRE

    Kottoor, Jojo; Albuquerque, Denzil Valerian; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequen...

  5. Root canal preparation in endodontics: conventional versus laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodis, Harold E.; White, Joel M.; Marshall, Sally J.; Marshall, Grayson W.; Moskowitz, Emrey

    1992-06-01

    Conventional cleaning and shaping of root canal systems employs hand and/or rotary instrumentation to remove the contents of the canal and shape the canal to receive a filling material. With the advent of the Nd:YAG laser system another method of accomplishing proper cleaning and shaping is evaluated. Single rooted teeth were radiographed bucco- lingually and mesio-distally and were divided into 2 groups. The first group was accessed and the root canal systems cleaned and shaped with a step back technique utilizing hand files and gates glidden burs. At completion of the procedure the teeth were again radiographed at the same positions as those prior to the procedure. The teeth were split longitudinally and examined under scanning electron microscopy to assess cleaning. The second group of teeth were accessed, and cleaning and shaping was accomplished using the Nd:YAG laser in combination with hand files and rotary instruments. These teeth were subjected to the same analysis as those in the first group. The before and after radiographs of each group were subjected to image analysis to determine effectiveness of the two methods in shaping the canal systems. We will discuss the ability of Nd:YAG to clean and shape root canal spaces and remove smear layer and organic tissue remnants from those areas.

  6. Descendant root volume varies as a function of root type: estimation of root biomass lost during uprooting in Pinus pinaster

    OpenAIRE

    Danjon, Frédéric; Caplan, Joshua S.; Fortin, Mathieu; Meredieu, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Root systems of woody plants generally display a strong relationship between the cross-sectional area or cross-sectional diameter (CSD) of a root and the dry weight of biomass (DWd) or root volume (Vd) that has grown (i.e., is descendent) from a point. Specification of this relationship allows one to quantify root architectural patterns and estimate the amount of material lost when root systems are extracted from the soil. However, specifications of this relationship generally do not account ...

  7. The anatomical relationship between the roots of mandibular second molars and the inferior alveolar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, B S; Quinn, A; Pawar, R R; Makdissi, J; Sidhu, S K

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the anatomical relationship between the roots of mandibular second molars and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) in relation to the risk of potential nerve injury during root canal treatment. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from the patient record database at a dental hospital were selected. The anonymized CBCT images were reconstructed and examined in three planes (coronal, axial and sagittal) using 3D viewing software. The relationship between each root apex of mandibular second molars and the IAN was evaluated by measuring the horizontal and vertical distances from coronal CBCT sections, and the actual distance was then calculated mathematically using Pythagoras' theorem. In 55% of the 272 mandibular second molar roots evaluated, from a total of 134 scans, the distance between the anatomical root apex and the IAN was ≤3 mm. In over 50% of the cases evaluated, there was an intimate relationship between the roots of mandibular second molars and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). Therefore, root canal treatment of mandibular second molars may pose a more significant potential risk of IAN injury; necessary precautions should be exercised, and the prudent use of CBCT should be considered if an intimate relationship is suspected. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Growth of plant root cultures in liquid- and gas-dispersed reactor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, S A; Gehrig, J A; Hollar, K A; Curtis, W R

    1993-01-01

    The growth of Agrobacterium transformed "hairy root" cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus was examined in various liquid- and gas-dispersed bioreactor configurations. Reactor runs were replicated to provide statistical comparisons of nutrient availability on culture performance. Accumulated tissue mass in submerged air-sparged reactors was 31% of gyratory shake-flask controls. Experiments demonstrate that poor performance of sparged reactors is not due to bubble shear damage, carbon dioxide stripping, settling, or flotation of roots. Impaired oxygen transfer due to channeling and stagnation of the liquid phase are the apparent causes of poor growth. Roots grown on a medium-perfused inclined plane grew at 48% of gyratory controls. This demonstrates the ability of cultures to partially compensate for poor liquid distribution through vascular transport of nutrients. A reactor configuration in which the medium is sprayed over the roots and permitted to drain down through the root tissue was able to provide growth rates which are statistically indistinguishable (95% T-test) from gyratory shake-flask controls. In this type of spray/trickle-bed configuration, it is shown that distribution of the roots becomes a key factor in controlling the rate of growth. Implications of these results regarding design and scale-up of bioreactors to produce fine chemicals from root cultures are discussed.

  9. Root locus analysis and design of the adaptation process in active noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H

    2012-10-01

    This paper applies root locus theory to develop a graphical tool for the analysis and design of adaptive active noise control systems. It is shown that the poles of the adaptation process performed in these systems move on typical trajectories in the z-plane as the adaptation step-size varies. Based on this finding, the dominant root of the adaptation process and its trajectory can be determined. The first contribution of this paper is formulating parameters of the adaptation process root locus. The next contribution is introducing a mechanism for modifying the trajectory of the dominant root in the root locus. This mechanism creates a single open loop zero in the original root locus. It is shown that appropriate localization of this zero can cause the dominant root of the locus to be pushed toward the origin, and thereby the adaptation process becomes faster. The validity of the theoretical findings is confirmed in an experimental setup which is implemented using real-time multi-threading and multi-core processing techniques.

  10. Live cell imaging of Arabidopsis root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular extensions from the root surface that expand by tip growth. This highly focused type of cell expansion, combined with position of root hairs on the surface of the root, makes them ideal cells for microscopic observation. This chapter describes the method that is routinely used

  11. Overgroups of root groups in classical groups

    CERN Document Server

    Aschbacher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The author extends results of McLaughlin and Kantor on overgroups of long root subgroups and long root elements in finite classical groups. In particular he determines the maximal subgroups of this form. He also determines the maximal overgroups of short root subgroups in finite classical groups and the maximal overgroups in finite orthogonal groups of c-root subgroups.

  12. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  13. Strategies of Coping With Stress During Root Canal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare Jahromi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Endodontic treatment is one of the stress producing situations. Objectives The purpose of this article was to determine the most stressful stage of root canal therapy among endodontists, endodontic residents, and undergraduate dental students and offering some strategies for reducing stress during this treatment. Patients and Methods This descriptive survey comprised three groups. Thirty-six endodontists, 41 endodontic residents, and 47 undergraduate dental students selected by convenience sampling. Participants were asked about age, sex, the most stressful stage of root canal therapy and stress reducing strategies during the procedure. Results The most stressful stage of root canal therapy was endodontic treatment for children in male endodontists and residents, preparing access cavity on crowns in female endodontists, obturation of apically root Resorped canals in female residents, obturation in female students, and preparing access cavity on molar teeth in male students. The most suggested strategy for reducing stress during root canal therapy was related to experience, knowledge, enough study, and technical mastery. Conclusions It is required to consider the strategies during student education in dental schools for both under and post-graduation dental students and better to follow them in workshops for other dentists and even endodontists.

  14. Estimating the Value of the Inclination Angle of the Lunar Plane to the Ecliptic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isildak, R. Suat; Isik, Hakan; Küçüközer, H. Asuman

    2018-01-01

    Sky appears to our students as a vast volume surrounding the Earth. The most striking astronomical events that they can witness in the sky are lunar phases and eclipses. However, eclipses do not occur as often as full and new phases of the Moon. This difference is due to the fact that the orbital planes of the Moon and the Earth do not overlap.…

  15. Lateral root development in the maize (Zea mays) lateral rootless1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husakova, Eva; Hochholdinger, Frank; Soukup, Ales

    2013-07-01

    The maize lrt1 (lateral rootless1) mutant is impaired in its development of lateral roots during early post-embryonic development. The aim of this study was to characterize, in detail, the influences that the mutation exerts on lateral root initiation and the subsequent developments, as well as to describe the behaviour of the entire plant under variable environmental conditions. Mutant lrt1 plants were cultivated under different conditions of hydroponics, and in between sheets of moist paper. Cleared whole mounts and anatomical sections were used in combination with both selected staining procedures and histochemical tests to follow root development. Root surface permeability tests and the biochemical quantification of lignin were performed to complement the structural data. The data presented suggest a redefinition of lrt1 function in lateral roots as a promoter of later development; however, neither the complete absence of lateral roots nor the frequency of their initiation is linked to lrt1 function. The developmental effects of lrt1 are under strong environmental influences. Mutant primordia are affected in structure, growth and emergence; and the majority of primordia terminate their growth during this last step, or shortly thereafter. The lateral roots are impaired in the maintenance of the root apical meristem. The primary root shows disturbances in the organization of both epidermal and subepidermal layers. The lrt1-related cell-wall modifications include: lignification in peripheral layers, the deposition of polyphenolic substances and a higher activity of peroxidase. The present study provides novel insights into the function of the lrt1 gene in root system development. The lrt1 gene participates in the spatial distribution of initiation, but not in its frequency. Later, the development of lateral roots is strongly affected. The effect of the lrt1 mutation is not as obvious in the primary root, with no influences observed on the root apical meristem

  16. Lateral root development in the maize (Zea mays) lateral rootless1 mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husakova, Eva; Hochholdinger, Frank; Soukup, Ales

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The maize lrt1 (lateral rootless1) mutant is impaired in its development of lateral roots during early post-embryonic development. The aim of this study was to characterize, in detail, the influences that the mutation exerts on lateral root initiation and the subsequent developments, as well as to describe the behaviour of the entire plant under variable environmental conditions. Methods Mutant lrt1 plants were cultivated under different conditions of hydroponics, and in between sheets of moist paper. Cleared whole mounts and anatomical sections were used in combination with both selected staining procedures and histochemical tests to follow root development. Root surface permeability tests and the biochemical quantification of lignin were performed to complement the structural data. Key Results The data presented suggest a redefinition of lrt1 function in lateral roots as a promoter of later development; however, neither the complete absence of lateral roots nor the frequency of their initiation is linked to lrt1 function. The developmental effects of lrt1 are under strong environmental influences. Mutant primordia are affected in structure, growth and emergence; and the majority of primordia terminate their growth during this last step, or shortly thereafter. The lateral roots are impaired in the maintenance of the root apical meristem. The primary root shows disturbances in the organization of both epidermal and subepidermal layers. The lrt1-related cell-wall modifications include: lignification in peripheral layers, the deposition of polyphenolic substances and a higher activity of peroxidase. Conclusions The present study provides novel insights into the function of the lrt1 gene in root system development. The lrt1 gene participates in the spatial distribution of initiation, but not in its frequency. Later, the development of lateral roots is strongly affected. The effect of the lrt1 mutation is not as obvious in the primary root, with no

  17. In-plane and out-of-plane bending tests on carbon steel pipe bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouard, D.; Tremblais, A.; Vrillon, B.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of these tests were to obtain experimental results on bends behaviour in elastic and plastic regime by in plane and out of plane bending. Results were used to improve the computer model, for large distorsion of bends, to be used in a simplified beam type computer code for piping calculations. Tests were made on type ANSI B 169 DN 5 bends in ASTM A 106 Grade B carbon steel. These tests made it possible to measure, for identical bends, in elastic regime, the flexibility factors and, in plastic regime, the total evolution in opening, in closing and out of plane. Flexibility factors of 180 0 bend without flanges are approximately the same in opening and in closing. The end effect due to flanges is not very significant, but it is important for 90 0 bends. In plastic regime, collapse loads or collapse moments of bends depends also of both the end effects and the angle bend. The end effects and the angle bend are more sensitive in opening than in closing. The interest of these tests is to procure some precise evolution curves of identical bends well characterized in geometry and metal strength, deflected in large distorsions. (orig./HP)

  18. First results from the INTEGRAL galactic plane scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Schonfelder, V.

    2003-01-01

    Scans of the Galactic plane performed at regular intervals constitute a key element of the guaranteed time observations of the INTEGRAL observing programme. These scans are done for two reasons: frequent monitoring of the Galactic plane in order to detect transient sources, and time resolved mapp...... mapping of the Galactic plane in continuum and diffuse line emission. This paper describes first results obtained from the Galactic plane scans executed so far during the early phase (Dec. 2002-May 2003) of the nominal mission.......Scans of the Galactic plane performed at regular intervals constitute a key element of the guaranteed time observations of the INTEGRAL observing programme. These scans are done for two reasons: frequent monitoring of the Galactic plane in order to detect transient sources, and time resolved...

  19. On the determination of general plane stress states in orthotropic materials from ultrasonic velocity data in non symmetry planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves Filho, Orlando J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the progress in the development of a new experimental protocol for plane stress determination in orthotropic materials based on the ultrasonic velocity of bulk waves propagating in non symmetry planes with oblique incidence. The presence of stress-induced deformation introduces an acoustic anisotropy in the material in addition to that defined by its texture. Orthotropic materials under general plane stress states become acoustically monoclic and its orthotropic planes orthogonal to the stress plane become non symmetry planes. The inverse solution of the generalized Christoffel equation for ultrasonic bulk waves propagating in non symmetry planes of anisotropic bodies is known to be numerically unstable. The suggested protocol deals with this numerical instability without recourse to bulk wave propagation in the stress plane as proposed in the literature. Hence, it should be useful for plane stress analysis of thin wall pressure vessels where ultrasonic measurements in the direction of the wall plane are not possible. For the initial validation of the suggested protocol and verification of the stability of the inversion algorithm, computer simulation of stress determination have been performed from synthetic sets of velocity data obtained by the forward solution of the generalized Christoffel equation. Preliminary results for slightly orthotropic aluminium highlight the potential of the suggested protocol. (author)

  20. Finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure under plane strain state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Joo; Kang, Jae Youn; Song, Ji Ho

    2004-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure is performed for plane strain conditions. The stabilization behavior of crack opening level and the effect of mesh size on the crack opening stress are investigated. In order to obtain a stabilized crack opening level for plane strain conditions, the crack must be advanced through approximately four times the initial monotonic plastic zone. The crack opening load tends to increase with the decrease of mesh size. The mesh size nearly equal to the theoretical plane strain cyclic plastic zone size may provide reasonable numerical results comparable with experimental crack opening data. The crack opening behavior is influenced by the crack growth increment and discontinuous opening behavior is observed. A procedure to predict the most appropriate mesh size for different stress ratio is suggested. Crack opening loads predicted by the FE analysis based on the procedure suggested resulted in good agreement with experimental ones within the error of 5 %. Effect of the distance behind the crack tip on the crack opening load determined by the ASTM compliance offset method based on the load-displacement relation and by the rotational offset method based on the load-differential displacement relation is investigated. Optimal gage location and method to determine the crack opening load is suggested

  1. Multi-Stream Saline-Jet Dissection Using a Simple Irrigation System Defines Difficult Tissue Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Philip CH

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Single-stream hydro-jet dissection is increasingly used in various laparoscopic procedures, but its use requires special equipment. We describe a simple method for using an irrigation system for saline-jet tissue dissection as a useful adjunct prior to adhesiolysis. Material and Methods: Intraabdominal adhesions prolong laparoscopic procedures, because tissue planes are difficult to identify. We performed multi-jet saline dissection (MSSJ) between 2000 and 2009 in more than 500 patients during laparoscopy involving hernias, gallbladders, appendices, and intestinal obstructions. We use a standard suction irrigation probe, which is attached to a 1-liter saline bag with an inflatable cuff around to create a pressure of 250mm Hg to 300mm Hg. In effect, this is the standard setup generally used for irrigation. After using saline dissection, tissue planes can be better defined and the structures can then be separated. Result and Discussion: Using this method, we have successfully identified tissue planes in spite of dense adhesions, and our conversion rates to open have been reduced dramatically. This method is relatively safer than other modalities of tissue dissection, such as diathermy, ultrasonic, blunt or sharp dissection. The disadvantage is that with tissues saturated with saline it becomes more difficult to use diathermy hemostasis. Care has to be exercised in monitoring the temperature and volume of the fluid used. PMID:20529528

  2. Weighted straight skeletons in the plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedl, Therese; Held, Martin; Huber, Stefan; Kaaser, Dominik; Palfrader, Peter

    2015-02-01

    We investigate weighted straight skeletons from a geometric, graph-theoretical, and combinatorial point of view. We start with a thorough definition and shed light on some ambiguity issues in the procedural definition. We investigate the geometry, combinatorics, and topology of faces and the roof model, and we discuss in which cases a weighted straight skeleton is connected. Finally, we show that the weighted straight skeleton of even a simple polygon may be non-planar and may contain cycles, and we discuss under which restrictions on the weights and/or the input polygon the weighted straight skeleton still behaves similar to its unweighted counterpart. In particular, we obtain a non-procedural description and a linear-time construction algorithm for the straight skeleton of strictly convex polygons with arbitrary weights.

  3. [Anatomical planes and landmarks of transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and prophylaxis of intraoperative complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Shan

    2017-07-25

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is a mile-stone procedure in the history of rectal cancer surgery, but the exposure of surgical field of distal rectum is usually poor in patients with male, obese and narrow pelvis, which may lead to tumor residue and relative complications. Recently, a new technique called transanal TME (taTME) is considered to solve the above problems, but most medical centers are still in the learning curve of this procedure. Therefore, anatomical planes and landmarks of taTME for rectal cancer and prophylaxis of intraoperative complications are induced in this paper, which includes posterior plane: angle of anus and distal mesorectum and bleeding of mesorectum; rectosacral fascia and presacral bleeding; lateral and posterior-lateral plane: posterior branches of pelvic plexus and damage of anal function; anterior plane: vessel branches of neurovascular bundle and bleeding. Familiarity with the specific anatomical planes and landmarks plays an important role in shortening the learning curve, decreasing the complications, increasing the success rate of operation and standardization of taTME.

  4. Helical waves in easy-plane antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Yuriy G.; Li, Xi-Lai; Xu, Xinyi; Kim, Ki Wook

    2017-12-01

    Effective spin torques can generate the Néel vector oscillations in antiferromagnets (AFMs). Here, it is theoretically shown that these torques applied at one end of a normal AFM strip can excite a helical type of spin wave in the strip whose properties are drastically different from characteristic spin waves. An analysis based on both a Néel vector dynamical equation and the micromagnetic simulation identifies the direction of magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor as the two key parameters determining the dynamics. Helical wave propagation requires the hard axis of the easy-plane AFM to be aligned with the traveling direction, while the damping limits its spatial extent. If the damping is neglected, the calculation leads to a uniform periodic domain wall structure. On the other hand, finite damping decelerates the helical wave rotation around the hard axis, ultimately causing stoppage of its propagation along the strip. With the group velocity staying close to spin-wave velocity at the wave front, the wavelength becomes correspondingly longer away from the excitation point. In a sufficiently short strip, a steady-state oscillation can be established whose frequency is controlled by the waveguide length as well as the excitation energy or torque.

  5. Planes y proyectos para un desarrollo sustentable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mg. Arq. Jorge Montenegro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available La cátedra de Urbanismo I A de la Facultad de Arquitectura, Urbanismo y Diseño de la Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, considera que es fundamental educar a los alumnos en la construcción de un pensamiento crítico reflexivo, sobre la base de teorías, modelos y metodologías preocupados por el desarrollo sustentable de nuestras ciudades. En este contexto, la cátedra promueve la construcción de una visión holística sobre la ciudad, abordando los contenidos, metodologías e instrumentación específca —planes maestros, proyectos urbanos— desde los enfoques tradicionales: físico–funcional y morfológico–perceptual, los que se complementan con una mirada socioambiental del fenómeno urbano. En este artículo presentamos una síntesis de la tarea académica que desarrollamos.

  6. planes de estudio y orientaciones oficiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Fernández Fraile

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo se propone, a través del análisis de los cambios introducidos en los Planes de estudios que más incidencia tienen sobre la enseñanza de las lenguas vivas (1900, 1926, 1934, 1938, 1953/1957, 1970 y 1990, destacar las tendencias evolutivas o las líneas maestras que configuran el concepto del Francés como Lengua Extranjera en tanto que disciplina escolar Se abordan así, en una presentación cronológica, las siguientes cuestiones: la regulación de la materia en sus aspectos “materiales” (horario, cursos, el concepto “social” e “institucional” de la disciplina (en conexión con el resto de las lenguas vivas y, finalmente, los objetivos-contenidos didácticos y las orientaciones metodológicas presentes en los textos oficiales.

  7. Grand unification in the projective plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebecker, A.

    2004-01-01

    A 6-dimensional grand unified theory with the compact space having the topology of a real projective plane, i.e., a 2-sphere with opposite points identified, is considered. The space is locally flat except for two conical singularities where the curvature is concentrated. One supersymmetry is preserved in the effective 4d theory. The unified gauge symmetry, for example SU(5), is broken only by the non-trivial global topology. In contrast to the Hosotani mechanism, no adjoint Wilson-line modulus associated with this breaking appears. Since, locally, SU(5) remains a good symmetry everywhere, no UV-sensitive threshold corrections arise and SU(5)-violating local operators are forbidden. Doublet-triplet splitting can be addressed in the context of a 6d N=2 super Yang-Mills theory with gauge group SU(6). If this symmetry is first broken to SU(5) at a fixed point and then further reduced to the standard model group in the above non-local way, the two light Higgs doublets of the MSSM are predicted by the group-theoretical and geometrical structure of the model. (author)

  8. Hybrid inflation in the complex plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; Domcke, V.; Kamada, K.; Schmitz, K.

    2014-04-01

    Supersymmetric hybrid inflation is an exquisite framework to connect inflationary cosmology to particle physics at the scale of grand unification. Ending in a phase transition associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking, it can naturally explain the generation of entropy, matter and dark matter. Coupling F-term hybrid inflation to soft supersymmetry breaking distorts the rotational invariance in the complex inflaton plane - an important fact, which has been neglected in all previous studies. Based on the δN formalism, we analyze the cosmological perturbations for the first time in the full two-field model, also taking into account the fast-roll dynamics at and after the end of inflation. As a consequence of the two-field nature of hybrid inflation, the predictions for the primordial fluctuations depend not only on the parameters of the Lagrangian, but are eventually fixed by the choice of the inflationary trajectory. Recognizing hybrid inflation as a two-field model resolves two shortcomings often times attributed to it: The fine-tuning problem of the initial conditions is greatly relaxed and a spectral index in accordance with the PLANCK data can be achieved in a large part of the parameter space without the aid of supergravity corrections. Our analysis can be easily generalized to other (including large-field) scenarios of inflation in which soft supersymmetry breaking transforms an initially single-field model into a multi-field model.

  9. Condensation on a cooled plane upright wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortier, Andre.

    1975-01-01

    The vapor condensation along a cooled upright plane wall was studied. The theoretical and experimental results obtained in the simple case, give the essential characteristics of the phenomenon of condensation along a cold wall that keeps the vapor apart from the coolant inside a surface condenser. The phenomenon presents two different appearances according as the wall is wetted or not by the liquid. In the first case a continuous liquid film runs down the wall and a conventional Nusselt calculation gives the film thickness and the heat exchange coefficient between a pure saturated vapor and the cold wall. The calculation is developed in detail and the effect of a vapor flow along the film is discussed as well as that of the presence of a noncondensable gas inside the vapor. In the second case, separated liquid drops are formed on the wall, the phenomenon is called ''dropwise condensation'' and the heat exchange coefficients obtained are much higher than with film condensation. The theoretical aspects of the problem are discussed with some experimental results [fr

  10. Mechanics of integrating root causes into PRAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruske, S.Z.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Stepina, P.L.; Vesely, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a derivation of root cause importance, root cause data for selected components of a pressurized water reactor auxiliary feedwater system, an Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) auxiliary feedwater system model, and the results of root cause importance calculations. The methodology shown herein is straightforward and is easily applied to existing probabilistic risk assessments. Root cause importance can greatly benefit the areas of design, maintenance, and inspection. Root cause importance for various components and circumstances can be evaluated

  11. Context based Coding of Quantized Alpha Planes for Video Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghito, Shankar Manuel; Forchhammer, Søren

    2002-01-01

    In object based video, each frame is a composition of objects that are coded separately. The composition is performed through the alpha plane that represents the transparency of the object. We present an alternative to MPEG-4 for coding of alpha planes that considers their specific properties....... Comparisons in terms of rate and distortion are provided, showing that the proposed coding scheme for still alpha planes is better than the algorithms for I-frames used in MPEG-4....

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and tetracycline hydrochloride as root conditioning agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Nanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Root surfaces of periodontitis-affected teeth are hypermineralized and contaminated with cytotoxic and other biologically active substances. Various root conditioning agents have been recommended as an adjunct to mechanical root surface debridement to expose dentin collagen and cementum bound proteins. The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and tetracycline hydrochloride (HCl as root conditioning agents on planed root surfaces. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 human maxillary anterior teeth indicated for extraction due to chronic periodontitis were collected and root planed. The teeth were sectioned and specimens were divided into two groups - Group I and II. Group I dentin specimens were treated with EDTA and Group II specimens were treated with tetracycline HCl solution at a concentration of 10% by active burnishing technique for 3 min. The root surface samples were then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results: The results of this study showed that EDTA and tetracycline HCl were equally effective in removing the smear layer. It was observed that the total and patent dentinal tubules were more in number in teeth treated with tetracycline when compared to EDTA group. However, EDTA was found to be much more effective as root conditioning agent because it enlarged the diameter of dentinal tubules more than that of tetracycline HCl. Conclusion: The results of in vitro study showed that both the agents are good root conditioning agents if applied in addition to periodontal therapy. However, further studies are required to establish the in vivo importance of EDTA and tetracycline HCL as root conditioners.

  13. ROOT VEGETABLES, BREEDING TRENDS, RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fedorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of root vegetables is their unique specificity and high economic importance. The benefits and medicinal properties of root vegetables being highly demanded by the market requirements to the commodity are highlighted in the article. The main directions of breeding program for root vegetable crops, including species of Apiaceae family with carrot, parsnips; Chenopodioideae family with red beet; Brassicaceae family with radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga. Initial breeding accessions of carrot, red beet, radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga have been selected out to be used for breeding program for heterosis. The mf and ms breeding lines were developed, and with the use of them the new gene pool was created. Variety supporting breeding program and methods were also proposed. 

  14. Facilitative root interactions in intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Jensen, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    of root architecture, exudation of growth stimulating substances, and biofumigation. Facilitative root interactions are most likely to be of importance in nutrient poor soils and in low-input agroecosystems due to critical interspecific competition for plant growth factors. However, studies from more...... nitrogen transfer between legumes and non-leguminous plants, exploitation of the soil via mycorrhizal fungi and soil-plant processes which alter the mobilisation of plant growth resources such as through exudation of amino acids, extra-cellular enzymes, acidification, competition-induced modification......Facilitation takes place when plants ameliorate the environment of their neighbours, and increase their growth and survival. Facilitation occurs in natural ecosystems as well as in agroecosystems. We discuss examples of facilitative root interactions in intercropped agroecosystems; including...

  15. Study of combined cycle engine for aerospace plane

    OpenAIRE

    苅田, 丈士; KANDA, Takeshi; 工藤, 賢司; KUDO, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    At the Ramjet Propulsion Research Center, the scramjet engine for an aerospace plane has been studied. Other engines are required for the plane to go into orbit. Recently, a combined cycle engine including scramjet mode has been also studied to complete the engine system for the plane. The scramjet and the combined cycle engine are most effective with application to the Single-Stage-to-Orbit (SSTO) aerospace plane, as shown in Figure 1. Recent activity on the combined cycle engine and the SST...

  16. Quantum Mechanics on the h-deformed Quantum Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sunggoo

    1998-01-01

    We find the covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra and the Laplace-Beltrami operator on the extended $h$-deformed quantum plane and solve the Schr\\"odinger equations explicitly for some physical systems on the quantum plane. In the commutative limit the behaviour of a quantum particle on the quantum plane becomes that of the quantum particle on the Poincar\\'e half-plane, a surface of constant negative Gaussian curvature. We show the bound state energy spectra for particles under specific poten...

  17. Angle measures, general rotations, and roulettes in normed planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestro, Vitor; Horváth, Ákos G.; Martini, Horst

    2017-12-01

    In this paper a special group of bijective maps of a normed plane (or, more generally, even of a plane with a suitable Jordan curve as unit circle) is introduced which we call the group of general rotations of that plane. It contains the isometry group as a subgroup. The concept of general rotations leads to the notion of flexible motions of the plane, and to the concept of Minkowskian roulettes. As a nice consequence of this new approach to motions the validity of strong analogues to the Euler-Savary equations for Minkowskian roulettes is proved.

  18. Root justifications for ontology repair

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Moodley_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 32328 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Moodley_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Root Justi cations... the ontology, based on the no- tion of root justi cations [8, 9]. In Section 5, we discuss the implementation of a Prot eg e3 plugin which demonstrates our approach to ontology repair. In this section we also discuss some experimental results comparing...

  19. Roots of the Chromatic Polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrett, Thomas

    The chromatic polynomial of a graph G is a univariate polynomial whose evaluation at any positive integer q enumerates the proper q-colourings of G. It was introduced in connection with the famous four colour theorem but has recently found other applications in the field of statistical physics...... extend Thomassen’s technique to the Tutte polynomial and as a consequence, deduce a density result for roots of the Tutte polynomial. This partially answers a conjecture of Jackson and Sokal. Finally, we refocus our attention on the chromatic polynomial and investigate the density of chromatic roots...

  20. Effect of polyvinyl alcohol on in vitro rooting capacity of shoots in pear clones (Pyrus communis L.) of different ploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor adventitious root formation is a major obstacle in micropropagation. In this study, intense efforts have been made for improvement of rooting procedures for triploid, tetraploid, and mixploid clones of the pear cultivar, 'Fertility', obtained by in vitro colchicine treatment. An efficient roo...

  1. Estimates of plastic loads for pipe bends under combined in-plane and out-of-plane bending moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a method to estimate plastic loads (defined by twice-elastic-slope) for pipe bends under combined in-plane and out-of-plane bending moment, based on detailed 3-D FE limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials. Because closing bending moment is always lower than opening bending moment, the combination of in-plane closing bending and out-of-plane bending moment becomes the most significant case. Due to conservatism of each bending moments, the resultant moment provided by ASME B and PV code is unduly conservative. However, the concept of the resultant moment is still valid. In this paper, FE results show that the accurate solutions of bending moments provide better estimates of plastic loads of pipe bend under combined in-plane bending and out-of-plane bending moment

  2. In-plane and out-of-plane emission of nuclear matter in Au+Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastid, N.; Dupieux, P.; Ramillien, V.; Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V.; Berger, L.; Boussange, S.; Fraysse, L.; Ibnouzahir, M.; Montarou, G.

    1995-01-01

    Collective flow effects in Au (E/A = 150 to 800 MeV) on Au collisions measured with the phase I setup of the FOPI detector at GSI - Darmstadt are presented. Directed side ward flow is studied, by the mean transverse momentum in the reaction plane x (y)>, without reaction plane reconstruction. A more quantitative measurement of the global amount of directed side ward flow is also made and some comparisons with the predictions of different QMD versions are given. Experimental results concerning the preferential emission of particles in a direction perpendicular to the reaction plane are also presented. Azimuthal distributions of fragments around the beam axis, with respect to the reaction plane are studied in the mid-rapidity region and the associated R N (out-of-plane/in-plane ratios) are extracted. The dependence of R N upon transverse momentum, centrality, fragment charge and bombarding energy is studied. (authors). 24 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  3. Nonsurgical management of horizontal root fracture associated external root resorption and internal root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraz Pasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal root fractures, which frequently affect the upper incisors, usually result from a frontal impact. As a result, combined injuries occur in dental tissues such as the pulp, dentin, cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Internal root canal inflammatory resorption involves a progressive loss of intraradicular dentin without adjunctive deposition of hard tissues adjacent to the resorptive sites. It is frequently associated with chronic pulpal inflammation, and bacteria might be identified from the granulation tissues when the lesion is progressive to the extent that it is identifiable with routine radiographs. With the advancement in technology, it is imperative to use modern diagnostic tools such as cone beam computed tomography and radiovisuography to diagnose and confirm the presence and extent of resorptions and fractures and their exact location. This case report presents a rare case having internal root resorption and horizontal root fracture with external inflammatory root resorption both which were treated successfully following guidelines by International Association of Dental Traumatology by nonsurgical treatment with 1 year follow-up.

  4. Partition functions of web diagrams with an O7{sup −}-plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Hirotaka [Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname,Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Departamento de Física Teórica and Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC,Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Zoccarato, Gianluca [Departamento de Física Teórica and Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC,Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-03-22

    We consider the computation of the topological string partition function for 5-brane web diagrams with an O7{sup −}-plane. Since upon quantum resolution of the orientifold plane these diagrams become non-toric web diagrams without the orientifold we are able to apply the topological vertex to obtain the Nekrasov partition function of the corresponding 5d theory. We apply this procedure to the case of 5d SU(N) theories with one hypermultiplet in the antisymmetric representation and to the case of 5d pure USp(2N) theories. For these cases we discuss the dictionary between parameters and moduli of the 5d gauge theory and lengths of 5-branes in the web diagram and moreover we perform comparison of the results obtained via application of the topological vertex and the one obtained via localisation techniques, finding in all instances we consider perfect agreement.

  5. A Technique to Facilitate Tooth Modification for Removable Partial Denture Prosthesis Guide Planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, C Brent; Abreu, Amara; Metzler, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The technique in this article was developed to provide a means to create prepared guide planes of proper dimension to ensure a more stable and retentive removable partial denture prosthesis (RPDP) framework when providing this service for a patient. Using commonly found clinical materials, a paralleling device can be fabricated from the modified diagnostic cast of the patient's dental arch requiring an RPDP. Polymethyl methacrylate or composite added to an altered thermoplastic form can be positioned intraorally and used as a guide to predictably adjust tooth structure for guide planes. Since it can potentially minimize the number of impressions and diagnostic casts made during the procedure, this can help achieve the desired result more efficiently and quickly for the patient. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  6. Flow study in the cross sectional planes of a turbine scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical study of the nonviscous flow characteristics in the cross-sectional planes of a radial inflow turbine scroll is presented. The velocity potential is used in the formulation to determine the flow velocity in these planes resulting from the continuous mass discharge. The effect of the through flow velocity is simulated by a continuous distribution of source/sink in the cross-section. A special iterative procedure is devised to handle the solution of the resulting Poisson's differential equation with Neumann boundary conditions in a domain with generally curved boundaries. The analysis is used to determine the effects of the radius of curvature, the location of the scroll section and its geometry on the flow characteristics in the turbine scroll.

  7. OsORC3 is required for lateral root development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinai; Shi, Jing; Hao, Xi; Liu, Huili; Shi, Jianghua; Wu, Yunrong; Wu, Zhongchang; Chen, Mingxiu; Wu, Ping; Mao, Chuanzao

    2013-04-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a pivotal element in DNA replication, heterochromatin assembly, checkpoint regulation and chromosome assembly. Although the functions of the ORC have been determined in yeast and model animals, they remain largely unknown in the plant kingdom. In this study, Oryza sativa Origin Recognition Complex subunit 3 (OsORC3) was cloned using map-based cloning procedures, and functionally characterized using a rice (Oryza sativa) orc3 mutant. The mutant showed a temperature-dependent defect in lateral root (LR) development. Map-based cloning showed that a G→A mutation in the 9th exon of OsORC3 was responsible for the mutant phenotype. OsORC3 was strongly expressed in regions of active cell proliferation, including the primary root tip, stem base, lateral root primordium, emerged lateral root primordium, lateral root tip, young shoot, anther and ovary. OsORC3 knockdown plants lacked lateral roots and had a dwarf phenotype. The root meristematic zone of ORC3 knockdown plants exhibited increased cell death and reduced vital activity compared to the wild-type. CYCB1;1::GUS activity and methylene blue staining showed that lateral root primordia initiated normally in the orc3 mutant, but stopped growing before formation of the stele and ground tissue. Our results indicate that OsORC3 plays a crucial role in the emergence of lateral root primordia. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Out-of-Plane vs. In-Plane Interscalene Catheters: A Randomized, Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Schwenk, Eric S.; Gandhi, Kishor; Baratta, Jaime L.; Torjman, Marc; Epstein, Richard H.; Chung, Jaeyoon; Vaghari, Benjamin A.; Beausang, David; Bojaxhi, Elird; Grady, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous interscalene blocks provide excellent analgesia after shoulder surgery. Although the safety of the ultrasound-guided in-plane approach has been touted, technical and patient factors can limit this approach. We developed a caudad-to-cephalad out-of-plane approach and hypothesized that it would decrease pain ratings due to better catheter alignment with the brachial plexus compared to the in-plane technique in a randomized, controlled study. Objectives: To compare an out-...

  9. ARBITRARY INTERACTION OF PLANE SUPERSONIC FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider the Riemann problem for parameters at collision of two plane flows at a certain angle. The problem is solved in the exact statement. Most cases of interference, both stationary and non-stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities, followed by supersonic flows can be reduced to the problem of random interaction of two supersonic flows. Depending on the ratio of the parameters in the flows, outgoing discontinuities turn out to be shock waves, or rarefactionwaves. In some cases, there is no solution at all. It is important to know how to find the domain of existence for the relevant decisions, as the type of shock-wave structures in these domains is known in advance. The Riemann problem is used in numerical methods such as the method of Godunov. As a rule, approximate solution is used, known as the Osher solution, but for a number of problems with a high precision required, solution of this problem needs to be in the exact statement. Main results.Domains of existence for solutions with different types of shock-wave structure have been considered. Boundaries of existence for solutions with two outgoing shock waves are analytically defined, as well as with the outgoing shock wave and rarefaction wave. We identify the area of Mach numbers and angles at which the flows interact and there is no solution. Specific flows with two outgoing rarefaction waves are not considered. Practical significance. The results supplement interference theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities and can be used to develop new methods of numerical calculation with extraction of discontinuities.

  10. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, George H.; Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Grüneis, Andreas; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory.

  11. From plane waves to local Gaussians for the simulation of correlated periodic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, George H., E-mail: george.booth@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King’s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Tsatsoulis, Theodoros; Grüneis, Andreas, E-mail: a.grueneis@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic [Frick Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-08-28

    We present a simple, robust, and black-box approach to the implementation and use of local, periodic, atom-centered Gaussian basis functions within a plane wave code, in a computationally efficient manner. The procedure outlined is based on the representation of the Gaussians within a finite bandwidth by their underlying plane wave coefficients. The core region is handled within the projected augment wave framework, by pseudizing the Gaussian functions within a cutoff radius around each nucleus, smoothing the functions so that they are faithfully represented by a plane wave basis with only moderate kinetic energy cutoff. To mitigate the effects of the basis set superposition error and incompleteness at the mean-field level introduced by the Gaussian basis, we also propose a hybrid approach, whereby the complete occupied space is first converged within a large plane wave basis, and the Gaussian basis used to construct a complementary virtual space for the application of correlated methods. We demonstrate that these pseudized Gaussians yield compact and systematically improvable spaces with an accuracy comparable to their non-pseudized Gaussian counterparts. A key advantage of the described method is its ability to efficiently capture and describe electronic correlation effects of weakly bound and low-dimensional systems, where plane waves are not sufficiently compact or able to be truncated without unphysical artifacts. We investigate the accuracy of the pseudized Gaussians for the water dimer interaction, neon solid, and water adsorption on a LiH surface, at the level of second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory.

  12. Rhizobial infection in Adesmia bicolor (Fabaceae) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Luciana

    2014-09-01

    The native legume Adesmia bicolor shows nitrogen fixation efficiency via symbiosis with soil rhizobia. The infection mechanism by means of which rhizobia infect their roots has not been fully elucidated to date. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify the infection mechanism in Adesmia bicolor roots. To this end, inoculated roots were processed following conventional methods as part of our root anatomy study, and the shape and distribution of root nodules were analyzed as well. Neither root hairs nor infection threads were observed in the root system, whereas infection sites-later forming nodules-were observed in the longitudinal sections. Nodules were found to form between the main root and the lateral roots. It can be concluded that in Adesmia bicolor, a bacterial crack entry infection mechanism prevails and that such mechanism could be an adaptive strategy of this species which is typical of arid environments.

  13. Treatment of a Developmental Groove and Supernumerary Root Using Guided Tissue Regeneration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alizadeh Tabari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The radicular groove is a developmental groove which is usually found on the palatal or lateral aspects of the maxillary incisor teeth. The present case is a maxillary lateral incisor with a small second root and a deep radicular groove. The developmental groove caused a combined periodontal-endodontic lesion. Methods. Case was managed using a combined treatment procedure involving nonsurgical root canal therapy and surgical periodontal treatment. After completion of root canal treatment, guided tissue regeneration (GTR was carried out using decalcified freeze dried bone allograft (DFDBA and a bioabsorbable collagenous membrane. Tooth also was splinted for two months. Results. After 12 months the tooth was asymptomatic. The periapical radiolucency disappeared and probing depth did not exceed 3 mm. Conclusion. Combined treatment procedure involving nonsurgical root canal therapy and surgical periodontal regenerative treatment can be a predictable technique in treating combined endodontic-periodontal lesions caused by radicular groove.

  14. HASL procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.H.

    1977-08-01

    Additions and corrections to the following sections of the HASL Procedures Manual are provided: General, Sampling, Field Measurements; General Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Procedures, Data Section, and Specifications

  15. Preliminary embryological study of the radiological concept of retroperitoneal interfascial planes: what are the interfascial planes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuo; Nakao, Shota; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Nakamuro, Makoto; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the radiological concept of retroperitoneal interfascial planes has been widely accepted to explain the extension of retroperitoneal pathologies. This study aimed to explore embryologically based corroborative evidence, which remains to be elucidated, for this concept. Using serial or semi-serial transverse sections from 29 human fetuses at the 5th-25th week of fetal age, we microscopically observed the development of the retroperitoneal fasciae and other structures in the retroperitoneal connective tissue. A hypothesis for the formation of the interfascial planes was generated from the developmental study and analysis of retroperitoneal fasciae in computed tomography images from 224 patients. Whereas the loose connective tissue was uniformly distributed in the retroperitoneum by the 9th week, the primitive renal and transversalis fasciae appeared at the 10th-12th week, as previous research has noted. By the 23rd week, the renal fascia, transversalis fascia, and primitive adipose tissue of the flank pad emerged. In addition, the primitive lateroconal fascia, which runs parallel to and close to the posterior renal fascia, emerged between the renal fascia and the adipose tissue of the flank pad. Conversely, pre-existing loose connective tissue was sandwiched between the opposing fasciae and was compressed and narrowed by the developing organs and fatty tissues. Through this developmental study, we provided the hypothesis that the compressed loose connective tissue and both opposed fasciae compose the interfascial planes. Analysis of the thickened retroperitoneal fasciae in computed tomography images supported this hypothesis. Further developmental or histological studies are required to verify our hypothesis.

  16. Topical Roots of Formal Dialectic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Erik C. W.

    Formal dialectic has its roots in ancient dialectic. We can trace this influence in Charles Hamblin's book on fallacies, in which he introduced his first formal dialectical systems. Earlier, Paul Lorenzen proposed systems of dialogical logic, which were in fact formal dialectical systems avant la

  17. The FairRoot framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Turany, M; Bertini, D; Karabowicz, R; Kresan, D; Malzacher, P; Uhlig, F; Stockmanns, T

    2012-01-01

    The FairRoot framework is an object oriented simulation, reconstruction and data analysis framework based on ROOT. It includes core services for detector simulation and offline analysis. The framework delivers base classes which enable the users to easily construct their experimental setup in a fast and convenient way. By using the Virtual Monte Carlo concept it is possible to perform the simulations using either Geant3 or Geant4 without changing the user code or the geometry description. Using and extending the task mechanism of ROOT it is possible to implement complex analysis tasks in a convenient way. Moreover, using the FairCuda interface of the framework it is possible to run some of these tasks also on GPU. Data IO, as well as parameter handling and data base connections are also handled by the framework. Since some of the experiments will not have an experimental setup with a conventional trigger system, the framework can handle also free flowing input streams of detector data. For this mode of operation the framework provides classes to create the needed time sorted input streams of detector data out of the event based simulation data. There are also tools to do radiation studies and to visualize the simulated data. A CMake-CDash based building and monitoring system is also part of the FairRoot services which helps to build and test the framework on many different platforms in an automatic way, including also Continuous Integration.

  18. Maximal Abelian sets of roots

    CERN Document Server

    Lawther, R

    2018-01-01

    In this work the author lets \\Phi be an irreducible root system, with Coxeter group W. He considers subsets of \\Phi which are abelian, meaning that no two roots in the set have sum in \\Phi \\cup \\{ 0 \\}. He classifies all maximal abelian sets (i.e., abelian sets properly contained in no other) up to the action of W: for each W-orbit of maximal abelian sets we provide an explicit representative X, identify the (setwise) stabilizer W_X of X in W, and decompose X into W_X-orbits. Abelian sets of roots are closely related to abelian unipotent subgroups of simple algebraic groups, and thus to abelian p-subgroups of finite groups of Lie type over fields of characteristic p. Parts of the work presented here have been used to confirm the p-rank of E_8(p^n), and (somewhat unexpectedly) to obtain for the first time the 2-ranks of the Monster and Baby Monster sporadic groups, together with the double cover of the latter. Root systems of classical type are dealt with quickly here; the vast majority of the present work con...

  19. Root cause - A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huey, F.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 3 yr, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) region V has been pursuing an initiative with region V power reactor licensees to provide improved and more consistent performance in event evaluation. The objectives of the initiative have been to encourage licensees to (a) develop improved skills within the plant organization for events evaluation, with particular emphasis on formal root-cause analysis, and (b) to increase the number of events subjected to root-cause analysis. The NRC's continuing effort now focuses on the need for more consistent quality of event evaluation by licensees. As current licensee programs continue to develop, the NRC will be paying additional attention to how well licensees maintain these programs as an effective and useful tool. Now that licensees have taken the initial steps to establish these programs, licensee management will need to provide continuing attention to ensure that the process does not become overly cumbersome. It is important that the final format for the root-cause programs be easy to use and recognized as being a valuable tool by all licensee personnel involved in the event evaluation process. This will become increasingly important as licensees expand the population of events requiring root-cause analysis and place additional responsibility on the line organization for the implementation of these programs

  20. Cutting the Roots of Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziey, Paul W.

    1996-01-01

    Violence is rooted in obedience to authority and in comparisons--foundations of our institutions of parenting and schooling. Obedience brings reward and punishment, comparison perpetuates a cycle of competition and conflict. Television violence is especially harmful because children easily understand visual images. The Reality Research approach to…